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Sample records for diffraction resolution studies

  1. Synchrotron X-Ray Reciprocal Space Mapping, Topography and Diffraction Resolution Studies of Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Judge, Russell A.; Siddons, D. P.; Snell, Edward H.; Stojanoff, V.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of microgravity and ground grown chicken egg white lysozyme crystals is presented using synchrotron X-ray reciprocal space mapping, topography techniques and diffraction resolution. Microgravity crystals displayed, on average, reduced intrinsic mosaicities but no differences in terms of stress over their earth grown counterparts. Topographic analysis revealed that in the microgravity case the majority of the crystal was contributing to the peak of the reflection at the appropriate Bragg angle. In the earth case at the diffraction peak only a small volume of the crystal contributed to the intensity. The techniques prove to be highly complementary with the reciprocal space mapping providing a quantitative measure of the crystal mosaicity and stress (or variation in lattice spacing) and topography providing a qualitative overall assessment of the crystal in terms of its X-ray diffraction properties. Structural data collection was also carried out both at the synchrotron and in the laboratory.

  2. Defining Electron Backscatter Diffraction Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Rollett, A D

    2005-02-07

    Automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping systems have existed for more than 10 years [1,2], and due to their versatility in characterizing multiple aspects of microstructure, they have become an important tool in microscale crystallographic studies. Their increasingly widespread use however raises questions about their accuracy in both determining crystallographic orientations, as well as ensuring that the orientation information is spatially correct. The issue of orientation accuracy (as defined by angular resolution) has been addressed previously [3-5]. While the resolution of EBSD systems is typically quoted to be on the order of 1{sup o}, it has been shown that by increasing the pattern quality via acquisition parameter adjustment, the angular resolution can be improved to sub-degree levels. Ultimately, the resolution is dependent on how it is identified. In some cases it can be identified as the orientation relative to a known absolute, in others as the misorientation between nearest neighbor points in a scan. Naturally, the resulting values can be significantly different. Therefore, a consistent and universal definition of resolution that can be applied to characterize any EBSD system is necessary, and is the focus of the current study. In this work, a Phillips (FEI) XL-40 FEGSEM coupled to a TexSEM Laboratories OIM system was used. The pattern capturing hardware consisted of both a 512 by 512 pixel SIT CCD camera and a 1300 by 1030 pixel Peltier cooled CCD camera. Automated scans of various sizes, each consisting of 2500 points, were performed on a commercial-grade single crystal silicon wafer used for angular resolution measurements. To adequately quantify angular resolution for all possible EBSD applications we define two angular values. The first is {omega}{sub center}, the mean of the misorientation angle distribution between all scan points and the scan point coincident to the calibration source (typically the scan center). The {omega

  3. High-resolution study of (222, 113) three-beam diffraction in Ge

    PubMed Central

    Kazimirov, A.; Kohn, V. G.

    2011-01-01

    The results of high-resolution analysis of the (222, >113) three-beam diffraction in Ge are presented. For monochromatization and angular collimation of the incident synchrotron beam a multi-crystal arrangement in a dispersive setup in both vertical and horizontal planes was used in an attempt to experimentally approach plane-wave incident conditions. Using this setup, for various azimuthal angles the polar angular curves which are very close to theoretical computer simulations for the plane monochromatic wave were measured. The effect of the strong two-beam 222 diffraction was observed for the first time with the maximum reflectivity close to 60% even though the total reflection of the incident beam into a forbidden reflection was not achieved owing to absorption. The structure factor of the 222 reflection in Ge was experimentally determined. PMID:21694480

  4. High-Resolution Infrared and Electron-Diffraction Studies of Trimethylenecyclopropane ([3]-Radialene)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Corey; Holmes, Joshua; Nibler, Joseph W.; Hedberg, Kenneth; White, James D.; Hedberg, Lise; Weber, Alfons; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-05-16

    Combined high-resolution spectroscopic, electron-diffraction, and quantum theoretical methods are particularly advantageous for small molecules of high symmetry and can yield accurate structures that reveal subtle effects of electron delocalization on molecular bonds. The smallest of the radialene compounds, trimethylenecyclopropane, [3]-radialene, has been synthesized and examined in the gas phase by these methods. The first high-resolution infrared spectra have been obtained for this molecule of D3h symmetry, leading to an accurate B0 rotational constant value of 0.1378629(8) cm-1, within 0.5% of the value obtained from electronic structure calculations (density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/cc-pVTZ). This result is employed in an analysis of electron-diffraction data to obtain the rz bond lengths (in Å): C-H = 1.072 (17), C-C = 1.437 (4), and C=C = 1.330 (4). The analysis does not lead to an accurate value of the HCH angle; however, from comparisons of theoretical and experimental angles for similar compounds, the theoretical prediction of 117.5° is believed to be reliable to within 2°. The effect of electron delocalization in radialene is to reduce the single C-C bond length by 0.07 Å compared to that in cyclopropane.

  5. Crystallography: Resolution beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-02-01

    A method has been devised that extends the resolution of X-ray crystal structures beyond the diffraction limit. This might help to improve the visualization of structures of proteins that form 'poorly diffracting' crystals. See Letter p.202

  6. Coherent diffractive imaging: towards achieving atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Dietze, S H; Shpyrko, O G

    2015-11-01

    The next generation of X-ray sources will feature highly brilliant X-ray beams that will enable the imaging of local nanoscale structures with unprecedented resolution. A general formalism to predict the achievable spatial resolution in coherent diffractive imaging, based solely on diffracted intensities, is provided. The coherent dose necessary to reach atomic resolution depends significantly on the atomic scale structure, where disordered or amorphous materials require roughly three orders of magnitude lower dose compared with the expected scaling of uniform density materials. Additionally, dose reduction for crystalline materials are predicted at certain resolutions based only on their unit-cell dimensions and structure factors. PMID:26524315

  7. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  8. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueland, B. G.; Saunders, S. M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below a temperature of T*=0.7 K , fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN=0.4 K , a Kondo temperature of TK≈1 K , and crystalline-electric-field splitting on the order of E /kB=1 -10 K . Whereas the compound has a face-centered-cubic lattice at ambient temperature, certain experimental data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining its crystalline-electric-field scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-resolution, high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ≈6 -10 ×10-5Å , no structural phase transition occurs between T =1.5 and 50 K . In combination with results from dilatometry measurements, we further show that the compound's thermal expansion has a minimum at ≈18 K and a region of negative thermal expansion for 9 ≲T ≲18 K . Despite diffraction patterns taken at 1.6 K which indicate that the lattice is face-centered cubic and that the Yb resides on a crystallographic site with cubic point symmetry, we demonstrate that the linear thermal expansion may be modeled using crystalline-electric-field level schemes appropriate for Yb3 + residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry.

  9. Study of the oxidation of W(110) by full-solid-angle photoelectron diffraction with chemical state and time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ynzunza, R. X.; Palomares, F. J.; Tober, E. D.; Wang, Z.; Morais, J.; Denecke, R.; Daimon, H.; Chen, Y.; Hussain, Z; Liesengang, J.; Van Hove, M. A.; Fadley, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    The brightness of third-generation synchrotron radiation from beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source has been combined with the high-intensities and energy resolutions possible with its advanced photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer experimental station in order to study the time dependence of the oxidation of the W(110) surface. This has been done via chemical-state-resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction. This system has been studied previously by other methods such as LEED and STM, but several questions remain as to the basic kinetics of oxidation and the precise adsorption structures involved. By studying the decay and growth with time of various peaks in the W 4f{sub 7/2} photoelectron spectra, it should be possible to draw quantitative conclusions concerning the reaction kinetics involved. The authors have also measured full-solid-angle photoelectron diffraction patterns for the two oxygen-induced W states, and these should permit fully defining the different structures involved in this oxidation process.

  10. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ueland, B. G.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Saunders, S. M.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Bud'ko, S. L.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Kreyssig, A.; et al

    2015-11-30

    In this study, YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below a temperature of T*=0.7K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0.4K, a Kondo temperature of TK ≈ 1K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting on the order of E/kB = 1 – 10K. Whereas the compound has a face-centered-cubic lattice at ambient temperature, certain experimental data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining its crystalline-electric-field scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-resolution, high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ≈ 6 – 10 × 10–5 Å,more » no structural phase transition occurs between T = 1.5 and 50 K. In combination with results from dilatometry measurements, we further show that the compound's thermal expansion has a minimum at ≈ 18 K and a region of negative thermal expansion for 9 ≲ T ≲ 18 K. Despite diffraction patterns taken at 1.6 K which indicate that the lattice is face-centered cubic and that the Yb resides on a crystallographic site with cubic point symmetry, we demonstrate that the linear thermal expansion may be modeled using crystalline-electric-field level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry.« less

  11. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    SciTech Connect

    Ueland, B. G.; Saunders, S. M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2015-11-30

    In this study, YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below a temperature of T*=0.7K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0.4K, a Kondo temperature of TK ≈ 1K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting on the order of E/kB = 1 – 10K. Whereas the compound has a face-centered-cubic lattice at ambient temperature, certain experimental data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining its crystalline-electric-field scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-resolution, high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ≈ 6 – 10 × 10–5 Å, no structural phase transition occurs between T = 1.5 and 50 K. In combination with results from dilatometry measurements, we further show that the compound's thermal expansion has a minimum at ≈ 18 K and a region of negative thermal expansion for 9 ≲ T ≲ 18 K. Despite diffraction patterns taken at 1.6 K which indicate that the lattice is face-centered cubic and that the Yb resides on a crystallographic site with cubic point symmetry, we demonstrate that the linear thermal expansion may be modeled using crystalline-electric-field level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry.

  12. XRD (x-ray diffraction) and HREM (high resolution electron microscopy) studies of nanocrystalline Cu and Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Siegel, R.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Consolidated powders of nanocrystalline Cu and Pd have been studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) as part of an investigation of the mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline pure metals. XRD line broadening measurements were made to estimate grain size, qualitative grain size distribution and average long range strains in a number of samples. Mean grain sizes range from 4--60 nm and have qualitatively narrow grain size distributions. Long range lattice strains are of the order of 0.2--3% in consolidated samples. These strains apparently persist and even increase in Cu samples after annealing at 0.35 Tm (498K) for 2h, accompanied by an apparent increase in grain size of {ge}2x. Grain size, grain size distribution width and internal strains vary somewhat among samples produced under apparently identical processing conditions. HREM studies show that twins, stacking faults and low-index facets are abundant in as-consolidated nanocrystalline Cu samples. Methodology, results, and analysis of XRD and HREM experiments are presented. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The effect of substrate topology on smectic liquid crystal alignment: A high-resolution x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Smela, E.

    1992-01-01

    Surface topography is theoretically predicted to affect liquid crystal alignment through mechanical interactions: elastic deformations of the director are energetically unfavorable, causing the molecules to realign to minimize the distortion energy. Octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB), a bilayer smecticA liquid crystal at room temperature, was deposited on gratings, grids, and flat surfaces, and was studied using high resolution x-ray diffraction at shallow angles of incidence. One surface of the film was in contact with air and the other was in contact with a treated glass or silicon substrate. At the air interface, surface tension forces caused the liquid crystal molecules to align perpendicularly with respect to the plane of the substrate. Competing with the LC-air interface, which is a strong aligner, a grating at the LC-substrate interface produced distortions in the smectic layering which resulted in excess elastic energy and favored alignment parallel to the substrate and the grooves. The results show that in films less than approximately 30 [mu]m thick, the homeotropic orientation was maintained throughout the film due to the constraint of perpendicular alignment at the air interface. However, for thicker films on gratings, Bragg scattering from molecules lying parallel to the grooves was observed. The free air surface was thus the strongest aligning force, followed by the surface topology, while surface anchoring was not found to play a role.

