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Sample records for differential luteolytic function

  1. Differential gene expression in the bovine corpus luteum during transition from early phase to midphase and its potential role in acquisition of luteolytic sensitivity to prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed

    Goravanahally, Madhusudan P; Salem, Mohamed; Yao, Jianbo; Inskeep, E Keith; Flores, Jorge A

    2009-05-01

    Prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF(2alpha)) brings about regression of the bovine corpus luteum (CL). This luteolytic property of PGF(2alpha) is used in beef and dairy cattle to synchronize estrus. A limitation of this protocol is insensitivity of the early CL to luteolytic actions of PGF(2alpha). The mechanisms underlying this differential luteal sensitivity are poorly understood. The developing CL has a maximum number of PGF(2alpha) receptors; therefore, differences in signaling events may be responsible for luteal insensitivity. Hence, differential gene expression at two developmental stages of CL, Day 4 (D-4) and D-10 after estrus, might account for differences in signal transduction pathways associated with luteal sensitivity. This possibility was examined in these studies. Microarray analysis (n = 3 cows per stage) identified 167 genes that were differentially expressed (P < 0.05). These were categorized into genes involved in protein biosynthesis and modification (18.5%), transcription regulation and DNA biosynthesis (18.5%), miscellaneous (17.0%), cell signaling (12.0%), steroidogenesis and metabolism (10.2%), extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal proteins (9.5%), unknown functions (6.0%), protein degradation (5.3%), and antioxidant property (3.0%). Real-time PCR confirmed the differential expression of nine selected genes, including tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygense activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ) and regulator of G protein signaling 2 24-kDa (RGS2), observed in microarray. Furthermore, the in vivo effect of exogenous PGF(2alpha) (n = 3 cows per stage) on selected genes that were found to be differentially expressed during this developmental transition was examined. PGF(2alpha) increased the expression of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) beta polypeptide 1 (GNB1) in D-4 CL and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase 2 beta (CAMKK2) in D-10 CL. Therefore, GNB1, CAMKK2, YWHAZ, and RGS2 are candidate genes that may

  2. Using Differentials to Differentiate Trigonometric and Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Tevian

    2013-01-01

    Starting from geometric definitions, we show how differentials can be used to differentiate trigonometric and exponential functions without limits, numerical estimates, solutions of differential equations, or integration.

  3. Differential dopamine function in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Daniel S; MacKie, Palmer J; Kareken, David A; Hutchins, Gary D; Chumin, Evgeny J; Christian, Bradley T; Yoder, Karmen K

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 30 % of Americans suffer from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia (FM), which can cause debilitating pain. Many pain-killing drugs prescribed for chronic pain disorders are highly addictive, have limited clinical efficacy, and do not treat the cognitive symptoms reported by many patients. The neurobiological substrates of chronic pain are largely unknown, but evidence points to altered dopaminergic transmission in aberrant pain perception. We sought to characterize the dopamine (DA) system in individuals with FM. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]fallypride (FAL) was used to assess changes in DA during a working memory challenge relative to a baseline task, and to test for associations between baseline D2/D3 availability and experimental pain measures. Twelve female subjects with FM and 11 female controls completed study procedures. Subjects received one FAL PET scan while performing a "2-back" task, and one while performing a "0-back" (attentional control, "baseline") task. FM subjects had lower baseline FAL binding potential (BP) in several cortical regions relative to controls, including anterior cingulate cortex. In FM subjects, self-reported spontaneous pain negatively correlated with FAL BP in the left orbitofrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Baseline BP was significantly negatively correlated with experimental pain sensitivity and tolerance in both FM and CON subjects, although spatial patterns of these associations differed between groups. The data suggest that abnormal DA function may be associated with differential processing of pain perception in FM. Further studies are needed to explore the functional significance of DA in nociception and cognitive processing in chronic pain. PMID:26497890

  4. Detecting Differential Person Functioning in Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmadi, Yahia M.; Alsmadi, Abdalla A.

    2009-01-01

    Differential Item Functioning (DIF) is a widely used term in test development literature. It is very important to analyze test's data for DIF because It is a serious threat to validity. If the same data matrix was transposed, similar analysis can be carried for Differential Person Functioning (DPF). The purpose of this paper is to introduce and…

  5. Identifying Possible Sources of Differential Functioning Using Differential Bundle Functioning with Polytomously Scored Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, F. A.; Oshima, T. C.; Raju, Nambury S.

    2007-01-01

    Oshima, Raju, Flowers, and Slinde (1998) described procedures for identifying sources of differential functioning for dichotomous data using differential bundle functioning (DBF) derived from the differential functioning of items and test (DFIT) framework (Raju, van der Linden, & Fleer, 1995). The purpose of this study was to extend the procedures…

  6. A Multilevel Assessment of Differential Item Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Linjun

    A multilevel approach was proposed for the assessment of differential item functioning and compared with the traditional logistic regression approach. Data from the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination for 2,300 freshman osteopathic medical students were analyzed. The multilevel approach used three-level hierarchical generalized…

  7. Differential Item Functioning in Survey Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George A.; Johanson, Susan N.

    Differential item functioning (DIF), or item bias, occurs when individuals in a focal group respond differently to a test item than do individuals in a reference group even when comparisons are restricted to individuals with similar overall skill levels on the trait in question. It is common in constructing a questionnaire or survey to recommend…

  8. Ramsay-Curve Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test, questionnaire, or interview has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of true group-mean differences on the constructs being measured. This article is focused on item response theory based likelihood ratio testing for DIF (IRT-LR or…

  9. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2012-01-01

    The literature in modern test theory on procedures for identifying items with differential item functioning (DIF) among two groups of persons includes the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) procedure. Generally, it is not recognized explicitly that if there is real DIF in some items which favor one group, then as an artifact of this procedure, artificial DIF…

  10. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  11. Monotone viable trajectories for functional differential inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Georges

    This paper is a study on functional differential inclusions with memory which represent the multivalued version of retarded functional differential equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring the existence of viable trajectories; that means trajectories remaining in a given nonempty closed convex set defined by given constraints the system must satisfy to be viable. Some motivations for this paper can be found in control theory where F( t, φ) = { f( t, φ, u)} uɛU is the set of possible velocities of the system at time t, depending on the past history represented by the function φ and on a control u ranging over a set U of controls. Other motivations can be found in planning procedures in microeconomics and in biological evolutions where problems with memory do effectively appear in a multivalued version. All these models require viability constraints represented by a closed convex set.

  12. Synchronization with propagation - The functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rǎsvan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The structure represented by one or several oscillators couple to a one-dimensional transmission environment (e.g. a vibrating string in the mechanical case or a lossless transmission line in the electrical case) turned to be attractive for the research in the field of complex structures and/or complex behavior. This is due to the fact that such a structure represents some generalization of various interconnection modes with lumped parameters for the oscillators. On the other hand the lossless and distortionless propagation along transmission lines has generated several research in electrical, thermal, hydro and control engineering leading to the association of some functional differential equations to the basic initial boundary value problems. The present research is performed at the crossroad of the aforementioned directions. We shall associate to the starting models some functional differential equations - in most cases of neutral type - and make use of the general theorems for existence and stability of forced oscillations for functional differential equations. The challenges introduced by the analyzed problems for the general theory are emphasized, together with the implication of the results for various applications.

  13. Radiative Damping and Functional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suvrat; Raju, C. K.

    We propose a general technique to solve the classical many-body problem with radiative damping. We modify the short-distance structure of Maxwell electrodynamics. This allows us to avoid runaway solutions as if we had a covariant model of extended particles. The resulting equations of motion are functional differential equations (FDEs) rather than ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Using recently developed numerical techniques for stiff, retarded FDEs, we solve these equations for the one-body central force problem with radiative damping. Our results indicate that locally the magnitude of radiation damping may be well approximated by the standard third-order expression but the global properties of our solutions are dramatically different. We comment on the two-body problem and applications to quantum field theory and quantum mechanics.

  14. Differentiability of Lieb functional in electronic density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Paul E.

    A solid understanding of the Lieb functional FL is important because of its centrality in the foundations of electronic density functional theory. A basic question is whether directional derivatives of FL at an ensemble-V-representable density are given by (minus) the potential. A widely accepted purported proof that FL is Gâteaux differentiable at EV-representable densities would say, ?yes.? But that proof is fallacious, as shown here. FL is not Gâteaux differentiable in the normal sense, nor is it continuous. By means of a constructive approach, however, we are able to show that the derivative of FL at an EV-representable density ?0 in the direction of ?1 is given by the potential if ?0 and ?1 are everywhere strictly greater than zero, and they and the ground state wave function have square integrable derivatives through second order.

  15. Multiple-Group Noncompensatory Differential Item Functioning in Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Wright, Keith; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Raju, van der Linden, and Fleer (1995) introduced a framework for differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) for unidimensional dichotomous models. Since then, DFIT has been shown to be a quite versatile framework as it can handle polytomous as well as multidimensional models both at the item and test levels. However, DFIT is still limited…

  16. Distinguishing Differential Testlet Functioning from Differential Bundle Functioning Using the Multilevel Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beretvas, S. Natasha; Walker, Cindy M.

    2012-01-01

    This study extends the multilevel measurement model to handle testlet-based dependencies. A flexible two-level testlet response model (the MMMT-2 model) for dichotomous items is introduced that permits assessment of differential testlet functioning (DTLF). A distinction is made between this study's conceptualization of DTLF and that of…

  17. Generalized Halanay inequalities for dissipativity of Volterra functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liping; Yu, Yuexin; Wang, Wansheng

    2008-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the dissipativity of theoretical solutions to nonlinear Volterra functional differential equations (VFDEs). At first, we give some generalizations of Halanay's inequality which play an important role in study of dissipativity and stability of differential equations. Then, by applying the generalization of Halanay's inequality, the dissipativity results of VFDEs are obtained, which provides unified theoretical foundation for the dissipativity analysis of systems in ordinary differential equations (ODEs), delay differential equations (DDEs), integro-differential equations (IDEs), Volterra delay-integro-differential equations (VDIDEs) and VFDEs of other type which appear in practice.

  18. Legendre-tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1986-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear retarded functional differential equations are considered using the so-called Legendre-tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time-differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time-varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximation is made.

  19. Legendre-Tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1983-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear functional differential equations are considered using the so called Legendre tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximations is made.

  20. Computations involving differential operators and their actions on functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Peter E.; Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The algorithms derived by Grossmann and Larson (1989) are further developed for rewriting expressions involving differential operators. The differential operators involved arise in the local analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. These algorithms are extended in two different directions: the algorithms are generalized so that they apply to differential operators on groups and the data structures and algorithms are developed to compute symbolically the action of differential operators on functions. Both of these generalizations are needed for applications.

  1. Higher-order automatic differentiation of mathematical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Isabelle; Dal Cappello, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Functions of mathematical physics such as the Bessel functions, the Chebyshev polynomials, the Gauss hypergeometric function and so forth, have practical applications in many scientific domains. On the one hand, differentiation formulas provided in reference books apply to real or complex variables. These do not account for the chain rule. On the other hand, based on the chain rule, the automatic differentiation has become a natural tool in numerical modeling. Nevertheless automatic differentiation tools do not deal with the numerous mathematical functions. This paper describes formulas and provides codes for the higher-order automatic differentiation of mathematical functions. The first method is based on Faà di Bruno's formula that generalizes the chain rule. The second one makes use of the second order differential equation they satisfy. Both methods are exemplified with the aforementioned functions.

  2. DIF Trees: Using Classification Trees to Detect Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Brandon K.; Wang, Qiu

    2010-01-01

    A nonparametric tree classification procedure is used to detect differential item functioning for items that are dichotomously scored. Classification trees are shown to be an alternative procedure to detect differential item functioning other than the use of traditional Mantel-Haenszel and logistic regression analysis. A nonparametric…

  3. Net and Global Differential Item Functioning in PISA Polytomously Scored Science Items: Application of the Differential Step Functioning Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akour, Mutasem; Sabah, Saed; Hammouri, Hind

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply two types of Differential Item Functioning (DIF), net and global DIF, as well as the framework of Differential Step Functioning (DSF) to real testing data to investigate measurement invariance related to test language. Data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)-2006 polytomously scored…

  4. Differentials of a State Reading Assessment: Item Functioning, Distractor Functioning, and Omission Frequency for Disability Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Kentaro; Moen, Ross E.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2009-01-01

    Large data sets from a state reading assessment for third and fifth graders were analyzed to examine differential item functioning (DIF), differential distractor functioning (DDF), and differential omission frequency (DOF) between students with particular categories of disabilities (speech/language impairments, learning disabilities, and emotional…

  5. Generating functionals and Lagrangian partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Vankerschaver, Joris; Liao, Cuicui; Leok, Melvin

    2013-08-15

    The main goal of this paper is to derive an alternative characterization of the multisymplectic form formula for classical field theories using the geometry of the space of boundary values. We review the concept of Type-I/II generating functionals defined on the space of boundary data of a Lagrangian field theory. On the Lagrangian side, we define an analogue of Jacobi's solution to the Hamilton–Jacobi equation for field theories, and we show that by taking variational derivatives of this functional, we obtain an isotropic submanifold of the space of Cauchy data, described by the so-called multisymplectic form formula. As an example of the latter, we show that Lorentz's reciprocity principle in electromagnetism is a particular instance of the multisymplectic form formula. We also define a Hamiltonian analogue of Jacobi's solution, and we show that this functional is a Type-II generating functional. We finish the paper by defining a similar framework of generating functions for discrete field theories, and we show that for the linear wave equation, we recover the multisymplectic conservation law of Bridges.

  6. Functional differentiability in time-dependent quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Penz, Markus Ruggenthaler, Michael

    2015-03-28

    In this work, we investigate the functional differentiability of the time-dependent many-body wave function and of derived quantities with respect to time-dependent potentials. For properly chosen Banach spaces of potentials and wave functions, Fréchet differentiability is proven. From this follows an estimate for the difference of two solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that evolve under the influence of different potentials. Such results can be applied directly to the one-particle density and to bounded operators, and present a rigorous formulation of non-equilibrium linear-response theory where the usual Lehmann representation of the linear-response kernel is not valid. Further, the Fréchet differentiability of the wave function provides a new route towards proving basic properties of time-dependent density-functional theory.

  7. Two temporal functions of Glass: Ommatidium patterning and photoreceptor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xulong; Mahato, Simpla; Hemmerich, Chris; Zelhof, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Much progress has been made in elucidating the molecular networks required for specifying retinal cells, including photoreceptors, but the downstream mechanisms that maintain identity and regulate differentiation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the transcription factor Glass has a dual role in establishing a functional Drosophila eye. Utilizing conditional rescue approaches, we confirm that persistent defects in ommatidium patterning combined with cell death correlate with the overall disruption of eye morphology in glass mutants. In addition, we reveal that Glass exhibits a separable role in regulating photoreceptor differentiation. In particular, we demonstrate the apparent loss of glass mutant photoreceptors is not only due to cell death but also a failure of the surviving photoreceptors to complete differentiation. Moreover, the late reintroduction of Glass in these developmentally stalled photoreceptors is capable of restoring differentiation in the absence of correct ommatidium patterning. Mechanistically, transcription profiling at the time of differentiation reveals that Glass is necessary for the expression of many genes implicated in differentiation, i.e. rhabdomere morphogenesis, phototransduction, and synaptogenesis. Specifically, we show Glass directly regulates the expression of Pph13, which encodes a transcription factor necessary for opsin expression and rhabdomere morphogenesis. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of Glass to choreograph photoreceptor differentiation is conserved between Drosophila and Tribolium, two holometabolous insects. Altogether, our work identifies a fundamental regulatory mechanism to generate the full complement of cells required for a functional rhabdomeric visual system and provides a critical framework to investigate the basis of differentiation and maintenance of photoreceptor identity. PMID:27105580

  8. Differential Forms Basis Functions for Better Conditioned Integral Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D; Stowell, M; Rieben, R; Sharpe, R; Madsen, N; Rockway, J D; Champagne, N J; Jandhyala, V; Pingenot, J

    2005-01-13

    Differential forms offer a convenient way to classify physical quantities and set up computational problems. By observing the dimensionality and type of derivatives (divergence,curl,gradient) applied to a quantity, an appropriate differential form can be chosen for that quantity. To use these differential forms in a simulation, the forms must be discretized using basis functions. The 0-form through 2-form basis functions are formed for surfaces. Twisted 1-form and 2-form bases will be presented in this paper. Twisted 1-form (1-forms) basis functions ({Lambda}) are divergence-conforming edge basis functions with units m{sup -1}. They are appropriate for representing vector quantities with continuous normal components, and they belong to the same function space as the commonly used RWG bases [1]. They are used here to formulate the frequency-domain EFIE with Galerkin testing. The 2-form basis functions (f) are scalar basis functions with units m{sup -2} and with no enforced continuity between elements. At lowest order, the 2-form basis functions are similar to pulse basis functions. They are used here to formulate an electrostatic integral equation. It should be noted that the derivative of an n-form differential form basis function is an (n+1)-form, i.e. the derivative of a 1-form basis function is a 2-form. Because the basis functions are constructed such that they have spatial units, the spatial units are removed from the degrees of freedom, leading to a better-conditioned system matrix. In this conference paper, we look at the performance of these differential forms and bases by examining the conditioning of matrix systems for electrostatics and the EFIE. The meshes used were refined across the object to consider the behavior of these basis transforms for elements of different sizes.

  9. Regulatory T Cells: Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Plitas, George; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    The immune system of vertebrate animals has evolved to mount an effective defense against a diverse set of pathogens while minimizing transient or lasting impairment in tissue function that could result from the inflammation caused by immune responses to infectious agents. In addition, misguided immune responses to "self" and dietary antigens, as well as to commensal microorganisms, can lead to a variety of inflammatory disorders, including autoimmunity, metabolic syndrome, allergies, and cancer. Regulatory T cells expressing the X chromosome-linked transcription factor Foxp3 suppress inflammatory responses in diverse biological settings and serve as a vital mechanism of negative regulation of immune-mediated inflammation. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 721-5. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27590281

  10. Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests (DFIT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Morris, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    Nambury S. Raju (1937-2005) developed two model-based indices for differential item functioning (DIF) during his prolific career in psychometrics. Both methods, Raju's area measures (Raju, 1988) and Raju's DFIT (Raju, van der Linden, & Fleer, 1995), are based on quantifying the gap between item characteristic functions (ICFs). This approach…

  11. Green's function of the second order differential operator with involution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Sarsenbi, Abdisalam A.

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, the Green's function of the second order differential operator L defined by formula L u =α u″ (x ) -u″ (-x ) =λ u (x ) ,-1 function is established.

  12. Decisions that Make a Difference in Detecting Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sireci, Stephen G.; Rios, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous statistical procedures for detecting items that function differently across subgroups of examinees that take a test or survey. However, in endeavouring to detect items that may function differentially, selection of the statistical method is only one of many important decisions. In this article, we discuss the important decisions…

  13. Functional Analysis and Characterization of Differential Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Lang; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Differential coexpression analysis is emerging as a complement to conventional differential gene expression analysis. The identified differential coexpression links can be assembled into a differential coexpression network (DCEN) in response to environmental stresses or genetic changes. Differential coexpression analyses have been successfully used to identify condition-specific modules; however, the structural properties and biological significance of general DCENs have not been well investigated. Here, we analyzed two independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae DCENs constructed from large-scale time-course gene expression profiles in response to different situations. Topological analyses show that DCENs are tree-like networks possessing scale-free characteristics, but not small-world. Functional analyses indicate that differentially coexpressed gene pairs in DCEN tend to link different biological processes, achieving complementary or synergistic effects. Furthermore, the gene pairs lacking common transcription factors are sensitive to perturbation and hence lead to differential coexpression. Based on these observations, we integrated transcriptional regulatory information into DCEN and identified transcription factors that might cause differential coexpression by gain or loss of activation in response to different situations. Collectively, our results not only uncover the unique structural characteristics of DCEN but also provide new insights into interpretation of DCEN to reveal its biological significance and infer the underlying gene regulatory dynamics. PMID:26282208

  14. Osteoblast differentiation is functionally associated with decreased AMP kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takayuki; Bandow, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Hiraku; Chiba, Norika; Kakimoto, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Tomokazu; Kawamoto, Shin-ichiro; Nagaoka, Eiichi; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya

    2009-12-01

    Osteoblasts, originating from mesenchymal stem cells, play a pivotal role in bone formation and mineralization. Several transcription factors including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) have been reported to be essential for osteoblast differentiation, whereas the cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways controlling the differentiation process have not been fully elucidated. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine-threonine kinase generally regarded as a key regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, polarity, and division. Recent lines of evidence have indicated that the activity of the catalytic alpha subunit of AMPK is regulated through its phosphorylation by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs) including LKB1. Here, we explored the role of AMPK in osteoblast differentiation using in vitro culture models. Phosphorylation of AMPKalpha was significantly decreased during osteoblastic differentiation in both primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1, a mouse osteoblastic cell line. Conversely, the terminal differentiation of primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, represented by matrix mineralization, was significantly inhibited by glucose restriction and stimulation with metformin, both of which are known activators of AMPK. Matrix mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was also inhibited by the forced expression of a constitutively active form of AMPKalpha. Metformin significantly inhibited gene expression of Runx2 along with osteoblast differentiation markers including osteocalcin (Ocn), bone sialo protein (Bsp), and osteopontin (Opn). Thus, our present data indicate that differentiation of osteoblasts is functionally associated with decreased AMPK activity. PMID:19725053

  15. Pharmacological Bypass of Cockayne Syndrome B Function in Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuming; Jones-Tabah, Jace; Chakravarty, Probir; Stewart, Aengus; Muotri, Alysson; Laposa, Rebecca R.; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth abnormalities, premature aging, and photosensitivity. Mutation of Cockayne syndrome B (CSB) affects neuronal gene expression and differentiation, so we attempted to bypass its function by expressing downstream target genes. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of Synaptotagmin 9 (SYT9), a key component of the machinery controlling neurotrophin release, bypasses the need for CSB in neuritogenesis. Importantly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin implicated in neuronal differentiation and synaptic modulation, and pharmacological mimics such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone and amitriptyline can compensate for CSB deficiency in cell models of neuronal differentiation as well. SYT9 and BDNF are downregulated in CS patient brain tissue, further indicating that sub-optimal neurotrophin signaling underlies neurological defects in CS. In addition to shedding light on cellular mechanisms underlying CS and pointing to future avenues for pharmacological intervention, these data suggest an important role for SYT9 in neuronal differentiation. PMID:26972010

  16. Oligodendroglial differentiation induces mitochondrial genes and inhibition of mitochondrial function represses oligodendroglial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Robert; Wong, Alice; Silva, Jillian; Li, Ming; Itoh, Aki; Horiuchi, Makoto; Itoh, Takayuki; Pleasure, David; Cortopassi, Gino

    2011-01-01

    Demyelination occurs in multiple inherited mitochondrial diseases. We studied which genes were induced as a consequence of differentiation in rodent and human oligodendroglia. Cholesterol, myelin and mitochondrial genes were significantly increased with oligodendroglial differentiation. Mitochondrial DNA content per cell and acetyl CoA-related transcripts increased significantly; thus, the large buildup of cholesterol necessary for myelination appears to require mitochondrial production of acetyl-CoA. Oligodendroglia were treated with low doses of the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone to test the dependence of differentiation on mitochondrial function. Undifferentiated cells were resistant to rotenone, whereas differentiating cells were much more sensitive. Very low doses of rotenone that did not affect viability or ATP synthesis still inhibited differentiation, as measured by reduced levels of the myelin transcripts 2′,3′-Cyclic Nucleotide-3′-Phosphodiesterase and Myelin Basic Protein. Thus, mitochondrial transcripts and mtDNA are amplified during oligodendroglial differentiation, and differentiating oligodendroglia are especially sensitive to mitochondrial inhibition, suggesting mechanisms for demyelination observed in mitochondrial disease. PMID:20005986

  17. HYPERDIRE-HYPERgeometric functions DIfferential REduction: Mathematica-based packages for the differential reduction of generalized hypergeometric functions: Lauricella function FC of three variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytev, Vladimir V.; Kniehl, Bernd A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a further extension of the HYPERDIRE project, which is devoted to the creation of a set of Mathematica-based program packages for manipulations with Horn-type hypergeometric functions on the basis of differential equations. Specifically, we present the implementation of the differential reduction for the Lauricella function FC of three variables.

  18. Exploring Crossing Differential Item Functioning by Gender in Mathematics Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Yoke Mooi; Williams, Julian; Lamprianou, Iasonas

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore crossing differential item functioning (DIF) in a test drawn from a national examination of mathematics for 11-year-old pupils in England. An empirical dataset was analyzed to explore DIF by gender in a mathematics assessment. A two-step process involving the logistic regression (LR) procedure for…

  19. Effect of Multiple Testing Adjustment in Differential Item Functioning Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye; Oshima, T. C.

    2013-01-01

    In a typical differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, a significance test is conducted for each item. As a test consists of multiple items, such multiple testing may increase the possibility of making a Type I error at least once. The goal of this study was to investigate how to control a Type I error rate and power using adjustment…

  20. Detection of Differential Item Functioning in Multiple Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seock-Ho; And Others

    Detection of differential item functioning (DIF) is most often done between two groups of examinees under item response theory. It is sometimes important, however, to determine whether DIF is present in more than two groups. A method is presented for the detection of DIF in multiple groups. The method, the Q(sub j) statistic, is closely related to…

  1. Three Classes of Nonparametric Differential Step Functioning Effect Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.

    2008-01-01

    The examination of measurement invariance in polytomous items is complicated by the possibility that the magnitude and sign of lack of invariance may vary across the steps underlying the set of polytomous response options, a concept referred to as differential step functioning (DSF). This article describes three classes of nonparametric DSF effect…

  2. Local Analytic Solutions of a Functional Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingxia

    This paper is concerned with the existence of analytic solutions of an iterative functional differential equation. Employing the method of majorant series, we need to discuss the constant α given in Schröder transformation. we study analytic solutions of the equation in the case of α at resonance and the case of α near resonance under the Brjuno condition.

  3. Evaluating the Magnitude of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    1996-01-01

    Two possible standard error formulas for the polytomous differential item functioning index proposed by N. J. Dorans and A. P. Schmitt (1991) were derived. These standard errors, and associated hypothesis-testing procedures, were evaluated through simulated data. The standard error that performed better is based on N. Mantel's (1963)…

  4. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) for an item between two groups is present if, for the same person location on a variable, persons from different groups have different expected values for their responses. Applying only to dichotomously scored items in the popular Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method for detecting DIF in which persons are classified by…

  5. IRT Differential Item Functioning: An Examination of Ability Scale Purifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lautenschlager, Gary J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) differential item functioning (DIF) methods used to determine the accuracy of item classification as biased or unbiased were studied. Results from simulations show that the iterative linking and ability scale purification method can be more effective than iterative linking alone primarily by reducing false negatives.…

  6. Bounded and periodic solutions of nonlinear functional differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, Vasilii E

    2012-05-31

    Conditions for the existence of bounded and periodic solutions of the nonlinear functional differential equation d{sup m}x(t)/dt{sup m} + (Fx)(t) = h(t), t element of R, are presented, involving local linear approximations to the operator F. Bibliography: 23 titles.

  7. An Analysis of Differential Item Functioning Based on Calculator Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Richard; Rich, Changhua; Arenson, Ethan; Podrabsky, Tracy; Cook, Gary

    The effect of calculator type on student performance on a mathematics examination was studied. Differential item functioning (DIF) methodology was applied to examine group differences (calculator use) on item performance while conditioning on the relevant ability. Other survey questions were developed to ask students the extent to which they used…

  8. Testing for Differential Item Functioning with Measures of Partial Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test or questionnaire has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of mean differences on the construct. There are many methods available for DIF assessment. The present article is focused on indices of partial association. A family of average…

  9. MIMIC Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Three multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) methods, namely, the standard MIMIC method (M-ST), the MIMIC method with scale purification (M-SP), and the MIMIC method with a pure anchor (M-PA), were developed to assess differential item functioning (DIF) in polytomous items. In a series of simulations, it appeared that all three methods…

  10. Differential Item Functioning (DIF): Current Problems and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karami, Hossein; Salmani Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2011-01-01

    With the rising concerns over the fairness of language tests, Differential Item Functioning (DIF) has been increasingly applied in bias analysis. Despite its widespread use in psychometric circles, DIF is facing a number of serious problems. This paper is an attempt to shed light on a number of the issues involved in DIF analysis. Specifically,…

  11. Detection of Differential Item Functioning Using the Lasso Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a novel approach to detect differential item functioning (DIF) among dichotomously scored items. Unlike standard DIF methods that perform an item-by-item analysis, we propose the "LR lasso DIF method": logistic regression (LR) model is formulated for all item responses. The model contains item-specific intercepts,…

  12. Using Mixed Methods to Interpret Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benítez, Isabel; Padilla, José-Luis; Hidalgo Montesinos, María Dolores; Sireci, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of differential item functioning (DIF) is often used to determine if cross-lingual assessments are equivalent across languages. However, evidence on the causes of cross-lingual DIF is still evasive. Expert appraisal is a qualitative method useful for obtaining detailed information about problematic elements in the different linguistic…

  13. The Effects of Testlets on Reliability and Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teker, Gulsen Tasdelen; Dogan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Reliability and differential item functioning (DIF) analyses were conducted on testlets displaying local item dependence in this study. The data set employed in the research was obtained from the answers given by 1,500 students to the 20 items included in six testlets given in English Proficiency Exam by the School of Foreign Languages of a state…

  14. Detecting Differential Item Functioning Using Logistic Regression Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaminathan, Hariharan; Rogers, H. Jane

    1990-01-01

    A logistic regression model for characterizing differential item functioning (DIF) between two groups is presented. A distinction is drawn between uniform and nonuniform DIF in terms of model parameters. A statistic for testing the hypotheses of no DIF is developed, and simulation studies compare it with the Mantel-Haenszel procedure. (Author/TJH)

  15. Advances in the Detection of Differentially Functioning Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K.; And Others

    The development and evaluation of methods for detecting potentially biased items or differentially functioning items (DIF) represent a critical area of research for psychometricians because of the negative impact of biased items on test validity. A summary is provided of the authors' 12 years of research at the University of Massachusetts…

  16. The epigenetic landscape of mammary gland development and functional differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conf...

  17. A Comparison of Methods for Detecting Differential Distractor Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koon, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the odds-ratio method (Penfield, 2008) and the multinomial logistic regression method (Kato, Moen, & Thurlow, 2009) for measuring differential distractor functioning (DDF) effects in comparison to the standardized distractor analysis approach (Schmitt & Bleistein, 1987). Students classified as participating…

  18. Augmentation of differentiation and gap junction function by kaempferol in partially differentiated colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Mori, Toshio; Sato, Kenji; Ohtsuki, Kozo; Upham, Brad L; Trosko, James E

    2005-03-01

    Kaempferol induces differentiation in partially differentiated colon cancer cells which express low levels of connexin43 protein and connexin43 mRNA (KNC cells). Differentiation was observed as changes in cell morphology and the activity of alkaline phosphatase. Increased differentiation in kaempferol-treated KNC cells correlated with restoration of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), increased levels of connexin43 protein and its phosphorylation status. Phosphorylation (activation) of Stat3 and Erk was also reduced by kaempferol. An inhibitor of Stat3 phosphorylation also induced morphological changes in KNC cells similar to those in kaempferol-treated cells, suggesting that kaempferol-induced differentiation may be mediated by inhibition of Stat3 phosphorylation. These effects were not observed in HCT116 cells, a poorly differentiated colon cancer cell line deficient in expression of connexin43 mRNA and connexin43 protein. In conclusion, kaempferol might function as an anticancer agent by re-establishing GJIC through enhancement of the expression and phosphorylation of connexin43 protein in a tumorigenic colon cancer cell line that already expresses connexin43 mRNA via a Stat3-dependent mechanism. In contrast, kaempferol had no effect in a tumorigenic colon cancer cell line that did not express connexin43 mRNA and was deficient in GJIC. PMID:15618237

  19. Almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzinbi, Khalil; N'guerekata, Gaston Mandata

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we study the existence of almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations. We prove that the existence of a bounded solution on implies the existence of an almost automorphic solution. Our results extend the classical known theorem by Bohr and Neugebauer on the existence of almost periodic solutions for inhomegeneous linear almost periodic differential equations. We give some applications to hyperbolic equations and Lotka-Volterra type equations used to describe the evolution of a single diffusive animal species.

  20. [FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN BRYOZOAN COLONY: A PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Kutyumov, V A; Maltseva, A L; Kotenko, N; Ostrovsky, A N

    2016-01-01

    Bryozoans are typical modular organisms. They consist of repetitive structural units, the zooids. Bryozoan colonies grow by zooidal budding, with the distribution pattern of the budding loci underlying the diversity of colony forms. Budding is usually restricted to the zooids at the periphery of the colony, which form a "growing edge" or local terminal growth zones. Non-budding parts of the colony can be functionally subdivided, too. In many species colonies consists of regular, often repetitive zones of feeding and non-feeding modules, associated with a periodical degeneration and regeneration of the polypide, retractile tentacle crown with a gut and the accompanying musculature. So, there is functional differentiation in bryozoan colonies but its mechanisms are unknown. Presumably, budding and/or polypide recycling in different colony parts are induced or inhibited by certain determinants of functional specialization. An effective tool of their identification is the comparison of proteomes of functionally different zones. Here we report the results of proteomic analysis of three bryozoan species from the White Sea, which have a different colony form: Flustrellidra hispida, Terminoflustra membranaceotruncata and Securiflustra securifrons. Using differential two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we compared proteomes of the growing edge and the zones consisting of feeding and non-feeding zooids in these species. We estimated the overall proteome variability, revealed proteins whose relative abundance gradually changed along the proximal-distal colony axis and suggested that they might be involved in the functional differentiation of the colony. PMID:27220253

  1. Limited role of functional differentiation in early diversification of animals

    PubMed Central

    Knope, M.L.; Heim, N.A.; Frishkoff, L.O.; Payne, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of most animal phyla and classes during the Cambrian explosion has been hypothesized to represent an ‘early burst’ of evolutionary exploration of functional ecological possibilities. However, the ecological history of marine animals has yet to be fully quantified, preventing an assessment of the early-burst model for functional ecology. Here we use ecological assignments for 18,621 marine animal genera to assess the relative timing of functional differentiation versus taxonomic diversification from the Cambrian to the present day. We find that functional diversity increased more slowly than would be expected given the history of taxonomic diversity. Contrary to previous inferences of rapid ecological differentiation from the early appearances of all well-fossilized phyla and classes, explicit coding of functional characteristics demonstrates that Cambrian genera occupied comparatively few modes of life. Functional diversity increased in the Ordovician and, especially, during the recoveries from the end-Permian and end-Cretaceous mass extinctions. Permanent shifts in the relationship between functional and taxonomic diversity following the era-bounding extinctions indicates a critical role for these biotic crises in coupling taxonomic and functional diversity. PMID:25737406

  2. Limited role of functional differentiation in early diversification of animals.

    PubMed

    Knope, M L; Heim, N A; Frishkoff, L O; Payne, J L

    2015-01-01

    The origin of most animal phyla and classes during the Cambrian explosion has been hypothesized to represent an 'early burst' of evolutionary exploration of functional ecological possibilities. However, the ecological history of marine animals has yet to be fully quantified, preventing an assessment of the early-burst model for functional ecology. Here we use ecological assignments for 18,621 marine animal genera to assess the relative timing of functional differentiation versus taxonomic diversification from the Cambrian to the present day. We find that functional diversity increased more slowly than would be expected given the history of taxonomic diversity. Contrary to previous inferences of rapid ecological differentiation from the early appearances of all well-fossilized phyla and classes, explicit coding of functional characteristics demonstrates that Cambrian genera occupied comparatively few modes of life. Functional diversity increased in the Ordovician and, especially, during the recoveries from the end-Permian and end-Cretaceous mass extinctions. Permanent shifts in the relationship between functional and taxonomic diversity following the era-bounding extinctions indicates a critical role for these biotic crises in coupling taxonomic and functional diversity. PMID:25737406

  3. Sodium-Dependent Phosphate Transporters in Osteoclast Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wagner, Carsten A.; Biber, Jürg; Hernando, Nati; Hofstetter, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated bone degrading cells. Phosphate is an important constituent of mineralized bone and released in significant quantities during bone resorption. Molecular contributors to phosphate transport during the resorptive activity of osteoclasts have been controversially discussed. This study aimed at deciphering the role of sodium-dependent phosphate transporters during osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Our studies reveal RANKL-induced differential expression of sodium-dependent phosphate transport protein IIa (NaPi-IIa) transcript and protein during osteoclast development, but no expression of the closely related NaPi-IIb and NaPi-IIc SLC34 family isoforms. In vitro studies employing NaPi-IIa-deficient osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclasts reveal that NaPi-IIa is dispensable for bone resorption and osteoclast differentiation. These results are supported by the analysis of structural bone parameters by high-resolution microcomputed tomography that yielded no differences between adult NaPi-IIa WT and KO mice. By contrast, both type III sodium-dependent phosphate transporters Pit-1 and Pit-2 were abundantly expressed throughout osteoclast differentiation, indicating that they are the relevant sodium-dependent phosphate transporters in osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors. We conclude that phosphate transporters of the SLC34 family have no role in osteoclast differentiation and function and propose that Pit-dependent phosphate transport could be pivotal for bone resorption and should be addressed in further studies. PMID:25910236

  4. Rax regulates hypothalamic tanycyte differentiation and barrier function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Angulo, Ana L.; Byerly, Mardi S.; Mesa, Janny; Wang, Hong; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-01-01

    The wall of the ventral third ventricle is composed of two distinct cell populations: tanycytes and ependymal cells. Tanycytes regulate many aspects of hypothalamic physiology, but little is known about the transcriptional network that regulates their development and function. We observed that the retina and anterior neural fold homeobox transcription factor (Rax) is selectively expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, and showed a complementary pattern of expression to markers of hypothalamic ependymal cells, such as Rarres2 (retinoic acid receptor responder). To determine whether Rax controls tanycyte differentiation and function, we generated Rax haploinsufficient mice and examined their cellular and molecular phenotype in adulthood. These mice appeared grossly normal, but careful examination revealed a thinning of the third ventricular wall and reduction of both tanycyte and ependymal markers. These experiments show that Rax is required for hypothalamic tanycyte and ependymal cell differentiation. Rax haploinsufficiency also resulted in the ectopic presence of ependymal cells in the α2 tanycytic zone, where few ependymal cells are normally found, suggesting that Rax is selectively required for α2 tanycyte differentiation. These changes in the ventricular wall were associated with reduced diffusion of Evans Blue tracer from the ventricle to the hypothalamic parenchyma, with no apparent repercussion on the gross anatomical or behavioral phenotype of these mice. In conclusion, we have provided evidence that Rax is required for the normal differentiation and patterning of hypothalamic tanycytes and ependymal cells, as well as for maintenance of the cerebrospinal fluid-hypothalamus barrier. PMID:23939786

  5. Differentiable exact penalty functions via Hestenis-Powell-Rockafellar`s augmented Lagrangian function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wu

    1994-12-31

    We study differentiable exact penalty functions, depending only on x, derived from Hestenes-Powell-Rockafellar`s quadratic augmented Lagrangian function for a minimization problem with two-sided inequality constraints by using Fletcher`s Lagrangian multiplier estimate. We also consider new penalty functions, depending only on the Lagrangian multiplier, derived from the augmented Lagrangian function. These penalty functions are particularly useful for quadratic programming problems.

  6. Optimized higher-order automatic differentiation for the Faddeeva function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Considerable research efforts have been directed at implementing the Faddeeva function w(z) and its derivatives with respect to z, but these did not consider the key computing issue of a possible dependence of z on some variable t. The general case is to differentiate the compound function w(z(t)) = w ∘ z(t) with respect to t by applying the chain rule for a first order derivative, or Faà di Bruno's formula for higher-order ones. Higher-order automatic differentiation (HOAD) is an efficient and accurate technique for derivative calculation along scientific computing codes. Although codes are available for w(z) , a special symbolic HOAD is required to compute accurate higher-order derivatives for w ∘ z(t) in an efficient manner. A thorough evaluation is carried out considering a nontrivial case study in optics to support this assertion.

  7. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  8. Regulation of T Cell Differentiation and Function by EZH2.

    PubMed

    Karantanos, Theodoros; Chistofides, Anthos; Barhdan, Kankana; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2016-01-01

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), one of the polycomb-group proteins, is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and induces the trimethylation of the histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) promoting epigenetic gene silencing. EZH2 contains a SET domain promoting the methyltransferase activity, while the three other protein components of PRC2, namely EED, SUZ12, and RpAp46/48, induce compaction of the chromatin permitting EZH2 enzymatic activity. Numerous studies highlight the role of this evolutionary conserved protein as a master regulator of differentiation in humans involved in the repression of the homeotic gene and the inactivation of X-chromosome. Through its effects in the epigenetic regulation of critical genes, EZH2 has been strongly linked to cell cycle progression, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer biology, being currently at the cutting edge of research. Most recently, EZH2 has been associated with hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation, thymopoiesis and lymphopoiesis. Several studies have evaluated the role of EZH2 in the regulation of T cell differentiation and plasticity as well as its implications in the development of autoimmune diseases and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding the role of EZH2 in the regulation of the differentiation and function of T cells focusing on possible applications in various immune-mediated conditions, including autoimmune disorders and GVHD. PMID:27199994

  9. Osteoclast differentiation and function in aquaglyceroporin AQP9 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangjian; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Rojek, Aleksandra; Nielsen, Søren; Agre, Peter; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Information Osteoclasts are cells specialized for bone resorption and play important roles in bone growth and calcium homeostasis. Differentiation of osteoclasts involves fusion of bone marrow macrophage mononuclear precursors in response to extracellular signals. A dramatic increase in osteoclast cell volume occurs during osteoclast biogenesis and is believed to be mediated by Aquaporin 9 (AQP9), a membrane protein that can rapidly transport water and other small neutral solutes across cell membranes. Results Here we report an increase in expression of AQP9 during differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line into osteoclasts. Bone marrow macrophages from wild type and AQP9 null mice differentiate into osteoclasts that have similar morphology, contain comparable numbers of nuclei, and digest synthetic bone to the same extent. Bones from wild type and AQP9 null mice contain similar numbers of osteoclasts and have comparable density and structure as measured by X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography. Conclusions Our data confirm that AQP9 expression rises during osteoclast biogenesis but indicate that AQP9 is not essential for osteoclast function or differentiation under normal physiological conditions. PMID:18666888

  10. Regulation of T Cell Differentiation and Function by EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Karantanos, Theodoros; Chistofides, Anthos; Barhdan, Kankana; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.

    2016-01-01

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), one of the polycomb-group proteins, is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and induces the trimethylation of the histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) promoting epigenetic gene silencing. EZH2 contains a SET domain promoting the methyltransferase activity, while the three other protein components of PRC2, namely EED, SUZ12, and RpAp46/48, induce compaction of the chromatin permitting EZH2 enzymatic activity. Numerous studies highlight the role of this evolutionary conserved protein as a master regulator of differentiation in humans involved in the repression of the homeotic gene and the inactivation of X-chromosome. Through its effects in the epigenetic regulation of critical genes, EZH2 has been strongly linked to cell cycle progression, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer biology, being currently at the cutting edge of research. Most recently, EZH2 has been associated with hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation, thymopoiesis and lymphopoiesis. Several studies have evaluated the role of EZH2 in the regulation of T cell differentiation and plasticity as well as its implications in the development of autoimmune diseases and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding the role of EZH2 in the regulation of the differentiation and function of T cells focusing on possible applications in various immune-mediated conditions, including autoimmune disorders and GVHD. PMID:27199994

  11. Control of functional differential equations to target sets in function space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Kent, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Optimal control of systems governed by functional differential equations of retarded and neutral type is considered. Problems with function space initial and terminal manifolds are investigated. Existence of optimal controls, regularity, and bang-bang properties are discussed. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived, and several solved examples which illustrate the theory are presented.

  12. T follicular helper cell differentiation, function, and roles in disease

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Summary Follicular helper T (Tfh) cells are specialized providers of T cell help to B cells, and are essential for germinal center formation, affinity maturation, and the development of most high affinity antibodies and memory B cells. Tfh cell differentiation is a multi-stage, multi-factorial process involving B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) and other transcription factors. This article reviews understanding of Tfh cell biology, including their differentiation, migration, transcriptional regulation, and B cell help functions. Tfh cells are critical components of many protective immune responses against pathogens. As such, there is strong interest in harnessing Tfh cells to improve vaccination strategies. Tfh cells also have roles in a range of other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Overall, there have been dramatic advances in this young field, but there is much to be learned about Tfh cell biology in the interest of applying that knowledge to biomedical needs. PMID:25367570

  13. Neutrophil extracellular traps promote differentiation and function of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chrysanthopoulou, Akrivi; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Apostolidou, Eirini; Arelaki, Stella; Mikroulis, Dimitrios; Konstantinidis, Theocharis; Sivridis, Efthimios; Koffa, Maria; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Ritis, Konstantinos; Kambas, Konstantinos

    2014-07-01

    Neutrophil activation by inflammatory stimuli and the release of extracellular chromatin structures (neutrophil extracellular traps - NETs) have been implicated in inflammatory disorders. Herein, we demonstrate that NETs released by neutrophils treated either with fibrosis-related agents, such as cigarette smoke, magnesium silicate, bleomycin, or with generic NET inducers, such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, induced activation of lung fibroblasts (LFs) and differentiation into myofibroblast (MF) phenotype. Interestingly, the aforementioned agents or IL-17 (a primary initiator of inflammation/fibrosis) had no direct effect on LF activation and differentiation. MFs treated with NETs demonstrated increased connective tissue growth factor expression, collagen production, and proliferation/migration. These fibrotic effects were significantly decreased after degradation of NETs with DNase1, heparin or myeloperoxidase inhibitor, indicating the key role of NET-derived components in LF differentiation and function. Furthermore, IL-17 was expressed in NETs and promoted the fibrotic activity of differentiated LFs but not their differentiation, suggesting that priming by DNA and histones is essential for IL-17-driven fibrosis. Additionally, autophagy was identified as the orchestrator of NET formation, as shown by inhibition studies using bafilomycin A1 or wortmannin. The above findings were further supported by the detection of NETs in close proximity to alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-expressing fibroblasts in biopsies from patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease or from skin scar tissue. Together, these data suggest that both autophagy and NETs are involved not only in inflammation but also in the ensuing fibrosis and thus may represent potential therapeutic targets in human fibrotic diseases. PMID:24740698

  14. Sirt6 regulates dendritic cell differentiation, maturation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Lasigliè, Denise; Boero, Silvia; Bauer, Inga; Morando, Sara; Damonte, Patrizia; Cea, Michele; Monacelli, Fiammetta; Odetti, Paizio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Uccelli, Antonio; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Poggi, Alessandro; Nencioni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that critically influence decisions about immune activation or tolerance. Impaired DC function is at the core of common chronic disorders and contributes to reduce immunocompetence during aging. Knowledge on the mechanisms regulating DC generation and function is necessary to understand the immune system and to prevent disease and immunosenescence. Here we show that the sirtuin Sirt6, which was previously linked to healthspan promotion, stimulates the development of myeloid, conventional DCs (cDCs). Sirt6-knockout (Sirt6KO) mice exhibit low frequencies of bone marrow cDC precursors and low yields of bone marrow-derived cDCs compared to wild-type (WT) animals. Sirt6KO cDCs express lower levels of class II MHC, of costimulatory molecules, and of the chemokine receptor CCR7, and are less immunostimulatory compared to WT cDCs. Similar effects in terms of differentiation and immunostimulatory capacity were observed in human monocyte-derived DCs in response to SIRT6 inhibition. Finally, while Sirt6KO cDCs show an overall reduction in their ability to produce IL-12, TNF-α and IL-6 secretion varies dependent on the stimulus, being reduced in response to CpG, but increased in response to other Toll-like receptor ligands. In conclusion, Sirt6 plays a crucial role in cDC differentiation and function and reduced Sirt6 activity may contribute to immunosenescence. PMID:26761436

  15. Formaldehyde exposure impairs the function and differentiation of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Lee, Eun-Hee; Lee, Ki-Mo; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Jang, Ji-Hun; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Yoon, Il-Joo; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Moon-Jin; Kim, Kwang Dong; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2013-11-25

    We investigated the cytotoxic effects of formaldehyde (FA) on lymphocytes. FA-exposed mice showed a profound reduction not only in the number of natural killer (NK) cells but also in the expression of NK cell-specific receptors, but these mice did not exhibit decreases in the numbers of T or B lymphocytes. FA exposure also induced decreases in NK cytolytic activity and in the expression of NK cell-associated genes, such as IFN-γ, perforin and CD122. To determine the effect of FA on tumorigenicity, C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with B16F10 melanoma cells after FA exposure. The mass of the B16F10 tumor and the concentration of extravascular polymorphonuclear leukocytes were greater than those in unexposed tumor-bearing control mice. The number and cytolytic activity of NK cells were also reduced in B16F10 tumor-bearing mice exposed to FA. To determine how FA reduces the NK cell number, NK precursor (pNK) cells were treated with FA, and the differentiation status of the NK cells was analyzed. NK cell differentiation was impaired by FA treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings indicate that FA exposure may promote tumor progression by impairing NK cell function and differentiation. PMID:24060340

  16. Silibinin Regulates Lipid Metabolism and Differentiation in Functional Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Ignazio; Vanella, Luca; Cambria, Maria T.; Tibullo, Daniele; Godos, Justyna; Guarnaccia, Laura; Zappalà, Agata; Galvano, Fabio; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Silibinin, a natural plant flavonolignan is the main active constituent found in milk thistle (Silybum marianum). It is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-neoplastic effect, and suppresses lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Objective of this study was to investigate the effect of silibinin on adipogenic differentiation and thermogenic capacity of human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells. Silibinin (10 μM) treatment, either at the beginning or at the end of adipogenic differentiation, resulted in an increase of SIRT-1, PPARα, Pgc-1α, and UCPs gene expression. Moreover, silibinin administration resulted in a decrease of PPARγ, FABP4, FAS, and MEST/PEG1 gene expression during the differentiation, confirming that this compound is able to reduce fatty acid accumulation and adipocyte size. Our data showed that silibinin regulated adipocyte lipid metabolism, inducing thermogenesis and promoting a brown remodeling in adipocyte. Taken together, our findings suggest that silibinin increases UCPs expression by stimulation of SIRT1, PPARα, and Pgc-1α, improved metabolic parameters, decreased lipid mass leading to the formation of functional adipocytes. PMID:26834634

  17. IL-33 in T Cell Differentiation, Function, and Immune Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Peine, Michael; Marek, Roman M; Löhning, Max

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a role for the alarmin interleukin (IL)-33 in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation and function, and have also revealed important distinctions. The IL-33 receptor ST2 is constitutively and abundantly expressed on T-helper-2 (Th2) and GATA-3(+) regulatory T cells in a GATA-3- and STAT5-dependent manner. Upon activation, Th1 and cytotoxic T cells express ST2 transiently, driven by T-bet and/or STAT4. We review these findings here, and critically examine evidence indicating that IL-33 enhances the differentiation and functionality of various T cell subsets through positive feedback loops involving lineage-specifying transcription factors. In this context, we discuss how quantitative and qualitative differences in ST2 expression between effector and GATA-3(+) regulatory T cells may contribute to immune homeostasis, and outline important areas of future inquiry. PMID:27055914

  18. Nodal centrality of functional network in the differentiation of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Newman, Sharlene; Goñi, Joaquín; Kent, Jerillyn S; Howell, Josselyn; Bolbecker, Amanda; Puce, Aina; O'Donnell, Brian F; Hetrick, William P

    2015-10-01

    A disturbance in the integration of information during mental processing has been implicated in schizophrenia, possibly due to faulty communication within and between brain regions. Graph theoretic measures allow quantification of functional brain networks. Functional networks are derived from correlations between time courses of brain regions. Group differences between SZ and control groups have been reported for functional network properties, but the potential of such measures to classify individual cases has been little explored. We tested whether the network measure of betweenness centrality could classify persons with schizophrenia and normal controls. Functional networks were constructed for 19 schizophrenic patients and 29 non-psychiatric controls based on resting state functional MRI scans. The betweenness centrality of each node, or fraction of shortest-paths that pass through it, was calculated in order to characterize the centrality of the different regions. The nodes with high betweenness centrality agreed well with hub nodes reported in previous studies of structural and functional networks. Using a linear support vector machine algorithm, the schizophrenia group was differentiated from non-psychiatric controls using the ten nodes with the highest betweenness centrality. The classification accuracy was around 80%, and stable against connectivity thresholding. Better performance was achieved when using the ranks as feature space as opposed to the actual values of betweenness centrality. Overall, our findings suggest that changes in functional hubs are associated with schizophrenia, reflecting a variation of the underlying functional network and neuronal communications. In addition, a specific network property, betweenness centrality, can classify persons with SZ with a high level of accuracy. PMID:26299706

  19. TCDD exposure disrupts mammary epithelial cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Loretta L.; Lew, Betina J.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2011-01-01

    Mammary gland growth and differentiation during pregnancy is a developmental process that is sensitive to the toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD is a widespread environmental contaminant and a potent ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We demonstrate reduced β-casein protein induction in mouse mammary glands and in cultured SCp2 mammary epithelial cells following exposure to TCDD. SCp2 cells exposed to TCDD also show reduced cell clustering and less alveolar-like structure formation. SCp2 cells express transcriptionally active AhR, and exposure to TCDD induces expression of the AhR target gene CYP1B1. Exposure to TCDD during pregnancy reduced expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin in the mammary gland and decreased phosphorylation of STAT5, a known regulator of β-casein gene expression. These data provide morphological and molecular evidence that TCDD-mediated AhR activation disrupts structural and functional differentiation of the mammary gland, and present an in vitro model for studying the effects of TCDD on mammary epithelial cell function. PMID:19490989

  20. The Epigenetic Landscape of Mammary Gland Development and Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rijnkels, Monique; Kabotyanski, Elena; Montazer-Torbati, Mohamad B.; Beauvais, C. Hue; Vassetzky, Yegor; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Devinoy, Eve

    2010-01-01

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conformation initiated by DNA methylation, histone variants, post-translational modifications of histones, non-histone chromatin proteins, and non-coding RNAs. Epigenetics plays a key role in development. However, very little is known about its role in the developing mammary gland or how it might integrate the many signalling pathways involved in mammary gland development and function that have been discovered during the past few decades. An inverse relationship between marks of closed (DNA methylation) or open chromatin (DnaseI hypersensitivity, certain histone modifications) and milk protein gene expression has been documented. Recent studies have shown that during development and functional differentiation, both global and local chromatin changes occur. Locally, chromatin at distal regulatory elements and promoters of milk protein genes gains a more open conformation. Furthermore, changes occur both in looping between regulatory elements and attachment to nuclear matrix. These changes are induced by developmental signals and environmental conditions. Additionally, distinct epigenetic patterns have been identified in mammary gland stem and progenitor cell sub-populations. Together, these findings suggest that epigenetics plays a role in mammary development and function. With the new tools for epigenomics developed in recent years, we now can begin to establish a framework for the role of epigenetics in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:20157770

  1. Exploration of the Validity of Gender Differences in Mathematics Assessment Using Differential Bundle Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Yoke Mooi; Williams, Julian Scott; Lamprianou, Iasonas

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study are (a) to examine the sources of differential functioning by gender via differential bundle functioning (DBF) in mathematics assessment and (b) to use DBF to explore whether the differential functioning displayed is construct-relevant or construct-irrelevant. Three qualitatively different areas, namely curriculum domains,…

  2. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  3. Non-monotonicity of Lyapunov functions for functional differential equations with enlightenments for related research methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xueyan; Deng, Feiqi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a particular property of Lyapunov functions for functional differential equations (FDEs) is developed, that is the direct dependence of the signs of the derivatives of the Lyapunov functions on the initial data. This property implies that the derivatives of the Lyapunov functions for FDEs cannot be guaranteed to be negative definite generally, and then makes the FDEs differ from the ordinary differential equations constitutionally. With this property, we give some enlightenments for the research methods for establishing stability theorems or criteria for FDEs, which may help us to form a common view about the choice of the investigation methods on the stability of FDEs. The conclusion is stated in both the deterministic and stochastic versions. Two illustrative examples are given to show and verify our conclusion through the paper.

