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Sample records for differentiation complex edc-encoded

  1. Differential Complexes in Continuum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2015-04-01

    We study some differential complexes in continuum mechanics that involve both symmetric and non-symmetric second-order tensors. In particular, we show that the tensorial analogue of the standard grad-curl-div complex can simultaneously describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion of a continuum. The relation between this complex and the de Rham complex allows one to readily derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the compatibility of displacement gradient and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies.We also derive the local compatibility equations in terms of the Green deformation tensor for motions of 2D and 3D bodies, and shells in curved ambient spaces with constant curvatures.

  2. Constructing Complexity for Differentiated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Catherine A.; Hauser, Sherryl; Corbishley, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Differentiated instruction requires that teachers pay attention to many differences among students, including their varied interests, learning styles, and ability and achievement levels. This article grew out of a study that explored how the challenge level of learning tasks is connected to behavior for students who show strong potential in…

  3. Update on the epidermal differentiation complex.

    PubMed

    Henry, Julie; Toulza, Eve; Hsu, Chiung-Yueh; Pellerin, Laurence; Balica, Stefana; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Paul, Carle; Serre, Guy; Jonca, Nathalie; Simon, Michel

    2012-01-01

    On human chromosome 1q21, a 2-Mb region called the epidermal differentiation complex comprises many genes encoding structural and regulatory proteins that are of crucial importance for keratinocyte differentiation and stratum corneum properties. Apart from those for involucrin and loricrin, most of the genes are organized in four families: the genes encoding EF-hand calcium-binding proteins of the S100A family, the genes encoding the small proline rich proteins (SPRRs) and the late cornified envelope (LCE) proteins, two families of cornified cell envelope components, and the genes encoding the S100-fused type proteins (SFTPs). This review focuses on the SPRRs, LCE proteins and SFTPs. It describes their structures, their specific functions and, when known, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their expression. It also highlights their possible involvement in skin diseases. PMID:22201818

  4. A complex Noether approach for variational partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, R.; Mahomed, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    Scalar complex partial differential equations which admit variational formulations are studied. Such a complex partial differential equation, via a complex dependent variable, splits into a system of two real partial differential equations. The decomposition of the Lagrangian of the complex partial differential equation in the real domain is shown to yield two real Lagrangians for the split system. The complex Maxwellian distribution, transonic gas flow, Maxwellian tails, dissipative wave and Klein-Gordon equations are considered. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the split system that correspond to both the Lagrangians are constructed by the Noether approach. In the case of coupled split systems, the same Noether symmetries are obtained. The Noether symmetries for the uncoupled split systems are different. The conserved vectors of the split system which correspond to both the Lagrangians are compared to the split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation for the examples. The split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation are the same as the conserved vectors of the split system of real partial differential equations in the case of coupled systems. Moreover a Noether-like theorem for the split system is proved which provides the Noether-like conserved quantities of the split system from knowledge of the Noether-like operators. An interesting result on the split characteristics and the conservation laws is shown as well. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the split system with the split Noether-like operators and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the given complex partial differential equation are compared. Folklore suggests that the split Noether-like operators of a Lagrangian of a complex Euler-Lagrange partial differential equation are symmetries of the Lagrangian of the split system of real partial differential equations. This is not the case. They are proved to be the same if the

  5. The increasingly complex regulation of adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Sylvia P; Dodson, Michael V; Culver, Melinda F; Hausman, Gary J

    2016-03-01

    Adipose (AD) tissue development and function relies on the ability of adipocytes to proliferate and differentiate into lipid-containing cells that also have endocrine function. Research suggests that certain conditions can induce AD tissue stem cells to differentiate into various cell types and that the microenvironment of the cell, including the extracellular matrix (ECM), is essential in maintaining cell and tissue function. This review provides an overview of factors involved in the proliferation and differentiation of adipocytes. A brief review of the numerous factors that influence PPARγ, the transcription factor thought to be the master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, provides context of established pathways that regulate adipogenesis. Thought provoking findings from research with hypoxia that is supported by earlier research that vascular development is related to adipogenesis are reviewed. Finally, our understanding of the critical role of the ECM and environment in adipogenesis is discussed and compared with studies that suggest that adipocytes may dedifferentiate and can convert into other cell types. PMID:26645953

  6. The complex world of oligodendroglial differentiation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kremer, David; Aktas, Orhan; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    Myelination is a central nervous system (CNS) process wherein oligodendrocyte-axon interactions lead to the establishment of myelin sheaths that stabilize, protect, and electrically insulate axons. In inflammatory demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), the degeneration and eventual loss of functional myelin sheaths slows and blocks saltatory conduction in axons, which results in clinical impairment. However, remyelination can occur, and lesions can be partially repaired, resulting in clinical remission. The recruitment and activation of resident oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) play a critical role in the repair process because these cells have the capacity to differentiate into functional myelinating cells. Mature oligodendrocytes, however, are thought to have lost the capacity to develop new myelin sheaths and frequently undergo programmed cell death in MS. The endogenous capacity to generate new oligodendrocytes in MS is limited, and this is predominantly due to the presence of inhibitory components that block OPC differentiation and maturation. Here, we present an overview of recently identified negative regulators of oligodendroglial differentiation and their potential relevance for CNS repair in MS. Because currently available immunomodulatory drugs for MS mainly target inflammatory cascades outside the brain and fail to repair existing lesions, achieving more efficient lesion repair constitutes an important goal for future MS therapies. PMID:21520230

  7. Sample Complexity Bounds for Differentially Private Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Kamalika; Hsu, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the problem of privacy-preserving classification – namely, learning a classifier from sensitive data while preserving the privacy of individuals in the training set. In particular, the learning algorithm is required in this problem to guarantee differential privacy, a very strong notion of privacy that has gained significant attention in recent years. A natural question to ask is: what is the sample requirement of a learning algorithm that guarantees a certain level of privacy and accuracy? We address this question in the context of learning with infinite hypothesis classes when the data is drawn from a continuous distribution. We first show that even for very simple hypothesis classes, any algorithm that uses a finite number of examples and guarantees differential privacy must fail to return an accurate classifier for at least some unlabeled data distributions. This result is unlike the case with either finite hypothesis classes or discrete data domains, in which distribution-free private learning is possible, as previously shown by Kasiviswanathan et al. (2008). We then consider two approaches to differentially private learning that get around this lower bound. The first approach is to use prior knowledge about the unlabeled data distribution in the form of a reference distribution chosen independently of the sensitive data. Given such a reference , we provide an upper bound on the sample requirement that depends (among other things) on a measure of closeness between and the unlabeled data distribution. Our upper bound applies to the non-realizable as well as the realizable case. The second approach is to relax the privacy requirement, by requiring only label-privacy – namely, that the only labels (and not the unlabeled parts of the examples) be considered sensitive information. An upper bound on the sample requirement of learning with label privacy was shown by Chaudhuri et al. (2006); in this work, we show a lower bound. PMID:25285183

  8. The coquaternion algebra and complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Konstantinov, Mihail; Todorov, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of differentiation of coquaternionic functions. Let us recall that coquaternions are elements of an associative non-commutative real algebra with zero divisor, introduced by James Cockle (1849) under the name of split-quaternions or coquaternions. Developing two type complex representations for Cockle algebra (complex and paracomplex ones) we present the problem in a non-commutative form of the δ¯-type holomorphy. We prove that corresponding differentiable coquaternionic functions, smooth and analytic, satisfy PDE of complex, and respectively of real variables. Applications for coquaternionic polynomials are sketched.

  9. Integrator complex plays an essential role in adipose differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Yuichiro; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Fujishiro, Midori; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Okubo, Hirofumi; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Haruya; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Nishimura, Fusanori; Kamata, Hideaki; Katagiri, Hideki; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •IntS6 and IntS11 are subunits of the Integrator complex. •Expression levels of IntS6 and IntS11 were very low in 3T3-L1 fibroblast. •IntS6 and IntS11 were upregulated during adipose differentiation. •Suppression of IntS6 or IntS11 expression inhibited adipose differentiation. -- Abstract: The dynamic process of adipose differentiation involves stepwise expressions of transcription factors and proteins specific to the mature fat cell phenotype. In this study, it was revealed that expression levels of IntS6 and IntS11, subunits of the Integrator complex, were increased in 3T3-L1 cells in the period when the cells reached confluence and differentiated into adipocytes, while being reduced to basal levels after the completion of differentiation. Suppression of IntS6 or IntS11 expression using siRNAs in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes markedly inhibited differentiation into mature adipocytes, based on morphological findings as well as mRNA analysis of adipocyte-specific genes such as Glut4, perilipin and Fabp4. Although Pparγ2 protein expression was suppressed in IntS6 or IntS11-siRNA treated cells, adenoviral forced expression of Pparγ2 failed to restore the capacity for differentiation into mature adipocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that increased expression of Integrator complex subunits is an indispensable event in adipose differentiation. Although further study is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanism, the processing of U1, U2 small nuclear RNAs may be involved in cell differentiation steps.

  10. Differential and double-differential dielectric spectroscopy to measure complex permittivity in transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzi, Leandro; Carla, Marcello; M. C. Gambi, Cecilia; Lanzi, Leonardo

    2002-08-01

    This article presents and compares two differential methods for measuring the complex permittivity of dielectric materials: In the first method, two measuring cells built as coaxial transmission lines of identical cross section and terminations but different lengths are filled with a sample of the dielectric material. The complex dielectric permittivity is determined from the scattering parameter measurements and the length difference between the two cells, neglecting the resistive losses due to the cells. The second method is a double-differential one: Repeating measurements on the same cells empty, no other knowledge or limiting assumption is required.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex differentiation in Sacramento River chinook salmon.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, T J; Parker, K M; Hedrick, P W

    1999-01-01

    The chinook salmon of the Sacramento River, California, have been reduced to a fraction of their former abundance because of human impact and use of the river system. Here we examine the genetic variation at a major histocompatibility complex class II exon in the four Sacramento chinook salmon runs. Examination of the alleles found in these and other chinook salmon revealed nucleotide patterns consistent with selection for amino acid replacement at the putative antigen-binding sites. We found a significant amount of variation in each of the runs, including the federally endangered winter run. All of the samples were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. A significant amount of genetic differentiation between runs was revealed by several measures of differentiation. Winter run was the most genetically divergent, while the spring, late-fall, and fall runs were less differentiated. PMID:10049927

  12. Immunological characterization of exocyst complex subunits in cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Hsu, Shu C

    2003-06-01

    We have generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three proteins sec6, sec15, and exo84. These proteins have been shown to be components of the exocyst complex, a macromolecule required for many biological processes such as kidney epithelial formation and neuronal development. These antibodies can detect the three proteins by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunoprecipitation. Using these antibodies, we found that the three proteins have similar subcellular localization which changes upon cell differentiation. These three proteins also co-immunoprecipitate with each other. These results suggest that at least three exocyst subunits associate with each other in vivo and redistribute in response to cell differentiation. In the future, these antibodies should be useful in the cell biological and functional analysis of the exocyst complex under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:12954101

  13. Hunting complex differential gene interaction patterns across molecular contexts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingzhou; Zhang, Yang; Katzaroff, Alexia J.; Edgar, Bruce A.; Buttitta, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity in genetic networks across different signaling molecular contexts can suggest molecular regulatory mechanisms. Here we describe a comparative chi-square analysis (CPχ2) method, considerably more flexible and effective than other alternatives, to screen large gene expression data sets for conserved and differential interactions. CPχ2 decomposes interactions across conditions to assess homogeneity and heterogeneity. Theoretically, we prove an asymptotic chi-square null distribution for the interaction heterogeneity statistic. Empirically, on synthetic yeast cell cycle data, CPχ2 achieved much higher statistical power in detecting differential networks than alternative approaches. We applied CPχ2 to Drosophila melanogaster wing gene expression arrays collected under normal conditions, and conditions with overexpressed E2F and Cabut, two transcription factor complexes that promote ectopic cell cycling. The resulting differential networks suggest a mechanism by which E2F and Cabut regulate distinct gene interactions, while still sharing a small core network. Thus, CPχ2 is sensitive in detecting network rewiring, useful in comparing related biological systems. PMID:24482443

  14. A note on the Dirichlet problem for model complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Karaca, Bahriye

    2016-08-01

    Complex model partial differential equations of arbitrary order are considered. The uniqueness of the Dirichlet problem is studied. It is proved that the Dirichlet problem for higher order of complex partial differential equations with one complex variable has infinitely many solutions.

  15. On the adaptivity and complexity embedded into differential evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkerik, Roman; Pluhacek, Michal; Zelinka, Ivan; Jasek, Roman

    2016-06-01

    This research deals with the comparison of the two modern approaches for evolutionary algorithms, which are the adaptivity and complex chaotic dynamics. This paper aims on the investigations on the chaos-driven Differential Evolution (DE) concept. This paper is aimed at the embedding of discrete dissipative chaotic systems in the form of chaotic pseudo random number generators for the DE and comparing the influence to the performance with the state of the art adaptive representative jDE. This research is focused mainly on the possible disadvantages and advantages of both compared approaches. Repeated simulations for Lozi map driving chaotic systems were performed on the simple benchmark functions set, which are more close to the real optimization problems. Obtained results are compared with the canonical not-chaotic and not adaptive DE. Results show that with used simple test functions, the performance of ChaosDE is better in the most cases than jDE and Canonical DE, furthermore due to the unique sequencing in CPRNG given by the hidden chaotic dynamics, thus better and faster selection of unique individuals from population, ChaosDE is faster.

  16. Stochastic Computational Approach for Complex Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaid, Ali Khan; Muhammad, Asif Zahoor Raja; Ijaz Mansoor, Qureshi

    2011-02-01

    We present an evolutionary computational approach for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (NLODEs). The mathematical modeling is performed by a feed-forward artificial neural network that defines an unsupervised error. The training of these networks is achieved by a hybrid intelligent algorithm, a combination of global search with genetic algorithm and local search by pattern search technique. The applicability of this approach ranges from single order NLODEs, to systems of coupled differential equations. We illustrate the method by solving a variety of model problems and present comparisons with solutions obtained by exact methods and classical numerical methods. The solution is provided on a continuous finite time interval unlike the other numerical techniques with comparable accuracy. With the advent of neuroprocessors and digital signal processors the method becomes particularly interesting due to the expected essential gains in the execution speed.

  17. Spatial complexity of solutions of higher order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukavica, Igor

    2004-03-01

    We address spatial oscillation properties of solutions of higher order parabolic partial differential equations. In the case of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation ut + uxxxx + uxx + u ux = 0, we prove that for solutions u on the global attractor, the quantity card {x epsi [0, L]:u(x, t) = lgr}, where L > 0 is the spatial period, can be bounded by a polynomial function of L for all \\lambda\\in{\\Bbb R} . A similar property is proven for a general higher order partial differential equation u_t+(-1)^{s}\\partial_x^{2s}u+ \\sum_{k=0}^{2s-1}v_k(x,t)\\partial_x^k u =0 .

  18. The value of electrocardiography for differential diagnosis in wide QRS complex tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pedro A; Pereira, Salomé; Candeias, Rui; de Jesus, Ilídio

    2014-03-01

    Correct diagnosis in wide QRS complex tachycardia remains a challenge. Differential diagnosis between ventricular and supraventricular tachycardia has important therapeutic and prognostic implications, and although data from clinical history and physical examination may suggest a particular origin, it is the 12-lead surface electrocardiogram that usually enables this differentiation. Since 1978, various electrocardiographic criteria have been proposed for the differential diagnosis of wide complex tachycardias, particularly the presence of atrioventricular dissociation, and the axis, duration and morphology of QRS complexes. Despite the wide variety of criteria, diagnosis is still often difficult, and errors can have serious consequences. To reduce such errors, several differential diagnosis algorithms have been proposed since 1991. However, in a small percentage of wide QRS tachycardias the diagnosis remains uncertain and in these the wisest decision is to treat them as ventricular tachycardias. The authors' objective was to review the main electrocardiographic criteria and differential diagnosis algorithms of wide QRS tachycardia. PMID:24656320

  19. Effects of differential habitat warming on complex communities.

    PubMed

    Tunney, Tyler D; McCann, Kevin S; Lester, Nigel P; Shuter, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    Food webs unfold across a mosaic of micro and macro habitats, with each habitat coupled by mobile consumers that behave in response to local environmental conditions. Despite this fundamental characteristic of nature, research on how climate change will affect whole ecosystems has overlooked (i) that climate warming will generally affect habitats differently and (ii) that mobile consumers may respond to this differential change in a manner that may fundamentally alter the energy pathways that sustain ecosystems. This reasoning suggests a powerful, but largely unexplored, avenue for studying the impacts of climate change on ecosystem functioning. Here, we use lake ecosystems to show that predictable behavioral adjustments to local temperature differentials govern a fundamental structural shift across 54 food webs. Data show that the trophic pathways from basal resources to a cold-adapted predator shift toward greater reliance on a cold-water refuge habitat, and food chain length increases, as air temperatures rise. Notably, cold-adapted predator behavior may substantially drive this decoupling effect across the climatic range in our study independent of warmer-adapted species responses (for example, changes in near-shore species abundance and predator absence). Such modifications reflect a flexible food web architecture that requires more attention from climate change research. The trophic pathway restructuring documented here is expected to alter biomass accumulation, through the regulation of energy fluxes to predators, and thus potentially threatens ecosystem sustainability in times of rapid environmental change. PMID:24843178

  20. Effects of differential habitat warming on complex communities

    PubMed Central

    Tunney, Tyler D.; McCann, Kevin S.; Lester, Nigel P.; Shuter, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Food webs unfold across a mosaic of micro and macro habitats, with each habitat coupled by mobile consumers that behave in response to local environmental conditions. Despite this fundamental characteristic of nature, research on how climate change will affect whole ecosystems has overlooked (i) that climate warming will generally affect habitats differently and (ii) that mobile consumers may respond to this differential change in a manner that may fundamentally alter the energy pathways that sustain ecosystems. This reasoning suggests a powerful, but largely unexplored, avenue for studying the impacts of climate change on ecosystem functioning. Here, we use lake ecosystems to show that predictable behavioral adjustments to local temperature differentials govern a fundamental structural shift across 54 food webs. Data show that the trophic pathways from basal resources to a cold-adapted predator shift toward greater reliance on a cold-water refuge habitat, and food chain length increases, as air temperatures rise. Notably, cold-adapted predator behavior may substantially drive this decoupling effect across the climatic range in our study independent of warmer-adapted species responses (for example, changes in near-shore species abundance and predator absence). Such modifications reflect a flexible food web architecture that requires more attention from climate change research. The trophic pathway restructuring documented here is expected to alter biomass accumulation, through the regulation of energy fluxes to predators, and thus potentially threatens ecosystem sustainability in times of rapid environmental change. PMID:24843178

  1. E-Index for Differentiating Complex Dynamic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jiandong; Sun, Jianfeng; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    While it is a daunting challenge in current biology to understand how the underlying network of genes regulates complex dynamic traits, functional mapping, a tool for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), has been applied in a variety of cases to tackle this challenge. Though useful and powerful, functional mapping performs well only when one or more model parameters are clearly responsible for the developmental trajectory, typically being a logistic curve. Moreover, it does not work when the curves are more complex than that, especially when they are not monotonic. To overcome this inadaptability, we therefore propose a mathematical-biological concept and measurement, E-index (earliness-index), which cumulatively measures the earliness degree to which a variable (or a dynamic trait) increases or decreases its value. Theoretical proofs and simulation studies show that E-index is more general than functional mapping and can be applied to any complex dynamic traits, including those with logistic curves and those with nonmonotonic curves. Meanwhile, E-index vector is proposed as well to capture more subtle differences of developmental patterns. PMID:27064292

  2. The Effects of Differential Goal Weights on the Performance of a Complex Financial Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmister, Robert O.; Locke, Edwin A.

    1987-01-01

    Determined whether people could obtain outcomes on a complex task that would be in line with differential goal weights corresponding to different aspects of the task. Bank lending officers were run through lender-simulation exercises. Five performance goals were weighted. Demonstrated effectiveness of goal setting with complex tasks, using group…

  3. [Differentiation activity of pyridoxal thiosemicarbazone and its copper and cobalt complexes on Friend erythroleukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Albertini, R; Gasparri Fava, G; Pinelli, S; Tarasconi, P; Starcich, B

    1991-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazones are a wide group of organic derivatives whose biological activities are a function of the parent aldehyde or ketone and of the coordination metal type. Some thiosemicarbazones possess a broad spectrum of potentially useful chemotherapeutic properties (antitumor, antibacterial, antiviral, antimalarial). The present study reports the biological effects of pyridoxal thiosemicarbazone, H2L, and relative complexes with copper, [(Cu(HL)(OH2))2]++ and with cobalt, [Co(III)(L)(HL)] on the differentiation of Friend erythroleukemia cells (FLC). They are murine proerythroblasts chronically infected by a producing Friend leukemia virus complex; their exposure to dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO) or other chemical agents induces these cells to terminal erythroid differentiation, therefore these cells represent a good model of differentiation in vitro. Here we describe induction differentiation experiment of pyridoxal thiosemicarbazone and relative complexes of copper and cobalt on FLC performed with concentrations of 50 ug/ml (ligand), 2 ug/ml (complexes). These have little effects on cell proliferation at doses used in these experiments. Higher doses have evident cytotoxic effects. The treatment with the copper complex induces a moderate differentiation of FLC and enhances effects on erythroid differentiation of Me2SO-induced FLC. On the contrary H2L and [Co(III)(L)(HL)] haven't inducing effects or enhancing effects on Me2SO-induced FLC hemopoietic differentiation. In conclusion, the present study shows that copper complexes of pyridoxal thiosemicarbazone exert action of inducing agent and are able to enhance Me2SO-induced FLC hemopoietic differentiation. PMID:1818592

  4. Divergent regulation of functionally distinct γ-tubulin complexes during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Muroyama, Andrew; Seldin, Lindsey; Lechler, Terry

    2016-06-20

    Differentiation induces the formation of noncentrosomal microtubule arrays in diverse tissues. The formation of these arrays requires loss of microtubule-organizing activity (MTOC) at the centrosome, but the mechanisms regulating this transition remain largely unexplored. Here, we use the robust loss of centrosomal MTOC activity in the epidermis to identify two pools of γ-tubulin that are biochemically and functionally distinct and differentially regulated. Nucleation-competent CDK5RAP2-γ-tubulin complexes were maintained at centrosomes upon initial epidermal differentiation. In contrast, Nedd1-γ-tubulin complexes did not promote nucleation but were required for anchoring of microtubules, a previously uncharacterized activity for this complex. Cell cycle exit specifically triggered loss of Nedd1-γ-tubulin complexes, providing a mechanistic link connecting MTOC activity and differentiation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that distinct γ-tubulin complexes regulate different microtubule behaviors at the centrosome and show that differential regulation of these complexes drives loss of centrosomal MTOC activity. PMID:27298324

  5. Silver complexation and tandem mass spectrometry for differentiation of isomeric flavonoid diglycosides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junmei; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2005-03-15

    For detection and differentiation of isomeric flavonoids, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is used to generate silver complexes of the type (Ag + flavonoid)+. Collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the resulting 1:1 silver/flavonoid complexes allows isomer differentiation of flavonoids. Eighteen flavonoid diglycosides constituting seven isomeric series are distinguishable from each other based on the CAD patterns of their silver complexes. Characteristic dissociation pathways allow identification of the site of glycosylation, the type of disaccharide (rutinose versus neohesperidose), and the type of aglycon (flavonol versus flavone versus flavanone). This silver complexation method is more universal than previous metal complexation methods, as intense silver complexes are observed even for flavonoids that lack the typical metal chelation sites. To demonstrate the feasibility of using silver complexation and tandem mass spectrometry to characterize flavonoids in complex mixtures, flavonoids extracted from grapefruit juice are separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and analyzed via a postcolumn complexation ESI-MS/MS strategy. Diagnostic fragmentation pathways of the silver complexes of the individual eluting flavonoids allow successful identification of the six flavonoids in the extract. PMID:15762583

  6. A Cbx8-containing polycomb complex facilitates the transition to gene activation during ES cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Creppe, Catherine; Palau, Anna; Malinverni, Roberto; Valero, Vanesa; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2014-12-01

    Polycomb proteins play an essential role in maintaining the repression of developmental genes in self-renewing embryonic stem cells. The exact mechanism allowing the derepression of polycomb target genes during cell differentiation remains unclear. Our project aimed to identify Cbx8 binding sites in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells. Therefore, we used a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation of endogenous Cbx8 coupled to direct massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Our analysis identified 171 high confidence peaks. By crossing our data with previously published microarray analysis, we show that several differentiation genes transiently recruit Cbx8 during their early activation. Depletion of Cbx8 partially impairs the transcriptional activation of these genes. Both interaction analysis, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments support the idea that activating Cbx8 acts in the context of an intact PRC1 complex. Prolonged gene activation results in eviction of PRC1 despite persisting H3K27me3 and H2A ubiquitination. The composition of PRC1 is highly modular and changes when embryonic stem cells commit to differentiation. We further demonstrate that the exchange of Cbx7 for Cbx8 is required for the effective activation of differentiation genes. Taken together, our results establish a function for a Cbx8-containing complex in facilitating the transition from a Polycomb-repressed chromatin state to an active state. As this affects several key regulatory differentiation genes this mechanism is likely to contribute to the robust execution of differentiation programs. PMID:25500566

  7. Synaptic Basis for Differential Orientation Selectivity between Complex and Simple Cells in Mouse Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-tang; Liu, Bao-hua; Chou, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Li I.

    2015-01-01

    In the primary visual cortex (V1), orientation-selective neurons can be categorized into simple and complex cells primarily based on their receptive field (RF) structures. In mouse V1, although previous studies have examined the excitatory/inhibitory interplay underlying orientation selectivity (OS) of simple cells, the synaptic bases for that of complex cells have remained obscure. Here, by combining in vivo loose-patch and whole-cell recordings, we found that complex cells, identified by their overlapping on/off subfields, had significantly weaker OS than simple cells at both spiking and subthreshold membrane potential response levels. Voltage-clamp recordings further revealed that although excitatory inputs to complex and simple cells exhibited a similar degree of OS, inhibition in complex cells was more narrowly tuned than excitation, whereas in simple cells inhibition was more broadly tuned than excitation. The differential inhibitory tuning can primarily account for the difference in OS between complex and simple cells. Interestingly, the differential synaptic tuning correlated well with the spatial organization of synaptic input: the inhibitory visual RF in complex cells was more elongated in shape than its excitatory counterpart and also was more elongated than that in simple cells. Together, our results demonstrate that OS of complex and simple cells is differentially shaped by cortical inhibition based on its orientation tuning profile relative to excitation, which is contributed at least partially by the spatial organization of RFs of presynaptic inhibitory neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Simple and complex cells, two classes of principal neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1), are generally thought to be equally selective for orientation. In mouse V1, we report that complex cells, identified by their overlapping on/off subfields, has significantly weaker orientation selectivity (OS) than simple cells. This can be primarily attributed to the

  8. The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation JE Royland, SH Warren, S Jeffay, MR Hoopes, HP Nichols, ES Hunter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC The importance of mitochondrial funct...

  9. Value Differentiation in Adolescence: The Role of Age and Cultural Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Ella; Schiefer, David; Mollering, Anna; Benish-Weisman, Maya; Boehnke, Klaus; Knafo, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Living in complex social worlds, individuals encounter discordant values across life contexts, potentially resulting in different importance of values across contexts. Value differentiation is defined here as the degree to which values receive different importance depending on the context in which they are considered. Early and mid-adolescents (N…

  10. Injury and differentiation following inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV in rat oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ziabreva, Iryna; Campbell, Graham; Rist, Julia; Zambonin, Jessica; Rorbach, Joanna; Wydro, Mateusz M; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J M; Mahad, Don

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage cells are susceptible to a variety of insults including hypoxia, excitotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species. Demyelination is a well-recognized feature of several CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis, white matter strokes, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and disorders due to mitochondrial DNA mutations. Although mitochondria have been implicated in the demise of oligodendrocyte lineage cells, the consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects have not been examined. We determine the in vitro impact of established inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV or cytochrome c oxidase on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and mature oligodendrocytes as well as on differentiation capacity of OPCs from P0 rat. Injury to mature oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition was significantly greater than to OPCs, judged by cell detachment and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes, although viability of cells that remained attached was not compromised. Active mitochondria were abundant in processes of differentiated oligodendrocytes and MMP was significantly greater in differentiated oligodendrocytes than OPCs. MMP dissipated following complex IV inhibition in oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, complex IV inhibition impaired process formation within oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Injury to and impaired process formation of oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition has potentially important implications for the pathogenesis and repair of CNS myelin disorders. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20665559

  11. Differentiating Types of Wide-Complex Tachycardia to Determine Appropriate Treatment in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Peterson, Alanna C; Marill, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    Wide-complex tachycardia is a rare disease entity among patients presenting to the emergency department. However, due to its potential life-threatening nature, emergency clinicians must know how to assess and manage this condition. Wide-complex tachycardia encompasses a range of cardiac dysrhythmias, some of which can be difficult to distinguish and may require specific treatment approaches. This review summarizes the etiology and pathophysiology of wide-complex tachycardia, describes the differential diagnosis, and presents an evidence-based approach to identification of the different types of tachycardias through the use of a thorough history and physical examination, vagal maneuvers, electrocardiography, and adenosine. The treatment options and disposition for patients with various wide-complex tachycardias are also discussed, with attention to special circumstances and select controversial/contemporary topics. PMID:26308484

  12. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex subunit SNF5 is essential for hepatocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gresh, Lionel; Bourachot, Brigitte; Reimann, Andreas; Guigas, Bruno; Fiette, Laurence; Garbay, Serge; Muchardt, Christian; Hue, Louis; Pontoglio, Marco; Yaniv, Moshe; Klochendler-Yeivin, Agnès

    2005-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression underlies cell differentiation and organogenesis. Both transcription factors and chromatin modifiers are crucial for this process. To study the role of the ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex in cell differentiation, we inactivated the gene encoding the core complex subunit SNF5/INI1 in the developing liver. Hepatic SNF5 deletion caused neonatal death due to severe hypoglycemia; mutant animals fail to store glycogen and have impaired energetic metabolism. The formation of a hepatic epithelium is also affected in SNF5-deficient livers. Transcriptome analyses showed that SNF5 inactivation is accompanied by defective transcriptional activation of 70% of the genes that are normally upregulated during liver development. These include genes involved in glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis and cell–cell adhesion. A fraction of hepatic developmentally activated genes were normally expressed, suggesting that cell differentiation was not completely blocked. Moreover, SNF5-deleted cells showed increased proliferation and we identified several misexpressed genes that may contribute to cell cycle deregulation in these cells. Our results emphasize the role of chromatin remodeling in the activation of cell-type-specific genetic programs and driving cell differentiation. PMID:16138077

  13. Pronounced Fixation, Strong Population Differentiation and Complex Population History in the Canary Islands Blue Tit Subspecies Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Ljungqvist, Marcus; Illera, Juan-Carlos; Kvist, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary molecular studies of island radiations may lead to insights in the role of vicariance, founder events, population size and drift in the processes of population differentiation. We evaluate the degree of population genetic differentiation and fixation of the Canary Islands blue tit subspecies complex using microsatellite markers and aim to get insights in the population history using coalescence based methods. The Canary Island populations were strongly genetically differentiated and had reduced diversity with pronounced fixation including many private alleles. In population structure models, the relationship between the central island populations (La Gomera, Tenerife and Gran Canaria) and El Hierro was difficult to disentangle whereas the two European populations showed consistent clustering, the two eastern islands (Fuerteventura and Lanzarote) and Morocco weak clustering, and La Palma a consistent unique lineage. Coalescence based models suggested that the European mainland forms an outgroup to the Afrocanarian population, a split between the western island group (La Palma and El Hierro) and the central island group, and recent splits between the three central islands, and between the two eastern islands and Morocco, respectively. It is clear that strong genetic drift and low level of concurrent gene flow among populations have shaped complex allelic patterns of fixation and skewed frequencies over the archipelago. However, understanding the population history remains challenging; in particular, the pattern of extreme divergence with low genetic diversity and yet unique genetic material in the Canary Island system requires an explanation. A potential scenario is population contractions of a historically large and genetically variable Afrocanarian population, with vicariance and drift following in the wake. The suggestion from sequence-based analyses of a Pleistocene extinction of a substantial part of North Africa and a Pleistocene/Holocene eastward

  14. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems. PMID:27054112

  15. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems. PMID:27054112

  16. Germ cell differentiation and synaptonemal complex formation are disrupted in CPEB knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Richter, J D

    2001-08-01

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA binding protein that regulates translation during vertebrate oocyte maturation. Adult female CPEB knockout mice contained vestigial ovaries that were devoid of oocytes; ovaries from mid-gestation embryos contained oocytes that were arrested at the pachytene stage. Male CPEB null mice also contained germ cells arrested at pachytene. The germ cells from the knockout mice harbored fragmented chromatin, suggesting a possible defect in homologous chromosome adhesion or synapsis. Two CPE-containing synaptonemal complex protein mRNAs, which interact with CPEB in vitro and in vivo, contained shortened poly(A) tails and mostly failed to sediment with polysomes in the null mice. Synaptonemal complexes were not detected in these animals. CPEB therefore controls germ cell differentiation by regulating the formation of the synaptonemal complex. PMID:11702780

  17. Genetic and Ecotypic Differentiation in a Californian Plant Polyploid Complex (Grindelia, Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Abigail J.; Moore, William L.; Baldwin, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ecotypic differentiation in the California Floristic Province have contributed greatly to plant evolutionary biology since the pioneering work of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. The extent of gene flow and genetic differentiation across interfertile ecotypes that span major habitats in the California Floristic Province is understudied, however, and is important for understanding the prospects for local adaptation to evolve or persist in the face of potential gene flow across populations in different ecological settings. We used microsatellite data to examine local differentiation in one of these lineages, the Pacific Coast polyploid complex of the plant genus Grindelia (Asteraceae). We examined 439 individuals in 10 different populations. The plants grouped broadly into a coastal and an inland set of populations. The coastal group contained plants from salt marshes and coastal bluffs, as well as a population growing in a serpentine grassland close to the coast, while the inland group contained grassland plants. No evidence for hybridization was found at the single location where adjacent populations of the two groups were sampled. In addition to differentiation along ecotypic lines, there was also a strong signal of local differentiation, with the plants grouping strongly by population. The strength of local differentiation is consistent with the extensive morphological variation observed across populations and the history of taxonomic confusion in the group. The Pacific Clade of Grindelia and other young Californian plant groups warrant additional analysis of evolutionary divergence along the steep coast-to-inland climatic gradient, which has been associated with local adaptation and ecotype formation since the classic studies of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. PMID:24755840

  18. Aggregated α-synuclein and complex I deficiency: exploration of their relationship in differentiated neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, A K; Ludtmann, M HR; Angelova, P R; Simcox, E M; Horrocks, M H; Klenerman, D; Gandhi, S; Turnbull, D M; Abramov, A Y

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein becomes misfolded and aggregated upon damage by various factors, for example, by reactive oxygen species. These aggregated forms have been proposed to have differential toxicities and their interaction with mitochondria may cause dysfunction within this organelle that contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, the association of α-synuclein with mitochondria occurs through interaction with mitochondrial complex I and importantly defects of this protein have been linked to the pathogenesis of PD. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between aggregated α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction, and the consequences of this interaction on cell survival. To do this, we studied the effects of α-synuclein on cybrid cell lines harbouring mutations in either mitochondrial complex I or IV. We found that aggregated α-synuclein inhibited mitochondrial complex I in control and complex IV-deficient cells. However, when aggregated α-synuclein was applied to complex I-deficient cells, there was no additional inhibition of mitochondrial function or increase in cell death. This would suggest that as complex I-deficient cells have already adapted to their mitochondrial defect, the subsequent toxic effects of α-synuclein are reduced. PMID:26181201

  19. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  20. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  1. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  2. Early enhancer establishment and regulatory locus complexity shape transcriptional programs in hematopoietic differentiation.