  14. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueland, B. G.; Saunders, S. M.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below T* = 0 . 7 K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0 . 4 K, a Kondo temperature of TK ~ 1 K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting (CEF) on the order of E /kB = 1 - 10 K. Its lattice is face-centered cubic at ambient temperature, but certain data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining the CEF level scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ~ 6 - 10 ×10-5 Å, no structural phase transition occurs between 1 . 5 and 50 K. Despite this result, we demonstrate that the compound's thermal expansion may be modeled using CEF level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the US DOE, BES, DMSE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. Work at Occidental College was supported by the NSF under DMR-1408598. This research used resources at the Advanced Photon Source a US DOE, Office of Science, User Facility.

  15. High-Resolution Atom Interferometers with Suppressed Diffraction Phases.

    PubMed

    Estey, Brian; Yu, Chenghui; Müller, Holger; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2015-08-21

    We experimentally and theoretically study the diffraction phase of large-momentum transfer beam splitters in atom interferometers based on Bragg diffraction. We null the diffraction phase and increase the sensitivity of the interferometer by combining Bragg diffraction with Bloch oscillations. We demonstrate agreement between experiment and theory, and a 1500-fold reduction of the diffraction phase, limited by measurement noise. In addition to reduced systematic effects, our interferometer has high contrast with up to 4.4×10(6) radians of phase difference, and a resolution in the fine structure constant of δα/α=0.25  ppb in 25 h of integration time. PMID:26340186

  16. Phase coexistence in NaTaO3 at room temperature; a high resolution neutron powder diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2015-05-01

    Room temperature high resolution neutron powder diffraction data, measured in time-of-flight, from two independent samples of NaTaO3 shows the presence of phase coexistence of two orthorhombic structures with space groups Pbnm, and Cmcm. The failure of earlier work to recognise the extent of the hysteresis associated with the high temperature (∼763 K on heating) Cmcm - Pbnm phase transition, that extends down to room temperature, and probably to 0 K, is due to data having been collected at too low a real-space resolution to characterise the diagnostic pseudocubic fundamental and superlattice reflection multiplicities. The phase fraction of the Cmcm phase increases with increasing temperature from 45 weight % at 298 K, to 74 weight % at 758 K. Throughout the whole temperature interval 298 K-758 K, the volume per formula unit of the Cmcm phase exceeds that of the Pbnm phase by an almost constant ∼0.01 Å3 suggesting the addition of pressure would supress the volume fraction of the higher temperature phase. The crystal structure of both phases, determined from data collected at 298 K, are reported, with the atomic displacement parameters of the Cmcm phase being significantly larger than those associated with the Pbnm phase, probably reflecting a high degree of thermal and static disorder.

  17. Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Jian-min

    2011-01-12

    A major scientific challenge is determining the 3-D atomic structure of small nanostructures, including single molecules. Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a promising approach. Recent progress has demonstrated coherent diffraction patterns can be recorded from individual nanostructures and phased to reconstruct their structure. However, overcoming the dose limit imposed by radiation damage is a major obstacle toward the full potential of CDI. One approach is to use ultrafast x-ray or electron pulses. In electron diffraction, amplitudes recorded in a diffraction pattern are unperturbed by lens aberrations, defocus, and other microscope resolution-limiting factors. Sub-A signals are available beyond the information limit of direct imaging. Significant contrast improvement is obtained compared to high-resolution electron micrographs. progress has also been made in developing time-resolved electron diffraction and imaging for the study of ultrafast dynamic processes in materials. This talk will cover these crosscutting issues and the convergence of electron and x-ray diffraction techniques toward structure determination of single molecules.

  18. Calcium binding in. alpha. -amylases: An X-ray diffraction study at 2. 1- angstrom resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, E.; Jensen, V.J.; Petersen, S.B.; Thim, L. Woldike, H.F. ); Brady, L.; Brzozowski, AM.; Derewenda, Z.; Dodson, G.G.; Swift, H. )

    1990-07-03

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca{sup 2+} with an unusually high number of eight ligands. A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) {alpha}-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and addition kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites.

  19. Structured illumination diffraction phase microscopy for broadband, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established technique that allows sub-diffraction resolution imaging by heterodyning high sample frequencies into the system’s passband via structured illumination. However, until now, SIM has been typically used to achieve sub-diffraction resolution for intensity-based imaging. Here, we present a novel optical setup that uses structured illumination with a broadband-light source to obtain noise-reduced, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative-phase (QPM) imaging of cells. We compare this with a previous work for sub-diffraction QPM imaging via SIM that used a laser source, and was thus still corrupted by coherent noise. PMID:24562266

  20. Breaking resolution limits in ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction are powerful techniques for the study of the time-resolved structures of molecules, materials, and biological systems. Central to these approaches is the use of ultrafast coherent electron packets. The electron pulses typically have an energy of 30 keV for diffraction and 100–200 keV for microscopy, corresponding to speeds of 33–70% of the speed of light. Although the spatial resolution can reach the atomic scale, the temporal resolution is limited by the pulse width and by the difference in group velocities of electrons and the light used to initiate the dynamical change. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of tilted optical pulses into diffraction and imaging techniques and demonstrate the methodology experimentally. These advances allow us to reach limits of time resolution down to regimes of a few femtoseconds and, possibly, attoseconds. With tilted pulses, every part of the sample is excited at precisely the same time as when the electrons arrive at the specimen. Here, this approach is demonstrated for the most unfavorable case of ultrafast crystallography. We also present a method for measuring the duration of electron packets by autocorrelating electron pulses in free space and without streaking, and we discuss the potential of tilting the electron pulses themselves for applications in domains involving nuclear and electron motions. PMID:17056711

  1. Phases and phase transitions of polymeric liquid crystals: A high resolution x ray diffraction and light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachaliel, Ehud

    1991-03-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) were compared with monomeric liquid crystals (MLC) by means of high-resolution x-ray (HIREX) and light scattering (LIS). Both HIREX and LIS were used to study the nematic-smectic(sub a) phase transition of P4.1 polysiloxane; the following critical exponents were determined: nu(sub parallel) = 0.77 +/-0.05; nu(sub normal) = 0.57 +/-0.08; gamma = 1.3 +/-0.10. The bare correlation lengths were found to be: xi(sup 0)(sub parallel) = 3.27 +/-0.08; xi(sup 0)(sub normal)q(sub 0) = 1.09 +/-0.14 which are unusually large in comparison with MLC. LIS experiments confirmed these values and indicated 'cross over' of nu(sub parallel) from 0.77 to 0.53. These results are typical of a system near to a tricritical point. HIREX was used to study the nematic-smectic(sub c) phase transition in C6-polysiloxane; the results were a good fit to Chen and Lubensky's mean field theory but the correlation lengths saturated near the transition to the nematic phase. A study of the smectic(sub a) phase of PA6 polyacrylate, near the transition to the nematic phase, showed that, except very close to the transition, the first and second harmonics of the x-ray structure factor were found to be consistent with the harmonic theory of de Gennes and Caille. This is thought to indicate the importance of anharmonic corrections near the phase transition. Fits to the experimental data yielded the compressibility constant, B and the splay elastic constant, K(sub s). B was found to obey a power law: B varies as t(sup phi) in which phi = 0.82 +/-0.08. In good agreement with theoretical predictions using exponents from the literature, but in disagreement with previous experimental results on MLC's. The splay elastic constant K(sub s) has roughly the same magnitude as in MLC's but tends to decrease by approximately 50% upon approaching the transition from below. This temperature dependence might give further evidence for the importance of anharmonicity in the system. Finally, the

  2. Sub-diffraction limit resolution in microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ming (Inventor); Chen, Weinong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for visualizing sub-micron size particles employs a polarizing microscope wherein a focused beam of polarized light is projected onto a target, and a portion of the illuminating light is blocked from reaching the specimen, whereby to produce a shadow region, and projecting diffracted light from the target onto the shadow region.

  3. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beam Line at ESRF

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    The optical design and performance of the high-resolution powder diffraction beam line BM16 at ESRF are discussed and illustrated. Some recent studies carried out on BM16 are described, including crystal structure solution and refinement, anomalous scattering, in situ measurements, residual strain in engineering components, investigation of microstructure, and grazing-incidence diffraction from surface layers. The beam line is built on a bending magnet, and operates in the energy range from 5 keV to 40 keV. After the move to an undulator source in 2002, it will benefit from an extented energy range up to 60 keV and increased flux and resolution. It is anticipated that enhancements to the data quality will be achieved, leading to the solution of larger crystal structures, and improvements in the accuracy of refined structures. The systematic exploitation of anisotropic thermal expansion will help reduce the effects of peak overlap in the analysis of powder diffraction data. PMID:27366602

  4. Microbeam High Angular Resolution Diffraction Applied to Optoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D. H.; Sirenko, A. A.; Cai, Z.-H.; Lai, B.

    2007-01-19

    Collimating perfect crystal optics in a combination with the X-ray focusing optics has been applied to perform high angular resolution microbeam diffraction and scattering experiments on micron-size optoelectronic devices produced by modern semiconductor technology. At CHESS, we used capillary optics and perfect Si/Ge crystal(s) arrangement to perform X-ray standing waves, high angular-resolution diffraction and high resolution reciprocal space mapping analysis. At the APS, 2ID-D microscope beamline, we employed a phase zone plate producing a beam with the size of 240 nm in the horizontal plane and 350 nm in the vertical (diffraction) plane and a perfect Si (004) analyzer crystal to perform diffraction analysis of selectively grown InGaAsP and InGaAlAs-based waveguides with arc sec angular resolution.

  5. High-resolution X-ray diffraction study of laser lift-off AlGaN/GaN HEMTs grown by MOCVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. K.; Chan, C. P.; Fong, W. K.; Pilkuhn, M.; Schweizer, H.; Surya, C.

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) study of laser debonded AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), is performed. The lattice parameters as well as the in-plane and out-of-plane strains of the transistors before and after laser lift-off are determined from θ-2 θ X-ray diffraction spectra. The biaxial strains of the laser debonded HEMTs in a- and c-directions compared with the non-debonded HEMTs are extracted from the measured strain. The results clearly indicate stress relaxation in the device after laser debonding. Additionally, the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the X-ray rocking curves are compared before and after laser debonding. The results do not indicate any increase in the dislocation densities in the heterojunction after laser debonding. This corroborates with the studies on the I-V characteristics of the devices, which also indicate no degradation in the electronic properties after laser debonding.

  6. High-resolution computational ghost diffraction with shaped incoherent sources and its applicability in coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chun-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Computational ghost diffraction (CGD) with a higher-order cosh-Gaussian modulated incoherent source is investigated theoretically. The corresponding numerical simulations are given to see clearly the effects of the parameters of the higher-order cosh-Gaussian source on the imaging quality. Our results show that the resolution of the CGD patterns can be significantly improved by properly varying the source parameters. In addition, we numerically study the effect of the propagation distances in the CGD system and explore the CGD applicability in coherent diffraction imaging. These results may be helpful for implementation of high-resolution x-ray diffraction.