  4. Regulation of epithelial function, differentiation, and remodeling in the epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Sylvie; Ruan, Ye Chun; Park, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Bongki

    2016-01-01

    The epididymis is a single convoluted tubule lined by a pseudostratified epithelium. Specialized epididymal epithelial cells, the so-called principal, basal, narrow, and clear cells, establish a unique luminal environment for the maturation and storage of spermatozoa. The epididymis is functionally and structurally divided into several segments and sub-segments that create regionally distinct luminal environments. This organ is immature at birth, and epithelial cells acquire their fully differentiated phenotype during an extended postnatal period, but the factors involved in this complex process remain incompletely characterized. In the adult epididymis, the establishment of an acidic luminal pH and low bicarbonate concentration in the epididymis contributes to preventing premature activation of spermatozoa during their maturation and storage. Clear cells are proton-secreting cells throughout the epididymis, but principal cells have distinct acid/base transport properties, depending on their localization within the epididymis. Basal cells are located in all epididymal segments, but they have a distinct morphology depending on the segment and species examined. How this structural plasticity of basal cells is regulated is discussed here. Also, the role of luminal factors and androgens in the regulation of epithelial cells is reviewed in relation to their respective localization in the proximal versus distal regions of the epididymis. Finally, we describe a novel role for CFTR in tubulogenesis and epithelial cell differentiation. PMID:26585699

  5. MicroRNA control of lymphocyte differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Belver, Laura; Papavasiliou, Nina F; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2011-01-01

    Summary MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding regulatory RNAs that control gene regulation by guiding silencing protein complexes to mRNA in a sequence-dependent manner. In this way miRNAs are able to repress gene expression post-transcriptionally by affecting mRNA stability or translation. These ubiquitous molecules play central roles in a wide range of biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Within the context of the immune system, genetic studies have identified distinct roles for specific miRNAs in gene regulation during development, activation and maturation. Conversely, dysregulation of miRNA expression has been specifically correlated with cancer. This review outlines our current understanding of miRNA function in lymphocytes as it impacts expression of protein-coding genes in the context of proper development, as well as oncogenesis. PMID:21353514

  6. Differential assemblage of functional units in paddy soil microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are not only a global food source but also a major biogenic source of atmospheric methane. Using metatranscriptomics, we comparatively explored structural and functional succession of paddy soil microbiomes in the oxic surface layer and anoxic bulk soil. Cyanobacteria, Fungi, Xanthomonadales, Myxococcales, and Methylococcales were the most abundant and metabolically active groups in the oxic zone, while Clostridia, Actinobacteria, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Anaerolineae, and methanogenic archaea dominated the anoxic zone. The protein synthesis potential of these groups was about 75% and 50% of the entire community capacity, respectively. Their structure-function relationships in microbiome succession were revealed by classifying the protein-coding transcripts into core, non-core, and taxon-specific transcripts based on homologous gene distribution. The differential expression of core transcripts between the two microbiomes indicated that structural succession is primarily governed by the cellular ability to adapt to the given oxygen condition, involving oxidative stress, nitrogen/phosphorus metabolism, and fermentation. By contrast, the non-core transcripts were expressed from genes involved in the metabolism of various carbon sources. Among those, taxon-specific transcripts revealed highly specialized roles of the dominant groups in community-wide functioning. For instance, taxon-specific transcripts involved in photosynthesis and methane oxidation were a characteristic of the oxic zone, while those related to methane production and aromatic compound degradation were specific to the anoxic zone. Degradation of organic matters, antibiotics resistance, and secondary metabolite production were detected to be expressed in both the oxic and anoxic zones, but by different taxonomic groups. Cross-feeding of methanol between members of the Methylococcales and Xanthomonadales was suggested by the observation that in the oxic zone, they both

  7. Differential association between chronic cannabis use and brain function deficits.

    PubMed

    Soueif, M I

    1976-01-01

    To summarize, 12 objective tests that generated 16 test variables were administered to 850 male regular cannabis users and 839 nonusers. The tests were designed to assess various modalities, including speed of psychomotor performance, distance estimation, time estimation, immediate memory, and visuomotor coordination. Most of the test variables differentiated significantly between consumers and controls. At the same time, a significant second-order interaction emerged in most cases. This interaction meant that, under certain conditions that relate to the two dimensions "literacy-illiteracy" and/or "urbanism-ruralism," the superiority of controls over cannabis users became impressive, whereas under other conditions it almost disappeared. To account for this complex pattern of results, a working hypothesis was presented to the effect that "other conditions being equal, the lower the nondrug level of proficiency on tests of cognitive and psychomotor performance the smaller the size of function deficit associated with drug usage." For an empirical examination of the hypothesis, six predictions were formulated. Three predictions defined specific relationships between level of performance, on one hand, and each of three organismic variables, on the other: literacy, urbanism, and age. The remaining predictions delineated relationships to be expected between size of function deficit and the three organismic variables. All our predictions were confirmed, showing less function impairment to be contingent with cannabis usage among the illiterates, rurals, and older subjects. Level of cortical arousal was suggested as the central process associated with the three organismic variables. Because the version of our working hypothesis was formulated with reference to chronic material, the possibility of a transposition of the paradign to research on the acute effects of the drug was discussed. The suggestion was made that our working hypothesis, in either version, is capable of

  8. Defining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC DifferentiationDefining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC Differentiation Differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) undergo mitochondrial maturation leading to a switch from a system dependent upon glycolysis to a re...

  9. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  10. Dystroglycan depletion inhibits the functions of differentiated HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zárate, Alma Delia; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Winder, Steve J; Cerecedo, Doris

    2014-06-01

    Dystroglycan has recently been characterized in blood tissue cells, as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex but to date nothing is known of its role in the differentiation process of neutrophils. We have investigated the role of dystroglycan in the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL-60 differentiated to neutrophils. Depletion of dystroglycan by RNAi resulted in altered morphology and reduced properties of differentiated HL-60 cells, including chemotaxis, respiratory burst, phagocytic activities and expression of markers of differentiation. These findings strongly implicate dystroglycan as a key membrane adhesion protein involved in the differentiation process in HL-60 cells. PMID:24792180

  11. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future. PMID:24956585

  12. Racial differences in hypertension knowledge: effects of differential item functioning.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Brian J; Trivedi, Ranak; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2009-01-01

    Health-related knowledge is an important component in the self-management of chronic illnesses. The objective of this study was to more accurately assess racial differences in hypertension knowledge by using a latent variable modeling approach that controlled for sociodemographic factors and accounted for measurement issues in the assessment of hypertension knowledge. Cross-sectional data from 1,177 participants (45% African American; 35% female) were analyzed using a multiple indicator multiple causes (MIMIC) modeling approach. Available sociodemographic data included race, education, sex, financial status, and age. All participants completed six items on a hypertension knowledge questionnaire. Overall, the final model suggested that females, Whites, and patients with at least a high school diploma had higher latent knowledge scores than males, African Americans, and patients with less than a high school diploma, respectively. The model also detected differential item functioning (DIF) based on race for two of the items. Specifically, the error rate for African Americans was lower than would be expected given the lower level of latent knowledge on the items, on the questions related to: (a) the association between high blood pressure and kidney disease, and (b) the increased risk African Americans have for developing hypertension. Not accounting for DIF resulted in the difference between Whites and African Americans to be underestimated. These results are discussed in the context of the need for careful measurement of health-related constructs, and how measurement-related issues can result in an inaccurate estimation of racial differences in hypertension knowledge. PMID:19341159

  13. Carcinoma origin dictates differential skewing of monocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Bögels, Marijn; Braster, Rens; Nijland, Philip G.; Gül, Nuray; van de Luijtgaarden, Wendy; Fijneman, Remond J.A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Jimenez, Connie R.; Beelen, Robert H.J.; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are versatile cells, which phenotype is profoundly influenced by their environment. Pro-inflammatory classically activated or M1 macrophages, and anti-inflammatory alternatively-activated or M2 macrophages represent two extremes of a continuum of functional states. Consequently, macrophages that are present in tumors can exert tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressing activity, depending on the tumor milieu. In this study we investigated how human monocytes—the precursors of macrophages—are influenced by carcinoma cells of different origin. We demonstrate that monocytes, stimulated with breast cancer supernatant, showed increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-8 and chemokines CCL17 and CCL22, which are associated with an alternatively-activated phenotype. By contrast, monocytes that were cultured in supernatants of colon cancer cells produced more pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-12 and TNFα) and reactive oxygen species. Secretome analysis revealed differential secretion of proteins by colon and breast cancer cell lines, of which the proteoglycan versican was exclusively secreted by colon carcinoma cell lines. Reducing active versican by blocking with monoclonal antibodies or shRNA diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine production by monocytes. Thus, colon carcinoma cells polarize monocytes toward a more classically-activated anti-tumorigenic phenotype, whereas breast carcinomas predispose monocytes toward an alternatively activated phenotype. Interestingly, presence of macrophages in breast or colon carcinomas correlates with poor or good prognosis in patients, respectively. The observed discrepancy in macrophage activation by either colon or breast carcinoma cells may therefore explain the dichotomy between patient prognosis and macrophage presence in these different tumors. Designing new therapies, directing development of monocytes toward M1 activated tumor macrophages in cancer patients, may have great clinical benefits. PMID:23162747

  14. Quasi-Newton methods for parameter estimation in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Dennis W.

    1988-01-01

    A state-space approach to parameter estimation in linear functional differential equations is developed using the theory of linear evolution equations. A locally convergent quasi-Newton type algorithm is applied to distributed systems with particular emphasis on parameters that induce unbounded perturbations of the state. The algorithm is computationally implemented on several functional differential equations, including coefficient and delay estimation in linear delay-differential equations.

  15. A Generalized DIF Effect Variance Estimator for Measuring Unsigned Differential Test Functioning in Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.; Algina, James

    2006-01-01

    One approach to measuring unsigned differential test functioning is to estimate the variance of the differential item functioning (DIF) effect across the items of the test. This article proposes two estimators of the DIF effect variance for tests containing dichotomous and polytomous items. The proposed estimators are direct extensions of the…

  16. A Comparison of Function-Based Differential Reinforcement Interventions for Children Engaging in Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeGray, Matthew W.; Dufrene, Brad A.; Sterling-Turner, Heather; Olmi, D. Joe; Bellone, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a direct comparison of differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA). Participants included three children in center-based classrooms referred for functional assessments due to disruptive classroom behavior. Functional assessments included interviews and brief…

  17. Genes associated with T helper 17 cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Nalbant, Ayten; Eskier, Doga

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing T helper cells (Th17 cells) constitute a lineage of CD4 effector T helper cells that is distinct from the Th1 and Th2 CD4 phenotypes. In humans, Th17 differentiation is induced in the presence of the cytokines IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TGF beta, whereas IL-23 maintains Th17 survival. Effector human Th17 cells express several cytokines and cell surface markers, including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-26, CCR6 and TNFalpha. Studies on human cells have revealed that the RORC2 transcription factor plays an effective role in Th17 differentiation. Th17 cells contribute to the host immune response by involving various pathologies, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease. However, the full extent of their contribution to diseases is being investigated. The differentiation of Th17 cells is controlled by many transcription factors, including ROR gammat, IRF4, RUNX1, BATF, and STAT3. This review covers the general principles of CD4 T helper differentiation and the known transcription factors that play a role in the recently discovered Th17 cells. PMID:27100349

  18. Metabolic regulation of T cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Upon encountering pathogens, T cells mount immune responses by proliferating, increasing cellular mass and differentiating. These cellular changes impose significant energetic challenges on T cells. It was believed that TCR and cytokine-mediated signaling are dominant dictators of T cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, it was recognized that T cells utilize metabolic transporters and metabolic sensors that allow them to rapidly respond to nutrient-limiting inflammatory environments. Metabolic sensors allow T cells to find a balance between energy consumption (anabolic metabolism) and production (catabolic metabolism) in order to mount effective immune responses. Also, metabolic regulators interact with cytokine-dependent transcriptional regulators, suggesting a more integrative and advanced model of T cell activation and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss recent discoveries regarding the roles of metabolic regulators in effector and memory T cell development and their interaction with canonical transcription factors. PMID:26277275

  19. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  20. Some properties of solutions of a functional-differential equation of second order with delay.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Veronica Ana; Otrocol, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Existence, uniqueness, data dependence (monotony, continuity, and differentiability with respect to parameter), and Ulam-Hyers stability results for the solutions of a system of functional-differential equations with delays are proved. The techniques used are Perov's fixed point theorem and weakly Picard operator theory. PMID:24683363

  1. Exploring Differential Bundle Functioning in Mathematics by Gender: The Effect of Hierarchical Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Yoke Mooi; Williams, Julian; Lamprianou, Iasonas

    2013-01-01

    Researchers interested in exploring substantive group differences are increasingly attending to bundles of items (or testlets): the aim is to understand how gender differences, for instance, are explained by differential performances on different types or bundles of items, hence differential bundle functioning (DBF). Some previous work has…

  2. Analytical solution to a non-autonomous second order differential equation with modified hyperbolic tangent function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Guasti, M.

    2015-03-01

    The solution to a non-autonomous second order ordinary differential equation is presented. The real function, dependent on the differentiation variable, is a squared hyperbolic tangent function plus a term that involves the quotient of hyperbolic functions. This function varies from one limiting value to another without having any singularities. The solution is remarkably simple and involves only trigonometric and hyperbolic trigonometric functions. The solution is analyzed in the context of wave propagation in an inhomogeneous one-dimensional medium. The profile is shown to act as a perfect anti-reflection interface, providing a possible alternative route to the fabrication of reflectionless surfaces.

  3. Collective Dynamics Differentiates Functional Divergence in Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Glembo, Tyler J.; Farrell, Daniel W.; Gerek, Z. Nevin; Thorpe, M. F.; Ozkan, S. Banu

    2012-01-01

    Protein evolution is most commonly studied by analyzing related protein sequences and generating ancestral sequences through Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods, and/or by resurrecting ancestral proteins in the lab and performing ligand binding studies to determine function. Structural and dynamic evolution have largely been left out of molecular evolution studies. Here we incorporate both structure and dynamics to elucidate the molecular principles behind the divergence in the evolutionary path of the steroid receptor proteins. We determine the likely structure of three evolutionarily diverged ancestral steroid receptor proteins using the Zipping and Assembly Method with FRODA (ZAMF). Our predictions are within ∼2.7 Å all-atom RMSD of the respective crystal structures of the ancestral steroid receptors. Beyond static structure prediction, a particular feature of ZAMF is that it generates protein dynamics information. We investigate the differences in conformational dynamics of diverged proteins by obtaining the most collective motion through essential dynamics. Strikingly, our analysis shows that evolutionarily diverged proteins of the same family do not share the same dynamic subspace, while those sharing the same function are simultaneously clustered together and distant from those, that have functionally diverged. Dynamic analysis also enables those mutations that most affect dynamics to be identified. It correctly predicts all mutations (functional and permissive) necessary to evolve new function and ∼60% of permissive mutations necessary to recover ancestral function. PMID:22479170

  4. On the Relationship between Differential Item Functioning and Item Difficulty: An Issue of Methods? Item Response Theory Approach to Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between differential item functioning (DIF) and item difficulty on the SAT is such that more difficult items tended to exhibit DIF in favor of the focal group (usually minority groups). These results were reported by Kulick and Hu, and Freedle and have been enthusiastically discussed by more recent literature. Examining the…

  5. FETAL DEXAMETHASONE EXPOSURE ACCELERATES DEVELOPMENT OF RENAL FUNCTION: RELATIONSHIP TO DOSE, CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND GROWTH INHIBITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fetal exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids slows cellular development and impairs organ performance, in association with growth retardation. evertheless, low doses of glucocorticoids may enhance cell differentiation and accelerate specific functions. he current study examine...

  6. Mental Functioning, Perceptual Differentiation, Personality, and Achievement among Art and Non-Art Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorethy, Rex; Reeves, Dan

    1979-01-01

    College art majors, art education majors, and nonart majors were compared on measures of brain hemisphere dominance, general intelligence, brain functioning, visual perceptual differentiation, grade point average, flexibility-rigidity, and personal-social adjustment. (SJL)

  7. Directed Differentiation of Functional Astroglial Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krencik, Robert; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Regionally and functionally diverse types of astrocytes exist throughout the central nervous system and participate in nearly every aspect of normal and abnormal neural function. Therefore, human astrocyte subtypes are a useful tool for understanding brain function, modulating disease processes, and promoting neural regeneration. Here we describe a protocol for directed differentiation and maintenance of functional astroglia from human pluripotent stem cells in a chemically defined system. Human stem cells are first differentiated to neuroepithelial cells with or without exogenous patterning molecules(days 0 –21). Regular dissociation of the neuroepithelial clusters in suspension, and in the presence of mitogens, permits generation of astroglial subtypes over along term expansion (days 21–90). Finally, the astroglial progenitors are either amplified for an extended time or differentiated to functional astrocytes upon removal of mitogens and the addition of CNTF ( days > 90). This method generates robust populations of functionally diversified astrocytes with high efficiency. PMID:22011653

  8. Sexual Differentiation of Circadian Clock Function in the Adrenal Gland.

    PubMed

    Kloehn, Ian; Pillai, Savin B; Officer, Laurel; Klement, Claire; Gasser, Paul J; Evans, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in glucocorticoid production are associated with increased responsiveness of the adrenal gland in females. However, the adrenal-intrinsic mechanisms that establish sexual dimorphic function remain ill defined. Glucocorticoid production is gated at the molecular level by the circadian clock, which may contribute to sexual dimorphic adrenal function. Here we examine sex differences in the adrenal gland using an optical reporter of circadian clock function. Adrenal glands were cultured from male and female Period2::Luciferase (PER2::LUC) mice to assess clock function in vitro in real time. We confirm that there is a pronounced sex difference in the intrinsic capacity to sustain PER2::LUC rhythms in vitro, with higher amplitude rhythms in adrenal glands collected from males than from females. Changes in adrenal PER2::LUC rhythms over the reproductive life span implicate T as an important factor in driving sex differences in adrenal clock function. By directly manipulating hormone levels in adult mice in vivo, we demonstrate that T increases the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in adrenal glands of both male and female mice. In contrast, we find little evidence that ovarian hormones modify adrenal clock function. Lastly, we find that T in vitro can increase the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in male adrenals but not female adrenals, which suggests the existence of sex differences in the mechanisms of T action in vivo. Collectively these results reveal that activational effects of T alter circadian timekeeping in the adrenal gland, which may have implications for sex differences in stress reactivity and stress-related disorders. PMID:27007073

  9. Regeneration niche differentiates functional strategies of desert woody plant species

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Plant communities vary dramatically in the number and relative abundance of species that exhibit facilitative interactions, which contributes substantially to variation in community structure and dynamics. Predicting species’ responses to neighbors based on readily measurable functional traits would provide important insight into the factors that structure plant communities. We measured a suite of functional traits on seedlings of 20 species and mature plants of 54 species of shrubs from three arid biogeographic regions. We hypothesized that species with different regeneration niches—those that require nurse plants for establishment (beneficiaries) versus those that do not (colonizers)—are functionally different. Indeed, seedlings of beneficiary species had lower relative growth rates, larger seeds and final biomass, allocated biomass toward roots and height at a cost to leaf mass fraction, and constructed costly, dense leaf and root tissues relative to colonizers. Likewise at maturity, beneficiaries had larger overall size and denser leaves coupled with greater water use efficiency than colonizers. In contrast to current hypotheses that suggest beneficiaries are less “stress-tolerant” than colonizers, beneficiaries exhibited conservative functional strategies suited to persistently dry, low light conditions beneath canopies, whereas colonizers exhibited opportunistic strategies that may be advantageous in fluctuating, open microenvironments. In addition, the signature of the regeneration niche at maturity indicates that facilitation expands the range of functional diversity within plant communities at all ontogenetic stages. This study demonstrates the utility of specific functional traits for predicting species’ regeneration niches in hot deserts, and provides a framework for studying facilitation in other severe environments. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-010-1741-y) contains supplementary

  10. Differentiating High-Functioning Autism and Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Katherine E.; Cruess, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    Both high-functioning autism (HFA) and social phobia (SP) involve profound social interaction deficits. Although these disorders share some similar symptoms, they are conceptualized as distinct. Because both HFA and SP are defined behaviorally, the degree of overlap between the two disorders may result in misinterpretation of symptoms. However,…

  11. Integral estimates for differentiable functions on irregular domains

    SciTech Connect

    Besov, Oleg V

    2011-02-11

    Integral representations for functions and their partial derivatives in terms of some fixed system of partial derivatives are constructed on irregular domains in a Euclidean space. Embedding theorems for Sobolev-type spaces into a Lebesgue space are established and the norms of the derivatives are estimated. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  12. Differential function of Themis CABIT domains during T cell development.

    PubMed

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Nitta, Takeshi; Kaji, Kentaro; Takashima, Akiko; Oda, Hiroyo; Tamehiro, Norimasa; Goto, Motohito; Okamura, Tadashi; Patrick, Michael S; Suzuki, Harumi

    2014-01-01

    Themis (also named Gasp) is a newly identified Grb2-binding protein that is essential for thymocyte positive selection. Despite the possible involvement of Themis in TCR-mediated signal transduction, its function remains unresolved and controversial. Themis contains two functionally uncharacterized regions called CABIT (cysteine-containing, all-β in Themis) domains, a nuclear localization signal (NLS), and a proline-rich sequence (PRS). To elucidate the role of these motifs in Themis's function in vivo, we established a series of mutant Themis transgenic mice on a Themis(-/-) background. Deletion of the highly conserved Core motif of CABIT1 or CABIT2 (Core1 or Core2, respectively), the NLS, or the PRS abolished Grb2-association, as well as TCR-dependent tyrosine-phosphorylation and the ability to induce positive selection in the thymus. The NLS and Core1 motifs were required for the nuclear localization of Themis, whereas Core2 and PRS were not. Furthermore, expression of ΔCore1- but not ΔCore2-Themis conferred dominant negative-type inhibition on T cell development. Collectively, our current results indicate that PRS, NLS, CABIT1, and CABIT2 are all required for positive selection, and that each of the CABIT domains exerts distinct functions during positive selection. PMID:24586531

  13. Numerical solution of distributed order fractional differential equations by hybrid functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, S.; Razzaghi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new numerical method for solving the distributed fractional differential equations is presented. The method is based upon hybrid functions approximation. The properties of hybrid functions consisting of block-pulse functions and Bernoulli polynomials are presented. The Riemann-Liouville fractional integral operator for hybrid functions is introduced. This operator is then utilized to reduce the solution of the distributed fractional differential equations to a system of algebraic equations. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the technique.

  14. Development and Demonstration of Multidimensional IRT-Based Internal Measures of Differential Functioning of Items and Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Raju, Nambury S. Rajo; Flowers, Claudia P.

    1997-01-01

    Defines and demonstrates a framework for studying differential item functioning and differential test functioning for tests that are intended to be multidimensional. The procedure, which is illustrated with simulated data, is an extension of the unidimensional differential functioning of items and tests approach (N. Raju, W. van der Linden, and P.…

  15. Decellularized Tracheal Extracellular Matrix Supports Epithelial Migration, Differentiation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kutten, Johannes C.; McGovern, David; Hobson, Christopher M.; Luffy, Sarah A.; Nieponice, Alejandro; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J.; Reynolds, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal loss is a source of significant morbidity for affected patients with no acceptable solution. Interest in engineering tracheal transplants has created a demand for small animal models of orthotopic tracheal transplantation. Here, we examine the use of a decellularized graft in a murine model of tracheal replacement. Fresh or decellularized tracheas harvested from age-matched female donor C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into syngeneic recipients. Tracheas were decellularized using repeated washes of water, 3% Triton X-100, and 3 M NaCl under cyclic pressure changes, followed by disinfection with 0.1% peracetic acid/4% ethanol, and terminal sterilization by gamma irradiation. Tracheas were explanted for immunolabeling at 1, 4, and 8 weeks following surgery. Video microscopy and computed tomography were performed to assess function and structure. Decellularized grafts supported complete reepithelialization by 8 weeks and motile cilia were observed. Cartilaginous portions of the trachea were maintained in mice receiving fresh transplants, but repopulation of the cartilage was not seen in mice receiving decellularized transplants. We observed superior postsurgical survival, weight gain, and ciliary function in mice receiving fresh transplants compared with those receiving decellularized transplants. The murine orthotopic tracheal transplant provides an appropriate model to assess the repopulation and functional regeneration of decellularized tracheal grafts. PMID:24980864

  16. A taxonomy of effect size measures for the differential functioning of items and scales.

    PubMed

    Meade, Adam W

    2010-07-01

    Much progress has been made in the past 2 decades with respect to methods of identifying measurement invariance or a lack thereof. Until now, the focus of these efforts has been to establish criteria for statistical significance in items and scales that function differently across samples. The power associated with tests of differential functioning, as with all significance tests, is affected by sample size and other considerations. Additionally, statistical significance need not imply practical importance. There is a strong need as such for meaningful effect size indicators to describe the extent to which items and scales function differently. Recently developed effect size measures show promise for providing a metric to describe the amount of differential functioning present between groups. Expanding upon recent developments, this article presents a taxonomy of potential differential functioning effect sizes; several new indices of item and scale differential functioning effect size are proposed and illustrated with 2 data samples. Software created for computing these indices and graphing item- and scale-level differential functioning is described. PMID:20604592

  17. Intrinsic functional connectivity differentiates minimally conscious from unresponsive patients.

    PubMed

    Demertzi, Athena; Antonopoulos, Georgios; Heine, Lizette; Voss, Henning U; Crone, Julia Sophia; de Los Angeles, Carlo; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Di Perri, Carol; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Kronbichler, Martin; Trinka, Eugen; Phillips, Christophe; Gomez, Francisco; Tshibanda, Luaba; Soddu, Andrea; Schiff, Nicholas D; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Laureys, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging investigations, clinicians remain with the challenge of how to implement this paradigm on an individualized basis. Here, we assessed the clinical relevance of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions in patients with disorders of consciousness by means of a systems-level approach. Three clinical centres collected data from 73 patients in minimally conscious state, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome and coma. The main analysis was performed on the data set coming from one centre (Liège) including 51 patients (26 minimally conscious state, 19 vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, six coma; 15 females; mean age 49 ± 18 years, range 11-87; 16 traumatic, 32 non-traumatic of which 13 anoxic, three mixed; 35 patients assessed >1 month post-insult) for whom the clinical diagnosis with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised was congruent with positron emission tomography scanning. Group-level functional connectivity was investigated for the default mode, frontoparietal, salience, auditory, sensorimotor and visual networks using a multiple-seed correlation approach. Between-group inferential statistics and machine learning were used to identify each network's capacity to discriminate between patients in minimally conscious state and vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. Data collected from 22 patients scanned in two other centres (Salzburg: 10 minimally conscious state, five vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome; New York: five minimally conscious state, one vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, one emerged from minimally conscious state) were used to validate the classification with the selected features. Coma Recovery Scale-Revised total scores correlated with key regions of each network reflecting their involvement in consciousness-related processes. All networks had a high discriminative capacity (>80%) for

  18. Differential geometry of the Fermat quartic and theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadnot, Jason

    2012-02-01

    The universal curve over a finite cover of the moduli space of elliptic curves with level four structure is embedded in C as the Fermat quartic and is parametrized via the four Jacobi theta functions. Constructions from completely integrable systems have shown the importance of looking at the curvature of certain spaces and here we compute sectional curvatures. For our computations, we choose the ambient Fubini-Study metric of C. We also derive several theta identities which arise from the quartic's holomorphic two-form.

  19. Tribbles 3 inhibits brown adipocyte differentiation and function by suppressing insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ha-Won; Choi, Ran Hee; McClellan, Jamie L; Piroli, Gerardo G; Frizzell, Norma; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Goodyear, Laurie J; Koh, Ho-Jin

    2016-02-19

    Recent studies have demonstrated that adult humans have substantial amounts of functioning brown adipose tissue (BAT). Since BAT has been implicated as an anti-obese and anti-diabetic tissue, it is important to understand the signaling molecules that regulate BAT function. There has been a link between insulin signaling and BAT metabolism as deletion or pharmaceutical inhibition of insulin signaling impairs BAT differentiation and function. Tribbles 3 (TRB3) is a pseudo kinase that has been shown to regulate metabolism and insulin signaling in multiple tissues but the role of TRB3 in BAT has not been studied. In this study, we found that TRB3 expression was present in BAT and overexpression of TRB3 in brown preadipocytes impaired differentiation and decreased expression of BAT markers. Furthermore, TRB3 overexpression resulted in significantly lower oxygen consumption rates for basal and proton leakage, indicating decreased BAT activity. Based on previous studies showing that deletion or pharmaceutical inhibition of insulin signaling impairs BAT differentiation and function, we assessed insulin signaling in brown preadipocytes and BAT in vivo. Overexpression of TRB3 in cells impaired insulin-stimulated IRS1 and Akt phosphorylation, whereas TRB3KO mice displayed improved IRS1 and Akt phosphorylation. Finally, deletion of IRS1 abolished the function of TRB3 to regulate BAT differentiation and metabolism. These data demonstrate that TRB3 inhibits insulin signaling in BAT, resulting in impaired differentiation and function. PMID:26801556

  20. On the representation of bicomplex pseudoanalytic functions by integro-differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglez, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We consider a class of bicomplex pseudoanalytic functions which can be characterized by the generalized Bers-Vekua equation D w =c w * with c =γ-1(D γ ) where D represents the generalized Cauchy-Riemann operator of bicomplex analysis and γ a suitable solution of the differential equation DD*U - (n(n + 1)/(z + z*)2)U = 0, n ∈ ℕ. Using a particular Bäcklund transformation we succeed finding explicit representations for the solutions w by means of certain integro-differential operators. These operators act on bicomplex holomorphic functions. Some cases where the function γ is of particular form are investigated in detail.

  1. A Conceptual Analysis of Differential Item Functioning in Terms of a Multidimensional Item Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to describe how group differences in distributions of abilities, which are distinct from the target ability, influence the probability of a correct item response. In the multidimensional approach, differential item functioning is considered a function of the educational histories of the examinees. (SLD)

  2. Building Mathematical Maturity in Calculus: Teaching Implicit Differentiation through a Review of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Angela; Phillippy, Doug

    2004-01-01

    A program on calculus is conducted, which helps students learn about inherent differentiation through a study of mathematical functions, while simultaneously reinforcing their understanding of functional concepts. This process develops their mathematical experience in the field of calculus and in other advanced quantitative programs.

  3. Detection of Gender-Based Differential Item Functioning in a Mathematics Performance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ning; Lane, Suzanne

    This study used three different differential item functioning (DIF) procedures to examine the extent to which items in a mathematics performance assessment functioned differently for matched gender groups. In addition to examining the appropriateness of individual items in terms of DIF with respect to gender, an attempt was made to identify…

  4. The method of local linear approximation in the theory of nonlinear functional-differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, Vasilii E

    2010-10-06

    Conditions for the existence of solutions to the nonlinear functional-differential equation (d{sup m}x(t))/dt{sup m} + (fx)(t)=h(t), t element of R in the space of functions bounded on the axes are obtained by using local linear approximation to the operator F. Bibliography: 21 items.

  5. Analysis of Sources of Latent Class Differential Item Functioning in International Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveri, Maria Elena; Ercikan, Kadriye; Zumbo, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated differential item functioning (DIF) and its sources using a latent class (LC) modeling approach. Potential sources of LC DIF related to instruction and teacher-related variables were investigated using substantive and three statistical approaches: descriptive discriminant function, multinomial logistic regression,…

  6. The Green's function of the second order differential operator with an involution and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsenbi, Abdizhahan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the Green's function of a boundary boundary value problem with an involution is constructed. Applying the Green's function, a formula for expansion in the eigenfunctions of the spectral problem for a second order differential equation with an involution involving boundary conditions of Dirichlet type is presented.

  7. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the Mental, Emotional, and Bodily Toughness Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yong; Mack, Mick G.; Ragan, Moira A.; Ragan, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this study the authors used differential item functioning analysis to examine if there were items in the Mental, Emotional, and Bodily Toughness Inventory functioning differently across gender and athletic membership. A total of 444 male (56.3%) and female (43.7%) participants (30.9% athletes and 69.1% non-athletes) responded to the Mental,…

  8. A Generalized Logistic Regression Procedure to Detect Differential Item Functioning among Multiple Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles; Beland, Sebastien; Gerard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension of the logistic regression procedure to identify dichotomous differential item functioning (DIF) in the presence of more than two groups of respondents. Starting from the usual framework of a single focal group, we propose a general approach to estimate the item response functions in each group and to test for the presence…

  9. Children with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome: Can We Differentiate Their Cognitive Profiles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planche, Pascale; Lemonnier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger's syndrome (AS) can be differentiated from each other and from typically developing children on their cognitive profiles. The present study included a total of 45 participants: children with autism (high-functioning autism or Asperger's…

  10. Differential regional effects of octreotide on human gastrointestinal motor function.

    PubMed Central

    von der Ohe, M R; Camilleri, M; Thomforde, G M; Klee, G G

    1995-01-01

    The effects of octreotide on regional motor function in the human gut are unclear. In a randomised, blinded study the effects of octreotide (50 micrograms, subcutaneously, three times daily) and placebo on gastric, small bowel, and colonic transit, and colonic motility and tone were assessed in 12 healthy volunteers whose colon had been cleansed. Octreotide accelerated initial gastric emptying (p = 0.05), inhibited small bowel transit (p < 0.01), and reduced ileocolonic bolus transfers (p < 0.05). Colonic transit was unaltered by octreotide; the postprandial colonic tonic response was inhibited (p < 0.05 v placebo), whereas colonic phasic pressure activity was increased by octreotide (p < 0.05 v placebo). These data support the use of octreotide in diarrhoeal states but not in diseases that cause small bowel stasis and bacterial overgrowth. Simultaneous measurements of colonic transit, tone, and phasic contractility are valid in studying the effects of pharmacological changes and may be applicable to the study of the human colon in health and disease. PMID:7797125

  11. Starches of varied digestibilities differentially modify intestinal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Lajvardi, A; Mazarin, G I; Gillespie, M B; Satchithanandam, S; Calvert, R J

    1993-12-01

    Starches of different digestibilities may enter the colon to different extents and alter colonic function. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed diets containing 25% cooked potato starch, arrowroot starch, high amylose cornstarch or raw potato starch for 6 wk. Fecal weight, transit time, colonic thymidine kinase activity (a marker for cell proliferation), and weight, starch content and pH of the cecum and proximal and distal colon were measured. Raw potato starch was much less completely digested than high amylose cornstarch, resulting in a 32-fold greater amount of undigested starch entering the cecum in the raw potato starch group. Both the high amylose cornstarch and raw potato starch diets significantly enhanced fecal weight and produced large intestinal hypertrophy, effects that were greatest in the raw potato starch group. Raw potato starch feeding was associated with the highest level of thymidine kinase activity, although the differences in thymidine kinase activity among the four groups were not significant. This diet also produced a 50% longer transit time. Entry of a large amount of raw potato starch into the colon resulted in greater luminal acidity, greater luminal bulk and slower transit. A much smaller amount of starch entered the colon in the high amylose cornstarch group and resulted in fecal bulking but no alteration in transit. PMID:8263598

  12. Systematically Differentiating Functions for Alternatively Spliced Isoforms through Integrating RNA-seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajasree; Wen, Yuchen; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Kretzler, Matthias; Guan, Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires ‘ground-truth’ functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the ‘responsible’ isoform(s) of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the ‘responsible’ isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions. PMID:24244129

  13. Oscillations of solutions of vector differential equations of parabolic type with functional arguments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, Emil; Yoshida, Norio

    2003-02-01

    Vector parabolic differential equations with functional arguments are studied and the oscillations of solutions of boundary value problems are investigated. Our approach is to reduce the oscillation problems to the nonexistence of positive solutions of scalar differential inequalities by employing the concept of H-oscillation introduced by Domslak (see: R. Courant, D. Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics, Vol. I, Interscience, New York, 1996), where H denotes a unit vector.

  14. Fisher information of special functions and second-order differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yáñez, R. J.; Sánchez-Moreno, P.; Zarzo, A.; Dehesa, J. S.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a basic question of analytic information theory, namely, the evaluation of the Fisher information and the relative Fisher information with respect to a non-negative function, for the probability distributions obtained by squaring the special functions of mathematical physics which are solutions of second-order differential equations. We obtain explicit expressions for these information-theoretic properties via the expectation values of the coefficients of the differential equation. We illustrate our approach for various nonrelativistic D-dimensional wavefunctions and some special functions of physicomathematical interest. Emphasis is made in the Nikiforov-Uvarov hypergeometric-type functions, which include and generalize the Hermite functions and the Gauss and Kummer hypergeometric functions, among others.

  15. Rectifying and negative differential resistance behaviors of a functionalized Tour wire: The position effects of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Gordon; Zhang, Zhenhua; Pan, Jinbo

    2011-09-01

    Based on Tour wire, we construct four D-π-A molecular devices with different positional functional groups, in an attempt to explore the position effects of functional groups on their electronic transport properties and to show that some interesting physical phenomena can emerge by only varying the position of functional groups. The first-principles calculations demonstrate that the position of functional groups can affect the rectifying behaviors (rectification direction and ratio) significantly and determines whether or not the negative differential resistance (NDR) can be observed as well as the physical origin of the NDR phenomenon.

  16. On Equiconvergence of Expansions in Trigonometric Fourier Series and in Principal Functions of Ordinary Differential Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagabov, A. I.

    1985-06-01

    A regularity concept is given for ordinary differential pencils of a general form in a space of vector-valued functions, and this concept is subjected to analysis. Theorems are established asserting that the Fourier series of an arbitrary vector-valued function in the system of eigenelements of the pencils is equiconvergent with the usual trigonometric Fourier series of the components of this vector-valued function. Bibliography: 7 titles.

  17. Normal Form of Saddle-Node-Hopf Bifurcation in Retarded Functional Differential Equations and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Heping; Jiang, Jiao; Song, Yongli

    In this paper, we firstly employ the normal form theory of delayed differential equations according to Faria and Magalhães to derive the normal form of saddle-node-Hopf bifurcation for the general retarded functional differential equations. Then, the dynamical behaviors of a Leslie-Gower predator-prey model with time delay and nonmonotonic functional response are considered. Specially, the dynamical classification near the saddle-node-Hopf bifurcation point is investigated by using the normal form and the center manifold approaches. Finally, the numerical simulations are employed to support the theoretical results.

  18. Regulation of CFTR expression and function during differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sood, R; Bear, C; Auerbach, W; Reyes, E; Jensen, T; Kartner, N; Riordan, J R; Buchwald, M

    1992-01-01

    CFTR, the protein defective in cystic fibrosis is regulated during differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. The undifferentiated cells (Caco-2 and HT-29) show a lower level of CFTR mRNA, while a 10-fold increase is seen in differentiated cells. These differences correlate well with those of other intestinal-specific genes, including sucrase-isomaltase, villin and alpha 1-antitrypsin, indicating that the regulation is cell specific. In Caco-2 cells the increase in CFTR mRNA cannot be accounted for by increased transcription of the gene. These data indicate that CFTR mRNA stabilizing factor(s) might be present in differentiated cells. The higher levels of CFTR mRNA in differentiated cells are accompanied by decreased protein levels, indicating, as well, involvement of translational control in the regulation of CFTR in these cells. Finally, fully differentiated cells show lowered levels of cyclic AMP-activated C1- transport, the characteristic function of CFTR. Thus, CFTR function in differentiated cells is modulated by a complex interaction of regulatory elements. Caco-2 and HT-29 cells provide a suitable in vitro system in which to study the mechanism of regulation of CFTR. Images PMID:1378393

  19. Quantitative neuroproteomics: classical and novel tools for studying neural differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Farina, Annarita; Vissers, Johannes P C; Chambery, Angela

    2011-03-01

    Mechanisms underlying neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation play a critical role in the formation and wiring of neuronal connections. This process involves the activation of multiple serial events, which guide the undifferentiated cells to different lineages via distinctive developmental programs, forming neuronal circuits and thus shaping the adult nervous system. Furthermore, alterations within these strictly regulated pathways can lead to severe neurological and psychiatric diseases. In this framework, the investigation of the high dynamic protein expression changes and other factors affecting protein functions, for example post-translational modifications, the alterations of protein interaction networks, is of pivotal importance for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell differentiation. More recently, proteomic studies in neuroscience ("neuroproteomics") are receiving increased interest for the primary understanding of the regulatory networks underlying neuronal differentiation processes. Besides the classical two-dimensional-based proteomic strategies, the emerging platforms for LC-MS shotgun proteomic analysis hold great promise in unraveling the molecular basis of neural stem cell differentiation. In this review, recent advancements in label-free LC-MS quantitative neuroproteomics are highlighted as a new tool for the study of neural differentiation and functions, in comparison to mass spectrometry-based labeling approaches. The more commonly used protein profiling strategies and model systems for the analysis of neural differentiation are also discussed, along with the challenging proteomic approaches aimed to analyze the nervous system-specific organelles, the neural cells secretome and the specific protein interaction networks. PMID:20352529

  20. Osteogenic Differentiation of MSC through Calcium Signaling Activation: Transcriptomics and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Viti, Federica; Landini, Martina; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Petecchia, Loredana; Milanesi, Luciano; Scaglione, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The culture of progenitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) onto osteoconductive materials to induce a proper osteogenic differentiation and mineralized matrix regeneration represents a promising and widely diffused experimental approach for tissue-engineering (TE) applications in orthopaedics. Among modern biomaterials, calcium phosphates represent the best bone substitutes, due to their chemical features emulating the mineral phase of bone tissue. Although many studies on stem cells differentiation mechanisms have been performed involving calcium-based scaffolds, results often focus on highlighting production of in vitro bone matrix markers and in vivo tissue ingrowth, while information related to the biomolecular mechanisms involved in the early cellular calcium-mediated differentiation is not well elucidated yet. Genetic programs for osteogenesis have been just partially deciphered, and the description of the different molecules and pathways operative in these differentiations is far from complete, as well as the activity of calcium in this process. The present work aims to shed light on the involvement of extracellular calcium in MSC differentiation: a better understanding of the early stage osteogenic differentiation program of MSC seeded on calcium-based biomaterials is required in order to develop optimal strategies to promote osteogenesis through the use of new generation osteoconductive scaffolds. A wide spectrum of analysis has been performed on time-dependent series: gene expression profiles are obtained from samples (MSC seeded on calcium-based scaffolds), together with related microRNAs expression and in vivo functional validation. On this basis, and relying on literature knowledge, hypotheses are made on the biomolecular players activated by the biomaterial calcium-phosphate component. Interestingly, a key role of miR-138 was highlighted, whose inhibition markedly increases osteogenic differentiation in vitro and enhance ectopic bone formation in vivo

  1. Low-shear modelled microgravity environment maintains morphology and differentiated functionality of primary porcine hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Leonard J; Walker, Simon W; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocytes cultured in conventional static culture rapidly lose polarity and differentiated function. This could be explained by gravity-induced sedimentation, which prevents formation of complete three-dimensional (3D) cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions and disrupts integrin-mediated signals (including the most abundant hepatic integrin alpha(5)beta(1)), important for cellular polarity and differentiation. Cell culture in a low fluid shear modelled microgravity (about 10(-2) g) environment promotes spatial colocation/self-aggregation of dissociated cells and induction of 3D differentiated liver morphology. Previously, we demonstrated the utility of a NASA rotary bioreactor in maintaining key metabolic functions and 3D aggregate formation of high-density primary porcine hepatocyte cultures over 21 days. Using serum-free chemically defined medium, without confounding interactions of exogenous bioscaffolding or bioenhancing surface materials, we investigated features of hepatic cellular polarity and differentiated functionality, including expression of hepatic integrin alpha(5), as markers of functional morphology. We report here that in the absence of exogenous biomatrix scaffolding, hepatocytes cultured in serum-free chemically defined medium in a microgravity environment rapidly (<24 h) form macroscopic (2-5 mm), compacted 3D hepatospheroid structures consisting of a shell of glycogen-positive viable cells circumscribing a core of eosinophilic cells. The spheroid shell layers exhibited ultrastructural, morphological and functional features of differentiated, polarized hepatic tissue including strong expression of the integrin alpha(5) subunit, functional bile canaliculi, albumin synthesis, and fine ultrastructure reminiscent of in vivo hepatic tissue. The low fluid shear microgravity environment may promote tissue-like self-organization of dissociated cells, and offer advantages over spheroids cultured in conventional formats to delineate optimal conditions for

  2. Recursive Partitioning to Identify Potential Causes of Differential Item Functioning in Cross-National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, W. Holmes; Hernández Finch, Maria E.; French, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment is key in score validation. When DIF is present scores may not accurately reflect the construct of interest for some groups of examinees, leading to incorrect conclusions from the scores. Given rising immigration, and the increased reliance of educational policymakers on cross-national assessments…

  3. Utility of the Mantel-Haenszel Procedure for Detecting Differential Item Functioning in Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidalgo, Angel M.; Ferreres, Doris; Muniz, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Sample-size restrictions limit the contingency table approaches based on asymptotic distributions, such as the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) procedure, for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) in many practical applications. Within this framework, the present study investigated the power and Type I error performance of empirical and inferential…

  4. Detecting Native Language Group Differences at the Subskills Level of Reading: A Differential Skill Functioning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hongli; Suen, Hoi K.

    2013-01-01

    Differential skill functioning (DSF) exists when examinees from different groups have different probabilities of successful performance in a certain subskill underlying the measured construct, given that they have the same ability on the overall construct. Using a DSF approach, this study examined the differences between two native language…

  5. An Examination of Differential Item Functioning on the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polikoff, Morgan S.; May, Henry; Porter, Andrew C.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Goldring, Ellen; Murphy, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education is a 360-degree assessment of the effectiveness of principals' learning-centered leadership behaviors. In this report, we present results from a differential item functioning (DIF) study of the assessment. Using data from a national field trial, we searched for evidence of DIF on school level,…

  6. Differential Item Functioning Detection across Two Methods of Defining Group Comparisons: Pairwise and Composite Group Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Halil Ibrahim; Huggins, Anne Corinne

    2015-01-01

    This study compares two methods of defining groups for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF): (a) pairwise comparisons and (b) composite group comparisons. We aim to emphasize and empirically support the notion that the choice of pairwise versus composite group definitions in DIF is a reflection of how one defines fairness in DIF…

  7. A Synthesis of the Peer-Reviewed Differential Bundle Functioning Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to present a synthesis of the peer-reviewed differential bundle functioning (DBF) research that has been conducted to date. A total of 16 studies were synthesized according to the following characteristics: tests used and learner groups, organizing principles used for developing bundles, DBF detection methods used,…

  8. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the 2003-04 NHANES Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yong; Zhu, Weimo

    2011-01-01

    Using differential item functioning (DIF) analyses, this study examined whether there were any DIF items in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) physical activity (PA) questionnaire. A subset of adult data from the 2003-04 NHANES study (n = 3,083) was used. PA items related to respondents' occupational, transportation,…

  9. The Use of Loglinear Models for Assessing Differential Item Functioning across Manifest and Latent Examinee Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelderman, Henk; Macready, George B.

    1990-01-01

    Loglinear latent class models are used to detect differential item functioning (DIF). Likelihood ratio tests for assessing the presence of various types of DIF are described, and these methods are illustrated through the analysis of a "real world" data set. (TJH)

  10. Cauchy problem and Green's functions for first order differential operators and algebraic quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlhoff, Rainer

    2011-02-15

    Existence and uniqueness of advanced and retarded fundamental solutions (Green's functions) and of global solutions to the Cauchy problem is proved for a general class of first order linear differential operators on vector bundles over globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds. This is a core ingredient to CAR-/CCR-algebraic constructions of quantum field theories on curved spacetimes, particularly for higher spin field equations.

  11. DIFFERENTIAL ITEM FUNCTIONING AT POST ASSESSMENT BETWEEN TREATMENT AND CONTROL GROUPS FROM AN INCREASE IN KNOWLEDGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been some concern that participation in an intervention and exposure to a measurement instrument can distort subsequent responses to a questionnaire, thereby biasing results. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analysis with Item Response Modeling (IRM) can test these effects by testing f...

  12. Assessing Motor Skills as a Differentiating Feature between High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Maria R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if motor skills could be used as a differentiating feature between Asperger's Disorder (AD) and High Functioning (HFA) in children under the age of 9 years, 0 months, in order to provide additional information regarding the usefulness and validity of distinguishing these two disorders. There is…

  13. RIM: A Random Item Mixture Model to Detect Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederickx, Sofie; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul; Magis, David

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology for detecting differential item functioning (DIF). We introduce a DIF model, called the random item mixture (RIM), that is based on a Rasch model with random item difficulties (besides the common random person abilities). In addition, a mixture model is assumed for the item difficulties such that the…

  14. A Robust Outlier Approach to Prevent Type I Error Inflation in Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The identification of differential item functioning (DIF) is often performed by means of statistical approaches that consider the raw scores as proxies for the ability trait level. One of the most popular approaches, the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method, belongs to this category. However, replacing the ability level by the simple raw score is a source…

  15. Gender-Related Differential Item Functioning on a Middle-School Mathematics Performance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Suzanne; And Others

    This study examined gender-related differential item functioning (DIF) using a mathematics performance assessment, the QUASAR Cognitive Assessment Instrument (QCAI), administered to middle school students. The QCAI was developed for the Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Student Achievement and Reading (QUASAR) project, which focuses on…

  16. Differentiation of Cognitive Abilities as a Function of Neuroticism Level: A Measurement Equivalence/Invariance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaccio, Silvia; Reeve, Charlie L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the differentiation of cognitive abilities as a function of neuroticism. Specifically, we examine Eysenck and White's [Eysenck, H. J., and White, P. O. (1964). Personality and the measurement of intelligence. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 24, 197-201.] hypothesis that cognitive abilities are less differentiated…

  17. Potential Sources of Differential Item Functioning in the Adaptation of Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elosua, Paula; Lopez-Jauregui, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    This report shows a classification of differential item functioning (DIF) sources that have an effect on the adaptation of tests. This classification is based on linguistic and cultural criteria. Four general DIF sources are distinguished: cultural relevance, translation problems, morph syntactical differences, and semantic differences. The…

  18. Identification of Differential Item Functioning in Multiple-Group Settings: A Multivariate Outlier Detection Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; De Boeck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We focus on the identification of differential item functioning (DIF) when more than two groups of examinees are considered. We propose to consider items as elements of a multivariate space, where DIF items are outlying elements. Following this approach, the situation of multiple groups is a quite natural case. A robust statistics technique is…

  19. Comparison of Differential Item Functioning Determination Techniques: HGLM, LR and IRT-LR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, Tulin; Kelecioglu, Hulya

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine differential item functioning (DIF) by hierarchical linear modeling (HGLM) on test items and comparing these results by the DIF results determined by logistic regression (LR) and IRT-likelihood ratio (IRT-LR) techniques. Investigating the concordance between the techniques in determining the items with DIF,…

  20. Correlates of Communalities as Matching Variables in Differential Item Functioning Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, Huseyin H.; Yildirim, Selda

    2011-01-01

    Multivariate matching in Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analyses may contribute to understand the sources of DIF. In this context, detecting appropriate additional matching variables is a crucial issue. This present article argues that the variables which are correlated with communalities in item difficulties can be used as an additional…

  1. Group-Specific Effects of Matching Subtest Contamination on the Identification of Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiffer, Elizabeth Ann

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) simulation study was conducted to explore the type and level of impact that contamination had on type I error and power rates in DIF analyses when the suspect item favored the same or opposite group as the DIF items in the matching subtest. Type I error and power rates were displayed separately for the…

  2. Explaining Crossing DIF in Polytomous Items Using Differential Step Functioning Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.

    2010-01-01

    Crossing, or intersecting, differential item functioning (DIF) is a form of nonuniform DIF that exists when the sign of the between-group difference in expected item performance changes across the latent trait continuum. The presence of crossing DIF presents a problem for many statistics developed for evaluating DIF because positive and negative…

  3. Parent Ratings of ADHD Symptoms: Generalized Partial Credit Model Analysis of Differential Item Functioning across Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rapson

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Generalized partial credit model, which is based on item response theory (IRT), was used to test differential item functioning (DIF) for the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.), inattention (IA), and hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI) symptoms across boys and girls. Method: To accomplish this, parents completed…

  4. Investigating Gender Differential Item Functioning across Countries and Test Languages for PISA Science Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Luc T.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses PISA cycle 3 field trial data to investigate the relationships between gender differential item functioning (DIF) across countries and test languages for science items and their formats and the four other dimensions defined in PISA framework: focus, context, competency, and scientific knowledge. The data used were collected from 60…

  5. Myogenic Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells That Lack a Functional Pax7 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinska, Areta M.; Grabowska, Iwona; Archacka, Karolina; Bem, Joanna; Swierczek, Barbara; Helinska, Anita; Streminska, Wladyslawa; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Koblowska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Overexpression of Pax7 has been shown to promote the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. However, the effects of the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have not yet been directly tested. Herein, we studied mouse stem cells that lacked a functional Pax7 gene and characterized the differentiation of these stem cells under conditions that promoted the derivation of myoblasts in vitro. We analyzed the expression of myogenic factors, such as myogenic regulatory factors and muscle-specific microRNAs, in wild-type and mutant cells. Finally, we compared the transcriptome of both types of cells and did not find substantial differences in the expression of genes related to the regulation of myogenesis. As a result, we showed that the absence of functional Pax7 does not prevent the in vitro myogenic differentiation of ESCs. PMID:26649785

  6. Quantitative characterization of x-ray differential interference contrast microscopy using modulation transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Chang, Chang

    2011-08-01

    Performance of two types of differential interference contrast objectives, i.e., the XOR pattern and the zone-plate doublet, is quantitatively characterized and compared using modulation transfer function. Effects of partial coherence, finite absorption and phase in a complex object, as well as bias retardation are also examined.

  7. Quantitative characterization of x-ray differential interference contrast microscopy using modulation transfer function.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Chang, Chang

    2011-08-01

    Performance of two types of differential interference contrast objectives, i.e., the XOR pattern and the zone-plate doublet, is quantitatively characterized and compared using modulation transfer function. Effects of partial coherence, finite absorption and phase in a complex object, as well as bias retardation are also examined. PMID:21934894

  8. Evaluation of Model Selection Strategies for Cross-Level Two-Way Differential Item Functioning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patarapichayatham, Chalie; Kamata, Akihito; Kanjanawasee, Sirichai

    2012-01-01

    Model specification issues on the cross-level two-way differential item functioning model were previously investigated by Patarapichayatham et al. (2009). Their study clarified that an incorrect model specification can easily lead to biased estimates of key parameters. The objective of this article is to provide further insights on the issue by…

  9. Differential Tendencies To Guess as a Function of Gender and Lingual-Cultural Reference Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafni, Naomi; Estela, Melamed

    The objective of this study was to investigate differential tendencies to avoid guessing as a function of three variables: (1) lingual-cultural-group; (2) gender; and (3) examination year. The Psychometric Entrance Test (PET) for universities in Israel was used, which is administered in Hebrew, Arabic, English, French, Spanish, and Russian. The…

  10. Differential Effects of a Tier Two Behavior Intervention Based on Function of Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Kent; Campbell, Amy L.; Carter, Deborah Russell; Dickey, Celeste Rossetto

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a tier two daily behavior card intervention and differential effects based on function of problem behavior. The participants were 36 elementary school students nominated for additional intervention beyond universal School-Wide Positive Behavior Support. Measures included…

  11. Assessing the Item Response Theory with Covariate (IRT-C) Procedure for Ascertaining Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the item response theory with covariates (IRT-C) procedure for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) without preknowledge of anchor items (Tay, Newman, & Vermunt, 2011). This procedure begins with a fully constrained baseline model, and candidate items are tested for uniform and/or nonuniform DIF using the Wald statistic.…

  12. Detecting and Analyzing Differential Item Functioning in an Essay Test Using the Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steven; Walker-Bartnick, Leslie

    A procedure was developed to detect differential item functioning (DIF) in a standardized essay test using the Partial Credit Model, the general polychotomous form of the Rasch model. Using a panel of experts in the writing process, hypothesized explanations for DIF at some score points were developed. Data for the study included averaged…

  13. Parent Ratings of ADHD Symptoms: Differential Symptom Functioning across Malaysian Malay and Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair

    2008-01-01

    This study examined differential symptom functioning (DSF) in ADHD symptoms across Malay and Chinese children in Malaysia. Malay (N = 571) and Chinese (N = 254) parents completed the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, which lists the DSM-IV ADHD symptoms. DSF was examined using the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) structural equation…

  14. The differentiation and protective function of cytolytic CD4 T cells in influenza infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections...