    PubMed

    González, Alvaro J; Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S

    2015-11-01

    We carried out an integrative analysis of enhancer landscape and gene expression dynamics during hematopoietic differentiation using DNase-seq, histone mark ChIP-seq and RNA sequencing to model how the early establishment of enhancers and regulatory locus complexity govern gene expression changes at cell state transitions. We found that high-complexity genes-those with a large total number of DNase-mapped enhancers across the lineage-differ architecturally and functionally from low-complexity genes, achieve larger expression changes and are enriched for both cell type-specific and transition enhancers, which are established in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and maintained in one differentiated cell fate but lost in others. We then developed a quantitative model to accurately predict gene expression changes from the DNA sequence content and lineage history of active enhancers. Our method suggests a new mechanistic role for PU.1 at transition peaks during B cell specification and can be used to correct assignments of enhancers to genes. PMID:26390058

  3. Engineering complex tissue-like microgel arrays for evaluating stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Guermani, Enrico; Shaki, Hossein; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mehrali, Mehdi; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds with native-like biology and microarchitectures is a prerequisite for stem cell mediated generation of off-the-shelf-tissues. So far, the field of tissue engineering has not full-filled its grand potential of engineering such combinatorial scaffolds for engineering functional tissues. This is primarily due to the many challenges associated with finding the right microarchitectures and ECM compositions for optimal tissue regeneration. Here, we have developed a new microgel array to address this grand challenge through robotic printing of complex stem cell-laden microgel arrays. The developed microgel array platform consisted of various microgel environments that where composed of native-like cellular microarchitectures resembling vascularized and bone marrow tissue architectures. The feasibility of our array system was demonstrated through localized cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into complex tissue-like structures. In summary, we have developed a tissue-like microgel array for evaluating stem cell differentiation within complex and heterogeneous cell microenvironments. We anticipate that the developed platform will be used for high-throughput identification of combinatorial and native-like scaffolds for tissue engineering of functional organs. PMID:27465860

  4. Multiple evolutionary processes drive the patterns of genetic differentiation in a forest tree species complex

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rebecca C; Steane, Dorothy A; Lavery, Martyn; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M

    2013-01-01

    Forest trees frequently form species complexes, complicating taxonomic classification and gene pool management. This is certainly the case in Eucalyptus, and well exemplified by the Eucalyptus globulus complex. This ecologically and economically significant complex comprises four taxa (sspp. bicostata, globulus, maidenii, pseudoglobulus) that are geographically and morphologically distinct, but linked by extensive “intergrade” populations. To resolve their genetic affinities, nine microsatellites were used to genotype 1200 trees from throughout the natural range of the complex in Australia, representing 33 morphological core and intergrade populations. There was significant spatial genetic structure (FST = 0.10), but variation was continuous. High genetic diversity in southern ssp. maidenii indicates that this region is the center of origin. Genetic diversity decreases and population differentiation increases with distance from this area, suggesting that drift is a major evolutionary process. Many of the intergrade populations, along with other populations morphologically classified as ssp. pseudoglobulus or ssp. globulus, belong to a “cryptic genetic entity” that is genetically and geographically intermediate between core ssp. bicostata, ssp. maidenii, and ssp. globulus. Geography, rather than morphology, therefore, is the best predictor of overall genetic affinities within the complex and should be used to classify germplasm into management units for conservation and breeding purposes. PMID:23403692

  5. Magnetic Exchange Couplings in Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on Differential Local Spin Rotations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra P; Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2016-04-12

    We analyze the performance of a new method for the calculation of magnetic exchange coupling parameters for the particular case of heterodinuclear transition metals complexes of Cu, Ni, and V. This method is based on a generalized perturbative approach which uses differential local spin rotations via formal Lagrange multipiers (Phillips, J. J.; Peralta, J. E. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 174115). The reliability of the calculated couplings has been assessed by comparing with results from traditional energy differences with different density functional approximations and with experimental values. Our results show that this method to calculate magnetic exchange couplings can be reliably used for heteronuclear transition metal complexes, and at the same time, that it is independent from the different mapping schemes used in energy difference methods. PMID:26953521

  6. The BRPF2/BRD1-MOZ complex is involved in retinoic acid-induced differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye In; Kim, Min Seong; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2016-08-01

    The scaffold protein BRPF2 (also called BRD1), a key component of histone acetyltransferase complexes, plays an important role in embryonic development, but its function in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether BRPF2 is involved in mouse ESC differentiation. BRPF2 depletion resulted in abnormal formation of embryoid bodies, downregulation of differentiation-associated genes, and persistent maintenance of alkaline phosphatase activity even after retinoic acid-induced differentiation, indicating impaired differentiation of BRPF2-depleted ESCs. We also found reduced global acetylation of histone H3 lysine 14 (H3K14) in BRPF2-depleted ESCs, irrespective of differentiation status. Further, co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed a physical association between BRPF2 and the histone acetyltransferase MOZ in differentiated ESCs, suggesting the role of BRPF2-MOZ complexes in ESC differentiation. Together, these results suggest that BRPF2-MOZ complexes play an important role in the differentiation of ESCs via H3K14 acetylation. PMID:27256846

  7. Differential Regulation of Endosomal GPCR/β-Arrestin Complexes and Trafficking by MAPK*

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Etienne; Nikolajev, Ljiljana; Simaan, May; Namkung, Yoon; Laporte, Stéphane A.

    2014-01-01

    β-Arrestins are signaling adaptors that bind to agonist-occupied G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and target them for endocytosis; however, the mechanisms regulating receptor/β-arrestin complexes and trafficking in endosomes, remain ill defined. Here we show, in live cells, differential dynamic regulation of endosomal bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) complexes with either β-arrestin-1 or -2. We find a novel role for MAPK in the B2R/β-arrestin-2 complex formation, receptor trafficking and signaling mediated by an ERK1/2 regulatory motif in the hinge domain of the rat β-arrestin-2 (PET178P), but not rat β-arrestin-1 (PER177P). While the ERK1/2 regulatory motif is conserved between rat and mouse β-arrestin-2, it is surprisingly not conserved in human β-arrestin-2 (PEK178P). However, mutation of lysine 178 to threonine is sufficient to confer MAPK sensitivity to the human β-arrestin-2. Furthermore, substitution for a phosphomimetic residue in both the rat and the human β-arrestin-2 (T/K178D) significantly stabilizes B2R/β-arrestin complexes in endosomes, delays receptor recycling to the plasma membrane and maintains intracellular MAPK signaling. Similarly, the endosomal trafficking of β2-adrenergic, angiotensin II type 1 and vasopressin V2 receptors was altered by the β-arrestin-2 T178D mutant. Our findings unveil a novel subtype specific mode of MAPK-dependent regulation of β-arrestins in intracellular trafficking and signaling of GPCRs, and suggest differential endosomal receptor/β-arrestin-2 signaling roles among species. PMID:25016018

  8. Differential activation of the human trigeminal nuclear complex by noxious and non-noxious orofacial stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nash, Paul G; Macefield, Vaughan G; Klineberg, Iven J; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2009-11-01

    There is good evidence from animal studies for segregation in the processing of non-nociceptive and nociceptive information within the trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. However, it remains unknown whether a similar segregation occurs in humans, and a recent tract tracing study suggests that this segregation may not exist. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to define and compare activity patterns of the trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex during non-noxious and noxious cutaneous and non-noxious and noxious muscle orofacial stimulation in humans. We found that during cutaneous pain, signal intensity increased within the entire rostrocaudal extent of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (SpV), encompassing the ipsilateral oralis (SpVo), interpolaris (SpVi) and caudalis (SpVc) subdivisions. In contrast, muscle pain did not activate SpVi, but instead activated a discrete region of the ipsilateral SpVo and SpVc. Further, muscle noxious stimulation activated a region of the ipsilateral lateral pons in the region of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (Vp). Innocuous orofacial stimulation (lip brushing) also evoked a significant increase in signal intensity in the ipsilateral Vp; however, non-noxious muscle stimulation showed no increase in signal in this area. The data reveal that orofacial cutaneous and muscle nociceptive information and innocuous cutaneous stimulation are differentially represented within the trigeminal nuclear complex. It is well established that cutaneous and muscle noxious stimuli evoke different perceptual, behavioural and cardiovascular changes. We speculate that the differential activation evoked by cutaneous and muscle noxious stimuli within the trigeminal sensory complex may contribute to the neural basis for these differences. PMID:19492300

  9. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (Sox2) proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(0bp)) or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(3bp)) separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox2(0bp) and Oct4/Sox2(3bp) complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming. PMID:26790000

  10. Higher dimensional systems of differential equations obtainable by iterative use of complex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadir, Asghar; Mahomed, Fazal M.

    2015-04-01

    A procedure had been developed to solve systems of two ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) that could be obtained from scalar complex ODEs by splitting into their real and imaginary parts. The procedure was extended to four dimensional systems obtainable by splitting complex systems of two ODEs into their real and imaginary parts. As it stood, this procedure could be extended to any even dimension but not to odd dimensional systems. In this paper, the complex splitting is used iteratively to obtain three and four dimensional systems of ODEs and four dimensional systems of PDEs for four functions of two and four variables that correspond to a scalar base equation. We also provide characterization criteria for such systems to correspond to the base equation and a clear procedure to construct the base equation. The new systems of four ODEs are distinct from the class obtained by the single split of a two dimensional system. The previous complex methods split each infinitesimal symmetry generator into a pair of operators such that the entire set of operators do not form a Lie algebra. The iterative procedure sheds some light on the emergence of these "Lie-like" operators. In this procedure the higher dimensional system may not have any or the required symmetry for being directly solvable by symmetry and other methods although the base equation can have sufficient symmetry properties. Illustrative examples are provided.

  11. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (Sox2) proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox20bp) or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox23bp) separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox20bp and Oct4/Sox23bp complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming. PMID:26790000

  12. Molecular differentiation of Chenopodium album complex and some related species using ISSR profiles and ITS sequences.

    PubMed

    Rana, Tikam Singh; Narzary, Diganta; Ohri, Deepak

    2012-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to understand the genetic differentiation and relationships in various components of C. album complex, C. giganteum and some related species using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) profiles and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. The relationships based on UPGMA dendrograms have shown the heterogenous nature of C. album complex. The 2x taxa while showing close relation among themselves are sharply segregated from 4x and 6x taxa belonging to C. album and C. giganteum. Among the three cytotypes from North Indian plains the 4x shows greater similarity to 6x than to 2x which is corroborated by the karyotypic studies. Furthermore, the 6x C. album and C. giganteum accessions of American and European origin are clearly segregated from those of Indian origin which may show their separate origin. Other related species show relationships according to their taxonomic position. The present study based on ISSR profiles and ITS sequences has therefore been very useful in explaining the relationships between various components of C. album complex and related species. However, more work needs to be done using different CpDNA loci to define correct species boundary of the taxa under C. album complex from Himalayas and North Indian Plains. PMID:22233894

  13. Differential inhibitory effects of methylmalonic acid on respiratory chain complex activities in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Pettenuzzo, Leticia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C; Schmidt, Anna Laura; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir

    2006-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) and clinically by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is so far poorly established. Previous studies have shown that MMA inhibits complex II of the respiratory chain in rat cerebral cortex, although no inhibition of complexes I-V was found in bovine heart. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the in vitro effect of 2.5mM MMA on the activity of complexes I-III, II, II-III and IV in striatum, hippocampus, heart, liver and kidney homogenates from young rats. We observed that MMA caused a significant inhibition of complex II activity in striatum and hippocampus (15-20%) at low concentrations of succinate in the medium, but not in the peripheral tissues. We also verified that the inhibitory property of MMA only occurred after exposing brain homogenates for at least 10 min with the acid, suggesting that this inhibition was mediated by indirect mechanisms. Simultaneous preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and catalase (CAT) plus superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not prevent MMA-induced inhibition of complex II, suggesting that common reactive oxygen (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical) and nitric (nitric oxide) species were not involved in this effect. In addition, complex II-III (20-35%) was also inhibited by MMA in all tissues tested, and complex I-III only in the kidney (53%) and liver (38%). In contrast, complex IV activity was not changed by MMA in all tissues studied. These results indicate that MMA differentially affects the activity of the respiratory chain pending on the tissues studied, being striatum and hippocampus more vulnerable to its effect. In case our in vitro data are confirmed in vivo in tissues from methylmalonic acidemic patients, it is feasible that that the present findings may be

  14. Differential ionization cross-section calculations for hydrogenic targets with Z⩽4 using a propagating exterior complex scaling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2004-04-01

    A propagating exterior complex scaling method, with iterative coupling, has been adapted for the electron impact of charged hydrogenic targets. Using this fully ab initio method for solving the Schrödinger equation, which has no uncontrolled approximations, we present highly accurate total, single-differential, double-differential, and triple-differential cross-section calculations for the electron-impact ionization of hydrogenic targets with nuclear charge Z⩽4 (H, He+ , Li2+ , Be3+ ). For a fixed scaled energy, the total and differential cross sections begin to converge with respect to increasing Z when scaled by Z4 and Z6 , respectively, and converge more rapidly with increasing incident-electron energy. The angular distributions of the differential cross sections change systematically with increasing nuclear charge for energies above the peak total ionization cross section, but for some lower-energy kinematics the triple-differential cross section for charged targets is significantly different from that of atomic hydrogen.

  15. Simple structural differentiation of (μ-S,O) bridged sulfito complexes by vibrational spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieglstein, R.; Breitinger, D. K.

    1997-06-01

    Vibrational spectra of the newly prepared complexes [enM(SO 3) 2Men]·3H 2O (M = Pt ( 1) and Pd ( 2), en = 1,2-diaminoethane) indicate that in 1 the sulfite ligands link the two metal centers by two parallel μ-S,O bridges, whereas in 2 antiparallel bridges are realized, in accordance with the results of X-ray structure analyses for 1 and 2. Furthermore, the spectra allow a clear differentiation of the mononuclear educts K 2[M(SO 3) 2en]·2H 2O (M = Pt ( 3) and Pd ( 4)) with S-coordinated sulfite ligands and the binuclear products 1 and 2.

  16. Speciation and rapid phenotypic differentiation in the yellow-rumped warbler Dendroica coronata complex.

    PubMed

    Milá, Borja; Smith, Thomas B; Wayne, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    The relative importance of the Pleistocene glacial cycles in driving avian speciation remains controversial, partly because species limits in many groups remain poorly understood, and because current taxonomic designations are often based on phenotypic characteristics of uncertain phylogenetic significance. We use mtDNA sequence data to examine patterns of genetic variation, sequence divergence and phylogenetic relationships between phenotypically distinct groups of the yellow-rumped warbler complex. Currently classified as a single species, the complex is composed of two North American migratory forms (myrtle warbler Dendroica coronata coronata and Audubon's warbler Dendroica coronata auduboni), and two largely sedentary forms: Dendroica coronata nigrifrons of Mexico, and Dendroica coronata goldmani of Guatemala. The latter are typically considered to be races of the Audubon's warbler based on plumage characteristics. However, mtDNA sequence data reveal that sedentary Mesoamerican forms are reciprocally monophyletic to each other and to migratory forms, from which they show a long history of isolation. In contrast, migratory myrtle and Audubon's warblers form a single cluster due to high levels of shared ancestral polymorphism as evidenced by widespread sharing of mtDNA haplotypes despite marked phenotypic differentiation. Sedentary and migratory forms diverged in the early Pleistocene, whereas phenotypic differentiation between the two migratory forms has occurred in the Holocene and is likely the result of geographical isolation and subsequent range expansion since the last glaciation. Our results underscore the importance of Quaternary climatic events in driving songbird speciation and indicate that plumage traits can evolve remarkably fast, thus rendering them potentially misleading for inferring systematic relationships. PMID:17181728

  17. 2D NMR Barcoding and Differential Analysis of Complex Mixtures for Chemical Identification: The Actaea Triterpenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of NMR spectroscopic information for structure elucidation involves decoding of complex resonance patterns that contain valuable molecular information (δ and J), which is not readily accessible otherwise. We introduce a new concept of 2D-NMR barcoding that uses clusters of fingerprint signals and their spatial relationships in the δ−δ coordinate space to facilitate the chemical identification of complex mixtures. Similar to widely used general barcoding technology, the structural information of individual compounds is encoded as a specifics pattern of their C,H correlation signals. Software-based recognition of these patterns enables the structural identification of the compounds and their discrimination in mixtures. Using the triterpenes from various Actaea (syn. Cimicifuga) species as a test case, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) barcodes were generated on the basis of their structural subtypes from a statistical investigation of their δH and δC data in the literature. These reference barcodes allowed in silico identification of known triterpenes in enriched fractions obtained from an extract of A. racemosa (black cohosh). After dereplication, a differential analysis of heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra even allowed for the discovery of a new triterpene. The 2D barcoding concept has potential application in a natural product discovery project, allowing for the rapid dereplication of known compounds and as a tool in the search for structural novelty within compound classes with established barcodes. PMID:24673652

  18. 2D NMR barcoding and differential analysis of complex mixtures for chemical identification: the Actaea triterpenes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Burton, Ian; Karakach, Tobias; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2014-04-15

    The interpretation of NMR spectroscopic information for structure elucidation involves decoding of complex resonance patterns that contain valuable molecular information (δ and J), which is not readily accessible otherwise. We introduce a new concept of 2D-NMR barcoding that uses clusters of fingerprint signals and their spatial relationships in the δ-δ coordinate space to facilitate the chemical identification of complex mixtures. Similar to widely used general barcoding technology, the structural information of individual compounds is encoded as a specifics pattern of their C,H correlation signals. Software-based recognition of these patterns enables the structural identification of the compounds and their discrimination in mixtures. Using the triterpenes from various Actaea (syn. Cimicifuga) species as a test case, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) barcodes were generated on the basis of their structural subtypes from a statistical investigation of their δH and δC data in the literature. These reference barcodes allowed in silico identification of known triterpenes in enriched fractions obtained from an extract of A. racemosa (black cohosh). After dereplication, a differential analysis of heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra even allowed for the discovery of a new triterpene. The 2D barcoding concept has potential application in a natural product discovery project, allowing for the rapid dereplication of known compounds and as a tool in the search for structural novelty within compound classes with established barcodes. PMID:24673652

  19. Differentiation of clonal complex 59 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Pearson, Julie C; Tan, Hui-Leen; Christiansen, Keryn J; O'Brien, Frances G

    2010-05-01

    Clonal complex 59 (CC59) community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains were characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, diagnostic DNA microarrays, and PCRs targeting staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). Six distinct groups within CC59 were characterized. At least seven different variants of SCCmec elements were identified (IVa [2B], IVb [2B], IVd [2B], IV variant [2B], IVa [2B&5], V variant [5C2], and V [5C2&5]). (The structural type is indicated by a Roman numeral, with a lowercase letter indicating the subtype, and the ccr complex and the mec complex are indicated by an Arabic numeral and an uppercase letter, respectively. Where there is an extra ccr element, this is indicated by "&" and an Arabic numeral designating the ccr type.) The first group is similar to the American sequence type 59 (ST59) MRSA-IV CA-MRSA strain USA1000. The second group includes a PVL-negative ST87 strain with an SCCmec element of subtype IVb (2B). The third group comprises PVL-variable ST59 MRSA-IV strains harboring multiple SCCmec IV subtypes. PVL-negative ST59 MRSA strains with multiple or composite SCCmec elements (IVa [2B&5]) form the fourth group. Group 5 corresponds to the internationally known "Taiwan clone," a PVL-positive strain with a variant SCCmec element (V [5C2&5]). This strain proved to be the most common CC59 MRSA strain isolated in Western Australia. Finally, group 6 encompasses the ST59 MRSA-V variant (5C2). The differentiation of CC59 into groups and strains indicates a rapid evolution and spread of SCCmec elements. Observed differences between groups of strains as well as intrastrain variability within a group facilitate the tracing of their spread. PMID:20211891

  20. Variable Sources and Differentiation of Lavas from the Copahue-Caviahue Eruptive Complex, Neuquen Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, E.; Ort, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Caldera collapse (˜180 km2) associated with a large Pliocene pyroclastic eruption and subsequent glacial erosion exposed an extensive and complex cross-section of pre-caldera volcanic history (at least 5 My) at the Copahue-Caviahue Eruptive Center (CCEC) in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of Argentina. Lava flows in wall exposures range from olivine-rich basaltic andesite to trachyte, are typically horizontal, vary in abundance and thickness at different wall exposures, and rarely correlate with flows in adjacent sections, although some lava and pyroclastic deposits from adjacent sections are similar in petrography, mineral assemblage, and geochemistry. Bulk-rock geochemical and isotopic data indicate at least two distinct primary melt types contributed to pre-caldera CCEC volcanism, and their differentiates produced a high-K and a low-K series. Incompatible element and isotope systematics suggest they are not related by differentiation of a common parental melt, and less-evolved examples of both types occur throughout the pre-caldera stratigraphic section, suggesting long-lived recharge of the local system by variably-sourced magmas. Petrographic and mineral chemistry evidence indicates that mixing of dissimilar magma types produced compositionally intermediate magmas. The location of the CCEC, rear of the volcanic front (VF), yet trenchward of regional backarc basin (BAB) volcanism, is reflected by the composition of CCEC lavas, which are transitional between local VF and BAB types. Thus, contrasting low- and high-K CCEC magmas in the SVZ rear-arc may reflect local focusing of VF-like (low-K) and BAB-like (high-K) melts.

  1. Differential requirement for the mitochondrial Hsp70-Tim44 complex in unfolding and translocation of preproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Voos, W; von Ahsen, O; Müller, H; Guiard, B; Rassow, J; Pfanner, N

    1996-01-01

    The mitochondrial heat shock protein Hsp70 is essential for import of nuclear-encoded proteins, involved in both unfolding and membrane translocation of preproteins. mtHsp70 interacts reversibly with Tim44 of the mitochondrial inner membrane, yet the role of this interaction is unknown. We analysed this role by using two yeast mutants of mtHsp70 that differentially influenced its interaction with Tim44. One mutant mtHsp70 (Ssc1-2p) efficiently bound preproteins, but did not show a detectable complex formation with Tim44; the mitochondria imported loosely folded preproteins with wild-type kinetics, yet were impaired in unfolding of preproteins. The other mutant Hsp70 (Ssc1-3p') bound both Tim44 and preproteins, but the mitochondria did not import folded polypeptides and were impaired in import of unfolded preproteins; Ssc1-3p' was defective in its ATPase domain and did not undergo a nucleotide-dependent conformational change, resulting in permanent binding to Tim44. The following conclusions are suggested. (i) The import of loosely folded polypeptides (translocase function of mtHsp70) does not depend on formation of a detectable Hsp70-Tim44 complex. Two explanations are possible: a trapping mechanism by soluble mtHsp70, or a weak/very transient interaction of Ssc1-2p with Tim44 that leads to a weak force generation sufficient for import of loosely folded, but not folded, polypeptides. (ii) Import of folded preproteins (unfoldase function of mtHsp70) involves a reversible nucleotide-dependent interaction of mtHsp70 with Tim44, including a conformational change in mtHsp70. This is consistent with a model that the dynamic interaction of mtHsp70 with Tim44 generates a pulling force on preproteins which supports unfolding during translocation. Images PMID:8654364

  2. Differential proteolytic activation of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex by thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Eubanks, D.C.; Parker, C.G.; Lollar, P. )

    1989-09-01

    Blood coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is a plasma protein that is decreased or absent in hemophilia A. It is isolated as a mixture of heterodimers that contain a variably sized heavy chain and a common light chain. Thrombin catalyzes the activation of fVIII in a reaction that is associated with cleavages in both types of chain. The authors isolated a serine protease from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom that catalyzes thrombin-like heavy-chain cleavage but not light-chain cleavage in porcine fVIII as judged by NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and N-terminal sequence analysis. Using a plasma-free assay of the ability of activated {sup 125}I-fVIII to function as a cofactor in the activation of factor X by factor IXa, they found that fVIII is activated by the venom enzyme. The venom enzyme-activated fVIII was isolated in stable form by cation-exchange HPLC. von Willebrand factor inhibited venom enzyme-activated fVIII but not thrombin-activated fVIII. These results suggest that the binding of fVIII to von Willebrand factor depends on the presence of an intact light chain and that activated fVIII must dissociate from von Willebrand factor to exert its cofactor effect. Thus, proteolytic activation of fVIII-von Willebrand factor complex appears to be differentially regulated by light-chain cleavage to dissociate the complex and heavy-chain cleavage to activate the cofactor function.

  3. Differentiating the mTOR inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Krueger, Darcy A

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign tumor-like lesions, called hamartomas, in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These hamartomas cause a diverse set of clinical problems based on their location and often result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. TSC is caused by mutations within the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that inactivate the genes' tumor-suppressive function and drive hamartomatous cell growth. In normal cells, TSC1 and TSC2 integrate growth signals and nutrient inputs to downregulate signaling to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine-threonine kinase that controls cell growth and cell survival. The molecular connection between TSC and mTOR led to the clinical use of allosteric mTOR inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus) for the treatment of TSC. Everolimus is approved for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas in patients with TSC. Sirolimus, though not approved for TSC, has undergone considerable investigation to treat various aspects of the disease. Everolimus and sirolimus selectively inhibit mTOR signaling with similar molecular mechanisms, but with distinct clinical profiles. This review differentiates mTOR inhibitors in TSC while describing the molecular mechanisms, pathogenic mutations, and clinical trial outcomes for managing TSC. PMID:26289591

  4. Tuning the electrical properties of the heart by differential trafficking of KATP ion channel complexes

    PubMed Central

    Arakel, Eric C.; Brandenburg, Sören; Uchida, Keita; Zhang, Haixia; Lin, Yu-Wen; Kohl, Tobias; Schrul, Bianca; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Efimov, Igor R.; Nichols, Colin G.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Schwappach, Blanche

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The copy number of membrane proteins at the cell surface is tightly regulated. Many ion channels and receptors present retrieval motifs to COPI vesicle coats and are retained in the early secretory pathway. In some cases, the interaction with COPI is prevented by binding to 14-3-3 proteins. However, the functional significance of this antagonism between COPI and 14-3-3 in terminally differentiated cells is unknown. Here, we show that ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, which are composed of Kir6.2 and SUR1 subunits, are stalled in the Golgi complex of ventricular, but not atrial, cardiomyocytes. Upon sustained β-adrenergic stimulation, which leads to activation of protein kinase A (PKA), SUR1-containing channels reach the plasma membrane of ventricular cells. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the C-terminus of Kir6.2 decreases binding to COPI and, thereby, silences the arginine-based retrieval signal. Thus, activation of the sympathetic nervous system releases this population of KATP channels from storage in the Golgi and, hence, might facilitate the adaptive response to metabolic challenges. PMID:24569881

  5. Deconvolution of complex differential scanning calorimetry profiles for protein transitions under kinetic control.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Núñez, Citlali; Vera-Robles, L Iraís; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Hernández-Arana, Andrés

    2016-09-15

    A frequent outcome in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments carried out with large proteins is the irreversibility of the observed endothermic effects. In these cases, DSC profiles are analyzed according to methods developed for temperature-induced denaturation transitions occurring under kinetic control. In the one-step irreversible model (native → denatured) the characteristics of the observed single-peaked endotherm depend on the denaturation enthalpy and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constant, k. Several procedures have been devised to obtain the parameters that determine the variation of k with temperature. Here, we have elaborated on one of these procedures in order to analyze more complex DSC profiles. Synthetic data for a heat capacity curve were generated according to a model with two sequential reactions; the temperature dependence of each of the two rate constants involved was determined, according to the Eyring's equation, by two fixed parameters. It was then shown that our deconvolution procedure, by making use of heat capacity data alone, permits to extract the parameter values that were initially used. Finally, experimental DSC traces showing two and three maxima were analyzed and reproduced with relative success according to two- and four-step sequential models. PMID:27402175

  6. Differentiation in the Trochulus hispidus complex and related taxa (Pulmonata: Hygromiidae): morphology, ecology and their relation to phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Michael; Kruckenhauser, Luise; Sattmann, Helmut; Harl, Josef; Jaksch, Katharina; Haring, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the morphology and ecology of representatives of the taxonomically ambiguous genus Trochulus. The main focus was on the T. hispidus complex, which comprises several genetically highly divergent mitochondrial clades, as determined in a parallel molecular genetic study. We analysed shell morphology and anatomical traits and asked whether the clades are differentiated in these characters. In addition, the related species T. oreinos and T. striolatus were investigated and compared with the T. hispidus complex. Finally, we compared the ecological requirements of the taxa. Among the genetic clades of the T. hispidus complex there was no clear morphological differentiation and geographic populations could not be distinguished based on their morphology. The investigated characters of the genital anatomy did not allow discrimination of any of the T. hispidus clades and were not even diagnostic for the group as a whole. The morphotype of T. sericeus is present in all clades and thus cannot be assigned to a genetic group or any specific population. Thus, our morphological data do not provide evidence that any of the mitochondrial T. hispidus clades represent separate species. Concerning interspecific delimitation, the T. hispidus complex was clearly differentiated from T. striolatus and T. oreinos by shell morphological and anatomical characters, e.g. sculpture of shell surface and details of the penis. Finally, the habitat of T. oreinos is different from those of the other two species. In contrast to the lack of correspondence between genetic and morphological differentiation within the T. hispidus complex, related species display intraspecific morphological differentiation corresponding with mitochondrial clades: within T. striolatus there was a slight morphological differentiation between the subspecies T. s. striolatus, T. s. juvavensis and T. s. danubialis. The two subspecies of T. oreinos could be discriminated by a small but consistent

  7. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm of the Liver Masquerading as an Echinococcal Cyst: Radiologic-pathologic Differential of Complex Cystic Liver Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Daniel; Jiang, Kun; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Although simple liver cysts are common, complex cystic liver lesions are infrequent and represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The differential diagnosis of complex cystic liver lesions can be grouped into neoplastic, infectious or inflammatory, and miscellaneous pathologic entities. Clinicians should remember to consider mucinous cystic neoplasm and echinococcal cysts in the differential, which are uncommon etiologies for liver lesions but may expose unique challenges. We present a case of a 49-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of a new complex cystic liver lesion. The following brief review describes how radiologic imaging and pathologic testing can help distinguish between the broad spectrum of diseases that may produce cystic liver lesions. PMID:27195178

  8. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-01-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3′ end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3′ end protection and 5′–3′ decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes. PMID:26092942

  9. The nuclear pore complex acts as a master switch for nuclear and cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with the functional differentiation of the nucleus, in which alteration of the expression profiles of transcription factors occurs to destine cell fate. Nuclear transport machineries, such as importin-α, have also been reported as critical factors that induce cell differentiation. Using various fluorescence live cell imaging methods, including time-lapse imaging, FRAP analysis and live-cell imaging associated correlative light and electron microscopy (Live CLEM) of Tetrahymena, a unicellular ciliated protozoan, we have recently discovered that type switching of the NPC is the earliest detectable event of nuclear differentiation. Our studies suggest that this type switching of the NPC directs the fate of the nucleus to differentiate into either a macronucleus or a micronucleus. Our findings in this organism may provide new insights into the role of the NPC in controlling nuclear functions in general in eukaryotes, including controlling cell fate leading to cell differentiation in multicellular metazoa. PMID:26479399

  10. The nuclear pore complex acts as a master switch for nuclear and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with the functional differentiation of the nucleus, in which alteration of the expression profiles of transcription factors occurs to destine cell fate. Nuclear transport machineries, such as importin-α, have also been reported as critical factors that induce cell differentiation. Using various fluorescence live cell imaging methods, including time-lapse imaging, FRAP analysis and live-cell imaging associated correlative light and electron microscopy (Live CLEM) of Tetrahymena, a unicellular ciliated protozoan, we have recently discovered that type switching of the NPC is the earliest detectable event of nuclear differentiation. Our studies suggest that this type switching of the NPC directs the fate of the nucleus to differentiate into either a macronucleus or a micronucleus. Our findings in this organism may provide new insights into the role of the NPC in controlling nuclear functions in general in eukaryotes, including controlling cell fate leading to cell differentiation in multicellular metazoa. PMID:26479399

  11. Differential SAGE analysis in Arabidopsis uncovers increased transcriptome complexity in response to low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Stephen J; Parkin, Isobel AP

    2008-01-01

    Background Abiotic stress, including low temperature, limits the productivity and geographical distribution of plants, which has led to significant interest in understanding the complex processes that allow plants to adapt to such stresses. The wide range of physiological, biochemical and molecular changes that occur in plants exposed to low temperature require a robust global approach to studying the response. We have employed Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) to uncover changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana over a time course of low temperature stress. Results Five SAGE libraries were generated from A. thaliana leaf tissue collected at time points ranging from 30 minutes to one week of low temperature treatment (4°C). Over 240,000 high quality SAGE tags, corresponding to 16,629 annotated genes, provided a comprehensive survey of changes in the transcriptome in response to low temperature, from perception of the stress to acquisition of freezing tolerance. Interpretation of these data was facilitated by representing the SAGE data by gene identifier, allowing more robust statistical analysis, cross-platform comparisons and the identification of genes sharing common expression profiles. Simultaneous statistical calculations across all five libraries identified 920 low temperature responsive genes, only 24% of which overlapped with previous global expression analysis performed using microarrays, although similar functional categories were affected. Clustering of the differentially regulated genes facilitated the identification of novel loci correlated with the development of freezing tolerance. Analysis of their promoter sequences revealed subsets of genes that were independent of CBF and ABA regulation and could provide a mechanism for elucidating complementary signalling pathways. The SAGE data emphasised the complexity of the plant response, with alternate pre-mRNA processing events increasing at low temperatures and antisense transcription

  12. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) Is required for mouse spermatogonial differentiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Busada, Jonathan T; Niedenberger, Bryan A; Velte, Ellen K; Keiper, Brett D; Geyer, Christopher B

    2015-11-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) must balance self-renewal with production of transit-amplifying progenitors that differentiate in response to retinoic acid (RA) before entering meiosis. This self-renewal vs. differentiation spermatogonial fate decision is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis, as imbalances cause spermatogenesis defects that can lead to human testicular cancer or infertility. A great deal of effort has been exerted to understand how the SSC population is maintained. In contrast, little is known about the essential program of differentiation initiated by retinoic acid (RA) that precedes meiosis, and the pathways and proteins involved are poorly defined. We recently reported a novel role for RA in stimulating the PI3/AKT/mTOR kinase signaling pathway to activate translation of repressed mRNAs such as Kit. Here, we examined the requirement for mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in mediating the RA signal to direct spermatogonial differentiation in the neonatal testis. We found that in vivo inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin blocked spermatogonial differentiation, which led to an accumulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia. In addition, rapamycin also blocked the RA-induced translational activation of mRNAs encoding KIT, SOHLH1, and SOHLH2 without affecting expression of STRA8. These findings highlight dual roles for RA in germ cell development - transcriptional activation of genes, and kinase signaling to stimulate translation of repressed messages required for spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:26254600

  13. Differential amplification of satellite PaB6 in chromosomally hypervariable Prospero autumnale complex (Hyacinthaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Emadzade, Khatere; Jang, Tae-Soo; Macas, Jiří; Kovařík, Ales; Novák, Petr; Parker, John; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Chromosomal evolution, including numerical and structural changes, is a major force in plant diversification and speciation. This study addresses genomic changes associated with the extensive chromosomal variation of the Mediterranean Prospero autumnale complex (Hyacinthaceae), which includes four diploid cytotypes each with a unique combination of chromosome number (x = 5, 6, 7), rDNA loci and genome size. Methods A new satellite repeat PaB6 has previously been identified, and monomers were reconstructed from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data of P. autumnale cytotype B6B6 (2n = 12). Monomers of all other Prospero cytotypes and species were sequenced to check for lineage-specific mutations. Copy number, restriction patterns and methylation levels of PaB6 were analysed using Southern blotting. PaB6 was localized on chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Key Results The monomer of PaB6 is 249 bp long, contains several intact and truncated vertebrate-type telomeric repeats and is highly methylated. PaB6 is exceptional because of its high copy number and unprecedented variation among diploid cytotypes, ranging from 104 to 106 copies per 1C. PaB6 is always located in pericentromeric regions of several to all chromosomes. Additionally, two lineages of cytotype B7B7 (x = 7), possessing either a single or duplicated 5S rDNA locus, differ in PaB6 copy number; the ancestral condition of a single locus is associated with higher PaB6 copy numbers. Conclusions Although present in all Prospero species, PaB6 has undergone differential amplification only in chromosomally variable P. autumnale, particularly in cytotypes B6B6 and B5B5. These arose via independent chromosomal fusions from x = 7 to x = 6 and 5, respectively, accompanied by genome size increases. The copy numbers of satellite DNA PaB6 are among the highest in angiosperms, and changes of PaB6 are exceptionally dynamic in this group of closely related cytotypes of a single

  14. Identification and Ultrastructural Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Degradation Complex in Differentiating Lens Fiber Cells.