  7. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  8. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  9. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  10. Calcium binding in alpha-amylases: an X-ray diffraction study at 2.1-A resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Boel, E; Brady, L; Brzozowski, A M; Derewenda, Z; Dodson, G G; Jensen, V J; Petersen, S B; Swift, H; Thim, L; Woldike, H F

    1990-07-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-A resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca2+ with an unusually high number of eight ligands (O delta 1 and O delta 2 of Asp175, O delta of Asn121, main-chain carbonyl oxygens of Glu162 and Glu210, and three water molecules). A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) alpha-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-A resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and additional kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites. PMID:2207069

  11. High-resolution diffraction grating interferometric transducer of linear displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ping; Xia, Haojie; Fei, Yetai

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution transducer of linear displacements is presented. The system is based on semiconductor laser illumination and a diffraction grating applied as a length master. The theory of the optical method is formulated using Doppler description. The relationship model among the interference strips, measurement errors, grating deflection around the X, Y and Z axes and translation along the Z axis is built. The grating interference strips' direction and space is not changed with movement along the X (direction of grating movement), Y (direction of grating line), Z axis, and the direction and space has a great effect when rotating around the X axis. Moreover the space is little affected by deflection around the Z axis however the direction is changed dramatically. In addition, the strips' position shifted rightward or downwards respectively for deflection around the X or Y axis. Because the emitted beams are separated on the grating plane, the tilt around the X axis error of the stage during motion will lead to the optical path difference of the two beams resulting in phase shift. This study investigates the influence of the tilt around the X axis error. Experiments show that after yaw error compensation, the high-resolution diffraction grating interferometric transducer readings can be significantly improved. The error can be reduced from +/-80 nm to +/-30 nm in maximum.

  12. High-resolution projection image reconstruction of thick objects by hard x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2010-12-01

    Hard x-ray diffraction microscopy enables us to observe thick objects at high spatial resolution. The resolution of this method is limited, in principle, by only the x-ray wavelength and the largest scattering angle recorded. As the resolution approaches the wavelength, the thickness effect of objects plays a significant role in x-ray diffraction microscopy. In this paper, we report high-resolution hard x-ray diffraction microscopy for thick objects. We used highly focused coherent x rays with a wavelength of {approx}0.1 nm as an incident beam and measured the diffraction patterns of a {approx}150-nm-thick silver nanocube at the scattering angle of {approx}3 deg. We observed a characteristic contrast of the coherent diffraction pattern due to only the thickness effect and collected the diffraction patterns at nine incident angles so as to obtain information on a cross section of Fourier space. We reconstructed a pure projection image by the iterative phasing method from the patched diffraction pattern. The edge resolution of the reconstructed image was {approx}2 nm, which was the highest resolution so far achieved by x-ray microscopy. The present study provides us with a method for quantitatively observing thick samples at high resolution by hard x-ray diffraction microscopy.

  13. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  14. On effective and optical resolutions of diffraction data sets.

    PubMed

    Urzhumtseva, Ludmila; Klaholz, Bruno; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    In macromolecular X-ray crystallography, diffraction data sets are traditionally characterized by the highest resolution dhigh of the reflections that they contain. This measure is sensitive to individual reflections and does not refer to the eventual data incompleteness and anisotropy; it therefore does not describe the data well. A physically relevant and robust measure that provides a universal way to define the `actual' effective resolution deff of a data set is introduced. This measure is based on the accurate calculation of the minimum distance between two immobile point scatterers resolved as separate peaks in the Fourier map calculated with a given set of reflections. This measure is applicable to any data set, whether complete or incomplete. It also allows characterizion of the anisotropy of diffraction data sets in which deff strongly depends on the direction. Describing mathematical objects, the effective resolution deff characterizes the `geometry' of the set of measured reflections and is irrelevant to the diffraction intensities. At the same time, the diffraction intensities reflect the composition of the structure from physical entities: the atoms. The minimum distance for the atoms typical of a given structure is a measure that is different from and complementary to deff; it is also a characteristic that is complementary to conventional measures of the data-set quality. Following the previously introduced terms, this value is called the optical resolution, dopt. The optical resolution as defined here describes the separation of the atomic images in the `ideal' crystallographic Fourier map that would be calculated if the exact phases were known. The effective and optical resolution, as formally introduced in this work, are of general interest, giving a common `ruler' for all kinds of crystallographic diffraction data sets. PMID:24100312

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies to near-atomic resolution of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Benjamin R.; Dobson, Renwick C. J. Dogovski, Con; Jameson, Geoffrey B.; Parker, Michael W.; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2008-07-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme of the lysine-biosynthetic pathway, is a promising target for antibiotic development against pathogenic bacteria. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis to 1.45 Å resolution of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant S. aureus is reported. In recent years, dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS; EC 4.2.1.52) has received considerable attention from both mechanistic and structural viewpoints. DHDPS is part of the diaminopimelate pathway leading to lysine, coupling (S)-aspartate-β-semialdehyde with pyruvate via a Schiff base to a conserved active-site lysine. In this paper, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, an important bacterial pathogen, are reported. The enzyme was crystallized in a number of forms, predominantly from PEG precipitants, with the best crystal diffracting to beyond 1.45 Å resolution. The space group was P1 and the unit-cell parameters were a = 65.4, b = 67.6, c = 78.0 Å, α = 90.1, β = 68.9, γ = 72.3°. The crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) was 2.34 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, with an estimated solvent content of 47% for four monomers per asymmetric unit. The structure of the enzyme will help to guide the design of novel therapeutics against the methicillin-resistant S. aureus pathogen.

  16. Electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy studies on layered Li2-δ(Mn1-xCox)1+δO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroki; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Mochiku, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    The structure of Li2MnO3-LiCoO2 solid solutions or Li2-δ(Mn1-xCox)1+δO3 (LMCO) which are promising lithium-battery cathodes was studied by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that Li1.6Mn0.2Co1.2O3 and Li1.7Mn0.4Co0.9O3 take a rhombohedral (R3¯m space group) structure, whereas Li1.85Mn0.7Co0.45O3 and Li1.95Mn0.9Co0.15O3 take a monoclinic (C2/m) superstructure. HREM studies on those samples reveal that all of the observed crystallites in sample Li1.95Mn0.9Co0.15O3 contain sharp stripe structures due to the planar defects along the ch-axis (stacking direction of the hexagonal close-packed planes) of parent rhombohedral R3¯m cell. Such stripe structures become faint with increasing x, Co content. The origin of the planar defects is mainly attributed not to the different structures but to the different local orientations of the monoclinic LMCO. Local disordering of Li and (Mn,Co) in (Li,Mn,Co) planes is developed with increasing x and the structures are transformed from C2/m to R3¯m. The alternative (Li,Mn,Co)-plane stacking structure, trigonal P3112 LMCO, was occasionally observed. However, only P3112 LMCO platelets with a thickness of a single unit cell were detected.

  17. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering and neutron powder diffraction study of the adsorption of dihydrogen by the Cu(II) metal-organic framework material HKUST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callear, Samantha K.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; David, William I. F.; Millange, Franck; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-12-01

    We present new high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra (measured using the TOSCA and MARI instruments at ISIS) and powder neutron diffraction data (measured on the diffractometer WISH at ISIS) from the interaction of the prototypical metal-organic framework HKUST-1 with various dosages of dihydrogen gas. The INS spectra show direct evidence for the sequential occupation of various distinct sites for dihydrogen in the metal-organic framework, whose population is adjusted during increasing loading of the guest. The superior resolution of TOSCA reveals subtle features in the spectra, not previously reported, including evidence for split signals, while complementary spectra recorded on MARI present full information in energy and momentum transfer. The analysis of the powder neutron patterns using the Rietveld method shows a consistent picture, allowing the crystallographic indenisation of binding sites for dihydrogen, thus building a comprehensive picture of the interaction of the guest with the nanoporous host.

  18. High-resolution structure of viruses from random diffraction snapshots

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinizadeh, A.; Schwander, P.; Dashti, A.; Fung, R.; D'Souza, R. M.; Ourmazd, A.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has made it possible to record diffraction snapshots of biological entities injected into the X-ray beam before the onset of radiation damage. Algorithmic means must then be used to determine the snapshot orientations and thence the three-dimensional structure of the object. Existing Bayesian approaches are limited in reconstruction resolution typically to 1/10 of the object diameter, with the computational expense increasing as the eighth power of the ratio of diameter to resolution. We present an approach capable of exploiting object symmetries to recover three-dimensional structure to high resolution, and thus reconstruct the structure of the satellite tobacco necrosis virus to atomic level. Our approach offers the highest reconstruction resolution for XFEL snapshots to date and provides a potentially powerful alternative route for analysis of data from crystalline and nano-crystalline objects. PMID:24914154

  19. Atomic-Resolution 3D Electron Microscopy with Dynamic Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Meisheng, Hu

    2005-02-15

    Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Lower-resolution electron microscope tomography has been used to produce reconstructed 3D images of nanoparticles [1] but extension to atomic resolution is considered not to be straightforward. Accurate three-dimensional reconstruction from two-dimensional projections generally requires that intensity in the series of 2-D images be a monotonic function of the specimen structure (often specimen density, but in our case atomic potential). This condition is not satisfied in electron microscopy when specimens with strong periodicity are tilted close to zone-axis orientation and produce ''anomalous'' image contrast because of strong dynamic diffraction components. Atomic-resolution reconstructions from tilt series containing zone-axis images (with their contrast enhanced by strong dynamical scattering) can be distorted when the stronger zone-axis images overwhelm images obtained in other ''random'' orientations in which atoms do not line up in neat columns. The first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms [2,3]. Initial resolution was to the 1.6{angstrom} Scherzer limit of a JEOL-ARM1000. Later experiments used focal-series reconstruction from 5 to 10 images to produce staurolite images from the ARM1000 with resolution extended beyond the Scherzer limit to 1.38{angstrom} [4,5]. To obtain a representation of the three-dimensional structure, images were obtained

  20. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  1. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  2. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  3. Coherent Diffractive Imaging: From Nanometric Down to Picometric Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Caro, Liberato; Carlino, Elvio; Siliqi, Dritan; Giannini, Cinzia

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a novel technique for inspecting (crystalline and non-crystalline) matter from nanometric down to picometric resolution. It was used originally with X-rays and, more recently, with electrons (so-called electron diffractive imaging, or EDI). This chapter introduces basic concepts concerning CDI and addresses the different types of X-ray CDI experiments that have been conducted, namely plane wave CDI from isolated objects in forward scattering, focused-beam Fresnel CDI from isolated objects in forward scattering, Bragg CDI from nanocrystals, and keyhole CDI and ptychography from extended objects. A CDI experiment with a transmission electron microscope, alternatively named an EDI experiment, is also introduced.

  4. Imaging outside the box: Resolution enhancement in X-ray coherent diffraction imaging by extrapolation of diffraction patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana Fink, Hans-Werner; Chushkin, Yuriy; Zontone, Federico

    2015-11-02

    Coherent diffraction imaging is a high-resolution imaging technique whose potential can be greatly enhanced by applying the extrapolation method presented here. We demonstrate the enhancement in resolution of a non-periodical object reconstructed from an experimental X-ray diffraction record which contains about 10% missing information, including the pixels in the center of the diffraction pattern. A diffraction pattern is extrapolated beyond the detector area and as a result, the object is reconstructed at an enhanced resolution and better agreement with experimental amplitudes is achieved. The optimal parameters for the iterative routine and the limits of the extrapolation procedure are discussed.

  5. Towards high-resolution ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2011-06-01

    Ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy is a lensless imaging technique with a large field of view and high spatial resolution, which is also useful for characterizing the wavefront of an x-ray probe. The performance of this technique is degraded by positioning errors due to the drift between the sample and illumination optics. We propose an experimental approach for correcting the positioning errors and demonstrate success by two-dimensionally reconstructing both the wavefront of the focused x-ray beam and the complex transmissivity of the weakly scattering objects at the pixel resolution of better than 10 nm in the field of view larger than 5 {mu}m. This method is applicable to not only the observation of organelles inside cells or nano-mesoscale structures buried within bulk materials but also the characterization of probe for single-shot imaging with x-ray free electron lasers.

  6. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.; King, W.C.; Ursic, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  7. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering); Ursic, J.R. . Region V)

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  8. The Influence of Surface Morphology and Diffraction Resolution of Canavalin Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plomp, M.; Thomas, B. R.; Day, J. S.; McPherson, A.; Chernov, A. A.; Malkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Canavalin crystals grown from material purified and not purified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography were studied by atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction. After purification, resolution was improved from 2.55Angstroms to 2.22Angstroms and jagged isotropic spiral steps transformed into regular, well polygonized steps.