  15. Testing for Nonuniform Differential Item Functioning with Multiple Indicator Multiple Cause Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.; Grimm, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    In extant literature, multiple indicator multiple cause (MIMIC) models have been presented for identifying items that display uniform differential item functioning (DIF) only, not nonuniform DIF. This article addresses, for apparently the first time, the use of MIMIC models for testing both uniform and nonuniform DIF with categorical indicators. A…

  16. A Comparison of Four Differential Item Functioning Procedures in the Presence of Multidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastug, Özlem Yesim Özbek

    2016-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF), or item bias, is a relatively new concept. It has been one of the most controversial and the most studied subject in measurement theory. DIF occurs when people who have the same ability level but from different groups have a different probability of a correct response. According to Item Response Theory (IRT),…

  17. Detection of Differential Item Functioning for More than Two Groups: A Monte Carlo Comparison of Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, W. Holmes

    2016-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment is a crucial component in test construction, serving as the primary way in which instrument developers ensure that measures perform in the same way for multiple groups within the population. When such is not the case, scores may not accurately reflect the trait of interest for all individuals in the…

  18. Comparing Methods of Assessing Differential Item Functioning in a Computerized Adaptive Testing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Pui-Wa; Chen, Shu-Ying; Yu, Lan

    2006-01-01

    Mantel-Haenszel and SIBTEST, which have known difficulty in detecting non-unidirectional differential item functioning (DIF), have been adapted with some success for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). This study adapts logistic regression (LR) and the item-response-theory-likelihood-ratio test (IRT-LRT), capable of detecting both unidirectional…

  19. Iterative Purification and Effect Size Use with Logistic Regression for Differential Item Functioning Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Brian F.; Maller, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Two unresolved implementation issues with logistic regression (LR) for differential item functioning (DIF) detection include ability purification and effect size use. Purification is suggested to control inaccuracies in DIF detection as a result of DIF items in the ability estimate. Additionally, effect size use may be beneficial in controlling…

  20. The Matching Criterion Purification for Differential Item Functioning Analyses in a Large-Scale Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, HyeSun; Geisinger, Kurt F.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the impact of matching criterion purification on the accuracy of differential item functioning (DIF) detection in large-scale assessments. The three matching approaches for DIF analyses (block-level matching, pooled booklet matching, and equated pooled booklet matching) were employed with the Mantel-Haenszel…

  1. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  2. The MIMIC Method with Scale Purification for Detecting Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin; Yang, Chih-Chien

    2009-01-01

    This study implements a scale purification procedure onto the standard MIMIC method for differential item functioning (DIF) detection and assesses its performance through a series of simulations. It is found that the MIMIC method with scale purification (denoted as M-SP) outperforms the standard MIMIC method (denoted as M-ST) in controlling…

  3. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of Math Performance of Hispanic, Asian, and White NAEP Respondents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Donald; Chan, Kaling

    The differential item functioning of mathematics performance of Hispanic, Asian, and White students on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) was studied, using a modification of the Mantel-Haenszel Procedure. The sample for grades 3, 7, and 11, respectively, included: (1) 1,367, 1,570, and 1,580 Whites; (2) 265, 613, and 760…

  4. An Introduction to Missing Data in the Context of Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces practitioners and researchers to the topic of missing data in the context of differential item functioning (DIF), reviews the current literature on the issue, discusses implications of the review, and offers suggestions for future research. A total of nine studies were reviewed. All of these studies determined what effect…

  5. Assessment of Differential Item Functioning under Cognitive Diagnosis Models: The DINA Model Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of differential item functioning (DIF) is routinely conducted to ensure test fairness and validity. Although many DIF assessment methods have been developed in the context of classical test theory and item response theory, they are not applicable for cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), as the underlying latent attributes of CDMs are…

  6. Does Gender-Specific Differential Item Functioning Affect the Structure in Vocational Interest Inventories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beinicke, Andrea; Pässler, Katja; Hell, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates consequences of eliminating items showing gender-specific differential item functioning (DIF) on the psychometric structure of a standard RIASEC interest inventory. Holland's hexagonal model was tested for structural invariance using a confirmatory methodological approach (confirmatory factor analysis and randomization…

  7. Power and Sample Size Calculations for Logistic Regression Tests for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Zhushan

    2014-01-01

    Logistic regression is a popular method for detecting uniform and nonuniform differential item functioning (DIF) effects. Theoretical formulas for the power and sample size calculations are derived for likelihood ratio tests and Wald tests based on the asymptotic distribution of the maximum likelihood estimators for the logistic regression model.…

  8. Studying Differential Item Functioning via Latent Variable Modeling: A Note on a Multiple-Testing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Lee, Chun-Lung; Chang, Chi

    2013-01-01

    This note is concerned with a latent variable modeling approach for the study of differential item functioning in a multigroup setting. A multiple-testing procedure that can be used to evaluate group differences in response probabilities on individual items is discussed. The method is readily employed when the aim is also to locate possible…

  9. Content Analysis of Gender-Related Differential Item Functioning TIMSS Items in Mathematics in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innabi, Hanan; Dodeen, Hamzeh

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze items that exhibit gender-related Differential Item Functioning (DIF) in Mathematics in Jordan. Data was taken from the TIMSS 1999 of Jordan, which includes responses of 5, 299 eighth grade students. Mantel-Haenszel (MH) DIF procedure was applied to 124 multiple-choice items. The results showed that 37 items…

  10. Demonstrating the Utility of a Multilevel Model in the Assessment of Differential Item Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommerich, Mary

    When tests contain few items, observed score may not be an accurate reflection of true score, and the Mantel Haenszel (MH) statistic may perform poorly in detecting differential item functioning. Applications of the MH procedure in such situations require an alternate strategy; one such strategy is to include background variables in the matching…

  11. An Analysis of Sex-Related Differential Item Functioning in Attitude Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodeen, Hamzeh; Johanson, George A.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzed and classified items that display sex-related differential item functioning (DIF) in attitude assessment. Analyzed 982 items, from 23 real data sets, that measure attitudes. Found that sex DIF is common in attitude scales: more than 27 percent of items showed DIF related to sex, 15 percent of the items exhibited moderate to large DIF, and…

  12. Examining the Relationship between Race-Based Differential Item Functioning and Item Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherbaum, Charles A.; Goldstein, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research examining racial differences on standardized cognitive tests has focused on the impact of test item difficulty. Studies using data from the SAT and GRE have reported a correlation between item difficulty and differential item functioning (DIF) such that minority test takers are less likely than majority test takers to respond…

  13. Item Purification in Differential Item Functioning Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    For this dissertation, four item purification procedures were implemented onto the generalized linear mixed model for differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, and the performance of these item purification procedures was investigated through a series of simulations. Among the four procedures, forward and generalized linear mixed model (GLMM)…

  14. A Comparison of Adjacent Categories and Cumulative Differential Step Functioning Effect Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattamorta, Karina A.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2012-01-01

    The study of measurement invariance in polytomous items that targets individual score levels is known as differential step functioning (DSF). The analysis of DSF requires the creation of a set of dichotomizations of the item response variable. There are two primary approaches for creating the set of dichotomizations to conduct a DSF analysis: the…

  15. High-Stakes Tests for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities: Disability-Based Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anjorin, Idayatou

    2009-01-01

    Students with learning disabilities are increasingly included in state accountability systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate disability-based differential item functioning (DIF) on a statewide high-stakes mathematics test administered in the Spring of 2003 to all students seeking a high-school diploma in one state in the eastern…

  16. Evaluation of Two Types of Differential Item Functioning in Factor Mixture Models with Binary Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, HwaYoung; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Conventional differential item functioning (DIF) detection methods (e.g., the Mantel-Haenszel test) can be used to detect DIF only across observed groups, such as gender or ethnicity. However, research has found that DIF is not typically fully explained by an observed variable. True sources of DIF may include unobserved, latent variables, such as…

  17. Integrin-Linked Kinase Is Indispensable for Keratinocyte Differentiation and Epidermal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Leclerc, Valerie; Dagnino, Lina

    2016-02-01

    A functional permeability barrier is essential to prevent the passage of water and electrolytes, macromolecules, and pathogens through the epidermis. This is accomplished in terminally differentiated keratinocytes through formation of a cornified envelope and the assembly of tight intercellular junctions. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a scaffold protein essential for hair follicle morphogenesis and epidermal attachment to the basement membrane. However, the biological functions of ILK in differentiated keratinocytes remain poorly understood. Furthermore, whether ILK is implicated in keratinocyte differentiation and intercellular junction formation has remained an unresolved issue. Here we describe a pivotal role for ILK in keratinocyte differentiation responses to increased extracellular Ca(2+), regulation of adherens and tight junction assembly, and the formation of an outside-in permeability barrier toward macromolecules. In the absence of ILK, the calcium sensing receptor, E-cadherin, and ZO-1 fail to translocate to the cell membrane, through mechanisms that involve abnormalities in microtubules and in RhoA activation. In situ, ILK-deficient epidermis exhibits reduced tight junction formation and increased outside-in permeability to a dextran tracer, indicating reduced barrier properties toward macromolecules. Therefore, ILK is an essential component of keratinocyte differentiation programs that contribute to epidermal integrity and the establishment of its barrier properties. PMID:26967476

  18. PTPN13 regulates cellular signalling and β-catenin function during megakaryocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sardina, José L; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Prieto-Bermejo, Rodrigo; Sánchez-Sánchez, Beatriz; Pérez-Fernández, Alejandro; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Quintales, Luis; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús; Llanillo, Marcial; Antequera, Francisco; Hernández-Hernández, Angel

    2014-12-01

    PTPN13 is a high-molecular weight intracellular phosphatase with several isoforms that exhibits a highly modular structure. Although in recent years different roles have been described for PTPN13, we are still far from understanding its function in cell biology. Here we show that PTPN13 expression is activated during megakaryocytic differentiation at the protein and mRNA level. Our results show that the upregulation of PTPN13 inhibits megakaryocytic differentiation, while PTPN13 silencing triggers differentiation. The ability of PTPN13 to alter megakaryocytic differentiation can be explained by its capacity to regulate ERK and STAT signalling. Interestingly, the silencing of β-catenin produced the same effect as PTPN13 downregulation. We demonstrate that both proteins coimmunoprecipitate and colocalise. Moreover, we provide evidence showing that PTPN13 can regulate β-catenin phosphorylation, stability and transcriptional activity. Therefore, the ability of PTPN13 to control megakaryocytic differentiation must be intimately linked to the regulation of β-catenin function. Moreover, our results show for the first time that PTPN13 is stabilised upon Wnt signalling, which makes PTPN13 an important player in canonical Wnt signalling. Our results show that PTPN13 behaves as an important regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation in cell lines and also in murine haematopoietic progenitors. This importance can be explained by the ability of PTPN13 to regulate cellular signalling, and especially through the regulation of β-catenin stability and function. Our results hold true for different megakaryocytic cell lines and also for haematopoietic progenitors, suggesting that these two proteins may play a relevant role during in vivo megakaryopoiesis. PMID:25193362

  19. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinju; Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Stegeman, Samantha; Pfaff-Amesse, Teresa; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wenfeng; Amesse, Lawrence; Chen, Yanfang

    2012-01-01

    Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs). The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs) has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs). In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29) and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34) expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO) for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1) MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation) accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2) expression; 2) The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm) and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation); 3) Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4) Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system) as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production. PMID:22952951

  20. Exponential rational function method for space-time fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Esin; Kaplan, Melike; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, exponential rational function method is applied to obtain analytical solutions of the space-time fractional Fokas equation, the space-time fractional Zakharov Kuznetsov Benjamin Bona Mahony, and the space-time fractional coupled Burgers' equations. As a result, some exact solutions for them are successfully established. These solutions are constructed in fractional complex transform to convert fractional differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The fractional derivatives are described in Jumarie's modified Riemann-Liouville sense. The exact solutions obtained by the proposed method indicate that the approach is easy to implement and effective.

  1. Viscoelastic Properties of Differentiating Blood Cells Are Fate- and Function-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Whyte, Graeme; Chalut, Kevin; Pagliara, Stefano; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Fiddler, Christine; Paschke, Stephan; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Guck, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Although cellular mechanical properties are known to alter during stem cell differentiation, understanding of the functional relevance of such alterations is incomplete. Here, we show that during the course of differentiation of human myeloid precursor cells into three different lineages, the cells alter their viscoelastic properties, measured using an optical stretcher, to suit their ultimate fate and function. Myeloid cells circulating in blood have to be advected through constrictions in blood vessels, engendering the need for compliance at short time-scales (differentiated cell types reduce their steady-state viscosity by more than 50% and show over 140% relative increase in their ability to migrate through tissue-like pores at long time-scales (>minutes), compared to undifferentiated cells. These findings suggest that reduction in steady-state viscosity is a physiological adaptation for enhanced migration through tissues. Our results indicate that the material properties of cells define their function, can be used as a cell differentiation marker and could serve as target for novel therapies. PMID:23028868

  2. Temperament and arousal systems: A new synthesis of differential psychology and functional neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Trofimova, Irina; Robbins, Trevor W

    2016-05-01

    This paper critically reviews the unidimensional construct of General Arousal as utilised by models of temperament in differential psychology for example, to underlie 'Extraversion'. Evidence suggests that specialization within monoamine neurotransmitter systems contrasts with the attribution of a "general arousal" of the Ascending Reticular Activating System. Experimental findings show specialized roles of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin systems in hypothetically mediating three complementary forms of arousal that are similar to three functional blocks described in classical models of behaviour within kinesiology, clinical neuropsychology, psychophysiology and temperament research. In spite of functional diversity of monoamine receptors, we suggest that their functionality can be classified using three universal aspects of actions related to expansion, to selection-integration and to maintenance of chosen behavioural alternatives. Monoamine systems also differentially regulate analytic vs. routine aspects of activities at cortical and striatal neural levels. A convergence between main temperament models in terms of traits related to described functional aspects of behavioural arousal also supports the idea of differentiation between these aspects analysed here in a functional perspective. PMID:26969100

  3. Analytic Solutions of a Second-Order Iterative Functional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingxia

    In this paper, the existence of analytic solutions of an iterative functional differential equation is studied. We reduce this problem to finding analytic solutions of a functional differential equation without iteration of the unknown function. For technical reasons, in previous work the constant α given in Schröder transformation is required to fulfill that α is off the unit circle or lies on the circle with the Diophantine condition. In this paper, we break the restraint of the Diophantine condition and obtain results of analytic solutions in the case of α at resonance, i.e., at a root of the unity and the case of α near resonance under the Brjuno condition.

  4. Functional maintenance of differentiated embryoid bodies in microfluidic systems: a platform for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A; Anchan, Raymond M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-03-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30-120 pg/ml and 150-450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  5. Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 and -2 Function also as Modulators for Dictyostelium Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Kubohara, Yuzuru

    2009-01-01

    Background In the early stages of development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, chemotaxis toward cAMP plays a pivotal role in organizing discrete cells into a multicellular structure. In this process, a series of signaling molecules, such as G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors for cAMP, phosphatidylinositol metabolites, and cyclic nucleotides, function as the signal transducers for controlling dynamics of cytoskeleton. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 and -2 (DIF-1 and DIF-2) were originally identified as the factors (chlorinated alkylphenones) that induce Dictyostelium stalk cell differentiation, but it remained unknown whether the DIFs had any other physiologic functions. Methodology/Principal Findings To further elucidate the functions of DIFs, in the present study we investigated their effects on chemotaxis under various conditions. Quite interestingly, in shallow cAMP gradients, DIF-1 suppressed chemotaxis whereas DIF-2 promoted it greatly. Analyses with various mutants revealed that DIF-1 may inhibit chemotaxis, at least in part, via GbpB (a phosphodiesterase) and a decrease in the intracellular cGMP concentration ([cGMP]i). DIF-2, by contrast, may enhance chemotaxis, at least in part, via RegA (another phosphodiesterase) and an increase in [cGMP]i. Using null mutants for DimA and DimB, the transcription factors that are required for DIF-dependent prestalk differentiation, we also showed that the mechanisms for the modulation of chemotaxis by DIFs differ from those for the induction of cell differentiation by DIFs, at least in part. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that DIF-1 and DIF-2 function as negative and positive modulators for Dictyostelium chemotaxis, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report in any organism of physiologic modulators (small molecules) for chemotaxis having differentiation-inducing activity. PMID:19684855

  6. Functional Maintenance of Differentiated Embryoid Bodies in Microfluidic Systems: A Platform for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S.; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D.; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30–120 pg/ml and 150–450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  7. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1988-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  8. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  9. Dynamic Functional Connectomics Signatures for Characterization and Differentiation of PTSD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Zhu, Dajiang; Jiang, Xi; Jin, Changfeng; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Xiaoping; Li, Jingjiang; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Functional connectomes have been recently shown to be powerful in characterizing brain conditions. However, many previous studies assumed temporal stationarity of functional connectomes, while their temporal dynamics are rarely explored. Here, based on the structural connectomes constructed from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, functional connectomes are derived from resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) data and are then temporally divided into quasi-stable segments via a sliding time window approach. After integrating and pooling over a large number of those temporally quasi-stable functional connectome segments from 44 post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients and 51 healthy controls, common functional connectome (CFC) patterns are derived via effective dictionary learning and sparse coding algorithms. It is found that there are 16 CFC patterns that are reproducible across healthy controls, and interestingly, two additional CFC patterns with altered connectivity patterns (termed signature functional connectome (SFC) here) exist dominantly in PTSD subjects. These two SFC patterns alone can successfully differentiate 80% of PTSD subjects from healthy controls with only 2% false positive. Furthermore, the temporal transition dynamics of CFC patterns in PTSD subjects are substantially different from those in healthy controls. These results have been replicated in separate testing datasets, suggesting that dynamic functional connectomics signatures can effectively characterize and differentiate PTSD patients. PMID:23671011

  10. Functional network analysis of genes differentially expressed during xylogenesis in soc1ful woody Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Davin, Nicolas; Edger, Patrick P; Hefer, Charles A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Schuetz, Mathias; Smets, Erik; Myburg, Alexander A; Douglas, Carl J; Schranz, Michael E; Lens, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Many plant genes are known to be involved in the development of cambium and wood, but how the expression and functional interaction of these genes determine the unique biology of wood remains largely unknown. We used the soc1ful loss of function mutant - the woodiest genotype known in the otherwise herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis - to investigate the expression and interactions of genes involved in secondary growth (wood formation). Detailed anatomical observations of the stem in combination with mRNA sequencing were used to assess transcriptome remodeling during xylogenesis in wild-type and woody soc1ful plants. To interpret the transcriptome changes, we constructed functional gene association networks of differentially expressed genes using the STRING database. This analysis revealed functionally enriched gene association hubs that are differentially expressed in herbaceous and woody tissues. In particular, we observed the differential expression of genes related to mechanical stress and jasmonate biosynthesis/signaling during wood formation in soc1ful plants that may be an effect of greater tension within woody tissues. Our results suggest that habit shifts from herbaceous to woody life forms observed in many angiosperm lineages could have evolved convergently by genetic changes that modulate the gene expression and interaction network, and thereby redeploy the conserved wood developmental program. PMID:26952251

  11. Divergent regulation of functionally distinct γ-tubulin complexes during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Muroyama, Andrew; Seldin, Lindsey; Lechler, Terry

    2016-06-20

    Differentiation induces the formation of noncentrosomal microtubule arrays in diverse tissues. The formation of these arrays requires loss of microtubule-organizing activity (MTOC) at the centrosome, but the mechanisms regulating this transition remain largely unexplored. Here, we use the robust loss of centrosomal MTOC activity in the epidermis to identify two pools of γ-tubulin that are biochemically and functionally distinct and differentially regulated. Nucleation-competent CDK5RAP2-γ-tubulin complexes were maintained at centrosomes upon initial epidermal differentiation. In contrast, Nedd1-γ-tubulin complexes did not promote nucleation but were required for anchoring of microtubules, a previously uncharacterized activity for this complex. Cell cycle exit specifically triggered loss of Nedd1-γ-tubulin complexes, providing a mechanistic link connecting MTOC activity and differentiation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that distinct γ-tubulin complexes regulate different microtubule behaviors at the centrosome and show that differential regulation of these complexes drives loss of centrosomal MTOC activity. PMID:27298324

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentiating to Adipocytes Accumulate Autophagic Vesicles Instead of Functional Lipid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Gruia, Alexandra T; Suciu, Maria; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Azghadi, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Cristea, Mirabela I; Nica, Dragos V; Vaduva, Adrian; Muntean, Danina; Mic, Ani Aurora; Mic, Felix A

    2016-04-01

    Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) can easily be differentiated into a variety of cells. In vivo transplantation of BMSCs-differentiated cells has had limited success, suggesting that these cells may not be fully compatible with the cells they are intended to replace in vivo. We investigated the structural and functional features of BMSCs-derived adipocytes as compared with adipocytes from adipose tissue, and the structure and functionality of lipid vesicles formed during BMSCs differentiation to adipocytes. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed fatty acid composition of BMSCs-derived adipocytes and adipocytes from the adipose tissue to be very different, as is the lipid rafts composition, caveolin-1 expression, caveolae distribution in their membranes, and the pattern of expression of fatty acid elongases. Confocal microscopy confirmed the absence from BMSCs-derived adipocytes of markers of lipid droplets. BMSCs-derived adipocytes cannot convert deuterated glucose into deuterated species of fatty acids and cannot uptake the deuterated fatty acid-bovine serum albumin complexes from the culture medium, suggesting that intra-cellular accumulation of lipids does not occur by lipogenesis. We noted that BMSCs differentiation to adipocytes is accompanied by an increase in autophagy. Autophagic vesicles accumulate in the cytoplasm of BMSCs-derived adipocytes and their size and distribution resembles that of Nile Red-stained lipid vesicles. Stimulation of autophagy in BMSCs triggers the intra-cellular accumulation of lipids, while inhibition of autophagy prevents this accumulation. In conclusion, differentiation of BMSCs-derived adipocytes leads to intra-cellular accumulation of autophagic vesicles rather than functional lipid droplets, suggesting that these cells are not authentic adipocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 863-875, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26332160

  13. A parsimonious statistical method to detect groupwise differentially expressed functional connectivity networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; Kang, Jian; Xing, Yishi; Wang, Guoqing

    2015-12-01

    Group-level functional connectivity analyses often aim to detect the altered connectivity patterns between subgroups with different clinical or psychological experimental conditions, for example, comparing cases and healthy controls. We present a new statistical method to detect differentially expressed connectivity networks with significantly improved power and lower false-positive rates. The goal of our method was to capture most differentially expressed connections within networks of constrained numbers of brain regions (by the rule of parsimony). By virtue of parsimony, the false-positive individual connectivity edges within a network are effectively reduced, whereas the informative (differentially expressed) edges are allowed to borrow strength from each other to increase the overall power of the network. We develop a test statistic for each network in light of combinatorics graph theory, and provide p-values for the networks (in the weak sense) by using permutation test with multiple-testing adjustment. We validate and compare this new approach with existing methods, including false discovery rate and network-based statistic, via simulation studies and a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging case-control study. The results indicate that our method can identify differentially expressed connectivity networks, whereas existing methods are limited. PMID:26416398

  14. An Efficient Spectral Method for Ordinary Differential Equations with Rational Function Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Torres, David; Hagstrom, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    We present some relations that allow the efficient approximate inversion of linear differential operators with rational function coefficients. We employ expansions in terms of a large class of orthogonal polynomial families, including all the classical orthogonal polynomials. These families obey a simple three-term recurrence relation for differentiation, which implies that on an appropriately restricted domain the differentiation operator has a unique banded inverse. The inverse is an integration operator for the family, and it is simply the tridiagonal coefficient matrix for the recurrence. Since in these families convolution operators (i.e. matrix representations of multiplication by a function) are banded for polynomials, we are able to obtain a banded representation for linear differential operators with rational coefficients. This leads to a method of solution of initial or boundary value problems that, besides having an operation count that scales linearly with the order of truncation N, is computationally well conditioned. Among the applications considered is the use of rational maps for the resolution of sharp interior layers.

  15. A Parsimonious Statistical Method to Detect Groupwise Differentially Expressed Functional Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; Kang, Jian; Xing, Yishi; Wang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Group-level functional connectivity analyses often aim to detect the altered connectivity patterns between subgroups with different clinical or psychological experimental conditions, for example, comparing cases and healthy controls. We present a new statistical method to detect differentially expressed connectivity networks with significantly improved power and lower false-positive rates. The goal of our method was to capture most differentially expressed connections within networks of constrained numbers of brain regions (by the rule of parsimony). By virtue of parsimony, the false-positive individual connectivity edges within a network are effectively reduced, whereas the informative (differentially expressed) edges are allowed to borrow strength from each other to increase the overall power of the network. We develop a test statistic for each network in light of combinatorics graph theory, and provide p-values for the networks (in the weak sense) by using permutation test with multiple-testing adjustment. We validate and compare this new approach with existing methods, including false discovery rate and network-based statistic, via simulation studies and a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging case–control study. The results indicate that our method can identify differentially expressed connectivity networks, whereas existing methods are limited. PMID:26416398

  16. A Comparison of Unidimensional and Three-Dimensional Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Two-Dimensional Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Teresa K.; Oshima, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    Oshima, Raju, and Flowers demonstrated the use of an item response theory-based technique for analyzing differential item function (DIF) and differential test function for dichotomously scored data that are intended to be multidimensional. Their study assumed that the number of intended-to-be measured dimensions was correctly identified. In…

  17. Using Item Response Theory and Model-Data Fit to Conceptualize Differential Item and Person Functioning for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhard, George, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to describe a conceptual framework for examining differential item functioning (DIF) and differential person functioning (DPF) as types of model-data misfit within the context of assessing students with disabilities. Specifically, DIF and DPF can be viewed through the lens of residual analyses. Residual analyses…

  18. It Might Not Make a Big DIF: Improved Differential Test Functioning Statistics That Account for Sampling Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, R. Philip; Counsell, Alyssa; Flora, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Differential test functioning, or DTF, occurs when one or more items in a test demonstrate differential item functioning (DIF) and the aggregate of these effects are witnessed at the test level. In many applications, DTF can be more important than DIF when the overall effects of DIF at the test level can be quantified. However, optimal statistical…

  19. Differential relationships between personal and community stressors and children's neurocognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Diana; Warner, Tara; Krebs, Christopher; Trevarthen, Nancy; Flannery, Barbara; Hammond, Jane

    2009-11-01

    Early adversity can alter development of neurocognition, including executive cognitive and emotional regulatory functions. This is the first study to explore differential relationships between personal (physical and emotional abuse and neglect, school and parental stressors) and community (neighborhood problems and witnessing neighborhood violence) stressors and neurocognition. Predominantly Latino children (n = 553) aged 10 to 12 years completed tasks measuring intelligence, impulsivity, problem solving, cognitive flexibility, decision making, and emotion attributions. Adjusting for age and parent education, bivariate regression analyses found exposure to personal stressors to be associated with relative deficits in at least one neurocognitive function. Community stressors were related to relative deficits in emotion attributions and problem solving. In multivariate analyses, neglect was related to misattributions of emotion and IQ deficits, and physical abuse was related to problem solving. Community stressors were not correlated with neurocognition when viewed relative to personal stressors. Stressor types were differentially associated with performance on specific neurocognitive tasks. PMID:18971345

  20. Recovery of partial differential operators on classes of periodic functions with mixed smoothness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balgimbayeva, Sholpan

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of optimal linear recovery for mixed partial differential operator A on the unit ball SBpθ r(Tn) of the Nikol'skii-Besov space of periodic functions with mixed smoothness. We find error bounds sharp in order for optimal linear recovery of operator A on class SBpθ r(Tn) . As information IMδ(f ) about the functions f from class SBpθ r(Tn) we shall use Fourier coefficients with numbers from step "hyperbolic" cross. As the linear method using the information about Fourier coefficients, we shall consider action of the mixed partial differential operator A on the special "private" sum of decomposition on system (type as wavelets) trigonometric polynomials.

  1. Regeneration of Thyroid Function by Transplantation of Differentiated Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kurmann, Anita A; Serra, Maria; Hawkins, Finn; Rankin, Scott A; Mori, Munemasa; Astapova, Inna; Ullas, Soumya; Lin, Sui; Bilodeau, Melanie; Rossant, Janet; Jean, Jyh C; Ikonomou, Laertis; Deterding, Robin R; Shannon, John M; Zorn, Aaron M; Hollenberg, Anthony N; Kotton, Darrell N

    2015-11-01

    Differentiation of functional thyroid epithelia from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) holds the potential for application in regenerative medicine. However, progress toward this goal is hampered by incomplete understanding of the signaling pathways needed for directed differentiation without forced overexpression of exogenous transgenes. Here we use mouse PSCs to identify key conserved roles for BMP and FGF signaling in regulating thyroid lineage specification from foregut endoderm in mouse and Xenopus. Thyroid progenitors derived from mouse PSCs can be matured into thyroid follicular organoids that provide functional secretion of thyroid hormones in vivo and rescue hypothyroid mice after transplantation. Moreover, by stimulating the same pathways, we were also able to derive human thyroid progenitors from normal and disease-specific iPSCs generated from patients with hypothyroidism resulting from NKX2-1 haploinsufficiency. Our studies have therefore uncovered the regulatory mechanisms that underlie early thyroid organogenesis and provide a significant step toward cell-based regenerative therapy for hypothyroidism. PMID:26593959

  2. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network. PMID:27425612

  3. Unsteady Solution of Non-Linear Differential Equations Using Walsh Function Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Walsh functions form an orthonormal basis set consisting of square waves. The discontinuous nature of square waves make the system well suited for representing functions with discontinuities. The product of any two Walsh functions is another Walsh function - a feature that can radically change an algorithm for solving non-linear partial differential equations (PDEs). The solution algorithm of non-linear differential equations using Walsh function series is unique in that integrals and derivatives may be computed using simple matrix multiplication of series representations of functions. Solutions to PDEs are derived as functions of wave component amplitude. Three sample problems are presented to illustrate the Walsh function series approach to solving unsteady PDEs. These include an advection equation, a Burgers equation, and a Riemann problem. The sample problems demonstrate the use of the Walsh function solution algorithms, exploiting Fast Walsh Transforms in multi-dimensions (O(Nlog(N))). Details of a Fast Walsh Reciprocal, defined here for the first time, enable inversion of aWalsh Symmetric Matrix in O(Nlog(N)) operations. Walsh functions have been derived using a fractal recursion algorithm and these fractal patterns are observed in the progression of pairs of wave number amplitudes in the solutions. These patterns are most easily observed in a remapping defined as a fractal fingerprint (FFP). A prolongation of existing solutions to the next highest order exploits these patterns. The algorithms presented here are considered a work in progress that provide new alternatives and new insights into the solution of non-linear PDEs.

  4. Differentiability of Palmer's linearization theorem and converse result for density functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, Álvaro; Robledo, Gonzalo

    2015-11-01

    We study differentiability properties in a particular case of the Palmer's linearization theorem, which states the existence of a homeomorphism H between the solutions of a linear ODE system having exponential dichotomy and a quasilinear system. Indeed, if the linear system is uniformly asymptotically stable, sufficient conditions ensuring that H is a C2 preserving orientation diffeomorphism are given. As an application, we generalize a converse result of density functions for a nonlinear system in the nonautonomous case.

  5. The DIF-Free-Then-DIF Strategy for the Assessment of Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin; Sun, Guo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The DIF-free-then-DIF (DFTD) strategy consists of two steps: (a) select a set of items that are the most likely to be DIF-free and (b) assess the other items for DIF (differential item functioning) using the designated items as anchors. The rank-based method together with the computer software IRTLRDIF can select a set of DIF-free polytomous items…

  6. Finite-difference models of ordinary differential equations - Influence of denominator functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Smith, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence on the solutions of finite-difference schemes of using a variety of denominator functions in the discrete modeling of the derivative for any ordinary differential equation. The results obtained are a consequence of using a generalized definition of the first derivative. A particular example of the linear decay equation is used to illustrate in detail the various solution possibilities that can occur.

  7. Spatial congregation of STAT binding directs selective nuclear architecture during T-cell functional differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Ofir; Sung, Myong-Hee; Nakayamada, Shingo; Voss, Ty C.; Baek, Songjoon; Hager, Gordon L.

    2013-01-01

    Higher-order genome organization shows tissue-specific patterns. However, functional relevance and the mechanisms shaping the genome architecture are poorly understood. Here we report a profound shift from promiscuous to highly selective genome organization that accompanies the effector lineage choice of differentiating T cells. As multipotent naive cells receive antigenic signals and commit to a T helper (Th) pathway, the genome-wide contacts of a lineage-specific cytokine locus are preferentially enriched for functionally relevant genes. Despite the establishment of divergent interactomes and global reprogramming of transcription in Th1 versus Th2, the overall expression status of the contact genes is surprisingly similar between the two lineages. Importantly, during differentiation, the genomic contacts are retained and strengthened precisely at DNA binding sites of the specific lineage-determining STAT transcription factor. In cells from the specific STAT knock-out mouse, the signature cytokine locus is unable to shed the promiscuous contacts established in the naive T cells, indicating the importance of genomic STAT binding. Altogether, the global aggregation of STAT binding loci from genic and nongenic regions highlights a new role for differentiation-promoting transcription factors in direct specification of higher-order nuclear architecture through interacting with regulatory regions. Such subnuclear environments have significant implications for efficient functioning of the mature effector lymphocytes. PMID:23212947

  8. From Monocytes to M1/M2 Macrophages: Phenotypical vs. Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Italiani, Paola; Boraschi, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Studies on monocyte and macrophage biology and differentiation have revealed the pleiotropic activities of these cells. Macrophages are tissue sentinels that maintain tissue integrity by eliminating/repairing damaged cells and matrices. In this M2-like mode, they can also promote tumor growth. Conversely, M1-like macrophages are key effector cells for the elimination of pathogens, virally infected, and cancer cells. Macrophage differentiation from monocytes occurs in the tissue in concomitance with the acquisition of a functional phenotype that depends on microenvironmental signals, thereby accounting for the many and apparently opposed macrophage functions. Many questions arise. When monocytes differentiate into macrophages in a tissue (concomitantly adopting a specific functional program, M1 or M2), do they all die during the inflammatory reaction, or do some of them survive? Do those that survive become quiescent tissue macrophages, able to react as naïve cells to a new challenge? Or, do monocyte-derived tissue macrophages conserve a “memory” of their past inflammatory activation? This review will address some of these important questions under the general framework of the role of monocytes and macrophages in the initiation, development, resolution, and chronicization of inflammation. PMID:25368618

  9. Cellular Trafficking of Phospholamban and Formation of Functional Sarcoplasmic Reticulum During Myocyte DIfferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stenoien, David L.; Knyushko, Tatyana V.; Londono, Monica P.; Opresko, Lee; Mayer, M. Uljana; Brady, Scott T.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2007-06-01

    The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) family members are transmembrane proteins that play an essential role in regulating intracellular calcium levels. Phospholamban (PLB), a 52 amino acid phosphoprotein, regulates SERCA activity in adult heart and skeletal muscle. Using the C2C12 myocyte cell line, we find endogenous PLB constitutively expressed in both myoblasts and myotubes, whereas SERCA expression coincides with activation of the differentiation program. PLB has a punctuate distribution in myoblasts changing to a reticular distribution in myotubes where it colocalizes with SERCAs. To examine the distribution and dynamics of PLB and SERCA, we expressed fluorescent fusion proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) of PLB and SERCA in myoblasts. Coexpressed PLB and SERCA localize to distinct cellular compartments in myoblasts but begin to colocalize as cells differentiate. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) studies show different recovery patterns for each protein in myoblasts confirming their localization to distinct compartments. To extend these studies, we created stable cell lines expressing O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) fusions with PLB or SERCA to track their localization as myocytes differentiate. These experiments demonstrate that PLB localizes to punctate vesicles in myoblasts and adopts a reticular distribution that coincides with SERCA distribution after differentiation. Colocalization experiments indicate that a subset of PLB in myoblasts colocalizes with endosomes, Golgi, and the plasma membrane however PLB also localizes to other, as yet unidentified vesicles. Our results indicate that differentiation plays a critical role in regulating PLB distribution to ensure its colocalization within the same cellular compartment as SERCA in differentiated cells. The presence and altered distribution of PLB in undifferentiated myoblasts raises the possibility that this protein has additional functions distinct from SERCA regulation.

  10. New results for global exponential synchronization in neural networks via functional differential inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongshu; Huang, Lihong; Tang, Longkun

    2015-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the synchronization dynamical behaviors for a class of delayed neural networks with discontinuous neuron activations. Continuous and discontinuous state feedback controller are designed such that the neural networks model can realize exponential complete synchronization in view of functional differential inclusions theory, Lyapunov functional method and inequality technique. The new proposed results here are very easy to verify and also applicable to neural networks with continuous activations. Finally, some numerical examples show the applicability and effectiveness of our main results.

  11. New results for global exponential synchronization in neural networks via functional differential inclusions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongshu; Huang, Lihong; Tang, Longkun

    2015-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the synchronization dynamical behaviors for a class of delayed neural networks with discontinuous neuron activations. Continuous and discontinuous state feedback controller are designed such that the neural networks model can realize exponential complete synchronization in view of functional differential inclusions theory, Lyapunov functional method and inequality technique. The new proposed results here are very easy to verify and also applicable to neural networks with continuous activations. Finally, some numerical examples show the applicability and effectiveness of our main results. PMID:26328554

  12. Age-related Differential Item Functioning for the Patient-Reported Outcomes Information System (PROMIS®) Physical Functioning Items

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Sylvia H; Spritzer, Karen L; Morales, Leo S; Hays, Ron D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the equivalence of the PROMIS® wave 1 physical functioning item bank, by age (50 years or older versus 18-49). Materials and methods A total of 114 physical functioning items with 5 response choices were administered to English- (n=1504) and Spanish-language (n=640) adults. Item frequencies, means and standard deviations, item-scale correlations, and internal consistency reliability were estimated. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) by age was evaluated. Results Thirty of the 114 items were fagged for DIF based on an R-squared of 0.02 or above criterion. The expected total score was higher for those respondents who were 18-49 than those who were 50 or older. Conclusions Those who were 50 years or older versus 18-49 years old with the same level of physical functioning responded differently to 30 of the 114 items in the PROMIS® physical functioning item bank. This study yields essential information about the equivalence of the physical functioning items in older versus younger individuals. PMID:24052925

  13. Cardiogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells with gold nanoparticle loaded functionalized nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Sreepathy; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering promises to revolutionize the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure and provide new solutions to the serious problems of shortage of heart donors. The influence of extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an influential role along with nanostructured components for guided stem cell differentiation. Hence, nanoparticle embedded Nanofibrous scaffolds of FDA approved polycaprolactone (PCL), Vitamin B12 (Vit B12), Aloe Vera(AV) and Silk fibroin(SF) was constructed to differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into cardiac lineage. Cardiomyocytes (CM) and Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were co-cultured on these fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. Results demonstrated that synthesized gold nanoparticles were of the size 16 nm and the nanoparticle loaded nanofibrous scaffold has a mechanical strength of 2.56 MPa matching that of the native myocardium. The gold nanoparticle blended PCL scaffolds were found to be enhancing the MSCs proliferation and differentiation into cardiogenesis. Most importantly the phenotype and cardiac marker expression in differentiated MSCs were highly resonated in gold nanoparticle loaded nanofibrous scaffolds. The appropriate mechanical strength provided by the functionalized nanofibrous scaffolds profoundly supported MSCs to produce contractile proteins and achieve typical cardiac phenotype. PMID:26209968

  14. RotundRacGAP functions with Ras during spermatogenesis and retinal differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bergeret, E; Pignot-Paintrand, I; Guichard, A; Raymond, K; Fauvarque, M O; Cazemajor, M; Griffin-Shea, R

    2001-09-01

    Our analysis of rotund (rn) null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster revealed that deletion of the rn locus affects both spermatid and retinal differentiation. In the male reproductive system, the absence of RnRacGAP induced small testes, empty seminal vesicles, short testicular cysts, reduced amounts of interspermatid membrane, the absence of individualization complexes, and incomplete mitochondrial condensation. Flagellar growth continued within the short rn null cysts to produce large bulbous terminations of intertwined mature flagella. Organization of the retina was also severely perturbed as evidenced by grossly misshapen ommatidia containing reduced numbers of photoreceptor and pigment cells. These morphological phenotypes were rescued by genomic rnRacGAP transgenes, demonstrating that RnRacGAP function is critical to spermatid and retinal differentiation. The testicular phenotypes were suppressed by heterozygous hypomorphic mutations in the Dras1 and drk genes, indicating cross talk between RacGAP-regulated signaling and that of the Ras pathway. The observed genetic interactions are consistent with a model in which Rac signaling is activated by Ras and negatively regulated by RnRacGAP during spermatid differentiation. RnRacGAP and Ras cross talk also operated during retinal differentiation; however, while the heterozygous hypomorphic drk mutation continued to act as a suppressor of the rn null mutation, the heterozygous hypomorphic Dras1 mutation induced novel retinal phenotypes. PMID:11509670

  15. Stimulus set meaningfulness and neurophysiological differentiation: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Boly, Melanie; Sasai, Shuntaro; Gosseries, Olivia; Oizumi, Masafumi; Casali, Adenauer; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    A meaningful set of stimuli, such as a sequence of frames from a movie, triggers a set of different experiences. By contrast, a meaningless set of stimuli, such as a sequence of 'TV noise' frames, triggers always the same experience--of seeing 'TV noise'--even though the stimuli themselves are as different from each other as the movie frames. We reasoned that the differentiation of cortical responses underlying the subject's experiences, as measured by Lempel-Ziv complexity (incompressibility) of functional MRI images, should reflect the overall meaningfulness of a set of stimuli for the subject, rather than differences among the stimuli. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the differentiation of brain activity patterns in response to a movie sequence, to the same movie scrambled in time, and to 'TV noise', where the pixels from each movie frame were scrambled in space. While overall cortical activation was strong and widespread in all conditions, the differentiation (Lempel-Ziv complexity) of brain activation patterns was correlated with the meaningfulness of the stimulus set, being highest in the movie condition, intermediate in the scrambled movie condition, and minimal for 'TV noise'. Stimulus set meaningfulness was also associated with higher information integration among cortical regions. These results suggest that the differentiation of neural responses can be used to assess the meaningfulness of a given set of stimuli for a given subject, without the need to identify the features and categories that are relevant to the subject, nor the precise location of selective neural responses. PMID:25970444

  16. Olig1 Function Is Required for Oligodendrocyte Differentiation in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Ahrendsen, Jared T.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination are tightly regulated processes orchestrated by a complex transcriptional network. Two bHLH transcription factors in this network, Olig1 and Olig2, are expressed exclusively by oligodendrocytes after late embryonic development. Although the role of Olig2 in the lineage is well established, the role of Olig1 is still unclear. The current studies analyzed the function of Olig1 in oligodendrocyte differentiation and developmental myelination in brain. Both oligodendrocyte progenitor cell commitment and oligodendrocyte differentiation were impaired in the corpus callosum of Olig1-null mice, resulting in hypomyelination throughout adulthood in the brain. As seen in previous studies with this mouse line, although there was an early myelination deficit in the spinal cord, essentially full recovery with normal spinal cord myelination was seen. Intriguingly, this regional difference may be partially attributed to compensatory upregulation of Olig2 protein expression in the spinal cord after Olig1 deletion, which is not seen in brain. The current study demonstrates a unique role for Olig1 in promoting oligodendrocyte progenitor cell commitment, differentiation, and subsequent myelination primarily in brain, but not spinal cord. PMID:25762682

  17. Olig1 function is required for oligodendrocyte differentiation in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K; Ahrendsen, Jared T; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-03-11

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination are tightly regulated processes orchestrated by a complex transcriptional network. Two bHLH transcription factors in this network, Olig1 and Olig2, are expressed exclusively by oligodendrocytes after late embryonic development. Although the role of Olig2 in the lineage is well established, the role of Olig1 is still unclear. The current studies analyzed the function of Olig1 in oligodendrocyte differentiation and developmental myelination in brain. Both oligodendrocyte progenitor cell commitment and oligodendrocyte differentiation were impaired in the corpus callosum of Olig1-null mice, resulting in hypomyelination throughout adulthood in the brain. As seen in previous studies with this mouse line, although there was an early myelination deficit in the spinal cord, essentially full recovery with normal spinal cord myelination was seen. Intriguingly, this regional difference may be partially attributed to compensatory upregulation of Olig2 protein expression in the spinal cord after Olig1 deletion, which is not seen in brain. The current study demonstrates a unique role for Olig1 in promoting oligodendrocyte progenitor cell commitment, differentiation, and subsequent myelination primarily in brain, but not spinal cord. PMID:25762682

  18. FIDEA: a server for the functional interpretation of differential expression analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Daniel; Grassi, Luigi; Mazzapioda, Mariagiovanna; Tramontano, Anna

    2013-07-01

    The results of differential expression analyses provide scientists with hundreds to thousands of differentially expressed genes that need to be interpreted in light of the biology of the specific system under study. This requires mapping the genes to functional classifications that can be, for example, the KEGG pathways or InterPro families they belong to, their GO Molecular Function, Biological Process or Cellular Component. A statistically significant overrepresentation of one or more category terms in the set of differentially expressed genes is an essential step for the interpretation of the biological significance of the results. Ideally, the analysis should be performed by scientists who are well acquainted with the biological problem, as they have a wealth of knowledge about the system and can, more easily than a bioinformatician, discover less obvious and, therefore, more interesting relationships. To allow experimentalists to explore their data in an easy and at the same time exhaustive fashion within a single tool and to test their hypothesis quickly and effortlessly, we developed FIDEA. The FIDEA server is located at http://www.biocomputing.it/fidea; it is free and open to all users, and there is no login requirement. PMID:23754850

  19. Pax3 functions at a nodal point in melanocyte stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Deborah; Lu, Min Min; Huang, Li; Engleka, Kurt A; Zhang, Maozhen; Chu, Emily Y; Lipner, Shari; Skoultchi, Arthur; Millar, Sarah E; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2005-02-24

    Most stem cells are not totipotent. Instead, they are partially committed but remain undifferentiated. Upon appropriate stimulation they are capable of regenerating mature cell types. Little is known about the genetic programmes that maintain the undifferentiated phenotype of lineage-restricted stem cells. Here we describe the molecular details of a nodal point in adult melanocyte stem cell differentiation in which Pax3 simultaneously functions to initiate a melanogenic cascade while acting downstream to prevent terminal differentiation. Pax3 activates expression of Mitf, a transcription factor critical for melanogenesis, while at the same time it competes with Mitf for occupancy of an enhancer required for expression of dopachrome tautomerase, an enzyme that functions in melanin synthesis. Pax3-expressing melanoblasts are thus committed but undifferentiated until Pax3-mediated repression is relieved by activated beta-catenin. Thus, a stem cell transcription factor can both determine cell fate and simultaneously maintain an undifferentiated state, leaving a cell poised to differentiate in response to external stimuli. PMID:15729346

  20. Dicer1-miR-328-Bace1 signalling controls brown adipose tissue differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Oliverio, Matteo; Schmidt, Elena; Mauer, Jan; Baitzel, Catherina; Hansmeier, Nils; Khani, Sajjad; Konieczka, Sandra; Pradas-Juni, Marta; Brodesser, Susanne; Van, Trieu-My; Bartsch, Deniz; Brönneke, Hella S; Heine, Markus; Hilpert, Hans; Tarcitano, Emilio; Garinis, George A; Frommolt, Peter; Heeren, Joerg; Mori, Marcelo A; Brüning, Jens C; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm

    2016-03-01

    Activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) controls energy homeostasis in rodents and humans and has emerged as an innovative strategy for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we show that ageing- and obesity-associated dysfunction of brown fat coincides with global microRNA downregulation due to reduced expression of the microRNA-processing node Dicer1. Consequently, heterozygosity of Dicer1 in BAT aggravated diet-induced-obesity (DIO)-evoked deterioration of glucose metabolism. Analyses of differential microRNA expression during preadipocyte commitment and mouse models of progeria, longevity and DIO identified miR-328 as a regulator of BAT differentiation. Reducing miR-328 blocked preadipocyte commitment, whereas miR-328 overexpression instigated BAT differentiation and impaired muscle progenitor commitment-partly through silencing of the β-secretase Bace1. Loss of Bace1 enhanced brown preadipocyte specification in vitro and was overexpressed in BAT of obese and progeroid mice. In vivo Bace1 inhibition delayed DIO-induced weight gain and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. These experiments reveal Dicer1-miR-328-Bace1 signalling as a determinant of BAT function, and highlight the potential of Bace1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach to improve not only neurodegenerative diseases but also ageing- and obesity-associated impairments of BAT function. PMID:26900752

  1. Differentiation and functional connection of vascular elements in compatible and incompatible pear/quince internode micrografts.

    PubMed

    Espen, Luca; Cocucci, Maurizio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio

    2005-11-01

    Micrografts of internodes excised from in vitro grown pear plants (Pyrus communis L. cv. 'Bosc' (B) and cv. 'Butirra Hardy' (BH)) and quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill. East Malling clone C (EMC)), were cultured aseptically to test the effectiveness of their functional vascular reconnection in relation to incompatibility-compatibility relationships that these genotypes exhibit in the field. The incompatible heterograft (B/EMC) showed a marked delay in internode cohesion compared with the autografts (both B/B and BH/BH) and the compatible heterograft (BH/EMC). Even when fused, the translocation of [14C]-sorbitol from upper to lower internode was lower in B/EMC micrografts than in the other combinations. Epifluorescence studies performed with carboxyfluorescin, a specific phloem probe, indicated that the limited translocation was caused by a delay in the establishment of functional phloem continuity between the two internodes. In the B/EMC combination, new differentiated tracheary elements (TE) in the parenchyma tissue at the graft interface between the two internodes were not detected until 30 days after grafting, whereas in the BH/EMC heterograft and both autografts, new xylem connections appeared to cross the interface 20 days after grafting. Immunohistochemical detection (terminal nick-end labeling assay) of the number of cells undergoing nuclear DNA fragmentation at the graft interface confirmed that the limited and delayed TE differentiation in B/EMC heterografts was associated with a decrease in the activity of programmed cell death processes involved in the differentiation of TE. PMID:16105809

  2. Dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning and extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, Lars; Burianová, Hana; Reutens, David C

    2016-07-01

    The high evolutionary value of learning when to respond to threats or when to inhibit previously learned associations after changing threat contingencies is reflected in dedicated networks in the animal and human brain. Recent evidence further suggests that adaptive learning may be dependent on the dynamic interaction of meta-stable functional brain networks. However, it is still unclear which functional brain networks compete with each other to facilitate associative learning and how changes in threat contingencies affect this competition. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamic competition between large-scale networks related to associative learning in the human brain by combining a repeated differential conditioning and extinction paradigm with independent component analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The results (i) identify three task-related networks involved in initial and sustained conditioning as well as extinction, and demonstrate that (ii) the two main networks that underlie sustained conditioning and extinction are anti-correlated with each other and (iii) the dynamic competition between these two networks is modulated in response to changes in associative contingencies. These findings provide novel evidence for the view that dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning from extinction learning in the healthy brain and suggest that dysfunctional network dynamics might contribute to learning-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27079532

  3. Urinary NGAL Levels Correlate with Differential Renal Function in Patients with Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction Undergoing Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Cost, Nicholas G.; Noh, Paul H.; Devarajan, Prasad; Ivancic, Vesna; Reddy, Pramod P.; Minevich, Eugene; Bennett, Michael; Haffner, Christopher; Schulte, Marion; DeFoor, W. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Recent investigations described the use of NGAL, a sensitive biomarker for kidney injury, in the setting of ureteropelvic junction obstruction. We prospectively evaluated urinary NGAL levels in the affected renal pelvis and bladder of children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction undergoing unilateral dismembered pyeloplasty. Our hypothesis was that higher NGAL in the kidney and bladder would correlate with decreased ipsilateral differential function. Materials and Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study in patients treated with unilateral dismembered pyeloplasty from 2010 to 2012. Urine was obtained intraoperatively from the bladder and obstructed renal pelvis. A control population of unaffected children was recruited to provide a voided bladder specimen. Bladder NGAL levels were compared between the study and control populations. We tested our study hypothesis by correlating bladder and renal pelvic NGAL levels with the differential renal function of the affected kidney. Results: A total of 61 patients with a median age at surgery of 1.62 years (range 0.12 to 18.7) were enrolled in the study. Median bladder NGAL was 18.6 ng/mg (range 1.4-1,650.8) and median renal pelvic NGAL was 26.2 ng/mg (range 1.2-18,034.5, p = 0.004). Median bladder NGAL was significantly higher than in controls (p = 0.004). The correlation of bladder and renal pelvic NGAL with differential renal function was r = −0.359 (p = 0.004) and r = −0.383 (p = 0.002), respectively. Conclusions: Bladder NGAL is increased in children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Renal pelvic and bladder normalized urinary NGAL levels correlate inversely with the relative function of the affected kidney in cases of unilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction. PMID:23791906

  4. Multivoxel patterns reveal functionally differentiated networks underlying auditory feedback processing of speech.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zane Z; Vicente-Grabovetsky, Alejandro; MacDonald, Ewen N; Munhall, Kevin G; Cusack, Rhodri; Johnsrude, Ingrid S

    2013-03-01

    The everyday act of speaking involves the complex processes of speech motor control. An important component of control is monitoring, detection, and processing of errors when auditory feedback does not correspond to the intended motor gesture. Here we show, using fMRI and converging operations within a multivoxel pattern analysis framework, that this sensorimotor process is supported by functionally differentiated brain networks. During scanning, a real-time speech-tracking system was used to deliver two acoustically different types of distorted auditory feedback or unaltered feedback while human participants were vocalizing monosyllabic words, and to present the same auditory stimuli while participants were passively listening. Whole-brain analysis of neural-pattern similarity revealed three functional networks that were differentially sensitive to distorted auditory feedback during vocalization, compared with during passive listening. One network of regions appears to encode an "error signal" regardless of acoustic features of the error: this network, including right angular gyrus, right supplementary motor area, and bilateral cerebellum, yielded consistent neural patterns across acoustically different, distorted feedback types, only during articulation (not during passive listening). In contrast, a frontotemporal network appears sensitive to the speech features of auditory stimuli during passive listening; this preference for speech features was diminished when the same stimuli were presented as auditory concomitants of vocalization. A third network, showing a distinct functional pattern from the other two, appears to capture aspects of both neural response profiles. Together, our findings suggest that auditory feedback processing during speech motor control may rely on multiple, interactive, functionally differentiated neural systems. PMID:23467350

  5. Tissue-specific DNA demethylation is required for proper B-cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Orlanski, Shari; Labi, Verena; Reizel, Yitzhak; Spiro, Adam; Lichtenstein, Michal; Levin-Klein, Rena; Koralov, Sergei B; Skversky, Yael; Rajewsky, Klaus; Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2016-05-01

    There is ample evidence that somatic cell differentiation during development is accompanied by extensive DNA demethylation of specific sites that vary between cell types. Although the mechanism of this process has not yet been elucidated, it is likely to involve the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC by Tet enzymes. We show that a Tet2/Tet3 conditional knockout at early stages of B-cell development largely prevents lineage-specific programmed demethylation events. This lack of demethylation affects the expression of nearby B-cell lineage genes by impairing enhancer activity, thus causing defects in B-cell differentiation and function. Thus, tissue-specific DNA demethylation appears to be necessary for proper somatic cell development in vivo. PMID:27091986

  6. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. Inmore » conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.« less

  7. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. In conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.