    PubMed

    Costello, M Joseph; Brennan, Lisa A; Mohamed, Ashik; Gilliland, Kurt O; Johnsen, Sönke; Kantorow, Marc

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved issue in structural biology is how the encapsulated lens removes membranous organelles to carry out its role as a transparent optical element. In this ultrastructural study, we establish a mechanism for nuclear elimination in the developing chick lens during the formation of the organelle-free zone. Day 12-15 chick embryo lenses were examined by high-resolution confocal light microscopy and thin section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following fixation in 10% formalin and 4% paraformaldehyde, and then processing for confocal or TEM as described previously. Examination of developing fiber cells revealed normal nuclei with dispersed chromatin and clear nucleoli typical of cells in active ribosome production to support protein synthesis. Early signs of nuclear degradation were observed about 300 μm from the lens capsule in Day 15 lenses where the nuclei display irregular nuclear stain and prominent indentations that sometimes contained a previously undescribed macromolecular aggregate attached to the nuclear envelope. We have termed this novel structure the nuclear excisosome. This complex by confocal is closely adherent to the nuclear envelope and by TEM appears to degrade the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope, then the inner leaflet up to 500 μm depth. The images suggest that the nuclear excisosome separates nuclear membrane proteins from lipids, which then form multilamellar assemblies that stain intensely in confocal and in TEM have 5 nm spacing consistent with pure lipid bilayers. The denuded nucleoplasm then degrades by condensation and loss of structure in the range 600 to 700 μm depth producing pyknotic nuclear remnants. None of these stages display any classic autophagic vesicles or lysosomes associated with nuclei. Uniquely, the origin of the nuclear excisosome is from filopodial-like projections of adjacent lens fiber cells that initially contact, and then appear to fuse with the outer nuclear membrane. These filopodial

  15. Bexarotene-Activated Retinoid X Receptors Regulate Neuronal Differentiation and Dendritic Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Mounier, Anais; Georgiev, Danko; Nam, Kyong Nyon; Fitz, Nicholas F.; Castranio, Emilie L.; Wolfe, Cody M.; Cronican, Andrea A.; Schug, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Bexarotene-activated retinoid X receptors (RXRs) ameliorate memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models, including mice expressing human apolipoprotein E (APOE) isoforms. The goal of this study was to gain further insight into molecular mechanisms whereby ligand-activated RXR can affect or restore cognitive functions. We used an unbiased approach to discover genome-wide changes in RXR cistrome (ChIP-Seq) and gene expression profile (RNA-Seq) in response to bexarotene in the cortex of APOE4 mice. Functional categories enriched in both datasets revealed that bexarotene-liganded RXR affected signaling pathways associated with neurogenesis and neuron projection development. To further validate the significance of RXR for these functions, we used mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, primary neurons, and APOE3 and APOE4 mice treated with bexarotene. In vitro data from ES cells confirmed that bexarotene-activated RXR affected neuronal development at different levels, including proliferation of neural progenitors and neuronal differentiation, and stimulated neurite outgrowth. This effect was validated in vivo by demonstrating an increased number of neuronal progenitors after bexarotene treatment in the dentate gyrus of APOE3 and APOE4 mice. In primary neurons, bexarotene enhanced the dendritic complexity characterized by increased branching, intersections, and bifurcations. This effect was confirmed by in vivo studies demonstrating that bexarotene significantly improved the compromised dendritic structure in the hippocampus of APOE4 mice. We conclude that bexarotene-activated RXRs promote genetic programs involved in the neurogenesis and development of neuronal projections and these results have significance for the improvement of cognitive deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Bexarotene-activated retinoid X receptors (RXRs) ameliorate memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models, including mice expressing human apolipoprotein E (APOE) isoforms. The goal of this

  16. Identification and Ultrastructural Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Degradation Complex in Differentiating Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M. Joseph; Brennan, Lisa A.; Gilliland, Kurt O.; Johnsen, Sönke; Kantorow, Marc

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved issue in structural biology is how the encapsulated lens removes membranous organelles to carry out its role as a transparent optical element. In this ultrastructural study, we establish a mechanism for nuclear elimination in the developing chick lens during the formation of the organelle-free zone. Day 12–15 chick embryo lenses were examined by high-resolution confocal light microscopy and thin section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following fixation in 10% formalin and 4% paraformaldehyde, and then processing for confocal or TEM as described previously. Examination of developing fiber cells revealed normal nuclei with dispersed chromatin and clear nucleoli typical of cells in active ribosome production to support protein synthesis. Early signs of nuclear degradation were observed about 300 μm from the lens capsule in Day 15 lenses where the nuclei display irregular nuclear stain and prominent indentations that sometimes contained a previously undescribed macromolecular aggregate attached to the nuclear envelope. We have termed this novel structure the nuclear excisosome. This complex by confocal is closely adherent to the nuclear envelope and by TEM appears to degrade the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope, then the inner leaflet up to 500 μm depth. The images suggest that the nuclear excisosome separates nuclear membrane proteins from lipids, which then form multilamellar assemblies that stain intensely in confocal and in TEM have 5 nm spacing consistent with pure lipid bilayers. The denuded nucleoplasm then degrades by condensation and loss of structure in the range 600 to 700 μm depth producing pyknotic nuclear remnants. None of these stages display any classic autophagic vesicles or lysosomes associated with nuclei. Uniquely, the origin of the nuclear excisosome is from filopodial-like projections of adjacent lens fiber cells that initially contact, and then appear to fuse with the outer nuclear membrane. These filopodial

  17. Differential diagnosis of hyperkalemia: an update to a complex problem

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriadis, T; Leivaditis, K; Antoniadi, G; Liakopoulos, V

    2012-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a relative common and sometimes life threatening electorlyte disorder. Although its symptomatic treatment is relatively easy, since precise therapeutic algorithms are available, its differential diagnosis is more complicated. The present review aims to unfold the differential diagnosis of hypekalemia using a pathophysiological, albeit clinically useful, approach. The basic elements of potassium homeostasis are provided, the causes of hyperkalemia are categorized and analysed and finally the required for the diferrential diagnosis laboratory tests are mentioned. PMID:23935306

  18. Neuropilin-1 forms complexes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsaka, Akimichi; Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Shibata, Miki; Komatsu, Norio

    2009-12-25

    We investigated whether the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR and neuropilin-1 [NRP-1]) could be specifically regulated during the megakaryocytic differentiation of human thrombopoietin (TPO)-dependent UT-7/TPO cells. Undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells expressed a functional VEGFR-2, leading to VEGF binding and VEGF{sub 165}-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition. The megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of NRP-1 mRNA and protein expression and by an increase in VEGF-binding activity, which was mainly mediated by VEGFR-2. VEGF{sub 165} promoted the formation of complexes containing NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 in undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells, PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells exhibited complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 even in the absence of VEGF{sub 165}. These findings suggest that NRP-1-VEGFR-2-complex formation may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by VEGF{sub 165} in megakaryocytic cells.

  19. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Fiona A.; Jensen, Thomas E.; Hardie, D. Grahame

    2015-01-01

    The γ subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different γ isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged versions of the γ1, γ2 or γ3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), γ1- and γ2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, γ3 complexes were barely activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr172 phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With γ1 complexes, activation and Thr172 phosphorylation induced by the upstream kinase LKB1 [liver kinase B1; but not calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ)] in cell-free assays was markedly promoted by AMP and, to a smaller extent and less potently, by ADP. However, effects of AMP or ADP on activation and phosphorylation of the γ2 and γ3 complexes were small or insignificant. Binding of AMP or ADP protected all three γ subunit complexes against inactivation by Thr172 dephosphorylation; with γ2 complexes, ADP had similar potency to AMP, but with γ1 and γ3 complexes, ADP was less potent than AMP. Thus, AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms respond differently to changes in AMP, ADP or ATP. These differences may tune the responses of the isoforms to fit their differing physiological roles. PMID:26542978

  20. Complexity and Hemispheric Abilities: Evidence for a Differential Impact on Semantics and Phonology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Tania; Monetta, Laura; Joanette, Yves

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to determine whether the phonological and semantic processing of words are similarly influenced by an increase in processing complexity. Thirty-six French-speaking young adults performed both semantic and phonological word judgment tasks, using a divided visual field procedure. The phonological complexity of words…

  1. The Differential Effects of Task Complexity on Domain-Specific and Peer Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zundert, Marjo J.; Sluijsmans, Dominique M. A.; Konings, Karen D.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study the relationship between domain-specific skills and peer assessment skills as a function of task complexity is investigated. We hypothesised that peer assessment skills were superposed on domain-specific skills and will therefore suffer more when higher cognitive load is induced by increased task complexity. In a mixed factorial…

  2. Landscape complexity differentially benefits generalist fourth, over specialized third, trophic level natural enemies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential loss of higher trophic levels in the face of natural habitat loss can result in the disruption of important ecosystem services such as pollination and biological control. Landscape- level conservation biological control aims to mitigate these negative impacts by conserving or resto...

  3. Solving Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations without Using Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kougias, Ioannis E.

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is a subject with a wide range of applications and the need of introducing it to students often arises in the last year of high school, as well as in the early stages of tertiary education. The usual methods of solving second-order ODEs with constant coefficients, among others, rely upon the use of complex…

  4. Chromatin-Remodelling Complex NURF Is Essential for Differentiation of Adult Melanocyte Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Koludrovic, Dana; Laurette, Patrick; Strub, Thomas; Keime, Céline; Le Coz, Madeleine; Coassolo, Sebastien; Mengus, Gabrielle; Larue, Lionel; Davidson, Irwin

    2015-10-01

    MIcrophthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) regulates melanocyte and melanoma physiology. We show that MITF associates the NURF chromatin-remodelling factor in melanoma cells. ShRNA-mediated silencing of the NURF subunit BPTF revealed its essential role in several melanoma cell lines and in untransformed melanocytes in vitro. Comparative RNA-seq shows that MITF and BPTF co-regulate overlapping gene expression programs in cell lines in vitro. Somatic and specific inactivation of Bptf in developing murine melanoblasts in vivo shows that Bptf regulates their proliferation, migration and morphology. Once born, Bptf-mutant mice display premature greying where the second post-natal coat is white. This second coat is normally pigmented by differentiated melanocytes derived from the adult melanocyte stem cell (MSC) population that is stimulated to proliferate and differentiate at anagen. An MSC population is established and maintained throughout the life of the Bptf-mutant mice, but these MSCs are abnormal and at anagen, give rise to reduced numbers of transient amplifying cells (TACs) that do not express melanocyte markers and fail to differentiate into mature melanin producing melanocytes. MSCs display a transcriptionally repressed chromatin state and Bptf is essential for reactivation of the melanocyte gene expression program at anagen, the subsequent normal proliferation of TACs and their differentiation into mature melanocytes. PMID:26440048

  5. Chromatin-Remodelling Complex NURF Is Essential for Differentiation of Adult Melanocyte Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koludrovic, Dana; Laurette, Patrick; Strub, Thomas; Keime, Céline; Le Coz, Madeleine; Coassolo, Sebastien; Mengus, Gabrielle; Larue, Lionel; Davidson, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    MIcrophthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) regulates melanocyte and melanoma physiology. We show that MITF associates the NURF chromatin-remodelling factor in melanoma cells. ShRNA-mediated silencing of the NURF subunit BPTF revealed its essential role in several melanoma cell lines and in untransformed melanocytes in vitro. Comparative RNA-seq shows that MITF and BPTF co-regulate overlapping gene expression programs in cell lines in vitro. Somatic and specific inactivation of Bptf in developing murine melanoblasts in vivo shows that Bptf regulates their proliferation, migration and morphology. Once born, Bptf-mutant mice display premature greying where the second post-natal coat is white. This second coat is normally pigmented by differentiated melanocytes derived from the adult melanocyte stem cell (MSC) population that is stimulated to proliferate and differentiate at anagen. An MSC population is established and maintained throughout the life of the Bptf-mutant mice, but these MSCs are abnormal and at anagen, give rise to reduced numbers of transient amplifying cells (TACs) that do not express melanocyte markers and fail to differentiate into mature melanin producing melanocytes. MSCs display a transcriptionally repressed chromatin state and Bptf is essential for reactivation of the melanocyte gene expression program at anagen, the subsequent normal proliferation of TACs and their differentiation into mature melanocytes. PMID:26440048

  6. Differential susceptibility of mitochondrial complex II to inhibition by oxaloacetate in brain and heart.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Anna; Shurubor, Yevgeniya; Valsecchi, Federica; Manfredi, Giovanni; Galkin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II is a key mitochondrial enzyme connecting the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the electron transport chain. Studies of complex II are clinically important since new roles for this enzyme have recently emerged in cell signalling, cancer biology, immune response and neurodegeneration. Oxaloacetate (OAA) is an intermediate of the TCA cycle and at the same time is an inhibitor of complex II with high affinity (Kd~10(-8)M). Whether or not OAA inhibition of complex II is a physiologically relevant process is a significant, but still controversial topic. We found that complex II from mouse heart and brain tissue has similar affinity to OAA and that only a fraction of the enzyme in isolated mitochondrial membranes (30.2±6.0% and 56.4±5.6% in the heart and brain, respectively) is in the free, active form. Since OAA could bind to complex II during isolation, we established a novel approach to deplete OAA in the homogenates at the early stages of isolation. In heart, this treatment significantly increased the fraction of free enzyme, indicating that OAA binds to complex II during isolation. In brain the OAA-depleting system did not significantly change the amount of free enzyme, indicating that a large fraction of complex II is already in the OAA-bound inactive form. Furthermore, short-term ischemia resulted in a dramatic decline of OAA in tissues, but it did not change the amount of free complex II. Our data show that in brain OAA is an endogenous effector of complex II, potentially capable of modulating the activity of the enzyme. PMID:27287543

  7. Polymorphisms in the ITS rDNA regions for differentiating strains of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex in Sfax-Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Drira, I; Neji, S; Hadrich, I; Trabelsi, H; Sellami, H; Cheikhrouhou, F; Guidara, R; Makni, F; Ayadi, A

    2014-08-01

    The Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex is the main cause of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Molecular research has provided useful insights into the taxonomy of this complex to overcome the challenges with conventional diagnostics. The aim of this study was to identify, type and differentiate anthropophilic and zoophilic species of the T. mentagrophytes complex. Sixty clinical samples identified as T. mentagrophytes by morphological characteristics were isolated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The identification of our strains by conventional methods was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing in 93.34% of the cases. The strains under investigation were recategorised as T. rubrum (Tr2711). In addition, PCR products were independently digested with the restriction endonucleases, MvaI and HinfI, to produce a single dominant profile for T. interdigitale. ITS sequence analysis revealed a polymorphism in the ITS1 and 5.8S regions. Analysis of the consensus sequences distinguished four types of genotypes among our T. interdigitale species. Moreover, ITS type I was the dominant genotype characterising the anthropophilic variant of T. interdigitale. The phylogenetic study showed that only 5% of our strains were zoophilic. PCR sequencing was useful for distinguishing anthropophilic and zoophilic species of T. interdigitale, in which the differentiation is relevant because it helps to prescribe the correct treatment and to identify the surrounding source of infection. PMID:24621449

  8. Cilium transition zone proteome reveals compartmentalization and differential dynamics of ciliopathy complexes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Samuel; Moreira-Leite, Flavia; Varga, Vladimir; Gull, Keith

    2016-08-30

    The transition zone (TZ) of eukaryotic cilia and flagella is a structural intermediate between the basal body and the axoneme that regulates ciliary traffic. Mutations in genes encoding TZ proteins (TZPs) cause human inherited diseases (ciliopathies). Here, we use the trypanosome to identify TZ components and localize them to TZ subdomains, showing that the Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) is more distal in the TZ than the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex. Several of the TZPs identified here have human orthologs. Functional analysis shows essential roles for TZPs in motility, in building the axoneme central pair apparatus and in flagellum biogenesis. Analysis using RNAi and HaloTag fusion protein approaches reveals that most TZPs (including the MKS ciliopathy complex) show long-term stable association with the TZ, whereas the BBSome is dynamic. We propose that some Bardet-Biedl syndrome and MKS pleiotropy may be caused by mutations that impact TZP complex dynamics. PMID:27519801

  9. Fam65b is important for formation of the HDAC6-dysferlin protein complex during myogenic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Anuradha; Kawahara, Genri; Gupta, Vandana A; Rozkalne, Anete; Beauvais, Ariane; Kunkel, Louis M; Gussoni, Emanuela

    2014-07-01

    Previously, we identified family with sequence similarity 65, member B (Fam65b), as a protein transiently up-regulated during differentiation and fusion of human myogenic cells. Silencing of Fam65b expression results in severe reduction of myogenin expression and consequent lack of myoblast fusion. The molecular function of Fam65b and whether misregulation of its expression could be causative of muscle diseases are unknown. Protein pulldowns were used to identify Fam65b-interacting proteins in differentiating human muscle cells and regenerating muscle tissue. In vitro, human muscle cells were treated with histone-deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, and expression of Fam65b and interacting proteins was studied. Nontreated cells were used as controls. In vivo, expression of Fam65b was down-regulated in developing zebrafish to determine the effects on muscle development. Fam65b binds to HDAC6 and dysferlin, the protein mutated in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B. The tricomplex Fam65b-HDAC6-dysferlin is transient, and Fam65b expression is necessary for the complex to form. Treatment of myogenic cells with pan-HDAC or HDAC6-specific inhibitors alters Fam65b expression, while dysferlin expression does not change. Inhibition of Fam65b expression in developing zebrafish results in abnormal muscle, with low birefringence, tears at the myosepta, and increased embryo lethality. Fam65b is an essential component of the HDAC6-dysferlin complex. Down-regulation of Fam65b in developing muscle causes changes consistent with muscle disease.-Balasubramanian, A., Kawahara, G., Gupta, V. A., Rozkalne, A., Beauvais, A., Kunkel, L. M., Gussoni, E. Fam65b is important for formation of the HDAC6-dysferlin protein complex during myogenic cell differentiation. PMID:24687993

  10. Three RNA Binding Proteins Form a Complex to Promote Differentiation of Germline Stem Cell Lineage in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shaowei; Geng, Qing; Gao, Yu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    In regenerative tissues, one of the strategies to protect stem cells from genetic aberrations, potentially caused by frequent cell division, is to transiently expand the stem cell daughters before further differentiation. However, failure to exit the transit amplification may lead to overgrowth, and the molecular mechanism governing this regulation remains vague. In a Drosophila mutagenesis screen for factors involved in the regulation of germline stem cell (GSC) lineage, we isolated a mutation in the gene CG32364, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein (RBP) and is designated as tumorous testis (tut). In tut mutant, spermatogonia fail to differentiate and over-amplify, a phenotype similar to that in mei-P26 mutant. Mei-P26 is a TRIM-NHL tumor suppressor homolog required for the differentiation of GSC lineage. We found that Tut binds preferentially a long isoform of mei-P26 3′UTR, and is essential for the translational repression of mei-P26 reporter. Bam and Bgcn are both RBPs that have also been shown to repress mei-P26 expression. Our genetic analyses indicate that tut, bam, or bgcn is required to repress mei-P26 and to promote the differentiation of GSCs. Biochemically, we demonstrate that Tut, Bam, and Bgcn can form a physical complex in which Bam holds Tut on its N-terminus and Bgcn on its C-terminus. Our in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrate that Tut acts with Bam, Bgcn to accurately coordinate proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila germline stem cell lineage. PMID:25412508

  11. Knockdown of PRKAR1A, the Gene Responsible for Carney Complex, Interferes With Differentiation in Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Manchanda, Parmeet K.; Wu, Dayong; Wang, Qianben

    2014-01-01

    PRKAR1A is the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of protein kinase A, and it is the cause of the inherited human tumor syndrome Carney complex. Data from our laboratory has demonstrated that Prkar1a loss causes tumors in multiple cell lineages, including neural crest cells and osteoblasts. We have proposed that one mechanism by which tumorigenesis occurs is through the failure of terminal differentiation. In the present study, we directly test the effects of Prkar1a reduction on osteogenic differentiation in mouse and human cells in vitro. We found that Prkar1a levels noticeably increased during osteoblastic differentiation, indicating a positive correlation between the expression of Prkar1a and osteogenic potential. To validate this hypothesis, we generated stable Prkar1a knockdown in both mouse and human cells. These cells displayed significantly suppressed bone nodule formation and decreased expression of osteoblast markers such as osteocalcin and osteopontin. These observations imply that the antiosteogenic effect of Prkar1a ablation is not species or cell line specific. Furthermore, because Runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) is a key mediator of osteoblast differentiation, we reasoned that the function of this transcription factor may be inhibited by Prkar1a knockdown. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays demonstrated that Prkar1a ablation repressed DNA binding and function of Runx2 at its target genes. Additionally, we determined that this effect is likely due to reductions in the Runx2-cooperating transcription factors forkhead box O1 and activating transcription factor 4. Taken together, this study provides direct evidence that ablation of Prkar1a interferes with signaling pathways necessary for osteoblast differentiation. PMID:24506536

  12. Knockdown of PRKAR1A, the gene responsible for Carney complex, interferes with differentiation in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Wu, Dayong; Wang, Qianben; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2014-03-01

    PRKAR1A is the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of protein kinase A, and it is the cause of the inherited human tumor syndrome Carney complex. Data from our laboratory has demonstrated that Prkar1a loss causes tumors in multiple cell lineages, including neural crest cells and osteoblasts. We have proposed that one mechanism by which tumorigenesis occurs is through the failure of terminal differentiation. In the present study, we directly test the effects of Prkar1a reduction on osteogenic differentiation in mouse and human cells in vitro. We found that Prkar1a levels noticeably increased during osteoblastic differentiation, indicating a positive correlation between the expression of Prkar1a and osteogenic potential. To validate this hypothesis, we generated stable Prkar1a knockdown in both mouse and human cells. These cells displayed significantly suppressed bone nodule formation and decreased expression of osteoblast markers such as osteocalcin and osteopontin. These observations imply that the antiosteogenic effect of Prkar1a ablation is not species or cell line specific. Furthermore, because Runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) is a key mediator of osteoblast differentiation, we reasoned that the function of this transcription factor may be inhibited by Prkar1a knockdown. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays demonstrated that Prkar1a ablation repressed DNA binding and function of Runx2 at its target genes. Additionally, we determined that this effect is likely due to reductions in the Runx2-cooperating transcription factors forkhead box O1 and activating transcription factor 4. Taken together, this study provides direct evidence that ablation of Prkar1a interferes with signaling pathways necessary for osteoblast differentiation. PMID:24506536

  13. Complex effect of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on the differentiation and functional activity of human pre-osteoclastic cells.

    PubMed

    Costa-Rodrigues, João; Silva, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Almeida, Maria Margarida; Costa, Maria Elisabete; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2014-12-01

    Nanosized hydroxyapatite (HA) is a promising material in clinical applications targeting the bone tissue. NanoHA is able to modulate bone cellular events, which accounts for its potential utility, but also raises safety concerns regarding the maintenance of the bone homeostasis. This work analyses the effects of HA nanoparticles (HAnp) on osteoclastic differentiation and activity, an issue that has been barely addressed. Rod-like HAnp, produced by a hydrothermal precipitation method, were tested on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), which contains the CD14+ osteoclastic precursors, in unstimulated or osteoclastogenic-induced conditions. HAnp were added at three time-points during the osteoclastic differentiation pathway, and cell response was evaluated for osteoclastic related parameters. Results showed that HAnp modulated the differentiation and function of osteoclastic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the effects were dependent on the stage of osteoclastic differentiation. In unstimulated PBMC, HAnp significantly increased osteoclastogenesis, leading to the formation of mature osteoclasts, as evident by the significant increase of TRAP activity, number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells, osteoclastic gene expression and resorbing ability. However, in a population of mature osteoclasts (formed in osteoclastogenic-induced PBMC cultures), HAnp caused a dose-dependent decrease on the osteoclastic-related parameters. These results highlight the complex effects of HAnp in osteoclastic differentiation and activity, and suggest the possibility of HAnp to modulate/disrupt osteoclastic behavior, with eventual imbalances in the bone metabolism. This should be carefully considered in bone-related and other established and prospective biomedical applications of HAnp. PMID:26000372

  14. A (Not Really) Complex Method for Finding Solutions to Linear Differential Equations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 497.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uebelacker, James W.

    This module considers ordinary linear differential equations with constant coefficients. The "complex method" used to find solutions is discussed, with numerous examples. The unit includes both problem sets and an exam, with answers provided for both. (MP)

  15. Differential evolution based on the node degree of its complex network: Initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skanderova, Lenka; Zelinka, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is reported our progress in the synthesis of two partially different areas of research: complex networks and evolutionary computation. Ideas and results reported and mentioned here are based on our previous results and experiments. The main core of our participation is an evolutionary algorithm performance improvement by means of complex network use. Complex network is related to the evolutionary dynamics and reflect it. We report here our latest results as well as propositions on further research that is in process in our group (http://navy.cs.vsb.cz/). Only the main ideas and results are reported here, for more details it is recommended to read related literature of our previous research and results.

  16. Writing Development in Four Genres from Grades Three to Seven: Syntactic Complexity and Genre Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Scott F.; Nagy, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Two measures of syntactic complexity, clauses per T-unit and words per clause, were used to examine differences among four genres of text--narrative, descriptive, compare/contrast, and persuasive--written by the same two cohorts (83 students in grades three and five and 96 students in grades five and seven) on two occasions 2 years apart as part…

  17. Differential proteomic profiling unveils new molecular mechanisms associated with mitochondrial complex III deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Morán, María; López-Bernardo, Elia; Cadenas, Susana; Hidalgo, Beatriz; Sánchez, Ricardo; Seneca, Sara; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A.; Ugalde, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the cellular pathways and metabolic adaptations that take place in primary skin fibroblasts from patients with mutations in BCS1L, a major genetic cause of mitochondrial complex III enzyme deficiency. Mutant fibroblasts exhibited low oxygen consumption rates and intracellular ATP levels, indicating that the main altered molecular event probably is a limited respiration-coupled ATP production through the OXPHOS system. Two-dimensional DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analyses unambiguously identified 39 proteins whose expression was significantly altered in complex III-deficient fibroblasts. Extensive statistical and cluster analyses revealed a protein profile characteristic for the BCS1L mutant fibroblasts that included alterations in energy metabolism, cell signaling and gene expression regulation, cytoskeleton formation and maintenance, and intracellular stress responses. The physiological validation of the predicted functional adaptations of human cultured fibroblasts to complex III deficiency confirmed the up-regulation of glycolytic enzyme activities and the accumulation of branched-chain among other amino acids, suggesting the activation of anaerobic glycolysis and cellular catabolic states, in particular protein catabolism, together with autophagy as adaptive responses to mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and ATP deficiency. Our data point to an overall metabolic and genetic reprogramming that could contribute to explain the clinical manifestations of complex III deficiency in patients. PMID:25239759

  18. Differential Relations between Facets of Complex Problem Solving and Students' Immigration Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnleitner, Philipp; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich; Martin, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the assessment of complex problem solving (CPS) has received increasing attention in the context of international large-scale assessments, its fairness in regard to students' cultural background has gone largely unexplored. On the basis of a student sample of 9th-graders (N = 299), including a representative number of immigrant students (N…

  19. Differential Disadvantage of Anglophone Weak Readers Due to English Orthographic Complexity and Cognitive Processing Weakness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galletly, Susan A.; Knight, Bruce Allen

    2011-01-01

    The highly regular orthographies (spelling systems) of many nations expedite literacy development, and their children experience a rapid transition from early literacy (learning to read and write) to sophisticated literacy (reading and writing to learn). In contrast, English orthographic complexity impedes literacy development, particularly for…

  20. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 Controls CD8 T Cell Memory Differentiation in a Foxo1-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianjun; Tschumi, Benjamin O; Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; Oberle, Susanne G; Meyer, Marten; Samson, Guerric; Rüegg, Markus A; Hall, Michael N; Fajas, Lluis; Zehn, Dietmar; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Donda, Alena; Romero, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    Upon infection, antigen-specific naive CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into short-lived effector cells (SLECs) and memory precursor cells (MPECs). The underlying signaling pathways remain largely unresolved. We show that Rictor, the core component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), regulates SLEC and MPEC commitment. Rictor deficiency favors memory formation and increases IL-2 secretion capacity without dampening effector functions. Moreover, mTORC2-deficient memory T cells mount more potent recall responses. Enhanced memory formation in the absence of mTORC2 was associated with Eomes and Tcf-1 upregulation, repression of T-bet, enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, and fatty acid oxidation. This transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming is mainly driven by nuclear stabilization of Foxo1. Silencing of Foxo1 reversed the increased MPEC differentiation and IL-2 production and led to an impaired recall response of Rictor KO memory T cells. Therefore, mTORC2 is a critical regulator of CD8 T cell differentiation and may be an important target for immunotherapy interventions. PMID:26804903

  1. A genome wide transcriptional model of the complex response to pre-TCR signalling during thymocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Barbarulo, Alessandro; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Furmanski, Anna; Saldaña, José Ignacio; Ono, Masahiro; Hubank, Mike; Barenco, Martino; Crompton, Tessa

    2015-10-01

    Developing thymocytes require pre-TCR signalling to differentiate from CD4-CD8- double negative to CD4+CD8+ double positive cell. Here we followed the transcriptional response to pre-TCR signalling in a synchronised population of differentiating double negative thymocytes. This time series analysis revealed a complex transcriptional response, in which thousands of genes were up and down-regulated before changes in cell surface phenotype were detected. Genome-wide measurement of RNA degradation of individual genes showed great heterogeneity in the rate of degradation between different genes. We therefore used time course expression and degradation data and a genome wide transcriptional modelling (GWTM) strategy to model the transcriptional response of genes up-regulated on pre-TCR signal transduction. This analysis revealed five major temporally distinct transcriptional activities that up regulate transcription through time, whereas down-regulation of expression occurred in three waves. Our model thus placed known regulators in a temporal perspective, and in addition identified novel candidate regulators of thymocyte differentiation. PMID:26415229

  2. Dynamic Interplay of Smooth Muscle α-Actin Gene-Regulatory Proteins Reflects the Biological Complexity of Myofibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Strauch, Arthur Roger; Hariharan, Seethalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (MFBs) are smooth muscle-like cells that provide contractile force required for tissue repair during wound healing. The leading agonist for MFB differentiation is transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) that induces transcription of genes encoding smooth muscle α-actin (SMαA) and interstitial collagen that are markers for MFB differentiation. TGFβ1 augments activation of Smad transcription factors, pro-survival Akt kinase, and p38 MAP kinase as well as Wingless/int (Wnt) developmental signaling. These actions conspire to activate β-catenin needed for expression of cyclin D, laminin, fibronectin, and metalloproteinases that aid in repairing epithelial cells and their associated basement membranes. Importantly, β-catenin also provides a feed-forward stimulus that amplifies local TGFβ1 autocrine/paracrine signaling causing transition of mesenchymal stromal cells, pericytes, and epithelial cells into contractile MFBs. Complex, mutually interactive mechanisms have evolved that permit several mammalian cell types to activate the SMαA promoter and undergo MFB differentiation. These molecular controls will be reviewed with an emphasis on the dynamic interplay between serum response factor, TGFβ1-activated Smads, Wnt-activated β-catenin, p38/calcium-activated NFAT protein, and the RNA-binding proteins, Purα, Purβ, and YB-1, in governing transcriptional and translational control of the SMαA gene in injury-activated MFBs. PMID:24832798

  3. Differential response of continental stock complexes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, Kevin D.; Shank, Burton V.; Todd, Christopher D.; McGinnity, Philip; Nye, Janet A.

    2014-05-01

    Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, in the North Atlantic are managed as a set of population complexes distributed in North America and Europe. In recent years, these complexes have experienced reduced marine survival and many populations within the complexes are at risk, especially those at the southern ends of the species amphi-Atlantic range. Atlantic salmon is an anadromous fish dividing its life history between residence in freshwater and the marine environment. The freshwater portion of the life history includes spawning and the rearing of juveniles where in-river production has tended to be relatively stable, whereas the first year at sea, termed the post-smolt year, is characterized by more variable rates of mortality. Although their habitats are widely separated geographically along the North Atlantic seaboards, strong recruitment coherence exists between North American and European stock complexes. This recruitment coherence is correlated with ocean temperature variation associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) appears to be relatively unimportant as a driver of salmon abundance. The mechanism determining the link between AMO-related thermal variation and abundance appears to differ fundamentally for the two continental stock groupings. Whereas ocean climate variability during the first springtime months of juvenile salmon migration to sea appears to be important to the survival of North American stocks, summer climate variation appears to be central to adult recruitment variation for European stocks. This contrast in seasonal effects appears to be related to the varying roles of predation pressure and size-related mortality on the continental stock complexes. The anticipated warming due to global climate change will impose thermal conditions on salmon populations outside historical context and challenge the ability of many populations to persist.

  4. Differential Effects of Munc18s on Multiple Degranulation-Relevant Trans-SNARE Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Arnold, Matthew Grant; Kumar, Sushmitha Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell exocytosis, which includes compound degranulation and vesicle-associated piecemeal degranulation, requires multiple Q- and R- SNAREs. It is not clear how these SNAREs pair to form functional trans-SNARE complexes and how these trans-SNARE complexes are selectively regulated for fusion. Here we undertake a comprehensive examination of the capacity of two Q-SNARE subcomplexes (syntaxin3/SNAP-23 and syntaxin4/SNAP-23) to form fusogenic trans-SNARE complexes with each of the four granule-borne R-SNAREs (VAMP2, 3, 7, 8). We report the identification of at least six distinct trans-SNARE complexes under enhanced tethering conditions: i) VAMP2/syntaxin3/SNAP-23, ii) VAMP2/syntaxin4/SNAP-23, iii) VAMP3/syntaxin3/SNAP-23, iv) VAMP3/syntaxin4/SNAP-23, v) VAMP8/syntaxin3/SNAP-23, and vi) VAMP8/syntaxin4/SNAP-23. We show for the first time that Munc18a operates synergistically with SNAP-23-based non-neuronal SNARE complexes (i to iv) in lipid mixing, in contrast to Munc18b and c, which exhibit no positive effect on any SNARE combination tested. Pre-incubation with Munc18a renders the SNARE-dependent fusion reactions insensitive to the otherwise inhibitory R-SNARE cytoplasmic domains, suggesting a protective role of Munc18a for its cognate SNAREs. Our findings substantiate the recently discovered but unexpected requirement for Munc18a in mast cell exocytosis, and implicate post-translational modifications in Munc18b/c activation. PMID:26384026

  5. Macroorganization of Chlorophyll a/b light-harvesting complex in thylakoids and aggregates: information from circular differential scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Garab, G.; Faludi-Daniel, A.; Sutherland, J.C.; Hind, G.