  9. Axial resolution of laser opto-acoustic imaging: influence of acoustic attenuation and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Alma, Herve; Tittel, Frank K.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    1998-05-01

    Laser optoacoustic imaging can be applied for characterization of layered and heterogeneous tissue structures in vivo. Accurate tissue characterization may provide: (1) means for medical diagnoses, and (2) pretreatment tissue properties important for therapeutic laser procedures. Axial resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is higher than that of optical imaging. However, the resolution may degrade due to either attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves in tissue, or/and diffraction of low-frequency acoustic waves. The goal of this study was to determine the axial resolution as a function of acoustic attenuation and diffraction upon propagation of laser-induced pressure waves in water with absorbing layer, in breast phantoms, and in biological tissues. Acoustic pressure measurements were performed in absolute values using piezoelectric transducers. A layer or a small sphere of absorbing medium was placed within a medium with lower optical absorption. The distance between the acoustic transducer and the absorbing object was varied, so that the effects of acoustic attenuation and diffraction could be observed. The location of layers or spheres was measured from recorded optoacoustic pressure profiles and compared with real values measured with a micrometer. The experimental results were analyzed using theoretical models for spherical and planar acoustic waves. Our studies demonstrated that despite strong acoustic attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves, the axial resolution of laser optoacoustic imaging may be as high as 20 micrometers for tissue layers located at a 5-mm depth. An axial resolution of 10 micrometers to 20 micrometers was demonstrated for an absorbing layer at a distance of 5 cm in water, when the resolution is affected only by diffraction. Acoustic transducers employed in optoacoustic imaging can have either high sensitivity or fast temporal response. Therefore, a high resolution may not be achieved with sensitive transducers utilized in

  10. Scanning x-ray diffraction: A technique with high compositional resolution for studying phase formation in co-deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Selinder, T.I.; Miller, D.J.; Gray, K.E.; Beno, M.A.; Knapp, G.S.

    1994-04-01

    Investigation of the formation of new metastable phases in alloy thin films requires ways of quickly determining the crystalline structure of samples with different compositions. We report a novel technique for acquiring structural information from films intentionally grown with a composition gradient. For example, binary metal alloy films were deposited using a phase-spread sputtering method. In this way essentially the entire composition range could be grown in a single deposition. By using a narrow incident x-ray beam and a translating sample stage combined with a position sensitive x-ray detector technique, detailed information of the metastable phase diagram can be obtained rapidly. Compositional resolution of the order of {plus_minus}0.2% can be achieved, and is limited by the brightness of the x-ray source. Initial results from studies of phase formation in Zr-Ta alloys are presented. Extensions of the analysis technique to ternary systems are discussed.

  11. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  12. Structure of Ce2RhIn8: an example of complementary use of high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and reciprocal-space mapping to study complex materials.

    PubMed

    Moshopoulou, E G; Ibberson, R M; Sarrao, J L; Thompson, J D; Fisk, Z

    2006-04-01

    The room-temperature crystal structure of the heavy fermion antiferromagnet Ce2RhIn8, dicerium rhodium octaindide, has been studied by a combination of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray reciprocal-space mapping of single crystals and high-resolution time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. The structure is disordered, exhibiting a complex interplay of non-periodic, partially correlated planar defects, coexistence and segregation of polytypic phases (induced by periodic planar ;defects'), mosaicity (i.e. domain misalignment) and non-uniform strain. These effects evolve as a function of temperature in a complicated way, but they remain down to low temperatures. The room-temperature diffraction data are best represented by a complex mixture of two polytypic phases, which are affected by non-periodic, partially correlated planar defects, differ slightly in their tetragonal structures, and exhibit different mosaicities and strain values. Therefore, Ce2RhIn8 approaches the paracrystalline state, rather than the classic crystalline state and thus several of the concepts of conventional single-crystal crystallography are inapplicable. The structural results are discussed in the context of the role of disorder in the heavy-fermion state and in the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. PMID:16552150

  13. A GUINIER CAMERA FOR SR POWDER DIFFRACTION: HIGH RESOLUTION AND HIGH THROUGHPUT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIDDONS,D.P.; HULBERT, S.L.; STEPHENS, P.W.

    2006-05-28

    The paper describe a new powder diffraction instrument for synchrotron radiation sources which combines the high throughput of a position-sensitive detector system with the high resolution normally only provided by a crystal analyzer. It uses the Guinier geometry which is traditionally used with an x-ray tube source. This geometry adapts well to the synchrotron source, provided proper beam conditioning is applied. The high brightness of the SR source allows a high resolution to be achieved. When combined with a photon-counting silicon microstrip detector array, the system becomes a powerful instrument for radiation-sensitive samples or time-dependent phase transition studies.

  14. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  15. High throughput screening of ligand binding to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.; D'Amico, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    A process is provided for the high throughput screening of binding of ligands to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction data including producing a first sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and a solvent, producing a second sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material, one or more ligands and the solvent, obtaining a high resolution powder diffraction pattern on each of said first sample slurry and the second sample slurry, and, comparing the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the first sample slurry and the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the second sample slurry whereby a difference in the high resolution powder diffraction patterns of the first sample slurry and the second sample slurry provides a positive indication for the formation of a complex between the selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and at least one of the one or more ligands.

  16. A combination of high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and diffraction imaging techniques applied to the study of MOVPE-grown Cd xHg 1-xTe/CdTe on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, A. M.; Barnett, S. J.; Giess, J.; Walsh, T. D.; Astles, M. G.

    1991-06-01

    We have applied a range of high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and diffraction imaging techniques to study the structural properties of Cd xHg 1- xTe (CMT) grown epitaxially on GaAs by MOVPE. In this paper we specifically describe three such techniques and evaluate and compare the results from each. Automated double crystal diffractometry with a mapping facility provides information on the quality and uniformity of the layers. 004 rocking curve widths vary from < 70 arc seconds on the best samples to substantially higher values on poorer material. Study of non-uniform layers shows that lattice tilts are a dominant influence on rocking curve widths and large (up to 2°) misorientations between epilayer and substrate (100) planes are found on some samples. These characteristics are further investigated using triple crystal diffractometry. X-ray topography of the layers shows orientation-contrast features which correlate directly with the GaAs substrate dislocation distribution. A number of layers with varying degrees of structural quality have been examined using a combination of the above techniques. Recent results are reported illustrating the value of each technique and we demonstrate how the application of a combination of X-ray diffraction techniques can be a powerful tool for investigating the nature of structural defects in this highly mismatched heteroepitaxial system.

  17. Accuracy, Precision, and Resolution in Strain Measurements on Diffraction Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvino, Sean M.

    Diffraction stress analysis is a commonly used technique to evaluate the properties and performance of different classes of materials from engineering materials, such as steels and alloys, to electronic materials like Silicon chips. Often to better understand the performance of these materials at operating conditions they are also commonly subjected to elevated temperatures and different loading conditions. The validity of any measurement under these conditions is only as good as the control of the conditions and the accuracy and precision of the instrument being used to measure the properties. What is the accuracy and precision of a typical diffraction system and what is the best way to evaluate these quantities? Is there a way to remove systematic and random errors in the data that are due to problems with the control system used? With the advent of device engineering employing internal stress as a method for increasing performance the measurement of stress from microelectronic structures has become of enhanced importance. X-ray diffraction provides an ideal method for measuring these small areas without the need for modifying the sample and possibly changing the strain state. Micro and nano diffraction experiments on Silicon-on-Insulator samples revealed changes to the material under investigation and raised significant concerns about the usefulness of these techniques. This damage process and the application of micro and nano diffraction is discussed.

  18. Trade-off study for high resolution spectroscopy in the near infrared with ELT telescopes: seeing-limited vs. diffraction limited instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Nicoletta; Oliva, E.; Massi, Fabrizio; Cresci, G.; Origlia, L.

    2014-08-01

    HIRES, a high resolution spectrometer, is one of the first five instruments foreseen in the ESO roadmap for the E-ELT. This spectrograph should ideally provide full spectral coverage from the UV limit to 2.5 microns, with a resolving power from R˜10,000 to R˜100,000. At visual/blue wavelengths, where the adaptive optics (AO) cannot provide an efficient light-concentration, HIRES will necessarily be a bulky, seeing-limited instrument. The fundamental question, which we address in this paper, is whether the same approach should be adopted in the near-infrared range, or HIRES should only be equipped with compact infrared module(s) with a much smaller aperture, taking advantage of an AO-correction. The main drawbacks of a seeing-limited instrument at all wavelengths are: i) Lower sensitivities at wavelengths dominated by thermal background (red part of the K-band). ii) Much higher volumes and costs for the IR spectrograph module(s). The main drawbacks of using smaller, AO-fed IR module(s) are: i) Performances rapidly degrading towards shorter wavelengths (especially J e Y bands). ii) Different spatial sampling of extended objects (the optical module see a much larger area on the sky). In this paper we perform a trade-off analysis and quantify the various effects that contribute to improve or deteriorate the signal to noise ratio. In particular, we evaluate the position of the cross-over wavelength at which AO-fed instruments starts to outperform seeing-limited instruments. This parameter is of paramount importance for the design of the part of HIRES covering the K-band.

  19. Crystals of DhaA mutants from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 diffracted to ultrahigh resolution: crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Koudelakova, Tana; Pavlova, Martina; Damborsky, Jiri

    2008-02-01

    Three mutants of the haloalkane dehalogenase DhaA derived from R. rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 were crystallized and diffracted to ultrahigh resolution. The enzyme DhaA from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 belongs to the haloalkane dehalogenases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of haloalkanes to the corresponding alcohols. The haloalkane dehalogenase DhaA and its variants can be used to detoxify the industrial pollutant 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). Three mutants named DhaA04, DhaA14 and DhaA15 were constructed in order to study the importance of tunnels connecting the buried active site with the surrounding solvent to the enzymatic activity. All protein mutants were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals of DhaA04 belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, while the crystals of the other two mutants DhaA14 and DhaA15 belonged to the triclinic space group P1. Native data sets were collected for the DhaA04, DhaA14 and DhaA15 mutants at beamline X11 of EMBL, DESY, Hamburg to the high resolutions of 1.30, 0.95 and 1.15 Å, respectively.

  20. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  1. Ultra high resolution neutron scattering: Neutron Resonance Spin-Echo and Larmor Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Andrew; Keller, Thomas; Keimer, Bernhard

    2012-02-01

    The TRISP spectrometer at the FRM II neutron source near Munich, Germany, is a unique world-leading neutron scattering instrument which employs the Neutron Resonance Spin-Echo technique (NRSE). Linewidths of dispersive excitations with energy transfers up to 50 meV can be measured with an energy resolution in the μeV range without the restrictive flux limitations that normally apply to high resolution neutron triple-axis spectrometers. Pioneering studies on the electron-phonon interaction in elemental superconductorsootnotetextP. Aynajian et al., Science 319 1509 (2008) and the lifetimes of magnetic excitations in archetypal magnetic systems will be reviewed.ootnotetextS. Bayrakci et al., Science 312 1928 (2006) The instrument can also be used as a Larmor diffractometer, enabling d-spacings to be measured with a resolution of δdd ˜10-6, i.e. more than one order of magnitude more sensitive than conventional diffraction techniques.ootnotetextC. Pfleiderer et al., Science 316 1871 (2007) Ongoing and future NRSE and Larmor diffraction projects will be outlined, especially in regard to prospective studies which will take full advantage of the new low temperature and high pressure sample environment capabilities now available at TRISP.