  8. Differentiation and function of group 3 innate lymphoid cells, from embryo to adult.

    PubMed

    van de Pavert, Serge A; Vivier, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) represent a heterogeneous population of cells that share the nuclear hormone receptor RORγt (retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt) as a master regulator for differentiation and function. ILC3 can be divided into two major subsets based on the cell surface expression of the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR), NKp46. A subset of NCR(-) ILC3 includes the previously known lymphoid-tissue inducer cells that are essential for the embryonic formation of peripheral lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. After birth, the NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 contribute to the maintenance of health but also to inflammation in mucosal tissues. This review will describe the differentiation pathways of ILC3, their involvement in the development of the adaptive immune system and their role in the establishment and maintenance of gut immunity. PMID:26374472

  9. Notch gain of function inhibits chondrocyte differentiation via Rbpj-dependent suppression of Sox9.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan; Tao, Jianning; Bae, Yangjin; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Bertin, Terry; Chen, Yuqing; Yang, Tao; Lee, Brendan

    2013-03-01

    Notch signaling plays a critical role during development by directing the binary cell fate decision between progenitors and differentiated cells. Previous studies have shown sustained Notch activation in cartilage leads to chondrodysplasia. Genetic evidence indicates that Notch regulates limb bud mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into chondrocytes via an Rbpj-dependent Notch pathway. However, it is still unknown how Notch governs chondrogenesis in the axial skeleton where Notch serves a primary patterning function. We hypothesized that both Rbpj-dependent and Rbpj-independent Notch signaling mechanisms might be involved. Cartilage-specific Notch gain-of-function (GOF) mutant mice display chondrodysplasia accompanied by loss of Sox9 expression in vertebrae. To evaluate the contribution of an Rbpj-dependent Notch signaling to this phenotype, we deleted Rbpj on the Notch GOF background. These mice showed persistent spine abnormalities characterized by "butterfly" vertebrae suggesting that removal of Rbpj does not fully rescue the axial skeleton deformities caused by Notch GOF. However, Sox9 protein level was restored in Rbpj-deficient Notch GOF mice compared with Notch GOF mutants, demonstrating that regulation of Sox9 expression is canonical or Rbpj-dependent. To further understand the molecular basis of this regulation, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and detected the recruitment of the Rbpj/NICD transcription complex to Rbpj-binding sites upstream of the Sox9 promoter. The association of the Rbpj/NICD complex with the Sox9 promoter is associated with transcriptional repression of Sox9 in a cellular model of chondrocyte differentiation. Hence, Notch negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation in the axial skeleton by suppressing Sox9 transcription, and Rbpj-independent Notch signaling mechanisms may also contribute to axial skeletogenesis. PMID:22991339

  10. Notch gain of function inhibits chondrocyte differentiation via Rbpj-dependent suppression of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shan; Tao, Jianning; Bae, Yangjin; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Bertin, Terry; Chen, Yuqing; Yang, Tao; Lee, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Notch signaling plays a critical role during development by directing the binary cell fate decision between progenitors and differentiated cells. Previous studies have shown sustained Notch activation in cartilage leads to chondrodysplasia. Genetic evidence indicates that Notch regulates limb bud mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into chondrocytes via an Rbpj-dependent Notch pathway. However, it is still unknown how Notch governs chondrogenesis in the axial skeleton where Notch serves a primary patterning function. We hypothesized that both Rbpj-dependent and Rbpj-independent Notch signaling mechanisms might be involved. Cartilage-specific Notch gain-of-function (GOF) mutant mice display chondrodysplasia accompanied by loss of Sox9 expression in vertebrae. To evaluate the contribution of an Rbpj-dependent Notch signaling to this phenotype, we deleted Rbpj on the Notch GOF background. These mice showed persistent spine abnormalities characterized by “butterfly” vertebrae suggesting that removal of Rbpj does not fully rescue the axial skeleton deformities caused by Notch GOF. However, Sox9 protein level was restored in Rbpj-deficient Notch GOF mice compared with Notch GOF mutants, demonstrating that regulation of Sox9 expression is canonical or Rbpj-dependent. To further understand the molecular basis of this regulation, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and detected the recruitment of the Rbpj/NICD transcription complex to Rbpj-binding sites upstream of the Sox9 promoter. The association of the Rbpj/NICD complex with the Sox9 promoter is associated with transcriptional repression of Sox9 in a cellular model of chondrocyte differentiation. Hence, Notch negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation in the axial skeleton by suppressing Sox9 transcription, and Rbpj-independent Notch signaling mechanisms may also contribute to axial skeletogenesis. PMID:22991339

  11. Regulation of microRNA function in somatic stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Archana; Blelloch, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are important modulators of development. Owing to their ability to simultaneously silence hundreds of target genes, they have key roles in large-scale transcriptomic changes that occur during cell fate transitions. In somatic stem and progenitor cells — such as those involved in myogenesis, haematopoiesis, skin and neural development — miRNA function is carefully regulated to promote and stabilize cell fate choice. miRNAs are integrated within networks that form both positive and negative feedback loops. Their function is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, biogenesis, stability, availability and/or number of target sites, as well as their cooperation with other miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Together, these regulatory mechanisms result in a refined molecular response that enables proper cellular differentiation and function. PMID:25118717

  12. Targeting multifunctional proteins by virtual screening: structurally diverse cytohesin inhibitors with differentiated biological functions.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bill, Anke; Novak, Nina; Loch, Gerrit; Blockus, Heike; Geppert, Hanna; Becker, Thomas; Schmitz, Anton; Hoch, Michael; Kolanus, Waldemar; Famulok, Michael; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-09-17

    Virtual screening (VS) of chemical libraries formatted in silico provides an alternative to experimental high-throughput screening (HTS) for the identification of small molecule modulators of protein function. We have tailored a VS approach combining fingerprint similarity searching and support vector machine modeling toward the identification of small molecular probes for the study of cytohesins, a family of cytoplasmic regulator proteins with multiple cellular functions. A total of 40 new structurally diverse inhibitors were identified, and 26 of these compounds were more active than the primary VS template, a single known inhibitory chemotype, in at least one of three different assays (guanine nucleotide exchange, Drosophila insulin signaling, and human leukocyte cell adhesion). Moreover, these inhibitors displayed differential inhibitory profiles. Our findings demonstrate that, at least for the cytohesins, computational extrapolation from known active compounds was capable of identifying small molecular probes with highly diversified functional profiles. PMID:20614894

  13. Incorporation of functionalized gold nanoparticles into nanofibers for enhanced attachment and differentiation of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electrospun nanofibers have been widely used as substrata for mammalian cell culture owing to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrices. Structurally consistent electrospun nanofibers can be produced with synthetic polymers but require chemical modification to graft cell-adhesive molecules to make the nanofibers functional. Development of a facile method of grafting functional molecules on the nanofibers will contribute to the production of diverse cell type-specific nanofiber substrata. Results Small molecules, peptides, and functionalized gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated with polymethylglutarimide (PMGI) nanofibers through electrospinning. The PMGI nanofibers functionalized by the grafted AuNPs, which were labeled with cell-adhesive peptides, enhanced HeLa cell attachment and potentiated cardiomyocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Conclusions PMGI nanofibers can be functionalized simply by co-electrospinning with the grafting materials. In addition, grafting functionalized AuNPs enable high-density localization of the cell-adhesive peptides on the nanofiber. The results of the present study suggest that more cell type-specific synthetic substrata can be fabricated with molecule-doped nanofibers, in which diverse functional molecules are grafted alone or in combination with other molecules at different concentrations. PMID:22686683

  14. Differential effects of hunger and satiety on insular cortex and hypothalamic functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Hazel; Li, Xiaoyun; Fallon, Nicholas B; Crookall, Rebecca; Giesbrecht, Timo; Thomas, Anna; Halford, Jason C G; Harrold, Joanne; Stancak, Andrej

    2016-05-01

    The insula cortex and hypothalamus are implicated in eating behaviour, and contain receptor sites for peptides and hormones controlling energy balance. The insula encompasses multi-functional subregions, which display differential anatomical and functional connectivities with the rest of the brain. This study aimed to analyse the effect of fasting and satiation on the functional connectivity profiles of left and right anterior, middle, and posterior insula, and left and right hypothalamus. It was hypothesized that the profiles would be altered alongside changes in homeostatic energy balance. Nineteen healthy participants underwent two 7-min resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans, one when fasted and one when satiated. Functional connectivity between the left posterior insula and cerebellum/superior frontal gyrus, and between left hypothalamus and inferior frontal gyrus was stronger during fasting. Functional connectivity between the right middle insula and default mode structures (left and right posterior parietal cortex, cingulate cortex), and between right hypothalamus and superior parietal cortex was stronger during satiation. Differences in blood glucose levels between the scans accounted for several of the altered functional connectivities. The insula and hypothalamus appear to form a homeostatic energy balance network related to cognitive control of eating; prompting eating and preventing overeating when energy is depleted, and ending feeding or transferring attention away from food upon satiation. This study provides evidence of a lateralized dissociation of neural responses to energy modulations. PMID:26790868

  15. HES6-1 and HES6-2 Function through Different Mechanisms during Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Henrique, Domingos

    2010-01-01

    Background Notch signalling plays a central role in the mechanisms regulating neuronal differentiation in the vertebrate nervous system. The transcriptional repressors encoded by Hes genes are the main effectors of this pathway, acting in neural progenitors during the lateral inhibition process to repress proneural genes and inhibit differentiation. However, Hes6 genes seem to behave differently: they are expressed in differentiating neurons and facilitate the activity of proneural genes in promoting neurogenesis. Still, the molecular mechanisms underlying this unique function of Hes6 genes are not yet understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we identify two subgroups of Hes6 genes that seem conserved in most vertebrate species and characterize a novel Hes6 gene in chicken: cHes6-1. The embryonic expression pattern of cHes6-1 suggests roles for this gene in the formation of the pancreas, nervous system and in the generation of body asymmetry. We show that cHes6-1 is negatively regulated by Notch signalling in the developing embryonic spinal cord and in pancreatic progenitors, but requires Notch for the observed asymmetric expression at the lateral mesoderm. Functional studies by ectopic expression in the chick embryonic neural tube revealed that cHES6-1 up-regulates the expression of cDelta1 and cHes5 genes, in contrast with overexpression of cHES6-2, which represses the same genes. We show that this activity of cHES6-2 is dependent on its capacity to bind DNA and repress transcription, while cHES6-1 seems to function by sequestering other HES proteins and inhibit their activity as transcriptional repressors. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the two chick HES6 proteins act at different phases of neuronal differentiation, contributing to the progression of neurogenesis by different mechanisms: while cHES6-2 represses the transcription of Hes genes, cHES6-1 acts later, sequestering HES proteins. Together, the two cHES6 proteins progressively

  16. Highly efficient differentiation of hESCs to functional hepatic endoderm requires ActivinA and Wnt3a signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hay, David C.; Fletcher, Judy; Payne, Catherine; Terrace, John D.; Gallagher, Ronald C. J.; Snoeys, Jan; Black, James R.; Wojtacha, Davina; Samuel, Kay; Hannoun, Zara; Pryde, Anne; Filippi, Celine; Currie, Ian S.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Ross, James A.; Newsome, Philip N.; Iredale, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a valuable source of pluripotential primary cells. To date, however, their homogeneous cellular differentiation to specific cell types in vitro has proven difficult. Wnt signaling has been shown to play important roles in coordinating development, and we demonstrate that Wnt3a is differentially expressed at critical stages of human liver development in vivo. The essential role of Wnt3a in hepatocyte differentiation from hESCs is paralleled by our in vitro model, demonstrating the importance of a physiologic approach to cellular differentiation. Our studies provide compelling evidence that Wnt3a signaling is important for coordinated hepatocellular function in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that Wnt3a facilitates clonal plating of hESCs exhibiting functional hepatic differentiation. These studies represent an important step toward the use of hESC-derived hepatocytes in high-throughput metabolic analysis of human liver function. PMID:18719101

  17. Mitochondrial (Dys)function in Adipocyte (De)differentiation and Systemic Metabolic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Aurélia; Tejerina, Silvia; Raes, Martine; Keijer, Jaap; Arnould, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, adipose tissue, composed of BAT and WAT, collaborates in energy partitioning and performs metabolic regulatory functions. It is the most flexible tissue in the body, because it is remodeled in size and shape by modifications in adipocyte cell size and/or number, depending on developmental status and energy fluxes. Although numerous reviews have focused on the differentiation program of both brown and white adipocytes as well as on the pathophysiological role of white adipose tissues, the importance of mitochondrial activity in the differentiation or the dedifferentiation programs of adipose cells and in systemic metabolic alterations has not been extensively reviewed previously. Here, we address the crucial role of mitochondrial functions during adipogenesis and in mature adipocytes and discuss the cellular responses of white adipocytes to mitochondrial activity impairment. In addition, we discuss the increase in scientific knowledge regarding mitochondrial functions in the last 10 years and the recent suspicion of mitochondrial dysfunction in several 21st century epidemics (ie, obesity and diabetes), as well as in lipodystrophy found in HIV-treated patients, which can contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies targeting adipocyte mitochondria. PMID:19700756

  18. miR-150 Regulates Differentiation and Cytolytic Effector Function in CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Norah L.; Wissink, Erin M.; Grimson, Andrew; Rudd, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate most mammalian genes, and they control numerous aspects of immune system development and function. Their precise roles in the CD8+ T cell response, however, remain unclear. In this report, we show that in the absence of the microRNA miR-150, CD8+ T cells fail to undergo robust expansion and differentiation into short-lived terminal effector cells in response to primary infection with Listeria monocytogenes or Vaccinia virus. Notably, even after transitioning into the memory pool, miR-150−/− cells still mount a weaker recall response to secondary infection, and remain less differentiated than their wild-type counterparts. Transcriptome analysis shows miR-150 gene targets are globally upregulated in cells lacking miR-150, and amongst these targets, we found misregulation of genes associated with proliferation and effector cell function. These transcriptome data suggest that miR-150 deficient CD8+ T cells are less efficient in killing infected cells, which we validate experimentally. Together, these results reveal a cell-intrinsic role for miR-150 in the regulation of effector CD8+ T cell fate and function. PMID:26549197

  19. Solutions to an advanced functional partial differential equation of the pantograph type

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Ali A.; Van Brunt, B.; Wake, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    A model for cells structured by size undergoing growth and division leads to an initial boundary value problem that involves a first-order linear partial differential equation with a functional term. Here, size can be interpreted as DNA content or mass. It has been observed experimentally and shown analytically that solutions for arbitrary initial cell distributions are asymptotic as time goes to infinity to a certain solution called the steady size distribution. The full solution to the problem for arbitrary initial distributions, however, is elusive owing to the presence of the functional term and the paucity of solution techniques for such problems. In this paper, we derive a solution to the problem for arbitrary initial cell distributions. The method employed exploits the hyperbolic character of the underlying differential operator, and the advanced nature of the functional argument to reduce the problem to a sequence of simple Cauchy problems. The existence of solutions for arbitrary initial distributions is established along with uniqueness. The asymptotic relationship with the steady size distribution is established, and because the solution is known explicitly, higher-order terms in the asymptotics can be readily obtained. PMID:26345391

  20. Functional differentiation of stem cell-derived neurons from different murine backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E.

    2014-01-01

    Murine stem cell-derived neurons have been used to study a wide variety of neuropsychiatric diseases with a hereditary component, ranging from autism to Alzheimer’s. While a significant amount of data on their molecular biology has been generated, there is little data on the physiology of these cultures. Different mouse strains show clear differences in behavioral and other neurobiologically relevant readouts. We have studied the physiology of early differentiation and network formation in neuronal cultures derived from three different mouse embryonic stem cell lines. We have found largely overlapping patterns with some significant differences in the timing of the functional milestones. Neurons from R1 showed the fastest development of intrinsic excitability, while E14Tg2a and J1 were slower. This was also reflected in an earlier appearance of synaptic activity in R1 cultures, while E14Tg2a and J1 were delayed by up to 2 days. In conclusion, stem cells from all backgrounds could be successfully differentiated into functioning neural networks with similar developmental patterns. Differences in the timing of specific milestones, suggest that control cell lines and time-points should be carefully chosen when investigating genetic alterations that lead to subtle deficits in neuronal function. PMID:24600351

  1. miR-150 Regulates Differentiation and Cytolytic Effector Function in CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Norah L; Wissink, Erin M; Grimson, Andrew; Rudd, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate most mammalian genes, and they control numerous aspects of immune system development and function. Their precise roles in the CD8+ T cell response, however, remain unclear. In this report, we show that in the absence of the microRNA miR-150, CD8+ T cells fail to undergo robust expansion and differentiation into short-lived terminal effector cells in response to primary infection with Listeria monocytogenes or Vaccinia virus. Notably, even after transitioning into the memory pool, miR-150(-/-) cells still mount a weaker recall response to secondary infection, and remain less differentiated than their wild-type counterparts. Transcriptome analysis shows miR-150 gene targets are globally upregulated in cells lacking miR-150, and amongst these targets, we found misregulation of genes associated with proliferation and effector cell function. These transcriptome data suggest that miR-150 deficient CD8+ T cells are less efficient in killing infected cells, which we validate experimentally. Together, these results reveal a cell-intrinsic role for miR-150 in the regulation of effector CD8+ T cell fate and function. PMID:26549197

  2. Improvement in Detection of Differential Item Functioning Using a Mixture Item Response Theory Model.

    PubMed

    Maij-de Meij, Annette M; Kelderman, Henk; van der Flier, Henk

    2010-11-30

    Usually, methods for detection of differential item functioning (DIF) compare the functioning of items across manifest groups. However, the manifest groups with respect to which the items function differentially may not necessarily coincide with the true source of the bias. It is expected that DIF detection under a model that includes a latent DIF variable is more sensitive to this source of bias. In a simulation study, it is shown that a mixture item response theory model, which includes a latent grouping variable, performs better in identifying DIF items than DIF detection methods using manifest variables only. The difference between manifest and latent DIF detection increases as the correlation between the manifest variable and the true source of the DIF becomes smaller. Different sample sizes, relative group sizes, and significance levels are studied. Finally, an empirical example demonstrates the detection of heterogeneity in a minority sample using a latent grouping variable. Manifest and latent DIF detection methods are applied to a Vocabulary test of the General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB). PMID:26760725

  3. An in vitro model of innate lymphoid cell function and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Allan, D S J; Kirkham, C L; Aguilar, O A; Qu, L C; Chen, P; Fine, J H; Serra, P; Awong, G; Gommerman, J L; Zúñiga-Pflücker, J C; Carlyle, J R

    2015-03-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are RAG-independent lymphocytes with important roles in innate immunity, and include group-1 (natural killer (NK) cell, ILC1), group-2 (ILC2), and group-3 (lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi), NCR(+) ILC3) subsets. Group-3 ILC express Rorγt, produce interleukin (IL)-22, and are critically important in the normal function of mucosal tissues. Here, we describe a novel model cell line for the study of ILC function and differentiation. The parental MNK cell line, derived from NKR-P1B(+) fetal thymocytes, shows a capacity to differentiate in γc cytokines. One IL-7-responsive subline, designated MNK-3, expresses Rorγt and produces high levels of IL-22 in response to IL-23 and IL-1β stimulation. MNK-3 cells display surface markers and transcript expression characteristic of group-3 ILC, including IL-7Rα (CD127), c-kit (CD117), CCR6, Thy1 (CD90), RANK, RANKL, and lymphotoxin (LTα1β2). Using an in vitro assay of LTi cell activity, MNK-3 cells induce ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression on stromal cells in a manner dependent upon LTα1β2 expression. A second IL-2-responsive subline, MNK-1, expresses several NK cell receptors, perforin and granzymes, and shows some cytotoxic activity. Thus, MNK-1 cells serve as a model of ILC1/NK development and differentiation, whereas MNK-3 cells provide an attractive in vitro system to study the function of ILC3/LTi cells. PMID:25138665

  4. A lattice Boltzmann model with an amending function for simulating nonlinear partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin-Jie; Ma, Chang-Feng

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a lattice Boltzmann model with an amending function for one-dimensional nonlinear partial differential equations (NPDEs) in the form ut + αuux + βunux + γuxx + δuxxx + ζuxxxx = 0. This model is different from existing models because it lets the time step be equivalent to the square of the space step and derives higher accuracy and nonlinear terms in NPDEs. With the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the governing evolution equation is recovered correctly from the continuous Boltzmann equation. The numerical results agree well with the analytical solutions.

  5. Existence, uniqueness, and stability of stochastic neutral functional differential equations of Sobolev-type

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xuetao; Zhu, Quanxin

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we are mainly concerned with a class of stochastic neutral functional differential equations of Sobolev-type with Poisson jumps. Under two different sets of conditions, we establish the existence of the mild solution by applying the Leray-Schauder alternative theory and the Sadakovskii’s fixed point theorem, respectively. Furthermore, we use the Bihari’s inequality to prove the Osgood type uniqueness. Also, the mean square exponential stability is investigated by applying the Gronwall inequality. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the theory results.

  6. Differential PAX3 functions in normal skin melanocytes and melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Medic, Sandra; Rizos, Helen; Ziman, Mel

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} PAX3 retains embryonic roles in adult melanocytes and melanoma cells. {yields} Promotes 'stem' cell-like phenotype via NES and SOX9 in both cells types. {yields} Regulates melanoma and melanocyte migration through MCAM and CSPG4. {yields} PAX3 regulates melanoma but not melanocyte proliferation via TPD52. {yields} Regulates melanoma cell (but not melanocyte) survival via BCL2L1 and PTEN. -- Abstract: The PAX3 transcription factor is the key regulator of melanocyte development during embryogenesis and is also frequently found in melanoma cells. While PAX3 is known to regulate melanocyte differentiation, survival, proliferation and migration during development, it is not clear if its function is maintained in adult melanocytes and melanoma cells. To clarify this we have assessed which genes are targeted by PAX3 in these cells. We show here that similar to its roles in development, PAX3 regulates complex differentiation networks in both melanoma cells and melanocytes, in order to maintain cells as 'stem' cell-like (via NES and SOX9). We show also that mediators of migration (MCAM and CSPG4) are common to both cell types but more so in melanoma cells. By contrast, PAX3-mediated regulation of melanoma cell proliferation (through TPD52) and survival (via BCL2L1 and PTEN) differs from that in melanocytes. These results suggest that by controlling cell proliferation, survival and migration as well as maintaining a less differentiated 'stem' cell like phenotype, PAX3 may contribute to melanoma development and progression.

  7. Cdk4 functions in multiple cell types to control Drosophila intestinal stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Adlesic, Mojca; Frei, Christian; Frew, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and differentiation of enteroblasts to form mature enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes in the Drosophila intestinal epithelium must be tightly regulated to maintain homeostasis. We show that genetic modulation of CyclinD/Cdk4 activity or mTOR-dependent signalling cell-autonomously regulates enterocyte growth, which influences ISC proliferation and enteroblast differentiation. Increased enterocyte growth results in higher numbers of ISCs and defective enterocyte growth reduces ISC abundance and proliferation in the midgut. Adult midguts deficient for Cdk4 show severe disruption of intestinal homeostasis characterised by decreased ISC self-renewal, enteroblast differentiation defects and low enteroendocrine cell and enterocyte numbers. The ISC/enteroblast phenotypes result from a combination of cell autonomous and non-autonomous requirements for Cdk4 function. One non-autonomous consequence of Cdk4-dependent deficient enterocyte growth is high expression of Delta in ISCs and Delta retention in enteroblasts. We postulate that aberrant activation of the Delta–Notch pathway is a possible partial cause of lost ISC stemness. These results support the idea that enterocytes contribute to a putative stem cell niche that maintains intestinal homeostasis in the Drosophila anterior midgut. PMID:26879465

  8. Cdk4 functions in multiple cell types to control Drosophila intestinal stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Adlesic, Mojca; Frei, Christian; Frew, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and differentiation of enteroblasts to form mature enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes in the Drosophila intestinal epithelium must be tightly regulated to maintain homeostasis. We show that genetic modulation of CyclinD/Cdk4 activity or mTOR-dependent signalling cell-autonomously regulates enterocyte growth, which influences ISC proliferation and enteroblast differentiation. Increased enterocyte growth results in higher numbers of ISCs and defective enterocyte growth reduces ISC abundance and proliferation in the midgut. Adult midguts deficient for Cdk4 show severe disruption of intestinal homeostasis characterised by decreased ISC self-renewal, enteroblast differentiation defects and low enteroendocrine cell and enterocyte numbers. The ISC/enteroblast phenotypes result from a combination of cell autonomous and non-autonomous requirements for Cdk4 function. One non-autonomous consequence of Cdk4-dependent deficient enterocyte growth is high expression of Delta in ISCs and Delta retention in enteroblasts. We postulate that aberrant activation of the Delta-Notch pathway is a possible partial cause of lost ISC stemness. These results support the idea that enterocytes contribute to a putative stem cell niche that maintains intestinal homeostasis in the Drosophila anterior midgut. PMID:26879465

  9. Differential Density Statistics of the Galaxy Distribution and the Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, V. V. L.; Iribarrem, A. S.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2007-03-01

    This paper uses data obtained from the galaxy luminosity function (LF) to calculate two types of radial number density statistics of the galaxy distribution as discussed in Ribeiro, namely, the differential density γ and the integral differential density γ*. By applying the theory advanced by Ribeiro & Stoeger, which connects the relativistic cosmology number counts with the astronomically derived LF, the differential number counts dN/dz are extracted from the LF and used to calculate both γ and γ* with various cosmological distance definitions, namely, area distance, luminosity distance, galaxy area distance, and redshift distance. LF data are taken from the CNOC2 galaxy redshift survey, and γ and γ* are calculated for two cosmological models: Einstein-de Sitter and an Ωm0=0.3, ΩΛ0=0.7 standard cosmology. The results confirm the strong dependency of both statistics on the distance definition, as predicted in Ribeiro, as well as showing that plots of γ and γ* against the luminosity and redshift distances indicate that the CNOC2 galaxy distribution follows a power-law pattern for redshifts higher than 0.1. These findings support Ribeiro's theoretical proposition that using different cosmological distance measures in statistical analyses of galaxy surveys can lead to significant ambiguity in drawing conclusions about the behavior of the observed large-scale distribution of galaxies.

  10. Poly(norepinephrine) as a functional bio-interface for neuronal differentiation on electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Mehmet Berat; Xu, Ruodan; Zhao, Huiling; Wang, Xueqin; Dong, Mingdong; Besenbacher, Flemming; Chen, Menglin

    2015-04-14

    Based on the catecholic chemistry of a mussel inspired coating, norepinephrine (NE), a catecholamine found both in neurotransmitters and mussel adhesive proteins, was for the first time applied as a unique bio-interface integrating multi-functions facilitating PC12 neuron-like differentiation. A uniform, ultra-smooth pNE coating was achieved on electrospun submicron PLCL fibers, proven by surface characterization. The introduced catechol groups from pNE were further used to not only anchor collagen to enhance cell adhesion but also localize nerve growth factor to promote neuron-like differentiation. The obtained pNE-collagen coating was found to be a superior substrate for PC12 differentiation, confirmed by both cellular toxicity/viability assays and immunochemical staining. The aligned PLCL fiber conformation further steered neurite formation along the fiber direction and contributed to neurite extension and increased the number of neurites per cell body. This facile pNE coating might lead to a more efficient use of growth factor, drugs and other bioactive molecules with lower loading dosage and sustained activity resulting in enhanced therapeutic effects and decreased adverse effects. PMID:25766518

  11. Instrumented Functional Reach Test Differentiates Individuals at High Risk for Parkinson’s Disease from Controls

    PubMed Central

    Hasmann, Sandra E.; Berg, Daniela; Hobert, Markus A.; Weiss, David; Lindemann, Ulrich; Streffer, Johannes; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Maetzler, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The functional reach (FR) test as a complex measure of balance including limits of stability has been proven to differentiate between patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and controls (CO). Recently, it has been shown that the instrumentation of the FR (iFR) with a wearable sensor may increase this diagnostic accuracy. This cross-sectional study aimed at investigating whether the iFR has the potential to differentiate individuals with high risk for PD (HRPD) from CO, as the delineation of such individuals would allow for, e.g., early neuromodulation. Thirteen PD patients, 13 CO, and 31 HRPD were investigated. HRPD was defined by presence of an enlarged area of hyperechogenicity in the mesencephalon on transcranial sonography and either one motor sign or two risk and prodromal markers of PD. All participants were asked to reach with their right arm forward as far as possible and hold this position for 10 s. During this period, sway parameters were assessed with an accelerometer (Dynaport, McRoberts) worn at the lower back. Extracted parameters that differed significantly between PD patients and CO in our cohort [FR distance (shorter in PD), anterior–posterior and mediolateral acceleration (both lower in PD)] as well as JERK, which has been shown to differentiate HRPD from CO and PD in a previous study, were included in a model, which was then used to differentiate HRPD from CO. The model yielded an area under the curve of 0.77, with a specificity of 85%, and a sensitivity of 74%. These results suggest that the iFR can contribute to an assessment panel focusing on the definition of HRPD individuals. PMID:25386137

  12. Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells restore cardiac function in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy via trilineage differentiating capacity

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Henry C.; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E.; Oskouei, Behzad N.; Feigenbaum, Gary S.; Rodriguez, Jose E.; Valdes, David; Pattany, Pradip M.; Zambrano, Juan P.; Hu, Qinghua; McNiece, Ian; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying cardiac reparative effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) remain highly controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MSCs regenerate chronically infarcted myocardium through mechanisms comprising long-term engraftment and trilineage differentiation. Twelve weeks after myocardial infarction, female swine received catheter-based transendocardial injections of either placebo (n = 4) or male allogeneic MSCs (200 million; n = 6). Animals underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and in vivo cell fate was determined by co-localization of Y-chromosome (Ypos) cells with markers of cardiac, vascular muscle, and endothelial lineages. MSCs engrafted in infarct and border zones and differentiated into cardiomyocytes as ascertained by co-localization with GATA-4, Nkx2.5, and α-sarcomeric actin. In addition, Ypos MSCs exhibited vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell differentiation, contributing to large and small vessel formation. Infarct size was reduced from 19.3 ± 1.7% to 13.9 ± 2.0% (P < 0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) increased from 35.0 ± 1.7% to 41.3 ± 2.7% (P < 0.05) in MSC but not placebo pigs over 12 weeks. This was accompanied by increases in regional contractility and myocardial blood flow (MBF), particularly in the infarct border zone. Importantly, MSC engraftment correlated with functional recovery in contractility (R = 0.85, P < 0.05) and MBF (R = 0.76, P < 0.01). Together these findings demonstrate long-term MSC survival, engraftment, and trilineage differentiation following transplantation into chronically scarred myocardium. MSCs are an adult stem cell with the capacity for cardiomyogenesis and vasculogenesis which contribute, at least in part, to their ability to repair chronically scarred myocardium. PMID:19666564

  13. Stimulus Set Meaningfulness and Neurophysiological Differentiation: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Melanie; Sasai, Shuntaro; Gosseries, Olivia; Oizumi, Masafumi; Casali, Adenauer; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    A meaningful set of stimuli, such as a sequence of frames from a movie, triggers a set of different experiences. By contrast, a meaningless set of stimuli, such as a sequence of ‘TV noise’ frames, triggers always the same experience—of seeing ‘TV noise’—even though the stimuli themselves are as different from each other as the movie frames. We reasoned that the differentiation of cortical responses underlying the subject’s experiences, as measured by Lempel-Ziv complexity (incompressibility) of functional MRI images, should reflect the overall meaningfulness of a set of stimuli for the subject, rather than differences among the stimuli. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the differentiation of brain activity patterns in response to a movie sequence, to the same movie scrambled in time, and to ‘TV noise’, where the pixels from each movie frame were scrambled in space. While overall cortical activation was strong and widespread in all conditions, the differentiation (Lempel-Ziv complexity) of brain activation patterns was correlated with the meaningfulness of the stimulus set, being highest in the movie condition, intermediate in the scrambled movie condition, and minimal for ‘TV noise’. Stimulus set meaningfulness was also associated with higher information integration among cortical regions. These results suggest that the differentiation of neural responses can be used to assess the meaningfulness of a given set of stimuli for a given subject, without the need to identify the features and categories that are relevant to the subject, nor the precise location of selective neural responses. PMID:25970444

  14. Differential Abundance of Microbial Functional Groups along the Elevation Gradient from the Coast to the Luquillo Mountains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial communities respond to multiple abiotic and biotic factors that change along elevation gradients. We compare changes in microbial community composition in soil and review previous research on differential abundance of microbial functional groups along an elevation gradi...

  15. Cool and hot executive function as predictors of aggression in early childhood: Differentiating between the function and form of aggression.

    PubMed

    Poland, Sarah E; Monks, Claire P; Tsermentseli, Stella

    2016-06-01

    Executive function (EF) has been implicated in childhood aggression. Understanding of the role of EF in aggression has been hindered, however, by the lack of research taking into account the function and form of aggression and the almost exclusive focus on cool EF. This study examined the role of cool and hot EF in teacher reported aggression, differentiating between reactive and proactive as well as physical and relational aggression. Children (N = 106) completed laboratory tasks measuring cool (inhibition, planning, working memory) and hot EF (affective decision-making, delay of gratification). Cool, but not hot, EF significantly contributed to understanding of childhood aggression. Inhibition was a central predictor of childhood aggression. Planning and working memory, in contrast, were significant independent predictors of proactive relational aggression only. Added to this, prosocial behaviour moderated the relationship between working memory and reactive relational aggression. This study therefore suggests that cool EF, particularly inhibition, is associated with childhood aggression across the different functions and forms. PMID:26615980

  16. Biological Sensitivity to Family Income: Differential Effects on Early Executive Functioning.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Jelena; Portilla, Ximena A; Ballard, Parissa J

    2016-03-01

    The study examined how the interplay between children's cortisol response and family income is related to executive function (EF) skills. The sample included one hundred and two 5- to 6-year-olds (64% minority). EF skills were measured using laboratory tasks and observer ratings. Physiological reactivity was assessed via cortisol response during a laboratory visit. A consistent, positive association between family income and EF skills emerged only for children who showed high cortisol response, a marker of biological sensitivity to context. In contrast, family income was not related to EF skills in children who displayed low cortisol response. Follow-up analyses revealed a disordinal interaction, suggesting that differential susceptibility can be detected at the level of basic cognitive and self-regulatory skills that support adaptive functioning. PMID:26709089

  17. CTCF establishes discrete functional chromatin domains at the Hox clusters during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Narendra, Varun; Rocha, Pedro P.; An, Disi; Raviram, Ramya; Skok, Jane A.; Mazzoni, Esteban O.; Reinberg, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group proteins encode the epigenetic memory of cellular positional identity by establishing inheritable domains of repressive and active chromatin within the Hox clusters. Here, we demonstrate that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) functions to insulate these adjacent yet antagonistic chromatin domains during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cervical motor neurons. Deletion of CTCF binding sites within the Hox clusters results in the expansion of active chromatin into the repressive domain. CTCF functions as an insulator by organizing Hox clusters into spatially disjoint domains. Ablation of CTCF binding disrupts topological boundaries such that caudal Hox genes leave the repressed domain and become subject to transcriptional activation. Hence, CTCF is required to insulate facultative heterochromatin from impinging euchromatin to produce discrete positional identities. PMID:25722416

  18. Methyl donor deficiency affects small-intestinal differentiation and barrier function in rats.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, Aude; Pooya, Shabnam; Bossenmeyer-Pourie, Carine; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Germain, Adeline; Chevaux, Jean-Baptiste; Coste, Florence; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2013-02-28

    Dietary methyl donors and their genetic determinants are associated with Crohn's disease risk. We investigated whether a methyl-deficient diet (MDD) may affect development and functions of the small intestine in rat pups from dams subjected to the MDD during gestation and lactation. At 1 month before pregnancy, adult females were fed with either a standard food or a diet without vitamin B12, folate and choline. A global wall hypotrophy was observed in the distal small bowel (MDD animals 0·30 mm v. controls 0·58 mm; P< 0·001) with increased crypt apoptosis (3·37 v. 0·4%; P< 0·001), loss of enterocyte differentiation in the villus and a reduction in intestinal alkaline phosphatase production. Cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining (MDD animals 3·37% v. controls 0·4%, P< 0·001) and the Apostain labelling index showed increased crypt apoptosis (3·5 v. 1·4%; P= 0·018). Decreased proliferation was observed in crypts of the proximal small bowel with a reduced number of minichromosome maintenance 6 (MDD animals 52·83% v. controls 83·17%; P= 0·048) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells (46·25 v. 59 %; P= 0·05). This lack of enterocyte differentiation in the distal small bowel was associated with an impaired expression of β-catenin and a decreased β-catenin-E-cadherin interaction. The MDD affected the intestinal barrier in the proximal small bowel by decreasing Paneth cell number after immunostaining for lysosyme (MDD animals 8·66% v. controls 21·66%) and by reducing goblet cell number and mucus production after immunostaining for mucin-2 (crypts 8·66 v. 15·33%; villus 7 v. 17%). The MDD has dual effects on the small intestine by producing dramatic effects on enterocyte differentiation and barrier function in rats. PMID:22794784

  19. Identifying Country-Specific Cultures of Physics Education: A differential item functioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesic, Vanes

    2012-11-01

    In international large-scale assessments of educational outcomes, student achievement is often represented by unidimensional constructs. This approach allows for drawing general conclusions about country rankings with respect to the given achievement measure, but it typically does not provide specific diagnostic information which is necessary for systematic comparisons and improvements of educational systems. Useful information could be obtained by exploring the differences in national profiles of student achievement between low-achieving and high-achieving countries. In this study, we aimed to identify the relative weaknesses and strengths of eighth graders' physics achievement in Bosnia and Herzegovina in comparison to the achievement of their peers from Slovenia. For this purpose, we ran a secondary analysis of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007 data. The student sample consisted of 4,220 students from Bosnia and Herzegovina and 4,043 students from Slovenia. After analysing the cognitive demands of TIMSS 2007 physics items, the correspondent differential item functioning (DIF)/differential group functioning contrasts were estimated. Approximately 40% of items exhibited large DIF contrasts, indicating significant differences between cultures of physics education in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Slovenia. The relative strength of students from Bosnia and Herzegovina showed to be mainly associated with the topic area 'Electricity and magnetism'. Classes of items which required the knowledge of experimental method, counterintuitive thinking, proportional reasoning and/or the use of complex knowledge structures proved to be differentially easier for students from Slovenia. In the light of the presented results, the common practice of ranking countries with respect to universally established cognitive categories seems to be potentially misleading.

  20. A numerical method for solving systems of higher order linear functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüzbasi, Suayip; Gök, Emrah; Sezer, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Functional differential equations have importance in many areas of science such as mathematical physics. These systems are difficult to solve analytically.In this paper we consider the systems of linear functional differential equations [1-9] including the term y(αx + β) and advance-delay in derivatives of y .To obtain the approximate solutions of those systems, we present a matrix-collocation method by using Müntz-Legendre polynomials and the collocation points. For this purpose, to obtain the approximate solutions of those systems, we present a matrix-collocation method by using Müntz-Legendre polynomials and the collocation points. This method transform the problem into a system of linear algebraic equations. The solutions of last system determine unknown co-efficients of original problem. Also, an error estimation technique is presented and the approximate solutions are improved by using it. The program of method is written in Matlab and the approximate solutions can be obtained easily. Also some examples are given to illustrate the validity of the method.

  1. Trichostatin A, a critical factor in maintaining the functional differentiation of primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Henkens, Tom . E-mail: Tom.Henkens@vub.ac.be; Papeleu, Peggy; Elaut, Greetje; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) have been shown to increase differentiation-related gene expression in several tumor-derived cell lines by hyperacetylating core histones. Effects of HDI on primary cultured cells, however, have hardly been investigated. In the present study, the ability of trichostatin A (TSA), a prototype hydroxamate HDI, to counteract the loss of liver-specific functions in primary rat hepatocyte cultures has been investigated. Upon exposure to TSA, it was found that the cell viability of the cultured hepatocytes and their albumin secretion as a function of culture time were increased. TSA-treated hepatocytes also better maintained cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated phase I biotransformation capacity, whereas the activity of phase II glutathione S-transferases (GST) was not affected. Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis of CYP1A1, CYP2B1 and CYP3A11 protein and mRNA levels, respectively, further revealed that TSA acts at the transcriptional level. In addition, protein expression levels of the liver-enriched transcription factors (LETFs) hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4{alpha}) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP{alpha}) were accordingly increased by TSA throughout culture time. In conclusion, these findings indicate that TSA plays a major role in the preservation of the differentiated hepatic phenotype in culture. It is suggested that the effects of TSA on CYP gene expression are mediated via controlling the expression of LETFs.

  2. Analyte species and concentration identification using differentially functionalized microcantilever arrays and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Datskos, Panos G; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have performed analyte species and concentration identification using an array of ten differentially functionalized microcantilevers coupled with a back-propagation artificial neural network pattern recognition algorithm. The array consists of ten nanostructured silicon microcantilevers functionalized by polymeric and gas chromatography phases and macrocyclic receptors as spatially dense, differentially responding sensing layers for identification and quantitation of individual analyte(s) and their binary mixtures. The array response (i.e. cantilever bending) to analyte vapor was measured by an optical readout scheme and the responses were recorded for a selection of individual analytes as well as several binary mixtures. An artificial neural network (ANN) was designed and trained to recognize not only the individual analytes and binary mixtures, but also to determine the concentration of individual components in a mixture. To the best of our knowledge, ANNs have not been applied to microcantilever array responses previously to determine concentrations of individual analytes. The trained ANN correctly identified the eleven test analyte(s) as individual components, most with probabilities greater than 97%, whereas it did not misidentify an unknown (untrained) analyte. Demonstrated unique aspects of this work include an ability to measure binary mixtures and provide both qualitative (identification) and quantitative (concentration) information with array-ANN-based sensor methodologies.

  3. A KAP1 phosphorylation switch controls MyoD function during skeletal muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kulwant; Cassano, Marco; Planet, Evarist; Sebastian, Soji; Jang, Suk Min; Sohi, Gurjeev; Faralli, Hervé; Choi, Jinmi; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional activator MyoD serves as a master controller of myogenesis. Often in partnership with Mef2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2), MyoD binds to the promoters of hundreds of muscle genes in proliferating myoblasts yet activates these targets only upon receiving cues that launch differentiation. What regulates this off/on switch of MyoD function has been incompletely understood, although it is known to reflect the action of chromatin modifiers. Here, we identify KAP1 (KRAB [Krüppel-like associated box]-associated protein 1)/TRIM28 (tripartite motif protein 28) as a key regulator of MyoD function. In myoblasts, KAP1 is present with MyoD and Mef2 at many muscle genes, where it acts as a scaffold to recruit not only coactivators such as p300 and LSD1 but also corepressors such as G9a and HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1), with promoter silencing as the net outcome. Upon differentiation, MSK1-mediated phosphorylation of KAP1 releases the corepressors from the scaffold, unleashing transcriptional activation by MyoD/Mef2 and their positive cofactors. Thus, our results reveal KAP1 as a previously unappreciated interpreter of cell signaling, which modulates the ability of MyoD to drive myogenesis. PMID:25737281

  4. A Nanoscale Interface Promoting Molecular and Functional Differentiation of Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Posati, Tamara; Pistone, Assunta; Saracino, Emanuela; Formaggio, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Troni, Elisabetta; Sagnella, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Bonetti, Simone; Caprini, Marco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Zamboni, Roberto; Muccini, Michele; Benfenati, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and aquaporins expressed by astrocytes are key players in the maintenance of cerebral homeostasis and in brain pathophysiologies. One major challenge in the study of astrocyte membrane channels in vitro, is that their expression pattern does not resemble the one observed in vivo. Nanostructured interfaces represent a significant resource to control the cellular behaviour and functionalities at micro and nanoscale as well as to generate novel and more reliable models to study astrocytes in vitro. However, the potential of nanotechnologies in the manipulation of astrocytes ion channels and aquaporins has never been previously reported. Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) are layered materials with increasing potential as biocompatible nanoscale interface. Here, we evaluate the effect of the interaction of HTlc nanoparticles films with primary rat neocortical astrocytes. We show that HTlc films are biocompatible and do not promote gliotic reaction, while favouring astrocytes differentiation by induction of F-actin fibre alignment and vinculin polarization. Western Blot, Immunofluorescence and patch-clamp revealed that differentiation was accompanied by molecular and functional up-regulation of both inward rectifying potassium channel Kir 4.1 and aquaporin 4, AQP4. The reported results pave the way to engineering novel in vitro models to study astrocytes in a in vivo like condition. PMID:27503424

  5. A Nanoscale Interface Promoting Molecular and Functional Differentiation of Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Posati, Tamara; Pistone, Assunta; Saracino, Emanuela; Formaggio, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Troni, Elisabetta; Sagnella, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Bonetti, Simone; Caprini, Marco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Zamboni, Roberto; Muccini, Michele; Benfenati, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and aquaporins expressed by astrocytes are key players in the maintenance of cerebral homeostasis and in brain pathophysiologies. One major challenge in the study of astrocyte membrane channels in vitro, is that their expression pattern does not resemble the one observed in vivo. Nanostructured interfaces represent a significant resource to control the cellular behaviour and functionalities at micro and nanoscale as well as to generate novel and more reliable models to study astrocytes in vitro. However, the potential of nanotechnologies in the manipulation of astrocytes ion channels and aquaporins has never been previously reported. Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) are layered materials with increasing potential as biocompatible nanoscale interface. Here, we evaluate the effect of the interaction of HTlc nanoparticles films with primary rat neocortical astrocytes. We show that HTlc films are biocompatible and do not promote gliotic reaction, while favouring astrocytes differentiation by induction of F-actin fibre alignment and vinculin polarization. Western Blot, Immunofluorescence and patch-clamp revealed that differentiation was accompanied by molecular and functional up-regulation of both inward rectifying potassium channel Kir 4.1 and aquaporin 4, AQP4. The reported results pave the way to engineering novel in vitro models to study astrocytes in a in vivo like condition. PMID:27503424

  6. A Nanoscale Interface Promoting Molecular and Functional Differentiation of Neural Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posati, Tamara; Pistone, Assunta; Saracino, Emanuela; Formaggio, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Troni, Elisabetta; Sagnella, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Bonetti, Simone; Caprini, Marco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Zamboni, Roberto; Muccini, Michele; Benfenati, Valentina

    2016-08-01

    Potassium channels and aquaporins expressed by astrocytes are key players in the maintenance of cerebral homeostasis and in brain pathophysiologies. One major challenge in the study of astrocyte membrane channels in vitro, is that their expression pattern does not resemble the one observed in vivo. Nanostructured interfaces represent a significant resource to control the cellular behaviour and functionalities at micro and nanoscale as well as to generate novel and more reliable models to study astrocytes in vitro. However, the potential of nanotechnologies in the manipulation of astrocytes ion channels and aquaporins has never been previously reported. Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) are layered materials with increasing potential as biocompatible nanoscale interface. Here, we evaluate the effect of the interaction of HTlc nanoparticles films with primary rat neocortical astrocytes. We show that HTlc films are biocompatible and do not promote gliotic reaction, while favouring astrocytes differentiation by induction of F-actin fibre alignment and vinculin polarization. Western Blot, Immunofluorescence and patch-clamp revealed that differentiation was accompanied by molecular and functional up-regulation of both inward rectifying potassium channel Kir 4.1 and aquaporin 4, AQP4. The reported results pave the way to engineering novel in vitro models to study astrocytes in a in vivo like condition.

  7. Structural and Mutational Analysis of Functional Differentiation between Synaptotagmins-1 and -7

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Mingshan; Craig, Timothy K.; Shin, Ok-Ho; Li, Liyi; Brautigam, Chad A.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Rosenmund, Christian; Rizo, Josep

    2012-01-20

    Synaptotagmins are known to mediate diverse forms of Ca{sup 2+}-triggered exocytosis through their C{sub 2} domains, but the principles underlying functional differentiation among them are unclear. Synaptotagmin-1 functions as a Ca{sup 2+} sensor in neurotransmitter release at central nervous system synapses, but synaptotagmin-7 does not, and yet both isoforms act as Ca{sup 2+} sensors in chromaffin cells. To shed light into this apparent paradox, we have performed rescue experiments in neurons from synaptotagmin-1 knockout mice using a chimera that contains the synaptotagmin-1 sequence with its C{sub 2}B domain replaced by the synaptotagmin-7 C{sub 2}B domain (Syt1/7). Rescue was not achieved either with the WT Syt1/7 chimera or with nine mutants where residues that are distinct in synaptotagmin-7 were restored to those present in synaptotagmin-1. To investigate whether these results arise because of unique conformational features of the synaptotagmin-7 C{sub 2}B domain, we determined its crystal structure at 1.44 {angstrom} resolution. The synaptotagmin-7 C{sub 2}B domain structure is very similar to that of the synaptotagmin-1 C{sub 2}B domain and contains three Ca{sup 2+}-binding sites. Two of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding sites of the synaptotagmin-7 C{sub 2}B domain are also present in the synaptotagmin-1 C{sub 2}B domain and have analogous ligands to those determined for the latter by NMR spectroscopy, suggesting that a discrepancy observed in a crystal structure of the synaptotagmin-1 C{sub 2}B domain arose from crystal contacts. Overall, our results suggest that functional differentiation in synaptotagmins arises in part from subtle sequence changes that yield dramatic functional differences.

  8. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  9. Androgens induce sebaceous differentiation in sebocyte cells expressing a stable functional androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Barrault, Christine; Garnier, Julien; Pedretti, Nathalie; Cordier-Dirikoc, Sevda; Ratineau, Emeline; Deguercy, Alain; Bernard, François-Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Androgens act through non-genomic and androgen receptor (AR)-dependent genomic mechanisms. AR is expressed in the sebaceous gland and the importance of androgens in the sebaceous function is well established. However, the in vitro models used to date have failed to evidence a clear genomic effect (e.g., modification of gene expression profile) of androgens on human sebocyte cells. In order to study the impact of active androgens in sebocytes, we constructed a stable human sebocyte cell line derived from SEBO662 [17] constitutively expressing a fully functional AR. In these SEBO662 AR+ cells, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced AR nuclear translocation and the strong modulation of a set of transcripts (RASD1, GREB1...) known to be androgen-sensitive in other androgenic cells and tissues. Moreover, we observed that DHT precociously down-regulated markers for immature follicular cells (KRT15, TNC) and for hair lineage (KRT75, FST) and up-regulated the expression of genes potentially related to sebocyte differentiation (MUC1/EMA, AQP3, FADS2). These effects were fully confirmed at the protein level. In addition, DHT-stimulated SEBO662 AR+, cultured in a low-calcium defined keratinocyte medium without serum or any complement, neosynthesize lipids, including sebum lipids, and store increased amounts of triglycerides in lipid droplets. DHT also induces morphological changes, increases cell size, and treatments over 7 days lead to a time-dependent increase in the population of apoptotic DNA-fragmented cells. Taken together, these results show for the first time that active androgens alone can engage immature sebocytes in a clear lipogenic differentiation process (Graphical abstract). These effects depend on the expression of a functional AR in these cells. This model should be of interest for revisiting the mechanisms of the sebaceous function in vitro and for the design of relevant pharmacological models for drug or compound testing. PMID:25864624

  10. Retinoic acid induced the differentiation of neural stem cells from embryonic spinal cord into functional neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bo-Tao; Wang, Li; Li, Sen; Long, Zai-Yun; Wu, Ya-Min; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid is an important molecular taking part in the development and homeostasis of nervous system. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into three main neural cells including neuron, astrocyte and oligodendrocyte. However, whether retinoic acid can induce NSCs derived from embryonic spinal cord differentiating into functional neurons and its efficiency are not clear. In this experiment, NSCs were isolated from embryonic 14 d spinal cord of rats. The growth and neuronal differentiation of NSCs induced by 500 nM RA was examined in vitro. It was indicated that compared with the control group, there were more differentiated cells with longer cytodendrites in the medium treated with RA at different time. And more, there were more neuronal marker positive cells in 500 nM RA group than the control group seven days after differentiation. At the same time, the expression of β-tublin III protein in RA group was higher than those in control group, which was contrary to the expression of astrocyte marker GFAP protein at seven days after differentiation. However the differentiated neurons, whether treated with RA or not both exhibited biological electrical reactivity after stimulated by glutamine. Therefore, these findings indicated that RA could promote growth of cellular dendrites and neuronal differentiation of NSCs, which also induce functional maturation of differentiated neurons finally. PMID:26339381

  11. Effect of LYRM1 knockdown on proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and mitochondrial function in the P19 cell model of cardiac differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Mei; Li, Xing; Song, Gui-Xian; Liu, Ming; Fan, Yi; Wu, Li-Jie; Li, Hua; Zhang, Qi-Jun; Liu, Yao-Qiu; Qian, Ling-Mei

    2016-02-01

    To explore the effects of LYRM1 knockdown on proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and mitochondrial function in the embryonic carcinoma (P19) cell model of cardiac differentiation. Knockdown of LYRM1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Cell Counting Kit-8(CCK-8) proliferation assays and cell cycle analysis demonstrated that LYRM1 gene silencing significantly inhibited P19 cell proliferation. Flow cytometry and measurement of their caspase-3 activities revealed that knockdown of LYRM1 increased P19 cell apoptosis. Observation of morphological changes using an inverted microscope and expression analysis of specific differentiation marker genes using quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed that knockdown of LYRM1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of P19 cells into cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR applied to detect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number implied that there was no significant difference in the LYRM1 knockdown group compared with the control group. Cellular ATP production investigated by luciferase-based luminescence assay was dramatically decreased in differentiated cells transfected with LYRM1 RNAi. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometery were used to detect the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) showed that the level of ROS was dramatically increased and MMP was obviously decreased in differentiated cells transfected with LYRM1 RNAi. Collectively, knockdown of LYRM1 promoted apoptosis and suppressed proliferation and differentiation in P19 cells. In addition, knockdown of LYRM1 induced mitochondrial impairment in P19 cells during differentiation, which was reflected by decreased ATP synthesis, lower MMP and increased ROS levels. PMID:26759027

  12. COP9-Hedgehog axis regulates the function of the germline stem cell progeny differentiation niche in the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tinglin; Wang, Su; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Ying; Yang, Zhihao; Liu, Luping; Song, Xiaoqing; Ni, Jianquan; Xie, Ting

    2015-12-15

    Both stem cell self-renewal and lineage differentiation are controlled extrinsically as well as intrinsically. Germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila ovary provide an attractive model in which to study both stem cell self-renewal and lineage differentiation at the molecular and cellular level. Recently, we have proposed that escort cells (ECs) form a differentiation niche to control GSC lineage specification extrinsically. However, it remains poorly understood how the maintenance and function of the differentiation niche are regulated at the molecular level. Here, this study reveals a new role of COP9 in the differentiation niche to modulate autocrine Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, thereby promoting GSC lineage differentiation. COP9, which is a highly conserved protein complex composed of eight CSN subunits, catalyzes the removal of Nedd8 protein modification from target proteins. Our genetic results have demonstrated that all the COP9 components and the hh pathway components, including hh itself, are required in ECs to promote GSC progeny differentiation. Interestingly, COP9 is required in ECs to maintain Hh signaling activity, and activating Hh signaling in ECs can partially bypass the requirement for COP9 in GSC progeny differentiation. Finally, both COP9 and Hh signaling in ECs promote GSC progeny differentiation partly by preventing BMP signaling and maintaining cellular processes. Therefore, this study has demonstrated that the COP9-Hh signaling axis operates in the differentiation niche to promote GSC progeny differentiation partly by maintaining EC cellular processes and preventing BMP signaling. This provides new insight into how the function of the differentiation niche is regulated at the molecular level. PMID:26672093

  13. Increased mitochondrial function downstream from KDM5A histone demethylase rescues differentiation in pRB-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Váraljai, Renáta; Islam, Abul B M M K; Beshiri, Michael L; Rehman, Jalees; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Benevolenskaya, Elizaveta V

    2015-09-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRb restricts cell growth through inhibition of cell cycle progression. Increasing evidence suggests that pRb also promotes differentiation, but the mechanisms are poorly understood, and the key question remains as to how differentiation in tumor cells can be enhanced in order to diminish their aggressive potential. Previously, we identified the histone demethylase KDM5A (lysine [K]-specific demethylase 5A), which demethylates histone H3 on Lys4 (H3K4), as a pRB-interacting protein counteracting pRB's role in promoting differentiation. Here we show that loss of Kdm5a restores differentiation through increasing mitochondrial respiration. This metabolic effect is both necessary and sufficient to induce the expression of a network of cell type-specific signaling and structural genes. Importantly, the regulatory functions of pRB in the cell cycle and differentiation are distinct because although restoring differentiation requires intact mitochondrial function, it does not necessitate cell cycle exit. Cells lacking Rb1 exhibit defective mitochondria and decreased oxygen consumption. Kdm5a is a direct repressor of metabolic regulatory genes, thus explaining the compensatory role of Kdm5a deletion in restoring mitochondrial function and differentiation. Significantly, activation of mitochondrial function by the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator Pgc-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α; also called PPARGC1A) a coactivator of the Kdm5a target genes, is sufficient to override the differentiation block. Overexpression of Pgc-1α, like KDM5A deletion, inhibits cell growth in RB-negative human cancer cell lines. The rescue of differentiation by loss of KDM5A or by activation of mitochondrial biogenesis reveals the switch to oxidative phosphorylation as an essential step in restoring differentiation and a less aggressive cancer phenotype. PMID:26314709

  14. Increased mitochondrial function downstream from KDM5A histone demethylase rescues differentiation in pRB-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Váraljai, Renáta; Islam, Abul B.M.M.K.; Beshiri, Michael L.; Rehman, Jalees; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Benevolenskaya, Elizaveta V.

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRb restricts cell growth through inhibition of cell cycle progression. Increasing evidence suggests that pRb also promotes differentiation, but the mechanisms are poorly understood, and the key question remains as to how differentiation in tumor cells can be enhanced in order to diminish their aggressive potential. Previously, we identified the histone demethylase KDM5A (lysine [K]-specific demethylase 5A), which demethylates histone H3 on Lys4 (H3K4), as a pRB-interacting protein counteracting pRB's role in promoting differentiation. Here we show that loss of Kdm5a restores differentiation through increasing mitochondrial respiration. This metabolic effect is both necessary and sufficient to induce the expression of a network of cell type-specific signaling and structural genes. Importantly, the regulatory functions of pRB in the cell cycle and differentiation are distinct because although restoring differentiation requires intact mitochondrial function, it does not necessitate cell cycle exit. Cells lacking Rb1 exhibit defective mitochondria and decreased oxygen consumption. Kdm5a is a direct repressor of metabolic regulatory genes, thus explaining the compensatory role of Kdm5a deletion in restoring mitochondrial function and differentiation. Significantly, activation of mitochondrial function by the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator Pgc-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α; also called PPARGC1A) a coactivator of the Kdm5a target genes, is sufficient to override the differentiation block. Overexpression of Pgc-1α, like KDM5A deletion, inhibits cell growth in RB-negative human cancer cell lines. The rescue of differentiation by loss of KDM5A or by activation of mitochondrial biogenesis reveals the switch to oxidative phosphorylation as an essential step in restoring differentiation and a less aggressive cancer phenotype. PMID:26314709

  15. Differential Item and Person Functioning in Large-Scale Writing Assessments within the Context of the SAT®. Research Report 2013-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhard, George, Jr.; Wind, Stefanie A.; Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Chajewski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to illustrate the use of explanatory models based on Rasch measurement theory to detect systematic relationships between student and item characteristics and achievement differences using differential item functioning (DIF), differential group functioning (DGF), and differential person functioning (DPF) techniques. The…

  16. A Monte Carlo Examination of the Sensitivity of the Differential Functioning of Items and Tests Framework for Tests of Measurement Invariance with Likert Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Adam W.; Lautenschlager, Gary J.; Johnson, Emily C.