    1988-04-05

    Circular dichroism (CD) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra were recorded for spinach thylakoids and for isolated, aggregated chlorophyll a/b light-harvesting pigment-protein complex, in random and magnetically aligned states of orientation at room and low temperatures. The shape and magnitude of the CD signal of most bands strongly depended on the orientation of the thylakoid membranes or the aggregated pigment-protein complex. In both thylakoids and aggregated light-harvesting complexes, however, the MCD spectra of the two different orientations were almost identical. Random and magnetically aligned samples exhibited anomalous, large CD signals outside the bands of pigment absorbance. Lack of similarity between the corresponding MCD and CD spectra showed that the large CD signals are not produced as a distortion of CD of absorbance by light scattering. Instead, these anomalous spectral features are believed to originate in differential selective scattering of circularly polarized light. The results lead to the conclusion that the light-harvesting pigment-protein complex in thylakoid grana forms a helical macroarray with dimensions commensurate with the wavelengths of the anomalous circular dichroism signals. A hypothesis is put forward suggesting a role for these macrodomains in granal organization.

  6. Differential mobility of pigment-protein complexes in granal and agranal thylakoid membranes of C₃ and C₄ plants.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Helmut; Sharpe, Richard M; Herbstova, Miroslava; Yarbrough, Robert; Edwards, Gerald E

    2013-01-01

    The photosynthetic performance of plants is crucially dependent on the mobility of the molecular complexes that catalyze the conversion of sunlight to metabolic energy equivalents in the thylakoid membrane network inside chloroplasts. The role of the extensive folding of thylakoid membranes leading to structural differentiation into stacked grana regions and unstacked stroma lamellae for diffusion-based processes of the photosynthetic machinery is poorly understood. This study examines, to our knowledge for the first time, the mobility of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in unstacked thylakoid regions in the C₃ plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and agranal bundle sheath chloroplasts of the C₄ plants sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and maize (Zea mays) by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In unstacked thylakoid membranes, more than 50% of the protein complexes are mobile, whereas this number drops to about 20% in stacked grana regions. The higher molecular mobility in unstacked thylakoid regions is explained by a lower protein-packing density compared with stacked grana regions. It is postulated that thylakoid membrane stacking to form grana leads to protein crowding that impedes lateral diffusion processes but is required for efficient light harvesting of the modularly organized photosystem II and its light-harvesting antenna system. In contrast, the arrangement of the photosystem I light-harvesting complex I in separate units in unstacked thylakoid membranes does not require dense protein packing, which is advantageous for protein diffusion. PMID:23148078

  7. Phospholipase D regulates myogenic differentiation through the activation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Rami; Zeiller, Caroline; Pirola, Luciano; Di Grazia, Antonio; Naro, Fabio; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Némoz, Georges

    2011-06-24

    How phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in myogenesis remains unclear. At the onset of myogenic differentiation of L6 cells induced by the PLD agonist vasopressin in the absence of serum, mTORC1 complex was rapidly activated, as reflected by phosphorylation of S6 kinase1 (S6K1). Both the long (p85) and short (p70) S6K1 isoforms were phosphorylated in a PLD1-dependent way. Short rapamycin treatment specifically inhibiting mTORC1 suppressed p70 but not p85 phosphorylation, suggesting that p85 might be directly activated by phosphatidic acid. Vasopressin stimulation also induced phosphorylation of Akt on Ser-473 through PLD1-dependent activation of mTORC2 complex. In this model of myogenesis, mTORC2 had a positive role mostly unrelated to Akt activation, whereas mTORC1 had a negative role, associated with S6K1-induced Rictor phosphorylation. The PLD requirement for differentiation can thus be attributed to its ability to trigger via mTORC2 activation the phosphorylation of an effector that could be PKCα. Moreover, PLD is involved in a counter-regulation loop expected to limit the response. This study thus brings new insights in the intricate way PLD and mTOR cooperate to control myogenesis. PMID:21525000

  8. [The differentiation of the antigens making up the circulating immune complexes].

    PubMed

    Gorina, L G; Vul'fovich, Iu V

    1996-01-01

    A simple method for the detection and analysis of circulating immune complexes (CIC) in specimens of biological fluids is proposed. The method was approved in the examination of patients with chronic infections caused by mycoplasmas and Streptococcus pyogenes L-forms. The method made it possible to diagnose infectious diseases accompanied by the formation of immune complexes and to study the dynamics of the processes of the accumulation and elimination of CIC in the course of the disease. Thus, the detection rate of specific antigens (Ag) incorporated into CIC in patients with mycoplasmal pneumonia exceeded 90 %. In children aged up to 1 year this rate decreased to 40 %. The diagnostic value of the determination of specific Ag incorporated into CIC was shown in streptococcal infections caused by S.pyogenes L-forms, viz. in frequently relapsing erysipelas, as well as in subacute rheumatism and in infectious allergic myocarditis. PMID:8820681

  9. Differentiation in the Elymus dahuricus complex (Poaceae): evidence from grain proteins, DNA, and crossability.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, A V; Baum, B R; Bailey, L G; Agafonova, O V

    2001-01-01

    The status of the taxa Elymus dahuricus Turcz. ex Griseb., E. excelsus Turcz. ex Griseb., E. woroschilowii Probat. and E. tangutorum (Nevski) Hand.-Mazz., all of which are sometimes treated as members of E. dahuricus s.l. or as constituting the E. dahuricus complex, has been investigated using morphological, biochemical (SDS-PAGE of endosperm proteins) and molecular (DNA-AFLP) variation characteristics. Populations include accessions from Siberia, Far East (Russia), Tien-Shan (Kirghizstan), and Tibet and Sichuan Provinces (China). Variation in the morphological characteristics and endosperm proteins patterns have been found in all populations of the complex. DNA variation was very low within populations but was different among populations; this was attributed to genetic drift. Seed fertility of artificial hybrids and F2-F3 progenies in 38 combinations was analyzed. All biotypes studied form a common recombination genepool (RGP). The reproductive compatibility of hybrid combinations decreases with increased geographical separation of the parents. Differences in protein patterns and in genetic variation drawn from DNA-AFLPs and phenotypical segregation in F2 on series of diagnostic characters does not support existing taxonomic treatments of the E. dahuricus complex in Southern Russia, and Central-Asian area. The E. dahuricus complex seems to be a polymorphic species having a wide geographical range and wide genetic variation. The different species need probably be relegated to infraspecific rank. We have refrained from making the necessary combinations pending examination of additional specimens, including specimens of taxa not included in this study and the type specimens of all taxa involved. PMID:12152347

  10. Complexity of indica-japonica varietal differentiation in Bangladesh rice landraces revealed by microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mumu; Zhu, Zuofeng; Tan, Lubin; Liu, Fengxia; Fu, Yongcai; Sun, Chuanqing; Cai, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    To understand the genetic diversity and indica-japonica differentiation in Bangladesh rice varieties, a total of 151 accessions of rice varieties mostly Bangladesh traditional varieties including Aus, Boro, broadcast Aman, transplant Aman and Rayada varietal groups were genotyped using 47 rice nuclear SSRs. As a result, three distinct groups were detected by cluster analysis, corresponding to indica, Aus and japonica rice. Among deepwater rice varieties analyzed some having particular morphological features that mainly corresponded to the japonica varietal group. Some small seeded and aromatic varieties from Bangladesh also corresponded to the japonica varietal group. This research for the first time establishes that the japonica varietal group is a prominent component of traditional varieties in Bangladesh, particularly in deepwater areas. PMID:23853518

  11. Hydraulic Transients in the Long Diversion-Type Hydropower Station with a Complex Differential Surge Tank

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Based on the theory of hydraulic transients and the method of characteristics (MOC), a mathematic model of the differential surge tank with pressure-reduction orifices (PROs) and overflow weirs for transient calculation is proposed. The numerical model of hydraulic transients is established using the data of a practical hydropower station; and the probable transients are simulated. The results show that successive load rejection is critical for calculating the maximum pressure in spiral case and the maximum rotating speed of runner when the bifurcated pipe is converging under the surge tank in a diversion-type hydropower station; the pressure difference between two sides of breast wall is large during transient conditions, and it would be more serious when simultaneous load rejections happen after load acceptance; the reasonable arrangement of PROs on breast wall can effectively decrease the pressure difference. PMID:25133213

  12. Differential Stability of PNS and CNS Nodal Complexes When Neuronal Neurofascin Is Lost

    PubMed Central

    Desmazieres, Anne; Zonta, Barbara; Zhang, Ao; Wu, Lai-Man N.; Sherman, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Fast, saltatory conduction in myelinated nerves requires the clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) at nodes of Ranvier in a nodal complex. The Neurofascin (Nfasc) gene encodes neuronal Neurofascin 186 (Nfasc186) at the node and glial Neurofascin 155 at the paranode, and these proteins play a key role in node assembly. However, their role in the maintenance and stability of the node is less well understood. Here we show that by inducible ablation of Nfasc in neurons in adult mice, Nfasc186 expression is reduced by >99% and 94% at PNS and CNS nodes, respectively. Gliomedin and NrCAM at PNS and brevican at CNS nodes are largely lost with neuronal neurofascin; however, Nav at nodes of Ranvier persist, albeit with ∼40% reduction in expression levels. βIV Spectrin, ankyrin G, and, to a lesser extent, the β1 subunit of the sodium channel, are less affected at the PNS node than in the CNS. Nevertheless, there is a 38% reduction in PNS conduction velocity. Loss of Nfasc186 provokes CNS paranodal disorganization, but this does not contribute to loss of Nav. These results show that Nav at PNS nodes are still maintained in a nodal complex when neuronal neurofascin is depleted, whereas the retention of nodal Nav in the CNS, despite more extensive dissolution of the complex, suggests a supportive role for the partially disrupted paranodal axoglial junction in selectively maintaining Nav at the CNS node. PMID:24719087

  13. Differential stability of PNS and CNS nodal complexes when neuronal neurofascin is lost.

    PubMed

    Desmazieres, Anne; Zonta, Barbara; Zhang, Ao; Wu, Lai-Man N; Sherman, Diane L; Brophy, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Fast, saltatory conduction in myelinated nerves requires the clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) at nodes of Ranvier in a nodal complex. The Neurofascin (Nfasc) gene encodes neuronal Neurofascin 186 (Nfasc186) at the node and glial Neurofascin 155 at the paranode, and these proteins play a key role in node assembly. However, their role in the maintenance and stability of the node is less well understood. Here we show that by inducible ablation of Nfasc in neurons in adult mice, Nfasc186 expression is reduced by >99% and 94% at PNS and CNS nodes, respectively. Gliomedin and NrCAM at PNS and brevican at CNS nodes are largely lost with neuronal neurofascin; however, Nav at nodes of Ranvier persist, albeit with ∼40% reduction in expression levels. βIV Spectrin, ankyrin G, and, to a lesser extent, the β1 subunit of the sodium channel, are less affected at the PNS node than in the CNS. Nevertheless, there is a 38% reduction in PNS conduction velocity. Loss of Nfasc186 provokes CNS paranodal disorganization, but this does not contribute to loss of Nav. These results show that Nav at PNS nodes are still maintained in a nodal complex when neuronal neurofascin is depleted, whereas the retention of nodal Nav in the CNS, despite more extensive dissolution of the complex, suggests a supportive role for the partially disrupted paranodal axoglial junction in selectively maintaining Nav at the CNS node. PMID:24719087

  14. Path Complexity in Virtual Water Maze Navigation: Differential Associations with Age, Sex, and Regional Brain Volume.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ana M; Yuan, Peng; Dahle, Cheryl L; Bender, Andrew R; Yang, Yiqin; Raz, Naftali

    2015-09-01

    Studies of human navigation in virtual maze environments have consistently linked advanced age with greater distance traveled between the start and the goal and longer duration of the search. Observations of search path geometry suggest that routes taken by older adults may be unnecessarily complex and that excessive path complexity may be an indicator of cognitive difficulties experienced by older navigators. In a sample of healthy adults, we quantify search path complexity in a virtual Morris water maze with a novel method based on fractal dimensionality. In a two-level hierarchical linear model, we estimated improvement in navigation performance across trials by a decline in route length, shortening of search time, and reduction in fractal dimensionality of the path. While replicating commonly reported age and sex differences in time and distance indices, a reduction in fractal dimension of the path accounted for improvement across trials, independent of age or sex. The volumes of brain regions associated with the establishment of cognitive maps (parahippocampal gyrus and hippocampus) were related to path dimensionality, but not to the total distance and time. Thus, fractal dimensionality of a navigational path may present a useful complementary method of quantifying performance in navigation. PMID:24860019

  15. Members of the Candida parapsilosis Complex and Candida albicans are Differentially Recognized by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mata, Eine; Navarro-Arias, María J.; Pérez-García, Luis A.; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; López, Mercedes G.; Csonka, Katalin; Gacser, Attila; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic infections caused by members of the Candida parapsilosis complex are currently associated to high morbility and mortality rates, and are considered as relevant as those caused by Candida albicans. Since the fungal cell wall is the first point of contact with the host cells, here we performed a comparison of this organelle in members of the C. parapsilosis complex, and its relevance during interaction with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that the wall of the C. parapsilosis complex members is similar in composition, but differs to that from C. albicans, with less mannan content and more β-glucan and porosity levels. Furthermore, lectin-based analysis showed increased chitin and β1,3-glucan exposure at the surface of C. parapsilosis sensu lato when compared to C. albicans. Yeast cells of members of the C. parapsilosis complex stimulated more cytokine production by human PBMCs than C. albicans cells; and this significantly changed upon removal of O-linked mannans, indicating this wall component plays a significant role in cytokine stimulation by C. parapsilosis sensu lato. When inner wall components were exposed on the wall surface, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis, but not C. orthopsilosis, stimulated higher cytokine production. Moreover, we found a strong dependency on β1,3-glucan recognition for the members of the C. parapsilosis complex, but not for live C. albicans cells; whereas TLR4 was required for TNFα production by the three members of the complex, and stimulation of IL-6 by C. orthopsilosis. Mannose receptor had a significant role during TNFα and IL-1β stimulation by members of the complex. Finally, we demonstrated that purified N- and O-mannans from either C. parapsilosis sensu lato or C. albicans are capable to block the recognition of these pathogens by human PBMCs. Together; our results suggest that the innate immune recognition of the members of the C. parapsilosis complex is differential

  16. Differential adsorption of complex organic molecules isomers at interstellar ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Bertin, M.; Mokrane, H.; Romanzin, C.; Michaut, X.; Jeseck, P.; Fillion, J.-H.; Chaabouni, H.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.; Baouche, S.; Lemaire, J.-L.; Pauzat, , F.; Pilmé, J.; Minot, C.; Ellinger, Y.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Over 20 of the ~150 different species detected in the interstellar and circumstellar media have also been identified in icy environments. For most of the species observed so far in the interstellar medium (ISM), the most abundant isomer of a given generic chemical formula is the most stable one (minimum energy principle - MEP) with few exceptions such as, for example, CH3COOH/HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2OH/CH3OCH3, whose formation is thought to occur on the icy mantles of interstellar grains. Aims: We investigate whether differences found in the compositions of molecular ices and the surrounding gas phase could originate from differences between the adsorption of one isomer from that of another at the ice surface. Methods: We performed a coherent and concerted theoretical/experimental study of the adsorption energies of the four molecules mentioned above, i.e. acetic acid (AA)/methyl formate (MF) and ethanol (EtOH)/dimethyl ether (DME) on the surface of water ice at low temperature. The question was first addressed theoretically at LCT using solid state periodic density functional theory (DFT) to represent the organized solid support. The experimental determination of the ice/molecule interaction energies was then carried out independently by two teams at LPMAA and LERMA/LAMAp using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) under an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) between 70 and 160 K. Results: For each pair of isomers, theory and experiments both agree that the most stable isomer (AA or EtOH) interacts more efficiently with the water ice than the higher energy isomer (MF or DME). This differential adsorption can be clearly seen in the different desorption temperatures of the isomers. It is not related to their intrinsic stability but instead to both AA and EtOH producing more and stronger hydrogen bonds with the ice surface. Conclusions: We show that hydrogen bonding may play an important role in the release of organic species from grains and propose that, depending on the

  17. Identification of neural stem cell differentiation repressor complex Pnky-PTBP1

    PubMed Central

    Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Splicing increases immensely the complexity of gene products expressed in the cell. The precise regulation of splicing is critical for the development, homeostasis, and function of all tissues in the body, including those comprising the neural system. Ramos et al. recently identified Pnky as a long noncoding RNA expressed selectively in neural tissues that was implicated in the transition of neural stem cells (NSCs) to mature neurons. Pnky actions appeared to be mediated by its interaction with the splicing factor and RNA-binding protein (RBP) polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1), as silencing either Pnky or PTBP1 modulated in similar ways the patterns of spliced and expressed mRNAs in the cell. Strikingly, lowering the expression levels of Pnky or PTBP1 in NSCs actually enhanced neurogenesis, suggesting that the Pnky-PTBP1 complex elicited a splicing program of suppression of neurogenesis. With rapid progress in the design and delivery of RNA-based therapies, interventions to reduce Pnky levels may prove beneficial towards enhancing neurogenesis in disease states characterized by aberrant neuronal loss. PMID:27358902

  18. The Tightly Controlled Deubiquitination Activity of the Human SAGA Complex Differentially Modifies Distinct Gene Regulatory Elements▿

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Guillaume; Bonnet, Jacques; Umlauf, David; Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Koffler, Jennifer; Stierle, Matthieu; Devys, Didier; Tora, László

    2011-01-01

    The multisubunit SAGA coactivator complex facilitates access of general transcription factors to DNA through histone acetylation mediated by GCN5. USP22 (ubiquitin-specific protease 22) was recently described as a subunit of the human SAGA complex that removes ubiquitin from monoubiquitinated histone H2B and H2A in vitro. Here we demonstrate an allosteric regulation of USP22 through multiple interactions with different domains of other subunits of the SAGA deubiquitination module (ATXN7, ATXN7L3, and ENY2). Downregulation of ATXN7L3 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) specifically inactivated the SAGA deubiquitination activity, leading to a strong increase of global H2B ubiquitination and a moderate increase of H2A ubiquitination. Thus, SAGA is the major H2Bub deubiquitinase in human cells, and this activity cannot be fully compensated by other deubiquitinases. Here we show that the deubiquitination activity of SAGA is required for full activation of SAGA-dependent inducible genes. Interestingly, the reduction of the SAGA deubiquitination activity and the parallel increase in H2B ubiquitation at inducible target genes before activation do not induce aberrant gene expression. Our data together indicate that different dynamic equilibriums of H2B ubiquitination/deubiquitination are established at different gene regulatory elements and that H2B ubiquitination changes are necessary but not sufficient to trigger parallel activation of gene expression. PMID:21746879

  19. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging. PMID:25244469

  20. Reproductive isolation and patterns of genetic differentiation in a cryptic butterfly species complex

    PubMed Central

    Dincâ, V; Wiklund, C; Lukhtanov, V A; Kodandaramaiah, U; Norén, K; Dapporto, L; Wahlberg, N; Vila, R; Friberg, M

    2013-01-01

    Molecular studies of natural populations are often designed to detect and categorize hidden layers of cryptic diversity, and an emerging pattern suggests that cryptic species are more common and more widely distributed than previously thought. However, these studies are often decoupled from ecological and behavioural studies of species divergence. Thus, the mechanisms by which the cryptic diversity is distributed and maintained across large spatial scales are often unknown. In 1988, it was discovered that the common Eurasian Wood White butterfly consisted of two species (Leptidea sinapis and Leptidea reali), and the pair became an emerging model for the study of speciation and chromosomal evolution. In 2011, the existence of a third cryptic species (Leptidea juvernica) was proposed. This unexpected discovery raises questions about the mechanisms preventing gene flow and about the potential existence of additional species hidden in the complex. Here, we compare patterns of genetic divergence across western Eurasia in an extensive data set of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences with behavioural data on inter- and intraspecific reproductive isolation in courtship experiments. We show that three species exist in accordance with both the phylogenetic and biological species concepts and that additional hidden diversity is unlikely to occur in Europe. The Leptidea species are now the best studied cryptic complex of butterflies in Europe and a promising model system for understanding the formation of cryptic species and the roles of local processes, colonization patterns and heterospecific interactions for ecological and evolutionary divergence. PMID:23909947

  1. Two types of mu chain complexes are expressed during differentiation from pre-B to mature B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Takemori, T; Mizuguchi, J; Miyazoe, I; Nakanishi, M; Shigemoto, K; Kimoto, H; Shirasawa, T; Maruyama, N; Taniguchi, M

    1990-01-01

    Immunoglobulin mu chains synthesized in murine pre-B cells are known to be associated with surrogate light chains designated as omega (omega), iota (iota) and B34. In addition to these molecules, we identified the complexes of polypeptides (50, 40, 27 and 15.5 kd) associated with surface or intracellular mu chains of pre-B cell lines. Most of these polypeptides were continuously synthesized and associated with mu chains in virgin B cells lines, although some of them scarcely bound to the mu kappa dimer or mu 2 kappa 2 tetramer concomitantly present in the same clone or population. However, in mature B cells they were no longer detectable except B34. Cross-linking of micron chains on the surface of pre-B cells resulted in an increase in intracellular free Ca2+, indicating that the micron chain complex on the surface of pre-B cell lines acted as a signal transduction molecule. However, the receptor cross-linkage of pre-B cell lines did not induce the increased inositol phospholipid metabolism usually observed in virgin and mature B cell lines. These results suggest that, during the differentiation from pre-B to mature B cells, the cells express two types of mu chain complexes which exhibit different structures as a whole and possess different signal transducing capacities. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2114976

  2. Differential effects of salen and manganese-salen complex (EUK-8) on the regulation of cellular cadmium uptake and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2005-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes cell damage. We investigated here the feasibility of using a cell permeable superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic, EUK-8, to reduce the Cd-induced ROS and cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells. EUK-8 reduces the ROS level caused by Cd treatment. EUK-8 also curtails propidium iodide (PI) influx and increases the viability of Cd-treated cells. The efficacy of EUK-8 as a Cd antidote diminishes gradually when added at a later stage of Cd treatment. EUK-8 blocks Cd transport into cells. It is ineffective in accelerating the efflux of metals from the cells. EUK-8 is a Mn-salen complex. Mn decreases the uptake and cytotoxicity of Cd, while salen perturbs the membrane integrity and increases the uptake and cytotoxicity of Cd. Salen is able to bind Cd, and the Cd-salen complex formed does not perturb the integrity of cell membranes and thus the influx of metal is not enhanced. Our results reveal a differential effect of salen and Mn-salen complex on the transport of Cd with subsequent different levels of cell damage. PMID:15689422

  3. Differential effects of a complex organochlorine mixture on the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Michel; Larochelle, Christian; Ayotte, Pierre

    2011-04-15

    Organochlorine compounds (OCs) are a group of persistent chemicals that accumulate in fatty tissues with age. Although OCs has been tested individually for their capacity to induce breast cancer cell proliferation, few studies examined the effect of complex mixtures that comprise compounds frequently detected in the serum of women. We constituted such an OC mixture containing 15 different components in environmentally relevant proportions and assessed its proliferative effects in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, CAMA-1, MDAMB231) and in non-cancerous CV-1 cells. We also determined the capacity of the mixture to modulate cell cycle stage of breast cancer cells and to induce estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects using gene reporter assays. We observed that low concentrations of the mixture (100x10{sup 3} and 50x10{sup 3} dilutions) stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7 cells while higher concentrations (10x10{sup 3} and 5x10{sup 3} dilutions) had the opposite effect. In contrast, the mixture inhibited the proliferation of non-hormone-dependent cell lines. The mixture significantly increased the number of MCF-7 cells entering the S phase, an effect that was blocked by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Low concentrations of the mixture also caused an increase in CAMA-1 cell proliferation but only in the presence estradiol and dihydrotestosterone (p<0.05 at the 50x10{sup 3} dilution). DDT analogs and polychlorinated biphenyls all had the capacity to stimulate the proliferation of CAMA-1 cells in the presence of sex steroids. Reporter gene assays further revealed that the mixture and several of its constituents (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, toxaphene) induced estrogenic effects, whereas the mixture and several components (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin and PCBs) inhibited the androgen signaling pathway. Our results indicate that the complex OC mixture increases the proliferation of MCF-7 cells due to its estrogenic potential. The

  4. Evidence for differential changes of junctional complex proteins in murine neurocysticerosis dependent upon CNS vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Jorge I.; Teale, Judy M.

    2009-01-01

    The delicate balance required to maintain homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Upon injury, the BBB is disrupted compromising the CNS. BBB disruption has been represented as a uniform event. However, our group has shown in a murine model of neurocysticercosis (NCC) that BBB disruption varies depending upon the anatomical site/vascular bed analyzed. In this study further understanding of the mechanisms of BBB disruption were explored in blood vessels located in leptomeninges (pial vessels) and brain parenchyma (parenchymal vessels) by examining the expression of junctional complex proteins in murine brain infected with Mesocestoides corti. Both pial and parenchymal vessels from mock infected animals showed significant colocalization of junctional proteins and displayed an organized architecture. Upon infection, the patterned organization was disrupted and in some cases, particular tight junction and adherens junction proteins were undetectable or appeared to be undergoing proteolysis. The extent and timing of these changes differed between both types of vessels (pial vessel disruption within days versus weeks for parenchymal vessels). To approach potential mechanisms, the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was evaluated by in situ zymography. The results indicated an increase in MMP-9 activity at sites of BBB disruption exhibiting leukocyte infiltration. Moreover, the timing of MMP activity in pial and parenchymal vessels correlated with the timing of permeability disruption. Thus, breakdown of the BBB is a mutable process despite the similar structure of the junctional complex between pial and parenchymal vessels and involvement of MMP activity. PMID:17686468

  5. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  6. Transducin duplicates in the zebrafish retina and pineal complex: differential specialisation after the teleost tetraploidisation.

    PubMed

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E; Larhammar, Dan; Abalo, Xesús M

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  7. Unsplit complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer for second-order wave equation using auxiliary differential equations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2015-12-01

    The complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (CFS-PML) can improve the absorbing performance of PML for nearly grazing incident waves. However, traditional PML and CFS-PML are based on first-order wave equations; thus, they are not suitable for second-order wave equation. In this paper, an implementation of CFS-PML for second-order wave equation is presented using auxiliary differential equations. This method is free of both convolution calculations and third-order temporal derivatives. As an unsplit CFS-PML, it can reduce the nearly grazing incidence. Numerical experiments show that it has better absorption than typical PML implementations based on second-order wave equation. PMID:26723366

  8. Differential regulation of aggressive features in melanoma cells by members of the miR-17-92 complex.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Eyal; Hajdu, Steven; Nemlich, Yael; Cohen, Ronit; Itzhaki, Orit; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Besser, Michal J; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2014-06-01

    The various roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in controlling the phenotype of cancer cells are the focus of contemporary research efforts. We have recently shown that miR-17 directly targets the ADAR1 gene and thereby enhances melanoma cell aggressiveness. miR-17 and miR-20a belong to the miR-17/92 complex, and their mature forms are identical except for two non-seed nucleotides. Nevertheless, here we show that these two miRNAs carry markedly different effects on melanoma cells. A strong positive correlation was observed between the expression of miR-17 and miR-20a among various melanoma cultures. Luciferase assays showed that miR-17 but not miR-20a directly targets the 3' untranslated region of the ADAR1 gene. Ectopic expression of these miRNAs in melanoma cells differentially alters the expression of five exemplar TargetScan-predicted target genes: ADAR1, ITGB8, TGFBR2, MMP2 and VEGF-A. Whole-genome expression microarrays confirm a markedly differential effect on the transcriptome. Functionally, over-expression of miR-20a but not of miR-17 in melanoma cells inhibits net proliferation in vitro. The differential functional effect was observed following ectopic expression of the mature miRNA or of the pre-miRNA sequences. This suggests that the two non-seed nucleotides dictate target sequence recognition and overall functional relevance. These miRNAs are clearly not redundant in melanoma cell biology. PMID:24920276

  9. Biased assembly of the nuclear pore complex is required for somatic and germline nuclear differentiation in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Koujin, Takako; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Kojidani, Tomoko; Matsuda, Atsushi; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Ciliates have two functionally distinct nuclei, a somatic macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC) that develop from daughter nuclei of the last postzygotic division (PZD) during the sexual process of conjugation. Understanding this nuclear dimorphism is a central issue in ciliate biology. We show, by live-cell imaging of Tetrahymena, that biased assembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) occurs immediately after the last PZD, which generates anterior-posterior polarized nuclei: MAC-specific NPCs assemble in anterior presumptive MACs but not in posterior presumptive MICs. MAC-specific NPC assembly in the anterior nuclei occurs much earlier than transport of Twi1p, which is required for MAC genome rearrangement. Correlative light-electron microscopy shows that addition of new nuclear envelope (NE) precursors occurs through the formation of domains of redundant NE, where the outer double membrane contains the newly assembled NPCs. Nocodazole inhibition of the second PZD results in assembly of MAC-specific NPCs in the division-failed zygotic nuclei, leading to failure of MIC differentiation. Our findings demonstrate that NPC type switching has a crucial role in the establishment of nuclear differentiation in ciliates. PMID:25788697

  10. Biased assembly of the nuclear pore complex is required for somatic and germline nuclear differentiation in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Koujin, Takako; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Kojidani, Tomoko; Matsuda, Atsushi; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-05-01

    Ciliates have two functionally distinct nuclei, a somatic macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC) that develop from daughter nuclei of the last postzygotic division (PZD) during the sexual process of conjugation. Understanding this nuclear dimorphism is a central issue in ciliate biology. We show, by live-cell imaging of Tetrahymena, that biased assembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) occurs immediately after the last PZD, which generates anterior-posterior polarized nuclei: MAC-specific NPCs assemble in anterior presumptive MACs but not in posterior presumptive MICs. MAC-specific NPC assembly in the anterior nuclei occurs much earlier than transport of Twi1p, which is required for MAC genome rearrangement. Correlative light-electron microscopy shows that addition of new nuclear envelope (NE) precursors occurs through the formation of domains of redundant NE, where the outer double membrane contains the newly assembled NPCs. Nocodazole inhibition of the second PZD results in assembly of MAC-specific NPCs in the division-failed zygotic nuclei, leading to failure of MIC differentiation. Our findings demonstrate that NPC type switching has a crucial role in the establishment of nuclear differentiation in ciliates. PMID:25788697

  11. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera–Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  12. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Chou, Loke Ming; Toh, Tai Chong; Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  13. Differential hypersaline stress response in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii complex yeasts: a physiological and transcriptional study.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa; Vezzani, Veronica; Cassanelli, Stefano; Dakal, Tikam Chand; Pazzini, Jacopo; Giudici, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The Zygosaccharomyces rouxii complex comprises three distinct lineages of halotolerant yeasts relevant in food processing and spoilage, such as Z. sapae, Z. rouxii and a mosaic group of allodiploid strains. They manifest plastic genome architecture (variation in karyotype, ploidy level and Na(+)/H(+) antiporter-encoding gene copy number), and exhibit diverse tolerances to salt concentrations. Here, we investigated accumulation of compatible osmolytes and transcriptional regulation of Na(+)/H(+) antiporter-encoding ZrSOD genes during salt exposure in strains representative for the lineages, namely Z. sapae ABT301(T) (low salt tolerant), Z. rouxii CBS 732(T) (middle salt tolerant) and allodiploid strain ATCC 42981 (high salt tolerant). Growth curve modelling in 2 M NaCl-containing media supplemented with or without yeast extract as nitrogen source indicates that moderate salt tolerance of CBS 732(T) mainly depends on nitrogen availability rather than intrinsic inhibitory effects of salt. All the strains produce glycerol and not mannitol under salt stress and use two different glycerol balance strategies. ATCC 42981 produces comparatively more glycerol than Z. sapae and Z. rouxii under standard growth conditions and better retains it intracellularly under salt injuries. Conversely, Z. sapae and Z. rouxii enhance glycerol production under salt stress and intracellularly retain glycerol less efficiently than ATCC 42981. Expression analysis shows that, in diploid Z. sapae and allodiploid ATCC 42981, transcription of gene variants ZrSOD2-22/ZrSOD2 and ZrSOD22 is constitutive and salt unresponsive. PMID:27493145

  14. Differential interaction of bacterial species from the Burkholderia cepacia complex with human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Moura, Jane A; Cristina de Assis, Maria; Ventura, Grasiella C; Saliba, Alessandra M; Gonzaga, Luiz; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Marques, Elizabeth de A; Plotkowski, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    To increase knowledge of the pathogenic potential of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), we investigated the effects of reference strains of the nine BCC species on human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. B. multivorans exhibited the highest rates of adherence to and internalization by host cells. Two out of three clinical isolates recovered from cystic fibrosis patients confirmed the B. multivorans high adhesiveness. All four B. multivorans isolates exhibited an aggregated pattern of adherence but any of them expressed cable pili. When bacteria were centrifuged onto cell cultures to circumvent their poor adhesiveness, B. pyrrocinia exhibited the highest internalization rate, followed by B. multivorans. The percentages of apoptotic cells in cultures infected with B. cepacia, B. multivorans, B. cenocepacia (subgroups IIIA and IIIB), B. stabilis and B. vietnamiensis were significantly higher than in control non-infected cultures. All nine BCC species triggered a similar release of the inflammatory cytokine IL-8, that was not reduced by cell treatment with cytochalasin D. Hence, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that all BCC species exhibit a similar ability to induce the expression of host immune mediators whereas they differ on their ability to adhere to, invade and kill airway epithelial cells. PMID:18068390

  15. Differential Trafficking of Oxidized LDL and Oxidized LDL Immune Complexes in Macrophages: Impact on Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Al Gadban, Mohammed M.; Smith, Kent J.; Soodavar, Farzan; Piansay, Christabelle; Chassereau, Charlyne; Twal, Waleed O.; Klein, Richard L.; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F.; Hammad, Samar M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) contribute to formation of lipid-laden macrophages (foam cells). It has been shown that oxLDL-IC are considerably more efficient than oxLDL in induction of foam cell formation, inflammatory cytokines secretion, and cell survival promotion. Whereas oxLDL is taken up by several scavenger receptors, oxLDL-IC are predominantly internalized through the FCγ receptor I (FCγ RI). This study examined differences in intracellular trafficking of lipid and apolipoprotein moieties of oxLDL and oxLDL-IC and the impact on oxidative stress. Methodology/Findings Fluorescently labeled lipid and protein moieties of oxLDL co-localized within endosomal and lysosomal compartments in U937 human monocytic cells. In contrast, the lipid moiety of oxLDL-IC was detected in the endosomal compartment, whereas its apolipoprotein moiety advanced to the lysosomal compartment. Cells treated with oxLDL-IC prior to oxLDL demonstrated co-localization of internalized lipid moieties from both oxLDL and oxLDL-IC in the endosomal compartment. This sequential treatment likely inhibited oxLDL lipid moieties from trafficking to the lysosomal compartment. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, oxLDL-IC but not oxLDL induced GFP-tagged heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and HSP70B', which co-localized with the lipid moiety of oxLDL-IC in the endosomal compartment. This suggests that HSP70 family members might prevent the degradation of the internalized lipid moiety of oxLDL-IC by delaying its advancement to the lysosome. The data also showed that mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased and generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species was increased in U937 cell treated with oxLDL compared to oxLDL-IC. Conclusions/Significance Findings suggest that lipid and apolipoprotein moieties of oxLDL-IC traffic to separate cellular compartments, and that HSP70/70B' might sequester the lipid moiety of oxLDL-IC in the

  16. Deep inside a neoproterozoic intra-oceanic arc: growth, differentiation and exhumation of the Amalaoulaou complex (Gourma, Mali)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Julien; Caby, Renaud; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Mercier, Jean-Claude C.; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    We show here that the Amalaoulaou complex, in the Pan-African belt of West Africa (Gourma, Mali), corresponds to the lower and middle sections of a Neoproterozoic intra-oceanic arc. This complex records a 90-130-Ma-long evolution of magmatic inputs and differentiation above a subducting oceanic slab. Early c. 793 Ma-old metagabbros crystallised at lower crustal or uppermost mantle depths (25-30 km) and have geochemical characteristic of high-alumina basalts extracted from a depleted mantle source slightly enriched by slab-derived sedimentary components ((La/Sm)N < 1; ɛNd: +5.4-6.2; 87Sr/86Sr: 0.7027-0.7029). In response to crustal thickening, these mafic rocks were recrystallised into garnet-granulites (850-1,000°C; 10-12 kbar) and subject to local dehydration-melting reactions, forming trondhjemititic leucosomes with garnet-clinopyroxene-rutile residues. Slightly after the granulitic event, the arc root was subject to strong HT shearing during partial exhumation (detachment faults/rifting or thrusting), coeval with the emplacement of spinel- and garnet-pyroxenite dykes crystallised from a high-Mg andesitic parental magma. Quartz and hornblende-gabbros (700-660 Ma) with composition typical of hydrous volcanic rocks from mature arcs ((La/Sm)N: 0.9-1.8; ɛNd: +4.6 to +5.2; 87Sr/86Sr: 0.7028-0.7031) were subsequently emplaced at mid-arc crust levels (~15 km). Trace element and isotopic data indicate that magmas tapped a depleted mantle source significantly more enriched in oceanic sedimentary components (0.2%). Exhumation occurred either in two stages (700-660 and 623 Ma) or in one stage (623 Ma) with a final exhumation of the arc root along cold P-T path (550°C, 6-9 kbar; epidote-amphibolite and greenschist facies conditions) during the main Pan-African collision event (620-580 Ma). The composition of magmas forming the Cryogenian Amalaoulaou arc and the processes leading to intra-arc differentiation are strikingly comparable to those observed in the deep section

  17. PCR-Based Method To Differentiate the Subspecies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex on the Basis of Genomic Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Richard C.; de Oliveira Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio; Butler, W. Ray; van Soolingen, Dick; Ho, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The classical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MtbC) subspecies include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum (subtypes I and II), Mycobacterium bovis (along with the attenuated M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin [BCG]), and Mycobacterium microti; increasingly recognized MtbC groupings include Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae and “Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp. canettii.” Previous investigations have documented each MtbC subspecies as a source of animal and/or human tuberculosis. However, study of these organisms is hindered by the lack of a single protocol that quickly and easily differentiates all of the MtbC groupings. Towards this end we have developed a rapid, simple, and reliable PCR-based MtbC typing method that makes use of MtbC chromosomal region-of-difference deletion loci. Here, seven primer pairs (which amplify within the loci 16S rRNA, Rv0577, IS1561′, Rv1510, Rv1970, Rv3877/8, and Rv3120) were run in separate but simultaneous reactions. Each primer pair either specifically amplified a DNA fragment of a unique size or failed, depending upon the source mycobacterial DNA. The pattern of amplification products from all of the reactions, visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed immediate identification either as MtbC composed of M. tuberculosis (or M. africanum subtype II), M. africanum subtype I, M. bovis, M. bovis BCG, M. caprae, M. microti, or “M. canettii” or as a Mycobacterium other than MtbC (MOTT). This MtbC PCR typing panel provides an advanced approach to determine the subspecies of MtbC isolates and to differentiate them from clinically important MOTT species. It has proven beneficial in the management of Mycobacterium collections and may be applied for practical clinical and epidemiological use. PMID:12682155

  18. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  19. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Latron, F; Jotterand-Bellomo, M; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Bernard, M; Strominger, J L; Accolla, R S

    1988-01-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class II-negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids. Images PMID:3127829

  20. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  1. Differential Targeting of the E-Cadherin/β-Catenin Complex by Gram-Positive Probiotic Lactobacilli Improves Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Stephanie; Veltman, Katharina; Cichon, Christoph; Sonnenborn, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is balanced by dynamic interactions between resident and incoming microbes, the gastrointestinal barrier, and the mucosal immune system. However, in the context of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), where the integrity of the gastrointestinal barrier is compromised, resident microbes contribute to the development and perpetuation of inflammation and disease. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to exert beneficial effects, e.g., enhancing epithelial barrier integrity. However, the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are only poorly understood. Here, we comparatively investigated the effects of four probiotic lactobacilli, namely, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. gasseri, and L. rhamnosus, in a T84 cell epithelial barrier model. Results of DNA microarray experiments indicating that lactobacilli modulate the regulation of genes encoding in particular adherence junction proteins such as E-cadherin and β-catenin were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, we show that epithelial barrier function is modulated by Gram-positive probiotic lactobacilli via their effect on adherence junction protein expression and complex formation. In addition, incubation with lactobacilli differentially influences the phosphorylation of adherence junction proteins and the abundance of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms such as PKCδ that thereby positively modulates epithelial barrier function. Further insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms triggered by these probiotics might also foster the development of novel strategies for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases (e.g., IBD). PMID:22179242

  2. Complex magnetic topology and strong differential rotation on the low-mass T Tauri star V2247 Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Skelly, M. B.; Bouvier, J.; Jardine, M. M.; Gregory, S. G.; Morin, J.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Dougados, C.; Ménard, F.; Unruh, Y.