  2. Technologies of diffractive imaging system for high-resolution earth observation from geostationary orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Su, Yun; Jiao, Jianchao

    2013-08-01

    High-resolution earth observation from geostationary orbit (GEO) is a good way to satisfy the increased time resolution for resource, environment and disaster monitor. Earth observation from geostationary orbit will require optical remote sensor with ultra-large aperture. Given size, weight and launch ability constraints, as well as cost consideration, the traditional monolithic aperture optical system couldn't satisfy the need. This paper gives a new method, the diffractive imaging system. Diffract ive imaging system is a feasible way to realize high-resolution earth observation from geostationary orbit. The principle of diffract ive imaging system is introduced firstly, then, the primary design of remote sensor with 1m resolution from geostationary orbit using diffractive imaging system is analyzed. Finally, the key technologies are analyzed and feasible solutions are given.

  3. Conical diffraction illumination opens the way for low phototoxicity super-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Julien; Fallet, Clément; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Moisan, Lionel; Braitbart, L Philippe (Ori); Sirat, Gabriel Y; Shorte, Spencer L

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technology for super-resolution fluorescence imaging, based on conical diffraction. Conical diffraction is a linear, singular phenomenon, taking place when a laser beam is diffracted through a biaxial crystal. We use conical diffraction in a thin biaxial crystal to generate illumination patterns that are more compact than the classical Gaussian beam, and use them to generate a super-resolution imaging modality. While there already exist several super-resolution modalities, our technology (biaxial super-resolution: BSR) is distinguished by the unique combination of several performance features. Using BSR super-resolution data are achieved using low light illumination significantly less than required for classical confocal imaging, which makes BSR ideal for live-cell, long-term time-lapse super-resolution imaging. Furthermore, no specific sample preparation is required, and any fluorophore can be used. Perhaps most exciting, improved resolution BSR-imaging resolution enhancement can be achieved with any type of objective no matter the magnification, numerical aperture, working distance, or the absence or presence of immersion medium. In this article, we present the first implementation of BSR modality on a commercial confocal microscope. We acquire and analyze validation data, showing high quality super-resolved images of biological objects, and demonstrate the wide applicability of the technology. We report live-cell super-resolution imaging over a long period, and show that the light dose required for super-resolution imaging is far below the threshold likely to generate phototoxicity. PMID:25482642

  4. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  5. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  6. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  7. Numerical study of grating-assisted optical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chaumet, Patrick C.; Belkebir, Kamal; Sentenac, Anne

    2007-07-15

    We study the resolution of an optical diffraction tomography system in which the objects are either in an homogeneous background or deposited onto a glass prism, a prism surmounted by a thin metallic film or a prism surmounted by a metallic film covered by a periodically nanostructured dielectric layer. For all these configurations, we present an inversion procedure that yields the map of the relative permittivity of the objects from their diffracted far field. When multiple scattering can be neglected, we show that the homogeneous, prism, and metallic film configurations yield a resolution about {lambda}/4 while the grating substrate yields a resolution better than {lambda}/10. When Born approximation fails, we point out that it is possible to neglect the coupling between the object and the substrate and account solely for the multiple scattering within the objects to obtain a satisfactory reconstruction. Last, we present the robustness of our inversion procedure to noise.

  8. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  9. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  10. Breaking the acoustic diffraction limit via nonlinear effect and thermal confinement for potential deep-tissue high-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Baohong; Pei, Yanbo; Kandukuri, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Our recently developed ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging technique showed that it was feasible to conduct high-resolution fluorescence imaging in a centimeter-deep turbid medium. Because the spatial resolution of this technique highly depends on the ultrasound-induced temperature focal size (UTFS), minimization of UTFS becomes important for further improving the spatial resolution USF technique. In this study, we found that UTFS can be significantly reduced below the diffraction-limited acoustic intensity focal size via nonlinear acoustic effects and thermal confinement by appropriately controlling ultrasound power and exposure time, which can be potentially used for deep-tissue high-resolution imaging. PMID:23479498

  11. Low-cost high-resolution diffractive position sensors for X-by-wire applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupinier, L.; Marroux, O.; Ndao, M.; Kress, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2006-04-01

    We are proposing a novel method to implement high resolution optical position sensors for automotive and other applications. Grating diffractive incremental encoders (both linear and rotation) are already becoming commodity products now, and include a read-out grating and a ruling grating [3]. We are implementing out high resolution incremental and/or absolute position encoders with a single diffractive substrate, replicated in mass in plastic. The diffractive structures are here much more complex than standard linear gratings. These new optical position sensors can achieve high absolute resolution without need of electronic interpolation, therefore being potentially very fast and accurate. Furthermore, due to the nature of these diffractive optical elements (surface relief elements), they are very cheaply replicated in mass by either polymers embossing or injection moulding.

  12. High-resolution elastic and rotationally inelastic diffraction of D2 from NiAl(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barredo, Daniel; Laurent, Guillaume; Nieto, Pablo; Farías, Daniel; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2010-09-01

    High-resolution angular distributions of D2 scattered from NiAl(110) have been measured at incident energies between 20 and 150 meV. The measurements were performed along the [11¯0] azimuth using a high sensitivity time-of-flight apparatus, which allows the recording of diffraction channels not previously studied, including out-of-plane rotationally inelastic diffraction peaks. The attenuation of both elastic and rotationally inelastic diffraction intensities with surface temperature was found to follow a Debye-Waller model. The time-of-flight data analysis allowed us to assign unequivocally the different transition probabilities to each final state. In this way, 0→2, 2→0, and 1→3 transition probabilities were observed, covering relative intensities over two orders of magnitude. In the energy range investigated, the 0→2 transition was found to be a factor of 2-3 larger than the 2→0 one, which lies a factor of 10 above the 1→3 transition probability.

  13. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  14. High numerical aperture tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscopy with 70-nm resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Richard L.; Song, Changyong; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W.; Raymondson, Daisy A.; Paul, Ariel; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Lee, Edwin; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Miao, Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to ≈200 nm. By using imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens with techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, and photoactivated localization microscopy. Here, we report a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 70- to 90-nm resolution by using two different tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources—a soft x-ray laser and a high-harmonic source. We also use field curvature correction that allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5λ. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science because of its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution. PMID:18162534

  15. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  16. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  17. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  18. Insights into Analogue Perovskite Solid Solutions from High-Resolution Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfern, S. A.; Chaddock, E. H.; Becerro, A. I.

    2002-12-01

    Neutron powder diffraction provides a powerful tool for the study of phase transitions as a function of pressure, temperature, or chemical composition. The structural information obtainable from powders using diffractometers such as HRPD (ISIS, UK) or D2B (ILL, France) rivals, and in some respects exceeds what may be possible using conventional crystallographic techniques reliant on single crystals. We have used both instruments to explore the subtle phase transitions observed in the (CaxSr1-x)TiO3 and (SrxBa1-x)SnO3 solid solutions. We have also used low resolution high flux instruments to explore the thermal dependence of the superlattice behavior below the cubic to tetragonal phase transition in (CaxSr1-x)TiO3. In each case a sequence of phase transitions from Pm-3m through I4/mcm to Pbnm is seen as a function of composition, and is driven by the change in average radius of the B-cation. This sequence of transitions is the same as expected for a magnesium silicate perovskite structure on increasing temperature. It is now recognised that lower mantle perovskite is likely aluminous, with solid solution towards either a stoichiometric or oxygen-defect end-member. The analogue systems we have characterised have been doped with trivalent cations on the B site to explore the effect of such substitution on the sequence of phase transitions. High-temperature neutron diffraction shows that oxygen defects stabilize the higher symmetry structures, lowering Tc for the transition to cubic. New developments in high-T high-P neutron diffraction techniques will allow the extension of these ambient pressure studies to the investigation of the influence of pressure as a variable, and hence the extension of such analogue studies to the whole range of variables experienced in the lower mantle. These will be briefly outlined.

  19. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  20. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  1. Diffraction limited gamma-ray optics using Fresnel lenses for micro-arc second angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, G.; von Ballmoos, P.; Gehrels, N.; Krzmanic, J.

    2003-03-01

    Refractive indices at gamma-ray wavelengths are such that material thicknesses of the order of millimeters allow the phase of a wavefront to be changed by up to 2π . Thus a phase Fresnel lens can be made from a simple profiled thin disk of, for example, aluminium or plastic. Such a lens can easily have a collecting area of several square meters and an efficiency >90%. Ordinary engineering tolerances allow the manufacture of a lens which can be diffraction limited in the pico-meter wavelength band (up to ˜MeV) and thus provides a simple optical system with angular resolution better than a micro arc second i.e. the resolution necessary to resolve structures on the scale of the event horizon of super-massive black holes in AGN. However the focal length of such a lens is very long - up to a million km. Nevertheless studies have shown that a mission `Fresnel' using a detector and a phase Fresnel lens on two station-keeping spacecraft separated by such a distance is feasible. Results from these studies and work on other proof of concept studies are presented.

  2. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  3. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  4. Electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy studies on layered Li{sub 2−δ}(Mn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}){sub 1+δ}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hiroki; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Mochiku, Takashi

    2013-07-15

    The structure of Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}–LiCoO{sub 2} solid solutions or Li{sub 2−δ}(Mn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}){sub 1+δ}O{sub 3} (LMCO) which are promising lithium-battery cathodes was studied by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that Li{sub 1.6}Mn{sub 0.2}Co{sub 1.2}O{sub 3} and Li{sub 1.7}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.9}O{sub 3} take a rhombohedral (R3-bar m space group) structure, whereas Li{sub 1.85}Mn{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.45}O{sub 3} and Li{sub 1.95}Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} take a monoclinic (C2/m) superstructure. HREM studies on those samples reveal that all of the observed crystallites in sample Li{sub 1.95}Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} contain sharp stripe structures due to the planar defects along the c{sub h}-axis (stacking direction of the hexagonal close-packed planes) of parent rhombohedral R3-bar m cell. Such stripe structures become faint with increasing x, Co content. The origin of the planar defects is mainly attributed not to the different structures but to the different local orientations of the monoclinic LMCO. Local disordering of Li and (Mn,Co) in (Li,Mn,Co) planes is developed with increasing x and the structures are transformed from C2/m to R3-bar m. The alternative (Li,Mn,Co)-plane stacking structure, trigonal P3{sub 1}12 LMCO, was occasionally observed. However, only P3{sub 1}12 LMCO platelets with a thickness of a single unit cell were detected. - Graphical abstract: An HREM image for Li{sub 1.95}(Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.15})O{sub 3} and schematic drawings of C2/m and P3{sub 1}12 Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} projected along the various zone axes. Each projected unit cell is indicated by rectangles and parallelograms . - Highlights: • Li{sub 2−δ}(Mn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}){sub 1+δ}O{sub 3} was studied by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). • HREM studies revealed a large amount of planar defects in C2/m Li{sub 1.95}Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 3}. • The origin of the defects is the different

  5. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  6. 7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  7. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  8. Beamline I11 at Diamond: A new instrument for high resolution powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Parker, J. E.; Potter, J.; Hill, T. P.; Birt, A.; Cobb, T. M.; Yuan, F.; Tang, C. C.

    2009-07-01

    The performance characteristics of a new synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction beamline (I11) at the Diamond Light Source are presented. Using an in-vacuum undulator for photon production and deploying simple x-ray optics centered around a double-crystal monochromator and a pair of harmonic rejection mirrors, a high brightness and low bandpass x-ray beam is delivered at the sample. To provide fast data collection, 45 Si(111) analyzing crystals and detectors are installed onto a large and high precision diffractometer. High resolution powder diffraction data from standard reference materials of Si, α-quartz, and LaB6 are used to characterize instrumental performance.

  9. Competing orbital ordering in RVO{sub 3} compounds: High-resolution x-ray diffraction and thermal expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, M. H.; Blake, G. R.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Marquina, C.