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights issues associated with the use of the differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) methodology for assessing measurement invariance (or differential functioning) with Likert-type data. Monte Carlo analyses indicate relatively low sensitivity of the DFIT methodology for identifying differential item functioning (DIF)…

  17. Aberrant functional connectivity differentiates retrosplenial cortex from posterior cingulate cortex in prodromal Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dillen, Kim N H; Jacobs, Heidi I L; Kukolja, Juraj; von Reutern, Boris; Richter, Nils; Onur, Özgür A; Dronse, Julian; Langen, Karl-Josef; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-08-01

    The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) is a key hub of the default mode network, a resting-state network involved in episodic memory, showing functional connectivity (FC) changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, PCC is a cytoarchitectonically heterogeneous region. Specifically, the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), often subsumed under the PCC, is an area functionally and microanatomically distinct from PCC. To investigate FC patterns of RSC and PCC separately, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy aging participants, patients with subjective cognitive impairment, and prodromal AD. Compared to the other 2 groups, we found higher FC from RSC to frontal cortex in subjective cognitive impairment but higher FC to occipital cortex in prodromal AD. Conversely, FC from PCC to the lingual gyrus was higher in prodromal AD. Furthermore, data indicate that RSC and PCC are characterized by differential FC patterns represented by hub-specific interactions with memory and attentions scores in prodromal AD compared to cognitively normal individuals, possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms for RSC and neurodegenerative processes for PCC. Data thus confirm and extend previous studies suggesting that the RSC is functionally distinct from PCC. PMID:27318139

  18. Application of functional analysis to perturbation theory of differential equations. [nonlinear perturbation of the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, V. M.; Bond, V. B.

    1980-01-01

    The deviation of the solution of the differential equation y' = f(t, y), y(O) = y sub O from the solution of the perturbed system z' = f(t, z) + g(t, z), z(O) = z sub O was investigated for the case where f and g are continuous functions on I x R sup n into R sup n, where I = (o, a) or I = (o, infinity). These functions are assumed to satisfy the Lipschitz condition in the variable z. The space Lip(I) of all such functions with suitable norms forms a Banach space. By introducing a suitable norm in the space of continuous functions C(I), introducing the problem can be reduced to an equivalent problem in terminology of operators in such spaces. A theorem on existence and uniqueness of the solution is presented by means of Banach space technique. Norm estimates on the rate of growth of such solutions are found. As a consequence, estimates of deviation of a solution due to perturbation are obtained. Continuity of the solution on the initial data and on the perturbation is established. A nonlinear perturbation of the harmonic oscillator is considered a perturbation of equations of the restricted three body problem linearized at libration point.

  19. Differential sensitivity of cranial and limb motor function to nigrostriatal dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Emily K; Maling, Nicholas; Rivera, Benjamin J; Larson, Krista; Thomas, Nagheme J; Fowler, Stephen C; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Shrivastav, Rahul; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-15

    The present study determined the differential effects of unilateral striatal dopamine depletion on cranial motor versus limb motor function. Forty male Long Evans rats were first trained on a comprehensive motor testing battery that dissociated cranial versus limb motor function and included: cylinder forepaw placement, single pellet reaching, vermicelli pasta handling; sunflower seed opening, pasta biting acoustics, and a licking task. Following baseline testing, animals were randomized to either a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (n=20) or control (n=20) group. Animals in the 6-OHDA group received unilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA infusions to induce striatal dopamine depletion. Six-weeks following infusion, all animals were re-tested on the same battery of motor tests. Near infrared densitometry was performed on sections taken through the striatum that were immunohistochemically stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Animals in the 6-OHDA condition showed a mean reduction in TH staining of 88.27%. Although 6-OHDA animals were significantly impaired on all motor tasks, limb motor deficits were more severe than cranial motor impairments. Further, performance on limb motor tasks was correlated with degree of TH depletion while performance on cranial motor impairments showed no significant correlation. These results suggest that limb motor function may be more sensitive to striatal dopaminergic depletion than cranial motor function and is consistent with the clinical observation that therapies targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in Parkinson's disease are more effective for limb motor symptoms than cranial motor impairments. PMID:23018122

  20. Differentiated adipose-derived stem cells promote the recovery of nociceptor function in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Tomita, Koichi; Kiya, Koichiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2016-10-19

    The loss of nociceptive function in the skin because of trauma or surgery can impair the quality of life. The recovery of nociceptor function is mediated by two different axonal responses: nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent collateral sprouting of undamaged nerves and NGF-independent regeneration of damaged nerves. We reported previously that adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can transdifferentiate into Schwann cell (SC)-like cells (dASCs) and that transplantation of dASCs increases axonal density in skin flaps. In the present study, we used an animal model that allowed for the individual assessment of collateral sprouting and regeneration. In-vitro differentiation of ASCs to dASCs significantly increased the production of NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to levels comparable with SCs. In-vivo experiments showed that dASC and SC transplantation significantly increased the area of the mechano-nociceptive field in both collateral sprouting and regeneration models, whereas ASC transplantation exerted no significant effect. Antibody blocking experiment showed that these effects of dASC transplantation in the regeneration model were partly mediated by BDNF. Interestingly, the final areas of nociceptive fields between the two experimental models did not differ significantly for any treatment condition. These results indicate that dASC transplantation differentially facilitates collateral sprouting and axonal regeneration by delivering NGF and other neurotrophic factors (e.g. BDNF), respectively. Although there is a limit to nociceptive field enlargement irrespective of axonal response, dASC transplantation could present a new approach for improving nociceptive function in denervated skin. PMID:27513202

  1. Highly Efficient Differentiation of Functional Hepatocytes From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaocui; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Roll, Garrett; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ahuja, Tijess P.; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Wang, Charles; McGee, Jeannine; Khoobyari, Shiva; Nolta, Jan A.; Willenbring, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great potential for use in regenerative medicine, novel drug development, and disease progression/developmental studies. Here, we report highly efficient differentiation of hiPSCs toward a relatively homogeneous population of functional hepatocytes. hiPSC-derived hepatocytes (hiHs) not only showed a high expression of hepatocyte-specific proteins and liver-specific functions, but they also developed a functional biotransformation system including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and phase III transporters. Nuclear receptors, which are critical for regulating the expression of metabolizing enzymes, were also expressed in hiHs. hiHs also responded to different compounds/inducers of cytochrome P450 as mature hepatocytes do. To follow up on this observation, we analyzed the drug metabolizing capacity of hiHs in real time using a novel ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We found that, like freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes, the seven major metabolic pathways of the drug bufuralol were found in hiHs. In addition, transplanted hiHs engrafted, integrated, and proliferated in livers of an immune-deficient mouse model, and secreted human albumin, indicating that hiHs also function in vivo. In conclusion, we have generated a method for the efficient generation of hepatocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro and in vivo, and it appears that the cells function similarly to primary human hepatocytes, including developing a complete metabolic function. These results represent a significant step toward using patient/disease-specific hepatocytes for cell-based therapeutics as well as for pharmacology and toxicology studies. PMID:23681950

  2. Differentiations and Functional State of Osteogenic Cells in Conditions of Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, Ganna; Rodionova, Natalia; Markevich, Ganna; Markevich, Ganna

    The space flight factors (space radiation, magnetic fields etc.) affect considerably the state of bone tissue, leading to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia in the bone skeleton. Many aspects of reactions of bone tissue cells still remain unclear until now. With the use of electron microscopy and autoradiography with 3H-thymidine we studied the samples gathered from the femoral bone epiphyses and metaphyses of rats flown on board American Spacelab -2 and in experiments with modeling of microgravity ("tail suspension" method). In our work the main attention is focused on studying the ultrastructure and metabolism of osteogenetic cells. The degree of differentiation and functional state are evaluated according to the degree of development of organelles for specific biosynthesis: rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), Golgy complex (GC), as well as the state of mitochondria and cell nucleus. As compared with a control, the population of osteogenetic cells from zones of bone reconstruction shows a decrease in the number of functionally active forms. We can judge of this from the reduction volume of RER, GC, mitochondria in osteoblasts. RER loses architectonics typical for osteoblasts and, as against the control, is represented by short narrow canaliculi distributed throughout the cy-toplasm; some canals disintegrate. GC is slightly pronounced, mitochondria become smaller in size and acquire an optically dark matrix. These phenomena are supposed to be associated with the desorganization of microtubules and microfilaments in the cells under microgravity condi-tions. The number of degrading and apoptotic cells increases in the population of osteoblasts. The dynamics of labeled cells following various intervals after 3H-thymidine injection testifies to a delay in the rates of osteoblasts' differentiation and their transformation to osteocytes in the experiment animals. A lower 3H-glycine uptake by the osteogenic cells and bone matrix as compared with a control is

  3. Temporally tuned neuronal differentiation supports the functional remodeling of a neuronal network in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Veverytsa, Lyubov; Allan, Douglas W

    2012-03-27

    During insect metamorphosis, neuronal networks undergo extensive remodeling by restructuring their connectivity and recruiting newborn neurons from postembryonic lineages. The neuronal network that directs the essential behavior, ecdysis, generates a distinct behavioral sequence at each developmental transition. Larval ecdysis replaces the cuticle between larval stages, and pupal ecdysis externalizes and expands the head and appendages to their adult position. However, the network changes that support these differences are unknown. Crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) neurons and the peptide hormones they secrete are critical for ecdysis; their targeted ablation alters larval ecdysis progression and results in a failure of pupal ecdysis. In this study, we demonstrate that the CCAP neuron network is remodeled immediately before pupal ecdysis by the emergence of 12 late CCAP neurons. All 12 are CCAP efferents that exit the central nervous system. Importantly, these late CCAP neurons were found to be entirely sufficient for wild-type pupal ecdysis, even after targeted ablation of all other 42 CCAP neurons. Our evidence indicates that late CCAP neurons are derived from early, likely embryonic, lineages. However, they do not differentiate to express their peptide hormone battery, nor do they project an axon via lateral nerve trunks until pupariation, both of which are believed to be critical for the function of CCAP efferent neurons in ecdysis. Further analysis implicated ecdysone signaling via ecdysone receptors A/B1 and the nuclear receptor ftz-f1 as the differentiation trigger. These results demonstrate the utility of temporally tuned neuronal differentiation as a hard-wired developmental mechanism to remodel a neuronal network to generate a scheduled change in behavior. PMID:22393011

  4. Differential and synergistic effects of mechanical stimulation and growth factor presentation on vascular wall function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mao-Shih; Koobatian, Maxwell T.; Lei, Pedro; Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that immobilizing TGF-β1 within fibrin hydrogels may act in synergy with cyclic mechanical stimulation to enhance the properties of vascular grafts. To this end, we engineered a fusion TGF-β1 protein that can covalently anchor to fibrin during polymerization upon the action of factor XIII. We also developed a 24-well based bioreactor in which vascular constructs can be mechanically stimulated by distending the silastic mandrel in the middle of each well. TGF-β1 was either conjugated to fibrin or supplied in the culture medium and the fibrin based constructs were cultured statically for a week followed by cyclic distention for another week. The tissues were examined for myogenic differentiation, vascular reactivity, mechanical properties and ECM content. Our results showed that some aspects of vascular function were differentially affected by growth factor presentation vs. pulsatile force application, while others were synergistically enhanced by both. Overall, this two-prong biomimetic approach improved ECM secretion, vascular reactivity and mechanical properties of vascular constructs. These findings may be applied in other tissue engineering applications such as cartilage, tendon or cardiac regeneration where growth factors TGF-β1 and mechano-stimulation play critical roles. PMID:23810080

  5. Influence of neurotransmitters on sexual differentiation of brain structure and function.

    PubMed

    Döhler, K D; Jarzab, B; Sickmöller, P M; Kokociñska, D; Kaminski, M; Gubala, E; Achtelik, W; Wagiel, J

    1991-01-01

    Newborn rats received daily subcutaneous treatment with compounds which influence serotoninergic, cholinergic, alpha-adrenergic and beta-adrenergic activity. In adulthood luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion pattern, female sexual behavior, and the volume of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic are (SDN-POA) were determined. Postnatal administration of l-tryptophan increased the volume of the SDN-POA significantly when given alone or when given simultaneously with testosterone propionate (TP). Para-chlorophenyl-alanine (pCPA) also increased SDN-POA volume, but did not potentiate the stimulating influence of TP. Clonidine had no effect per se on SDN-POA development, but it significantly potentiated the effect of TP in females. Salbutamol increased SDN-POA volume in females and in males. Postnatal treatment of female rats with the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonists prazosine and yohimbine or with the nicotin receptor antagonist mecamylamine had permanent potentiating effects on the pattern of LH secretion, whereas postnatal treatment with beta-adrenergic compounds reduced the LH-release response to gonadal steroids in adulthood. Postnatal treatment with clonidin or l-tryptophane inhibited differentiation of the capacity for lordosis behavior. Beta-receptor agonists postnatally had a potentiating effect on the capacity for lordosis behavior in female and male rats. Cholinergic stimulation postnatally inhibited differentiation of the capacity for lordosis behavior in female rats, but prevented the inhibitory effect of postnatal androgenization. There was no correlation between SDN-POA volume and any of the two functional parameters. PMID:1685710

  6. Efficient differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into functional cerebellar-like cells.

    PubMed

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Zipancic, Ivan; Lainez, Sergio; Roselló, Mireia Gárcia; Xiong, Chen; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Fernando Javier; Planells, Rosa; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Bhattacharya, Shom Shanker; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-11-01

    The cerebellum has critical roles in motor and sensory learning and motor coordination. Many cerebellum-related disorders indicate cell therapy as a possible treatment of neural loss. Here we show that application of inductive signals involved in early patterning of the cerebellar region followed by application of different factors directs human embryonic stem cell differentiation into cerebellar-like cells such as granule neurons, Purkinje cells, interneuron, and glial cells. Neurons derived using our protocol showed a T-shaped polarity phenotype and express similar markers to the developed human cerebellum. Electrophysiological measurements confirmed functional electrical properties compatible with these cells. In vivo implantation of differentiated human embryonic stem cells transfected with MATH1-GFP construct into neonatal mice resulted in cell migration across the molecular and the Purkinje cell layers and settlement in the internal molecular layers. Our findings demonstrate that the universal mechanisms involved in the development of cerebellum can be efficiently recapitulated in vitro, which enables the design of new strategies for cell replacement therapy, to study early human development and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20521974

  7. miR-300 mediates Bmi1 function and regulates differentiation in primitive cardiac progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, F M; Tomé, M; Bernal, J A; Bernad, A

    2015-01-01

    B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (Bmi1) is a polycomb-family transcriptional factor critical for self-renewal in many adult stem cells and human neoplasia. We sought to identify microRNAs regulated by Bmi1 that could play a role in multipotent cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) decisions. We found that miR-300, a poorly characterized microRNA mapping in the Dlk1-Dio3 microRNA cluster, was positively regulated by Bmi1 in CPCs. Forced expression of miR-300 in CPCs promoted an improved stemness signature with a significant increase in Oct4 levels, a reduction in senescence progression and an enhanced proliferative status via p19 activation and inhibition of p16 accumulation. Endothelial and cardiogenic differentiation were clearly compromised by sustained miR-300 expression. Additionally, RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant reduction in key cardiac transcription factors, including Nkx2.5 and Tbx5. Collectively, these results suggest that some functions attributed to Bmi1 are due to induction of miR-300, which decreases the cardiogenic differentiation potential of multipotent CPCs in vitro and promotes self-renewal. PMID:26512961

  8. miR-300 mediates Bmi1 function and regulates differentiation in primitive cardiac progenitors.

    PubMed

    Cruz, F M; Tomé, M; Bernal, J A; Bernad, A

    2015-01-01

    B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (Bmi1) is a polycomb-family transcriptional factor critical for self-renewal in many adult stem cells and human neoplasia. We sought to identify microRNAs regulated by Bmi1 that could play a role in multipotent cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) decisions. We found that miR-300, a poorly characterized microRNA mapping in the Dlk1-Dio3 microRNA cluster, was positively regulated by Bmi1 in CPCs. Forced expression of miR-300 in CPCs promoted an improved stemness signature with a significant increase in Oct4 levels, a reduction in senescence progression and an enhanced proliferative status via p19 activation and inhibition of p16 accumulation. Endothelial and cardiogenic differentiation were clearly compromised by sustained miR-300 expression. Additionally, RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant reduction in key cardiac transcription factors, including Nkx2.5 and Tbx5. Collectively, these results suggest that some functions attributed to Bmi1 are due to induction of miR-300, which decreases the cardiogenic differentiation potential of multipotent CPCs in vitro and promotes self-renewal. PMID:26512961

  9. Versatility and differential roles of cysteine residues in human prostacyclin receptor structure and function.

    PubMed

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott R; Douville, Karen; Arehart, Eric; Hwa, John

    2006-12-01

    Prostacyclin plays important roles in vascular homeostasis, promoting vasodilatation and inhibiting platelet thrombus formation. Previous studies have shown that three of six cytoplasmic cysteines, particularly those within the C-terminal tail, serve as important lipidation sites and are differentially conjugated to palmitoyl and isoprenyl groups (Miggin, S. M., Lawler, O. A., and Kinsella, B. T. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 6947-6958). Here we report distinctive roles for extracellular- and transmembrane-located cysteine residues in human prostacyclin receptor structure-function. Within the extracellular domain, all cysteines (4 of 4) appear to be involved in disulfide bonding interactions (i.e. a highly conserved Cys-92-Cys-170 bond and a putative non-conserved Cys-5-Cys-165 bond), and within the transmembrane (TM) region there are several cysteines (3 of 8) that maintain critical hydrogen bonding interactions (Cys-118 (TMIII), Cys-251 (TMVI), and Cys-202 (TMV)). This study highlights the necessity of sulfhydryl (SH) groups in maintaining the structural integrity of the human prostacyclin receptor, as 7 of 12 extracellular and transmembrane cysteines studied were found to be differentially indispensable for receptor binding, activation, and/or trafficking. Moreover, these results also demonstrate the versatility and reactivity of these cysteine residues within different receptor environments, that is, extracellular (disulfide bonds), transmembrane (H-bonds), and cytoplasmic (lipid conjugation). PMID:17015447

  10. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-10-20

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

  11. A G-CSF functionalized scaffold for stem cells seeding: a differentiating device for cardiac purposes.

    PubMed

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Rainer, Alberto; Trombetta, Marcella; Centola, Matteo; Lusini, Mario; Chello, Massimo; Covino, Elvio; De Marco, Federico; Coccia, Raffaella; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Genovese, Jorge A

    2011-05-01

    Myocardial infarction and its consequences represent one of the most demanding challenges in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Transfer of skeletal myoblasts into decompensated hearts has been performed through intramyocardial injection. However, the achievements of both cardiomyocyte differentiation and precise integration of the injected cells into the myocardial wall, in order to augment synchronized contractility and avoid potentially life-threatening alterations in the electrical conduction of the heart, still remain a major target to be pursued. Recently, granulocytes colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) fuelled the interest of researchers for its direct effect on cardiomyocytes, inhibiting both apoptosis and remodelling in the failing heart and protecting from ventricular arrhythmias through the up-regulation of connexin 43 (Cx43). We propose a tissue engineering approach concerning the fabrication of an electrospun cardiac graft functionalized with G-CSF, in order to provide the correct signalling sequence to orientate myoblast differentiation and exert important systemic and local effects, positively modulating the infarction microenvironment. Poly-(L-lactide) electrospun scaffolds were seeded with C2C12 murine skeletal myoblast for 48 hrs. Biological assays demonstrated the induction of Cx43 expression along with morphostructural changes resulting in cell elongation and appearance of cellular junctions resembling the usual cardiomyocyte arrangement at the ultrastructural level. The possibility of fabricating extracellular matrix-mimicking scaffolds able to promote myoblast pre-commitment towards myocardiocyte lineage and mitigate the hazardous environment of the damaged myocardium represents an interesting strategy in cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:20518852

  12. Injectable Peptide Decorated Functional Nanofibrous Hollow Microspheres to Direct Stem Cell Differentiation and Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Gupte, Melanie J.; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Injectable microspheres are attractive stem cell carriers for minimally invasive procedures. For tissue regeneration, the microspheres need to present the critical cues to properly direct stem cell differentiation. In natural extracellular matrix (ECM), growth factors (GFs) and collagen nanofibers provide critical chemical and physical cues. However, there have been no reported technologies that integrate synthetic nanofibers and GFs into injectable microspheres. In this study, we synthesized functional nanofibrous hollow microspheres (FNF-HMS), which can covalently bind GF-mimicking peptides. Two different GF-mimicking peptides, Transforming Growth Factor-β1 mimicking peptide Cytomodulin (CM) and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 mimicking peptide P24, were separately conjugated onto the FNF-HMS to induce distinct differentiation pathways of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). While no existing biomaterials were reported to successfully deliver CM to induce chondrogenesis, the developed FNF-HMS were shown to effectively present CM to BMSCs and successfully induced their chondrogenesis for cartilage formation in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, P24 was conjugated onto the newly developed FNF-HMS and was capable of retaining its bioactivity and inducing ectopic bone formation in nude mice. These results demonstrate that the novel FNF-HMS can effectively deliver GF-mimicking peptides to modulate stem cell fate and tissue regeneration. PMID:26069467

  13. Acceleration of screened-exchange density-functional calculations with approximate differential overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan; Schultz, Peter

    2014-03-01

    We implement the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened-exchange density functional in the SEQQUEST electronic structure code. HSE calculations are accelerated by approximating differential overlap in the Fock exchange based on an atomic-orbital partitioning scheme. All one-center and two-center exchange integrals are calculated. A subset of three-center exchange integrals are calculated for one-center Fock exchange matrix elements and for exchange mediated by one-center density matrix elements. Four-center exchange integrals are not calculated. We test the validity of this approximation by examining the number and magnitude of these different classes of exchange integrals. Basis set and pseudopotential errors in HSE calculations are benchmarked on atoms. Differential overlap approximation errors are benchmarked on small molecules. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Functional Differentiation of Bundle Sheath and Mesophyll Maize Chloroplasts Determined by Comparative ProteomicsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Majeran, Wojciech; Cai, Yang; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2005-01-01

    Chloroplasts of maize (Zea mays) leaves differentiate into specific bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (M) types to accommodate C4 photosynthesis. Consequences for other plastid functions are not well understood but are addressed here through a quantitative comparative proteome analysis of purified M and BS chloroplast stroma. Three independent techniques were used, including cleavable stable isotope coded affinity tags. Enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, nitrogen import, and tetrapyrrole and isoprenoid biosynthesis are preferentially located in the M chloroplasts. By contrast, enzymes involved in starch synthesis and sulfur import preferentially accumulate in BS chloroplasts. The different soluble antioxidative systems, in particular peroxiredoxins, accumulate at higher levels in M chloroplasts. We also observed differential accumulation of proteins involved in expression of plastid-encoded proteins (e.g., EF-Tu, EF-G, and mRNA binding proteins) and thylakoid formation (VIPP1), whereas others were equally distributed. Enzymes related to the C4 shuttle, the carboxylation and regeneration phase of the Calvin cycle, and several regulators (e.g., CP12) distributed as expected. However, enzymes involved in triose phosphate reduction and triose phosphate isomerase are primarily located in the M chloroplasts, indicating that the M-localized triose phosphate shuttle should be viewed as part of the BS-localized Calvin cycle, rather than a parallel pathway. PMID:16243905

  15. Manganese superoxide dismutase is required to maintain osteoclast differentiation and function under static force

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tao; Zhang, Liqiang; Konermann, Anna; Zhou, Hong; Jin, Fang; Liu, Wenjia

    2015-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance of osteoblasts (OBs) and osteoclasts (OCs). Increased activity of OCs not only contributes to pathological bone resorption, such as osteoporosis and periodontitis, but also is responsible for physiological conditions like orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). However, the detailed mechanism by which orthodontic force promotes the formation of OCs is still poorly understood. In this study, we confirmed that static force promoted the differentiation of human cord monocytes (HMNCs) into OCs depending on loading time and magnitude. Protein expression profiles among HMNCs, HMNCs subjected to static force and mature OCs were established via 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Total respective protein spot numbers of 549 ± 13, 612 ± 19 and 634 ± 16 were detected in each of the gels by image analysis. The five proteins identified were plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2, Spot 1), peroxiredoxin-6 (PRD-6, Spot 3), manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2, Spot 6), Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2 (Rho-GDI2, Spot 11) and L-lactate dehydrogenase B chain (L-LDH, Spot 15). More importantly, we revealed that SOD2 was required to maintain monocyte differentiation into functional OCs and may become a potential target for regulating the efficiency of OTM in the future. PMID:25619900

  16. Item-focussed Trees for the Identification of Items in Differential Item Functioning.

    PubMed

    Tutz, Gerhard; Berger, Moritz

    2016-09-01

    A novel method for the identification of differential item functioning (DIF) by means of recursive partitioning techniques is proposed. We assume an extension of the Rasch model that allows for DIF being induced by an arbitrary number of covariates for each item. Recursive partitioning on the item level results in one tree for each item and leads to simultaneous selection of items and variables that induce DIF. For each item, it is possible to detect groups of subjects with different item difficulties, defined by combinations of characteristics that are not pre-specified. The way a DIF item is determined by covariates is visualized in a small tree and therefore easily accessible. An algorithm is proposed that is based on permutation tests. Various simulation studies, including the comparison with traditional approaches to identify items with DIF, show the applicability and the competitive performance of the method. Two applications illustrate the usefulness and the advantages of the new method. PMID:26596721

  17. Parent ratings of ADHD symptoms: differential symptom functioning across Malaysian Malay and Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair

    2008-08-01

    This study examined differential symptom functioning (DSF) in ADHD symptoms across Malay and Chinese children in Malaysia. Malay (N=571) and Chinese (N=254) parents completed the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, which lists the DSM-IV ADHD symptoms. DSF was examined using the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) structural equation modeling procedure. Although DSF was found for a single inattention (IA) symptom and three hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) symptoms, all these differences had low effect sizes. Controlling for these DSF, Chinese children had higher IA and HI latent factor scores. However the effect sizes were small. Together, these findings suggest adequate support for invariance of the ADHD symptoms across these ethno-cultural groups. The implications of the findings for cross-cultural invariance of the ADHD symptoms are discussed. PMID:18317918

  18. mTOR, metabolism, and the regulation of T-cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Waickman, Adam T; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Upon antigen recognition, naive T cells undergo rapid expansion and activation. The energy requirements for this expansion are formidable, and T-cell activation is accompanied by dramatic changes in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, the outcome of antigen engagement is guided by multiple cues derived from the immune microenvironment. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is emerging as a central integrator of these signals playing a critical role in driving T-cell differentiation and function. Indeed, multiple metabolic programs are controlled by mTOR signaling. In this review, we discuss the role of mTOR in regulating metabolism and how these pathways intersect with the ability of mTOR to integrate cues that guide the outcome of T-cell receptor engagement. PMID:22889214

  19. An extension of a bayesian approach to detect differential item functioning.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    The application of the existing test statistics to determine differential item functioning (DIF) requires large samples, but test administrators often face the challenge of detecting DIF with small samples. One advantage of a Bayesian approach over a frequentist approach is that the former can incorporate, in the form of a prior distribution, existing information on the inference problem at hand. Sinharay, Dorans, Grant, and Blew (2009) suggested the use of information from past data sets as a prior distribution in a Bayesian DIF analysis. This paper suggests an extension of the method of Sinharay et al. (2009). The suggested extension is compared to the existing DIF detection methods in a realistic simulation study. PMID:23816593

  20. Differential Diagnosis: Shape and Function, Fractal Tools in the Pathology Lab.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    Fractal analysis is a useful objective tool in describing complexity of shapes and signals providing information for understanding pathological changes. We present fractal approaches and software used in our pathology laboratory to analyze shapes of tumors in tissues and cells, to evaluate the microvessel network complexity in hereditary diseases or the complexity of the surface of blood cells in atherosclerosis-linked condition, as well to analyze function in vasculopathic subjects by chaotic analysis of electrocardiographic signals, in order to perform differential diagnosis. The fractal parameters appear to converge towards distinct values in pathological conditions compared to healthy, approaching the characteristics values of a percolation process or the diffusion-limited aggregation process, respectively: a bifurcation that allows to support the diagnostic process of the pathologist in his daily work. These methods, presented here as a kind of a cookbook ready for the pathologist, are low cost and not time consuming. PMID:26375935

  1. A Degenerate Hopf Bifurcation in Retarded Functional Differential Equations, and Applications to Endemic Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Victor G.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we study degenerate Hopf bifurcations in a class of parametrized retarded functional differential equations. Specifically, we are interested in the case where the eigenvalue crossing condition of the classical Hopf bifurcation theorem is violated. Our approach is based on center manifold reduction and Poincaré-Birkhoff normal forms, and a singularity theoretical classification of this degenerate Hopf bifurcation. Our results are applied to a recently developed SIS model incorporating a delayed behavioral response. We show the phenomenon of endemic bubbles, which is characterized by a branch of periodic solutions which bifurcates from the endemic equilibrium at some value of the basic reproduction number R_0, and then reconnects to the endemic equilibrium at a larger value of R_0, originates in a codimension-two organizing center where the eigenvalue crossing condition for the Hopf bifurcation theorem is violated.

  2. Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) in T cell differentiation, maturation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Douglas C.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines are key modulators of T cell biology but their influence can be attenuated by suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS), a family of proteins comprised of eight members, SOCS1-7 and CIS. SOCS proteins regulate cytokine signals that control the polarization of CD4+ T cells into Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory cell lineages, the maturation of CD8+ T cells from naïve to “stem-cell memory” (Tscm), central memory (Tcm), and effector memory (Tem) states, and the activation of these lymphocytes. Understanding how SOCS family members regulate T cell maturation, differentiation and function might prove critical in improving adoptive immunotherapy for cancer and therapies aimed at treating autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:19879803

  3. Proteome analysis of functionally differentiated bovine (Bos indicus) mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk.

    PubMed

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Jamwal, Manu; Singh, Surender; Kumar, Saravanan; Panigrahi, Aswini K; Hariprasad, Gururao; Jena, Manoj K; Anand, Vijay; Kumar, Sudarshan; Kaushik, Jai K; Dang, Ajay K; Mukesh, Manishi; Mishra, Bishnu P; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Reddy, Vanga S; Mohanty, Ashok K

    2013-11-01

    Mammary gland is made up of a branching network of ducts that end in alveoli. Terminally differentiated mammary epithelial cells (MECs) constitute the innermost layer of aveoli. They are milk-secreting cuboidal cells that secrete milk proteins during lactation. Little is known about the expression profile of proteins in the metabolically active MECs during lactation or their functional role in the lactation process. In the present investigation, we have reported the proteome map of MECs in lactating cows using 2DE MALDI-TOF/TOF MS and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS. MECs were isolated from milk using immunomagnetic beads and confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS and 2DE-MS/MS based approaches led to identification of 431 and 134 proteins, respectively, with a total of 497 unique proteins. Proteins identified in this study were clustered into functional groups using bioinformatics tools. Pathway analysis of the identified proteins revealed 28 pathways (p < 0.05) providing evidence for involvement of various proteins in lactation function. This study further provides experimental evidence for the presence of many proteins that have been predicted in annotated bovine genome. The data generated further provide a set of bovine MEC-specific proteins that will help the researchers to understand the molecular events taking place during lactation. PMID:24030930

  4. Differential Selection within the Drosophila Retinal Determination Network and Evidence for Functional Divergence between Paralog Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rhea R.; Cruickshank, Tami; Kumar, Justin P.

    2011-01-01

    The retinal determination (RD) network in Drosophila comprises fourteen known nuclear proteins that include DNA binding proteins, transcriptional co-activators, kinases and phosphatases. The composition of the network varies considerably throughout the animal kingdom, with the network in several basal insects having fewer members and with vertebrates having potentially significantly higher numbers of retinal determination genes. One important contributing factor for the variation in gene number within the network is gene duplication. For example, ten members of the RD network in Drosophila are derived from duplication events. Here we present an analysis of the coding regions of the five pairs of duplicate genes from within the retinal determination network of several different Drosophila species. We demonstrate that there is differential selection across the coding regions of all RD genes. Additionally, some of the most significant differences in ratios of non-silent to silent site substitutions (dN/dS) between paralog pairs are found within regions that have no ascribed function. Previous structure/function analyses of several duplicate genes have identified areas within one gene that contain novel activities when compared to its paralog. The evolutionary analysis presented here identifies these same areas in the paralogs as being under high levels of relaxed selection. We suggest that sequence divergence between paralogs and selection signatures can be used as a reasonable predictor of functional changes in rapidly evolving motifs. PMID:21210943

  5. Stimulation of proliferation, differentiation, and function of human cells by primate interleukin 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.F.; To, L.B.; Yang, Y.C.; Gamble, J.R.; Shannon, M.F.; Burns, G.F.; Dyson, P.G.; Juttner, C.A.; Clark, S.; Vadas, M.A.

    1987-05-01

    Cloned gibbon interleukin 3 (gIL-3) was found to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow cells to produce day-14 granulocyte, macrophage, granulocyte-macrophage, and eosinophil colonies in semisolid agar. In the presence of normal human plasma, gIL-3 stimulated megakaryocytes. In methylcellulose cultures, it stimulated erythroid colonies in the presence, but not in the absence, of erythropoietin. When mature human leukocytes were used, gIL-3 stimulated the function of purified mature eosinophils as measured by the capacity to kill /sup 51/Cr-labeled antibody-coated target cells, to produce superoxide anions, and to phagocytize opsonized yeast particles in a manner similar to recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In contrast, gIL-3 did not significantly stimulate any of the neutrophil functions tested, whereas human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was active in these assay. Among cytokines that are active on human hematopoietic cells, gIL-3 thus has a distinct set of functions and may predict the range of actions of the human molecule.

  6. Dual amyloid domains promote differential functioning of the chaplin proteins during Streptomyces aerial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Capstick, David S.; Jomaa, Ahmad; Hanke, Chistopher; Ortega, Joaquin; Elliot, Marie A.

    2011-01-01

    The chaplin proteins are functional amyloids found in the filamentous Streptomyces bacteria. These secreted proteins are required for the aerial development of Streptomyces coelicolor, and contribute to an intricate rodlet ultrastructure that decorates the surfaces of aerial hyphae and spores. S. coelicolor encodes eight chaplin proteins. Previous studies have revealed that only three of these proteins (ChpC, ChpE, and ChpH) are necessary for promoting aerial development, and of these three, ChpH is the primary developmental determinant. Here, we show that the model chaplin, ChpH, contains two amyloidogenic domains: one in the N terminus and one in the C terminus of the mature protein. These domains have different polymerization properties as determined using fluorescence spectroscopy, secondary structure analyses, and electron microscopy. We coupled these in vitro assays with in vivo genetic studies to probe the connection between ChpH amyloidogenesis and its biological function. Using mutational analyses, we demonstrated that both N- and C-terminal amyloid domains of ChpH were required for promoting aerial hypha formation, while the N-terminal domain was dispensable for assembly of the rodlet ultrastructure. These results suggest that there is a functional differentiation of the dual amyloid domains in the chaplin proteins. PMID:21628577

  7. Visualizing digestive organ morphology and function using differential fatty acid metabolism in live zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Carten, Juliana Debrito; Bradford, Mary Katherine; Farber, Steven Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular function as sources of fuel, critical signaling molecules and membrane components. Deficiencies in lipid processing and transport underlie many metabolic diseases. To better understand metabolic function as it relates to disease etiology, a whole animal approach is advantageous, one in which multiple organs and cell types can be assessed simultaneously in vivo. Towards this end, we have developed an assay to visualize fatty acid (FA) metabolism in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). The method utilizes egg yolk liposomes to deliver different chain length FA analogs (BODIPY-FL) to six day-old larvae. Following liposome incubation, larvae accumulate the analogs throughout their digestive organs, providing a comprehensive readout of organ structure and physiology. Using this assay we have observed that different chain length FAs are differentially transported and metabolized by the larval digestive system. We show that this assay can also reveal structural and metabolic defects in digestive mutants. Because this labeling technique can be used to investigate digestive organ morphology and function, we foresee its application in diverse studies of organ development and physiology. PMID:21968100

  8. Activated NKT cells imprint NK-cell differentiation, functionality and education.

    PubMed

    Riese, Peggy; Trittel, Stephanie; May, Tobias; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Chambers, Benedict J; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    NK cells represent a vital component of the innate immune system. The recent discoveries demonstrating that the functionality of NK cells depends on their differentiation and education status underscore their potential as targets for immune intervention. However, to exploit their full potential, a detailed understanding of the cellular interactions involved in these processes is required. In this regard, the cross-talk between NKT cells and NK cells needs to be better understood. Our results provide strong evidence for NKT cell-induced effects on key biological features of NK cells. NKT-cell activation results in the generation of highly active CD27(high) NK cells with improved functionality. In this context, degranulation activity and IFNγ production were mainly detected in the educated subset. In a mCMV infection model, we also demonstrated that NKT-cell stimulation induced the generation of highly functional educated and uneducated NK cells, crucial players in viral control. Thus, our findings reveal new fundamental aspects of the NKT-NK cell axis that provide important hints for the manipulation of NK cells in clinical settings. PMID:25808315

  9. Effectiveness of Combining Statistical Tests and Effect Sizes When Using Logistic Discriminant Function Regression to Detect Differential Item Functioning for Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez-Benito, Juana; Hidalgo, Maria Dolores; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article was to find an optimal decision rule for identifying polytomous items with large or moderate amounts of differential functioning. The effectiveness of combining statistical tests with effect size measures was assessed using logistic discriminant function analysis and two effect size measures: R[superscript 2] and…

  10. Differential function and regulation of orphan nuclear receptor TR3 isoforms in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Cui, Pengfei; Zhao, Shengqiang; Ye, Taiyang; Li, Yan; Peng, Jin; Niu, Gengming; Zhao, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    TR3 has been reported to be an excellent target for angiogenesis therapies. We reported three TR3 transcript variant messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and are differentially regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). TR3 transcript variant 1 (TR3-TV1) and variant 2 (TR3-TV2) encoding the same TR3 isoform 1 protein (TR3-iso1) that was named TR3 has been extensively studied. However, the function of TR3 isoform 2 protein (TR3-iso2) encoded by TR3 transcript variant 3 (TR3-TV3) is still not known. Here, we clone and express the novel TR3-iso2 protein and find that expression of TR3-iso2, in contrast to TR3-iso1, inhibits en-dothelial cell proliferation induced by VEGF-A, histamine, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The differential function of TR3-iso2 correlates with the down-regulation of cyclin D1. However, TR3-iso2 plays similar roles in endothelial cell migration and monolayer permeability as TR3-iso1. We further demonstrate that several intracellular signaling pathways are involved in histamine-induced TR3 transcript variants, including histamine receptor H1-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)/calcium/calcineurin/protein kinase C (PKC)/ protein kinase D (PKD) pathway and ERK pathway, as well as histamine receptor H3-mediated PKC-ERK pathway. Further, expressions of TR3-TV1, TR3-TV2, and TR3-TV3 by VEGF and histamine are regulated by different promoters, but not by their mRNA stability. PMID:26440050

  11. Local invertible analytic solution of a functional differential equation with deviating arguments depending on the state derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jianguo; Ma, Minghuan

    2007-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a functional differential equation of the formx'(z)=1/x(az+bx'(z)) with the distinctive feature that the argument of the unknown function depends on the state derivative, where a,b are two complex numbers. By reducing the equation with the Schroder transformation to another functional differential equation with proportional delay, we give existence of its local invertible analytic solutions. We discuss not only that the constant [alpha] given in Schroder transformation at resonance, i.e., at a root of the unity, but also those [alpha] near resonance (near a root of the unity) under the Brjuno condition.

  12. Empirical Bayes versus Standard Mantel-Haenszel Statistics for Detecting Differential Item Functioning under Small Sample Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidalgo, Angel M.; Hashimoto, Kanako; Bartram, Dave; Muniz, Jose

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors assess several strategies created on the basis of the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) procedure for conducting differential item functioning (DIF) analysis with small samples. One of the analytical strategies is a loss function (LF) that uses empirical Bayes Mantel-Haenszel estimators, whereas the other strategies use the classical…

  13. A Formulation of the Mantel-Haenszel Differential Item Functioning Parameter with Practical Implications. Statistical Report. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roussos, Louis A.; Schnipke, Deborah L.; Pashley, Peter J.

    The Mantel-Haenszel (MH) differential item functioning (DIF) parameter for uniform DIF is well defined when item responses follow the two-parameter-logistic (2PPL) item response function (IRF), but not when they follow the three-parameter-logistic (3PL) IRF, the model typically used with multiple choice items. This research report presents a…

  14. Differential Item Functioning for Lesbians, Bisexual, and Heterosexual Women in the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnholz, Justin L.; Young, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed whether the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) functions equivalently in assessing depressive symptom severity in lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual women. Using differential item functioning methods, the authors examined (a) whether there is a bias in CES-D total scores and in individual item scores…

  15. Loquat leaf extract enhances myogenic differentiation, improves muscle function and attenuates muscle loss in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jo; Kim, Minjung; Jeong, Ji Won; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-09-01

    A main characteristic of aging is the debilitating, progressive and generalized impairment of biological functions, resulting in an increased vulnerability to disease and death. Skeletal muscle comprises approximately 40% of the human body; thus, it is the most abundant tissue. At the age of 30 onwards, 0.5‑1% of human muscle mass is lost each year, with a marked acceleration in the rate of decline after the age of 65. Thus, novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function are required to improve the quality of life of older subjects. The aim of the present study was to determine whether loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf extract (LE) can prevent the loss of skeletal muscle function in aged rats. Young (5-month-old) and aged (18‑19-month-old) rats were fed LE (50 mg/kg/day) for 35 days and the changes in muscle mass and strength were evaluated. The age‑associated loss of grip strength was attenuated, and muscle mass and muscle creatine kinase (CK) activity were enhanced following the administration of LE. Histochemical analysis also revealed that LE abrogated the age‑associated decrease in cross‑sectional area (CSA) and decreased the amount of connective tissue in the muscle of aged rats. To investigate the mode of action of LE, C2C12 murine myoblasts were used to evaluate the myogenic potential of LE. The expression levels of myogenic proteins (MyoD and myogenin) and functional myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were measured by western blot analysis. LE enhanced MyoD, myogenin and MyHC expression. The changes in the expression of myogenic genes corresponded with an increase in the activity of CK, a myogenic differentiation marker. Finally, LE activated the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is involved in muscle protein synthesis during myogenesis. These findings suggest that LE attenuates sarcopenia by promoting myogenic differentiation and subsequently promoting muscle protein synthesis

  16. Correlation function analysis of the COBE differential microwave radiometer sky maps

    SciTech Connect

    Lineweaver, C.H. |

    1994-08-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite has detected anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. A two-point correlation function analysis which helped lead to this discovery is presented in detail. The results of a correlation function analysis of the two year DMR data set is presented. The first and second year data sets are compared and found to be reasonably consistent. The positive correlation for separation angles less than {approximately}20{degree} is robust to Galactic latitude cuts and is very stable from year to year. The Galactic latitude cut independence of the correlation function is strong evidence that the signal is not Galactic in origin. The statistical significance of the structure seen in the correlation function of the first, second and two year maps is respectively > 9{sigma}, > 10{sigma} and > 18{sigma} above the noise. The noise in the DMR sky maps is correlated at a low level. The structure of the pixel temperature covariance matrix is given. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60{degree} due to the 60{degree} separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance of 60{degree} is 0.45%{sub {minus}0.14}{sup +0.18} of the mean variance. The noise properties of the DMR maps are thus well approximated by the noise properties of maps made by a single-beam experiment. Previously published DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  17. Numerical solution of differential equations using multiquadric radial basis functions networks.

    PubMed

    Mai-Duy, N; Tran-Cong, T

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents mesh-free procedures for solving linear differential equations (ODEs and elliptic PDEs) based on multiquadric (MQ) radial basis function networks (RBFNs). Based on our study of approximation of function and its derivatives using RBFNs that was reported in an earlier paper (Mai-Duy, N. & Tran-Cong, T. (1999). Approximation of function and its derivatives using radial basis function networks. Neural networks, submitted), new RBFN approximation procedures are developed in this paper for solving DEs, which can also be classified into two types: a direct (DRBFN) and an indirect (IRBFN) RBFN procedure. In the present procedures, the width of the RBFs is the only adjustable parameter according to a(i) = betad(i), where d(i) is the distance from the ith centre to the nearest centre. The IRBFN method is more accurate than the DRBFN one and experience so far shows that beta can be chosen in the range 7 < or = beta 10 for the former. Different combinations of RBF centres and collocation points (uniformly and randomly distributed) are tested on both regularly and irregularly shaped domains. The results for a 1D Poisson's equation show that the DRBFN and the IRBFN procedures achieve a norm of error of at least O(1.0 x 10(-4)) and O(1.0 x 10(-8)), respectively, with a centre density of 50. Similarly, the results for a 2D Poisson's equation show that the DRBFN and the IRBFN procedures achieve a norm of error of at least O(1.0 x 10(-3)) and O(1.0 x10(-6)) respectively, with a centre density of 12 X 12. PMID:11316233

  18. Residual Symptoms Were Differentially Associated with Brain Function in Remitted Patients with Major Depressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Mieko; Pu, Shenghong; Yokoyama, Katsutoshi; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Yamanashi, Takehiko; Itakura, Masashi; Sugie, Takuya; Miura, Akihiko; Nagata, Izumi; Iwata, Masaaki; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    likely to impair their social functioning and that these symptoms are differentially associated with brain function measured with NIRS. PMID:27046947

  19. Pharmacological activation of estrogen receptors-α and -β differentially modulates keratinocyte differentiation with functional impact on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    PERŽEĽOVÁ, VLASTA; SABOL, FRANTIŠEK; VASILENKO, TOMÁŠ; NOVOTNÝ, MARTIN; KOVÁČ, IVAN; SLEZÁK, MARTIN; ĎURKÁČ, JÁN; HOLLÝ, MARTIN; PILÁTOVÁ, MARTINA; SZABO, PAVOL; VARINSKÁ, LENKA; ČRIEPOKOVÁ, ZUZANA; KUČERA, TOMÁŠ; KALTNER, HERBERT; ANDRÉ, SABINE; GABIUS, HANS-JOACHIM; MUČAJI, PAVEL; SMETANA, KAREL; GÁL, PETER

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen deprivation is considered responsible for many age-related processes, including poor wound healing. Guided by previous observations that estradiol accelerates re-epithelialization through estrogen receptor (ER)-β, in the present study, we examined whether selective ER agonists [4,4′,4″-(4-propyl [1H] pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-trisphenol (PPT), ER-α agonist; 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN), ER-β agonist] affect the expression of basic proliferation and differentiation markers (Ki-67, keratin-10, -14 and -19, galectin-1 and Sox-2) of keratinocytes using HaCaT cells. In parallel, ovariectomized rats were treated daily with an ER modulator, and wound tissue was removed 21 days after wounding and routinely processed for basic histological analysis. Our results revealed that the HaCaT keratinocytes expressed both ER-α and -β, and thus are well-suited for studying the effects of ER agonists on epidermal regeneration. The activation of ER-α produced a protein expression pattern similar to that observed in the control culture, with a moderate expression of Ki-67 being observed. However, the activation of ER-β led to an increase in cell proliferation and keratin-19 expression, as well as a decrease in galectin-1 expression. Fittingly, in rat wounds treated with the ER-β agonist (DPN), epidermal regeneration was accelerated. In the present study, we provide information on the mechanisms through which estrogens affect the expression patterns of selected markers, thus modulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation; in addition, we demonstrate that the pharmacological activation of ER-α and -β has a direct impact on wound healing. PMID:26397183

  20. Heterogeneity in the differentiation and function of CD8⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Visekruna, Alexander; Huber, Magdalena

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that CD8(+) T cells constitute an important branch of adaptive immunity contributing to clearance of intracellular pathogens and providing long-term protection. These functions are mostly fulfilled by the best characterized subpopulation of CD8(+) T cells, the cytotoxic T lymphocytes (also called Tc1 cells), owing to their ability to kill infected cells and to secrete cytokines such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. However, there is growing evidence for alternative CD8(+) T cell fates influencing CD4(+) T-cell-mediated responses in the context of allergy, autoimmunity and infections. Thus, like subpopulations of CD4(+) T cells, also CD8(+) T cells under particular conditions acquire the expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, IL-17 or suppressive activity and thereby influence immune responses. The process of CD8(+) T-cell differentiation is dictated by antigen strength, co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. These environmental cues induce transcription factors further specifying CD8(+) T-cell decision into Tc1, Tc2, Tc9, Tc17 or CD8(+) T regulatory fate. Here, we discuss our current understanding about functional diversity of effector CD8(+) T cells and contribution of transcription factors to this process. PMID:24879097

  1. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  2. Differential item functioning analysis of the Vanderbilt Expertise Test for cars.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Yeol; Cho, Sun-Joo; McGugin, Rankin W; Van Gulick, Ana Beth; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Vanderbilt Expertise Test for cars (VETcar) is a test of visual learning for contemporary car models. We used item response theory to assess the VETcar and in particular used differential item functioning (DIF) analysis to ask if the test functions the same way in laboratory versus online settings and for different groups based on age and gender. An exploratory factor analysis found evidence of multidimensionality in the VETcar, although a single dimension was deemed sufficient to capture the recognition ability measured by the test. We selected a unidimensional three-parameter logistic item response model to examine item characteristics and subject abilities. The VETcar had satisfactory internal consistency. A substantial number of items showed DIF at a medium effect size for test setting and for age group, whereas gender DIF was negligible. Because online subjects were on average older than those tested in the lab, we focused on the age groups to conduct a multigroup item response theory analysis. This revealed that most items on the test favored the younger group. DIF could be more the rule than the exception when measuring performance with familiar object categories, therefore posing a challenge for the measurement of either domain-general visual abilities or category-specific knowledge. PMID:26418499

  3. Differential downstream functions of protein kinase Ceta and -theta in EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M S; Kang, B S; Luu, D; Wickham, J T; Sando, J J; Hahn, C S

    1998-10-16

    Sensitive EL4 mouse thymoma cells (s-EL4) respond to phorbol esters with growth inhibition, adherence to substrate, and production of cytokines including interleukin 2. Since these cells express several of the phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes, the function of each isozyme remains unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that s-EL4 cells expressed substantially more PKCeta and PKCtheta than did EL4 cells resistant to phorbol esters (r-EL4). To examine potential roles for PKCeta and PKCtheta in EL4 cells, wild type and constitutively active versions of the isozymes were transiently expressed using a Sindbis virus system. Expression of constitutively active PKCeta, but not PKCtheta, in s- and r-EL4 cells altered cell morphology and cytoskeletal structure in a manner similar to that of phorbol ester treatment, suggesting a role for PKCeta in cytoskeletal organization. Prolonged treatment of s-EL4 cells with phorbol esters results in inhibition of cell cycling along with a decreased expression of most of the PKC isozymes, including PKCtheta. Introduction of virally expressed PKCtheta, but not PKCeta, overcame the inhibitory effects of the prolonged phorbol ester treatment on cell cycle progression, suggesting a possible involvement of PKCtheta in cell cycle regulation. These results support differential functions for PKCeta and PKCtheta in T cell activation. PMID:9765301

  4. INITIAL FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OUTCOMES AND MODIFICATIONS IN PURSUIT OF DIFFERENTIATION: A SUMMARY OF 176 INPATIENT CASES

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, Louis P.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Jessel, Joshua; DeLeon, Iser G.

    2016-01-01

    The functional analysis (FA) described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982/1994) delineated not only a set a specific procedures, but also a model that involves the use of analogue conditions wherein antecedent and consequent variables are systematically manipulated. This consecutive case-series analysis describes FAs of 176 individuals with intellectual disabilities who had been admitted to an inpatient unit for severe problem behavior. Following an initial standardized FA, additional modifications were performed in pursuit of differentiation. Ultimately, a function was identified in 86.9% of the 176 cases and in 93.3% of the 161 cases for which the FA, if necessary, was modified up to 2 times. All modifications were documented and classified as involving changes to antecedents, consequences, or design (or some combination of these). Outcomes for each type of modification are reported. The results support the utility of ongoing hypothesis testing through individualized modifications to FA procedures, and provide information regarding how each type of modification affected results. PMID:24114088

  5. Differential item functioning analysis of the Vanderbilt Expertise Test for cars

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo-Yeol; Cho, Sun-Joo; McGugin, Rankin W.; Van Gulick, Ana Beth; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Vanderbilt Expertise Test for cars (VETcar) is a test of visual learning for contemporary car models. We used item response theory to assess the VETcar and in particular used differential item functioning (DIF) analysis to ask if the test functions the same way in laboratory versus online settings and for different groups based on age and gender. An exploratory factor analysis found evidence of multidimensionality in the VETcar, although a single dimension was deemed sufficient to capture the recognition ability measured by the test. We selected a unidimensional three-parameter logistic item response model to examine item characteristics and subject abilities. The VETcar had satisfactory internal consistency. A substantial number of items showed DIF at a medium effect size for test setting and for age group, whereas gender DIF was negligible. Because online subjects were on average older than those tested in the lab, we focused on the age groups to conduct a multigroup item response theory analysis. This revealed that most items on the test favored the younger group. DIF could be more the rule than the exception when measuring performance with familiar object categories, therefore posing a challenge for the measurement of either domain-general visual abilities or category-specific knowledge. PMID:26418499

  6. Differential Pair Distribution Function Study of the Structure of Arsenate Adsorbed on Nanocrystalline [gamma]-Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Tang, Yuanzhi; Kubicki, James D.; Aryanpour, Masoud; Reeder, Richard J.; Parise, John B.; Phillips, Brian L.

    2012-03-15

    Structural information is important for understanding surface adsorption mechanisms of contaminants on metal (hydr)oxides. In this work, a novel technique was employed to study the interfacial structure of arsenate oxyanions adsorbed on {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles, namely, differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering. The d-PDF is the difference of properly normalized PDFs obtained for samples with and without arsenate adsorbed, otherwise identically prepared. The real space pattern contains information on atomic pair correlations between adsorbed arsenate and the atoms on {gamma}-alumina surface (Al, O, etc.). PDF results on the arsenate adsorption sample on {gamma}-alumina prepared at 1 mM As concentration and pH 5 revealed two peaks at 1.66 {angstrom} and 3.09 {angstrom}, corresponding to As-O and As-Al atomic pair correlations. This observation is consistent with those measured by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, which suggests a first shell of As-O at 1.69 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 4 and a second shell of As-Al at 3.13 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 2. These results are in agreement with a bidentate binuclear coordination environment to the octahedral Al of {gamma}-alumina as predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculation.

  7. Differential Requirements of TCR Signaling in Homeostatic Maintenance and Function of Dendritic Epidermal T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baojun; Wu, Jianxuan; Jiao, Yiqun; Bock, Cheryl; Dai, Meifang; Chen, Benny; Chao, Nelson; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhuang, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) are generated exclusively in the fetal thymus and maintained in the skin epithelium throughout postnatal life of the mouse. DETCs have restricted antigenic specificity as a result of their exclusive usage of a canonical TCR. Although the importance of the TCR in DETC development has been well established, the exact role of TCR signaling in DETC homeostasis and function remains incompletely defined. In this study, we investigated TCR signaling in fully matured DETCs by lineage-restricted deletion of the Lat gene, an essential signaling molecule downstream of the TCR. We found that Lat deletion impaired TCR-dependent cytokine gene activation and the ability of DETCs to undergo proliferative expansion. However, linker for activation of T cells-deficient DETCs were able to maintain long-term population homeostasis, although with a reduced proliferation rate. Mice with Lat deletion in DETCs exhibited delayed wound healing accompanied by impaired clonal expansion within the wound area. Our study revealed differential requirements for TCR signaling in homeostatic maintenance of DETCs and in their effector function during wound healing. PMID:26408667

  8. Approaches for analyzing the differential activities and functions of eIF4E family members.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Robert E; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D; Jagus, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    The translational initiation factor eIF4E binds to the m(7)G-containing cap of mRNA and participates in recruitment of mRNA to ribosomes for protein synthesis. eIF4E also functions in nucleocytoplasmic transport of mRNA, sequestration of mRNA in a nontranslatable state, and stabilization of mRNA against decay in the cytosol. Multiple eIF4E family members have been identified in a wide range of organisms that includes plants, flies, mammals, frogs, birds, nematodes, fish, and various protists. This chapter reviews methods that have been applied to learn the biochemical properties and physiological functions that differentiate eIF4E family members within a given organism. Much has been learned to date about approaches to discover new eIF4E family members, their in vitro properties (cap binding, stimulation of cell-free translation systems), tissue and developmental expression patterns, protein-binding partners, and their effects on the translation or repression of specific subsets of mRNA. Despite these advances, new eIF4E family members continue to be found and new physiological roles discovered. PMID:17913628

  9. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Codona, Johanan L.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms. PMID:27042684

  10. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codona, Johanan L.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms.