    2010-03-01

    From observations collected with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we report the detection of Zeeman signatures on the low-mass classical T Tauri star (cTTS) V2247 Oph. Profile distortions and circular polarization signatures detected in photospheric lines can be interpreted as caused by cool spots and magnetic regions at the surface of the star. The large-scale field is of moderate strength and highly complex; moreover, both the spot distribution and the magnetic field show significant variability on a time-scale of only 1 week, as a likely result of strong differential rotation. Both properties make V2247 Oph very different from the (more massive) prototypical cTTS BP Tau; we speculate that this difference reflects the lower mass of V2247 Oph. During our observations, V2247 Oph was in a low-accretion state, with emission lines showing only weak levels of circular polarization; we nevertheless find that excess emission apparently concentrates in a mid-latitude region of a strong radial field, suggesting that it is the footpoint of an accretion funnel. The weaker and more complex field that we report on V2247 Oph may share similarities with those of very-low-mass late-M dwarfs and potentially explain why low-mass cTTSs rotate on average faster than intermediate-mass ones. These surprising results need confirmation from new independent data sets on V2247 Oph and other similar low-mass cTTSs. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: donati@ast.obs-mip.fr (J-FD); mskelly@ast.obs-mip.fr (MBS); jerome.bouvier@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr (JB); mmj@st-andrews.ac.uk (MMJ); sg64@st-andrews.ac.uk (SGG); jmorin@ast.obs-mip.fr (JM); ghussain@eso.org (GAJH); catherine.dougados@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr (CD); francois

  3. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  4. Differential expression of estrogen receptor alpha in the embryonic adrenal-kidney-gonadal complex of the oviparous lizard, Calotes versicolor (Daud.).

    PubMed

    Inamdar, L S; Khodnapur, B S; Nindi, R S; Dasari, S; Seshagiri, P B

    2015-09-01

    Estrogen signalling is critical for ovarian differentiation in reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). To elucidate the involvement of estrogen in this process, adrenal-kidney-gonadal (AKG) expression of estrogen receptor (ERα) was studied at female-producing temperature (FPT) in the developing embryos of the lizard, Calotes versicolor which exhibits a distinct pattern of TSD. The eggs of this lizard were incubated at 31.5±0.5°C (100% FPT). The torso of embryos containing adrenal-kidney-gonadal complex (AKG) was collected during different stages of development and subjected to Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis. The ERα antibody recognized two protein bands with apparent molecular weight ∼55 and ∼45kDa in the total protein extracts of embryonic AKG complex of C. versicolor. The observed results suggest the occurrence of isoforms of ERα. The differential expression of two different protein isoforms may reveal their distinct role in cell proliferation during gonadal differentiation. This is the first report to reveal two isoforms of the ERα in a reptile during development. Immunohistochemical studies reveal a weak, but specific, cytoplasmic ERα immunostaining exclusively in the AKG during late thermo-sensitive period suggesting the responsiveness of AKG to estrogens before gonadal differentiation at FPT. Further, cytoplasmic as well as nuclear expression of ERα in the medulla and in oogonia of the cortex (faint activity) at gonadal differentiation stage suggests that the onset of gonadal estrogen activity coincides with sexual differentiation of gonad. Intensity and pattern of the immunoreactions of ERα in the medullary region at FPT suggest endogenous production of estrogen which may act in a paracrine fashion to induce neighboring cells into ovarian differentiation pathway. PMID:25127850

  5. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji; Zhu, Li-juan; Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhou, Xiao-zhong

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  6. Stabilized β-Catenin Functions through TCF/LEF Proteins and the Notch/RBP-Jκ Complex To Promote Proliferation and Suppress Differentiation of Neural Precursor Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Kagawa, Tetsushi; Inoue, Toshihiro; Nonaka, Aya; Takada, Shinji; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Taga, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor cells are mutually exclusive during brain development. Despite its importance for precursor cell self renewal, the molecular linkage between these two events has remained unclear. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) promotes neural precursor cell proliferation and concurrently inhibits their differentiation, suggesting a cross talk between proliferation and differentiation signaling pathways downstream of the FGF receptor. We demonstrate that FGF2 signaling through phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase activation inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and leads to the accumulation of β-catenin in a manner different from that in the Wnt canonical pathway. The nuclear accumulated β-catenin leads to cell proliferation by activating LEF/TCF transcription factors and concurrently inhibits neuronal differentiation by potentiating the Notch1-RBP-Jκ signaling pathway. β-Catenin and the Notch1 intracellular domain form a molecular complex with the promoter region of the antineurogenic hes1 gene, allowing its expression. This signaling interplay is especially essential for neural stem cell maintenance, since the misexpression of dominant-active GSK3β completely inhibits the self renewal of neurosphere-forming stem cells and prompts their neuronal differentiation. Thus, the GSK3β/β-catenin signaling axis regulated by FGF and Wnt signals plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neural stem/precursor cells by linking the cell proliferation to the inhibition of differentiation. PMID:18852283

  7. Retinoic Acid Induces Ubiquitination-Resistant RIP140/LSD1 Complex to Fine-Tune Pax6 Gene in Neuronal Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Ying; Persaud, Shawna D; Wei, Li-Na

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) is a wide-spectrum coregulator for hormonal regulation of gene expression, but its activity in development/stem cell differentiation is unknown. Here, we identify RIP140 as an immediate retinoic acid (RA)-induced dual-function chaperone for LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1). RIP140 protects LSD1's catalytic domain and antagonizes its Jade-2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. In RA-induced neuronal differentiation, the increased RIP140/LSD1 complex is recruited by RA-elevated Pit-1 to specifically reduce H3K4me2 modification on the Pax6 promoter, thereby repressing RA-induction of Pax6. This study reveals a new RA-induced gene repressive mechanism that modulates the abundance, enzyme quality, and recruitment of histone modifier LSD1 to neuronal regulator Pax6, which provides a homeostatic control for RA induction of neuronal differentiation. PMID:26372689

  8. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Marie; Visser, Allerdien; Buabeng, Kwadwo M L; Poutsma, Ankie; van der Schors, Roel C; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively affect this trophoblast differentiation either by inducing proliferation rate or by causing cell cycle exit as shown by a decrease in both proliferation and invasion. As LincRNAs predominantly function through interactions with proteins, we identified the directly interacting proteins using chromatin isolation by RNA purification followed by protein mass spectrometry. We found 22 proteins predominantly clustering in two functional networks, i.e. RNA splicing and the ribosome. YBX1, PCBP1, PCBP2, RPS6 and RPL7 were validated, and binding to these proteins was influenced by the HELLP mutations carried. Finally, we show that the LINC-HELLP transcript levels are significantly upregulated in plasma of women in their first trimester of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women, whereas this upregulation seems absent in a pilot set of patients later developing pregnancy complications, indicative of its functional significance in vivo. PMID:26173455

  9. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  10. The CCR4-NOT Complex Mediates Deadenylation and Degradation of Stem Cell mRNAs and Promotes Planarian Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  11. Epidermal differentiation complex (locus 1q21) gene expression in head and neck cancer and normal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tyszkiewicz, Tomasz; Jarzab, Michal; Szymczyk, Cezary; Kowal, Monika; Krajewska, Jolanta; Jaworska, Magdalena; Fraczek, Marcin; Krajewska, Anna; Hadas, Ewa; Swierniak, Michal; Markowski, Jaroslaw; Lange, Dariusz; Poltorak, Stanislaw; Wiench, Malgorzata; Krecicki, Tomasz; Jarzab, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) comprises a number of genes associated with human skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. These genes have also been linked to numerous cancers, among them skin, gastric, colorectal, lung, ovarian and renal carcinomas. The involvement of EDC components encoding S100 proteins, small proline-rich proteins (SPRRs) and other genes in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has been previously suggested. The aim of the study was to systematically analyze the expression of EDC components on the transcript level in HNSCC. Tissue specimens from 93 patients with HNC of oral cavity and 87 samples from adjacent or distant grossly normal oral mucosawere analyzed. 48 samples (24 tumor and 24 corresponding surrounding tissue) were hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0 ST Arrays. For validation by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) the total RNA from all180 samples collected in the study was analyzed with Real-Time PCR system and fluorescent amplicon specific-probes. Additional set of samples from 14 patients with laryngeal carcinoma previously obtained by HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarray was also included in the analyses. The expression of analyzed EDC genes was heterogeneous. Two transcripts (S100A1 and S100A4) were significantly down-regulated in oral cancer when compared to normal mucosa (0.69 and 0.36-fold change, respectively), showing an opposite pattern of expression to the remaining S100 genes. Significant up-regulation in tumors was found for S100A11, S100A7, LCE3D, S100A3 and S100A2 genes. The increased expression of S100A7 was subsequently validated by QPCR, confirming significant differences. The remaining EDC genes, including all encoding SPRR molecules, did not show any differences between oral cancer and normal mucosa. The observed differences were also assessed in the independent set of laryngeal cancer samples, confirming the role of S100A3 and LCE3D transcripts in

  12. MiRNA-Mediated Regulation of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Controls Pluripotency and Endodermal Differentiation in Human ESCs.

    PubMed

    Wade, Staton L; Langer, Lee F; Ward, James M; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes represent powerful epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the pluripotent state. miR-302 is a strong inducer of pluripotency, which is characterized by a distinct chromatin architecture. This suggests that miR-302 regulates global chromatin structure; however, a direct relationship between miR-302 and chromatin remodelers has not been established. Here, we provide data to show that miR-302 regulates Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex composition in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) through direct repression of the BAF53a and BAF170 subunits. With the subsequent overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs, we show that miR-302's inhibition of BAF170 protein levels can affect the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation. Furthermore, miR-302-mediated repression of BAF170 regulates pluripotency by positively influencing mesendodermal differentiation. Overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs led to biased differentiation toward the ectoderm lineage during EB formation and severely hindered directed definitive endoderm differentiation. Taken together, these data uncover a direct regulatory relationship between miR-302 and the Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex that controls gene expression and cell fate decisions in hESCs and suggests that similar mechanisms are at play during early human development. PMID:26119756

  13. Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Diagnostic Assay for Identification and Differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium canettii, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains▿†

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Kate; O'Grady, Justin; Dorai-Raj, Siobhan; Maher, Majella; van Soolingen, Dick; Barry, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in humans is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). Rapid detection of the MTC is necessary for the timely initiation of antibiotic treatment, while differentiation between members of the complex may be important to guide the appropriate antibiotic treatment and provide epidemiological information. In this study, a multiplex real-time PCR diagnostics assay using novel molecular targets was designed to identify the MTC while simultaneously differentiating between M. tuberculosis and M. canettii. The lepA gene was targeted for the detection of members of the MTC, the wbbl1 gene was used for the differentiation of M. tuberculosis and M. canettii from the remainder of the complex, and a unique region of the M. canettii genome, a possible novel region of difference (RD), was targeted for the specific identification of M. canettii. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was tested using 125 bacterial strains (64 MTC isolates, 44 nontuberculosis mycobacteria [NTM], and 17 other bacteria). The assay was determined to be 100% specific for the mycobacteria tested. Limits of detection of 2.2, 2.17, and 0.73 cell equivalents were determined for M. tuberculosis/M. canettii, the MTC, and M. canettii, respectively, using probit regression analysis. Further validation of this diagnostics assay, using clinical samples, should demonstrate its potential for the rapid, accurate, and sensitive diagnosis of TB caused by M. tuberculosis, M. canettii, and the other members of the MTC. PMID:21123525

  14. Differentiation and grouping of isolates of the Ganoderma lucidum complex by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR compared with grouping on the basis of internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, R S; Wang, H H; Wang, H F; Moncalvo, J M

    1996-01-01

    Laccate polypores of the Ganoderma lucidum species complex are widespread white rot fungi of economic importance, but isolates cannot be identified by traditional taxonomic methods. Parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the ribosomal gene (rDNA) distinguished six lineages in this species complex. Each ITS lineage may represent one or more putative species. While some isolates have identical ITS sequences, all of them could be clearly differentiated by genetic fingerprinting using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). To investigate the suitability of RAPD markers for taxonomic identification and grouping of isolates of the G. lucidum complex, RAPD fragments (RAPDs) were used as phenotypic characters in numerical and parsimony analyses. Results show that data from RAPDS do not distinguish the same clades as ITS data do. Groupings based on analysis of RAPD data were very sensitive to the choice of the grouping method used, and no consistent grouping of isolates could be proposed. However, analysis with RAPDs did resolve several robust terminal clades containing putatively conspecific isolates, suggesting that RAPDs might be helpful for systematics at the lower taxonomic levels that are unresolved by ITS sequence data. The limitations of RAPDs for systematics are briefly discussed. The conclusion of this study is that ITS sequences can be used to identify isolates of the G. lucidum complex, whereas RAPDs can be used to differentiate between isolates having identical ITS sequences. The practical implications of these results are briefly illustrated. PMID:8919797

  15. Ephrin B1 Regulates Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Differentiation and Bone Formation by Influencing TAZ Transactivation via Complex Formation with NHERF1▿

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Weirong; Kim, Jonghyun; Wergedal, Jon; Chen, Shin-Tai; Mohan, Subburaman

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of ephrin B1 in humans result in craniofrontonasal syndrome. Because little is known of the role and mechanism of action of ephrin B1 in bone, we examined the function of osteoblast-produced ephrin B1 in vivo and identified the molecular mechanism by which ephrin B1 reverse signaling regulates bone formation. Targeted deletion of the ephrin B1 gene in type 1α2 collagen-producing cells resulted in severe calvarial defects, decreased bone size, bone mineral density, and trabecular bone volume, caused by impairment in osterix expression and osteoblast differentiation. Coimmunoprecipitation of the TAZ complex with TAZ-specific antibody revealed a protein complex containing ephrin B1, PTPN13, NHERF1, and TAZ in bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Activation of ephrin B1 reverse signaling with soluble EphB2-Fc led to a time-dependent increase in TAZ dephosphorylation and shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Treatment of BMS cells with exogenous EphB2-Fc resulted in a 4-fold increase in osterix expression as determined by Western blotting. Disruption of TAZ expression using specific lentivirus small hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased TAZ mRNA by 80% and ephrin B1 reverse signaling-mediated increases in osterix mRNA by 75%. Knockdown of NHERF1 expression reduced basal levels of osterix expression by 90% and abolished ephrin B1-mediated induction of osterix expression. We conclude that locally produced ephrin B1 mediates its effects on osteoblast differentiation by a novel molecular mechanism in which activation of reverse signaling leads to dephosphorylation of TAZ and subsequent release of TAZ from the ephrin B1/NHERF1/TAZ complex to translocate to the nucleus to induce expression of the osterix gene and perhaps other osteoblast differentiation genes. Our findings provide strong evidence that ephrin B1 reverse signaling in osteoblasts is critical for BMS cell differentiation and bone formation. PMID:19995908

  16. Ephrin B1 regulates bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and bone formation by influencing TAZ transactivation via complex formation with NHERF1.

    PubMed

    Xing, Weirong; Kim, Jonghyun; Wergedal, Jon; Chen, Shin-Tai; Mohan, Subburaman

    2010-02-01

    Mutations of ephrin B1 in humans result in craniofrontonasal syndrome. Because little is known of the role and mechanism of action of ephrin B1 in bone, we examined the function of osteoblast-produced ephrin B1 in vivo and identified the molecular mechanism by which ephrin B1 reverse signaling regulates bone formation. Targeted deletion of the ephrin B1 gene in type 1alpha2 collagen-producing cells resulted in severe calvarial defects, decreased bone size, bone mineral density, and trabecular bone volume, caused by impairment in osterix expression and osteoblast differentiation. Coimmunoprecipitation of the TAZ complex with TAZ-specific antibody revealed a protein complex containing ephrin B1, PTPN13, NHERF1, and TAZ in bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Activation of ephrin B1 reverse signaling with soluble EphB2-Fc led to a time-dependent increase in TAZ dephosphorylation and shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Treatment of BMS cells with exogenous EphB2-Fc resulted in a 4-fold increase in osterix expression as determined by Western blotting. Disruption of TAZ expression using specific lentivirus small hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased TAZ mRNA by 80% and ephrin B1 reverse signaling-mediated increases in osterix mRNA by 75%. Knockdown of NHERF1 expression reduced basal levels of osterix expression by 90% and abolished ephrin B1-mediated induction of osterix expression. We conclude that locally produced ephrin B1 mediates its effects on osteoblast differentiation by a novel molecular mechanism in which activation of reverse signaling leads to dephosphorylation of TAZ and subsequent release of TAZ from the ephrin B1/NHERF1/TAZ complex to translocate to the nucleus to induce expression of the osterix gene and perhaps other osteoblast differentiation genes. Our findings provide strong evidence that ephrin B1 reverse signaling in osteoblasts is critical for BMS cell differentiation and bone formation. PMID:19995908

  17. GSK3β, But Not GSK3α, Inhibits the Neuronal Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells As a Downstream Target of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex1

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jyhyun; Jang, Jiwon; Choi, Jinyong; Lee, Junsub; Oh, Seo-Ho; Lee, Junghun; Yoon, Keejung

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) acts as an important regulator during the proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs), but the roles of the isoforms of this molecule (GSK3α and GSK3β) have not been clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the functions of GSK3α and GSK3β in the context of neuronal differentiation of murine NPCs. Treatment of primary NPCs with a GSK3 inhibitor (SB216763) resulted in an increase in the percentage of TuJ1-positive immature neurons, suggesting an inhibitory role of GSK3 in embryonic neurogenesis. Downregulation of GSK3β expression increased the percentage of TuJ1-positive cells, while knock-down of GSK3α seemed to have no effect. When primary NPCs were engineered to stably express either isoform of GSK3 using retroviral vectors, GSK3β, but not GSK3α, inhibited neuronal differentiation and helped the cells to maintain the characteristics of NPCs. Mutant GSK3β (Y216F) failed to suppress neuronal differentiation, indicating that the kinase activity of GSK3β is important for this regulatory function. Similar results were obtained in vivo when a retroviral vector expressing GSK3β was delivered to E9.5 mouse brains using the ultrasound image-guided gene delivery technique. In addition, SB216763 was found to block the rapamycin-mediated inhibition of neuronal differentiation of NPCs. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GSK3β, but not GSK3α, negatively controls the neuronal differentiation of progenitor cells and that GSK3β may act downstream of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex1 signaling pathway. PMID:24397546

  18. Quantum state-resolved differential cross sections for complex-forming chemical reactions: Asymmetry is the rule, symmetry the exception

    SciTech Connect

    Larrégaray, Pascal Bonnet, Laurent

    2015-10-14

    We argue that statistical theories are generally unable to accurately predict state-resolved differential cross sections for triatomic bimolecular reactions studied in beam experiments, even in the idealized limit where the dynamics are fully chaotic. The basic reason is that quenching of interferences between partial waves is less efficient than intuitively expected, especially around the poles.

  19. Adaptive differentiation in seedling traits in a hybrid pine species complex, Pinus densata and its parental species, on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingxiang; Mao, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Fangqian; Chen, Xinyu; Liu, Hao; Xing, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from molecular genetics demonstrates that Pinus densata is a natural homoploid hybrid originating from the parent species Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis, and ecological selection may have played a role in the speciation of P. densata. However, data on differentiation in adaptive traits in the species complex are scarce. In this study, we performed a common garden test on 16 seedling traits to examine the differences between P. densata and its parental species in a high altitude environment. We found that among the 16 analyzed traits, 15 were significantly different among the species. Pinus tabuliformis had much earlier bud set and a relatively higher bud set ratio but poorer seedling growth, and P. yunnanensis had opposite responses for the same traits. P. densata had the greatest fitness with higher viability and growth rates than the parents. The relatively high genetic contribution of seedling traits among populations suggested that within each species the evolutionary background is complex. The correlations between the seedling traits of a population within a species and the environmental factors indicated different impacts of the environment on species evolution. The winter temperature is among the most important climate factors that affected the fitness of the three pine species. Our investigation provides empirical evidence on adaptive differentiation among this pine species complex at seedling stages. PMID:25757072

  20. Adaptive Differentiation in Seedling Traits in a Hybrid Pine Species Complex, Pinus densata and Its Parental Species, on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingxiang; Mao, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Fangqian; Chen, Xinyu; Liu, Hao; Xing, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from molecular genetics demonstrates that Pinus densata is a natural homoploid hybrid originating from the parent species Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis, and ecological selection may have played a role in the speciation of P. densata. However, data on differentiation in adaptive traits in the species complex are scarce. In this study, we performed a common garden test on 16 seedling traits to examine the differences between P. densata and its parental species in a high altitude environment. We found that among the 16 analyzed traits, 15 were significantly different among the species. Pinus tabuliformis had much earlier bud set and a relatively higher bud set ratio but poorer seedling growth, and P. yunnanensis had opposite responses for the same traits. P. densata had the greatest fitness with higher viability and growth rates than the parents. The relatively high genetic contribution of seedling traits among populations suggested that within each species the evolutionary background is complex. The correlations between the seedling traits of a population within a species and the environmental factors indicated different impacts of the environment on species evolution. The winter temperature is among the most important climate factors that affected the fitness of the three pine species. Our investigation provides empirical evidence on adaptive differentiation among this pine species complex at seedling stages. PMID:25757072

  1. Insight to structural subsite recognition in plant thiol protease-inhibitor complexes : Understanding the basis of differential inhibition and the role of water

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Suparna; Ghosh, Sreya; Chakraborty, Sibani; Bera, Asim K; Mukhopadhayay, Bishnu P; Dey, Indrani; Banerjee, Asok

    2001-01-01

    Background This work represents an extensive MD simulation / water-dynamics studies on a series of complexes of inhibitors (leupeptin, E-64, E-64-C, ZPACK) and plant cysteine proteases (actinidin, caricain, chymopapain, calotropin DI) of papain family to understand the various interactions, water binding mode, factors influencing it and the structural basis of differential inhibition. Results The tertiary structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes were built by visual interactive modeling and energy minimization followed by dynamic simulation of 120 ps in water environment. DASA study with and without the inhibitor revealed the potential subsite residues involved in inhibition. Though the interaction involving main chain atoms are similar, critical inspection of the complexes reveal significant differences in the side chain interactions in S2-P2 and S3-P3 pairs due to sequence differences in the equivalent positions of respective subsites leading to differential inhibition. Conclusion The key finding of the study is a conserved site of a water molecule near oxyanion hole of the enzyme active site, which is found in all the modeled complexes and in most crystal structures of papain family either native or complexed. Conserved water molecules at the ligand binding sites of these homologous proteins suggest the structural importance of the water, which changes the conventional definition of chemical geometry of inhibitor binding domain, its shape and complimentarity. The water mediated recognition of inhibitor to enzyme subsites (Pn...H2O....Sn) of leupeptin acetyl oxygen to caricain, chymopapain and calotropinDI is an additional information and offer valuable insight to potent inhibitor design. PMID:11602025

  2. Dynamic casting of a graben complex: Syn-sedimentary infill and differential subsidence during the permo-carboniferous; Peace River Embayment, western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, J.E. Univ. of Calgary, Alberta ); Krause, F.F. ); Campbell, R.R. Calamity Resources, Calgary, Alberta )

    1991-03-01

    The Carboniferous Stoddart Group and Permian Belloy Formation record infill of a long-lived graben complex in the center of the Peace River Embayment. The Dawson Creek Graben Complex began down-dropping during deposition of the Rundle Group and Golata Formation and reached its maximum during Kiskatinaw time. The overlying Taylor Flat Formation shows graben filling and graben decay; whereas the flat Permian Belloy Formation beds within and beyond graben limits indicate tectonic stability. The complex comprised the larger Fort St. John Graben and satellite Hines Creek, Whitelaw, and Cindy grabens. The grabens consist of kilometer-scale horst and graben blocks bounded by normal faults. The internal blocks subsided at various rates, with differential subsidence occurring in the form of horsts subsiding slower than neighboring grabens. Syn- and post-depositional growth-type normal faults controlled formation and bed thickness, as did inter- and intra-formation unconformities. From these observations, a structural/stratigraphic model can be constructed that explains the complex stratigraphy and depositional interpretations. This model describes a basin dominated by tectonic controls rather than global sea-level events. Syn- and post-sedimentary growth-type block faulting, differential subsidence of fault blocks, sedimentary infill, and unconformity truncation were the major controls on the basin. The model provides an analog to grabens and block-faulted basins of growth-faulted basins occurring elsewhere. The implications of the model to petroleum exploration are that all beds can be correlated by assuming that beds were essentially flat-lying prior to and during faulting. The combination of the block-faulted character and complex facies changes provides many structural and stratigraphic petroleum traps.

  3. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complexes I and III

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Daniel P.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Stowe, David F.; Lubbe, Ryan; Aldakkak, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission is a critical component in the etiology of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complexes I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by complex III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study suggests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III. PMID

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis of Liquid Non-Sporulating Streptomyces coelicolor Cultures Demonstrates the Existence of a Complex Differentiation Comparable to That Occurring in Solid Sporulating Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María Teresa; Rioseras, Beatriz; Martín, Juan Francisco; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species produce many clinically relevant secondary metabolites and exhibit a complex development that includes hyphal differentiation and sporulation in solid cultures. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains generally do not sporulate, and it was traditionally assumed that no differentiation took place. The aim of this work was to compare the transcriptomes of S. coelicolor growing in liquid and solid cultures, deepening the knowledge of Streptomyces differentiation. Microarrays demonstrated that gene expression in liquid and solid cultures were comparable and data indicated that physiological differentiation was similar for both conditions. Eighty-six percent of all transcripts showed similar abundances in liquid and solid cultures, such as those involved in the biosynthesis of actinorhodin (actVA, actII-4) and undecylprodigiosin (redF); activation of secondary metabolism (absR1, ndsA); genes regulating hydrophobic cover formation (aerial mycelium) (bldB, bldC, bldM, bldN, sapA, chpC, chpD, chpE, chpH, ramA, ramC, ramS); and even some genes regulating early stages of sporulation (wblA, whiG, whiH, whiJ). The two most important differences between transcriptomes from liquid and solid cultures were: first, genes related to secondary metabolite biosynthesis (CDA, CPK, coelichelin, desferrioxamine clusters) were highly up-regulated in liquid but not in solid cultures; and second, genes involved in the final stages of hydrophobic cover/spore maturation (chpF, rdlA, whiE, sfr) were up-regulated in solid but not in liquid cultures. New information was also provided for several non-characterized genes differentially expressed in liquid and solid cultures which might be regulating, at least in part, the metabolic and developmental differences observed between liquid and solid cultures. PMID:24466012

  5. Spin-filtering, giant magnetoresistance, rectifying and negative differential resistance effects in planar four-coordinate Fe complex with graphene nanoribbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P. E-mail: ss-cheng@ujn.edu.cn; Wu, Q. H.; Chen, G. E-mail: ss-cheng@ujn.edu.cn; Liu, D. S.; Department of Physics, Jining University, Qufu 273155

    2014-01-28

    By using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism combined with the density functional theory, we have investigated the spin-polarized transport properties of a planar four-coordinate Fe complex sandwiched between two zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) electrodes, where the ZGNRs are modulated by external magnetic field. The results show that the system can exhibit perfect dual spin-filtering and spin-rectifying effects at a wide bias range, giant magnetoresistance effect with large magnetoresistance ratio at small bias, and obvious negative differential resistance behavior. The mechanisms are proposed for these phenomena.