    2007-11-15

    We report evidence for the phase coexistence of orbital orderings of different symmetry in RVO{sub 3} compounds with intermediate-size rare earths. Through a study by high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction and thermal expansion, we show that the competing orbital orderings are associated with the magnitude of the VO{sub 6} octahedral tilting and magnetic exchange striction in these compounds and that the phase-separated state is stabilized by lattice strains.

  10. Pinhole diffraction holography for fabrication of high-resolution Fresnel zone plates.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sankha S; Solak, Harun H; David, Christian; van der Veen, J Friso

    2014-01-27

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) play an essential role in high spatial resolution x-ray imaging and analysis of materials in many fields. These diffractive lenses are commonly made by serial writing techniques such as electron beam or focused ion beam lithography. Here we show that pinhole diffraction holography has potential to generate FZP patterns that are free from aberrations and imperfections that may be present in alternative fabrication techniques. In this presented method, FZPs are fabricated by recording interference pattern of a spherical wave generated by diffraction through a pinhole, illuminated with coherent plane wave at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength. Fundamental and practical issues involved in formation and recording of the interference pattern are considered. It is found that resolution of the produced FZP is directly related to the diameter of the pinhole used and the pinhole size cannot be made arbitrarily small as the transmission of EUV or x-ray light through small pinholes diminishes due to poor refractive index contrast found between materials in these spectral ranges. We also find that the practical restrictions on exposure time due to the light intensity available from current sources directly imposes a limit on the number of zones that can be printed with this method. Therefore a trade-off between the resolution and the FZP diameter exists. Overall, we find that this method can be used to fabricate aberration free FZPs down to a resolution of about 10 nm. PMID:24515148

  11. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  12. High resolution x-ray diffraction analysis of InGaAs/InP superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cornet, D. M.; LaPierre, R. R.; Comedi, D.; Pusep, Y. A.

    2006-08-15

    The interfacial properties of lattice-matched InGaAs/InP superlattice (SL) structures grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy were investigated by high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD). SLs with various periods were grown to determine the contributions of the interface layers to the structural properties of the SLs. The HRXRD curves exhibited a number of features indicative of interfacial layers, including weak even-order satellite peaks, and a zero-order diffraction peak that shifted toward lower diffraction angles with decreasing SL period. A detailed structural model is proposed to explain these observations, consisting of strained InAsP and InGaAsP monolayers due to the group-V gas switching and atomic exchange at the SL interfaces.

  13. High resolution imaging of superficial mosaicity in single crystals using grazing incidence fast atom diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalmi, B.; Khemliche, H.; Momeni, A.; Soulisse, P.; Roncin, P.

    2012-11-01

    A new table top technique is used to simultaneously analyze the local morphology of crystalline surfaces as well as the misalignment of large scale domains at the topmost surface layer. The approach is based on fast atom diffraction at grazing incidence (GIFAD); the diffraction pattern yields the structural characteristics and the topology of the surface electronic density with atomic resolution. If superficial mosaicity is present, diffraction patterns arising from each mosaic domain can be distinguished, providing high sensitivity to the properties of each of the domains. Taking NaCl(001) as an example, we observe a discrete tilt angle distribution of the mosaic domains following an arithmetic progression with a 0.025° ± 0.005° difference; a twist mosaic angle of 0.09° ± 0.01° is also observed.

  14. Coherent diffractive imaging of time-evolving samples with improved temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, A.; Tripathi, A.; Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Cha, W.; Wild, S. M.; Stephenson, G. B.; Fuoss, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    Bragg coherent x-ray diffractive imaging is a powerful technique for investigating dynamic nanoscale processes in nanoparticles immersed in reactive, realistic environments. Its temporal resolution is limited, however, by the oversampling requirements of three-dimensional phase retrieval. Here, we show that incorporating the entire measurement time series, which is typically a continuous physical process, into phase retrieval allows the oversampling requirement at each time step to be reduced, leading to a subsequent improvement in the temporal resolution by a factor of 2-20 times. The increased time resolution will allow imaging of faster dynamics and of radiation-dose-sensitive samples. This approach, which we call "chrono CDI," may find use in improving the time resolution in other imaging techniques.

  15. High-Angular-Resolution Microbeam X-Ray Diffraction with CCD Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Sakaia, Akira; Sakata, Osami

    2010-04-06

    We have introduced a CCD-type two-dimensional X-ray detector for a microbeam X-ray diffraction system using synchrotron radiation, so that we can measure local reciprocal space maps (RSM) of samples rapidly. A local RSM of a strain-relaxed SiGe 004 grown on a Si (001) substrate was measured in higher-angular-resolution and faster than a conventional way. The measurement was achieved in 1 h 40 min. with the 2theta resolution of 80 murad and the spatial resolution of 1.4(h)x0.5(v) {mu}m{sup 2}. The introduction of the CCD enabled us to measure RSMs at many points in a sample, that is, the distribution of strain fields and lattice tilts can be revealed in high-angular- and high-spatial-resolution.

  16. High-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction study of the incommensurate modulation in the martensite phase of Ni2MnGa: Evidence for nearly 7M modulation and phason broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Petricek, V.; Rajput, Parasmani; Hill, Adrian H.; Suard, E.; Barman, S. R.; Pandey, Dhananjai

    2014-07-01

    The modulated structure of the martensite phase of Ni2MnGa is revisited using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction measurements, which reveal higher-order satellite reflections up to the third order and phason broadening of the satellite peaks. The structure refinement, using the (3+1) dimensional superspace group approach, shows that the modulated structure of Ni2MnGa can be described by orthorhombic superspace group Immm(00γ)s00 with lattice parameters a=4.218 61(2)Å,b=5.546 96(3)Å, and c=4.187 63(2) Å, and an incommensurate modulation wave vector q =0.43160(3)c*=(3/7+δ)c*, where δ =0.00303(3) is the degree of incommensuration of the modulated structure. Additional satellite peak broadening, which could not be accounted for in terms of the anisotropic strain broadening based on a lattice parameter distribution, has been modeled in terms of phasons using fourth-rank covariant strain-tensor representation for incommensurate structures. The simulation of single-crystal diffraction patterns from the refined structural parameters unambiguously reveals a rational approximant structure with 7M modulation. The inhomogeneous displacement of different atomic sites on account of incommensurate modulation and the presence of phason broadening clearly rule out the adaptive phase model proposed recently by Kaufmann et al. [S. Kaufmann, U. K. Rößler, O. Heczko, M. Wuttig, J. Buschbeck, L. Schultz, and S. Fähler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 145702 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.145702] and suggest that the modulation in Ni2MnGa originates from soft-mode phonons.

  17. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  18. Structural anomalies in undoped Gallium Arsenide observed in high resolution diffraction imaging with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Kuriyama, M.; Dobbyn, R. C.; Laor, U.; Larson, D.; Brown, M.

    1988-01-01

    Novel, streak-like disruption features restricted to the plane of diffraction have recently been observed in images obtained by synchrotron radiation diffraction from undoped, semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals. These features were identified as ensembles of very thin platelets or interfaces lying in (110) planes, and a structural model consisting of antiphase domain boundaries was proposed. We report here the other principal features observed in high resolution monochromatic synchrotron radiation diffraction images: (quasi) cellular structure; linear, very low-angle subgrain boundaries in (110) directions, and surface stripes in a (110) direction. In addition, we report systematic differences in the acceptance angle for images involving various diffraction vectors. When these observations are considered together, a unifying picture emerges. The presence of ensembles of thin (110) antiphase platelet regions or boundaries is generally consistent not only with the streak-like diffraction features but with the other features reported here as well. For the formation of such regions we propose two mechanisms, operating in parallel, that appear to be consistent with the various defect features observed by a variety of techniques.

  19. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Carbonate Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Hadi Y.; Leventouri, Theodora; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.

    1998-11-01

    Moghaddam H.Y., Leventouri Th.* (Dept. of Physics & Alloy Research Center, Florida Atlantic Univ.) Chakoumakos B.C. (Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Lab.**,kou@ornl.gov) We report Rietveld structural refinements of neutron diffraction data of a highly crystalline, single-phase natural carbonate apatite,(francolite of Epirus, Greece), in order to elucidate the details of carbonate substitution in the apatites. The composition is Ca9.56Na0.38Mg0.08(PO4)4.82(CO3)0.946(SO4)0.2F2.34, as determined by electron microprobe analysis. We report refinements of data for the native francolite as a function of temperature between 296K and 10K after the material had been heated at 750 °C to drive off adsorbed water and CO2. The neutron diffractioii@data were collected using a wavelength 1.0912 A on the HB4 high resolution powder diffractometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic displacement parameters can reveal the contribution from the temperature independent static positional disorder. Difference displacement parameters evaluated along various bonding directions are being used to describe the mechanics and dynamics of the carbonate for phosphate substitution.*Supported by a SURA-ORNL Summer Cooperative Research Program 1998.**Supported by the Division of Materials Sciences,U.S. D.O.E. (contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 with Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation).

  20. Neutron Powder Diffraction Measurements of the Spinel MgGa2O4:Cr3+ - A Comparative Study between the High Flux Diffractometer D2B at the ILL and the High Resolution Powder Diffractometer Aurora at IPEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. A. F. M.; Sosman, L. P.; Yokaichiya, F.; Mazzocchi, V. L.; Parente, C. B. R.; Mestnik-Filho, J.; Henry, P. F.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2012-02-01

    Optical materials that emit from the visible to the near-infrared spectral region are of great interest due to their possible application as tunable radiation sources, as signal transmission, display, optoelectronics signal storage, cellulose industry as well as in dosimetry. One important family of such systems are the spinel compounds doped with Cr3+, in which the physical the properties are related to the insertion of punctual defects in the crystalline structure. The purpose of our work is two fold. First, we compare the luminescence of the MgGa2O4-Ga2O3 system with the single phase Ga2O3 and MgGa2O4 and relate structural changes observed in MgGa2O4-Ga2O3 system to the optical properties, and secondly, to compare the neutron powder diffraction results obtained using two diffractometers: D2B located at the ILL (Grenoble, France) and Aurora located at IPEN (São Paulo, Brazil). In the configuration chosen, Aurora shows an improved resolution, which is related to the design of its silicon focusing monochromator.

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers.

    PubMed

    Badali, D S; Gengler, R Y N; Miller, R J D

    2016-05-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the "medium" energy regime (1-10 kV). An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples. PMID:27226978

  2. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Badali, D. S.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-01-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the “medium” energy regime (1–10 kV). An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples. PMID:27226978

  3. High resolution imaging beyond the acoustic diffraction limit in deep tissue via ultrasound-switchable NIR fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yanbo; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Cheng, Bingbing; Liu, Yuan; Xie, Zhiwei; Nguyen, Kytai; Yuan, Baohong

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescence imaging in deep tissue with high spatial resolution is highly desirable because it can provide details about tissue's structural, functional, and molecular information. Unfortunately, current fluorescence imaging techniques are limited either in penetration depth (microscopy) or spatial resolution (diffuse light based imaging) as a result of strong light scattering in deep tissue. To overcome this limitation, we developed an ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging technique whereby ultrasound was used to switch on/off the emission of near infrared (NIR) fluorophores. We synthesized and characterized unique NIR USF contrast agents. The excellent switching properties of these agents, combined with the sensitive USF imaging system developed in this study, enabled us to image fluorescent targets in deep tissue with spatial resolution beyond the acoustic diffraction limit.