  11. Comparisons of methamphetamine psychotic and schizophrenic symptoms: a differential item functioning analysis.

    PubMed

    Srisurapanont, Manit; Arunpongpaisal, Suwanna; Wada, Kiyoshi; Marsden, John; Ali, Robert; Kongsakon, Ronnachai

    2011-06-01

    The concept of negative symptoms in methamphetamine (MA) psychosis (e.g., poverty of speech, flatten affect, and loss of drive) is still uncertain. This study aimed to use differential item functioning (DIF) statistical techniques to differentiate the severity of psychotic symptoms between MA psychotic and schizophrenic patients. Data of MA psychotic and schizophrenic patients were those of the participants in the WHO Multi-Site Project on Methamphetamine-Induced Psychosis (or WHO-MAIP study) and the Risperidone Long-Acting Injection in Thai Schizophrenic Patients (or RLAI-Thai study), respectively. To confirm the unidimensionality of psychotic syndromes, we applied the exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA) on the eight items of Manchester scale. We conducted the DIF analysis of psychotic symptoms observed in both groups by using nonparametric kernel-smoothing techniques of item response theory. A DIF composite index of 0.30 or greater indicated the difference of symptom severity. The analyses included the data of 168 MA psychotic participants and the baseline data of 169 schizophrenic patients. For both data sets, the EFA and CFA suggested a three-factor model of the psychotic symptoms, including negative syndrome (poverty of speech, psychomotor retardation and flatten/incongruous affect), positive syndrome (delusions, hallucinations and incoherent speech) and anxiety/depression syndrome (anxiety and depression). The DIF composite indexes comparing the severity differences of all eight psychotic symptoms were lower than 0.3. The results suggest that, at the same level of syndrome severity (i.e., negative, positive, and anxiety/depression syndromes), the severity of psychotic symptoms, including the negative ones, observed in MA psychotic and schizophrenic patients are almost the same. PMID:21277930

  12. Comparing Two Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cell Lines (IPECs): Morphological Differentiation, Function and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nossol, Constanze; Barta-Böszörményi, Anicò; Kahlert, Stefan; Zuschratter, Werner; Faber-Zuschratter, Heidi; Reinhardt, Nicole; Ponsuksili, Siriluk; Wimmers, Klaus; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2015-01-01

    The pig shows genetical and physiological resemblance to human, which predestines it as an experimental animal model especially for mucosal physiology. Therefore, the intestinal epithelial cell lines 1 and J2 (IPEC-1, IPEC-J2) - spontaneously immortalised cell lines from the porcine intestine - are important tools for studying intestinal function. A microarray (GeneChip Porcine Genome Array) was performed to compare the genome wide gene expression of IPECs. Different significantly up-regulated pathways were identified, like “lysosome”, “pathways in cancer”, “regulation of actin cytoskeleton” and “oxidative phosphorylation” in IPEC-J2 in comparison to IPEC-1. On the other hand, “spliceosome”, “ribosome”, “RNA-degradation” and “tight junction” are significantly down-regulated pathways in IPEC-J2 in comparison to IPEC-1. Examined pathways were followed up by functional analyses. ATP-, oxygen, glucose and lactate-measurement provide evidence for up-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in IPEC-J2. These cells seem to be more active in their metabolism than IPEC-1 cells due to a significant higher ATP-content as well as a higher O2- and glucose-consumption. The down-regulated pathway “ribosome” was followed up by measurement of RNA- and protein content. In summary, IPEC-J2 is a morphologically and functionally more differentiated cell line in comparison to IPEC-1. In addition, IPEC-J2 cells are a preferential tool for in vitro studies with the focus on metabolism. PMID:26147118

  13. Differential Function of Arabidopsis SERK Family Receptor-like Kinases in Stomatal Patterning.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzong; Chen, Xin; Mang, Hyunggon; Liu, Chenglong; Yu, Xiao; Gao, Xiquan; Torii, Keiko U; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-09-21

    Plants use cell-surface-resident receptor-like kinases (RLKs) to sense diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues and elicit distinct biological responses. In Arabidopsis, ERECTA family RLKs recognize EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTORS (EPFs) to specify stomatal patterning. However, little is known about the molecular link between ERECTA activation and intracellular signaling. We report here that the SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE (SERK) family RLKs regulate stomatal patterning downstream of EPF ligands and upstream of a MAP kinase cascade. EPF ligands induce the heteromerization of ERECTA and SERK family RLKs. SERK and ERECTA family RLKs transphosphorylate each other. In addition, SERKs associate with the receptor-like protein (RLP) TMM, a signal modulator of stomata development, in a ligand-independent manner, suggesting that ERECTA, SERKs, and TMM form a multiprotein receptorsome consisting of different RLKs and RLP perceiving peptide ligands to regulate stomatal patterning. In contrast to the differential requirement of individual SERK members in plant immunity, cell-death control, and brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, all four functional SERKs are essential but have unequal genetic contributions to stomatal patterning, with descending order of importance from SERK3/BAK1 to SERK2 to SERK1 to SERK4. Although BR signaling connects stomatal development via multiple components, the function of SERKs in stomatal patterning is uncoupled from their involvement in BR signaling. Our results reveal that the SERK family is a shared key module in diverse Arabidopsis signaling receptorsomes and that different combinatorial codes of individual SERK members regulate distinct functions. PMID:26320950

  14. miR-23∼27∼24 clusters control effector T cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunglim; Wu, Cheng-Jang; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Cruz, Leilani O; Khan, Aly Azeem; Lin, Ling-Li; Nguyen, Duc T; Miller, Marina; Lee, Hyang-Mi; Kuo, Ming-Ling; Broide, David H; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Lu, Li-Fan

    2016-02-01

    Coordinated repression of gene expression by evolutionarily conserved microRNA (miRNA) clusters and paralogs ensures that miRNAs efficiently exert their biological impact. Combining both loss- and gain-of-function genetic approaches, we show that the miR-23∼27∼24 clusters regulate multiple aspects of T cell biology, particularly helper T (Th) 2 immunity. Low expression of this miRNA family confers proper effector T cell function at both physiological and pathological settings. Further studies in T cells with exaggerated regulation by individual members of the miR-23∼27∼24 clusters revealed that miR-24 and miR-27 collaboratively limit Th2 responses through targeting IL-4 and GATA3 in both direct and indirect manners. Intriguingly, although overexpression of the entire miR-23 cluster also negatively impacts other Th lineages, enforced expression of miR-24, in contrast to miR-23 and miR-27, actually promotes the differentiation of Th1, Th17, and induced regulatory T cells, implying that under certain conditions, miRNA families can fine tune the biological effects of their regulation by having individual members antagonize rather than cooperate with each other. Together, our results identify a miRNA family with important immunological roles and suggest that tight regulation of miR-23∼27∼24 clusters in T cells is required to maintain optimal effector function and to prevent aberrant immune responses. PMID:26834155

  15. Couple of the variational iteration method and fractional-order Legendre functions method for fractional differential equations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fukang; Song, Junqiang; Leng, Hongze; Lu, Fengshun

    2014-01-01

    We present a new numerical method to get the approximate solutions of fractional differential equations. A new operational matrix of integration for fractional-order Legendre functions (FLFs) is first derived. Then a modified variational iteration formula which can avoid "noise terms" is constructed. Finally a numerical method based on variational iteration method (VIM) and FLFs is developed for fractional differential equations (FDEs). Block-pulse functions (BPFs) are used to calculate the FLFs coefficient matrices of the nonlinear terms. Five examples are discussed to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the technique. PMID:24511303

  16. A Differential Evolution Algorithm Based on Nikaido-Isoda Function for Solving Nash Equilibrium in Nonlinear Continuous Games.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    A differential evolution algorithm for solving Nash equilibrium in nonlinear continuous games is presented in this paper, called NIDE (Nikaido-Isoda differential evolution). At each generation, parent and child strategy profiles are compared one by one pairwisely, adapting Nikaido-Isoda function as fitness function. In practice, the NE of nonlinear game model with cubic cost function and quadratic demand function is solved, and this method could also be applied to non-concave payoff functions. Moreover, the NIDE is compared with the existing Nash Domination Evolutionary Multiplayer Optimization (NDEMO), the result showed that NIDE was significantly better than NDEMO with less iterations and shorter running time. These numerical examples suggested that the NIDE method is potentially useful. PMID:27589229

  17. Supernatant from Bifidobacterium Differentially Modulates Transduction Signaling Pathways for Biological Functions of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoarau, Cyrille; Martin, Laurence; Faugaret, Delphine; Baron, Christophe; Dauba, Audrey; Aubert-Jacquin, Cécile; Velge-Roussel, Florence; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2008-01-01

    Background Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, the signaling pathways engaged by probiotics are poorly understood. We have previously reported that a fermentation product from Bifidobacterium breve C50 (BbC50sn) could induce maturation, high IL-10 production and prolonged survival of DCs via a TLR2 pathway. We therefore studied the roles of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways on biological functions of human monocyte-derived DCs treated with BbC50sn. Methodology/Principal Findings DCs were differentiated from human monocytes with IL-4 and GM-CSF for 5 days and cultured with BbC50sn, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Zymosan, with or without specific inhibitors of p38MAPK (SB203580), ERK (PD98059), PI3K (LY294002) and GSK3 (SB216763). We found that 1) the PI3K pathway was positively involved in the prolonged DC survival induced by BbC50sn, LPS and Zymosan in contrast to p38MAPK and GSK3 which negatively regulated DC survival; 2) p38MAPK and PI3K were positively involved in DC maturation, in contrast to ERK and GSK3 which negatively regulated DC maturation; 3) ERK and PI3K were positively involved in DC-IL-10 production, in contrast to GSK3 that was positively involved in DC-IL-12 production whereas p38MAPK was positively involved in both; 4) BbC50sn induced a PI3K/Akt phosphorylation similar to Zymosan and a p38MAPK phosphorylation similar to LPS. Conclusion/Significance We report for the first time that a fermentation product of a bifidobacteria can differentially activate MAPK, GSK3 and PI3K in order to modulate DC biological functions. These results give new insights on the fine-tuned balance between the maintenance of normal mucosal homeostasis to commensal and probiotic bacteria and the specific inflammatory immune responses to pathogen bacteria. PMID:18648505

  18. Differentiation and healthy family functioning of Koreans in South Korea, South Koreans in the United States, and White Americans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Prouty, Anne M; Smith, Douglas B; Ko, Mei-Ju; Wetchler, Joseph L; Oh, Jea-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Inconsistent results have been found in prior research on the Bowen Family Systems Theory concept of differentiation of self and its application to individuals, couples, and families of different cultural backgrounds. In this regard, this study examined the impact of differentiation of self on healthy family functioning, family communication, and family satisfaction with 277 participants including South Koreans living in South Korea, South Korean-born citizens living in the United States, and White Americans living in the United States. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis identified the measurement invariance of a differentiation scale (DSI-R) used for the three study groups. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) found significant differences between White Americans and South Koreans with regard to the level of differentiation. Results of multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses found a significant association between differentiation of self and healthy family functioning across the three groups with the American group having significantly higher differentiation than the two South Korean groups." Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:24750125

  19. Knocking down of heat-shock protein 27 directs differentiation of functional glutamatergic neurons from placenta-derived multipotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Chi-Jung; Lee, Yih-Jing; Tien, Lu-Tai; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chien, Raymond; Lee, Fa-Kung; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study presents human placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMCs) as a source from which functional glutamatergic neurons can be derived. We found that the small heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27) was downregulated during the neuronal differentiation process. The in vivo temporal and spatial profiles of HSP27 expression were determined and showed inverted distributions with neuronal proteins during mouse embryonic development. Overexpression of HSP27 in stem cells led to the arrest of neuronal differentiation; however, the knockdown of HSP27 yielded a substantially enhanced ability of PDMCs to differentiate into neurons. These neurons formed synaptic networks and showed positive staining for multiple neuronal markers. Additionally, cellular phenomena including the absence of apoptosis and rare proliferation in HSP27-silenced PDMCs, combined with molecular events such as cleaved caspase-3 and the loss of stemness with cleaved Nanog, indicated that HSP27 is located upstream of neuronal differentiation and constrains that process. Furthermore, the induced neurons showed increasing intracellular calcium concentrations upon glutamate treatment. These differentiated cells co-expressed the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, vesicular glutamate transporter, and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 but did not show expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase or glutamate decarboxylase 67. Therefore, we concluded that HSP27-silenced PDMCs differentiated into neurons possessing the characteristics of functional glutamatergic neurons. PMID:27444754

  20. Knocking down of heat-shock protein 27 directs differentiation of functional glutamatergic neurons from placenta-derived multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Chi-Jung; Lee, Yih-Jing; Tien, Lu-Tai; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chien, Raymond; Lee, Fa-Kung; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study presents human placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMCs) as a source from which functional glutamatergic neurons can be derived. We found that the small heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27) was downregulated during the neuronal differentiation process. The in vivo temporal and spatial profiles of HSP27 expression were determined and showed inverted distributions with neuronal proteins during mouse embryonic development. Overexpression of HSP27 in stem cells led to the arrest of neuronal differentiation; however, the knockdown of HSP27 yielded a substantially enhanced ability of PDMCs to differentiate into neurons. These neurons formed synaptic networks and showed positive staining for multiple neuronal markers. Additionally, cellular phenomena including the absence of apoptosis and rare proliferation in HSP27-silenced PDMCs, combined with molecular events such as cleaved caspase-3 and the loss of stemness with cleaved Nanog, indicated that HSP27 is located upstream of neuronal differentiation and constrains that process. Furthermore, the induced neurons showed increasing intracellular calcium concentrations upon glutamate treatment. These differentiated cells co-expressed the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, vesicular glutamate transporter, and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 but did not show expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase or glutamate decarboxylase 67. Therefore, we concluded that HSP27-silenced PDMCs differentiated into neurons possessing the characteristics of functional glutamatergic neurons. PMID:27444754

  1. Acellular Lung Scaffolds Direct Differentiation of Endoderm to Functional Airway Epithelial Cells: Requirement of Matrix-Bound HS Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Shojaie, Sharareh; Ermini, Leonardo; Ackerley, Cameron; Wang, Jinxia; Chin, Stephanie; Yeganeh, Behzad; Bilodeau, Mélanie; Sambi, Manpreet; Rogers, Ian; Rossant, Janet; Bear, Christine E.; Post, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Efficient differentiation of pluripotent cells to proximal and distal lung epithelial cell populations remains a challenging task. The 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold is a key component that regulates the interaction of secreted factors with cells during development by often binding to and limiting their diffusion within local gradients. Here we examined the role of the lung ECM in differentiation of pluripotent cells in vitro and demonstrate the robust inductive capacity of the native lung matrix alone. Extended culture of stem cell-derived definitive endoderm on decellularized lung scaffolds in defined, serum-free medium resulted in differentiation into mature airway epithelia, complete with ciliated cells, club cells, and basal cells with morphological and functional similarities to native airways. Heparitinase I, but not chondroitinase ABC, treatment of scaffolds revealed that the differentiation achieved is dependent on heparan sulfate proteoglycans and its bound factors remaining on decellularized scaffolds. PMID:25660407

  2. Genetic variants of ApoE and ApoER2 differentially modulate endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Konaniah, Eddy S.; Herz, Joachim; Gerard, Robert D.; Jung, Eunjeong; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Ahmed, Mohamed; Hui, David Y.; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    It is poorly understood why there is greater cardiovascular disease risk associated with the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE) allele vs. apoE3, and also greater risk with the LRP8/apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) variant ApoER2-R952Q. Little is known about the function of the apoE–ApoER2 tandem outside of the central nervous system. We now report that in endothelial cells apoE3 binding to ApoER2 stimulates endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and endothelial cell migration, and it also attenuates monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion. However, apoE4 does not stimulate eNOS or endothelial cell migration or dampen cell adhesion, and alternatively it selectively antagonizes apoE3/ApoER2 actions. The contrasting endothelial actions of apoE4 vs. apoE3 require the N-terminal to C-terminal interaction in apoE4 that distinguishes it structurally from apoE3. Reconstitution experiments further reveal that ApoER2-R952Q is a loss-of-function variant of the receptor in endothelium. Carotid artery reendothelialization is decreased in ApoER2−/− mice, and whereas adenoviral-driven apoE3 expression in wild-type mice has no effect, apoE4 impairs reendothelialization. Moreover, in a model of neointima formation invoked by carotid artery endothelial denudation, ApoER2−/− mice display exaggerated neointima development. Thus, the apoE3/ApoER2 tandem promotes endothelial NO production, endothelial repair, and endothelial anti-inflammatory properties, and it prevents neointima formation. In contrast, apoE4 and ApoER2-R952Q display dominant-negative action and loss of function, respectively. Thus, genetic variants of apoE and ApoER2 impact cardiovascular health by differentially modulating endothelial function. PMID:25197062

  3. Functional differentiation and alveolar morphogenesis of primary mammary cultures on reconstituted basement membrane

    SciTech Connect

    BARCELLOS-HOFF, M. H; AGGELER, J.; RAM, T. G; BISSELL, M. J

    1989-02-01

    An essential feature of mammary gland differentiation during pregnancy is the formation of alveoli composed of polarized epithelial cells, which, under the influence of lactogenic hormones, secrete vectorially and sequester milk proteins. Previous culture studies have described either organization of cells polarized towards lumina containing little or no demonstrable tissue-specific protein, or establishment of functional secretory cells exhibiting little or no glandular architecture. In this paper, we report that tissue-specific vectorial secretion coincides with the formation of functional alveoli-like structures by primary mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane matrix (derived from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm murine tumour). Morphogenesis of these unique three-dimensional structures was initiated by cell-directed remodelling of the exogenous matrix leading to reorganization of cells into matrixensheathed aggregates by 24 h after plating. The aggregates subsequently cavitated, so that by day 6 the cells were organized into hollow spheres in which apical cell surfaces faced lumina sealed by tight junctions and basal surfaces were surrounded by a distinct basal lamina. The profiles of proteins secreted into the apical (luminal) and basal (medium) compartments indicated that these alveoli-like structures were capable of an appreciable amount of vectorial secretion. Immunoprecipitation with a broad spectrum milk antiserum showed that more than 80% of caseins were secreted into the lumina, whereas iron-binding proteins (both lactoferrin and transferrin) were present in comparable amounts in each compartment. Thus, these mammary cells established protein targeting pathways directing milk-specific proteins to the luminal compartment. A time course monitoring secretory activity demonstrated that establishment of tissue-specific vectorial secretion and increased total and milk protein secretion coincided with functional alveolar

  4. Solid-phase differential display and bacterial expression systems in selection and functional analysis of cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Ståhl, S; Odeberg, J; Larsson, M; Røsok, O; Ree, A H; Lundeberg, J

    1999-01-01

    Differential gene expression can be expected during activation and differentiation of cells as well as during pathological conditions, such as cancer. A number of strategies have been described to identify and understand isolated differentially expressed genes. The differential display methodology has rapidly become a widely used technique to identify differentially expressed mRNAs. In this chapter we described a variant of the differential display method based on solid-phase technology. The solid-phase procedure offers an attractive alternative to solution-based differential display because minute amounts of sample can be analyzed in considerably less time than previously. The employed solid support, monodisperse super paramagnetic beads, which circumvents precipitation and centrifugations steps, has also allowed for optimization of the critical enzymatic and preparative steps in the differential display methodology. We also described how bacterial expression can be used as a means to elucidate gene function. An efficient dual-expression system was presented, together with a basic concept describing how parallel expression of selected portions of cDNAs can be used for production of cDNA-encoded proteins as parts of affinity-tagged fusion proteins. The fusion proteins are suitable both for the generation of antibodies reactive to the target cDNA-encoded protein and for the subsequent affinity enrichment of such antibodies. Affinity-enriched antibodies have proved to be valuable tools in various assays, including immunoblotting and immunocytochemical staining, and can thus be used to localize the target cDNA-encoded protein to certain cells in a tissue section or even to a specific cell compartment or organelle within a cell. High-resolution localization of a cDNA-encoded protein would provide valuable information toward the understanding of protein function. PMID:10349662

  5. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W M; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-29

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27(me3)) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122(+) NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26668377

  6. Formaldehyde Crosses the Human Placenta and Affects Human Trophoblast Differentiation and Hormonal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Gerbaud, Pascale; Guibourdenche, Jean; Thérond, Patrice; Ferreira, Fatima; Simasotchi, Christelle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Gil, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The chorionic villus of the human placenta is the source of specific endocrine functions and nutrient exchanges. These activities are ensured by the syncytiotrophobast (ST), which bathes in maternal blood. The ST arises and regenerates throughout pregnancy by fusion of underlying cytotrophoblasts (CT). Any anomaly of ST formation or regeneration can affect pregnancy outcome and fetal growth. Because of its direct interaction with maternal blood, the ST is sensitive to drugs, pollutants and xenohormones. Ex vivo assays of perfused cotyledon show that formaldehyde, a common pollutant present in furniture, paint and plastics, can accumulate in the human placenta and cross to the fetal compartment. By means of RT-qPCR, immunoblot and immunocytochemistry experiments, we demonstrate in vitro that formaldehyde exerts endocrine toxicity on human trophoblasts, including a decrease in the production of protein hormones of pregnancy. In addition, formaldehyde exposure triggered human trophoblast fusion by upregulating syncitin-1 receptor expression (ASC-type amino-acid transporter 2: ASCT2). Moreover, we show that formaldehyde-exposed trophoblasts present an altered redox status associated with oxidative stress, and an increase in ASCT2 expression intended to compensate for this stress. Finally, we demonstrate that the adverse effects of formaldehyde on trophoblast differentiation and fusion are reversed by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (Nac), an antioxidant. PMID:26186596

  7. Differential expression and tumorigenic function of neurotensin receptor 1 in neuroendocrine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Tae; Li, Jing; Song, Jun; Lee, Eun Y.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Evers, B. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin (NTS), localized predominantly to the small bowel, stimulates the growth of a variety of cancers, including neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), mainly through its interaction with the high-affinity NTS receptor 1 (NTSR1). Here, we observed increased expression of NTSR1 in almost all tested clinical NET samples, but not in normal tissues. Through RT-PCR analysis, we found that the expression of NTSR1 and NTSR2 was either variable (NTSR1) or absent (NTSR2) in human NET cell lines. In contrast, NTSR3 and NTS were expressed in all NET cells. Treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent, increased levels of NTSR1 and NTSR2 suggesting that DNA methylation contributes to NTSR1/2 expression patterns, which was confirmed by methylation analyses. In addition, we found that knockdown of NTSR1 decreased proliferation, expression levels of growth-related proteins, and anchorage-independent growth of BON human carcinoid cells. Moreover, stable silencing of NTSR1 suppressed BON cell growth, adhesion, migration and invasion. Our results show that high expression of NTSR1 is found in clinical NETs and that promoter methylation is an important mechanism controlling the differential expression of NTSR1 and silencing of NTSR2 in NET cells. Furthermore, knockdown of NTSR1 in BON cells suppressed oncogenic functions suggesting that NTSR1 contributes to NET tumorigenesis. PMID:26298774

  8. Non-functioning parathyroid adenoma: a rare differential diagnosis for vocal-cord paralysis.

    PubMed

    Kamali, D; Sharpe, A; Nagarajan, S; Elsaify, W

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Adenomas of the parathyroid gland typically present with symptoms of hyperparathyroidism, manifested by fatigue, bone pain, abdominal pain, weakness, dyspepsia, nephrolithiasis and skeletal bone disease. Here, we describe, for the first time, a case of a non-functioning benign tumour of the parathyroid gland presenting as vocal-cord paralysis. Case History A 49-year-old male presented with a 10-week history of dysphonia and the feeling of having 'something stuck in my throat'. History-taking elicited no other associated symptoms. Flexible nasal endoscopy demonstrated paralysis of the left vocal cord. Computed tomography of the neck revealed a cystic lesion, 18mm in diameter adjacent to the oesophagus. After more rigorous tests, a neck exploration, left hemithyroidectomy, excision of the left paratracheal mass and level-VI neck dissection was undertaken, without incident to the patient or surgical team. Histology was consistent with a parathyroid adenoma. Conclusions This case emphasises the importance of including adenomatous disease of the parathyroid gland in the differential diagnosis despite normal parathyroid status as a cause of vocal cord palsy. PMID:27055408

  9. Differential expression and function of CD27 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells expressing ZAP-70.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Sandrine T; Hou, Sen; Pauls, Samantha D; Johnston, James B; Gibson, Spencer B; Marshall, Aaron J

    2015-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy driven by abberant B cell signaling and survival. Leukemic B cells accumulate in the peripheral blood and the lymphoid organs where contact with stromal cells and T cells provide critical survival signals. Clinical severity of CLL is associated with several prognostic markers including expression of the kinase ZAP-70. ZAP-70 expression enhances signaling via the B cell antigen receptor and is associated with increased cell adhesion and migration capacity. Here we report that ZAP-70-positive CLL patients display significantly higher expression of the TNF superfamily receptor and memory marker CD27 than do ZAP-70 negative patients. CD27 expression by CLL was acutely elevated upon BCR cross-linking, or upon ectopic expression of ZAP-70. CD27 expression correlated with functional capacity to adhere to stromal cells and antibody blockade of CD27 impaired CLL binding to stroma. These results provide the first evidence for differential expression of CD27 among CLL prognostic groups, suggest a role for ZAP-70 dependent signaling in CD27 induction and implicate CD27 in cell-cell interactions with the lymphoid tissue microenvironment. PMID:26002513

  10. Factor structure and differential item functioning of the BASC-2 BESS Spanish Language Parent Form.

    PubMed

    Dever, Bridget V; Raines, Tara C; Dowdy, Erin

    2016-06-01

    Given the steady increase of students from diverse backgrounds in the U.S. educational system, in particular immigrant and Latino students, it is important to consider how to best support all students within our schools. The present study focuses on the Behavior Assessment System for Children-Second Edition (BASC-2) Behavioral and Emotional Screening System (BESS) Parent Spanish form, which is a promising assessment tool for those who are interested in screening for behavioral and emotional risk among Spanish-speaking populations. The present study included 725 students of Latino descent in Grades K-6 in an urban school district and their parents or legal guardians, who served as the informants. All parents completed the BESS language form (English or Spanish) of their choice. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported a 4-factor structure (Externalizing, Internalizing, Inattention, and Adaptive Skills) similar to that of the BESS Parent English form: χ2(77) = 248.06, p < .001; CFI = 0.903; TLI = 0.940. However, differential item functioning (DIF) analyses revealed 5 items (16.7%) demonstrated significant levels of DIF, with 4 of the 5 being easier to endorse in English. This study provides preliminary evidence of partial invariance of the BESS Parent across language forms. Although some evidence of invariance across language forms at the structural and item levels exists, more research is necessary to determine whether the DIF found in the present study results in any perceptible test bias. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27243244

  11. β-Catenin Signaling Drives Differentiation and Proinflammatory Function of IRF8-Dependent Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sara B.; Smith, Norah L.; McDougal, Courtney; Pepper, Marion; Shah, Suhagi; Yap, George S.; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Jiang, Aimin; Clausen, Björn E.; Rudd, Brian D.; Denkers, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    β-catenin signaling has recently been tied to the emergence of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Here we demonstrate a novel role for β-catenin in directing DC subset development through IRF8 activation. We found that splenic DC precursors express β-catenin, and DC from mice with CD11c-specific constitutive β-catenin activation upregulated IRF8 through targeting of the Irf8 promoter, leading to in vivo expansion of IRF8-dependent CD8α+, plasmacytoid, and CD103+CD11b− DC. β-catenin-stabilized CD8α+ DC secreted elevated IL-12 upon in vitro microbial stimulation, and pharmacological β-catenin inhibition blocked this response in WT cells. Upon infections with Toxoplasma gondii and vaccinia virus, mice with stabilized DC β-catenin displayed abnormally high Th1 and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses, respectively. Collectively, these results reveal a novel and unexpected function for β-catenin in programming DC differentiation towards subsets that orchestrate proinflammatory immunity to infection. PMID:25416805

  12. Acetylcholinesterase staining differentiates functionally distinct auditory pathways in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Adolphs, R

    1993-03-15

    The aim of this study was to examine how the functional specialization of the barn owl's auditory brainstem might correlate with histochemical compartmentalization. The barn owl uses interaural intensity and time differences to encode, respectively, the vertical and azimuthal positions of sound sources in space. These two auditory cues are processed in parallel ascending pathways that separate from each other at the level of the cochlear nuclei. Sections through the auditory brainstem were stained for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to examine whether nuclei that process different auditory cues stain differentially for this enzyme. Of the two cochlear nuclei, angularis showed more intense staining than nucleus magnocellularis. Nucleus angularis projects to all of the nuclei and subdivisions of nuclei that belong to the intensity processing pathway. Acetylcholinesterase stained all regions that contain terminal fields of nucleus angularis and thus provided discrimination between the time and intensity pathways. Moreover, staining patterns with acetylcholinesterase were complementary to those previously reported with an anti-calbindin antibody, which stains terminal fields of nucleus laminaris, and thus stains all the nuclei and subdivisions of nuclei that belong to the time pathway. Some of the gross staining patterns observed with AChE were similar to those reported with antibodies to glutamate decarboxylase. However, AChE is a more convenient and definitive marker in discriminating between these pathways than is calbindin or glutamate decarboxylase. Acetylcholinesterase staining of the intensity pathway in the owl may be related to encoding of sound intensity by spike rate over large dynamic ranges. PMID:7681456

  13. Differential regulatory functions of three classes of phosphatidylinositol and phosphoinositide 3-kinases in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved and exquisitely regulated self-eating cellular process with important biological functions. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PtdIns3Ks) and phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are involved in the autophagic process. Here we aim to recapitulate how 3 classes of these lipid kinases differentially regulate autophagy. Generally, activation of the class I PI3K suppresses autophagy, via the well-established PI3K-AKT-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1 (MTORC1) pathway. In contrast, the class III PtdIns3K catalytic subunit PIK3C3/Vps34 forms a protein complex with BECN1 and PIK3R4 and produces phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P), which is required for the initiation and progression of autophagy. The class II enzyme emerged only recently as an alternative source of PtdIns3P and autophagic initiator. However, the orthodox paradigm is challenged by findings that the PIK3CB catalytic subunit of class I PI3K acts as a positive regulator of autophagy, and PIK3C3 was thought to be an amino acid sensor for MTOR, which curbs autophagy. At present, a number of PtdIns3K and PI3K inhibitors, including specific PIK3C3 inhibitors, have been developed for suppression of autophagy and for clinical applications in autophagy-related human diseases. PMID:26018563

  14. Spatial resolution characterization of differential phase contrast CT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-01

    By adding a Talbot-Lau interferometer to a conventional x-ray absorption computed tomography (CT) imaging system, both differential phase contrast (DPC) signal and absorption contrast signal can be simultaneously measured from the same set of CT measurements. The imaging performance of such multi-contrast x-ray CT imaging systems can be characterized with standard metrics such as noise variance, noise power spectrum, contrast-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function (MTF), and task-based detectability index. Among these metrics, the measurement of the MTF can be challenging in DPC-CT systems due to several confounding factors such as phase wrapping and the difficulty of using fine wires as probes. To address these technical challenges, this paper discusses a viable and reliable method to experimentally measure the MTF of DPC-CT. It has been found that the spatial resolution of DPC-CT is degraded, when compared to that of the corresponding absorption CT, due to the presence of a source grating G0 in the Talbot-Lau interferometer. An effective MTF was introduced and experimentally estimated to describe the impact of the Talbot-Lau interferometer on the system MTF.

  15. Spatial resolution characterization of differential phase contrast CT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-21

    By adding a Talbot-Lau interferometer to a conventional x-ray absorption computed tomography (CT) imaging system, both differential phase contrast (DPC) signal and absorption contrast signal can be simultaneously measured from the same set of CT measurements. The imaging performance of such multi-contrast x-ray CT imaging systems can be characterized with standard metrics such as noise variance, noise power spectrum, contrast-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function (MTF), and task-based detectability index. Among these metrics, the measurement of the MTF can be challenging in DPC-CT systems due to several confounding factors such as phase wrapping and the difficulty of using fine wires as probes. To address these technical challenges, this paper discusses a viable and reliable method to experimentally measure the MTF of DPC-CT. It has been found that the spatial resolution of DPC-CT is degraded, when compared to that of the corresponding absorption CT, due to the presence of a source grating G0 in the Talbot-Lau interferometer. An effective MTF was introduced and experimentally estimated to describe the impact of the Talbot-Lau interferometer on the system MTF. PMID:23685949

  16. Divergent functions of hematopoietic transcription factors in lineage priming and differentiation during erythro-megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimkin, Maxim; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Mishra, Tejaswini; Morrissey, Christapher S; Wu, Weisheng; Keller, Cheryl A; Blobel, Gerd A; Lee, Dongwon; Beer, Michael A; Hardison, Ross C; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2014-12-01

    Combinatorial actions of relatively few transcription factors control hematopoietic differentiation. To investigate this process in erythro-megakaryopoiesis, we correlated the genome-wide chromatin occupancy signatures of four master hematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, TAL1, and FLI1) and three diagnostic histone modification marks with the gene expression changes that occur during development of primary cultured megakaryocytes (MEG) and primary erythroblasts (ERY) from murine fetal liver hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We identified a robust, genome-wide mechanism of MEG-specific lineage priming by a previously described stem/progenitor cell-expressed transcription factor heptad (GATA2, LYL1, TAL1, FLI1, ERG, RUNX1, LMO2) binding to MEG-associated cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in multipotential progenitors. This is followed by genome-wide GATA factor switching that mediates further induction of MEG-specific genes following lineage commitment. Interaction between GATA and ETS factors appears to be a key determinant of these processes. In contrast, ERY-specific lineage priming is biased toward GATA2-independent mechanisms. In addition to its role in MEG lineage priming, GATA2 plays an extensive role in late megakaryopoiesis as a transcriptional repressor at loci defined by a specific DNA signature. Our findings reveal important new insights into how ERY and MEG lineages arise from a common bipotential progenitor via overlapping and divergent functions of shared hematopoietic transcription factors. PMID:25319996

  17. Monosodium glutamate in its anhydrous and monohydrate form: Differentiation by Raman spectroscopies and density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peica, N.; Lehene, C.; Leopold, N.; Schlücker, S.; Kiefer, W.

    2007-03-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG), a common flavor enhancer, is detected in aqueous solutions by Raman and surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectroscopies at the micromolar level. The presence of different species, such as protonated and unprotonated MSG, is demonstrated by concentration and pH dependent Raman and SERS experiments. In particular, the symmetric bending modes of the amino group and the stretching modes of the carboxy moiety are employed as marker bands. The protonation of the NH 2 group at acidic pH values, for example, is detected in the Raman spectra. From the measured SERS spectra, a strong chemical interaction of MSG with the colloidal particles is deduced and a geometry of MSG adsorbed on the silver surface is proposed. In order to assign the observed Raman bands, calculations employing density functional theory (DFT) were performed. The calculated geometries, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and Raman scattering activities for both MSG forms are in good agreement with experimental data. The set of theoretical data enables a complete vibrational assignment of the experimentally detected Raman spectra and the differentiation between the anhydrous and monohydrate forms of MSG.

  18. Spatial resolution characterization of differential phase contrast CT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    By adding a Talbot–Lau interferometer to a conventional x-ray absorption computed tomography (CT) imaging system, both differential phase contrast (DPC) signal and absorption contrast signal can be simultaneously measured from the same set of CT measurements. The imaging performance of such multi-contrast x-ray CT imaging systems can be characterized with standard metrics such as noise variance, noise power spectrum, contrast-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function (MTF), and task-based detectability index. Among these metrics, the measurement of the MTF can be challenging in DPC-CT systems due to several confounding factors such as phase wrapping and the difficulty of using fine wires as probes. To address these technical challenges, this paper discusses a viable and reliable method to experimentally measure the MTF of DPC-CT. It has been found that the spatial resolution of DPC-CT is degraded, when compared to that of the corresponding absorption CT, due to the presence of a source grating G0 in the Talbot-Lau interferometer. An effective MTF was introduced and experimentally estimated to describe the impact of the Talbot–Lau interferometer on the system MTF. PMID:23685949

  19. Maternal reflective functioning as a multidimensional construct: Differential associations with children's temperament and externalizing behavior.

    PubMed

    Smaling, H J A; Huijbregts, S C J; van der Heijden, K B; van Goozen, S H M; Swaab, H

    2016-08-01

    Maternal reflective functioning (RF) has been associated with children's behavioral development. This study examined maternal prenatal and postnatal RF, as measured by the Pregnancy Interview and Parent Development Interview, as multidimensional constructs. It was also examined whether the RF-dimensions were associated with children's temperament and externalizing behavior, as assessed by several questionnaires. The sample consisted of 123 first-time mothers (M age=22.85years, SD=2.21) and their children (M age=19.97months, SD=0.85, 56% male). Two related but distinct dimensions were found for prenatal RF, termed self-focused and child-focused mentalization. Three dimensions were observed for postnatal RF, termed self-focused, child-focused, and relation-focused mentalization. Results showed that prenatal RF negatively related to reported child physical aggression. Postnatal self-focused RF was positively linked to externalizing behavior and negative emotionality in offspring, while relation-focused RF scores were negatively associated with child physical aggression. Findings show that it is important to also look at the specific RF-dimensions when examining the effects of maternal RF on children's behavioral development, as differential associations with behavioral outcomes exist. Discussion further focuses on the importance of these findings in prevention and clinical practice, and suggestions are being made to further improve the measurement of maternal RF-dimensions. PMID:27522031

  20. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W.; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y.; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W. M.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27me3) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122+ NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26668377

  1. Splicing factor SRSF3 is crucial for hepatocyte differentiation and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Supriya; Jumaa, Hassan; Webster, Nicholas J.G.

    2015-01-01

    SR family RNA binding proteins regulate splicing of nascent RNAs in vitro but their physiological role in vivo is largely unexplored, as genetic deletion of many SR protein genes results in embryonic lethality. Here we show that SRSF3HKO mice carrying a hepatocyte-specific deletion of Srsf3 (homologous to human SRSF3/SRp20) have a disrupted hepatic architecture and show pre- and postnatal growth retardation. SRSF3HKO mice exhibit impaired hepatocyte maturation with alterations in glucose and lipid homeostasis characterized by reduced glycogen storage, fasting hypoglycemia, increased insulin sensitivity and reduced cholesterol synthesis. We identify various splicing alterations in the SRSF3HKO liver that explain the in vivo phenotype. In particular, loss of SRSF3 causes aberrant splicing of Hnf1α, Ern1, Hmgcs1, Dhcr7 and Scap genes, which are critical regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism. Our study provides the first evidence for a SRSF3-driven genetic programme required for morphological and functional differentiation of hepatocytes that may have relevance for human liver disease and metabolic dysregulation. PMID:23299886

  2. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Responses to the Everyday Discrimination Scale: A Differential Item Functioning Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Tené T.; Yang, Frances M.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Fitchett, George

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the impact of race/ethnicity on responses to the Everyday Discrimination Scale, one of the most widely used discrimination scales in epidemiologic and public health research. Participants were 3,295 middle-aged US women (African-American, Caucasian, Chinese, Hispanic, and Japanese) from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) baseline examination (1996–1997). Multiple-indicator, multiple-cause models were used to examine differential item functioning (DIF) on the Everyday Discrimination Scale by race/ethnicity. After adjustment for age, education, and language of interview, meaningful DIF was observed for 3 (out of 10) items: “receiving poorer service in restaurants or stores,” “being treated as if you are dishonest,” and “being treated with less courtesy than other people” (all P's < 0.001). Consequently, the “profile” of everyday discrimination differed slightly for women of different racial/ethnic groups, with certain “public” experiences appearing to have more salience for African-American and Chinese women and “dishonesty” having more salience for racial/ethnic minority women overall. “Courtesy” appeared to have more salience for Hispanic women only in comparison with African-American women. Findings suggest that the Everyday Discrimination Scale could potentially be used across racial/ethnic groups as originally intended. However, researchers should use caution with items that demonstrated DIF. PMID:22306556

  3. Efficient episomal reprogramming of blood mononuclear cells and differentiation to hepatocytes with functional drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Brzeszczynska, Joanna; Samuel, Kay; Black, Jim; Palakkan, Anwar; Anderson, Richard A; Gallagher, Ronald; Ross, James A

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of converting cells from blood mononuclear cells (MNC) to liver cells provides promising opportunities for the study of diseases and the assessment of new drugs. However, clinical applications have to meet GMP requirements and the methods for generating induced pluripotent cells (iPCs) have to avoid insertional mutagenesis, a possibility when using viral vehicles for the delivery of reprogramming factors. We have developed an efficient non-integration method for reprogramming fresh or frozen blood MNC, maintained in an optimised cytokine cocktail, to generate induced pluripotent cells. Using electroporation for the effective delivery of episomal transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, L-Myc, and Lin28) in a feeder-free system, without any requirement for small molecules, we achieved a reprogramming efficiency of up to 0.033% (65 colonies from 2×10(5) seeded MNC). Applying the same cytokine cocktail and reprogramming methods to cord blood or fetal liver-derived CD34(+) cells, we obtained 148 iPS colonies from 10(5) seeding cells (0.148%). The iPS cell lines we generated maintained typical characteristics of pluripotent cells and could be successfully differentiated into hepatocytes with drug metabolic function. PMID:26256888

  4. Testicular function in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with radioiodine

    SciTech Connect

    Pacini, F.; Gasperi, M.; Fugazzola, L.

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether {sup 131}I therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) can affect endocrine testicular function. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) concentrations were measured in 103 patients periodically submitted for radioiodine therapy for residual or metastatic disease. Mean follow-up was 93.7{+-}54 mo (range 10-243 mo). Mean FSH values in {sup 131}I-treated patients tested after their last treatment were 15.3{+-}9.9 mU/ml, significantly higher than those of 19 untreated patients (6.5{+-}3.1 mU/ml). Considering the mean +3 s.d. FSH of untreated subjects as the upper limit of normal range, 36.8% of the patients had an abnormal increase in serum FSH. Longitudinal analysis performed in 21 patients showed that the behavior of FSH in response to {sup 131}I therapy was not universal. Six patients had no change or a slight increase in serum FSH after {sup 131}I administration; eleven patients had a transient increase above normal values 6-12 mo after {sup 131}I treatment, with return to normal levels in subsequent months. The administration of a second dose was followed by a similar increase in FSH levels. Finally, four patients, followed for a long period of time and treated with several {sup 131}I doses, showed a progressive increase in serum FSH, which eventually became permanent. Semen analysis, performed in a small subgroup of patients, showed a consistent reduction in the number of normokinetic sperm. No change was found in serum T levels between treated and untreated patients. The results indicate that {sup 131}I therapy for thyroid carcinoma is associated with transient impairment of testicular germinal cell function. The damage may become permanent for high-radiation activities delivered year after year and might pose a significant risk of infertility. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Clonal Tests of Conventional Kinesin Function during Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Brendza, Robert P.; Sheehan, Kathy B.; Turner, F.R.; Saxton, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Null mutations in the Drosophila Kinesin heavy chain gene (Khc), which are lethal during the second larval instar, have shown that conventional kinesin is critical for fast axonal transport in neurons, but its functions elsewhere are uncertain. To test other tissues, single imaginal cells in young larvae were rendered null for Khc by mitotic recombination. Surprisingly, the null cells produced large clones of adult tissue. The rates of cell proliferation were not reduced, indicating that conventional kinesin is not essential for cell growth or division. This suggests that in undifferentiated cells vesicle transport from the Golgi to either the endoplasmic reticulum or the plasma membrane can proceed at normal rates without conventional kinesin. In adult eye clones produced by null founder cells, there were some defects in differentiation that caused mild ultrastructural changes, but they were not consistent with serious problems in the positioning or transport of endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, or vesicles. In contrast, defective cuticle deposition by highly elongated Khc null bristle shafts suggests that conventional kinesin is critical for proper secretory vesicle transport in some cell types, particularly ones that must build and maintain long cytoplasmic extensions. The ubiquity and evolutionary conservation of kinesin heavy chain argue for functions in all cells. We suggest interphase organelle movements away from the cell center are driven by multilayered transport mechanisms; that is, individual organelles can use kinesin-related proteins and myosins, as well as conventional kinesin, to move toward the cell periphery. In this case, other motors can compensate for the loss of conventional kinesin except in cells that have extremely long transport tracks. PMID:10749933

  6. Synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors differentially modulate neuronal COX-2 function, lipid peroxidation, and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Stark, David T.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs) induces neuroprotection, while extrasynaptic NMDARs promote excitotoxic cell death. Neuronal expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is enhanced by synaptic NMDARs, and although this enzyme mediates neuronal functions, COX-2 is also regarded as a key modulator of neuroinflammation and is thought to exacerbate excitotoxicity via overproduction of prostaglandins. This raises an apparent paradox: synaptic NMDARs are pro-survival yet are essential for robust neuronal COX-2 expression. We hypothesized that stimulation of extrasynaptic NMDARs converts COX-2 signaling from a physiological to a potentially pathological process. We combined HPLC-ESI-MS/MS-based mediator lipidomics and unbiased image analysis in mouse dissociated and organotypic cortical cultures to uncover that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDARs differentially modulate neuronal COX-2 expression and activity. We show that synaptic NMDARs enhance neuronal COX-2 expression, while sustained synaptic stimulation limits COX-2 activity by suppressing cellular levels of the primary COX-2 substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). In contrast, extrasynaptic NMDARs suppress COX-2 expression while activating phospholipase A2 (PLA2), which enhances AA levels by hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. Thus, sequential activation of synaptic then extrasynaptic NMDARs maximizes COX-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis. We also show that excitotoxic events only drive induction of COX-2 expression through abnormal synaptic network excitability. Finally, we show that non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation of arachidonic and other polyunsaturated fatty acids is a function of network activity history. A new paradigm emerges from our results suggesting that pathological COX-2 signaling associated with models of stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegeneration requires specific spatio-temporal NMDAR stimulation. PMID:21957234

  7. A Differential Item Function Analysis of Somatic Symptoms of Depression in People with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Salene M. W.; Ludman, Evette J.; McCorkle, Ruth; Reid, Robert; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Penfold, Robert; Wagner, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The overlap of somatic symptoms of depression with symptoms of cancer treatment is widely acknowledged and studied. However, this literature provides little guidance for clinicians as to whether these items should be used in assessing depression. The current study examined the appropriateness of using somatic items for assessment of depression in people with cancer. Methods People with newly diagnosed breast, lung or colorectal cancer (n=251) completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ9) shortly after cancer diagnosis but before cancer treatment (baseline), 4 months later, typically during or shortly after treatment, and 12 months later. Pharmacy data was used to classify participants as having low somatic symptoms or high somatic symptoms. Differential item function (DIF) compared the functioning of the somatic items of the PHQ9 in the low vs. high symptom groups and the chemotherapy vs. no chemotherapy groups at the 4-month assessment. Results Significant DIF was not found on any of the four somatic items of the PHQ9 and differences in the item parameters of the somatic items was not consistent across the groups. However, fatigue and sleep indicated only mild depression. Only removing the fatigue item greatly affected the number screening positive for depression at 4 months (8.3%) but removing the other somatic items did not have as large an effect. Only one participant at baseline screened positive for depression by somatic symptoms alone (no psychological symptoms) and no participants screened positive by somatic symptoms alone at 4 months and 12 months. Limitations The sample size was small for DIF and consisted of mostly women with breast cancer. Conclusions Somatic symptoms of depression can continue to be administered to people with cancer, however the fatigue and sleep items should be used with caution. PMID:25240839

  8. Platelet-derived CXCL12 regulates monocyte function, survival, differentiation into macrophages and foam cells through differential involvement of CXCR4–CXCR7

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, M; von Ungern-Sternberg, S N I; Seizer, P; Schlegel, F; Büttcher, M; Sindhu, N A; Müller, S; Mack, A; Gawaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and release CXCL12 (SDF-1), which governs differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors into either endothelial or macrophage-foam cells. CXCL12 ligates CXCR4 and CXCR7 and regulates monocyte/macrophage functions. This study deciphers the relative contribution of CXCR4–CXCR7 in mediating the effects of platelet-derived CXCL12 on monocyte function, survival, and differentiation. CXCL12 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) that ligate CXCR4–CXCR7 induced a dynamic bidirectional trafficking of the receptors, causing CXCR4 internalization and CXCR7 externalization during chemotaxis, thereby influencing relative receptor availability, unlike MCP-1. In vivo we found enhanced accumulation of platelets and platelet-macrophage co-aggregates in peritoneal fluid following induction of peritonitis in mice. The relative surface expression of CXCL12, CXCR4, and CXCR7 among infiltrated monocytes was also enhanced as compared with peripheral blood. Platelet-derived CXCL12 from collagen-adherent platelets and recombinant CXCL12 induced monocyte chemotaxis specifically through CXCR4 engagement. Adhesion of monocytes to immobilized CXCL12 and CXCL12-enriched activated platelet surface under static and dynamic arterial flow conditions were mediated primarily through CXCR7 and were counter-regulated by neutralizing platelet-derived CXCL12. Monocytes and culture-derived-M1–M2 macrophages phagocytosed platelets, with the phagocytic potential of culture-derived-M1 macrophages higher than M2 involving CXCR4–CXCR7 participation. CXCR7 was the primary receptor in promoting monocyte survival as exerted by platelet-derived CXCL12 against BH3-mimetic induced apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential). In co-culture experiments with platelets, monocytes predominantly differentiated into CD163+ macrophages, which was attenuated upon CXCL12 neutralization and CXCR4/CXCR7 blocking antibodies

  9. Carbon monoxide improves neuronal differentiation and yield by increasing the functioning and number of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Ana S; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-08-01

    The process of cell differentiation goes hand-in-hand with metabolic adaptations, which are needed to provide energy and new metabolites. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous cytoprotective molecule able to inhibit cell death and improve mitochondrial metabolism. Neuronal differentiation processes were studied using the NT2 cell line, which is derived from human testicular embryonic teratocarcinoma and differentiates into post-mitotic neurons upon retinoic acid treatment. CO-releasing molecule A1 (CORM-A1) was used do deliver CO into cell culture. CO treatment improved NT2 neuronal differentiation and yield, since there were more neurons and the total cell number increased following the differentiation process. CO supplementation enhanced the mitochondrial population in post-mitotic neurons derived from NT2 cells, as indicated by an increase in mitochondrial DNA. CO treatment during neuronal differentiation increased the extent of the classical metabolic change that occurs during neuronal differentiation, from glycolytic to more oxidative metabolism, by decreasing the ratio of lactate production and glucose consumption. The expression of pyruvate and lactate dehydrogenases was higher, indicating an augmented oxidative metabolism. Moreover, these findings were corroborated by an increased percentage of (13) C incorporation from [U-(13) C]glucose into the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites malate and citrate, and also glutamate and aspartate in CO-treated cells. Finally, under low levels of oxygen (5%), which enhances glycolytic metabolism, some of the enhancing effects of CO on mitochondria were not observed. In conclusion, our data show that CO improves neuronal and mitochondrial yield by stimulation of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, and thus oxidative metabolism of NT2 cells during the process of neuronal differentiation. The process of cell differentiation is coupled with metabolic adaptations. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous cytoprotective

  10. Differential and Synergistic Functionality of Acylsugars in Suppressing Oviposition by Insect Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Thomas M.; Halitschke, Rayko; De Jong, Darlene M.; Kessler, André; Kennedy, George G.; Mutschler, Martha A.

    2016-01-01

    Acylsugars are secondary metabolites exuded from type IV glandular trichomes that provide broad-spectrum insect suppression for Solanum pennellii Correll, a wild relative of cultivated tomato. Acylsugars produced by different S. pennellii accessions vary by sugar moieties (glucose or sucrose) and fatty acid side chains (lengths and branching patterns). Our objective was to determine which acylsugar compositions more effectively suppressed oviposition of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Middle East—Asia Minor 1 Group), tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), and western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande). We extracted and characterized acylsugars from four S. pennellii accessions with different compositions, as well as from an acylsugar-producing tomato breeding line. We also fractionated the acylsugars of one S. pennellii accession to examine the effects of its components. Effects of acylsugars on oviposition were evaluated by administering a range of doses to oviposition sites of adult whiteflies and thrips in non-choice and choice bioassays, respectively. The acylsugars from S. pennellii accessions and the tomato breeding line demonstrated differential functionality in their ability to alter the distribution of whitefly oviposition and suppress oviposition on acylsugar treated substrates. Tobacco thrips were sensitive to all compositions while western flower thrips and whiteflies were more sensitive to acylsugars from a subset of S. pennellii accessions. It follows that acylsugars could thus mediate plant-enemy interactions in such a way as to affect evolution of host specialization, resistance specificity, and potentially host differentiation or local adaptation. The acylsugars from S. pennellii LA1376 were separated by polarity into two fractions that differed sharply for their sugar moieties and fatty acid side chains. These fractions had different efficacies, with neither having activity approaching that of the original

  11. Effect of tyrosine hydroxylase overexpression in lymphocytes on the differentiation and function of T helper cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Wei; Zuo, Cong; Chen, Xiao; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the overexpression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of catecholamines (CAs), in lymphocytes on the differentiation and function of T helper (Th) cells. A recombinant TH overexpression plasmid (pEGFP-N1-TH) was constructed and transfected into mesenteric lymphocytes using nucleofection technology. These cells were stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) for 48 h and then examined for TH expression and CA content, as well as for the percentage of Th1 and Th2 cells, cytokine concentrations and for the levels of signaling molecules. The lymphocytes overexpressing TH also expressed higher mRNA and protein levels of TH, and synthesized more CAs, including norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and dopamine (DA) than the mock-transfected control cells. TH gene overexpression in the lymphocytes reduced the percentage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ cells and the ratio of CD4+IFN-γ+/CD4+IL-4+ cells, as well as the percentages of CD4+CD26+ and CD4+CD30+ cells and the ratio of CD4+CD26+/CD4+CD30+ cells. TH overexpression also reduced the secretion of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) from lymphocytes. Moreover, NE inhibited the Con A-induced lymphocyte proliferation and decreased both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) expression in the lymphocytes. Our findings thus indicate that TH gene overexpression promotes the polarization and differentiation of CD4+ cells towards Th2 cells, and this effect is mediated by the cAMP and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:27315039

  12. Differential evolution of the UV luminosity function of Lyman break galaxies from z ~ 5 to 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, I.; Ohta, K.; Tamura, N.; Akiyama, M.; Aoki, K.; Ando, M.; Kiuchi, G.; Sawicki, M.