  6. Differential inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes by inhalation of combustion smoke and carbon monoxide, in vivo, in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Hallberg, Lance M; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2010-08-01

    Combustion smoke contains gases and particulates, which act via hypoxia and cytotoxicity producing mechanisms to injure cells and tissues. While carbon monoxide (CO) is the major toxicant in smoke, its toxicity is exacerbated in the presence of other compounds. Here, we examined modulations of mitochondrial and cytosolic energy metabolism by inhalation of combustion smoke versus CO, in vivo, in the rat brain. Measurements revealed reduced activities of respiratory chain (RC) complexes, with greater inhibition by smoke than equivalent CO in ambient air. In the case of RC complex IV, inhibition by CO and smoke was similar--suggesting that complex IV inhibition is primarily by the action of CO. In contrast, inhibition of complexes I and III was greater by smoke. Increases in cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase activities accompanied inhibition of RC complexes, likely reflecting compensatory increases in cytosolic energy production. Together, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms of smoke inhalation-induced perturbations of brain energetics, which impact neuronal function and contribute to the development of neuropathologies in survivors of exposures to CO and combustion smoke. PMID:20429857

  7. The Differential Effects of Three Types of Task Planning on the Fluency, Complexity, and Accuracy in L2 Oral Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to review studies that have investigated the effects of three types of planning (rehearsal, pre-task planning, and within-task planning) on the fluency, complexity, and accuracy of L2 performance. All three types of planning have been shown to have a beneficial effect on fluency but the results for complexity…

  8. Alpha2-plasmin inhibitor and alpha2-macroglobulin-plasmin complexes in plasma. Quantitation by an enzyme-linked differential antibody immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, P C

    1981-01-01

    An enzyme-linked differential antibody immunosorbent assay has been developed for the quantification of alpha2-plasmin inhibitor-plasmin and alpha2-macroglobulin-plasmin complexes. In this method the inhibitor-plasmin complex is bound to a surface by an inhibitor-specific antibody, and the plasmin bound to the inhibitor is quantified by a second antibody, rabbit antiplasminogen F(ab')2, labeled with alkaline phosphatase. The hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the alkaline phosphatase is expressed in femtomoles of plasminogen per milliliter, by reference to a standard plasminogen curve. Inhibitor-enzyme complexes were generated in plasma by the addition of plasmin or of urokinase. The concentration of plasmin added was well below the plasma concentration of alpha2-plasmin inhibitor (1 microM) or of alpha2-macroglobulin (3.5 microM), so that neither inhibitor would be fully saturated with enzyme. Under these conditions increasing amounts of plasmin generated an increase in both alpha2-plasmin inhibitor-plasmin and alpha2-macroglobulin-plasmin complexes. Varying amounts of plasmin were incubated with each of the purified inhibitors in the concentration found in plasma, and the complexes. Varying amounts of plasmin were incubated with each of the purified inhibitors in the concentration found in plasma, and the complexes that formed were quantified by immunoassay. These studies made it possible to quantify the distribution of plasmin between the two inhibitors in plasmin or urokinase-treated plasma. In plasmin-treated plasma, 10% or less of the plasmin bound to both inhibitors was in complex with alpha2-macroglobulin. In contrast, between 19 and 51% of the plasmin generated in urokinase-activated plasma was bound to alpha2-macroglobulin. Thus, major changes in the distribution of plasma were observed, according to whether plasmin was added to plasma or whether plasminogen was activated endogenously. The pattern of inhibitor plasmin complexes generated in vivo by

  9. In vitro cloning of complex mixtures of DNA on microbeads: Physical separation of differentially expressed cDNAs

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Sydney; Williams, Steven R.; Vermaas, Eric H.; Storck, Thorsten; Moon, Keith; McCollum, Christie; Mao, Jen-I; Luo, Shujun; Kirchner, James J.; Eletr, Sam; DuBridge, Robert B.; Burcham, Timothy; Albrecht, Glenn

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for cloning nucleic acid molecules onto the surfaces of 5-μm microbeads rather than in biological hosts. A unique tag sequence is attached to each molecule, and the tagged library is amplified. Unique tagging of the molecules is achieved by sampling a small fraction (1%) of a very large repertoire of tag sequences. The resulting library is hybridized to microbeads that each carry ≈106 strands complementary to one of the tags. About 105 copies of each molecule are collected on each microbead. Because such clones are segregated on microbeads, they can be operated on simultaneously and then assayed separately. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we show how to label and extract microbeads bearing clones differentially expressed between two libraries by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Because no prior information about the cloned molecules is required, this process is obviously useful where sequence databases are incomplete or nonexistent. More importantly, the process also permits the isolation of clones that are expressed only in given tissues or that are differentially expressed between normal and diseased states. Such clones then may be spotted on much more cost-effective, tissue- or disease-directed, low-density planar microarrays. PMID:10677516

  10. The Dictyostelium prestalk inducer differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) triggers unexpectedly complex global phosphorylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Chris; Urbaniak, Michael D.; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Williams, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a polyketide that induces Dictyostelium amoebae to differentiate as prestalk cells. We performed a global quantitative screen for phosphorylation changes that occur within the first minutes after addition of DIF-1, using a triple-label SILAC approach. This revealed a new world of DIF-1–controlled signaling, with changes in components of the MAPK and protein kinase B signaling pathways, components of the actinomyosin cytoskeletal signaling networks, and a broad range of small GTPases and their regulators. The results also provide evidence that the Ca2+/calmodulin–dependent phosphatase calcineurin plays a role in DIF-1 signaling to the DimB prestalk transcription factor. At the global level, DIF-1 causes a major shift in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation equilibrium toward net dephosphorylation. Of interest, many of the sites that are dephosphorylated in response to DIF-1 are phosphorylated in response to extracellular cAMP signaling. This accords with studies that suggest an antagonism between the two inducers and also with the rapid dephosphorylation of the cAMP receptor that we observe in response to DIF-1 and with the known inhibitory effect of DIF-1 on chemotaxis to cAMP. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001555. PMID:25518940

  11. Genetic differentiation in the winter pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa--wilkinsoni complex), inferred by AFLP and mitochondrial DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Salvato, Paola; Battisti, Andrea; Concato, Silvia; Masutti, Luigi; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo

    2002-11-01

    The winter pine processionary moth has become an important pine pest in the last century, as a consequence of the spread of pine cultivation in the Mediterranean region. The pattern of genetic differentiation of this group, that includes two sibling species (Thaumetopoea pityocampa and Th. wilkinsoni), has been studied in nine populations using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and single strand conformation polymorphism-sequence analysis (SSCP) of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI) and cytochrome oxydase 2 (COII). Results indicate the existence of strong genetic differentiation between the two species that became separated before the Quaternary ice ages. Moreover data indicate that Th. pityocampa has a strong geographical structure, particularly evident at the nuclear level, where all pairwise phiST resulted to be highly significant and individuals from the same population resulted to be strongly clustered when an individual tree was reconstructed. The estimates of the absolute number of migrants between populations (Nm), obtained from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers, suggest that gene flow is low and that a gender-related dispersal could occur in this species. The males appear to disperse more than females, contributing to the genetic diversity of populations on a relatively wide range, reducing the risks of inbreeding and the genetic loss associated with bottlenecks occurring in isolated populations. PMID:12406253

  12. Fourier-domain Jones-matrix mapping of a complex degree of mutual anisotropy in differentiation of biological tissues' pathological states.

    PubMed

    Ushenko, Yu A; Trifonyuk, L Yu; Dubolazov, A V; Karachevtsev, A O

    2014-04-01

    This article presents the theoretical background of an azimuthally stable method of Jones-matrix mapping of histological sections of a uterine wall biopsy on the basis of spatial-frequency selection of the mechanisms of linear and circular birefringence. The diagnostic application of a new correlation parameter--a complex degree of mutual anisotropy--is analytically substantiated. The method of measuring coordinate distributions of a complex degree of mutual anisotropy with further spatial filtration of their high- and low-frequency components is developed. The interconnections of such distributions with linear and circular birefringence parameters of the uterine-wall-endometrium histological sections are found. The comparative results of measuring the coordinate distributions of a complex degree of mutual anisotropy formed by fibrillar networks of myosin and collagen fibrils of uterus wall tissue of different pathological states--pre-cancer (dysplasia) and cancer (adenocarcinoma)--are shown. The values and ranges of change of the statistical (moments of the first to fourth orders) parameters of complex degree of mutual-anisotropy coordinate distributions are studied. The objective criteria of diagnosing the pathology and differentiation of its severity degree are determined. PMID:24787205

  13. Differential Mobility of Pigment-Protein Complexes in Granal and Agranal Thylakoid Membranes of C3 and C4 Plants1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, Helmut; Sharpe, Richard M.; Herbstova, Miroslava; Yarbrough, Robert; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2013-01-01

    The photosynthetic performance of plants is crucially dependent on the mobility of the molecular complexes that catalyze the conversion of sunlight to metabolic energy equivalents in the thylakoid membrane network inside chloroplasts. The role of the extensive folding of thylakoid membranes leading to structural differentiation into stacked grana regions and unstacked stroma lamellae for diffusion-based processes of the photosynthetic machinery is poorly understood. This study examines, to our knowledge for the first time, the mobility of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in unstacked thylakoid regions in the C3 plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and agranal bundle sheath chloroplasts of the C4 plants sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and maize (Zea mays) by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In unstacked thylakoid membranes, more than 50% of the protein complexes are mobile, whereas this number drops to about 20% in stacked grana regions. The higher molecular mobility in unstacked thylakoid regions is explained by a lower protein-packing density compared with stacked grana regions. It is postulated that thylakoid membrane stacking to form grana leads to protein crowding that impedes lateral diffusion processes but is required for efficient light harvesting of the modularly organized photosystem II and its light-harvesting antenna system. In contrast, the arrangement of the photosystem I light-harvesting complex I in separate units in unstacked thylakoid membranes does not require dense protein packing, which is advantageous for protein diffusion. PMID:23148078

  14. FfVel1 and FfLae1, components of a velvet-like complex in Fusarium fujikuroi, affect differentiation, secondary metabolism and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wiemann, Philipp; Brown, Daren W.; Kleigrewe, Karin; Bok, Jin Woo; Keller, Nancy P.; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Besides industrially produced gibberellins (GAs), Fusarium fujikuroi is able to produce additional secondary metabolites such as the pigments bikaverin and neurosporaxanthin and the mycotoxins fumonisins and fusarin C. The global regulation of these biosynthetic pathways is only poorly understood. Recently, the velvet complex containing VeA and several other regulatory proteins was shown to be involved in global regulation of secondary metabolism and differentiation in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we report on the characterization of two components of the F. fujikuroi velvet-like complex, FfVel1 and FfLae1. The gene encoding this first reported LaeA ortholog outside the class of Eurotiomycetidae is upregulated in ΔFfvel1 microarray-studies and FfLae1 interacts with FfVel1 in the nucleus. Deletion of Ffvel1 and Fflae1 revealed for the first time that velvet can simultaneously act as positive (GAs, fumonisins and fusarin C) and negative (bikaverin) regulator of secondary metabolism, and that both components affect conidiation and virulence of F. fujikuroi. Furthermore, the velvet-like protein FfVel2 revealed similar functions regarding conidiation, secondary metabolism and virulence as FfVel1. Cross genus complementation studies of velvet complex component mutants between Fusarium, Aspergillus and Penicillium support an ancient origin for this complex which has undergone a divergence in specific functions mediating development and secondary metabolism. PMID:20572938

  15. Glycosylation-dependent interaction between CD69 and S100A8/S100A9 complex is required for regulatory T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ru; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Tsai, Hsien-Yu; Wu, Ying-Ta; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of differentiation (CD)69 is a leukocyte activation receptor involved in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and is positively selected in activated regulatory T (Treg) cells, implicating its role during Treg-cell differentiation. By RNA interference, we show that CD69 is not sufficient to support the conversion of CD4(+) naive T cells into Treg cells, whereas it does that of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) (P < 0.01), suggesting that a ligand-receptor interaction is required for CD69 function. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified the S100A8/S100A9 complex as the natural ligand of CD69 in hPBMCs. CD69 specifically associates with S100A8/S100A9 complex as confirmed by in vitro binding and competition assay, and the treatment of CD69 with peptide-N-glycosidase significantly abolishes such association. In agreement, the glycomics analysis determines the glycosylation site and the N-glycan composition of CD69, and terminal removal of sialic acid from that N-linked glycans reverses the generation of forkhead box P3-positive Treg cells (23.21%; P < 0.05). More specifically, we showed that CD69-S100A8/S100A9 association is required for the up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 resulting in inhibited signaling of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (36.54% increase upon CD69 silencing; P < 0.01). This might in turn support the secretion of key regulator TGF-β (∼ 3.28-fold decrease upon CD69 silencing; P < 0.05), leading to reduced production of IL-4 in hPBMCs. Our results demonstrate the functional and mechanistic interplays between CD69 and S100A8/S100A9 in supporting Treg-cell differentiation. PMID:26296369

  16. Diversity and endemism in deglaciated areas: ploidy, relative genome size and niche differentiation in the Galium pusillum complex (Rubiaceae) in Northern and Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kolář, Filip; Lučanová, Magdalena; Vít, Petr; Urfus, Tomáš; Chrtek, Jindřich; Fér, Tomáš; Ehrendorfer, Friedrich; Suda, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants endemic to areas covered by ice sheets during the last glaciation represent paradigmatic examples of rapid speciation in changing environments, yet very few systems outside the harsh arctic zone have been comprehensively investigated so far. The Galium pusillum aggregate (Rubiaceae) is a challenging species complex that exhibits a marked differentiation in boreal parts of Northern Europe. As a first step towards understanding its evolutionary history in deglaciated regions, this study assesses cytological variation and ecological preferences of the northern endemics and compares the results with corresponding data for species occurring in neighbouring unglaciated parts of Central and Western Europe. Methods DNA flow cytometry was used together with confirmatory chromosome counts to determine ploidy levels and relative genome sizes in 1158 individuals from 181 populations. A formalized analysis of habitat preferences was applied to explore niche differentiation among species and ploidy levels. Key Results The G. pusillum complex evolved at diploid and tetraploid levels in Northern Europe, in contrast to the high-polyploid evolution of most other northern endemics. A high level of eco-geographic segregation was observed between different species (particularly along gradients of soil pH and competition) which is unusual for plants in deglaciated areas and most probably contributes to maintaining species integrity. Relative monoploid DNA contents of the species from previously glaciated regions were significantly lower than those of their counterparts from mostly unglaciated Central Europe, suggesting independent evolutionary histories. Conclusions The aggregate of G. pusillum in Northern Europe represents an exceptional case with a geographically vicariant and ecologically distinct diploid/tetraploid species endemic to formerly glaciated areas. The high level of interspecific differentiation substantially widens our perception of the

  17. Second sphere control of spin state: Differential tuning of axial ligand bonds in ferric porphyrin complexes by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Kaustuv; Sengupta, Kushal; Singha, Asmita; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Rana, Atanu; Samanta, Subhra; Dey, Abhishek

    2016-02-01

    An iron porphyrin with a pre-organized hydrogen bonding (H-Bonding) distal architecture is utilized to avoid the inherent loss of entropy associated with H-Bonding from solvent (water) and mimic the behavior of metallo-enzyme active sites attributed to H-Bonding interactions of active site with the 2nd sphere residues. Resonance Raman (rR) data on these iron porphyrin complexes indicate that H-Bonding to an axial ligand like hydroxide can result in both stronger or weaker Fe(III)-OH bond relative to iron porphyrin complexes. The 6-coordinate (6C) complexes bearing water derived axial ligands, trans to imidazole or thiolate axial ligand with H-Bonding stabilize a low spin (LS) ground state (GS) when a complex without H-Bonding stabilizes a high spin (HS) ground state. DFT calculations reproduce the trend in the experimental data and provide a mechanism of how H-Bonding can indeed lead to stronger metal ligand bonds when the axial ligand donates an H-Bond and lead to weaker metal ligand bonds when the axial ligand accepts an H-Bond. The experimental and computational results explain how a weak Fe(III)-OH bond (due to H-Bonding) can lead to the stabilization of low spin ground state in synthetic mimics and in enzymes containing iron porphyrin active sites. H-Bonding to a water ligand bound to a reduced ferrous active site can only strengthen the Fe(II)-OH2 bond and thus exclusion of water and hydrophilic residues from distal sites of O2 binding/activating heme proteins is necessary to avoid inhibition of O2 binding by water. These results help demonstrate the predominant role played by H-Bonding and subtle changes in its orientation in determining the geometric and electronic structure of iron porphyrin based active sites in nature. PMID:26638009

  18. Differential generation of superoxide radical by rat phagocytes stimulated with IgA and IgG immune complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, P.A.; Ward, P.A.; Johnson K.J.

    1986-03-01

    Rat glycogen elicited peritoneal neutrophils and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) marcophages were stimulated with preformed immune complexes consisting of monoclonal IgG anti-dinitorphenol linked bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) or monoclonal IgA anti-DNP-BSA. Superoxide (O/sub 2//sup tau/) was detected using superoxide dismutase inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C. Neutrophils (2 x 10/sup 6/) generated small (<2.3 nmole/30 min.) quantities of O/sub 2//sup tau/ when stimulated with IgA-DNP-BAS in the presence or absence of cytochalasin B (1.25 ..mu..g/ml). There was a 4 to 8-fold, dose-dependent increase in O/sub 2//sup tau/ generation by neutrophils stimulated with IgG-DNP-BSA. Cytochalasin B was required to generate this quantity (up to 7.7 nmol/30 min.) of O/sub 2//sup tau/. Whether stimulated with IgG-DNP-BSA or IgA-DNP-BSA, BAL macrophages (5 x 10/sup 5/) generated more O/sub 2//sup tau/ in the absence of cytochalasin B than in its presence. Increased O/sub 2//sup tau/ generation by the immune complex stimulated BAL macrophages was dose-dependent and increased to 6-fold with IgG-DNP-BSA stimulated cells and up to 4-fold with IgA-DNP-BSA stimulated cells. These data corroborate published in vivo studies suggesting that IgA immune complex mediated tissue injury may be mediated by macrophages and not neutrophils. These data also suggest that the mechanisms for immune complex induced O/sub 2//sup tau/ generation may vary depending both on the phagocyte as well as on the stimulus.

  19. Genetic differentiation of oak populations within the Quercus robur/Quercus petraea complex in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Gömöry, D; Yakovlev, I; Zhelev, P; Jedináková, J; Paule, L

    2001-05-01

    Genetic structure of 25 indigenous populations of sessile and pedunculate oaks (Quercus petraea and Q. robur), originating from three geographical regions: Slovakia, Bulgaria and the Republic Mari-El (Russia), was investigated using isozyme markers. Mean number of alleles per locus ranged between 1.8 and 2.6 in Q. robur populations and from 2.0 to 3.0 in Q. petraea populations; slightly higher expected heterozygosity values were found in Q. robur compared to Q. petraea. One locus, coding for a substrate-nonspecific dehydrogenase, differentiated the two species. The interspecific component of gene diversity was 46.7% at this locus, compared to 0.4-7.8% at the remaining loci. PMID:11554972

  20. A review of sleepwalking (somnambulism): the enigma of neurophysiology and polysomnography with differential diagnosis of complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this report is to review all aspects of sleepwalking (SW), also known as somnambulism. Various factors seem to initiate SW, especially drugs, stress, and sleep deprivation. As an etiology, heredity is important, but other conditions include thyrotoxicosis, stress, and herpes simplex encephalitis. Psychological characteristics of sleepwalkers often include aggression, anxiety, panic disorder, and hysteria. Polysomnographic characteristics emphasize abnormal deep sleep associated with arousal and slow wave sleep fragmentation. In the differential diagnosis, the EEG is important to properly identify a seizure disorder, rather than SW. Associated disorders are Tourette's syndrome, sleep-disordered breathing, and migraine. Various kinds of treatment are discussed, as are legal considerations, especially murder during sleepwalking. PMID:17931980

  1. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; Owen, Steven J.; Siefert, Christopher M.; Staten, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore » quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  2. Differential Binding Partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE Domains Regulate Mis18 Complex Recruitment to Centromeres.

    PubMed

    Stellfox, Madison E; Nardi, Isaac K; Knippler, Christina M; Foltz, Daniel R

    2016-06-01

    The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A-specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β, and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2). Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α directly interacts with the N terminus of Mis18BP1, whereas Mis18β directly interacts with CENP-C during G1 phase, revealing that these proteins have evolved to serve distinct functions in centromeres of higher eukaryotes. The N terminus of Mis18BP1, containing both the Mis18α and CENP-C binding domains, is necessary and sufficient for centromeric localization. Therefore, the Mis18 complex contains dual CENP-C recognition motifs that are combinatorially required to generate robust centromeric localization that leads to CENP-A deposition. PMID:27239045

  3. Differential binding partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE domains regulates the Mis18 complex recruitment to centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Knippler, Christina M.; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2). Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α directly interacts with the N-terminus of Mis18BP1; whereas, Mis18β directly interacts with CENP-C during G1 phase, revealing that these proteins have evolved to serve distinct functions in centromeres of higher eukaryotes. The N-terminus of Mis18BP1, containing both the Mis18α and CENP-C binding domains, is necessary and sufficient for centromeric localization. Therefore, the Mis18 complex contains dual CENP-C recognition motifs that are combinatorially required to generate robust centromeric localization that leads to CENP-A deposition. PMID:27239045

  4. The tryptophan synthase alpha 2 beta 2 complex: a comparison of the reactivity of amino groups in the alpha and beta 2 subunits and in the complex by differential labeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, E.W.; Fairwell, T.

    1984-05-01

    The interaction of the alpha and beta 2 subunits of tryptophan synthase of Escherichia coli to form an alpha 2 beta 2 complex has been probed by differential labeling studies. In the first step the separate alpha or beta 2 subunit or the alpha 2 beta 2 complex was labeled by reductive methylation with trace amounts of (/sup 3/H)HCHO in the presence of NaCNBH/sub 3/. In the second step the /sup 3/H-labeled preparation was fully labeled under denaturing conditions with (/sup 14/C)HCHO and NaCNBH/sub 3/. Peptides containing labeled monomethyl or dimethyl amino groups were isolated after thermolytic digestion or after cyanogen bromide treatment. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of each peptide is a measure of the relative reactivity of the amino group or groups in each peptide. The most reactive amino group in the alpha subunit, lysine-109, is strongly shielded from modification in the alpha 2 beta 2 complex. The most reactive amino group in the beta 2 subunit, the amino-terminal threonine, is not shielded from modification in the alpha 2 beta 2 complex.

  5. Heterocellular interaction enhances recruitment of {alpha} and {beta}-catenins and ZO-2 into functional gap-junction complexes and induces gap junction-dependant differentiation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, Rabih S. Mroue, Rana; Mokalled, Mayssa; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Nehme, Ralda; Ismail, Ayman; Khalil, Antoine; Zaatari, Mira; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2008-11-01

    Gap junctions (GJ) are required for mammary epithelial differentiation. Using epithelial (SCp2) and myoepithelial-like (SCg6) mouse-derived mammary cells, the role of heterocellular interaction in assembly of GJ complexes and functional differentiation ({beta}-casein expression) was evaluated. Heterocellular interaction is critical for {beta}-casein expression, independent of exogenous basement membrane or cell anchoring substrata. Functional differentiation of SCp2, co-cultured with SCg6, is more sensitive to GJ inhibition relative to homocellular SCp2 cultures differentiated by exogenous basement membrane. Connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 levels were not regulated across culture conditions; however, GJ functionality was enhanced under differentiation-permissive conditions. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated association of junctional complex components ({alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-2) with Cx32 and Cx43, in differentiation conditions, and additionally with Cx30 in heterocellular cultures. Although {beta}-catenin did not shuttle between cadherin and GJ complexes, increased association between connexins and {beta}-catenin in heterocellular cultures was observed. This was concomitant with reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin, suggesting that differentiation in heterocellular cultures involves sequestration of {beta}-catenin in GJ complexes.

  6. Characterization of the survival motor neuron (SMN) promoter provides evidence for complex combinatorial regulation in undifferentiated and differentiated P19 cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    There exist two SMN (survival motor neuron) genes in humans, the result of a 500 kb duplication in chromosome 5q13. Deletions/mutations in the SMN1 gene are responsible for childhood spinal muscular atrophy, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. While the SMN1 and SMN2 genes are not functionally equivalent, up-regulation of the SMN2 gene represents an important therapeutic target. Consequently, we exploited in silico, in vitro and in vivo approaches to characterize the core human and mouse promoters in undifferentiated and differentiated P19 cells. Phylogenetic comparison revealed four highly conserved regions that contained a number of cis-elements, only some of which were shown to activate/repress SMN promoter activity. Interestingly, the effect of two Sp1 cis-elements varied depending on the state of P19 cells and was only observed in combination with a neighbouring Ets cis-element. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and in vivo DNA footprinting provided evidence for DNA–protein interactions involving Sp, NF-IL6 and Ets cis-elements, whereas transient transfection experiments revealed complex interactions involving these recognition sites. SMN promoter activity was strongly regulated by an NF-IL6 response element and this regulation was potentiated by a downstream Ets element. In vivo results suggested that the NF-IL6 response must function either via a protein-tethered transactivation mechanism or a transcription factor binding an upstream element. Our results provide strong evidence for complex combinatorial regulation and suggest that the composition or state of the basal transcription complex binding to the SMN promoter is different between undifferentiated and differentiated P19 cells. PMID:15361068

  7. Petrogenesis of alkaline magmas at Minna Bluff, Antarctica: evidence for multi-stage differentiation and complex mixing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panter, K. S.; Dunbar, N. W.; Scanlan, M. K.; Wilch, T. I.; Fargo, A. J.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    Minna Bluff, a 45-km-long peninsula that extends SE into the Ross Ice Shelf from the Mt. Discovery stratovolcano, consists of coalesced late Miocene volcanic centers formed through eruption of alkaline magma compositions in a continental rift setting. Highly silica-undersaturated compositions vary from basanite to phonolite and are exposed in volcanic features ranging from small, primitive, cinder cones to large, evolved domes. Lava compositions are more evolved on the eastern end of Minna Bluff and show an overall age progression to younger, more mafic compositions towards Mt. Discovery. Phenocrysts in lava include amphibole, plagioclase and alkali feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, magnetite and apatite. A notable feature of volcanic rocks at Minna Bluff is the presence of large (up to 5 cm) kaersutite and feldspar megacrysts and deposits that contain abundant comagmatic inclusions (kaersutite-rich) and rare mantle xenoliths. Many lavas exhibit strong disequilibrium textures, mainly expressed by breakdown rims on kaersutite that vary dramatically in thickness from crystal to crystal, but reverse compositional zoning in plagioclase is also common. Kaersutite compositions vary within a single sample and show the same compositional range and similar disequilibrium textures in rocks that vary significantly in bulk composition. The textural and compositional characteristics suggest that, for many, mixing between one or more magmas controlled the final composition of the magmas. We envisage a scenario by which some of the primitive, mantle-derived, fluid-rich magmas rose relatively unimpeded to erupt at the surface, while others stalled at or near the crust-mantle boundary and differentiated. Semi-quantitative thermobarometric results for kaersutite and clinopyroxene indicate maximum P-T-X conditions for crystallization of hydrous magmas at 5-9 kbar, ≧1000°C and ≈3 wt. % equiv. H2O. The P-T estimates closely match geophysical and petrologic geotherm estimates for Moho

  8. Differential activation of the Toll-like receptor 2/6 complex by lipoproteins of Streptococcus suis serotypes 2 and 9.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Rebel, Johanna M J; Smits, Mari A; van Putten, Jos P M; Smith, Hilde E

    2010-07-14

    Streptococcus suis causes invasive infections in pigs and occasionally in humans. Worldwide, S. suis serotype 2 is most frequently isolated from diseased piglets, but the less virulent serotype 9 is emerging, at least in Europe. We compared the activation of human Toll-like receptors (hTLRs) by S. suis serotype 2 and 9 strains to better understand the role of the innate immune response in fighting S. suis infections. Neither live nor heat-killed log phase grown S. suis activated the hTLR1/2, hTLR2/6 and hTLR4/MD-2 complexes. However, the hTLR2/6 complex was specifically activated by both serotypes after disruption of the cell wall synthesis using penicillin. Activation levels of the hTLR2/6 complex were higher for serotype 9 strains compared to serotype 2 strains suggesting intrinsic differences in cell wall composition between both serotypes. The hTLR2/6 activating fractions decreased in molecular size after digestion with proteinase K and were sensitive for lipoprotein lipase digestion and NaOH hydrolysis, indicating lipoprotein(s) as active component(s). Overall, our results indicate that S. suis lipoproteins activate TLR2/6 but not TLR1/2 and that the clinically different serotypes 2 and 9 display differential release of TLR ligand when cell wall integrity is compromised. PMID:20044219

  9. Changes in Search Path Complexity and Length During Learning of a Virtual Water Maze: Age Differences and Differential Associations with Hippocampal Subfield Volumes.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ana M; Bender, Andrew R; Yuan, Peng; Raz, Naftali

    2016-06-01

    Impairment of hippocampus-dependent cognitive processes has been proposed to underlie age-related deficits in navigation. Animal studies suggest a differential role of hippocampal subfields in various aspects of navigation, but that hypothesis has not been tested in humans. In this study, we examined the association between volume of hippocampal subfields and age differences in virtual spatial navigation. In a sample of 65 healthy adults (age 19-75 years), advanced age was associated with a slower rate of improvement operationalized as shortening of the search path over 25 learning trials on a virtual Morris water maze task. The deficits were partially explained by greater complexity of older adults' search paths. Larger subiculum and entorhinal cortex volumes were associated with a faster decrease in search path complexity, which in turn explained faster shortening of search distance. Larger Cornu Ammonis (CA)1-2 volume was associated with faster distance shortening, but not in path complexity reduction. Age differences in regional volumes collectively accounted for 23% of the age-related variance in navigation learning. Independent of subfield volumes, advanced age was associated with poorer performance across all trials, even after reaching the asymptote. Thus, subiculum and CA1-2 volumes were associated with speed of acquisition, but not magnitude of gains in virtual maze navigation. PMID:25838036

  10. Histone chaperones ASF1 and NAP1 differentially modulate removal of active histone marks by LID-RPD3 complexes during NOTCH silencing.

    PubMed

    Moshkin, Yuri M; Kan, Tsung Wai; Goodfellow, Henry; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maeda, Robert K; Pilyugin, Maxim; Karch, Francois; Bray, Sarah J; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2009-09-24

    Histone chaperones are involved in a variety of chromatin transactions. By a proteomics survey, we identified the interaction networks of histone chaperones ASF1, CAF1, HIRA, and NAP1. Here, we analyzed the cooperation of H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 and H2A/H2B chaperone NAP1 with two closely related silencing complexes: LAF and RLAF. NAP1 binds RPD3 and LID-associated factors (RLAF) comprising histone deacetylase RPD3, histone H3K4 demethylase LID/KDM5, SIN3A, PF1, EMSY, and MRG15. ASF1 binds LAF, a similar complex lacking RPD3. ASF1 and NAP1 link, respectively, LAF and RLAF to the DNA-binding Su(H)/Hairless complex, which targets the E(spl) NOTCH-regulated genes. ASF1 facilitates gene-selective removal of the H3K4me3 mark by LAF but has no effect on H3 deacetylation. NAP1 directs high nucleosome density near E(spl) control elements and mediates both H3 deacetylation and H3K4me3 demethylation by RLAF. We conclude that histone chaperones ASF1 and NAP1 differentially modulate local chromatin structure during gene-selective silencing. PMID:19782028

  11. Drosophila CtBP regulates proliferation and differentiation of eye precursors and complexes with Eyeless, Dachshund, Dan and Danr during eye and antennal development

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Chinh Q.; Burnett, Micheal E.; Curtiss, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Specification factors regulate cell fate in part by interacting with transcriptional co-regulators like CtBP to regulate gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CtBP forms a complex or complexes with the Drosophila melanogaster Pax6 homolog Eyeless (Ey), and with Distal antenna (Dan), Distal antenna related (Danr) and Dachshund to promote eye and antennal specification. Phenotypic analysis together with molecular data indicates that CtBP interacts with Ey to prevent overproliferation of eye precursors. In contrast CtBP,dan,danr triple mutant adult eyes have significantly fewer ommatidia than CtBP single or dan,danr double mutants, suggesting that the CtBP/Dan/Danr complex functions to recruit ommatidia from the eye precursor pool. Further, CtBP single and to a greater extent CtBP,dan,danr triple mutants affect the establishment and maintenance of the R8 precursor, which is the founding ommatidial cells. Thus, CtBP interacts with different eye specification factors to regulate gene expression appropriate for proliferative versus differentiative stages of eye development. PMID:20730908

  12. Glycoconjugates and polysaccharides from the Scedosporium/Pseudallescheria boydii complex: structural characterisation, involvement in cell differentiation, cell recognition and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Livia Cristina L; da Silva, Mariana Ingrid D; Bittencourt, Vera Carolina B; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T; Rollin-Pinheiro, Rodrigo; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Bozza, Marcelo T; Gorin, Philip A J; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2011-10-01

    Peptidorhamnomannans (PRMs), rhamnomannans and α-glucans are especially relevant for the architecture of the Scedosporium/Pseudallescheria boydii cell wall, but many of them are immunologically active, with great potential as regulators of pathogenesis and the immune response of the host. In addition, some of them can be specifically recognised by antibodies from the sera of patients, suggesting that they could also be useful in diagnosis of fungal infections. Their primary structures have been determined, based on a combination of techniques including gas chromatography, electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), (1)H-COSY and TOCSY, (13)C and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using monoclonal antibodies to PRM, we showed that it is involved in germination and viability of P. boydii conidia, in the phagocytosis of P. boydii conidia by macrophages and non-phagocytic cells and in the survival of mice with P. boydii infection. Also, components of the fungal cell wall, such as α-glucans, are involved. Rhamnomannans are immunostimulatory and participate in the recognition and uptake of fungal cells by the immune system. These glycosylated polymers, being present in the fungal cell wall, are mostly absent from mammalian cells, and are excellent targets for the design of new agents capable of inhibiting fungal growth and differentiation of pathogens. PMID:21995660

  13. Differentiation of activities within the GABAA-chloride ionophore complex by means of 35-S-TBPS binding.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K G; Danielou, G; Thuret, F

    1988-01-01

    From the above results, it is evident that both alpidem and zolpidem modulate the GABAA receptor linked chloride ionophore in an allosteric manner via omega 1 anxiolytic/hypnotic recognition sites. As both are highly specific for the omega 1 site, with little affinity for the omega 2 site, it appears that omega 1 site activation is sufficient to fully engage the various linkages within the GABAA receptor supramolecular complex, resulting in modulation of the chloride ionophore. This action is related to an enhanced affinity of the recognition site for TBPS. Under the present conditions (high sodium chloride, frozen well-washed membranes), several (but not all, e.g. zolpidem) anxiolytics and hypnotics decreased TBPS binding at very high (100-500 microM) concentrations. This effect is unlikely related to the pharmacological activity of these compounds, as it is insensitive to flumazenil and occurs only at concentrations which would be supra-toxic. In contrast, the enhancement of TBPS binding by these anxiolytics and hypnotics occurs within the range of, and correlates with, their therapeutic plasma levels and their affinity for omega 1/omega 2 receptors. The present findings suggest that a different degree of linkage for different compounds occurs between the GABAA receptor and the omega 1/omega 2 receptor mediated enhancement of TBPS binding, as the action of alpidem is completely reversed by bicuculline, whereas for zopidem and flunitrazepam a component of the TBPS enhancement is bicuculline insensitive. A Ro 5-4864 sensitive site (probably not the omega 3 site) occurs with the GABAA receptor supramolecular complex, which apparently participates in the enhancement of TBPS binding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2459920

  14. Antigen-Specific Signaling by a Soluble, Dimeric Peptide/Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II/Fc Chimera Leading to T Helper Cell Type 2 Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Sofia; Zong, Cong S.; Radu, Dorel L.; Miller, Alexander; Bona, Constantin A.; Brumeanu, Teodor-Doru

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between a T cell receptor (TCR) and various ligands, i.e., anti-TCR antibodies, superantigens, peptides, or altered peptide ligands in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules can trigger different T helper cell (Th) effector functions. Herein, we studied the T cell response induced by a soluble, dimeric peptide/MHC class II chimera, namely hemagglutinin (HA)110-120/I-Edαβ/Fcγ2a (DEF). We have previously demonstrated that the soluble DEF molecule binds stably and specifically to HA110-120–specific TCRs expressed by a T cell hybridoma. Administration of DEF in vivo induced differentiation of resting and activated peptide-specific T cells toward a Th2 response, as indicated by the increase of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, and specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 antibodies and decrease of IL-2, specific IgG2a antibodies, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. In contrast to HA110-120 peptide presented by the DEF molecule to T cells, the nominal synthetic peptide induced a predominant Th1 response, and the PR8 virus–derived HA110-120 peptides induced a mixed Th1/Th2 response. Independent of antigen processing, soluble DEF was almost 2 logs more potent in stimulating cognate T cells than the nominal peptide. Polarization of cognate T cells toward the Th2 response occurred upon interaction of soluble DEF with TCR and CD4 molecules followed by early activation of p56lck and ZAP-70 tyrosine kinases, and negative signaling of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)4 pathway of Th1 differentiation. DEF-like molecules may provide a new tool to study the mechanisms of signaling toward Th2 differentiation and may also provide a potential immunotherapeutic approach to modulate autoreactive T cells toward protective Th2 immune responses. PMID:10449525

  15. A Negative Feedback Loop Controlling bHLH Complexes Is Involved in Vascular Cell Division and Differentiation in the Root Apical Meristem.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Kuninori; Kariya, Yuka; Asakawa, Tomohiro; Kan, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Hiroo; Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko

    2015-12-01

    Controlling cell division and differentiation in meristems is essential for proper plant growth. Two bHLH heterodimers consisting of LONESOME HIGHWAY (LHW) and TARGET OF MONOPTEROS 5 (TMO5)/TMO5-LIKE1 (T5L1) regulate periclinal cell division in vascular cells in the root apical meristem (RAM). In this study, we further investigated the functions of LHW-T5L1, finding that in addition to controlling cell division, this complex regulates xylem differentiation in the RAM via a novel negative regulatory system. LHW-T5L1 upregulated the thermospermine synthase gene ACAULIS5 (ACL5), as well as SUPPRESSOR OF ACAULIS5 LIKE3 (SACL3), which encodes a bHLH protein, in the RAM. The SACL3 promoter sequence contains a conserved upstream open reading frame (uORF), which blocked translation of the main SACL3 ORF in the absence of thermospermine. Thermospermine eliminated the negative effect of uORF and enhanced SACL3 production. Further genetic and molecular biological analyses indicated that ACL5 and SACL3 suppress the function of LHW-T5L1 through a protein-protein interaction between LHW and SACL3. Finally, we showed that a negative feedback loop consisting of LHW-T5L1, ACL5, SACL3, and LHW-SACL3 contributes to maintain RAM size and proper root growth. These findings suggest that a negative feedback loop regulates the LHW-T5L1 output level to coordinate cell division and differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:26616019