  4. High resolution coherent diffractive imaging with a table-top extreme ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Vu Le, Hoang Ba Dinh, Khuong; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap

    2014-11-07

    We demonstrate a resolution of 45 nm with a sample size down to 3 μm × 3 μm is achieved in a short exposure time of 2 s, from the diffraction pattern generated by a table-top high harmonic source at around 30 nm. By using a narrow-bandwidth focusing mirror, the diffraction pattern's quality is improved and the required exposure time is significantly reduced. In order to obtain a high quality of the reconstructed image, the ratio of the beam size to the sample size and the curvature of the focused beam need to be considered in the reconstruction process. This new experimental scheme is very promising for imaging sub-10 nm scale objects with a table-top source based on a small inexpensive femtosecond laser system.

  5. Study on the reversibility of the diffraction light path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Wan, Lingyu; Liu, Yun; Dong, Jianjie; Shen, Xiaoming

    2009-08-01

    of grating. First, we studied the reversibility of optical path of grating illuminated by monochromatic light, and then illuminated by polychromatic light. We found that the optical path of diffraction of grating has partial reversibility. Using the partial reversibility of optical path of diffraction of grating, we analyzed the spectral combination characteristic of grating and the bi-grating diffraction imaging effect.

  6. Strain measurement at the nanoscale: Comparison between convergent beam electron diffraction, nano-beam electron diffraction, high resolution imaging and dark field electron holography.

    PubMed

    Béché, A; Rouvière, J L; Barnes, J P; Cooper, D

    2013-08-01

    Convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED), nano-beam electron diffraction (NBED or NBD), high resolution imaging (HRTEM and HRSTEM) and dark field electron holography (DFEH or HoloDark) are five TEM based techniques able to quantitatively measure strain at the nanometer scale. In order to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of each technique, two samples composed of epitaxial silicon-germanium layers embedded in a silicon matrix have been investigated. The five techniques are then compared in terms of strain precision and accuracy, spatial resolution, field of view, mapping abilities and ease of performance and analysis. PMID:23673283

  7. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics by high-resolution, surrogate metrics of turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustic backscatter, and acoustic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Mark Newton

    Sedimentation is a primary and growing environmental, engineering, and agricultural issue around the world. However, collection of the data needed to develop solutions to sedimentation issues has declined by about three-fourths since 1983. Suspended-sediment surrogates have the potential to obtain sediment data using methods that are more accurate, of higher spatial and temporal resolution, and with less manually intensive, costly, and hazardous methods. The improved quality of sediment data from high-resolution surrogates may inform improved understanding and solutions to sedimentation problems. The field experiments for this research include physical samples of suspended sediment collected concurrently with surrogate metrics from instruments including 1.2, 1.5, and 3.0 megahertz frequency acoustic doppler current profilers, a nephelometric turbidity sensor, and a laser-diffraction particle size analyzer. This comprehensive data set was collected over five storms in 2009 and 2010 at Yellow River near Atlanta, Georgia. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics in this study can be determined by high-resolution surrogate parameters of turbidity, laser-diffraction and acoustics with model errors 33% to 49% lower than traditional methods using streamflow alone. Hysteresis in sediment-turbidity relations for single storm events was observed and quantitatively related to PSD changes of less than 10 microns in the fine silt to clay size range. Suspended sediment particle size detection (PSD) is significantly correlated with ratios of measured acoustic attenuation at different frequencies; however the data do not fit the theoretical relations. Using both relative acoustic backscatter (RB) and acoustic attenuation as explanatory variables results in a significantly improved model of suspended sediment compared with traditional sonar equations using only RB. High resolution PSD data from laser diffraction provide uniquely valuable information; however the size detection

  8. High resolution diffraction imaging of crystals grown in microgravity and closely related terrestrial crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Dobbyn, R.; Black, D.; Burdette, H.; Kuriyama, M.; Spal, R.; Vandenberg, L.; Fripp, A.; Simchick, R.; Lal, R.

    1991-01-01

    Irregularities found in three crystals grown in space, in four crystals grown entirely on the ground were examined and compared. Irregularities were observed in mercuric iodide, lead tin telluride, triglycine sulfate, and gallium arsenide by high resolution synchrotron x radiation diffraction imaging. Radiation detectors made from mercuric iodide crystals grown in microgravity were reported to perform far better than conventional detectors grown from the same material under full gravity. Effort is now underway to reproduce these 'space' crystals, optimize their properties, and extend comparable superiority to other types of materials.

  9. Novel techniques for detection and imaging of spin related phenomena: Towards sub-diffraction limited resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher Stuart

    The idea that the spin degree of freedom of particles can be used to store and transport information has revolutionized the data storage industry and inspired a huge amount of research activity. Spin electronics, or spintronics, provides a plethora of potential improvements to conventional charge electronics that include increased functionality and energy efficiency. Scientists studying spintronics will need a multitude of characterization tools to sensitively detect spins in new materials and devices. There are already a handful of powerful techniques to image spin-related phenomena, but each has limitations. Magnetic resonance force microscopy, for example, offers sensitive detection of spin moments that are localized or nearly so but requires a high vacuum, cryogenic environment. Magnetometry based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond is a powerful approach, but requires the nitrogen vacancy center to be in very close contact to the spin system being studied to be able to measure the field generated by the system. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy provides perhaps the best demonstrated spatial resolution, but typically requires ultrahigh vacuum conditions and is limited to studying the surface of a sample. Traditional optical techniques such as Faraday or Kerr microscopy are limited in spatial resolution by the optical diffraction limit. In this dissertation I will present three new techniques we have developed to address some of these issues and to provide the community with new tools to help push forward spintronics and magnetism related research. I will start by presenting the first experimental demonstration of scanned spin-precession microscopy. This technique has the potential to turn any spin-sensitive detection technique into an imaging platform by providing the groundwork for incorporating a magnetic field gradient with that technique, akin to magnetic resonance imaging, and the mathematical tools to analyze the data and extract the local

  10. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdol, V. B.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Gammer, C. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov; Jin, X. G.; Minor, A. M. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov

    2015-06-22

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  11. Improving spatial resolution of convergent beam electron diffraction strain mapping in silicon microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Armigliato, A.; Balboni, R.; Frabboni, S.

    2005-02-07

    Despite the use of nanometer-sized probes in field emission transmission electron microscopes, the spatial resolution in strain analysis performed by convergent beam electron diffraction is limited in one direction by the need for tilting the cross-sectional sample in the electron microscope off the vertical <110> direction. We demonstrate that it is possible to improve this resolution by using the <340> zone axis, instead of the <230> one, which has recently become of common use in the analysis of silicon microdevices. Quantitative strain information with good sensitivity and accuracy can be obtained in the new axis. An example of application to the two-dimensional strain mapping in shallow trench isolation structures, obtained with a scanning attachment and a high-angle annular dark-field detector, is reported.

  12. High-temperature structural phase transitions in neighborite: a high-resolution neutron powder diffraction investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Price, G. David; Stuart, John A.; Wood, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the apparently continuous structural phase transition at 1,049 K in the perovskite-structured, MgSiO3 isomorph, neighborite (NaMgF3), from the orthorhombic ( Pbnm) hettotype phase to the cubic () aristotype structure, has been re-investigated using high-resolution, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. Using data collected at 1 K intervals close to the nominal phase transition temperature, the temperature dependence of the intensities of superlattice reflections at the M point and the R point of the pseudocubic Brillouin zone indicate the existence of a new intermediate tetragonal phase in space group P4/ mbm, with a narrow phase field extending from ~1,046.5 to ~1,048.5 K, at ambient pressure. Group theoretical analysis shows that the structural transitions identified in this study, Pbnm- P4/ mbm, and P4/ mbm-, are permitted to be second order. The observation of the tetragonal phase resolves the longstanding issue of why the high-temperature phase transition, previously identified as Pbnm-, and which would be expected to be first order under Landau theory, is in fact found to be continuous. Analysis of the pseudocubic shear strain shows it to vary with a critical exponent of 0.5 implying that the phase transition from Pbnm to P4/ mbm is tricritical in character. The large librational modes that exist in the MgF6 octahedron at high temperature, and the use of Gaussian probability density functions to describe atomic displacements, result in apparent bond shortening in the Mg-F distances, making mode amplitude determination an unreliable method for determination of the critical exponent from internal coordinates. Crystal structures are reported for the three phases of NaMgF3 at 1,033 K ( Pbnm), 1,047 K ( P4/ mbm) and 1,049 K ().

  13. The Effect of Ionic Liquids on Protein Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Russell A.; Takahashi, Sumiko; Longenecker, Kenton L.; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Chiu, Mark L.

    2009-09-08

    Ionic liquids exhibit a variety of properties that make them attractive solvents for biomaterials. Given the potential for productive interaction between ionic liquids and biological macromolecules, we investigated the use of ionic liquids as precipitating agents and additives for protein crystallization for six model proteins (lysozyme, catalase, myoglobin, trypsin, glucose isomerase, and xylanase). The ionic liquids produced changes in crystal morphology and mediated significant increases in crystal size in some cases. Crystals grown using ionic liquids as precipitating agents or as additives provided X-ray diffraction resolution similar to or better than that obtained without ionic liquids. Based upon the experiments performed with model proteins, the ionic liquids were used as additives for the crystallization of the poorly diffracting monoclonal antibody 106.3 Fab in complex with the B-type natriuretic peptide (5-13). The ionic liquids improved the crystallization behavior and provided improved diffraction resulting in the determination of the structure. Ionic liquids should be considered as useful additives for the crystallization of other proteins.

  14. Printable Nanoscopic Metamaterial Absorbers and Images with Diffraction-Limited Resolution.

    PubMed

    Richner, Patrizia; Eghlidi, Hadi; Kress, Stephan J P; Schmid, Martin; Norris, David J; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-05-11

    The fabrication of functional metamaterials with extreme feature resolution finds a host of applications such as the broad area of surface/light interaction. Nonplanar features of such structures can significantly enhance their performance and tunability, but their facile generation remains a challenge. Here, we show that carefully designed out-of-plane nanopillars made of metal-dielectric composites integrated in a metal-dielectric-nanocomposite configuration can absorb broadband light very effectively. We further demonstrate that electrohydrodynamic printing in a rapid nanodripping mode is able to generate precise out-of-plane forests of such composite nanopillars with deposition resolutions at the diffraction limit on flat and nonflat substrates. The nanocomposite nature of the printed material allows the fine-tuning of the overall visible light absorption from complete absorption to complete reflection by simply tuning the pillar height. Almost perfect absorption (∼95%) over the entire visible spectrum is achieved by a nanopillar forest covering only 6% of the printed area. Adjusting the height of individual pillar groups by design, we demonstrate on-demand control of the gray scale of a micrograph with a spatial resolution of 400 nm. These results constitute a significant step forward in ultrahigh resolution facile fabrication of out-of-plane nanostructures, important to a broad palette of light design applications. PMID:27100105

  15. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. -G.

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  16. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.E.; Wilkinson, A.P.

    1993-05-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f` for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high {Tc} superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, FeNi{sub 2}BO{sub 5}), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}, Eu{sub 3}O{sub 4}, GaCl{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}PO{sub 5}), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub l2}).

  17. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.E. ); Wilkinson, A.P. . Dept. of Materials)

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f' for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high [Tc] superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo[sub 2](PO[sub 4])[sub 3], FeNi[sub 2]BO[sub 5]), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 6+x], Eu[sub 3]O[sub 4], GaCl[sub 2], Fe[sub 2]PO[sub 5]), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y[sub 3]Ga[sub 5]O[sub l2]).

  18. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction study of photostimulated purple membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, R D; Forsyth, J M

    1985-01-01

    A nanosecond resolution laser-driven x-ray source has been used to perform a time-resolved, x-ray diffraction study of the purple membrane of the Halobacterium halobium. Alterations in diffraction patterns have been observed 1 ms after photostimulation, and are interpreted to show disorder of bacteriorhodopsin packing in the plane of the membrane with little bacteriorhodopsin structural change. PMID:3978209

  19. Time of flight Laue fiber diffraction studies of perdeuterated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, V.T.; Whalley, M.A.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Fuller, W.