    2007-04-01

    We report the ultraviolet luminosity function (UVLF) of Lyman break galaxies at z ~ 5 derived from a deep and wide survey using the prime focus camera of the 8.2 m Subaru telescope (Suprime-Cam). Target fields consist of two blank regions of the sky, namely, the region including the Hubble Deep Field-North and the J0053+1234 region, and the total effective surveyed area is 1290 arcmin2. Applications of carefully determined colour selection criteria in V - Ic and Ic - z' yield a detection of 853 z ~ 5 candidates with z'AB < 26.5 mag. The UVLF at z ~ 5 based on this sample shows no significant change in the number density of bright (L >~ L*z=3) LBGs from that at z ~ 3, while there is a significant decline in the LF's faint end with increasing look-back time. This result means that the evolution of the number densities is differential with UV luminosity: the number density of UV luminous objects remains almost constant from z ~ 5 to 3 (the cosmic age is about 1.2 to 2.1 Gyr) while the number density of fainter objects gradually increases with cosmic time. This trend becomes apparent thanks to the small uncertainties in number densities both in the bright and faint parts of LFs at different epochs that are made possible by the deep and wide surveys we use. We discuss the origins of this differential evolution of the UVLF along the cosmic time and suggest that our observational findings are consistent with the biased galaxy evolution scenario: a galaxy population hosted by massive dark haloes starts active star formation preferentially at early cosmic time, while less massive galaxies increase their number density later. We also calculated the UV luminosity density by integrating the UVLF and at z ~ 5 found it to be 38.8+6.7-4.1 per cent of that at z ~ 3 for the luminosity range L > 0.1L*z=3. By combining our results with those from the literature, we find that the cosmic UV luminosity density marks its peak at and then slowly declines towards higher redshift. Based on

  13. Differential and Synergistic Functionality of Acylsugars in Suppressing Oviposition by Insect Herbivores.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Brian M; D'Ambrosio, Damon A; Chappell, Thomas M; Halitschke, Rayko; De Jong, Darlene M; Kessler, André; Kennedy, George G; Mutschler, Martha A

    2016-01-01

    Acylsugars are secondary metabolites exuded from type IV glandular trichomes that provide broad-spectrum insect suppression for Solanum pennellii Correll, a wild relative of cultivated tomato. Acylsugars produced by different S. pennellii accessions vary by sugar moieties (glucose or sucrose) and fatty acid side chains (lengths and branching patterns). Our objective was to determine which acylsugar compositions more effectively suppressed oviposition of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Middle East-Asia Minor 1 Group), tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), and western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande). We extracted and characterized acylsugars from four S. pennellii accessions with different compositions, as well as from an acylsugar-producing tomato breeding line. We also fractionated the acylsugars of one S. pennellii accession to examine the effects of its components. Effects of acylsugars on oviposition were evaluated by administering a range of doses to oviposition sites of adult whiteflies and thrips in non-choice and choice bioassays, respectively. The acylsugars from S. pennellii accessions and the tomato breeding line demonstrated differential functionality in their ability to alter the distribution of whitefly oviposition and suppress oviposition on acylsugar treated substrates. Tobacco thrips were sensitive to all compositions while western flower thrips and whiteflies were more sensitive to acylsugars from a subset of S. pennellii accessions. It follows that acylsugars could thus mediate plant-enemy interactions in such a way as to affect evolution of host specialization, resistance specificity, and potentially host differentiation or local adaptation. The acylsugars from S. pennellii LA1376 were separated by polarity into two fractions that differed sharply for their sugar moieties and fatty acid side chains. These fractions had different efficacies, with neither having activity approaching that of the original exudate

  14. Control of growth factor binding and release in bisphosphonate functionalized hydrogels guides rapid differentiation of precursor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kootala, Sujit; Zhang, Yu; Ghalib, Sara; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Hilborn, Jöns; Ossipov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    An in situ cross-linkable hyaluronan hydrogel functionalized with bisphosphonate (BP) groups allows tunable release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) determined by the amount of BP groups. The high affinity of matrix-anchored BP groups towards BMP-2 permits guided differentiation of entrapped progenitor cells in 3-D cultures. PMID:26610690

  15. Green function of the double-fractional Fokker-Planck equation: path integral and stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, H; Zatloukal, V

    2013-11-01

    The statistics of rare events, the so-called black-swan events, is governed by non-Gaussian distributions with heavy power-like tails. We calculate the Green functions of the associated Fokker-Planck equations and solve the related stochastic differential equations. We also discuss the subject in the framework of path integration. PMID:24329213

  16. Teacher Implementation of Trial-Based Functional Analysis and Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior for Students with Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Susan D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a training package on three middle school special education teachers' accurate implementation of trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) with their students with autism spectrum disorders or emotional and behavioral disorders in the…

  17. T Cell Fates Zipped Up: How the Bach2 Basic Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Repressor Directs T Cell Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Richer, Martin J; Lang, Mark L; Butler, Noah S

    2016-08-15

    Recent data illustrate a key role for the transcriptional regulator bric-a-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and cap'n'collar homology (Bach)2 in orchestrating T cell differentiation and function. Although Bach2 has a well-described role in B cell differentiation, emerging data show that Bach2 is a prototypical member of a novel class of transcription factors that regulates transcriptional activity in T cells at super-enhancers, or regions of high transcriptional activity. Accumulating data demonstrate specific roles for Bach2 in favoring regulatory T cell generation, restraining effector T cell differentiation, and potentiating memory T cell development. Evidence suggests that Bach2 regulates various facets of T cell function by repressing other key transcriptional regulators such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1. In this review, we examine our present understanding of the role of Bach2 in T cell function and highlight the growing evidence that this transcriptional repressor functions as a key regulator involved in maintenance of T cell quiescence, T cell subset differentiation, and memory T cell generation. PMID:27496973

  18. Examining Differential Item Functioning Trends for English Language Learners in a Reading Test: A Meta-Analytical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Jin; Becker, Betsy Jane; Kim, Young-Suk

    2014-01-01

    In this study, differential item functioning (DIF) trends were examined for English language learners (ELLs) versus non-ELL students in third and tenth grades on a large-scale reading assessment. To facilitate the analyses, a meta-analytic DIF technique was employed. The results revealed that items requiring knowledge of words and phrases in…

  19. Do Items that Measure Self-Perceived Physical Appearance Function Differentially across Gender Groups? An Application of the MACS Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Roma, Vicente; Tomas, Ines; Ferreres, Doris; Hernandez, Ana

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether the 6 items of the Physical Appearance Scale (Marsh, Richards, Johnson, Roche, & Tremayne, 1994) show differential item functioning (DIF) across gender groups of adolescents, and to show how this can be done using the multigroup mean and covariance structure (MG-MACS) analysis model. Two samples…

  20. Mixture Item Response Theory-MIMIC Model: Simultaneous Estimation of Differential Item Functioning for Manifest Groups and Latent Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilir, Mustafa Kuzey

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a new psychometric model (mixture item response theory-MIMIC model) that simultaneously estimates differential item functioning (DIF) across manifest groups and latent classes. Current DIF detection methods investigate DIF from only one side, either across manifest groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity, etc.), or across latent classes…

  1. Evaluation of the Magnitude of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items. Program Statistics Research Technical Report No. 94-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    Several recent studies have investigated the application of statistical inference procedures to the analysis of differential item functioning (DIF) in test items that are scored on an ordinal scale. Mantel's extension of the Mantel-Haenszel test is a possible hypothesis-testing method for this purpose. The development of descriptive statistics for…

  2. Factors Affecting Differential Item Functioning for Black Examinees on Scholastic Aptitude Test Analogy Items. Research Report No. 87-23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Alicia P.; Bleistein, Carole A.

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify item factors that may contribute to differential item functioning (DIF) for black examinees on Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) analogy items. Initially, items were classified according to several possible explanatory factors. Preliminary analyses identified several factors that seemed to affect DIF…

  3. Gender Bias and Construct Validity in Vocational Interest Measurement: Differential Item Functioning in the Strong Interest Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Sif; Rounds, James

    2009-01-01

    Item response theory was used to address gender bias in interest measurement. Differential item functioning (DIF) technique, SIBTEST and DIMTEST for dimensionality, were applied to the items of the six General Occupational Theme (GOT) and 25 Basic Interest (BI) scales in the Strong Interest Inventory. A sample of 1860 women and 1105 men was used.…

  4. Differential Item Functioning for Males and Females on SAT-Verbal Reading Subscore Items: Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Ida M.; Curley, W. Edward

    This study was conducted to attempt to verify findings from an earlier study by I. M. Lawrence, W. E. Curley, and F. J. McHale (1988) in which differential item functioning (DIF) was examined for females on Reading subscore items from four forms of the Scholastic Aptitude Test-Verbal (SAT-V). The specific focus of this research was on verifying…

  5. Identifying Differential Item Functioning of Rating Scale Items with the Rasch Model: An Introduction and an Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2006-01-01

    This study (a) provided a conceptual introduction to differential item functioning (DIF), (b) introduced the multifaceted Rasch rating scale model (MRSM) and an associated statistical procedure for identifying DIF in rating scale items, and (c) applied this procedure to previously collected data from American coaches who responded to the coaching…

  6. A Bifactor Multidimensional Item Response Theory Model for Differential Item Functioning Analysis on Testlet-Based Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuhara, Hirotaka; Kamata, Akihito

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) detection method for testlet-based data was proposed and evaluated in this study. The proposed DIF model is an extension of a bifactor multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model for testlets. Unlike traditional item response theory (IRT) DIF models, the proposed model takes testlet effects into…

  7. Detecting Differential Item Functioning in the Japanese Version of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List--Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuda, Tomoyuki; Lei, Pui-Wa; Suen, Hoi K.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the differential item functioning (DIF) of the English version and the Japanese-translated version of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List--Revised (MAACL-R) using the logistic regression (LR) procedure. The results of the LR are supplemented by multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA). A total of five items are…

  8. Differential Item Functioning and Language Translation: A Cross-National Study with a Test Developed for Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Larry R.; Oshima, T. C.

    Often, educational and psychological measurement instruments must be translated from one language to another when they are administered to different cultural groups. The translation process often necessarily introduces measurement inequivalence. Therefore, an examination may be said to exhibit differential functioning if the test provides a…

  9. Differential Item Functioning Assessment in Cognitive Diagnostic Modeling: Application of the Wald Test to Investigate DIF in the DINA Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Likun; de la Torre, Jimmy; Nandakumar, Ratna

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing examinees' responses using cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs) has the advantage of providing diagnostic information. To ensure the validity of the results from these models, differential item functioning (DIF) in CDMs needs to be investigated. In this article, the Wald test is proposed to examine DIF in the context of CDMs. This…

  10. Differential Item Functioning Detection with the Mantel-Haenszel Procedure: The Effects of Matching Types and Other Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Socha, Alan; DeMars, Christine E.; Zilberberg, Anna; Phan, Ha

    2015-01-01

    The Mantel-Haenszel (MH) procedure is commonly used to detect items that function differentially for groups of examinees from various demographic and linguistic backgrounds--for example, in international assessments. As in some other DIF methods, the total score is used to match examinees on ability. In thin matching, each of the total score…

  11. The Mantel-Haenszel Method for Detecting Differential Item Functioning in Dichotomously Scored Items: A Multilevel Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacInnes, Jann Marie Wise

    2009-01-01

    Multilevel data often exist in educational studies. The focus of this study is to consider differential item functioning (DIF) for dichotomous items from a multilevel perspective. One of the most often used methods for detecting DIF in dichotomously scored items is the Mantel-Haenszel log odds-ratio. However, the Mantel-Haenszel reduces the…

  12. Delay differential equations via the matrix Lambert W function and bifurcation analysis: application to machine tool chatter.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sun; Nelson, Patrick W; Ulsoy, A Galip

    2007-04-01

    In a turning process modeled using delay differential equations (DDEs), we investigate the stability of the regenerative machine tool chatter problem. An approach using the matrix Lambert W function for the analytical solution to systems of delay differential equations is applied to this problem and compared with the result obtained using a bifurcation analysis. The Lambert W function, known to be useful for solving scalar first-order DDEs, has recently been extended to a matrix Lambert W function approach to solve systems of DDEs. The essential advantages of the matrix Lambert W approach are not only the similarity to the concept of the state transition matrix in lin ear ordinary differential equations, enabling its use for general classes of linear delay differential equations, but also the observation that we need only the principal branch among an infinite number of roots to determine the stability of a system of DDEs. The bifurcation method combined with Sturm sequences provides an algorithm for determining the stability of DDEs without restrictive geometric analysis. With this approach, one can obtain the critical values of delay, which determine the stability of a system and hence the preferred operating spindle speed without chatter. We apply both the matrix Lambert W function and the bifurcation analysis approach to the problem of chatter stability in turning, and compare the results obtained to existing methods. The two new approaches show excellent accuracy and certain other advantages, when compared to traditional graphical, computational and approximate methods. PMID:17658931

  13. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the Science and Mathematics Items in the University Entrance Examinations in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaycioglu, Dilara Bakan; Berberoglu, Giray

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed to detect differential item functioning (DIF) items across gender groups, analyze item content for the possible sources of DIF, and eventually investigate the effect of DIF items on the criterion-related validity of the test scores in the quantitative section of the university entrance examination (UEE) in Turkey. The reason…

  14. Centering, Scale Indeterminacy, and Differential Item Functioning Detection in Hierarchical Generalized Linear and Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheong, Yuk Fai; Kamata, Akihito

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss and illustrate two centering and anchoring options available in differential item functioning (DIF) detection studies based on the hierarchical generalized linear and generalized linear mixed modeling frameworks. We compared and contrasted the assumptions of the two options, and examined the properties of their DIF…

  15. Gender Differential Item Functioning in the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale with a Sample of Early Adolescent Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Sudweeks, Richard R.

    2005-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) in the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale (B. A. Bracken, 1992) was evaluated using 2 different methods to identify and describe DIF. Of 149 items from the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale, 42% exhibited gender DIF. Nonuniform, crossover DIF was evident in items throughout the instrument.

  16. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs. PMID:26606055

  17. Dystroglycan Depletion Impairs Actin-Dependent Functions of Differentiated Kasumi-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escárcega-Tame, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Winder, Steve J.; Cerecedo, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystroglycan has recently been characterised in blood tissue cells, as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex involved in the differentiation process of neutrophils. Purpose In the present study we have investigated the role of dystroglycan in the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line Kasumi-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells. Methods We characterised the pattern expression and subcellular distribution of dystroglycans in non-differentiated and differentiated Kasumi-1 cells. Results Our results demonstrated by WB and flow cytometer assays that during the differentiation process to macrophages, dystroglycans were down-regulated; these results were confirmed with qRT-PCR assays. Additionally, depletion of dystroglycan by RNAi resulted in altered morphology and reduced properties of differentiated Kasumi-1 cells, including morphology, migration and phagocytic activities although secretion of IL-1β and expression of markers of differentiation are not altered. Conclusion Our findings strongly implicate dystroglycan as a key membrane adhesion protein involved in actin-based structures during the differentiation process in Kasumi-1 cells. PMID:26630171

  18. New bioactive motifs and their use in functionalized self-assembling peptides for NSC differentiation and neural tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelain, F.; Cigognini, D.; Caprini, A.; Silva, D.; Colleoni, B.; Donegá, M.; Antonini, S.; Cohen, B. E.; Vescovi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Developing functionalized biomaterials for enhancing transplanted cell engraftment in vivo and stimulating the regeneration of injured tissues requires a multi-disciplinary approach customized for the tissue to be regenerated. In particular, nervous tissue engineering may take a great advantage from the discovery of novel functional motifs fostering transplanted stem cell engraftment and nervous fiber regeneration. Using phage display technology we have discovered new peptide sequences that bind to murine neural stem cell (NSC)-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs), and promote their viability and differentiation in vitro when linked to LDLK12 self-assembling peptide (SAPeptide). We characterized the newly functionalized LDLK12 SAPeptides via atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and rheology, obtaining nanostructured hydrogels that support human and murine NSC proliferation and differentiation in vitro. One functionalized SAPeptide (Ac-FAQ), showing the highest stem cell viability and neural differentiation in vitro, was finally tested in acute contusive spinal cord injury in rats, where it fostered nervous tissue regrowth and improved locomotor recovery. Interestingly, animals treated with the non-functionalized LDLK12 had an axon sprouting/regeneration intermediate between Ac-FAQ-treated animals and controls. These results suggest that hydrogels functionalized with phage-derived peptides may constitute promising biomimetic scaffolds for in vitro NSC differentiation, as well as regenerative therapy of the injured nervous system. Moreover, this multi-disciplinary approach can be used to customize SAPeptides for other specific tissue engineering applications.Developing functionalized biomaterials for enhancing transplanted cell engraftment in vivo and stimulating the regeneration of injured tissues requires a multi-disciplinary approach customized for the tissue to be regenerated. In particular, nervous tissue engineering may take a great advantage from the

  19. Improved differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neurological function after spinal cord injury in rats by oscillating field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jing, J-H; Qian, J; Zhu, N; Chou, W-B; Huang, X-J

    2015-09-10

    Oscillating field stimulation (OFS) has been used in attempts to treat spinal cord injury (SCI) and has been shown to improve remyelination after SCI in rats. However, some controversies regarding the effects of OFS have been presented in previous papers. Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the main cell for remyelination and are derived from the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). To date, it has been unclear whether the differentiation of OPCs can be regulated by OFS. The goal of this study was to determine if OFS can improve the differentiation of OPCs and promote the recovery of neurological function after SCI in rats. Immature and mature OLs were observed in spinal cord slices through immunofluorescence staining. Levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) scores and transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) were used to evaluate the locomotor outcomes of rats after SCI. Our results showed a significant improvement in the differentiation of OPCs and the content of ATP and LIF in the injured spinal cord in the OFS group. Furthermore, BBB scores and tcMMEPs were significantly improved in the rats stimulated by OFS. These findings suggest that OFS can improve the differentiation of OPCs and promote the recovery of neurological function following SCI in rats. PMID:26166729

  20. Morphological and functional differentiation in BE(2)-M17 human neuroblastoma cells by treatment with Trans-retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Immortalized neuronal cell lines can be induced to differentiate into more mature neurons by adding specific compounds or growth factors to the culture medium. This property makes neuronal cell lines attractive as in vitro cell models to study neuronal functions and neurotoxicity. The clonal human neuroblastoma BE(2)-M17 cell line is known to differentiate into a more prominent neuronal cell type by treatment with trans-retinoic acid. However, there is a lack of information on the morphological and functional aspects of these differentiated cells. Results We studied the effects of trans-retinoic acid treatment on (a) some differentiation marker proteins, (b) types of voltage-gated calcium (Ca2+) channels and (c) Ca2+-dependent neurotransmitter ([3H] glycine) release in cultured BE(2)-M17 cells. Cells treated with 10 μM trans-retinoic acid (RA) for 72 hrs exhibited marked changes in morphology to include neurite extensions; presence of P/Q, N and T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels; and expression of neuron specific enolase (NSE), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChR-α7) and other neuronal markers. Moreover, retinoic acid treated cells had a significant increase in evoked Ca2+-dependent neurotransmitter release capacity. In toxicity studies of the toxic gas, phosgene (CG), that differentiation of M17 cells with RA was required to see the changes in intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations following exposure to CG. Conclusion Taken together, retinoic acid treated cells had improved morphological features as well as neuronal characteristics and functions; thus, these retinoic acid differentiated BE(2)-M17 cells may serve as a better neuronal model to study neurobiology and/or neurotoxicity. PMID:23597229

  1. Stress differentially impacts reserve pools and root exudation: implications for ecosystem functioning and carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landhäusser, Simon; Karst, Justine; Wiley, Erin; Gaster, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Environmental stress can influence carbon assimilation and the accumulation and distribution of carbon between growth, reserves, and exudation; however, it is unclear how these processes vary by different stress types. Partitioning of carbon to growth and reserves in plants might also vary between different organs. Roots reserves are of particular interest as they link the plant with the soil carbon cycle through exudation. Simple models of diffusion across concentration gradients predict the more C reserves in roots, the more C should be exuded from roots. However, the mechanisms underlying the accumulation and loss of C from roots may differ depending on the stress experienced by the plants. In a controlled study we tested whether different types of stresses (shade, cold soil, and drought) have differential effects on the distribution, abundance, and form (sugar vs. starch) of carbohydrates in seedlings, and whether these changes alone could explain differences in root exudation between stress types. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentration and pool sizes varied by stress type and between organs. Mass-specific C exudation increased with fine root sugar concentration; however, stress type affected exudation independently of reserve concentration. Seedlings exposed to cold soils exuded the most C on a per root mass basis followed by shade and drought. Through 13C labeling, we also found that depending on the stress type, aspen seedlings may be less able to control the loss of C to the soil compared with unstressed seedlings, resulting in more C leaked to the rhizosphere. The loss of C beyond that predicted by simple concentration gradients might have important implications for ecosystem functioning and carbon balance. If stressed plants lose proportionally more carbon to the soil, existing interactions between plants and soils may decouple under stress, and may include unexpected C fluxes between trees, soils and the atmosphere with a changing climate.

  2. Metabolic Substrates Exhibit Differential Effects on Functional Parameters of Mouse Sperm Capacitation1

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Summer G.; Qiu, Yunping; Sutton, Keith A.; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei; O'Brien, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although substantial evidence exists that sperm ATP production via glycolysis is required for mammalian sperm function and male fertility, conflicting reports involving multiple species have appeared regarding the ability of individual glycolytic or mitochondrial substrates to support the physiological changes that occur during capacitation. Several mouse models with defects in the signaling pathways required for capacitation exhibit reductions in sperm ATP levels, suggesting regulatory interactions between sperm metabolism and signal transduction cascades. To better understand these interactions, we conducted quantitative studies of mouse sperm throughout a 2-h in vitro capacitation period and compared the effects of single substrates assayed under identical conditions. Multiple glycolytic and nonglycolytic substrates maintained sperm ATP levels and comparable percentages of motility, but only glucose and mannose supported hyperactivation. These monosaccharides and fructose supported the full pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas nonglycolytic substrates supported at least partial tyrosine phosphorylation. Inhibition of glycolysis impaired motility in the presence of glucose, fructose, or pyruvate but not in the presence of hydroxybutyrate. Addition of an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation reduced motility with pyruvate or hydroxybutyrate as substrates but unexpectedly stimulated hyperactivation with fructose. Investigating differences between glucose and fructose in more detail, we demonstrated that hyperactivation results from the active metabolism of glucose. Differences between glucose and fructose appeared to be downstream of changes in intracellular pH, which rose to comparable levels during incubation with either substrate. Sperm redox pathways were differentially affected, with higher levels of associated metabolites and reactive oxygen species generated during incubations with fructose than during incubations with glucose. PMID

  3. Item analysis and differential item functioning of a brief conduct problem screen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Johnny; King, Kevin M; Witkiewitz, Katie; Racz, Sarah Jensen; McMahon, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    Research has shown that boys display higher levels of childhood conduct problems than girls, and Black children display higher levels than White children, but few studies have tested for scalar equivalence of conduct problems across gender and race. The authors conducted a 2-parameter item response theory (IRT) model to examine item characteristics of the Authority Acceptance scale from the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Revised (AA-TOCA-R; L. Larsson-Werthamer, S. G. Kellam, & L. Wheeler, 1991) in 8,820 kindergarten children and estimated the degree of differential item functioning (DIF) by gender and race/urban status. The mean level of latent conduct problems was best represented by behaviors such as being stubborn, breaking rules, and being disobedient, whereas breaking things and taking others' property best represented the construct at one standard deviation above the mean. DIF by gender was detected, such that at equivalent levels of latent conduct problems, males received more endorsements of overt behaviors from teachers, whereas females received more endorsements of nonphysical behaviors. Moreover, overt behaviors were better discriminators of latent conduct problems for males, and nonphysical behaviors were better discriminators of latent conduct problems for females. Differences across race/urban status were not found to be conceptually meaningful. The authors' analyses also suggest that the item scaling of the AA-TOCA-R may be best represented by 5e categories instead of 6. These findings provide support for the use of IRT modeling to examine item characteristics of conduct problem scales and DIF to test for scalar equivalence across diverse subpopulations. PMID:22040514

  4. Lipid Peroxidation-Derived Reactive Aldehydes Directly and Differentially Impair Spinal Cord and Brain Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Singh, Indrapal N.; Miller, Darren M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction in traumatic spinal cord and brain injury is associated with post-traumatic free radical–mediated oxidative damage to proteins and lipids. Lipid peroxidation by-products, such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein, can form adducts with proteins and exacerbate the effects of direct free radical–induced protein oxidation. The aim of the present investigation was to determine and compare the direct contribution of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein to spinal cord and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Ficoll gradient–isolated mitochondria from normal rat spinal cords and brains were treated with carefully selected doses of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal or acrolein, followed by measurement of complex I– and complex II–driven respiratory rates. Both compounds were potent inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal significantly compromised spinal cord mitochondrial respiration at a 0.1-μM concentration, whereas 10-fold greater concentrations produced a similar effect in brain. Acrolein was more potent than 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, significantly decreasing spinal cord and brain mitochondrial respiration at 0.01 μM and 0.1 μM concentrations, respectively. The results of this study show that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein can directly and differentially impair spinal cord and brain mitochondrial function, and that the targets for the toxic effects of aldehydes appear to include pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I–associated proteins. Furthermore, they suggest that protein modification by these lipid peroxidation products may directly contribute to post-traumatic mitochondrial damage, with spinal cord mitochondria showing a greater sensitivity than those in brain. PMID:20392143

  5. Screening of differentially expressed genes associated with human glioblastoma and functional analysis using a DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lina; Wei, Bo; Hu, Guozhang; Wang, Le; Bi, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhigang; Jin, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant type of human glioma, and has a poor prognosis. Screening differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in brain tumor samples and normal brain samples is of importance for identifying GBM and to design specific-targeting drugs. The transcriptional profile of GSE30563, containing three genechips of brain tumor samples and three genechips of normal brain samples, was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus to identify the DEGs. The differences in the expression of the DEGs in the two different samples were compared through hierarchical biclustering. The co-expression coefficient of the DEGs was calculated using the information from COXPRESdb, the network of the DEGs was constructed and functional enrichment and pathway analysis were performed. Finally, the transcription factors of important DEGs were predicted. A total of 1,006 DEGs, including 368 upregulated and 638 downregulated DEGs, were identified. A close correlation was demonstrated between six important genes, associated with immune response, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DPA1, HLA-B, HLA-DMA and HLA-DRA, and the immune response. Allograft rejection was selected as the most significant pathway. A total of 17 transcription factors, including nuclear factor (NF)-κB and NF-κB1, and their binding sites containing these six DEGs, were also identified. The DEGs, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, DQβ1, MHC class II, DRβ1, MHC class IB, MHC class II, DMα, MHC class II, DPα1, MHC class II, DRα, may provide novel targets for the diagnosis and treatment of GBM. The transcription factors of these six genes and their binding sites may also provide evidence and direction for identifying target-specific drugs. PMID:25901754

  6. Differential effect of age on posterior and anterior hippocampal functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Damoiseaux, Jessica S; Viviano, Raymond P; Yuan, Peng; Raz, Naftali

    2016-06-01

    Aging is associated with declines in cognitive performance and multiple changes in the brain, including reduced default mode functional connectivity (FC). However, conflicting results have been reported regarding age differences in FC between hippocampal and default mode regions. This discrepancy may stem from the variation in selection of hippocampal regions. We therefore examined the effect of age on resting state FC of anterior and posterior hippocampal regions in an adult life-span sample. Advanced age was associated with lower FC between the posterior hippocampus and three regions: the posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral parietal cortex. In addition, age-related reductions of FC between the left and right posterior hippocampus, and bilaterally along the posterior to anterior hippocampal axis were noted. Age differences in medial prefrontal and inter-hemispheric FC significantly differed between anterior and posterior hippocampus. Older age was associated with lower performance in all cognitive domains, but we observed no associations between FC and cognitive performance after controlling for age. We observed a significant effect of gender and a linear effect of COMT val158met polymorphism on hippocampal FC. Females showed higher FC of anterior and posterior hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex than males, and the dose of val allele was associated with lower posterior hippocampus - posterior cingulate FC, independent of age. Vascular and metabolic factors showed no significant effects on FC. These results suggest differential age-related reduction in the posterior hippocampal FC compared to the anterior hippocampus, and an age-independent effect of gender and COMT on hippocampal FC. PMID:27034025

  7. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Deborah M.; Lampe, Anna T.; Workman, Aspen M.

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL) play a role in chronic as well as acute infections, such as influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein–Barr virus, and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and antitumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin-mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin-mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other antiviral and antitumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell-mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection. PMID:27014272

  8. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deborah M; Lampe, Anna T; Workman, Aspen M

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL) play a role in chronic as well as acute infections, such as influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and antitumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin-mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin-mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other antiviral and antitumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell-mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection. PMID:27014272

  9. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners (ELLs) in State Science Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilich, Maria O.

    Psychometricians and test developers evaluate standardized tests for potential bias against groups of test-takers by using differential item functioning (DIF). English language learners (ELLs) are a diverse group of students whose native language is not English. While they are still learning the English language, they must take their standardized tests for their school subjects, including science, in English. In this study, linguistic complexity was examined as a possible source of DIF that may result in test scores that confound science knowledge with a lack of English proficiency among ELLs. Two years of fifth-grade state science tests were analyzed for evidence of DIF using two DIF methods, Simultaneous Item Bias Test (SIBTest) and logistic regression. The tests presented a unique challenge in that the test items were grouped together into testlets---groups of items referring to a scientific scenario to measure knowledge of different science content or skills. Very large samples of 10, 256 students in 2006 and 13,571 students in 2007 were examined. Half of each sample was composed of Spanish-speaking ELLs; the balance was comprised of native English speakers. The two DIF methods were in agreement about the items that favored non-ELLs and the items that favored ELLs. Logistic regression effect sizes were all negligible, while SIBTest flagged items with low to high DIF. A decrease in socioeconomic status and Spanish-speaking ELL diversity may have led to inconsistent SIBTest effect sizes for items used in both testing years. The DIF results for the testlets suggested that ELLs lacked sufficient opportunity to learn science content. The DIF results further suggest that those constructed response test items requiring the student to draw a conclusion about a scientific investigation or to plan a new investigation tended to favor ELLs.

  10. Modulation of retinoblastoma gene in normal adult hematopoiesis: peak expression and functional role in advanced erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, G L; Testa, U; Valtieri, M; Vitelli, L; De Luca, A; Barberi, T; Montesoro, E; Campisi, S; Giordano, A; Peschle, C

    1995-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) gene specifies a nuclear phosphoprotein (pRb 105), which is a prototype tumor suppressor inactivated in a variety of human tumors. Recent studies suggest that RB is also involved in embryonic development of murine central nervous and hematopoietic systems. We have investigated RB expression and function in human adult hematopoiesis--i.e., in liquid suspension culture of purified quiescent hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) induced by growth factor stimulus to proliferation and unilinage differentiation/maturation through the erythroid or granulocytic lineage. In the initial HPC differentiation stages, the RB gene is gradually induced at the mRNA and protein level in both erythroid and granulopoietic cultures. In late HPC differentiation and then precursor maturation, RB gene expression is sustained in the erythroid lineage, whereas it is sharply downmodulated in the granulocytic series. Functional studies were performed by treatment of HPC differentiation culture with phosphorothioate antisense oligomer targeting Rb mRNA; coherent with the expression pattern, oligomer treatment of late HPCs causes a dose-dependent and selective inhibition of erythroid colony formation. These observations suggest that the RB gene plays an erythroid- and stage-specific functional role in normal adult hematopoiesis, particularly at the level of late erythroid HPCs. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761404

  11. Differentiating cerebral ischemia from functional neurological symptom disorder: a psychosomatic perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The differential diagnosis of pseudo-neurological symptoms often represents a clinical challenge. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DSM-5, made an attempt to improve diagnostic criteria of conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder). Incongruences of the neurological examination, i.e. positive neurological signs, indicate a new approach - whereas psychological factors are not necessary anymore. As the DSM-5 will influence the International Classification of Diseases, ICD-11, this is of importance. In the case presented, a history of psychological distress and adverse childhood experiences coexisted with a true neurological disorder. We discuss the relevance of an interdisciplinary assessment and of operationalized diagnostic criteria. Case presentation A 32-year-old man presented twice with neurological symptoms without obvious pathological organic findings. A conversion disorder was considered early on at the second admission by the neurology team. Sticking to ICD-10, this diagnosis was not supported by a specialist for psychosomatic medicine, due to missing hints of concurrent psychological distress in temporal association with neurological symptoms. Further investigations then revealed a deep vein thrombosis (though D-dimers had been negative), which had probably resulted in a crossed embolus. Conclusion The absence of a clear proof of biological dysfunction underlying neurological symptoms should not lead automatically to the diagnosis of a conversion disorder. In contrast, at least in more complex patients, the work-up should include repeated psychological and neurological assessments in close collaboration. According to ICD-10 positive signs of concurrent psychological distress are required, while DSM-5 emphasizes an incongruity between neurological symptoms and neurophysiological patterns of dysfunction. In the case presented, an extensive medical work-up was initially negative, and neither positive

  12. Morphological differentiation and function of the coelomocytes in the parasitic stages of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Paul P

    2006-10-01

    Female and male worms of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis exhibited sexual dimorphism based on the number of coelomocytes present. A surprising multiplicity of diverse morphological types of coelomocytes developed in both female and male worms during the parasitic cycle. Cytoplasmic processes began to appear on the surface membrane of coelomocytes in the late third-stage larvae (L3s) in the lungs, and they increased greatly in type, size, and morphology during the fourth and fifth stages. These structures were characterized primarily as complex filopodia, pseudopodia, and cytoplasmic pearls, which resulted in the formation of highly pleomorphic cells. Pearls, starting as small protuberances, progressively increased in size and number with larval growth and development. In the adult worms, a novel process of autocannibalism was initiated in many of the very large coelomocytes. The pearls grew enormously in size at the expense of the cytoplasm, forming a peripheral garland in 1 plane surrounding a residual, small, flat, cytoplasmic core containing the nucleus. The underlying "strategy" was to increase the surface-to-volume ratio of these huge cells to overcome the restriction imposed by eutely; the coelomocytes do not undergo cell division. This morphological innovation makes possible a more efficient uptake of nutrients and exocytosis of waste matter. Vesicles (presumably lysosomes) in the coelomocytes of the infective L3 store an extraordinarily high concentration of vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl). At present, the only physiological function that can be assigned to coelomocytes of N. brasiliensis is the uptake, concentration, and storage of Cbl in the free-living stages, with the subsequent release of the molecule from the vesicles in the early phase of parasitism. Thus, stored Cbl in the infective L3 is made available for biochemical processes during the critical period of larval growth and differentiation initiated in the lung. A model of a hypothetical coelomocyte is

  13. Influence of IL-3 functional fragment on cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanxi; Jiang, Wenhong; Dai, Wei; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) is a multiple hematopoietic growth factor, which enhances stem cell expansion and hematopoiesis regeneration in vitro and in vivo, when administrated in combination with other cytokines. However, the structure-function study of rhIL-3 remains rarely studied, so far. The purpose of this study was to recognize the short peptide with similar function as rhIL-3, and assess the hematopoietic efficacy in umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cell culture as well. Methods Two novel monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (C1 and E1) were generated against rhIL-3 using hybridoma technique. Eleven short peptides were depicted and synthesized to overlap covering the full length sequence of rhIL-3. ELISA was employed to distinguish the antibody-binding peptide from the negative peptides. In addition, the multi-potential hematopoiesis capabilities of the positive peptides were evaluated by adding 25 ng/mL of each peptide to the culture medium of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derived from UCB. Total nucleated cell number and the CD34+ cell number from each individual treatment group were calculated on day 7. Correlated antibodies at 0.5 or 2 molar fold to each peptide were also tested in the stem cell expansion experiment, to further confirm the bioactivity of the peptides. Results Two peptides were recognized by the novel generated antibodies, using ELISA. Peptide 3 and 8 exhibited comparable hematopoiesis potentials, with 25.01±0.14 fold, and 19.89±0.12 fold increase of total nucleated cell number on day 7, respectively, compared with the basal medium control (4.93±0.55 fold). These biological effects were neutralized by adding the corresponding mAb at a dose dependent manner. Conclusions Our results identified two specific regions of rhIL-3 responsible for HSC proliferation and differentiation, which were located from 28 to 49 amino acids (P3), and 107 to 127 amino acids (P8), respectively. The short peptide 3 and 8 might act

  14. Movement preparation and execution: differential functional activation patterns after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gooijers, Jolien; Beets, Iseult A M; Albouy, Genevieve; Beeckmans, Kurt; Michiels, Karla; Sunaert, Stefan; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2016-09-01

    Years following the insult, patients with traumatic brain injury often experience persistent motor control problems, including bimanual coordination deficits. Previous studies revealed that such deficits are related to brain structural white and grey matter abnormalities. Here, we assessed, for the first time, cerebral functional activation patterns during bimanual movement preparation and performance in patients with traumatic brain injury, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eighteen patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (10 females; aged 26.3 years, standard deviation = 5.2; age range: 18.4-34.6 years) and 26 healthy young adults (15 females; aged 23.6 years, standard deviation = 3.8; age range: 19.5-33 years) performed a complex bimanual tracking task, divided into a preparation (2 s) and execution (9 s) phase, and executed either in the presence or absence of augmented visual feedback. Performance on the bimanual tracking task, expressed as the average target error, was impaired for patients as compared to controls (P < 0.001) and for trials in the absence as compared to the presence of augmented visual feedback (P < 0.001). At the cerebral level, movement preparation was characterized by reduced neural activation in the patient group relative to the control group in frontal (bilateral superior frontal gyrus, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), parietal (left inferior parietal lobe) and occipital (right striate and extrastriate visual cortex) areas (P's < 0.05). During the execution phase, however, the opposite pattern emerged, i.e. traumatic brain injury patients showed enhanced activations compared with controls in frontal (left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left lateral anterior prefrontal cortex, and left orbitofrontal cortex), parietal (bilateral inferior parietal lobe, bilateral superior parietal lobe, right precuneus, right primary somatosensory cortex), occipital (right striate and extrastriate visual cortices), and

  15. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A.; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for Treg-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in Treg cells than Tconv cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in Treg cells under inflammatory conditions with concomitant decrease of suppressor activity in dextran sulfate-induced colitis model. YY1 inhibits Smad3/4 binding to and chromatin remodelling of the Foxp3 locus. In addition, YY1 interrupts Foxp3-dependent target gene expression by physically interacting with Foxp3 and by directly binding to the Foxp3 target genes. Thus, YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of Treg cells by blocking Foxp3. PMID:26892542

  16. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for T(reg)-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in T(reg) cells than T(conv) cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in T(reg) cells under inflammatory conditions with concomitant decrease of suppressor activity in dextran sulfate-induced colitis model. YY1 inhibits Smad3/4 binding to and chromatin remodelling of the Foxp3 locus. In addition, YY1 interrupts Foxp3-dependent target gene expression by physically interacting with Foxp3 and by directly binding to the Foxp3 target genes. Thus, YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of T(reg) cells by blocking Foxp3. PMID:26892542

  17. The Role of the PI3K Signaling Pathway in CD4+ T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jonathan M.; Patterson, Scott J.; Levings, Megan K.

    2012-01-01

    The relative activity of regulatory versus conventional CD4+ T cells ultimately maintains the delicate balance between immune tolerance and inflammation. At the molecular level, the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream positive and negative regulators has a major role in controlling the balance between immune regulation and activation of different subsets of effector CD4+ T cells. In contrast to effector T cells which require activation of the PI3K to differentiate and mediate their effector function, regulatory T cells rely on minimal activation of this pathway to develop and maintain their characteristic phenotype, function, and metabolic state. In this review, we discuss the role of the PI3K signaling pathway in CD4+ T cell differentiation and function, and focus on how modulation of this pathway in T cells can alter the outcome of an immune response, ultimately tipping the balance between tolerance and inflammation. PMID:22905034

  18. The function of the sodium pump during differentiation of amphibian embryonic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, E A; Warner, A E

    1979-01-01

    1. A method has been developed for studying the differentiation in tissue culture of ectoderm and mesoderm derivatives, dissected from amphibian embryos which have just completed neurulation. 2. Neurones, striated muscle cells and pigment cells, together with other unidentifiable cell types, differentiated as a monolayer with approximately the same time course as in the whole embryo. The proportion of different cell types in the cultures was measured quantitatively by cell counting. 3. Treatment of embryos during neurulation with the cardiac glycoside strophanthidin reduced the number of neurones which subsequently differentiated in culture. Other cell types were not affected. 4. The relationship between inhibition of neural differentiation and strophanthidin concentration was sigmoid, with maximum inhibition at 10(-5) M-strophanthidin and the mid-point at 5 X 10(-7) M-strophanthidin. 35% of neurones differentiating in culture were not affected by glycoside treatment. 5. The glycoside hexahydroscillaren A had no effect on neural differentiation. 6. Increasing extracellular potassium to 100 nM during strophanthidin treatment completely protected differentiating neurones from the inhibitory effect of strophanthidin. 7. Treatment of embryos with 100 mM-KCl during neurulation had no effect on the subsequent differentiation of neurones. 8. Treatment of cultures with an antibody to mouse salivary gland Nerve Growth Factor reduced the number of neurones by 30%. 9. Exposure to strophanthidin while the embryo moved from the early neural fold stage to the late neural fold stage was as effective in reducing subsequent neural differentiation as treatment throughout neurulation. 10. The proportion of nerve cells in the cultures was not affected if strophanthidin treatment ended before the early neural fold stage or did not begin until the late neural fold stage. 11. Embryos treated with strophanthidin during neurulation and then allowed to grow into tadpoles developed abnormal

  19. Heterogeneity of functional responses in differentiated myeloid cell lines reveals EPRO cells as a valid model of murine neutrophil functional activation.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Peter; Chi, Jeffrey; Berliner, Nancy

    2005-05-01

    Mature neutrophils display multiple functional responses upon activation that include chemotaxis, adhesion to and transmigration across endothelial cells, phagocytosis, and pathogen destruction via potent microbicidal enzymes and reactive oxygen species. We are using myeloid cell line models to investigate the signaling pathways that govern neutrophil functional activation. To facilitate these studies, we have performed a direct comparison of functional responses of human and murine myeloid cell line models upon neutrophil differentiation. Our results show that EPRO cells, promyelocytes that undergo complete neutrophil maturation, demonstrate a full spectrum of functional responses, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis toward two murine chemokines, and phagocytosis. We also extend previous studies of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-induced 32Dcl3 cells, showing they demonstrate chemotaxis and phogocytosis but completely lack a respiratory burst as a result of the absent expression of a critical oxidase subunit, gp91(phox). Induced human leukemic NB4 and HL-60 cells display a respiratory burst and phagocytosis but have defective chemotaxis to multiple chemoattractants. We also tested each cell line for the ability to up-regulate cell-surface membrane-activated complex-1 (Mac-1) expression upon activation, a response mediating neutrophil adhesion and a surrogate marker for degranulation. We show that EPRO cells, but not 32Dcl3 or NB4, significantly increase Mac-1 surface expression upon functional activation. Together, these data show that EPRO and MPRO cells demonstrate complete, functional activation upon neutrophil differentiation, suggesting these promyelocytic models accurately reflect the functional capacity of mature murine neutrophils. PMID:15673544

  20. High Physiological Concentrations of Progesterone Reverse Estradiol-Mediated Changes in Differentiation and Functions of Bone Marrow Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Fangming; Anipindi, Varun C; Nguyen, Philip V; Boudreau, Jeanette; Liang, Hong; Wan, Yonghong; Snider, Denis P; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    Female sex steroids, estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4), play a key role in regulating immune responses in women, including dendritic cell (DC) development, and functions. Although the two hormones co-occur in the body of women throughout the reproductive years, no studies have explored their complex combinatorial effects on DCs, given their ability to regulate each other's actions. We examined murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) differentiation and functions, in the presence of a wide range of physiological concentrations of each hormone, as well as the combination of the two hormones. E2 (10-12 to 10-8M) enhanced the differentiation of CD11b+CD11c+ DCs from BM precursor cells, and promoted the expression of CD40 and MHC Class-II, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, P4 (10-9 to 10-5M) inhibited DC differentiation, but only at the highest concentrations. These effects on BMDCs were observed both in the presence or absence of LPS. When both hormones were combined, higher concentrations of P4, at levels seen in pregnancy (10-6M) reversed the E2 effects, regardless of the concentration of E2, especially in the absence of LPS. Functionally, antigen uptake was decreased and pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12, IL-1 and IL-6 production by CD11b+CD11c+ DCs, was increased in the presence of E2 and these effects were reversed by high concentrations of P4. Our results demonstrate the distinct effects of E2 and P4 on differentiation and functions of bone marrow myeloid DCs. The dominating effect of higher physiological concentrations of P4 provides insight into how DC functions could be modulated during pregnancy. PMID:27064901

  1. High Physiological Concentrations of Progesterone Reverse Estradiol-Mediated Changes in Differentiation and Functions of Bone Marrow Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Fangming; Anipindi, Varun C.; Nguyen, Philip V.; Boudreau, Jeanette; Liang, Hong; Wan, Yonghong; Snider, Denis P.; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    Female sex steroids, estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4), play a key role in regulating immune responses in women, including dendritic cell (DC) development, and functions. Although the two hormones co-occur in the body of women throughout the reproductive years, no studies have explored their complex combinatorial effects on DCs, given their ability to regulate each other’s actions. We examined murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) differentiation and functions, in the presence of a wide range of physiological concentrations of each hormone, as well as the combination of the two hormones. E2 (10−12 to 10-8M) enhanced the differentiation of CD11b+CD11c+ DCs from BM precursor cells, and promoted the expression of CD40 and MHC Class-II, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, P4 (10−9 to 10-5M) inhibited DC differentiation, but only at the highest concentrations. These effects on BMDCs were observed both in the presence or absence of LPS. When both hormones were combined, higher concentrations of P4, at levels seen in pregnancy (10-6M) reversed the E2 effects, regardless of the concentration of E2, especially in the absence of LPS. Functionally, antigen uptake was decreased and pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12, IL-1 and IL-6 production by CD11b+CD11c+ DCs, was increased in the presence of E2 and these effects were reversed by high concentrations of P4. Our results demonstrate the distinct effects of E2 and P4 on differentiation and functions of bone marrow myeloid DCs. The dominating effect of higher physiological concentrations of P4 provides insight into how DC functions could be modulated during pregnancy. PMID:27064901

  2. Differential expression and functional role of GATA-2, NF-E2, and GATA-1 in normal adult hematopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Labbaye, C; Valtieri, M; Barberi, T; Meccia, E; Masella, B; Pelosi, E; Condorelli, G L; Testa, U; Peschle, C

    1995-01-01

    We have explored the expression of the transcription factors GATA-1, GATA-2, and NF-E2 in purified early hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) induced to gradual unilineage erythroid or granulocytic differentiation by growth factor stimulus. GATA-2 mRNA and protein, already expressed in quiescent HPCs, is rapidly induced as early as 3 h after growth factor stimulus, but then declines in advanced erythroid and granulocytic differentiation and maturation. NF-E2 and GATA-1 mRNAs and proteins, though not detected in quiescent HPCs, are gradually induced at 24-48 h in both erythroid and granulocytic culture. Beginning at late differentiation/early maturation stage, both transcription factors are further accumulated in the erythroid pathway, whereas they are suppressed in the granulopoietic series. Similarly, the erythropoietin receptor (EpR) is induced and sustainedly expressed during erythroid differentiation, although beginning at later times (i.e., day 5), whereas it is barely expressed in the granulopoietic pathway. In the first series of functional studies, HPCs were treated with antisense oligomers targeted to transcription factor mRNA: inhibition of GATA-2 expression caused a decreased number of both erythroid and granulocyte-monocytic clones, whereas inhibition of NF-E2 or GATA-1 expression induced a selective impairment of erythroid colony formation. In a second series of functional studies, HPCs treated with retinoic acid were induced to shift from erythroid to granulocytic differentiation (Labbaye et al. 1994. Blood. 83:651-656); this was coupled with abrogation of GATA-1, NF-E2, and EpR expression and conversely enhanced GATA-2 levels. These results indicate the expression and key role of GATA-2 in the early stages of HPC proliferation/differentiation. Conversely, NF-E2 and GATA-1 expression and function are apparently restricted to erythroid differentiation and maturation: their expression precedes that of the EpR, and their function may be in part mediated

  3. Influence of Amino Acid Metabolism on Embryonic Stem Cell Function and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kilberg, Michael S; Terada, Naohiro; Shan, Jixiu

    2016-07-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have promise in regenerative medicine because of their ability to differentiate into all 3 primary germ layers. This review describes recent advances in the understanding of the link between the metabolism of ESCs/iPSCs and their maintenance/differentiation in the cell culture setting, with particular emphasis on amino acid (AA) metabolism. ESCs are endowed with unique metabolic features with regard to energy consumption, metabolite flux through particular pathways, and macromolecular synthesis. Therefore, nutrient availability has a strong influence on stem cell growth, self-renewal, and lineage specification, both in vivo and in vitro. Evidence from several laboratories has documented that self-renewal and differentiation of mouse ESCs are critically dependent on proline metabolism, with downstream metabolites possibly serving as signal molecules. Likewise, catabolism of either threonine (mouse) or methionine (human) is required for growth and differentiation of ESCs because these AAs serve as precursors for donor molecules used in histone methylation and acetylation. Epigenetic mechanisms are recognized as critical steps in differentiation, and AA metabolism in ESCs appears to modulate these epigenetic processes. Recent reports also document that, in vitro, the nutrient composition of the culture medium in which ESCs are differentiated into embryoid bodies can influence lineage specification, leading to enrichment of a specific cell type. Although research designed to direct tissue specification of differentiating embryoid bodies in culture is still in its infancy, early results indicate that manipulation of the nutrient milieu can promote or suppress the formation of specific cell lineages. PMID:27422515

  4. CREBBP re-arrangements affect protein function and lead to aberrant neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeti; Jadhav, Shweta P; Bapat, Sharmila A

    2010-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of the CREB-binding protein (CREBBP) a transcriptional co-activator produces an embryonic lethal phenotype in mice. In humans, re-arrangements in CREBBP are associated with the Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RSTS) that is characterised by craniofacial, skeletal and neuronal symptoms. Neuronal defects in RSTS can be attributed to genetic re-arrangements in CREBBP, which has been implicated in synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. The present study was designed to investigate the role of CREBBP re-arrangements during neuronal differentiation. Towards this, deletion constructs of pCREBBP, viz. pDeltaCB-HAT and pDeltaHAT-CT were generated and transfected into NT2 cells. Expression profiling of the components of Notch, Wnt, SHH and Retinoid signaling along with screening of the neuronal markers was carried out in the NT2 cells and their mutant derivatives. ChIP-PCRs along with co-immunoprecipitations were also performed in these cells to investigate defects due to inappropriate interaction of mutated CREEBP with the corresponding transcription factor and other transcription regulatory proteins both at steady state as well as during differentiation. Mutant NT2 cells lacking the CREB, BROMO and HAT domains (CB-HAT) were highly proliferative and showed limited differentiation; while mutant NT2 cells expressing CREBBP lacking the HAT and CTAD domains (HAT-CT) are proliferation deficient and differentiate rapidly albeit generating an insufficient number of neurons. Altered CREBBP structure resulted in changes in HAT activity, cell cycle profiles and expression of basal levels of components of Notch, SHH, Wnt and retinoid pathways known to be critical in the proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors. At the chromatin level, aberrant signaling correlated with altered binding affinities of the (CREBBP-transcription factor) complexes to promoter regions of components of these pathways. Thus, differentiation defects are manifested early at

  5. Osteoprotegerin exposure at different stages of osteoclastogenesis differentially affects osteoclast formation and function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyan; Gu, Jianhong; Dai, Nannan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Dong; Song, Ruilong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Liu, Zongping

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), during the various stages of osteoclast differentiation, and additionally investigate its effects on osteoclast adhesion and activity. RAW264.7 murine monocytic cells were incubated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor and RANKL for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days, followed by an additional 24-h incubation in the presence or absence of OPG (80 ng/mL). We examined osteoclast differentiation and adhesion capacity using the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and immunofluorescence microscopy, and additionally examined cell growth in real time using the xCELLigence system. Furthermore, the expression levels of TRAP, RANK, integrin β3, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, carbonic anhydrase II, and vesicular-type H(+)-ATPase A1 were examined using western blotting. OPG exposure on day 1 enhanced the osteoclast growth curve as well as adhesion, and increased RANK and integrin β3 expression. In contrast, exposure to OPG at later time points (days 3-7) inhibited osteoclast differentiation, adhesion structure formation, and protease expression. In conclusion, the biological effects of OPG exposure at the various stages of osteoclast differentiation were varied, and included the enhanced adhesion and survival of preosteoclasts, the block of differentiation from the early to the terminal stages of osteoclastogenesis, and suppression of mature osteoclast activation following OPG exposure during the terminal differentiation stage, suggesting that the effects of OPG exposure differ based on the stage of differentiation. PMID:26044733

  6. The role of Hath6, a newly identified shear-stress-responsive transcription factor, in endothelial cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Wasserman, Scott M.; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant; Cao, Feng; Li, Zongjin; Wilson, Kitchener D.; Yue, Wen; Wu, Joseph C.; Xie, Xiaoyan; Pei, Xuetao

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The key regulators of endothelial differentiation that is induced by shear stress are mostly unclear. Human atonal homolog 6 (Hath6 or ATOH8) is an endothelial-selective and shear-stress-responsive transcription factor. In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of Hath6 in the endothelial specification of embryonic stem cells. In a stepwise human embryonic stem cell to endothelial cell (hESC-EC) induction system, Hath6 mRNA was upregulated synchronously with endothelial determination. Subsequently, gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies of Hath6 were performed using the hESC-EC induction model and endothelial cell lines. The overexpression of Hath6, which mimics shear stress treatment, resulted in an increased CD45−CD31+KDR+ population, a higher tubular-structure-formation capacity and increased endothelial-specific gene expression. By contrast, the knockdown of Hath6 mRNA markedly decreased endothelial differentiation. Hath6 also facilitated the maturation of endothelial cells in terms of endothelial gene expression, tubular-structure formation and cell migration. We further demonstrated that the gene encoding eNOS is a direct target of Hath6 through a reporter system assay and western blot analysis, and that the inhibition of eNOS diminishes hESC-EC differentiation. These results suggest that eNOS plays a key role in linking Hath6 to the endothelial phenotype. Further in situ hybridization studies in zebrafish and mouse embryos indicated that homologs of Hath6 are involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. This study provides the first confirmation of the positive impact of Hath6 on human embryonic endothelial differentiation and function. Moreover, we present a potential signaling pathway through which shear stress stimulates endothelial differentiation. PMID:24463812

  7. The role of Hath6, a newly identified shear-stress-responsive transcription factor, in endothelial cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Wasserman, Scott M; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant; Cao, Feng; Li, Zongjin; Wilson, Kitchener D; Yue, Wen; Wu, Joseph C; Xie, Xiaoyan; Pei, Xuetao

    2014-04-01

    The key regulators of endothelial differentiation that is induced by shear stress are mostly unclear. Human atonal homolog 6 (Hath6 or ATOH8) is an endothelial-selective and shear-stress-responsive transcription factor. In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of Hath6 in the endothelial specification of embryonic stem cells. In a stepwise human embryonic stem cell to endothelial cell (hESC-EC) induction system, Hath6 mRNA was upregulated synchronously with endothelial determination. Subsequently, gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies of Hath6 were performed using the hESC-EC induction model and endothelial cell lines. The overexpression of Hath6, which mimics shear stress treatment, resulted in an increased CD45(-)CD31(+)KDR(+) population, a higher tubular-structure-formation capacity and increased endothelial-specific gene expression. By contrast, the knockdown of Hath6 mRNA markedly decreased endothelial differentiation. Hath6 also facilitated the maturation of endothelial cells in terms of endothelial gene expression, tubular-structure formation and cell migration. We further demonstrated that the gene encoding eNOS is a direct target of Hath6 through a reporter system assay and western blot analysis, and that the inhibition of eNOS diminishes hESC-EC differentiation. These results suggest that eNOS plays a key role in linking Hath6 to the endothelial phenotype. Further in situ hybridization studies in zebrafish and mouse embryos indicated that homologs of Hath6 are involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. This study provides the first confirmation of the positive impact of Hath6 on human embryonic endothelial differentiation and function. Moreover, we present a potential signaling pathway through which shear stress stimulates endothelial differentiation. PMID:24463812

  8. Serum IL-10 from systemic lupus erythematosus patients suppresses the differentiation and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhida; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Huijuan; Jiang, Pengtao; Zhang, Jiangquan; Zhang, Mingshun; Gu, Lei; Yang, Xiaofan; Zhang, Miaojia; Ji, Xiaohui

    2012-01-01

    The role played by cytokines, other than interferon (IFN)-α, in the differentiation and function of dendritic cells (DCs) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), remains unclear. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels are generally elevated in SLE patients, which might modulate the differentiation of DCs. In this study, DCs were induced from monocytes either by transendothelial trafficking or by culture with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) + IL-4 + tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Both systems were used to investigate the effects of elevated serum IL-10 level on DC differentiation in SLE patients. The results showed that monocyte-derived DCs induced by either SLE serum or exogenous IL-10 reduced the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and CD80, decreased IL-12p40 level, and increased IL-10 level, and exhibited an impaired capacity to stimulate allogenic T-cell proliferation. These results indicate that serum IL-10 may be involved in the pathogenesis of SLE by modulating the differentiation and function of DCs. PMID:23554785

  9. Iterative Linking with the Differential Functioning of Items and Tests (DFIT) Method: Comparison of Testwide and Item Parameter Replication (IPR) Critical Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybert, Jacob; Stark, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study was conducted to examine the accuracy of differential item functioning (DIF) detection using the differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) method. Specifically, the performance of DFIT was compared using "testwide" critical values suggested by Flowers, Oshima, and Raju, based on simulations involving large numbers of…

  10. Differential Domain Functioning on the Numeracy Component of the Foundation Skills Assessment: Bringing the Context into Picture by Investigating Sociological/Community Moderated Test and Item Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelin, Michaela N.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    This study introduced and demonstrated a new methodology for item and test bias studies: moderated differential item functioning (DIF). This technique expands the DIF methodology to incorporate contextual and sociological variables as moderating effects of the DIF. The study explored differential domain functioning (DDF), so that the focus of…

  11. Functional upregulation of the H2S/Cav3.2 channel pathway accelerates secretory function in neuroendocrine-differentiated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Kazuki; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Yasukawa, Miku; Asano, Erina; Kasamatsu, Ryuji; Ueda, Mai; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-10-01

    Neuroendocrine-differentiated prostate cancer cells may contribute to androgen-independent proliferation of surrounding cells through Ca(2+)-dependent secretion of mitogenic factors. Human prostate cancer LNCaP cells, when neuroendocrine-differentiated, overexpress Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels that contribute to Ca(2+)-dependent secretion. Given evidence for the acceleration of Cav3.2 activity by hydrogen sulfide (H2S), we examined the roles of the H2S/Cav3.2 pathway and then analyzed the molecular mechanisms of the Cav3.2 overexpression in neuroendocrine-differentiated LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells were differentiated by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protein levels and T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent currents (T-currents) were measured by immunoblotting and whole-cell pacth-clamp technique, respectively. Spontaneous release of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was monitored to evaluate secretory function. The differentiated LNCaP cells exhibited neurite outgrowth, androgen-independent proliferation and upregulation of mitogenic factors, and also showed elevation of Cav3.2 expression or T-currents. Expression of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), H2S-forming enzymes, and spontaneous secretion of PAP increased following the differentiation. The augmented T-currents were enhanced by H2S donors and suppressed by inhibitors of CSE, but not CBS. The PAP secretion was reduced by inhibition of CSE or T-type Ca(2+) channels. During differentiation, Egr-1 and REST, positive and negative transcriptional regulators for Cav3.2, were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, and Egr-1 knockdown prevented the Cav3.2 overexpression. Our data suggest that, in neuroendocrine-differentiated LNCaP cells, H2S formed by the upregulated CSE promotes the activity of the upregulated Cav3.2, leading to the elevated secretory functions. The overexpression of Cav3.2 appears to involve upregulation of Egr-1 and downregulation of REST. PMID:26256074

  12. Nuclear PTEN functions as an essential regulator of SRF-dependent transcription to control smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horita, Henrick; Wysoczynski, Christina L; Walker, Lori A; Moulton, Karen S; Li, Marcella; Ostriker, Allison; Tucker, Rebecca; McKinsey, Timothy A; Churchill, Mair E A; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular disease progression is associated with marked changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and function. SMC contractile gene expression and, thus differentiation, is under direct transcriptional control by the transcription factor, serum response factor (SRF); however, the mechanisms dynamically regulating SMC phenotype are not fully defined. Here we report that the lipid and protein phosphatase, PTEN, has a novel role in the nucleus by functioning as an indispensible regulator with SRF to maintain the differentiated SM phenotype. PTEN interacts with the N-terminal domain of SRF and PTEN-SRF interaction promotes SRF binding to essential promoter elements in SM-specific genes. Factors inducing phenotypic switching promote loss of nuclear PTEN through nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation resulting in reduced myogenically active SRF, but enhanced SRF activity on target genes involved in proliferation. Overall decreased expression of PTEN was observed in intimal SMCs of human atherosclerotic lesions underlying the potential clinical importance of these findings. PMID:26940659

  13. IFNγ inhibits Th17 differentiation and function via Tbet-dependent and Tbet-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Wen-I; McWilliams, Ian L.; Harrington, Laurie E.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Tbet is critical for the differentiation of Th1 CD4 T cells and is associated with the induction of multiple autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Herein, we demonstrate that Tbet suppresses IL-17A and Th17 differentiation both in vitro and in vivo in a cell-intrinsic manner, and that in fact, Tbet is not necessary for EAE induction. Moreover, we find that IFNγ inhibits the production of IL-17A and IL-17F in a STAT1-dependent, Tbet-independent manner. These findings illustrate multiple mechanisms utilized by developing Th1 cells to silence the Th17 program. PMID:24369297

  14. Alcohol and Cannabinoids Differentially Affect HIV Infection and Function of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells (MDDC)

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, Marisela; Figueroa, Gloria; Yndart, Adriana; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2015-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%), THC (5 and 10 μM), or JWH-015 (5 and 10 μM) for 4–7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR) estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV + EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV + JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV + THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection. PMID:26733986

  15. Differential Item Functioning by Gender on a Large-Scale Science Performance Assessment: A Comparison across Grade Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holweger, Nancy; Taylor, Grace

    The fifth-grade and eighth-grade science items on a state performance assessment were compared for differential item functioning (DIF) due to gender. The grade 5 sample consisted of 8,539 females and 8,029 males and the grade 8 sample consisted of 7,477 females and 7,891 males. A total of 30 fifth grade items and 26 eighth grade items were…

  16. Estradiol promotes functional responses in inflammatory and steady-state dendritic cells through differential requirement for activation function-1 of estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    Seillet, Cyril; Rouquié, Nelly; Foulon, Eliane; Douin-Echinard, Victorine; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-François; Guéry, Jean-Charles; Laffont, Sophie

    2013-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to regulate GM-CSF- or Flt3 ligand-driven dendritic cell (DC) development through estrogen receptor (ER) α signaling in myeloid progenitors. ERα regulates transcription of target genes through two distinct activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2, whose respective involvement varies in a cell type- or tissue-specific manner. In this study, we investigated the role of ERα AFs in the development and effector functions of inflammatory DCs, steady-state conventional DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDC), using mouse lacking either AF-1 or AF-2. In agreement with previous works, we showed that E2 fostered the differentiation and effector functions of inflammatory DCs through ERα-dependent upregulation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 in GM-CSF-stimulated myeloid progenitors. Interestingly, whereas AF-1 was required for early IRF-4 upregulation in DC precursors, it was dispensable to enhance IRF-4 expression in differentiated DCs to a level compatible with the development of the more functional Ly6C(-) CD11b(+) DC subset. Presence of E2 had no effect on progenitors from either knock-in mice with 7-aa deletion in helix 12 of ERα, lacking AF-2, or ERα(-/-) mice. By contrast, in Flt3 ligand-driven DC differentiation, activation of AF-1 domain was required to promote the development of more functionally competent conventional DCs and pDCs. Moreover, lack of ERα AF-1 blunted the TLR7-mediated IFN-α response of female pDCs in vivo. Thus, our study demonstrates that ERα uses AF-1 differently in steady-state and inflammatory DC lineages to regulate their innate functions, suggesting that selective ER modulators could be used to target specific DC subsets. PMID:23626011

  17. Investigating Linguistic Sources of Differential Item Functioning Using Expert Think-Aloud Protocols in Science Achievement Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Oliveri, Maria Elena; Dallie Sandilands, Debra; Lyons-Thomas, Juliette; Ercikan, Kadriye

    2013-03-01

    Even if national and international assessments are designed to be comparable, subsequent psychometric analyses often reveal differential item functioning (DIF). Central to achieving comparability is to examine the presence of DIF, and if DIF is found, to investigate its sources to ensure differentially functioning items that do not lead to bias. In this study, sources of DIF were examined using think-aloud protocols. The think-aloud protocols of expert reviewers were conducted for comparing the English and French versions of 40 items previously identified as DIF (N = 20) and non-DIF (N = 20). Three highly trained and experienced experts in verifying and accepting/rejecting multi-lingual versions of curriculum and testing materials for government purposes participated in this study. Although there is a considerable amount of agreement in the identification of differentially functioning items, experts do not consistently identify and distinguish DIF and non-DIF items. Our analyses of the think-aloud protocols identified particular linguistic, general pedagogical, content-related, and cognitive factors related to sources of DIF. Implications are provided for the process of arriving at the identification of DIF, prior to the actual administration of tests at national and international levels.