  16. Using Isomap to differentiate between anthropogenic and natural effects on groundwater dynamics in a complex geological setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Steven; Merz, Christoph; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    The water budget of many catchments has vastly changed throughout the last decades. Intensified land use and increased water withdrawal for drinking water production and irrigation are likely to intensify pressure on water resources. According to model predictions, changing rainfall intensity, duration and spatial distribution in conjunction with increasing temperatures will worsen the situation in the future. The current water resources management has to adapt to these negative developments and to account for competing demands and threats. Essential for successful management applications is the identification and the quantification of the cause-and-effect chains driving the hydrological behavior of a catchment on the scale of management. It needs to check direction and magnitude of intended effects of measures taken as well as to identify unintended side effects that interact with natural effects in heterogeneous environments (Wood et al., 1988; Bloschl and Sivapalan, 1995). Therefore, these tools have to be able to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic driven impacts, even in complex geological settings like the Pleistocene landscape of North-East Germany. This study presents an approach that utilizes monitoring data to detect and quantitatively describe the predominant processes or factors of an observed hydrological system. The multivariate data analysis involves a non-linear dimension reduction method called Isometric Feature Mapping (Isomap, Tenenbaum et al., 2000) to extract information about the causes for the observed dynamics. Ordination methods like Isomap are used to derive a meaningful low-dimensional representation of a complex, high-dimensional data set. The approach is based on the hypothesis, that the number of processes which explain the variance of the data is relative low although the intensity of the processes varies in time and space. Therefore, the results can be interpreted in reference to the effective hydrological processes which

  17. Genome-wide analysis of histone methylation reveals chromatin state-based complex regulation of differential gene transcription and function of CD8 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yasuto; Wang, Zhibin; Zang, Chongzhi; Wood, William H.; Schones, Dustin; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Lhotsky, Brad; Wersto, Robert P.; Peng, Weiqun; Becker, Kevin G.; Zhao, Keji; Weng, Nan-ping

    2009-01-01

    Summary Memory lymphocytes are characterized by their ability to exhibit a rapid response to the recall antigen, in which differential transcription plays a significant role, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. We report here a genome-wide analysis of histone methylation on two histone H3 lysine residues (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) and gene expression profiles in naïve and memory CD8 T cells. We found that a general correlation exists between the levels of gene expression and the levels of H3K4me3 (positive correlation) and H3K27me3 (negative correlation) across the gene body. These correlations display four distinct modes: repressive, active, poised, and bivalent, reflecting different functions of these genes. Furthermore, a permissive chromatin state of each gene is established by a combination of different histone modifications. Our findings reveal a complex regulation by histone methylation in differential gene expression and suggest that histone methylation may be responsible for memory CD8 T cell function. PMID:19523850

  18. Differential Phosphorylation of a Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase CK2 by Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling and the Cdc-like Kinase Kns1*

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Casalongue, Manuel E.; Lee, Jaehoon; Diamond, Aviva; Shuldiner, Scott; Moir, Robyn D.; Willis, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining protein synthetic capacity and is tightly controlled in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis was recently shown to involve the Cdc-like kinase Kns1 and the GSK-3 kinase Mck1. In this study, we explored additional roles for these conserved kinases in processes connected to the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1). We conducted a synthetic chemical-genetic screen in a kns1Δ mck1Δ strain and identified many novel rapamycin-hypersensitive genes. Gene ontology analysis showed enrichment for TORC1-regulated processes (vesicle-mediated transport, autophagy, and regulation of cell size) and identified new connections to protein complexes including the protein kinase CK2. CK2 is considered to be a constitutively active kinase and in budding yeast, the holoenzyme comprises two regulatory subunits, Ckb1 and Ckb2, and two catalytic subunits, Cka1 and Cka2. We show that Ckb1 is differentially phosphorylated in vivo and that Kns1 mediates this phosphorylation when nutrients are limiting and under all tested stress conditions. We determined that the phosphorylation of Ckb1 does not detectably affect the stability of the CK2 holoenzyme but correlates with the reduced occupancy of Ckb1 on tRNA genes after rapamycin treatment. Thus, the differential occupancy of tRNA genes by CK2 is likely to modulate its activation of RNA polymerase III transcription. Our data suggest that TORC1, via its effector kinase Kns1, may regulate the association of CK2 with some of its substrates by phosphorylating Ckb1. PMID:25631054

  19. Differential phosphorylation of a regulatory subunit of protein kinase CK2 by target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling and the Cdc-like kinase Kns1.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Casalongue, Manuel E; Lee, Jaehoon; Diamond, Aviva; Shuldiner, Scott; Moir, Robyn D; Willis, Ian M

    2015-03-13

    Transcriptional regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining protein synthetic capacity and is tightly controlled in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis was recently shown to involve the Cdc-like kinase Kns1 and the GSK-3 kinase Mck1. In this study, we explored additional roles for these conserved kinases in processes connected to the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1). We conducted a synthetic chemical-genetic screen in a kns1Δ mck1Δ strain and identified many novel rapamycin-hypersensitive genes. Gene ontology analysis showed enrichment for TORC1-regulated processes (vesicle-mediated transport, autophagy, and regulation of cell size) and identified new connections to protein complexes including the protein kinase CK2. CK2 is considered to be a constitutively active kinase and in budding yeast, the holoenzyme comprises two regulatory subunits, Ckb1 and Ckb2, and two catalytic subunits, Cka1 and Cka2. We show that Ckb1 is differentially phosphorylated in vivo and that Kns1 mediates this phosphorylation when nutrients are limiting and under all tested stress conditions. We determined that the phosphorylation of Ckb1 does not detectably affect the stability of the CK2 holoenzyme but correlates with the reduced occupancy of Ckb1 on tRNA genes after rapamycin treatment. Thus, the differential occupancy of tRNA genes by CK2 is likely to modulate its activation of RNA polymerase III transcription. Our data suggest that TORC1, via its effector kinase Kns1, may regulate the association of CK2 with some of its substrates by phosphorylating Ckb1. PMID:25631054

  20. Complexity and differential expression of carbohydrate epitopes associated with L-selectin recognition of high endothelial venules.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, E. L.; Mullowney, A. T.; Andrew, D. P.; Goldberg, J. E.; Butcher, E. C.

    1998-01-01

    Carbohydrate ligands for lymphocyte L-selectin are expressed on high endothelial venules (HEVs) in peripheral lymph nodes and sites of chronic inflammation and mediate the recruitment of lymphocytes from the blood into these tissues. In the mouse, these ligands, collectively termed the peripheral lymph node addressin (PNAd), have been shown to contain fucose, sialic acid, and sulfate and to include several HEV glycoproteins including GlyCAM-1, CD34, and MAdCAM-1. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) MECA-79, which binds a sulfate-dependent epitope, recognizes PNAd in both mouse and man. In humans, only CD34 has been identified among the glycoprotein species that react with MECA-79. Although P-selectin is highly expressed in tonsil HEVs, it was not found to react with MECA-79 or to support L-selectin-mediated lymphocyte rolling. To further characterize human PNAd, MAbs were developed against purified PNAd immunoisolated from human tonsil. MAbs JG-1, JG-5, JG-9, and JG-10, like MECA-79, bind HEVs in human tonsil and react similarly in Western blots, and JG-9 and JG-10 also block lymphocyte rolling on purified PNAd. In addition, by competitive ELISA on purified tonsil PNAd, all MAbs were found to react with overlapping epitopes. However, JG-1, JG-5, JG-9, and JG-10 do not recognize mouse PNAd, and unlike MECA-79, they recognize determinants that are sensitive to neuraminidase. Strikingly, the epitope recognized by JG-1, although abundant in tonsil and peripheral lymph node, is absent from appendix HEVs or HEVs in some samples of chronically inflamed skin, even though these HEVs are MECA-79 reactive. Moreover, although JG-5 and JG-9 react well with tonsil, peripheral lymph node, and inflamed skin HEVs, they react only with occasional endothelial cells in appendix tissues. These findings point to significant diversity in the carbohydrate determinants expressed by HEVs and recognized by L-selectin and demonstrate their differential representation in different sites in vivo. These

  1. SMA observations of the W3(OH) complex: Dynamical differentiation between W3(H2O) and W3(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sheng-Li; Schilke, Peter; Wu, Jingwen; Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Liu, Ying

    2016-03-01

    We present Submillimeter Array observations of the HCN (3-2) and HCO+ (3-2) molecular lines towards the W3(H2O) and W3(OH) star-forming complexes. Infall and outflow motions in the W3(H2O) have been characterized by observing HCN and HCO+ transitions. High-velocity blue/red-shifted emission, tracing the outflow, show multiple knots, which might originate in episodic and precessing outflows. `Blue-peaked' line profiles indicate that gas is infalling on to the W3(H2O) dust core. The measured large mass accretion rate, 2.3 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1, together with the small free-fall time-scale, 5 × 103 yr, suggest W3(H2O) is in an early evolutionary stage of the process of formation of high-mass stars. For the W3(OH), a two-layer model fit to the HCN and HCO+ spectral lines and Spizter/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) images support that the W3(OH) H II region is expanding and interacting with the ambient gas, with the shocked neutral gas being expanding with an expansion time-scale of 6.4 × 103 yr. The observations suggest different kinematical time-scales and dynamical states for the W3(H2O) and W3(OH).

  2. Mycobacterium kansasii infection in a bontebok (Damaliscus pygaragus dorcas) herd: diagnostic challenges in differentiating from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Terrell, Scott; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena; Harris, Beth; Thomsen, Bruce V; Fontenot, Deidre; Stetter, Mark; Neiffer, Don; Fleming, Greg

    2011-09-01

    Two adult female bontebok (Damaliscus pygarus dorcas) were euthanized because of signs of pneumonia and weakness (case 1), and a nonresponsive lameness with draining fistula (case 2). Necropsy findings were similar in both cases and consisted of disseminated granulomatous lesions in the liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, pleural surfaces, and multiple lymph nodes. Mycobacterium kansasii was isolated from both cases after multiple attempts on a variety of samples by two laboratories. The remaining four animals in the herd were tested for antibody responses using the Chembio ElephantTB STAT-PAK, DPP VetTB kits, and multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA), for immune reaction using the intradermal tuberculin test, and by tracheal wash cultures, and thoracic radiographs. Banked serum samples collected in 2005 and obtained from the original institution, revealed 1/9 (11.11%) seropositive animals using the three immunoassays. Retesting the current herd in 2008 showed 2/6 (33.33%) seropositive animals by the three tests, with MAPIA demonstrating antibody reactivity to MPB83 and MPB70 proteins. Inconsistent intradermal tuberculin test results, cross-reactivity in serologic assays designed for tuberculosis detection, difficulty in obtaining definitive identification by culture, and inability to identify a source of infection created challenges in distinguishing the atypical mycobacteriosis due to M. kansasii from the initially suspected tuberculous infection in this herd. Owing to regulatory considerations, differences in host-to-host transmission, and source of infection between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria, correct diagnosis is crucial for management of these diseases in wildlife species. PMID:22950320

  3. Differential role of PKA catalytic subunits in mediating phenotypes caused by knockout of the Carney complex gene Prkar1a.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhirong; Pringle, Daphne R; Jones, Georgette N; Kelly, Kimberly M; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2011-10-01

    The Carney complex is an inherited tumor predisposition caused by activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase [protein kinase A (PKA)] resulting from mutation of the PKA-regulatory subunit gene PRKAR1A. Myxomas and tumors in cAMP-responsive tissues are cardinal features of this syndrome, which is unsurprising given the important role played by PKA in modulating cell growth and function. Previous studies demonstrated that cardiac-specific knockout of Prkar1a causes embryonic heart failure and myxomatous degeneration in the heart, whereas limited Schwann cell-specific knockout of the gene causes schwannoma formation. In this study, we sought to determine the role of PKA activation in this phenotype by using genetic means to reduce PKA enzymatic activity. To accomplish this goal, we introduced null alleles of the PKA catalytic subunits Prkaca (Ca) or Prkacb (Cb) into the Prkar1a-cardiac knockout (R1a-CKO) or limited Schwann cell knockout (R1a-TEC3KO) line. Heterozygosity for Prkaca rescued the embryonic lethality of the R1a-CKO, although mice had a shorter than normal lifespan and died from cardiac failure with atrial thrombosis. In contrast, heterozygosity for Prkacb only enabled the mice to survive 1 extra day during embryogenesis. Biochemical analysis indicated that reduction of Ca markedly reduced PKA activity in embryonic hearts, whereas reduction of Cb had minimal effects. In R1a-TEC3KO mice, tumorigenesis was completely suppressed by a heterozygosity for Prkaca, and by more than 80% by heterozygosity for Prkacb. These data suggest that both developmental and tumor phenotypes caused by Prkar1a mutation result from excess PKA activity due to PKA-Ca. PMID:21852354

  4. Survival, Differentiation, and Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Human Stem Cells Complexed With Neurotrophin-3-Releasing Pharmacologically Active Microcarriers in an Ex Vivo Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Garbayo, Elisa; Sindji, Laurence; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Schiller, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). We recently reported the repair and functional recovery after treatment with human marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells adhered to neurotrophin-3 (NT3) releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats. In order to comprehend this effect, the goal of the present work was to elucidate the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of MIAMI cells and human neural stem cells (NSCs), both adhering to NT3-releasing PAMs in an ex vivo organotypic model of nigrostriatal degeneration made from brain sagittal slices. It was shown that PAMs led to a marked increase in MIAMI cell survival and neuronal differentiation when releasing NT3. A significant neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells adhering to PAMs was also demonstrated. NSCs barely had a neuroprotective effect and differentiated mostly into dopaminergic neuronal cells when adhering to PAM-NT3. Moreover, those cells were able to release dopamine in a sufficient amount to induce a return to baseline levels. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stanniocalcin-1 as potential mediators of the neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells and NSCs, respectively. It was also shown that VEGF locally stimulated tissue vascularization, which might improve graft survival, without excluding a direct neuroprotective effect of VEGF on dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate a prospective interest of human NSC/PAM and MIAMI cell/PAM complexes in tissue engineering for PD. Significance Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). The present work elucidates and compares the survival, differentiation, and

  5. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitate expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Mohandas, Narla; Gascard, Philippe D; Conboy, John G

    2004-10-01

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140- to 240-kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity; alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer. PMID:15475241

  6. Theoretical differential Raman scattering cross-sections of totally-symmetric vibrational modes of free pyridine and pyridine-metal cluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. Y.; Hayashi, M.; Lin, S. H.; Tian, Z. Q.

    2004-01-01

    The differential Raman scattering cross-sections of totally-symmetric vibrational modes for pyridine and pyridine-metal clusters have been calculated by using ab initio and density functional methods. The results are compared with experimental data and a good agreement is obtained. In particular, we can theoretically reproduce the significant changes in the relative Raman intensities of the ν12 mode in pyridine-metal cluster complexes. We focus on two mechanisms for these Raman intensities changes: (1) the chemical interaction between the pyridine and the metal clusters; and (2) the charge transfer mechanism. For the pyridine-silver cluster complexes, we find that due to the weak bonding, the chemical interaction does not influence the relative intensities of the Raman peaks of the ν1 and ν12 modes. However, in the case where the copper or the gold clusters are attached to pyridine, the intensity of the band of the ν12 mode is weakened significantly. We also find that the charge transfer mechanism increases the asymmetry of the bands of the ν1 and ν12 modes on all three metals.

  7. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  8. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes. PMID:25333871

  9. Matrix differentiation formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.; Tkhabisimov, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A compact differentiation technique (without using indexes) is developed for scalar functions that depend on complex matrix arguments which are combined by operations of complex conjugation, transposition, addition, multiplication, matrix inversion and taking the direct product. The differentiation apparatus is developed in order to simplify the solution of extremum problems of scalar functions of matrix arguments.

  10. Differential implications of the oncogene-tumor suppressor gene complex in the geneses of 19 human neoplasias. Evidence in support of the steroid carcinogenesis hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Murakami, M; Kodama, T

    1997-01-01

    The cancer risk changes of 19 human neoplasias over time and space, as expressed in terms of the logarithm of age-adjusted incidence rate (log AAIR), were found to hold a linear correlation with each other--a finding suggesting that the distribution pattern of log AAIR data sets of 2 cancers, when plotted on a two dimension diagram, may show a good fitness to the chemical equilibrium model a product of the law of mass action. On the basis of the statistical analysis of the data, we reached the conclusion that the risk changes of a given neoplasia in space represents the function of the centripetal force of an activated oncogene and the centrifugal force of an inactivated tumor suppressor gene, both of which should cooperate with each other to create a thermodynamic equilibrium under the law of mass action. The purpose of this study was to test the contribution of the oncogene-tumor suppressor gene complex to the sex discrimination of cancer risk in 19 human neoplasias. The results obtained are as follows: a) the correlation coefficient r seq of the sequential regression analysis, as applied to 47 log AAIR data sets of one tumor pair, served as a criterion in testing the balance of power between oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation. Sole activation of the oncogene should give an r seq value of -1.0, whereas sole inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene should give an r seq value of +1.0. b) Esophageal cancer and laryngeal cancer, two sex-discriminating tumors with distinct male predominance were each associated with differential implications of the oncogene-tumor suppressor gene complex between the male and female populations: in both tumors, the male populations were associated with a complex of activated oncogene and inactivated tumor suppressor gene, whereas the female population was associated with another complex of weakly activated (esophageal cancer) or non-activated (laryngeal cancer) oncogene and inactivated tumor suppressor gene, as

  11. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin increases the expression of genes in the human epidermal differentiation complex and accelerates epidermal barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Carrie Hayes; Bodreddigari, Sridevi; Campion, Christina; Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R

    2011-11-01

    Chloracne is commonly observed in people exposed to dioxins, yet the mechanism of toxicity is not well understood. The pathology of chloracne is characterized by hyperkeratinization of the interfollicular squamous epithelium, hyperproliferation and hyperkeratinization of hair follicle cells as well as a metaplastic response of the ductular sebum secreting sebaceous glands. In vitro studies using normal human epidermal keratinocytes to model interfollicular human epidermis demonstrate a 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-mediated acceleration of differentiation and increase in gene expression of several prodifferentiation genes, including filaggrin (FLG). Here, we demonstrated that the TCDD-activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) bound a small fragment of DNA upstream of the transcriptional start sites of the FLG gene, containing one of two candidate xenobiotic response elements (XREs). Reporter assays using the promoter region of FLG containing the two putative XREs indicated that the increase in this messenger RNA (mRNA) was due to TCDD-mediated enhanced transcription, which was lost when both XREs were mutated. As FLG is part of the human epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) found on chromosome 1, we measured mRNAs from an additional 18 EDC genes for their regulation by TCDD. Of these genes, 14 were increased by TCDD. Immunoblot assays demonstrated that the proteins of FLG as well as that of another prodifferentiation gene, small proline rich protein 2, were increased by TCDD. In utero exposure to TCDD accelerated the formation of the epidermal barrier in the developing mouse fetus by approximately 1 day. These results indicate that the epidermal permeability barrier is a functional target of the TCDD-activated AHR. PMID:21835898

  12. mTOR Complex Signaling through the SEMA4A–Plexin B2 Axis Is Required for Optimal Activation and Differentiation of CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Nishide, Masayuki; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takamatsu, Hyota; Kang, Sujin; Kimura, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuji; Morimoto, Keiko; Maeda, Yohei; Hosokawa, Takashi; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Ohshima, Jun; Kamimura, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Murakami, Masaaki; Morii, Eiichi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays crucial roles in activation and differentiation of diverse types of immune cells. Although several lines of evidence have demonstrated the importance of mTOR-mediated signals in CD4+ T cell responses, the involvement of mTOR in CD8+ T cell responses is not fully understood. In this study, we show that a class IV semaphorin, SEMA4A, regulates CD8+ T cell activation and differentiation through activation of mTOR complex (mTORC) 1. SEMA4A−/− CD8+ T cells exhibited impairments in production of IFN-γ and TNF-α and induction of the effector molecules granzyme B, perforin, and FAS-L. Upon infection with OVA-expressing Listeria monocytogenes, pathogen-specific effector CD8+ T cell responses were significantly impaired in SEMA4A−/− mice. Furthermore, SEMA4A−/− CD8+ T cells exhibited reduced mTORC1 activity and elevated mTORC2 activity, suggesting that SEMA4A is required for optimal activation of mTORC1 in CD8+ T cells. IFN-γ production and mTORC1 activity in SEMA4A−/− CD8+ T cells were restored by administration of recombinant Sema4A protein. In addition, we show that plexin B2 is a functional receptor of SEMA4A in CD8+ T cells. Collectively, these results not only demonstrate the role of SEMA4A in CD8+ T cells, but also reveal a novel link between a semaphorin and mTOR signaling. PMID:26116513

  13. Differential gene expression in cumulus oocyte complexes collected by ovum pick up from repeat breeder and normally fertile Holstein Friesian heifers.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Roberto; Cambuli, Caterina; Capoferri, Rossana; Giannino, Laura; Lukaj, Aleksander; Duchi, Roberto; Lazzari, Giovanna; Galli, Cesare; Feligini, Maria; Galli, Andrea; Bongioni, Graziella

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether perturbed gene expression during cumulus oocyte development causes repeat breeding in cattle. In this study, a repeat breeder was defined as a normal estrous cycling animal that did not become pregnant after three inseminations despite the absence of clinically detectable reproductive disorders. Transcripts of genes extracted from cumulus oocyte complexes (COC) that were collected from three repeat breeder and three normally fertile Holstein Friesian heifers were compared. Up to 40 COC were collected from each heifer by means of repeated sessions of ovum pick up in the absence of hormonal stimulation; immediately plunged into liquid nitrogen; and stored at -80°C until analysis. For each heifer, RNA was extracted from the pooled COC and hybridized on GeneChip(®) Bovine Gene Array (Affymetrix). Analysis of gene expression profiles of repeat breeder and control COC showed that 178 genes were differentially expressed (log2 fold change>1.5). Of these genes, 43 (24%) were up-regulated and 135 (76%) were down-regulated in repeat breeder relative to control heifers. This altered pattern of expression occurred in genes involved in several cellular biological processes and cellular components such as metabolism, angiogenesis, substrate/ion transport, regulation/signaling, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton. From these, 13 genes potentially involved in cumulus oocyte growth were subjected to validation by qRT-PCR and nine genes (annexin A1, ANXA1; lactoferrin, LTF; interferon stimulated exonuclease 20kDa, ISG20/HEM45; oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1, OLR1; fatty acid desaturase 2, FADS2; glutathione S-transferase A2 and A4, GSTA2 and GSTA4; glutathione peroxidase 1, GPX1; endothelin receptor type A, EDNRA) were confirmed to be differentially expressed. This study identified potential marker genes for fertility in dairy cattle. PMID:23911014

  14. Oxidized LDL Immune Complexes and Oxidized LDL Differentially Affect the Expression of Genes Involved with Inflammation and Survival In Human U937 Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Samar M; Twal, Waleed O; Barth, Jeremy L; Smith, Kent J.; Saad, Antonio F; Virella, Gabriel; Argraves, W. Scott; Lopes-Virella., Maria F

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the global effects of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) on gene expression in human monocytic cells and to identify differentially expressed genes involved with inflammation and survival. Methods and Results U937 cells were treated with oxLDL-IC, oxLDL, Keyhole limpet hemocyanin immune complexes (KLH-IC), or vehicle for 4 h. Transcriptome profiling was performed using DNA microarrays. oxLDL-IC uniquely affected the expression of genes involved with pro-survival (RAD54B, RUFY3, SNRPB2, and ZBTB24). oxLDL-IC also regulated many genes in a manner similar to KLH-IC. Functional categorization of these genes revealed that 39% are involved with stress responses, including the unfolded protein response which impacts cell survival, 19% with regulation of transcription, 10% with endocytosis and intracellular transport of protein and lipid, and 16% with inflammatory responses including regulation of I-κB/NF-κB cascade and cytokine activity. One gene in particular, HSP70 6, greatly up-regulated by ox-LDL-IC, was found to be required for the process by which oxLDL-IC augments IL1-β secretion. The study also revealed genes uniquely up-regulated by oxLDL including genes involved with growth inhibition (OKL38, NEK3, and FTH1), oxidoreductase activity (SPXN1 and HMOX1), and transport of amino acids and fatty acids (SLC7A11 and ADFP). Conclusions These findings highlight early transcriptional responses elicited by oxLDL-IC that may underlie its cytoprotective and pro-inflammatory effects. Cross-linking of Fcγ receptors appears to be the trigger for most of the transcriptional responses to oxLDL-IC. The findings further strengthen the hypothesis that oxLDL and oxLDL-IC elicit disparate inflammatory responses and play distinct roles in the process of atherosclerosis. PMID:18597759

  15. Association screening in the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC) identifies an SPRR3 repeat number variant as a risk factor for eczema.

    PubMed

    Marenholz, Ingo; Rivera, Vladimir A Gimenez; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min-Ae; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Kurek, Michael; Piskackova, Tereza; Macek, Milan; Lee, Young-Ae

    2011-08-01

    The genetically determined impairment of the skin barrier is a primary cause of eczema. As numerous genes essential for an intact epidermis reside within the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC), we screened the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database for putatively functional polymorphisms in the EDC genes and tested them for association with eczema. We identified 20 polymorphisms with predicted major impact on protein function. Of these, 4 were validated in 94 eczema patients: a nonsense mutation in FLG2 (rs12568784), a stop codon mutation in LCE1D (rs41268500), a 24-bp deletion in SPRR3 (rs28989168), and a frameshift mutation in S100A3 (rs11390146). The minor allele frequencies were 15.1, 6.1, 47.2, and 0.4%, respectively. Association testing of the validated polymorphisms in 555 eczema patients and 375 controls identified a significant effect of rs28989168 (SPRR3) on eczema. The association was replicated in another 1,314 cases and 1,322 controls, yielding an overall odds ratio of 1.30 (95% confidence interval 1.12-1.51; P=0.00067) for a dominant mode of inheritance. Small proline-rich proteins (SPRRs) are crossbridging proteins in the cornified cell envelope (CE), which provides the main barrier function of stratified squamous epithelia. The SPRR3 variant associated with eczema carried an extra 24-bp repeat in the central domain, which may alter the physical properties of the CE. PMID:21490620

  16. Differentiation-dependent expression of phosphatidylserine in mammalian plasma membranes: quantitative assessment of outer-leaflet lipid by prothrombinase complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, J; Bucana, C; Fidler, I J; Schroit, A J

    1989-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is asymmetrically distributed in mammalian cell membranes, being preferentially localized in the inner leaflet. Some studies have suggested that a disturbance in the normal asymmetric distribution of PS--e.g., PS exposure in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, which can occur upon platelet activation as well as in certain pathologic red cells--serves as a potent procoagulant surface and as a signal for triggering their recognition by macrophages. These studies suggest that the regulation of PS distribution in cell membranes may be critical in controlling coagulation and in determining the survival of pathologic cells in the circulation. In this paper we describe a sensitive technique, based on PS-dependent prothrombinase complex activity, for assessing the amount of PS on the external leaflet of intact viable cells. Our results indicate that tumorigenic, undifferentiated murine erythroleukemic cells express 7- to 8-fold more PS in their outer leaflet than do their differentiated, nontumorigenic counterparts. Increased expression of PS in the tumorigenic cells directly correlated with their ability to be recognized and bound by macrophages. PMID:2717615

  17. The protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation and increases sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 levels

    SciTech Connect

    King, Taj D.; Gandy, Johanna C.; Bijur, Gautam N. . E-mail: gautam@uab.edu

    2006-11-01

    The ubiquitously expressed protein glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is constitutively active, however its activity is markedly diminished following phosphorylation of Ser21 of GSK3{alpha} and Ser9 of GSK3{beta}. Although several kinases are known to phosphorylate Ser21/9 of GSK3, for example Akt, relatively much less is known about the mechanisms that cause the dephosphorylation of GSK3 at Ser21/9. In the present study KCl-induced plasma membrane depolarization of SH-SY5Y cells, which increases intracellular calcium concentrations caused a transient decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473, and GSK3 at Ser21/9. Overexpression of the selective protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, inhibitor-2, increased basal GSK3 phosphorylation at Ser21/9 and significantly blocked the KCl-induced dephosphorylation of GSK3{beta}, but not GSK3{alpha}. The phosphorylation of Akt was not affected by the overexpression of inhibitor-2. GSK3 activity is known to affect sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2) levels. Overexpression of inhibitor-2 or treatment of cells with the GSK3 inhibitors lithium and SB216763 increased the levels of SERCA2. These results indicate that the protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation induced by KCl and that GSK3 activity regulates SERCA2 levels.

  18. Complexity and Productivity Differentiation Models of Metallogenic Indicator Elements in Rocks and Supergene Media Around Daijiazhuang Pb-Zn Deposit in Dangchang County, Gansu Province

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jin-zhong Yao, Shu-zhen; Zhang, Zhong-ping; You, Guan-jin

    2013-03-15

    With the help of complexity indices, we quantitatively studied multifractals, frequency distributions, and linear and nonlinear characteristics of geochemical data for exploration of the Daijiazhuang Pb-Zn deposit. Furthermore, we derived productivity differentiation models of elements from thermodynamics and self-organized criticality of metallogenic systems. With respect to frequency distributions and multifractals, only Zn in rocks and most elements except Sb in secondary media, which had been derived mainly from weathering and alluviation, exhibit nonlinear distributions. The relations of productivity to concentrations of metallogenic elements and paragenic elements in rocks and those of elements strongly leached in secondary media can be seen as linear addition of exponential functions with a characteristic weak chaos. The relations of associated elements such as Mo, Sb, and Hg in rocks and other elements in secondary media can be expressed as an exponential function, and the relations of one-phase self-organized geological or metallogenic processes can be represented by a power function, each representing secondary chaos or strong chaos. For secondary media, exploration data of most elements should be processed using nonlinear mathematical methods or should be transformed to linear distributions before processing using linear mathematical methods.

  19. Potential of the reversed-inject differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of essential oils of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Cobelli, Luigi; Stani, Gianluca; Miliazza, Armando; Giardina, Matthew; Firor, Roger; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-10-23

    In this study, the first capillary flow technology reverse-inject differential flow modulator was implemented with different column configurations (lengths, diameters and stationary phase coupling) and detector combinations (mass spectrometry--MS and flame ionization detection--FID) to evaluate its potential in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of medium-to-highly complex essential oils. In particular, a parallel dual-secondary column dual-detection configuration that has shown to improve the information potential also with thermally modulated GC × GC platforms (MS identification reliability and accurate FID quantitation), was tested. Several system performance parameters (separation measure SGC × GC, modulation ratio MR, separation space used and peak symmetry) were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field. The systems demonstrating the best chromatographic performance were selected for quantitative profiling of lavender and mint essential oils and fingerprinting of vetiver essential oil. Experimental results demonstrate that careful tuning of column dimensions and system configurations yields improved: (a) selectivity; (b) operable carrier gas linear velocities at close-to-optimal values; (c) (2)D separation power by extending the modulation period and (d) handling of overloaded peaks without dramatic losses in resolution and quantitative accuracy. PMID:26387790

  20. Pathotypes in the Entomophaga grylli species complex of grasshopper pathogens differentiated with random amplification of polymorphic DNA and cloned-DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Bidochka, M J; Walsh, S R; Ramos, M E; Leger, R J; Silver, J C; Roberts, D W

    1995-01-01

    The zygomycetous fungus Entomophaga grylli is a pathogen that shows host-specific variance to grasshopper subfamilies. Three pathotypes of the E. grylli species complex were differentiated by three molecular techniques. In the first method, the three pathotypes showed different fragment patterns generated by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). There was little or no interisolate variability in RAPD fragment patterns within each pathotype. Passage of an isolate of pathotype 3, originally from an Australian grasshopper (Praxibulus sp.), through a North America grasshopper resulted in no differences in the resultant RAPD fragment patterns. In the second method, polymorphic RAPD fragments were used to probe the genomic DNA from the three pathotypes, and pathotype-specific fragments were found. In the third method, restriction fragments from genomic DNA of the three pathotypes were cloned and screened for pathotype specificity. A genomic probe specific for each pathotype was isolated. These probes did not hybridize to DNA from Entomophaga aulicae or from grasshoppers. To facilitate the use of RAPD analysis and other molecular tools to identify pathotypes, a method for extracting DNA from resting spores from infected grasshoppers was developed. The DNA from the fractured resting spores was of sufficient integrity to be blotted and probed with the pathotype-specific DNA probes, thus validating the use of these probes for pathotype identification in field-collected grasshoppers. PMID:7574596

  1. Evaluation of three real-time PCR assays for differential identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria species in liquid culture media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Jung; Kim, Ji-Youn; Song, Dong Joon; Koh, Won-Jung; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC)/nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) PCR assays for differential identification of MTBC and NTM using culture-positive liquid media. Eighty-five type strains and 100 consecutive mycobacterial liquid media cultures (MGIT 960 system) were analyzed by a conventional PCR assay (MTB-ID(®) V3) and three real-time PCR assays (AdvanSure™ TB/NTM real-time PCR, AdvanSure; GENEDIA(®) MTB/NTM Detection Kit, Genedia; Real-Q MTB & NTM kit, Real-Q). The accuracy rates for reference strains were 89.4%, 100%, 98.8%, and 98.8% for the MTB-ID V3, AdvanSure, Genedia, and Real-Q assays, respectively. Cross-reactivity in the MTB-ID V3 assay was mainly attributable to non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species. The diagnostic performance was determined using clinical isolates grown in liquid media, and the overall sensitivities for all PCR assays were higher than 95%. In conclusion, the three real-time PCR assays showed better performance in discriminating mycobacterium species and non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species than the conventional PCR assay. PMID:27105774

  2. Direct determination of dissolved cobalt and nickel in seawater by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltametry preceded by adsorptive collection of cyclohexane-1,2-dione dioxime complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Donat, J.R.; Bruland, K.W.

    1988-02-01

    A highly sensitive voltametric technique was developed for the direct determination of cobalt and nickel in seawater at picomolar and nanomolar concentrations, respectively. Cyclohexane-1,2-dione dioxime (nioxime) complexes of Co(II) and Ni(II) were concentrated from 10 mL of sample onto a hanging mercury drop electrode by controlled adsorption and the current resulting from reduction of Co(II) and Ni(II) was measured by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltametry. Detailed experiments were conducted to determine the optimal ligand type and concentration, buffer type and concentration, pH, and adsorption potential. Maximum sensitivity was obtained by using a nioxime concentration of 1 x 10/sup -4/ m, a HEPES buffer concentration of 0.03 m, a solution pH of 7.6, and an adsorption potential of -0.6 V. Replicate analyses of seawater reference materials yielded excellent agreement with certified values. Analytical precision for Co and Ni at coastal and open ocean concentrations was approximately +/-5% relative standard deviation. Detection limits for Co and Ni depend upon reagent blanks and are 6 pM and 0.45 nM, respectively, for 15-min adsorption periods.