  18. Functional role of an islet transcription factor, INSM1/IA-1, on pancreatic acinar cell trans-differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Saunee, Nicolle A.; Breslin, Mary B.; Song, Kejing; Lan, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the functional role of INSM1 is examined with an AR42J acinar cell model for trans-differentiation into insulin-positive cells. Islet transcription factors (ITFs: INSM1, Pdx-1, and NeuroD1) are over-expressed in AR42J cells using adenoviral vectors. Addition of Ad-INSM1 alone or the combination of three ITFs to the AR42J cells triggers cellular trans-differentiation. Ectopic expression of INSM1 directly induces insulin, Pax6, and Nkx6.1 expression, whereas Pdx-1 and NeuroD1 were slightly suppressed by INSM1. Addition of Pdx-1 and NeuroD1 with INSM1 further enhances endocrine trans-differentiation by increasing both the numbers and intensity of the insulin positive cells with simultaneous activation of ITFs, Ngn3 and MafA. INSM1 expression alone partially inhibits dexamethasone-induced exocrine amylase expression. The combination of the three ITFs completely inhibits amylase expression and concomitantly induces greater acinar cell trans-differentiation into endocrine cells. Also, addition of the three ITFs promotes EGF and TGFβ receptors expression. Stimulation by the three ITFs along with the EGF/TGFβ growth factors strongly promotes insulin gene expression. The combination of the three ITFs and EGF/TGFβ growth factors with the primary cultured pancreatic acini also facilitates exocrine to endocrine cell differentiation. Taken together, both the AR42J cell line and the primary cultured mouse acinar cells support INSM1 induced acini trans-differentiation model. PMID:21830214

  19. Production and Functional Characterization of Murine Osteoclasts Differentiated from ER-Hoxb8-Immortalized Myeloid Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zach, Frank; Mueller, Alexandra; Gessner, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro differentiation into functional osteoclasts is routinely achieved by incubation of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or primary as well as cryopreserved spleen and bone marrow-derived cells with soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Additionally, osteoclasts can be derived from co-cultures with osteoblasts or by direct administration of soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to RAW 264.7 macrophage lineage cells. However, despite their benefits for osteoclast-associated research, these different methods have several drawbacks with respect to differentiation yields, time and animal consumption, storage life of progenitor cells or the limited potential for genetic manipulation of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we therefore established a novel protocol for the differentiation of osteoclasts from murine ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid stem cells. We isolated and immortalized bone marrow cells from wild type and genetically manipulated mouse lines, optimized protocols for osteoclast differentiation and compared these cells to osteoclasts derived from conventional sources. In vitro generated ER-Hoxb8 osteoclasts displayed typical osteoclast characteristics such as multi-nucleation, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of supernatants and cells, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption activity. Furthermore, the osteoclast differentiation time course was traced on a gene expression level. Increased expression of osteoclast-specific genes and decreased expression of stem cell marker genes during differentiation of osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitor cells were detected by gene array and confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR approaches. In summary, we established a novel method for the quantitative production of murine bona fide osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8 stem cells generated from wild type or

  20. Functionalizing Ascl1 with Novel Intracellular Protein Delivery Technology for Promoting Neuronal Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Meghan; Chapani, Parv; Styan, Tara; Vaidyanathan, Ranjani; Willerth, Stephanie Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can become any cell type found in the body. Accordingly, one of the major challenges when working with pluripotent stem cells is producing a highly homogenous population of differentiated cells, which can then be used for downstream applications such as cell therapies or drug screening. The transcription factor Ascl1 plays a key role in neural development and previous work has shown that Ascl1 overexpression using viral vectors can reprogram fibroblasts directly into neurons. Here we report on how a recombinant version of the Ascl1 protein functionalized with intracellular protein delivery technology (Ascl1-IPTD) can be used to rapidly differentiate human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into neurons. We first evaluated a range of Ascl1-IPTD concentrations to determine the most effective amount for generating neurons from hiPSCs cultured in serum free media. Next, we looked at the frequency of Ascl1-IPTD supplementation in the media on differentiation and found that one time supplementation is sufficient enough to trigger the neural differentiation process. Ascl1-IPTD was efficiently taken up by the hiPSCs and enabled rapid differentiation into TUJ1-positive and NeuN-positive populations with neuronal morphology after 8 days. After 12 days of culture, hiPSC-derived neurons produced by Ascl1-IPTD treatment exhibited greater neurite length and higher numbers of branch points compared to neurons derived using a standard neural progenitor differentiation protocol. This work validates Ascl1-IPTD as a powerful tool for engineering neural tissue from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27138845

  1. Production and Functional Characterization of Murine Osteoclasts Differentiated from ER-Hoxb8-Immortalized Myeloid Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Frank; Mueller, Alexandra; Gessner, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro differentiation into functional osteoclasts is routinely achieved by incubation of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or primary as well as cryopreserved spleen and bone marrow-derived cells with soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Additionally, osteoclasts can be derived from co-cultures with osteoblasts or by direct administration of soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to RAW 264.7 macrophage lineage cells. However, despite their benefits for osteoclast-associated research, these different methods have several drawbacks with respect to differentiation yields, time and animal consumption, storage life of progenitor cells or the limited potential for genetic manipulation of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we therefore established a novel protocol for the differentiation of osteoclasts from murine ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid stem cells. We isolated and immortalized bone marrow cells from wild type and genetically manipulated mouse lines, optimized protocols for osteoclast differentiation and compared these cells to osteoclasts derived from conventional sources. In vitro generated ER-Hoxb8 osteoclasts displayed typical osteoclast characteristics such as multi-nucleation, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of supernatants and cells, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption activity. Furthermore, the osteoclast differentiation time course was traced on a gene expression level. Increased expression of osteoclast-specific genes and decreased expression of stem cell marker genes during differentiation of osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitor cells were detected by gene array and confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR approaches. In summary, we established a novel method for the quantitative production of murine bona fide osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8 stem cells generated from wild type or

  2. Predictive Validity of Attentional Functions in Differentiating Children with and without ADHD: A Componential Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Liane; Zieren, Nikola; Zotter, Sibylle; Karall, Daniela; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Haberlandt, Edda; Fimm, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate which attentional components are of predictive utility in differentiating children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder, combined type (ADHD-C) from their peers without ADHD. Methods: Thirty-four children participated in the study: 17 males with ADHD-C (mean age 10y 4mo, SD 1y 9mo) and…

  3. Lectin-functionalized microchannels for characterizing pluripotent cells and early differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Dwayne A. L.; Kulik, Michael; Hincapie, Marina; Hancock, William S.; Dalton, Stephen; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of proliferating and differentiating to form cells of the three embryonic germ layers, namely, endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. The utilization of human ES cell derivatives requires the ability to direct differentiation to specific lineages in defined, efficient, and scalable systems. Better markers are needed to identify early differentiation. Lectins have been reported as an attractive alternative to the common stem cell markers. They have been used to identify, characterize, and isolate various cell subpopulations on the basis of the presentation of specific carbohydrate groups on the cell surface. This article demonstrates how simple adhesion assays in lectin-coated microfluidic channels can provide key information on the interaction of lectins with ES and definitive endoderm cells and thereby track early differentiation. The microfluidic approach incorporates both binding strength and cell surface receptor density, whereas traditional flow cytometry only incorporates the latter. Both approaches are examined and shown to be complementary with the microfluidic approach providing more biologically relevant information. PMID:22712033

  4. Lectin-functionalized microchannels for characterizing pluripotent cells and early differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Dwayne A L; Kulik, Michael; Hincapie, Marina; Hancock, William S; Dalton, Stephen; Murthy, Shashi K

    2012-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of proliferating and differentiating to form cells of the three embryonic germ layers, namely, endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. The utilization of human ES cell derivatives requires the ability to direct differentiation to specific lineages in defined, efficient, and scalable systems. Better markers are needed to identify early differentiation. Lectins have been reported as an attractive alternative to the common stem cell markers. They have been used to identify, characterize, and isolate various cell subpopulations on the basis of the presentation of specific carbohydrate groups on the cell surface. This article demonstrates how simple adhesion assays in lectin-coated microfluidic channels can provide key information on the interaction of lectins with ES and definitive endoderm cells and thereby track early differentiation. The microfluidic approach incorporates both binding strength and cell surface receptor density, whereas traditional flow cytometry only incorporates the latter. Both approaches are examined and shown to be complementary with the microfluidic approach providing more biologically relevant information. PMID:22712033

  5. Death Concerns in Differential Levels of Consciousness as Functions of Defense Strategy and Religious Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenheim, Eliyahu; Muchnik, Benjamin

    1985-01-01

    Explores the relationships between defensive style (repression-sensitization) and Jewish religiosity and death concerns in the context of differential levels of awareness of 64 Israeli students. Found that the personality attribute of defensive style was linked systematically to death concern at all levels of consciousness. Religiosity was less…

  6. Differential Language Functioning of Monolinguals and Bilinguals on Positive-Negative Emotional Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kheirzadeh, Shiela; Hajiabed, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    The present interdisciplinary research investigates the differential emotional expression between Persian monolinguals and Persian-English bilinguals. In other words, the article was an attempt to answer the questions whether bilinguals and monolinguals differ in the expression of positive and negative emotions elicited through sad and happy…

  7. Analysis of mitochondrial function and localisation during human embryonic stem cell differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Andrew B J; Chong, Fenny; Elliott, David A; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P; Osborne, Geoffrey W

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives show promise as viable cell therapy options for multiple disorders in different tissues. Recent advances in stem cell biology have lead to the reliable production and detailed molecular characterisation of a range of cell-types. However, the role of mitochondria during differentiation has yet to be fully elucidated. Mitochondria mediate a cells response to altered energy requirements (e.g. cardiomyocyte contraction) and, as such, the mitochondrial phenotype is likely to change during the dynamic process of hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that manipulating mitochondrial biogenesis alters mesendoderm commitment. To investigate mitochondrial localisation during early lineage specification of hESCs we developed a mitochondrial reporter line, KMEL2, in which sequences encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are targeted to the mitochondria. Differentiation of KMEL2 lines into the three germ layers showed that the mitochondria in these differentiated progeny are GFP positive. Therefore, KMEL2 hESCs facilitate the study of mitochondria in a range of cell types and, importantly, permit real-time analysis of mitochondria via the GFP tag. PMID:23284940

  8. Sex Differential Item Functioning in the Inventory of Early Development III Social-Emotional Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Jessica L.; French, Brian F.; Finch, W. Holmes; Ullrich-French, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Social-emotional (SE) skills in the early developmental years of children influence outcomes in psychological, behavioral, and learning domains. The adult ratings of a child's SE skills can be influenced by sex stereotypes. These rating differences could lead to differential conclusions about developmental progress or risk. To ensure that…

  9. Experiences of identification and differentiation as functions of leprosy, personality and age.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, N S; Dhar, U; Singh, Y

    1984-01-01

    It is a study of sociogenic need satisfactions that determines the homeostasis of 'being' by remaining contingent conditions of perpetuation or debasement of the social 'self'. The paper has a focus on identification satisfaction and differentiation experience of patients of the highly stigmatized leprosy. The study proceeds with an 'Experimental Group--Control-Group' randomized design. Experimental Groups are two, viz., those of Lepromatous and Non-lepromatous patients. 'Control Group' consists of 'disease-free' normal people. The three independent variables are disease types, age, personality factors. The dependent variables are two, viz., score of identification satisfaction and differentiation experience, measured by standardized tools. Each dependent variable has four '3 X 3 X 2' factorial experiments to test 56 'Null Hypotheses'. The sample consists of 360 elements for each one of the eight experiments. Leprosy elements are drawn from the Central JALMA Institute for Leprosy and the 'Kushta Seva Sadan' (Agra). The 'F' test is run for statistical verification of 'Null hypotheses'. Results show presence of 'role-reversion' and 'role negation' of age and personality factors. The disease possesses 'anti-roles'. It does not allow age and personality factors to promote identification satisfaction and to demote differentiation and experience. The disease actively promotes differentiation and demotes identification through its own 'alien system'. The senescents are the greatest sufferers. 'Social Stigma' works a 'social thanatos' and exposes senescents to substantial 'self-erosion'. PMID:6548499

  10. Acceleration of Functional Maturation and Differentiation of Neonatal Porcine Islet Cell Monolayers Shortly In Vitro Cocultured with Microencapsulated Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Francesca; Calvitti, Mario; Luca, Giovanni; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Baroni, Tiziano; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Becchetti, Ennio; Arato, Iva; Boselli, Carlo; Ngo Nselel, Monique D.; Calafiore, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    The limited availability of cadaveric human donor pancreata as well as the incomplete success of the Edmonton protocol for human islet allografts fasten search for new sources of insulin the producing cells for substitution cell therapy of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Starting from isolated neonatal porcine pancreatic islets (NPIs), we have obtained cell monolayers that were exposed to microencapsulated monolayered Sertoli cells (ESCs) for different time periods (7, 14, 21 days). To assess the development of the cocultured cell monolayers, we have studied either endocrine cell phenotype differentiation markers or c-kit, a hematopoietic stem cell marker, has recently been involved with growth and differentiation of β-cell subpopulations in human as well as rodent animal models. ESC which were found to either accelerate maturation and differentiation of the NPIs β-cell phenotype or identify an islet cell subpopulation that was marked positively for c-kit. The insulin/c-kit positive cells might represent a new, still unknown functionally immature β-cell like element in the porcine pancreas. Acceleration of maturation and differentiation of our NPI cell monolayers might generate a potential new opportunity to develop insulin-producing cells that may suite experimental trials for cell therapy of T1DM. PMID:21048849

  11. Functional regulation of FoxO1 in neural stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, D-Y; Hwang, I; Muller, F L; Paik, J-H

    2015-12-01

    Forkhead transcription factor family O (FoxO) maintains adult stem cell reserves by supporting their long-term proliferative potential. MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate neuronal stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation and differentiation during neural development by controlling the expression of a specific set of target genes. In the neurogenic subventricular zone, FoxO1 is specifically expressed in NSPCs and is no longer detected during the transition to neuroblast stage, forming an inverse correlation with miR-9 expression. The 3'-untranslated region of FoxO1 contains a conserved target sequence of miR-9 and FoxO1 expression is coordinated in concert with miR-9 during neuronal differentiation. Our study demonstrates that FoxO1 contributes to NSPC fate decision through its cooperation with the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:26470727

  12. Legendre-tau approximation for functional differential equations. Part 2: The linear quadratic optimal control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1984-01-01

    The numerical scheme based on the Legendre-tau approximation is proposed to approximate the feedback solution to the linear quadratic optimal control problem for hereditary differential systems. The convergence property is established using Trotter ideas. The method yields very good approximations at low orders and provides an approximation technique for computing closed-loop eigenvalues of the feedback system. A comparison with existing methods (based on averaging and spline approximations) is made.

  13. Legendre-tau approximation for functional differential equations. II - The linear quadratic optimal control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kazufumi; Teglas, Russell

    1987-01-01

    The numerical scheme based on the Legendre-tau approximation is proposed to approximate the feedback solution to the linear quadratic optimal control problem for hereditary differential systems. The convergence property is established using Trotter ideas. The method yields very good approximations at low orders and provides an approximation technique for computing closed-loop eigenvalues of the feedback system. A comparison with existing methods (based on averaging and spline approximations) is made.

  14. GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  15. CTCF binding site sequence differences are associated with unique regulatory and functional trends during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Plasschaert, Robert N; Vigneau, Sébastien; Tempera, Italo; Gupta, Ravi; Maksimoska, Jasna; Everett, Logan; Davuluri, Ramana; Mamorstein, Ronen; Lieberman, Paul M; Schultz, David; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-01-01

    CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) is a highly conserved multifunctional DNA-binding protein with thousands of binding sites genome-wide. Our previous work suggested that differences in CTCF's binding site sequence may affect the regulation of CTCF recruitment and its function. To investigate this possibility, we characterized changes in genome-wide CTCF binding and gene expression during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. After separating CTCF sites into three classes (LowOc, MedOc and HighOc) based on similarity to the consensus motif, we found that developmentally regulated CTCF binding occurs preferentially at LowOc sites, which have lower similarity to the consensus. By measuring the affinity of CTCF for selected sites, we show that sites lost during differentiation are enriched in motifs associated with weaker CTCF binding in vitro. Specifically, enrichment for T at the 18(th) position of the CTCF binding site is associated with regulated binding in the LowOc class and can predictably reduce CTCF affinity for binding sites. Finally, by comparing changes in CTCF binding with changes in gene expression during differentiation, we show that LowOc and HighOc sites are associated with distinct regulatory functions. Our results suggest that the regulatory control of CTCF is dependent in part on specific motifs within its binding site. PMID:24121688

  16. CTCF binding site sequence differences are associated with unique regulatory and functional trends during embryonic stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Plasschaert, Robert N.; Vigneau, Sébastien; Tempera, Italo; Gupta, Ravi; Maksimoska, Jasna; Everett, Logan; Davuluri, Ramana; Mamorstein, Ronen; Lieberman, Paul M.; Schultz, David; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2014-01-01

    CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) is a highly conserved multifunctional DNA-binding protein with thousands of binding sites genome-wide. Our previous work suggested that differences in CTCF’s binding site sequence may affect the regulation of CTCF recruitment and its function. To investigate this possibility, we characterized changes in genome-wide CTCF binding and gene expression during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. After separating CTCF sites into three classes (LowOc, MedOc and HighOc) based on similarity to the consensus motif, we found that developmentally regulated CTCF binding occurs preferentially at LowOc sites, which have lower similarity to the consensus. By measuring the affinity of CTCF for selected sites, we show that sites lost during differentiation are enriched in motifs associated with weaker CTCF binding in vitro. Specifically, enrichment for T at the 18th position of the CTCF binding site is associated with regulated binding in the LowOc class and can predictably reduce CTCF affinity for binding sites. Finally, by comparing changes in CTCF binding with changes in gene expression during differentiation, we show that LowOc and HighOc sites are associated with distinct regulatory functions. Our results suggest that the regulatory control of CTCF is dependent in part on specific motifs within its binding site. PMID:24121688

  17. Glucose metabolite patterns as markers of functional differentiation in freshly isolated and cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissel, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the mammary gland of non-ruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lacation. By measuring the incorporation of glucose carbon from (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into intermediary metabolitees and metabolic products in mammary epithelia cells from virgin, pregnant, and lacating mice, we domonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate are important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells isolated from pregnant mice and cultured on collagen gels have a pattern similar to that of their freshly isolated counter-parts. When isolated from lacating mice, the metabolite patterns of cells cultured on collagen gels are different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  18. Hindsight/RREB-1 functions in both the specification and differentiation of stem cells in the adult midgut of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Brittany L; McKnight, Cameron; Pruchnicki, Porsha C; Biro, Nicole A; Reed, Bruce H

    2015-01-01

    The adult Drosophila midgut is established during the larval/pupal transition from undifferentiated cells known as adult midgut precursors (AMPs). Four fundamental cell types are found in the adult midgut epithelium: undifferentiated intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their committed daughter cells, enteroblasts (EBs), plus enterocytes (ECs) and enteroendocrine cells (EEs). Using the Drosophila posterior midgut as a model, we have studied the function of the transcription factor Hindsight (Hnt)/RREB-1 and its relationship to the Notch and Egfr signaling pathways. We show that hnt is required for EC differentiation in the context of ISC-to-EC differentiation, but not in the context of AMP-to-EC differentiation. In addition, we show that hnt is required for the establishment of viable or functional ISCs. Overall, our studies introduce hnt as a key factor in the regulation of both the developing and the mature adult midgut. We suggest that the nature of these contextual differences can be explained through the interaction of hnt with multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26658272

  19. Hindsight/RREB-1 functions in both the specification and differentiation of stem cells in the adult midgut of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Baechler, Brittany L.; McKnight, Cameron; Pruchnicki, Porsha C.; Biro, Nicole A.; Reed, Bruce H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adult Drosophila midgut is established during the larval/pupal transition from undifferentiated cells known as adult midgut precursors (AMPs). Four fundamental cell types are found in the adult midgut epithelium: undifferentiated intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their committed daughter cells, enteroblasts (EBs), plus enterocytes (ECs) and enteroendocrine cells (EEs). Using the Drosophila posterior midgut as a model, we have studied the function of the transcription factor Hindsight (Hnt)/RREB-1 and its relationship to the Notch and Egfr signaling pathways. We show that hnt is required for EC differentiation in the context of ISC-to-EC differentiation, but not in the context of AMP-to-EC differentiation. In addition, we show that hnt is required for the establishment of viable or functional ISCs. Overall, our studies introduce hnt as a key factor in the regulation of both the developing and the mature adult midgut. We suggest that the nature of these contextual differences can be explained through the interaction of hnt with multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26658272

  20. Expression and function of heterotypic adhesion molecules during differentiation of human skeletal muscle in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, J. R.; Abraham, D. J.; Bou-Gharios, G.; Partridge, T. A.; Olsen, I.

    1992-01-01

    The infiltration of skeletal muscle by leukocytes occurs in a variety of myopathies and frequently accompanies muscle degeneration and regeneration. The latter involves development of new myofibers from precursor myoblasts, and so infiltrating cells may interact with muscle at all stages of differentiation. The authors have investigated the surface expression of ligands for T-cell adhesion during the differentiation of human skeletal muscle in vitro. Myoblasts expressed low levels of ICAM-1 (CD54), which remained constant during muscle cell differentiation and could be induced by cytokines such as gamma-interferon. It is therefore likely that ICAM-1 is involved in the invasive accumulation of lymphocytes during skeletal muscle inflammation. In contrast, LFA-3 (CD58) was expressed at higher levels than ICAM-1 on myoblasts, decreased significantly during myogenesis, and was unaffected by immune mediators. Both ICAM-1 and LFA-3 were able to mediate T cell binding to myoblasts, whereas adhesion to myotubes was independent of the LFA-3 ligand. Although expressed throughout myogenesis, human leukocyte antigen class I and CD44 did not appear to mediate T cell binding. The expression of ligands that facilitate interaction of myogenic cells with lymphocytes may have important implications for myoblast transplantation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1739132

  1. Target Gene and Function Prediction of Differentially Expressed MicroRNAs in Lactating Mammary Glands of Dairy Goats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Cun-Xian; Wang, Gui-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that can regulate gene expression, and they can be involved in the regulation of mammary gland development. The differential expression of miRNAs during mammary gland development is expected to provide insight into their roles in regulating the homeostasis of mammary gland tissues. To screen out miRNAs that should have important regulatory function in the development of mammary gland from miRNA expression profiles and to predict their function, in this study, the target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs in the lactating mammary glands of Laoshan dairy goats are predicted, and then the functions of these miRNAs are analyzed via bioinformatics. First, we screen the expression patterns of 25 miRNAs that had shown significant differences during the different lactation stages in the mammary gland. Then, these miRNAs are clustered according to their expression patterns. Computational methods were used to obtain 215 target genes for 22 of these miRNAs. Combining gene ontology annotation, Fisher's exact test, and KEGG analysis with the target prediction for these miRNAs, the regulatory functions of miRNAs belonging to different clusters are predicted. PMID:24195063

  2. A Differential Item Functional Analysis by Age of Perceived Interpersonal Discrimination in a Multi-racial/ethnic Sample of Adults.

    PubMed

    Owens, Sherry; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L; Hunte, Haslyn E R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether individual items on the nine item William's Perceived Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS) functioned differently by age (<45 vs ≥ 45) within five racial groups in the United States: Asians (n=2,017); Hispanics (n=2,688); Black Caribbeans (n=1,377); African Americans (n=3,434); and Whites (n=854). We used data from the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Lives and the 2001-2003 National Latino and Asian Studies. Multiple-indicator, multiple-cause models (MIMIC) were used to examine differential item functioning (DIF) on the EDS by age within each racial/ethnic group. Overall, Asian and Hispanic respondents reported less discrimination than Whites; on the other hand, African Americans and Black Caribbeans reported more discrimination than Whites. Regardless of race/ethnicity, the younger respondents (aged <45 years) reported less discrimination than the older respondents (aged ≥ 45 years). In terms of age by race/ethnicity, the results were mixed for 19 out of 45 tests of DIF (40%). No differences in item function were observed among Black Caribbeans. "Being called names or insulted" and others acting as "if they are afraid" of the respondents were the only two items that did not exhibit differential item functioning by age across all racial/ethnic groups. Overall, our findings suggest that the EDS scale should be used with caution in multi-age multi-racial/ethnic samples. PMID:26673317

  3. Novel immortalized human fetal liver cell line, cBAL111, has the potential to differentiate into functional hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Deurholt, Tanja; van Til, Niek P; Chhatta, Aniska A; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Schwartlander, Ruth; Payne, Catherine; Plevris, John N; Sauer, Igor M; Chamuleau, Robert AFM; Elferink, Ronald PJ Oude; Seppen, Jurgen; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2009-01-01

    Background A clonal cell line that combines both stable hepatic function and proliferation capacity is desirable for in vitro applications that depend on hepatic function, such as pharmacological or toxicological assays and bioartificial liver systems. Here we describe the generation and characterization of a clonal human cell line for in vitro hepatocyte applications. Results Cell clones derived from human fetal liver cells were immortalized by over-expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase. The resulting cell line, cBAL111, displayed hepatic functionality similar to the parental cells prior to immortalization, and did not grow in soft agar. Cell line cBAL111 expressed markers of immature hepatocytes, like glutathione S transferase and cytokeratin 19, as well as progenitor cell marker CD146 and was negative for lidocaine elimination. On the other hand, the cBAL111 cells produced urea, albumin and cytokeratin 18 and eliminated galactose. In contrast to hepatic cell lines NKNT-3 and HepG2, all hepatic functions were expressed in cBAL111, although there was considerable variation in their levels compared with primary mature hepatocytes. When transplanted in the spleen of immunodeficient mice, cBAL111 engrafted into the liver and partly differentiated into hepatocytes showing expression of human albumin and carbamoylphosphate synthetase without signs of cell fusion. Conclusion This novel liver cell line has the potential to differentiate into mature hepatocytes to be used for in vitro hepatocyte applications. PMID:19845959

  4. Association of tissue lineage and gene expression: conservatively and differentially expressed genes define common and special functions of tissues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Embryogenesis is the process by which the embryo is formed, develops, and establishes developmental hierarchies of tissues. The recent advance in microarray technology made it possible to investigate the tissue specific patterns of gene expression and their relationship with tissue lineages. This study is focused on how tissue specific functions, tissue lineage, and cell differentiation are correlated, which is essential to understand embryonic development and organism complexity. Results We performed individual gene and gene set based analysis on multiple tissue expression data, in association with the classic topology of mammalian fate maps of embryogenesis. For each sub-group of tissues on the fate map, conservatively, differentially and correlatively expressed genes or gene sets were identified. Tissue distance was found to correlate with gene expression divergence. Tissues of the ectoderm or mesoderm origins from the same segments on the fate map shared more similar expression pattern than those from different origins. Conservatively expressed genes or gene sets define common functions in a tissue group and are related to tissue specific diseases, which is supported by results from Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene expression divergence is larger in certain human tissues than in the mouse homologous tissues. Conclusion The results from tissue lineage and gene expression analysis indicate that common function features of neighbor tissue groups were defined by the conservatively expressed genes and were related to tissue specific diseases, and differentially expressed genes contribute to the functional divergence of tissues. The difference of gene expression divergence in human and mouse homologous tissues reflected the organism complexity, i.e. distinct neural development levels and different body sizes. PMID:21172044

  5. Biomechanical strain vehicles for fibroblast-directed skeletal myoblast differentiation and myotube functionality in a novel coculture.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Michael R; Cao, Thanh V; Standley, Paul R

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle functionality is governed by multiple stimuli, including cytokines and biomechanical strain. Fibroblasts embedded within muscle connective tissue respond to biomechanical strain by secreting cytokines that induce myoblast differentiation and, we hypothesize, regulate myotube function. A coculture was established to allow cross talk between fibroblasts in Bioflex wells and myoblasts on nondeformable coverslips situated above Bioflex wells. Cyclic short-duration strain (CSDS) modeling repetitive stress/injury, acyclic long-duration strain (ALDS) modeling manipulative therapy, and combined strain paradigms (CSDS + ALDS) were applied to fibroblasts. Nonstrained myoblasts in uniculture and coculture served as controls. After fibroblasts had induced myoblast differentiation, myotube contraction was assessed by perfusion of ACh (10(-11)-10(-3) M). CSDS-treated fibroblasts increased myotube contractile sensitivity vs. uniculture (P < 0.05). As contraction is dependent on ACh binding, expression and clustering of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) were measured. CSDS-treated fibroblasts increased nAChR expression (P < 0.05), which correlated with myotube contraction. ALDS-treated fibroblasts did not significantly affect contraction or nAChR expression. Agrin-treated myotubes were then used to design a computer algorithm to identify α-bungarotoxin-stained nAChR clusters. ALDS-treated fibroblasts increased nAChR clustering (P < 0.05), while CSDS-treated fibroblasts disrupted cluster formation. CSDS-treated fibroblasts produced nAChRs preferentially located in nonclustered regions (P < 0.05). Strain-activated fibroblasts mediate myotube differentiation with multiple functional phenotypes. Similar to muscle injury, CSDS-treated fibroblasts disrupted nAChR clusters and hypersensitized myotube contraction, while ALDS-treated fibroblasts aggregated nAChRs in large clusters, which may have important clinical implications. Cellular strategies aimed at improving muscle

  6. An optimal point spread function subtraction algorithm for high-contrast imaging: a demonstration with angular differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Marois, C; Doyon, R; Artigau, E; Nadeau, D

    2006-09-19

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is limited by bright quasi-static speckles in the point spread function (PSF) of the central star. This limitation can be reduced by subtraction of reference PSF images. We have developed an algorithm to construct an optimal reference PSF image from an arbitrary set of reference images. This image is built as a linear combination of all available images and is optimized independently inside multiple subsections of the image to ensure that the absolute minimum residual noise is achieved within each subsection. The algorithm developed is completely general and can be used with many high contrast imaging observing strategies, such as angular differential imaging (ADI), roll subtraction, spectral differential imaging, reference star observations, etc. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated for ADI data. It is shown that for this type of data the new algorithm provides a gain in sensitivity by up 22 to a factor 3 at small separation over the algorithm previously used.

  7. Complex effect of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on the differentiation and functional activity of human pre-osteoclastic cells.

    PubMed

    Costa-Rodrigues, João; Silva, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Almeida, Maria Margarida; Costa, Maria Elisabete; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2014-12-01

    Nanosized hydroxyapatite (HA) is a promising material in clinical applications targeting the bone tissue. NanoHA is able to modulate bone cellular events, which accounts for its potential utility, but also raises safety concerns regarding the maintenance of the bone homeostasis. This work analyses the effects of HA nanoparticles (HAnp) on osteoclastic differentiation and activity, an issue that has been barely addressed. Rod-like HAnp, produced by a hydrothermal precipitation method, were tested on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), which contains the CD14+ osteoclastic precursors, in unstimulated or osteoclastogenic-induced conditions. HAnp were added at three time-points during the osteoclastic differentiation pathway, and cell response was evaluated for osteoclastic related parameters. Results showed that HAnp modulated the differentiation and function of osteoclastic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the effects were dependent on the stage of osteoclastic differentiation. In unstimulated PBMC, HAnp significantly increased osteoclastogenesis, leading to the formation of mature osteoclasts, as evident by the significant increase of TRAP activity, number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells, osteoclastic gene expression and resorbing ability. However, in a population of mature osteoclasts (formed in osteoclastogenic-induced PBMC cultures), HAnp caused a dose-dependent decrease on the osteoclastic-related parameters. These results highlight the complex effects of HAnp in osteoclastic differentiation and activity, and suggest the possibility of HAnp to modulate/disrupt osteoclastic behavior, with eventual imbalances in the bone metabolism. This should be carefully considered in bone-related and other established and prospective biomedical applications of HAnp. PMID:26000372

  8. Specific cognitive deficits and differential domains of social functioning impairment in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alex S; Forbes, Courtney B; Mann, Monica C; Blanchard, Jack J

    2006-01-31

    There is considerable inconsistency in findings regarding the relationship between specific cognitive deficits and social impairment in patients with schizophrenia. This inconsistency may relate to variability across studies in how social functioning is measured and preliminary evidence suggests that different indices of social functioning (e.g., laboratory test, community assessment) may have different cognitive correlates. The present study examined this issue by evaluating the relationships between cognitive deficits (including social cognitive deficits), role-play test performance, and community social functioning in 28 inpatients with schizophrenia. We expected the two measures of social functioning to have only modest convergence with each other. Moreover, informed by the literature on cognitive functioning in schizophrenia, we identified specific cognitive processes that were hypothesized to be associated with role-play performance (delayed verbal memory and attentional vigilance) and social functioning in the community (delayed verbal memory and executive functioning). As expected, the two measures of social functioning were modestly correlated with each other. Community social functioning was associated with a relatively constrained pattern of cognitive deficits and received a significant contribution (Deltar2=0.24) from specific cognitive processes beyond that of general cognitive functioning and symptom severity. In contrast to our hypotheses, role-play test performance was associated with a wide range of cognitive impairments and received little contribution from the specific cognitive processes beyond the effects of general cognitive functioning. Community social functioning, but not role-play test performance, was significantly associated with social cognition. These findings highlight the importance of conceptualizing social functioning as a multidimensional construct for schizophrenia research. PMID:16260120

  9. IRS-1 Functions as a Molecular Scaffold to Coordinate IGF-I/IGFBP-2 Signaling During Osteoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xi, Gang; Shen, Xinchun; Rosen, Clifford J; Clemmons, David R

    2016-06-01

    Insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) function coordinately to stimulate AKT and osteoblast differentiation. IGFBP-2 binding to receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ) stimulates polymerization and inactivation of phosphatase activity. Because phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is the primary target of RPTPβ, this leads to enhanced PTEN tyrosine phosphorylation and inactivation. However RPTPβ inactivation also requires IGF-I receptor activation. The current studies were undertaken to determine the mechanism by which IGF-I mediates changes in RPTPβ function in osteoblasts. IGFBP-2/IGF-I stimulated vimentin binding to RPTPβ and this was required for RPTPβ polymerization. Vimentin serine phosphorylation mediated its binding to RPTPβ and PKCζ was identified as the kinase that phosphorylated vimentin. To determine the mechanism underlying IGF-I stimulation of PKCζ-mediated vimentin phosphorylation, we focused on insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). IGF-I stimulated IRS-1 phosphorylation and recruitment of PKCζ and vimentin to phospho-IRS-1. IRS-1 immunoprecipitates containing PKCζ and vimentin were used to confirm that activated PKCζ directly phosphorylated vimentin. PKCζ does not contain a SH-2 domain that is required to bind to phospho-IRS-1. To determine the mechanism of PKCζ recruitment we analyzed the role of p62 (a PKCζ binding protein) that contains a SH2 domain. Exposure to differentiation medium plus IGF-I stimulated PKCζ/p62 association. Subsequent analysis showed the p62/PKCζ complex was co-recruited to IRS-1. Peptides that disrupted p62/PKCζ or p62/IRS-1 inhibited IGF-I/IGFBP-2 stimulated PKCζ activation, vimentin phosphorylation, PTEN tyrosine phosphorylation, AKT activation, and osteoblast differentiation. The importance of these signaling events for differentiation was confirmed in primary mouse calvarial osteoblasts. These results demonstrate the cooperative

  10. Variation in trait trade-offs allows differentiation among predefined plant functional types: implications for predictive ecology.

    PubMed

    Verheijen, Lieneke M; Aerts, Rien; Bönisch, Gerhard; Kattge, Jens; Van Bodegom, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Plant functional types (PFTs) aggregate the variety of plant species into a small number of functionally different classes. We examined to what extent plant traits, which reflect species' functional adaptations, can capture functional differences between predefined PFTs and which traits optimally describe these differences. We applied Gaussian kernel density estimation to determine probability density functions for individual PFTs in an n-dimensional trait space and compared predicted PFTs with observed PFTs. All possible combinations of 1-6 traits from a database with 18 different traits (total of 18 287 species) were tested. A variety of trait sets had approximately similar performance, and 4-5 traits were sufficient to classify up to 85% of the species into PFTs correctly, whereas this was 80% for a bioclimatically defined tree PFT classification. Well-performing trait sets included combinations of correlated traits that are considered functionally redundant within a single plant strategy. This analysis quantitatively demonstrates how structural differences between PFTs are reflected in functional differences described by particular traits. Differentiation between PFTs is possible despite large overlap in plant strategies and traits, showing that PFTs are differently positioned in multidimensional trait space. This study therefore provides the foundation for important applications for predictive ecology. PMID:26352461

  11. Modulation and functional involvement of CB2 peripheral cannabinoid receptors during B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carayon, P; Marchand, J; Dussossoy, D; Derocq, J M; Jbilo, O; Bord, A; Bouaboula, M; Galiègue, S; Mondière, P; Pénarier, G; Fur, G L; Defrance, T; Casellas, P

    1998-11-15

    Two subtypes of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: the CB1 central receptor subtype, which is mainly expressed in the brain, and the CB2 peripheral receptor subtype, which appears particularly abundant in the immune system. We investigated the expression of CB2 receptors in leukocytes using anti-CB2 receptor immunopurified polyclonal antibodies. We showed that peripheral blood and tonsillar B cells were the leukocyte subsets expressing the highest amount of CB2 receptor proteins. Dual-color confocal microscopy performed on tonsillar tissues showed a marked expression of CB2 receptors in mantle zones of secondary follicles, whereas germinal centers (GC) were weakly stained, suggesting a modulation of this receptor during the differentiation stages from virgin B lymphocytes to memory B cells. Indeed, we showed a clear downregulation of CB2 receptor expression during B-cell differentiation both at transcript and protein levels. The lowest expression was observed in GC proliferating centroblasts. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 on the CD40-mediated proliferation of both virgin and GC B-cell subsets. We found that CP55,940 enhanced the proliferation of both subsets and that this enhancement was blocked by the CB2 receptor antagonist SR 144528 but not by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716. Finally, we observed that CB2 receptors were dramatically upregulated in both B-cell subsets during the first 24 hours of CD40-mediated activation. These data strongly support an involvement of CB2 receptors during B-cell differentiation. PMID:9808554

  12. Biotic homogenization and differentiation of soil faunal communities in the production forest landscape: taxonomic and functional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mori, Akira S; Ota, Aino T; Fujii, Saori; Seino, Tatsuyuki; Kabeya, Daisuke; Okamoto, Toru; Ito, Masamichi T; Kaneko, Nobuhiro; Hasegawa, Motohiro

    2015-02-01

    Biotic homogenization has been reported worldwide. Although simplification of communities across space is often significant at larger scales, it could also occur at the local scale by changing biotic interactions. This study aimed to elucidate local community processes driving biotic homogenization of soil faunal communities, and the possibility of biotic re-differentiation. We recorded species of oribatid mites in litter and soil layers along a gradient of forest conversion from monoculture larch plantation to primary forests in central Japan. We collected data for functional traits of the recorded species to quantify functional diversity. Then we quantified their taxonomic/functional turnover. Litter diversity was reduced in the larch-dominated stands, leading to habitat homogenization. Consequently, litter communities were biologically homogenized and differentiated in the plantations and in the natural forest, respectively. Turnover of functional traits for litter communities was lower and higher than expected by chance in the plantations and in the natural stand, respectively. This result suggests that the dominant assembly process shifts from limiting similarity to habitat filtering along the forest restoration gradient. However, support for such niche-based explanations was not observed for communities in the soil layer. In the monocultures, functional diversity expected from a given regional species pool significantly decreased for litter communities but not for those in the soil layer. Such discrepancy between communities in different layers suggests that communities more exposed to anthropogenic stresses are more vulnerable to the loss of their functional roles. Our study explains possible community processes behind the observed patterns of biological organization, which can be potentially useful in guiding approaches for restoring biodiversity. PMID:25322821

  13. An Evolution-Based Screen for Genetic Differentiation between Anopheles Sister Taxa Enriches for Detection of Functional Immune Factors

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Eizo; Williams, Marni; Eiglmeier, Karin; Pain, Adrien; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Gneme, Awa; Brito-Fravallo, Emma; Holm, Inge; Lavazec, Catherine; Sagnon, N’Fale; Baxter, Richard H.; Riehle, Michelle M.; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide variation patterns across species are shaped by the processes of natural selection, including exposure to environmental pathogens. We examined patterns of genetic variation in two sister species, Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii, both efficient natural vectors of human malaria in West Africa. We used the differentiation signature displayed by a known coordinate selective sweep of immune genes APL1 and TEP1 in A. coluzzii to design a population genetic screen trained on the sweep, classified a panel of 26 potential immune genes for concordance with the signature, and functionally tested their immune phenotypes. The screen results were strongly predictive for genes with protective immune phenotypes: genes meeting the screen criteria were significantly more likely to display a functional phenotype against malaria infection than genes not meeting the criteria (p = 0.0005). Thus, an evolution-based screen can efficiently prioritize candidate genes for labor-intensive downstream functional testing, and safely allow the elimination of genes not meeting the screen criteria. The suite of immune genes with characteristics similar to the APL1-TEP1 selective sweep appears to be more widespread in the A. coluzzii genome than previously recognized. The immune gene differentiation may be a consequence of adaptation of A. coluzzii to new pathogens encountered in its niche expansion during the separation from A. gambiae, although the role, if any of natural selection by Plasmodium is unknown. Application of the screen allowed identification of new functional immune factors, and assignment of new functions to known factors. We describe biochemical binding interactions between immune proteins that underlie functional activity for malaria infection, which highlights the interplay between pathogen specificity and the structure of immune complexes. We also find that most malaria-protective immune factors display phenotypes for either human or rodent malaria, with

  14. An Evolution-Based Screen for Genetic Differentiation between Anopheles Sister Taxa Enriches for Detection of Functional Immune Factors.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Christian; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Takashima, Eizo; Williams, Marni; Eiglmeier, Karin; Pain, Adrien; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M; Gneme, Awa; Brito-Fravallo, Emma; Holm, Inge; Lavazec, Catherine; Sagnon, N'Fale; Baxter, Richard H; Riehle, Michelle M; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2015-12-01

    Nucleotide variation patterns across species are shaped by the processes of natural selection, including exposure to environmental pathogens. We examined patterns of genetic variation in two sister species, Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii, both efficient natural vectors of human malaria in West Africa. We used the differentiation signature displayed by a known coordinate selective sweep of immune genes APL1 and TEP1 in A. coluzzii to design a population genetic screen trained on the sweep, classified a panel of 26 potential immune genes for concordance with the signature, and functionally tested their immune phenotypes. The screen results were strongly predictive for genes with protective immune phenotypes: genes meeting the screen criteria were significantly more likely to display a functional phenotype against malaria infection than genes not meeting the criteria (p = 0.0005). Thus, an evolution-based screen can efficiently prioritize candidate genes for labor-intensive downstream functional testing, and safely allow the elimination of genes not meeting the screen criteria. The suite of immune genes with characteristics similar to the APL1-TEP1 selective sweep appears to be more widespread in the A. coluzzii genome than previously recognized. The immune gene differentiation may be a consequence of adaptation of A. coluzzii to new pathogens encountered in its niche expansion during the separation from A. gambiae, although the role, if any of natural selection by Plasmodium is unknown. Application of the screen allowed identification of new functional immune factors, and assignment of new functions to known factors. We describe biochemical binding interactions between immune proteins that underlie functional activity for malaria infection, which highlights the interplay between pathogen specificity and the structure of immune complexes. We also find that most malaria-protective immune factors display phenotypes for either human or rodent malaria, with

  15. Differential Relationships between RAN Performance, Behaviour Ratings, and Executive Function Measures: Searching for a Double Dissociation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, Ronald W.; Toplak, Maggie E.; Stanovich, Keith E.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationships between rapid naming of letters, digits and colours, and reading ability and executive function. We gave fifty-six grade three and four children rapid automatised naming tasks using letters and digits as stimuli, executive function measures including the Stroop task, a working memory task and the…

  16. An Animal Model with a Cardiomyocyte-Specific Deletion of Estrogen Receptor Alpha: Functional, Metabolic, and Differential Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Devanathan, Sriram; Whitehead, Timothy; Schweitzer, George G.; Fettig, Nicole; Kovacs, Attila; Korach, Kenneth S.; Finck, Brian N.; Shoghi, Kooresh I.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen exerts diverse biological effects in multiple tissues in both animals and humans. Much of the accumulated knowledge on the role of estrogen receptor (ER) in the heart has been obtained from studies using ovariectomized mice, whole body ER gene knock-out animal models, ex vivo heart studies, or from isolated cardiac myocytes. In light of the wide systemic influence of ER signaling in regulating a host of biological functions in multiple tissues, it is difficult to infer the direct role of ER on the heart. Therefore, we developed a mouse model with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of the ERα allele (cs-ERα−/−). Male and female cs-ERα−/− mice with age/sex-matched wild type controls were examined for differences in cardiac structure and function by echocardiogram and differential gene expression microarray analysis. Our study revealed sex-differences in structural parameters in the hearts of cs-ERα−/− mice, with minimal functional differences. Analysis of microarray data revealed differential variations in the expression of 208 genes affecting multiple transcriptional networks. Furthermore, we report sex-specific differences in the expression of 56 genes. Overall, we developed a mouse model with cardiac-specific deletion of ERα to characterize the role of ERα in the heart independent of systemic effects. Our results suggest that ERα is involved in controlling the expression of diverse genes and networks in the cardiomyocyte in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:25000186

  17. Explicitly Correlated Gaussian Basis Functions: Derivation and Implementation of Matrix Elements and Gradient Formulas Using Matrix Differential Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Donald Bruce

    The matrix differential calculus is introduced to the quantum chemistry community via new matrix derivations of integral formulas and gradients for Hamiltonian matrix elements in a basis of correlated Gaussian functions. Requisite mathematical background material on Kronecker products, Hadamard products, the vec and vech operators, linear structures, and matrix differential calculus is presented. New matrix forms for the kinetic and potential energy operators are presented. Integrals for overlap, kinetic energy and potential energy matrix elements are derived in matrix form using matrix calculus. The gradient of the energy functional with respect to the correlated Gaussian exponent matrices is derived. Burdensome summation notation is entirely replaced with a compact matrix notation that is both theoretically and computationally insightful. These new formulas in the basis of explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions, are implemented and applied to find variational upper bounds for non-relativistic ground states of ^4He, ^{infty}He, Ps_2, ^9Be, and ^ {infty}Be. Analytic gradients of the energy are included to speed optimization of the exponential variational parameters. Five different nonlinear optimization subroutines (algorithms) are compared: TN, truncated Newton; DUMING, quasi-Newton; DUMIDH, modified Newton; DUMCGG, conjugate gradient; POWELL, direction set (non-gradient). The new analytic gradient formulas are found to significantly accelerate optimizations that require gradients. The truncated Newton algorithm is found to outperform the other optimizers for the selected test cases. Computer timings and energy bounds are reported. The new TN bounds surpass previously reported bounds with the same basis size.

  18. Comparative study of approaches based on the differential critical region and correlation functions in modeling phase-transformation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tomellini, Massimo; Fanfoni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    The statistical methods exploiting the "Correlation-Functions" or the "Differential-Critical-Region" are both suitable for describing phase transformation kinetics ruled by nucleation and growth. We present a critical analysis of these two approaches, with particular emphasis to transformations ruled by diffusional growth which cannot be described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory. In order to bridge the gap between these two methods, the conditional probability functions entering the "Differential-Critical-Region" approach are determined in terms of correlation functions. The formulation of these probabilities by means of cluster expansion is also derived, which improves the accuracy of the computation. The model is applied to 2D and 3D parabolic growths occurring at constant value of either actual or phantom-included nucleation rates. Computer simulations have been employed for corroborating the theoretical modeling. The contribution to the kinetics of phantom overgrowth is estimated and it is found to be of a few percent in the case of constant value of the actual nucleation rate. It is shown that for a parabolic growth law both approaches do not provide a closed-form solution of the kinetics. In this respect, the two methods are equivalent and the longstanding overgrowth phenomenon, which limits the KJMA theory, does not admit an exact analytical solution. PMID:25493802

  19. Functional characterization of retromer in GLUT4 storage vesicle formation and adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe; Hong, Lee Kian; Follett, Jordan; Wabitsch, Martin; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Collins, Brett M; Bugarcic, Andrea; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2016-03-01

    Insulin-stimulated translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) storage vesicles (GSVs), the specialized intracellular compartments within mature adipocytes, to the plasma membrane (PM) is a fundamental cellular process for maintaining glucose homeostasis. Using 2 independent adipocyte cell line models, human primary Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblast cell lines, we demonstrate that the endosome-associated protein-sorting complex retromer colocalizes with GLUT4 on the GSVs by confocal microscopy in mature adipocytes. By use of both confocal microscopy and differential ultracentrifugation techniques, retromer is redistributed to the PM of mature adipocytes upon insulin stimulation. Furthermore, stable knockdown of the retromer subunit-vacuolar protein-sorting 35, or the retromer-associated protein sorting nexin 27, by lentivirus-delivered small hairpin RNA impaired the adipogenesis process when compared to nonsilence control. The knockdown of retromer decreased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ expression during differentiation, generating adipocytes with decreased levels of GSVs, lipid droplet accumulation, and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a role for retromer in the GSV formation and adipogenesis. PMID:26581601

  20. A general fractional differential equation associated with an integral operator with the H-function in the kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, H. M.; Harjule, P.; Jain, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce and investigate a fractional integral operator which contains Fox's H-function in its kernel. We find solutions to some fractional differential equations by using this operator. The results derived in this paper generalize the results obtained in earlier works by Kilbas et al. [7] and Srivastava and Tomovski [23]. A number of corollaries and consequences of the main results are also considered. Using some of these corollaries, graphical illustrations are presented and it is found that the graphs given here are quite comparable to the physical phenomena of decay processes.