  3. The differential effects of a complex protein drink versus isocaloric carbohydrate drink on performance indices following high-intensity resistance training: a two arm crossover design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-workout nutrient timing and macronutrient selection are essential for recovery, glycogen replenishment and muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Performance repeatability, particularly after strenuous activity, can be influenced by substrate availability, recovery markers and perceived rate of exertion. This study compared the differential effects of a complex protein ready-to-drink beverage (VPX) and isocaloric carbohydrate beverage (iCHO) on performance—agility T-test, push-up test, 40-yard sprint, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE), following high-intensity resistance training (HIRT). Methods In a randomized, double blind two-arm crossover controlled trial, 15 subjects performed a 15–18 minute (2:1 work to rest) HIRT and then immediately drank one of the two treatments. After a 2-hour fast, subjects returned to execute the field tests and report RPE. The protocol was repeated one week later with the other treatment. Results There were no significant main effect differences in the agility T-test (p = 0.83), push-up (p = 0.21) sprint (p = 0.12), average agility RPE (p = 0.83), average push-up RPE (p = 0.81) or average sprint RPE (p = 0.66) between the two trials and the two treatments. The multivariate analysis yielded a cumulative significant interaction effect amongst the three performance variables after consuming VPX (p < 0.01). These results suggest a complex protein beverage is a better post-workout choice compared to an isocaloric carbohydrate beverage for repeated performance for activities that require multiple energy demands and athletic skills; however, this outcome was not observed for each single performance event or RPE. Conclusion When considering the collective physical effects of the agility T-test, push-up and sprint tests, a complex protein beverage may provide a recovery advantage as it relates to repeated-bout performance compared to an iCHO-only beverage. Additional research examining the chronic effects of post

  4. Differential Effects of the Gβ5-RGS7 Complex on Muscarinic M3 Receptor–Induced Ca2+ Influx and Release

    PubMed Central

    Karpinsky-Semper, Darla; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Brothers, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    The G protein β subunit Gβ5 uniquely forms heterodimers with R7 family regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins (RGS6, RGS7, RGS9, and RGS11) instead of Gγ. Although the Gβ5-RGS7 complex attenuates Ca2+ signaling mediated by the muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R), the route of Ca2+ entry (i.e., release from intracellular stores and/or influx across the plasma membrane) is unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to suppressing carbachol-stimulated Ca2+ release, Gβ5-RGS7 enhanced Ca2+ influx. This novel effect of Gβ5-RGS7 was blocked by nifedipine and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate. Experiments with pertussis toxin, an RGS domain–deficient mutant of RGS7, and UBO-QIC {L-threonine,(3R)-N-acetyl-3-hydroxy-L-leucyl-(aR)-a-hydroxybenzenepropanoyl-2,3-idehydro-N-methylalanyl-L-alanyl-N-methyl-L-alanyl-(3R)-3-[[(2S,3R)-3-hydroxy-4- methyl-1-oxo-2-[(1-oxopropyl)amino]pentyl]oxy]-L-leucyl-N,O-dimethyl-,(7→1)-lactone (9CI)}, a novel inhibitor of Gq, showed that Gβ5-RGS7 modulated a Gq-mediated pathway. These studies indicate that Gβ5-RGS7, independent of RGS7 GTPase-accelerating protein activity, couples M3R to a nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channel. We also compared the action of Gβ5-RGS7 on M3R-induced Ca2+ influx and release elicited by different muscarinic agonists. Responses to Oxo-M [oxotremorine methiodide N,N,N,-trimethyl-4-(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)-2-butyn-1-ammonium iodide] were insensitive to Gβ5-RGS7. Pilocarpine responses consisted of a large release and modest influx components, of which the former was strongly inhibited whereas the latter was insensitive to Gβ5-RGS7. McN-A-343 [(4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium-3-chlorocarbanilate chloride] was the only compound whose total Ca2+ response was enhanced by Gβ5-RGS7, attributed to, in part, by the relatively small Ca2+ release this partial agonist stimulated. Together, these results show that distinct agonists not only have differential M3R functional selectivity, but also confer specific

  5. Differential gene expression patterns in developing sexually dimorphic rat brain regions exposed to antiandrogenic, estrogenic, or complex endocrine disruptor mixtures: glutamatergic synapses as target.

    PubMed

    Lichtensteiger, Walter; Bassetti-Gaille, Catherine; Faass, Oliver; Axelstad, Marta; Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie; Rehrauer, Hubert; Georgijevic, Jelena Kühn; Hass, Ulla; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Schlumpf, Margret

    2015-04-01

    The study addressed the question whether gene expression patterns induced by different mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) administered in a higher dose range, corresponding to 450×, 200×, and 100× high-end human exposure levels, could be characterized in developing brain with respect to endocrine activity of mixture components, and which developmental processes were preferentially targeted. Three EDC mixtures, A-Mix (anti-androgenic mixture) with 8 antiandrogenic chemicals (di-n-butylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, vinclozolin, prochloraz, procymidone, linuron, epoxiconazole, and DDE), E-Mix (estrogenic mixture) with 4 estrogenic chemicals (bisphenol A, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate, and butylparaben), a complex mixture, AEP-Mix, containing the components of A-Mix and E-Mix plus paracetamol, and paracetamol alone, were administered by oral gavage to rat dams from gestation day 7 until weaning. General developmental endpoints were not affected by EDC mixtures or paracetamol. Gene expression was analyzed on postnatal day 6, during sexual brain differentiation, by exon microarray in medial preoptic area in the high-dose group, and by real-time RT-PCR in medial preoptic area and ventromedial hypothalamus in all dose groups. Expression patterns were mixture, sex, and region specific. Effects of the analgesic drug paracetamol, which exhibits antiandrogenic activity in peripheral systems, differed from those of A-Mix. All mixtures had a strong, mixture-specific impact on genes encoding for components of excitatory glutamatergic synapses and genes controlling migration and pathfinding of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, as well as genes linked with increased risk of autism spectrum disorders. Because development of glutamatergic synapses is regulated by sex steroids also in hippocampus, this may represent a general target of ECD mixtures. PMID:25607892

  6. Aberrant differential expression of EZH1 and EZH2 in Polycomb repressive complex 2 among B- and T/NK-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Abdalkader, Lamia; Oka, Takashi; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Sato, Hiaki; Murakami, Ichiro; Otte, Arie P; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2016-08-01

    The Polycomb repressive complex-2 members (EZH2, EED, SUZ12 and EZH1) are important regulators of haematopoiesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Over-expression of EZH2 has been linked to cancer metastases and poor prognosis. Detailed information on the expression of other members in normal and neoplastic lymphoid tissue remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent analyses of 156 samples from haematopoietic neoplasms patients and 27 haematopoietic cell lines were used. B-cell neoplasms showed a significant over-expression of EZH2, EED and SUZ12 in the aggressive subtypes compared to the indolent subtypes and normal tissue (p = 0.000-0.046) while expression of EZH1 was decreased in mantle cell lymphoma compared to normal tissue (p = 0.011). T/NK-cell neoplasms also showed significant over-expression of EZH2, EED and SUZ12 (p = 0.000-0.002) and decreased expression of EZH1 (p = 0.001) compared to normal cells. EZH2 and EZH1 have opposite expression patterns both in normal and neoplastic lymphoid tissues as well as an opposite relation to Ki-67. These results were supported by western blotting analyses. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a difference in the intracellular localisation of EZH1 compared to other members. These evidences suggest that EZH2 and EZH1 are important in the counter-balancing mechanisms controlling proliferation/resting of lymphoid cells. The disruption of the balanced EZH2/EZH1 ratio may play important roles in the pathogenesis of lymphomas. PMID:27311868

  7. Stoichiometry of the heparin-Cu2+-glycine mixed-ligand complex according to differential thermal analysis and IR spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofanova, M. A.; Frantseva, Yu. V.; Zhuravlev, E. V.; Baranova, N. V.; Ryasenskii, S. S.

    2015-02-01

    A method or the synthesis, isolation, and purification of a mixed-ligand complex of heparin with copper and glycine cations was suggested. The complex was studied by elemental, thermal, and spectral analyses. The elemental and crystalline hydrate compositions of the complex were determined and the molecular formula was suggested to be Na3CuHepGly · 2H2O.

  8. Differential perturbations and D{sub {infinity}}-differential modules

    SciTech Connect

    Lapin, S V

    2001-12-31

    In the present paper the notions of a D{sub {infinity}}-differential and a D{sub {infinity}}-differential module are introduced, which are, respectively, homotopically invariant analogues of the differential and the chain complex. Basic homotopic properties of D{sub {infinity}}-differentials and D{sub {infinity}}-differential modules are established. The connection between the Gugenheim-Lambe-Stasheff theory of differential perturbations in homological algebra and the construction of a D{sub {infinity}}-differential module is considered.

  9. Conservation laws, differential identities, and constraints of partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharinov, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We consider specific cohomological properties such as low-dimensional conservation laws and differential identities of systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). We show that such properties are inherent to complex systems such as evolution systems with constraints. The mathematical tools used here are the algebraic analysis of PDEs and cohomologies over differential algebras and modules.

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary data analysis of the ligand–receptor complex of the growth and differentiation factor 5 variant R57A (GDF5R57A) and BMP receptor IA (BRIA)

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Joachim; Kotzsch, Alexander; Sebald, Walter; Mueller, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    The binary ligand–receptor complex of human growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) bound to its type I receptor BMP receptor IA (BRIA) was prepared and crystallized. By utilizing the GDF5 variant R57A, which exhibits a high affinity in the subnanomolar range for BRIA, the binary complex of GDF5R57A bound to the extracellular domain of BRIA could be produced and purified. Crystals of this complex belonged to a monoclinic space group: either I2, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.81, b = 62.85, c = 124.99 Å, β = 95.9°, or C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.17, b = 62.78, c = 63.53 Å, β = 112.8°. PMID:21543859

  11. Geochemistry of anorthositic differentiated sills in the Archean (~ 2970 Ma) Fiskenæsset Complex, SW Greenland: Implications for parental magma compositions, geodynamic setting, and secular heat flow in arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Ali; Fryer, Brian J.; Appel, Peter W. U.; Kalvig, Per; Kerrich, Robert; Dilek, Yildirim; Yang, Zhaoping

    2011-04-01

    The Fiskenæsset Complex, SW Greenland, is one of the best preserved layered Archean intrusions in the world, consisting of an association of ca. 550-meter-thick anorthosite, leucogabbro, gabbro, and ultramafic rocks (dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and hornblendite). Despite poly-phase deformation and amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism, primary cumulate textures and igneous layering are well-preserved in the complex. This study reports new major and trace element data for three variably thick (1 to 5 m) differentiated (dunite, through peridotite, pyroxenite, gabbro leucogabbro, to anorthosite) sequences (Sequences 1, 2 and 3) in the Sinarssuk area of the Fiskenæsset region. On several variation diagrams, samples from these sequences plot along a well-defined liquid line of descent, consistent with in situ fractional crystallization. The average chemical compositions of these sequences are used to constrain their approximate parental magma compositions. Petrographic observations and geochemical data suggest that Sequences 2 and 3 solidified from evolved magmas that underwent olivine fractionation prior to their intrusion. In contrast, Sequence 1 appears to have been derived from a near-primary parental magma (SiO 2 = 43 wt.%, MgO = 20 wt.%, Al 2O 3 = 16 wt.%, CaO = 9.3 wt.%, Ni = 840 ppm, Mg-number = 80). The trace element patterns of this parental magma are comparable to those of Phanerozoic boninites, consistent with a supra-subduction zone geodynamic setting. If the relative thickness of ultramafic layers, the sum of dunite, peridotite and pyroxenite layers, in differentiated sequences is taken as an analog for the original complex emplaced into Archean oceanic crust, the Fiskenæsset Complex might have had a minimum thickness of 1000 m, with a 500 m thick ultramafic unit at the bottom. The thickness of the ultramafic unit in the preserved complex is less than 50 m, suggesting that more than 90% of the original ultramafic unit was either delaminated

  12. Differential recall of derived and inflected word forms in working memory: examining the role of morphological information in simple and complex working memory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Service, Elisabet; Maury, Sini

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) has been described as an interface between cognition and action, or a system for access to a limited amount of information needed in complex cognition. Access to morphological information is needed for comprehending and producing sentences. The present study probed WM for morphologically complex word forms in Finnish, a morphologically rich language. We studied monomorphemic (boy), inflected (boy+’s), and derived (boy+hood) words in three tasks. Simple span, immediate serial recall of words, in Experiment 1, is assumed to mainly rely on information in the focus of attention. Sentence span, a dual task combining sentence reading with recall of the last word (Experiment 2) or of a word not included in the sentence (Experiment 3) is assumed to involve establishment of a search set in long-term memory for fast activation into the focus of attention. Recall was best for monomorphemic and worst for inflected word forms with performance on derived words in between. However, there was an interaction between word type and experiment, suggesting that complex span is more sensitive to morphological complexity in derivations than simple span. This was explored in a within-subjects Experiment 4 combining all three tasks. An interaction between morphological complexity and task was replicated. Both inflected and derived forms increased load in WM. In simple span, recall of inflectional forms resulted in form errors. Complex span tasks were more sensitive to morphological load in derived words, possibly resulting from interference from morphological neighbors in the mental lexicon. The results are best understood as involving competition among inflectional forms when binding words from input into an output structure, and competition from morphological neighbors in secondary memory during cumulative retrieval-encoding cycles. Models of verbal recall need to be able to represent morphological as well as phonological and semantic information. PMID:25642181

  13. Differential recall of derived and inflected word forms in working memory: examining the role of morphological information in simple and complex working memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Service, Elisabet; Maury, Sini

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) has been described as an interface between cognition and action, or a system for access to a limited amount of information needed in complex cognition. Access to morphological information is needed for comprehending and producing sentences. The present study probed WM for morphologically complex word forms in Finnish, a morphologically rich language. We studied monomorphemic (boy), inflected (boy+'s), and derived (boy+hood) words in three tasks. Simple span, immediate serial recall of words, in Experiment 1, is assumed to mainly rely on information in the focus of attention. Sentence span, a dual task combining sentence reading with recall of the last word (Experiment 2) or of a word not included in the sentence (Experiment 3) is assumed to involve establishment of a search set in long-term memory for fast activation into the focus of attention. Recall was best for monomorphemic and worst for inflected word forms with performance on derived words in between. However, there was an interaction between word type and experiment, suggesting that complex span is more sensitive to morphological complexity in derivations than simple span. This was explored in a within-subjects Experiment 4 combining all three tasks. An interaction between morphological complexity and task was replicated. Both inflected and derived forms increased load in WM. In simple span, recall of inflectional forms resulted in form errors. Complex span tasks were more sensitive to morphological load in derived words, possibly resulting from interference from morphological neighbors in the mental lexicon. The results are best understood as involving competition among inflectional forms when binding words from input into an output structure, and competition from morphological neighbors in secondary memory during cumulative retrieval-encoding cycles. Models of verbal recall need to be able to represent morphological as well as phonological and semantic information. PMID:25642181

  14. A Comprehensive Analysis of Chromoplast Differentiation Reveals Complex Protein Changes Associated with Plastoglobule Biogenesis and Remodeling of Protein Systems in Sweet Orange Flesh.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yunliu; Du, Jiabin; Wang, Lun; Pan, Zhiyong; Xu, Qiang; Xiao, Shunyuan; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-08-01

    Globular and crystalloid chromoplasts were observed to be region specifically formed in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) flesh and converted from amyloplasts during fruit maturation, which was associated with the composition of specific carotenoids and the expression of carotenogenic genes. Subsequent isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomic analyses of purified plastids from the flesh during chromoplast differentiation and senescence identified 1,386 putative plastid-localized proteins, 1,016 of which were quantified by spectral counting. The iTRAQ values reflecting the expression abundance of three identified proteins were validated by immunoblotting. Based on iTRAQ data, chromoplastogenesis appeared to be associated with three major protein expression patterns: (1) marked decrease in abundance of the proteins participating in the translation machinery through ribosome assembly; (2) increase in abundance of the proteins involved in terpenoid biosynthesis (including carotenoids), stress responses (redox, ascorbate, and glutathione), and development; and (3) maintenance of the proteins for signaling and DNA and RNA. Interestingly, a strong increase in abundance of several plastoglobule-localized proteins coincided with the formation of plastoglobules in the chromoplast. The proteomic data also showed that stable functioning of protein import, suppression of ribosome assembly, and accumulation of chromoplast proteases are correlated with the amyloplast-to-chromoplast transition; thus, these processes may play a collective role in chromoplast biogenesis and differentiation. By contrast, the chromoplast senescence process was inferred to be associated with significant increases in stress response and energy supply. In conclusion, this comprehensive proteomic study identified many potentially new plastid-localized proteins and provides insights into the potential developmental and molecular mechanisms underlying chromoplast

  15. A Comprehensive Analysis of Chromoplast Differentiation Reveals Complex Protein Changes Associated with Plastoglobule Biogenesis and Remodeling of Protein Systems in Sweet Orange Flesh1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yunliu; Du, Jiabin; Wang, Lun; Pan, Zhiyong; Xu, Qiang; Xiao, Shunyuan; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    Globular and crystalloid chromoplasts were observed to be region specifically formed in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) flesh and converted from amyloplasts during fruit maturation, which was associated with the composition of specific carotenoids and the expression of carotenogenic genes. Subsequent isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomic analyses of purified plastids from the flesh during chromoplast differentiation and senescence identified 1,386 putative plastid-localized proteins, 1,016 of which were quantified by spectral counting. The iTRAQ values reflecting the expression abundance of three identified proteins were validated by immunoblotting. Based on iTRAQ data, chromoplastogenesis appeared to be associated with three major protein expression patterns: (1) marked decrease in abundance of the proteins participating in the translation machinery through ribosome assembly; (2) increase in abundance of the proteins involved in terpenoid biosynthesis (including carotenoids), stress responses (redox, ascorbate, and glutathione), and development; and (3) maintenance of the proteins for signaling and DNA and RNA. Interestingly, a strong increase in abundance of several plastoglobule-localized proteins coincided with the formation of plastoglobules in the chromoplast. The proteomic data also showed that stable functioning of protein import, suppression of ribosome assembly, and accumulation of chromoplast proteases are correlated with the amyloplast-to-chromoplast transition; thus, these processes may play a collective role in chromoplast biogenesis and differentiation. By contrast, the chromoplast senescence process was inferred to be associated with significant increases in stress response and energy supply. In conclusion, this comprehensive proteomic study identified many potentially new plastid-localized proteins and provides insights into the potential developmental and molecular mechanisms underlying chromoplast

  16. Comparison of platinum, palladium, and rhodium distributions in some layered intrusions with special reference to the late differentiates (upper zone) of the Bushveld complex, South Africa.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Von Gruenewaldt, G.; Haffty, J.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Stillwater, Fiskenaesset and Bushveld complexes have many similarities. The trends of the Pt/(Pt + Pd) and its correlation with Mg/(Mg + Fe2+) are presented. Presumably the Pt/(Pt + Pd) variations are related to changes in major mineral compositions. -K.A.R.

  17. The Differential Effects of Two Types of Task Repetition on the Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency in Computer-Mediated L2 Written Production: A Focus on Computer Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiryousefi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Previous task repetition studies have primarily focused on how task repetition characteristics affect the complexity, accuracy, and fluency in L2 oral production with little attention to L2 written production. The main purpose of the study reported in this paper was to examine the effects of task repetition versus procedural repetition on the…

  18. Ancient DNA of the Extinct Lava Shearwater (Puffinus olsoni) from the Canary Islands Reveals Incipient Differentiation within the P. puffinus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Oscar; Illera, Juan Carlos; Rando, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Solis, Jacob; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2010-01-01

    Background The loss of species during the Holocene was, dramatically more important on islands than on continents. Seabirds from islands are very vulnerable to human-induced alterations such as habitat destruction, hunting and exotic predators. For example, in the genus Puffinus (family Procellariidae) the extinction of at least five species has been recorded during the Holocene, two of them coming from the Canary Islands. Methodology/Principal Findings We used bones of the two extinct Canary shearwaters (P. olsoni and P. holeae) to obtain genetic data, for use in providing insights into the differentiation process within the genus Puffinus. Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome b sequences were successfully retrieved from four Holocene specimens of the extinct Lava shearwater (P. olsoni) from Fuerteventura (Canary Islands), the P. holeae specimens yielded no DNA. Only one haplotype was detected in P. olsoni, suggesting a low genetic diversity within this species. Conclusions The phylogenetic analyses based on the DNA data reveal that: (i) the “Puffinus puffinus complex”, an assemblage of species defined using osteological characteristics (P. puffinus, P. olsoni, P. mauretanicus, P. yelkouan and probably P. holeae), shows unresolved phylogenetic relationships; (ii) despite the differences in body size and proportions, P. olsoni and the extant P. puffinus are sister species. Several hypotheses can be considered to explain the incipient differentiation between P. olsoni and P. puffinus. PMID:21209838

  19. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3–Induced Myeloid Cell Differentiation Is Regulated by a Vitamin D Receptor–Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hmama, Zakaria; Nandan, Devki; Sly, Laura; Knutson, Keith L.; Herrera-Velit, Patricia; Reiner, Neil E.

    1999-01-01

    1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (D3) promotes the maturation of myeloid cells and surface expressions of CD14 and CD11b, markers of cell differentiation in response to D3. To examine how these responses are regulated, THP-1 cells were grown in serum-free medium and incubated with D3. This was associated with rapid and transient increases in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity. Furthermore, induction of CD14 expression in response to D3 was abrogated by (a) the PI 3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin; (b) antisense oligonucleotides to mRNA for the p110 catalytic subunit of PI 3-kinase; and (c) a dominant negative mutant of PI 3-kinase. In THP-1 cells, induction of CD11b expression by D3 was also abrogated by LY294002 and wortmannin. Similarly, LY294002 and wortmannin inhibited D3-induced expression of both CD14 and CD11b in peripheral blood monocytes. In contrast to CD14 and CD11b, hormone-induced expression of the Cdk inhibitor p21 in THP-1 cells was unaffected by either wortmannin or LY294002. These findings suggest that PI 3-kinase selectively regulates D3-induced monocyte differentiation, independent of any effects on p21. PMID:10587349

  20. Top-down label-free LC-MALDI analysis of the peptidome during neural progenitor cell differentiation reveals complexity in cytoskeletal protein dynamics and identifies progenitor cell markers.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Daniel J; Brand, Sven; Belau, Eckhard; Paape, Rainer; Suckau, Detlev; Przyborski, Stefan A

    2011-10-01

    In the field of stem cell research, there is a strong requirement for the discovery of new biomarkers that more accurately define stem and progenitor cell populations, as well as their differentiated derivatives. The very-low-molecular-weight (<5 kDa) proteome/peptidome remains a poorly investigated but potentially rich source of cellular biomarkers. Here we describe a label-free LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF quantification approach to screen the very-low-molecular-weight proteome, i.e. the peptidome, of neural progenitor cells and derivative populations to identify potential neural stem/progenitor cell biomarkers. Twelve different proteins were identified on the basis of MS/MS analysis of peptides, which displayed differential abundance between undifferentiated and differentiated cultures. These proteins included major cytoskeletal components such as nestin, vimentin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which are all associated with neural development. Other cytoskeletal proteins identified were dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, prothymosin (thymosin α-1), and thymosin β-10. These findings highlight novel stem cell/progenitor cell marker candidates and demonstrate proteomic complexity, which underlies the limitations of major intermediate filament proteins long established as neural markers. PMID:21761558

  1. Communication complexity and information complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Denis

    Information complexity enables the use of information-theoretic tools in communication complexity theory. Prior to the results presented in this thesis, information complexity was mainly used for proving lower bounds and direct-sum theorems in the setting of communication complexity. We present three results that demonstrate new connections between information complexity and communication complexity. In the first contribution we thoroughly study the information complexity of the smallest nontrivial two-party function: the AND function. While computing the communication complexity of AND is trivial, computing its exact information complexity presents a major technical challenge. In overcoming this challenge, we reveal that information complexity gives rise to rich geometrical structures. Our analysis of information complexity relies on new analytic techniques and new characterizations of communication protocols. We also uncover a connection of information complexity to the theory of elliptic partial differential equations. Once we compute the exact information complexity of AND, we can compute exact communication complexity of several related functions on n-bit inputs with some additional technical work. Previous combinatorial and algebraic techniques could only prove bounds of the form theta( n). Interestingly, this level of precision is typical in the area of information theory, so our result demonstrates that this meta-property of precise bounds carries over to information complexity and in certain cases even to communication complexity. Our result does not only strengthen the lower bound on communication complexity of disjointness by making it more exact, but it also shows that information complexity provides the exact upper bound on communication complexity. In fact, this result is more general and applies to a whole class of communication problems. In the second contribution, we use self-reduction methods to prove strong lower bounds on the information

  2. Differential Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase-Akt-mTOR Activation by Semliki Forest and Chikungunya Viruses Is Dependent on nsP3 and Connected to Replication Complex Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Eng, Kai; Neuvonen, Maarit; Götte, Benjamin; Rheinemann, Lara; Mutso, Margit; Utt, Age; Varghese, Finny; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; McInerney, Gerald M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses affect or exploit the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, a crucial prosurvival signaling cascade. We report that this pathway was strongly activated in cells upon infection with the Old World alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV), even under conditions of complete nutrient starvation. We mapped this activation to the hyperphosphorylated/acidic domain in the C-terminal tail of SFV nonstructural protein nsP3. Viruses with a deletion of this domain (SFV-Δ50) but not of other regions in nsP3 displayed a clearly delayed and reduced capacity of Akt stimulation. Ectopic expression of the nsP3 of SFV wild type (nsP3-wt), but not nsP3-Δ50, equipped with a membrane anchor was sufficient to activate Akt. We linked PI3K-Akt-mTOR stimulation to the intracellular dynamics of viral replication complexes, which are formed at the plasma membrane and subsequently internalized in a process blocked by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Replication complex internalization was observed upon infection of cells with SFV-wt and SFV mutants with deletions in nsP3 but not with SFV-Δ50, where replication complexes were typically accumulated at the cell periphery. In cells infected with the closely related chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway was only moderately activated. Replication complexes of CHIKV were predominantly located at the cell periphery. Exchanging the hypervariable C-terminal tail of nsP3 between SFV and CHIKV induced the phenotype of strong PI3K-Akt-mTOR activation and replication complex internalization in CHIKV. In conclusion, infection with SFV but not CHIKV boosts PI3K-Akt-mTOR through the hyperphosphorylated/acidic domain of nsP3 to drive replication complex internalization. IMPORTANCE SFV and CHIKV are very similar in terms of molecular and cell biology, e.g., regarding replication and molecular interactions, but are strikingly different regarding pathology: CHIKV is a relevant human

  3. Calculation of the multifold differential cross section of the electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen by prolate spheroidal external complex scaling method with second Born corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Serov, Vladislav V.; Joulakian, Boghos B.

    2010-08-15

    We introduce the second Born dipole corrections in our recently developed ab initio procedure based on the driven Schroedinger equation formalism and the external scaling method for the determination of the multifold differential cross sections of the single and double ionization of molecular hydrogen by electron impact. To test our procedure, we first apply it to the excitation-ionization process of a He atom and compare the results to those of equivalent theoretical results, which are available. We then show that the introduction of the second Born correction including only dipole terms improves the agreement with the experimental results only in the case of the simple ionization. We think that the introduction of nondipole contributions in the second Born term which are not taken into account in the present work is necessary in the case of the double ionization process.

  4. Gene Loss and Lineage-Specific Restriction-Modification Systems Associated with Niche Differentiation in the Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Type 403 Clonal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Laura; McNally, Alan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Corander, Jukka; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Blom, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse species of bacteria commonly associated with infectious intestinal disease of humans and zoonotic carriage in poultry, cattle, pigs, and other animals. The species contains a large number of distinct clonal complexes that vary from host generalist lineages commonly found in poultry, livestock, and human disease cases to host-adapted specialized lineages primarily associated with livestock or poultry. Here, we present novel data on the ST403 clonal complex of C. jejuni, a lineage that has not been reported in avian hosts. Our data show that the lineage exhibits a distinctive pattern of intralineage recombination that is accompanied by the presence of lineage-specific restriction-modification systems. Furthermore, we show that the ST403 complex has undergone gene decay at a number of loci. Our data provide a putative link between the lack of association with avian hosts of C. jejuni ST403 and both gene gain and gene loss through nonsense mutations in coding sequences of genes, resulting in pseudogene formation. PMID:25795671

  5. Subunits of the Plastid ClpPR Protease Complex Have Differential Contributions to Embryogenesis, Plastid Biogenesis, and Plant Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Ramirez Rodriguez, Verenice; Zybailov, Boris; Olinares, Paul Dominic B.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2009-01-01

    The plastid ClpPR protease complex in Arabidopsis thaliana consists of five catalytic ClpP and four noncatalytic ClpR subunits. An extensive analysis of the CLPR family and CLPP5 is presented to address this complexity. Null alleles for CLPR2 and CLPR4 showed delayed embryogenesis and albino embryos, with seedling development blocked in the cotyledon stage; this developmental block was overcome under heterotrophic conditions, and seedlings developed into small albino to virescent seedlings. By contrast, null alleles for CLPP5 were embryo lethal. Thus, the ClpPR proteins make different functional contributions. To further test for redundancies and functional differences between the ClpR proteins, we overexpressed full-length cDNAs for ClpR1, R2, R3, R4 in clpr1, clpr2 and clpr4 mutants. This showed that overexpression of ClpR3 can complement for the loss of ClpR1, but not for the loss of ClpR2 or ClpR4, indicating that ClpR3 can functionally substitute ClpR1. By contrast, ClpR1, R2 and R4 could not substitute each other. Double mutants of weak CLPR1 and 2 alleles were seedling lethal, showing that a minimum concentration of different ClpR proteins is essential for Clp function. Microscopy and large-scale comparative leaf proteome analyses of a CLPR4 null allele demonstrate a central role of Clp protease in chloroplast biogenesis and protein homeostasis; substrates are discussed. Lack of transcriptional and translational feedback regulation within the CLPPR gene family indicates that regulation of Clp activity occurs through Clp complex assembly and substrate delivery. PMID:19525416

  6. Distinct Mutations in Yeast TAFII25 Differentially Affect the Composition of TFIID and SAGA Complexes as Well as Global Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Doris B.; vom Baur, Elmar; Thibault, Christelle; Sanders, Steven L.; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Davidson, Irwin; Weil, P. Anthony; Tora, Làszlò

    2002-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIID, composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFIIs), nucleates preinitiation complex formation at protein-coding gene promoters. SAGA, a second TAFII-containing multiprotein complex, is involved in transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the essential protein components common to SAGA and TFIID is yTAFII25. We define a minimal evolutionarily conserved 91-amino-acid region of TAFII25 containing a histone fold domain that is necessary and sufficient for growth in vivo. Different temperature-sensitive mutations of yTAFII25 or chimeras with the human homologue TAFII30 arrested cell growth at either the G1 or G2/M cell cycle phase and displayed distinct phenotypic changes and gene expression patterns. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TAFII25 mutation-dependent gene expression and phenotypic changes correlated at least partially with the integrity of SAGA and TFIID. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that the five TAFII25 temperature-sensitive mutant alleles individually affect the expression of between 18 and 33% of genes, whereas taken together they affect 64% of all class II genes. Thus, different yTAFII25 mutations induce distinct phenotypes and affect the regulation of different subsets of genes, demonstrating that no individual TAFII mutant allele reflects the full range of its normal functions. PMID:11940675

  7. R7BP Complexes With RGS9-2 and RGS7 in the Striatum Differentially Control Motor Learning and Locomotor Responses to Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Garret R; Cao, Yan; Davidson, Steve; Truong, Hai V; Pravetoni, Marco; Thomas, Mark J; Wickman, Kevin; Giesler, Glenn J; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2010-01-01

    In the striatum, signaling through G protein-coupled dopamine receptors mediates motor and reward behavior, and underlies the effects of addictive drugs. The extent of receptor responses is determined by RGS9-2/Gβ5 complexes, a striatally enriched regulator that limits the lifetime of activated G proteins. Recent studies suggest that the function of RGS9-2/Gβ5 is controlled by the association with an additional subunit, R7BP, making elucidation of its contribution to striatal signaling essential for understanding molecular mechanisms of behaviors mediated by the striatum. In this study, we report that elimination of R7BP in mice results in motor coordination deficits and greater locomotor response to morphine administration, consistent with the essential role of R7BP in maintaining RGS9-2 expression in the striatum. However, in contrast to previously reported observations with RGS9-2 knockouts, mice lacking R7BP do not show higher sensitivity to locomotor-stimulating effects of cocaine. Using a striatum-specific knockdown approach, we show that the sensitivity of motor stimulation to cocaine is instead dependent on RGS7, whose complex formation with R7BP is dictated by RGS9-2 expression. These results indicate that dopamine signaling in the striatum is controlled by concerted interplay between two RGS proteins, RGS7 and RGS9-2, which are balanced by a common subunit, R7BP. PMID:20043004

  8. Differential reaction kinetics, cleavage complex formation, and nonamer binding domain dependence dictate the structure-specific and sequence-specific nuclease activity of RAGs.

    PubMed

    Naik, Abani Kanta; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-01-20

    During V(D)J recombination, RAG (recombination-activating gene) complex cleaves DNA based on sequence specificity. Besides its physiological function, RAG has been shown to act as a structure-specific nuclease. Recently, we showed that the presence of cytosine within the single-stranded region of heteroduplex DNA is important when RAGs cleave on DNA structures. In the present study, we report that heteroduplex DNA containing a bubble region can be cleaved efficiently when present along with a recombination signal sequence (RSS) in cis or trans configuration. The sequence of the bubble region influences RAG cleavage at RSS when present in cis. We also find that the kinetics of RAG cleavage differs between RSS and bubble, wherein RSS cleavage reaches maximum efficiency faster than bubble cleavage. In addition, unlike RSS, RAG cleavage at bubbles does not lead to cleavage complex formation. Finally, we show that the "nonamer binding region," which regulates RAG cleavage on RSS, is not important during RAG activity in non-B DNA structures. Therefore, in the current study, we identify the possible mechanism by which RAG cleavage is regulated when it acts as a structure-specific nuclease. PMID:22119487

  9. Differential effects of the two amino acid sensing systems, the GCN2 kinase and the mTOR complex 1, on primary human alloreactive CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Tsogka, Konstantina; Sounidaki, Maria; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    Amino acid deprivation activates general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) kinase and inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), affecting the immune response. In this study, the effects of GCN2 kinase activation or mTOR inhibition on human alloreactive CD4+ T-cells were evaluated. The mixed lymphocyte reaction, as a model of alloreactivity, the GCN2 kinase activator, tryptophanol (TRP), and the mTOR complex 1 inhibitor, rapamycin (RAP), were used. Both TRP and RAP suppressed cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis. These events were p53-independent in the case of RAP, but were accompanied by an increase in p53 levels in the case of TRP. TRP decreased the levels of the Th2 signature transcription factor, GATA-3, as RAP did, yet the latter also decreased the levels of the Th1 and Th17 signature transcription factors, T-bet and RORγt, whereas it increased the levels of the Treg signature transcription factor, FoxP3. Accordingly, TRP decreased the production of interleukin (IL)-4, as RAP did, but RAP also decreased the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17. Both TRP and RAP increased the levels of IL-10. As regards hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which upregulates the Th17/Treg ratio, its levels were decreased by RAP. TRP increased the HIF-1α levels, which however, remained inactive. In conclusion, our findings indicate that, in primary human alloreactive CD4+ T-cells, the two systems that sense amino acid deprivation affect cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation in different ways or through different mechanisms. Both mTOR inhibition and GCN2 kinase activation exert immunosuppressive effects, since they inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. As regards CD4+ T-cell differentiation, mTOR inhibition exerted a more profound effect, since it suppressed differentiation into the Th1, Th2 and Th17 lineages, while it induced Treg differentiation. On the contrary, the activation of GCN2 kinase suppressed only Th2 differentiation

  10. The ferredoxin-binding site of ferredoxin: Nitrite oxidoreductase. Differential chemical modification of the free enzyme and its complex with ferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Dose, M M; Hirasawa, M; Kleis-SanFrancisco, S; Lew, E L; Knaff, D B

    1997-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacea oleracea) leaf ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent nitrite reductase was treated with either the arginine-modifying reagent phenyl-glyoxal or the lysine-modifying reagent pyridoxal-5'-phosphate under conditions where only the Fd-binding affinity of the enzyme was affected and where complex formation between Fd and the enzyme prevented the inhibition by either reagent. Modification with [14C]phenylglyoxal allowed the identification of two nitrite reductase arginines, R375 and R556, that are protected by Fd against labeling. Modification of nitrite reductase with pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, followed by reduction with NaBH4, allowed the identification of a lysine, K436, that is protected by Fd against labeling. Positive charges are present at these positions in all of the Fd-dependent nitrite reductase for which sequences are available, suggesting that these amino acids are directly involved in electrostatic binding of Fd to the enzyme. PMID:9232882