    1994-12-31

    The diffractometer SXD at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS pulsed neutron source has been used to record high resolution time-of-flight Laue fiber diffraction data from DNA. These experiments, which are the first of their kind, were undertaken using fibers of DNA in the A conformation and prepared using deuterated DNA in order to minimis incoherent background scattering. These studies complement previous experiments on instrument D19 at the Institute Laue Langevin using monochromatic neutrons. Sample preparation involved drawing large numbers of these deuterated DNA fibers and mounting them in a parallel array. The strategy of data collection is discussed in terms of camera design, sample environment and data collection. The methods used to correct the recorded time-of-flight data and map it into the final reciprocal space fiber diffraction dataset are also discussed. Difference Fourier maps showing the distribution of water around A-DNA calculated on the basis of these data are compared with results obtained using data recorded from hydrogenated A-DNA on D19. Since the methods used for sample preparation, data collection and data processing are fundamentally different for the monochromatic and Laue techniques, the results of these experiments also afford a valuable opportunity to independently test the data reduction and analysis techniques used in the two methods.

  20. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunatova, Tereza; Popelkova, Daniela; Wan, Wei; Oleynikov, Peter; Danis, Stanislav; Zou, Xiaodong; Kuzel, Radomir

    2014-01-15

    The structure of titanate nanotubes (Ti-NTs) was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti-NTs are prepared by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} powder. The structure is identified by powder X-ray diffraction as the one based on the structure of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O phase. The same structure is obtained by projected potential from HRTEM through-focus image series. The structure is verified by simulated PXRD pattern with the aid of the Debye formula. The validity of the model is tested by computing Fourier transformation of a single nanotube which is proportional to measured electron diffraction intensities. A good agreement of this calculation with measured precession electron diffraction data is achieved. - Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes were prepared by hydrothermal method. • X-ray powder diffraction indicated their structure based on that of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O. • Structural model was created with the aid of high-resolution electron microscopy. • The model was verified with electron diffraction data. • X-ray powder diffraction pattern was calculated with the aid of the Debye formula.

  1. High-resolution diffraction microscopy using the plane-wave field of a nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Furukawa, Hayato; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-08-01

    X-ray waves in the center of the beam waist of nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beams can be considered to have amplitude and phase that are both almost uniform, i.e., they are x-ray plane waves. Here we report the results of an experimental demonstration of high-resolution diffraction microscopy using the x-ray plane wave of the synchrotron x-ray beam focused using Kirkpatrik-Baez mirrors. A silver nanocube with an edge length of {approx}100 nm is illuminated with the x-ray beam focused to a {approx}1 {mu}m spot at 12 keV. A high-contrast symmetric diffraction pattern of the nanocube is observed in the forward far field. An image of the nanocube is successfully reconstructed by an iterative phasing method and its half-period resolution is 3.0 nm. This method does not only dramatically improve the spatial resolution of x-ray microscopy but also is a key technology for realizing single-pulse diffractive imaging using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  2. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; et al

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper wemore » address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.« less

  3. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D. A.; Spence, J. C.H.; Starodub, D.

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.

  4. Neutron Laue diffraction studies of coenzyme cob(II)alamin.

    PubMed

    Langan, P; Lehmann, M; Wilkinson, C; Jogl, G; Kratky, C

    1999-01-01

    Using a recently designed neutron single-crystal diffractometer utilizing a narrow-band Laue concept (LADI), diffraction data were collected from a crystal of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin (B12r), crystallized from a mixture of D2O and perdeuterated acetone. The instrument was placed at the end of a cold neutron guide at the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France), and data collection with neutrons of 1.8-8.0 A wavelength to a crystallographic resolution of 1.43 A was complete after about 36 h. This compares favourably with a previous experiment utilizing the same crystal specimen, where more than four weeks were required to collect monochromatic diffraction data to about 1 A resolution. Using the Laue data, the structure was solved by molecular replacement with the known X-ray crystal structure. Difference density maps revealed the atomic positions (including deuterium atoms) of seven ordered solvent water molecules and two (partially disordered) acetone molecules. These density maps were compared with corresponding maps computed with monochromatic neutron-diffraction data collected to 1. 0 A resolution using the same crystal specimen, as well as to maps derived from high-resolution (0.90 A) synchrotron X-ray data. In spite of the better definition of atomic positions in the two high-resolution maps, the 1.43 A LADI maps show considerable power for the determination of the location of hydrogen and deuterium positions. PMID:10089394

  5. Studies Related to Crystal Growth Using Synchrotron Radiation Diffraction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Small crystals of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate (ADP), sodium chlorate and sucrose, generated by secondary nucleation in aqueous solution, have been grown under constant conditions of supersaturation. A wide dispersion of growth rates was observed for each material using optical microscopy. A number of individual crystals of known growth rate were successfully retrieved from solution for each system. An assessment of the mosaic spread of each crystal was made using synchrotron radiation Laue diffraction on station 9.7 at Daresbury laboratory. All of the crystals produced diffraction patterns comprising small, sharp spots, indicative of low mosaic spread (<0.5 ^circ), contrary to published work. No correlation was found between growth rate and mosaic spread for these simple, small-molecule materials. An explanation of the previously reported discrepancies has been provided. The susceptibility of these compounds to radiation damage has been systematically investigated; ADP proved highly robust whilst sucrose and sodium chlorate showed significant sensitivity to irradiation. The role of mosaic spread in the growth of more complex systems is discussed with specific reference to two materials possessing channel structures: chenodeoxycholic acid and SAPO-5. In each case, the directions of slow growth have been related to high mosaic spread. An order of magnitude calculation of the rate of absorption of energy has been made for a variety of materials in the SRS white beam. The associated theoretical heating capability of the beam has also been estimated. A crystal melting experiment using crystals of 2 bromobenzophenone has indicated that the heating rate under standard experimental conditions is of the order of 1-2^circ C per sec., substantially less than anticipated. A pilot study of the combined use of SR Laue diffraction and high resolution powder diffraction for microcrystal structure determination has been

  6. Phase transition sequence in sodium bismuth titanate observed using high-resolution x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksel, Elena; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Kowalski, Benjamin; Jones, Jacob L.; Thomas, Pam A.

    2011-11-01

    High resolution powder x-ray diffraction patterns of Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 at selected temperatures were examined to compare structural changes with observed piezoelectric thermal depoling temperatures. The depoling temperatures do not correlate with discrete phase transition temperatures, and therefore, a structural transition is not the origin of thermal depoling. Rather, a correlation is made with an increase in volume fraction of material which does not obey the long-range Cc space group. The origin of the thermal depoling behavior may be the loss of long-range ferroelectric order by a decreasing proportion of the Cc phase or the associated percolation of disordered nano-scale platelets.

  7. Metalenses at visible wavelengths: Diffraction-limited focusing and subwavelength resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Chen, Wei Ting; Devlin, Robert C; Oh, Jaewon; Zhu, Alexander Y; Capasso, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Subwavelength resolution imaging requires high numerical aperture (NA) lenses, which are bulky and expensive. Metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures. We show that high-aspect-ratio titanium dioxide metasurfaces can be fabricated and designed as metalenses with NA = 0.8. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm with corresponding efficiencies of 86, 73, and 66%. The metalenses can resolve nanoscale features separated by subwavelength distances and provide magnification as high as 170×, with image qualities comparable to a state-of-the-art commercial objective. Our results firmly establish that metalenses can have widespread applications in laser-based microscopy, imaging, and spectroscopy. PMID:27257251

  8. Phase transition sequence in sodium bismuth titanate observed using high-resolution x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aksel, Elena; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Kowalski, Benjamin; Jones, Jacob L.; Thomas, Pam A.

    2012-02-06

    High resolution powder x-ray diffraction patterns of Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} at selected temperatures were examined to compare structural changes with observed piezoelectric thermal depoling temperatures. The depoling temperatures do not correlate with discrete phase transition temperatures, and therefore, a structural transition is not the origin of thermal depoling. Rather, a correlation is made with an increase in volume fraction of material which does not obey the long-range Cc space group. The origin of the thermal depoling behavior may be the loss of long-range ferroelectric order by a decreasing proportion of the Cc phase or the associated percolation of disordered nano-scale platelets.

  9. Metalenses at visible wavelengths: Diffraction-limited focusing and subwavelength resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Chen, Wei Ting; Devlin, Robert C.; Oh, Jaewon; Zhu, Alexander Y.; Capasso, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Subwavelength resolution imaging requires high numerical aperture (NA) lenses, which are bulky and expensive. Metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures. We show that high-aspect-ratio titanium dioxide metasurfaces can be fabricated and designed as metalenses with NA = 0.8. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm with corresponding efficiencies of 86, 73, and 66%. The metalenses can resolve nanoscale features separated by subwavelength distances and provide magnification as high as 170×, with image qualities comparable to a state-of-the-art commercial objective. Our results firmly establish that metalenses can have widespread applications in laser-based microscopy, imaging, and spectroscopy.

  10. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  11. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. PMID:27337604

  12. Crystal structure determination of thymoquinone by high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Pagola, S; Benavente, A; Raschi, A; Romano, E; Molina, M A A; Stephens, P W

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of 2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (thymoquinone) and its thermal behavior--as necessary physical and chemical properties--were determined in order to enhance the current understanding of thymoquinone chemical action by using high resolution x-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and 3 thermo-analytical techniques thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The findings obtained with high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction and molecular location methods based on a simulated annealing algorithm after Rietveld refinement showed that the triclinic unit cell was a = 6.73728(8) A, b = 6.91560(8) A, c = 10.4988(2) A, alpha = 88.864(2) degrees, beta = 82.449(1) degrees, gamma = 77.0299(9) degrees; cell volume = 472.52(1) A3, Z = 2, and space group P1. In addition, FTIR spectrum revealed absorption bands corresponding to the carbonyl and C-H stretching of aliphatic and vinylic groups characteristically observed in such p-benzoquinones. Also, a chemical decomposition process starting at 65 degrees C and ending at 213 degrees C was noted when TGA was used. DSC allowed for the determination of onset at 43.55 degrees C and a melting enthalpy value of DeltaH(m) = 110.6 J/g. The low value obtained for the fusion point displayed a van der Waals pattern for molecular binding, and the thermograms performed evidence that thymoquinone can only be found in crystalline triclinic form, as determined by DRX methods. PMID:15760086

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of porcine carboxypeptidase B

    SciTech Connect

    Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-05-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B have been grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction study showed that the crystals belong to sp. gr. P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 79.58 Å, c = 100.51 Å; α = β = γ = 90.00°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one of the grown crystals at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility to 0.98 Å resolution.

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.C.; Erwin Desa, J.A.; Weeks, R.A.; Sinclair, R.N.; Bailey, D.K.

    1983-08-01

    A neutron diffraction investigation has been carried out of the structures of several naturally occurring glasses, viz. Libyan Desert glass, a Fulgurite, Wabar glass, Lechatelierite from Canon Diablo, a Tektite, Obsidian (3 samples), and Macusani glass. Libyan Desert sand has also been examined, together with crystalline ..cap alpha..-quartz and ..cap alpha..-cristobalite. A comparison of data for the natural glasses and synthetic vitreous silica (Spectrosil B) in both reciprocal and real space allows a categorisation into Silicas, which closely resemble synthetic vitreous silica, and Silicates, for which the resemblance to silica is consistently less striking. The data support the view that Libyan Desert glass and sand have a common origin, while the Tektite has a structure similar to that of volcanic glasses.

  15. Detailed Study of the Phase Diagram of Fe-based Superconductor Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 by Super High-Resolution Neutron Diffraction Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeuchi, K.; Sato, M.; Li, S.; Toyoda, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Itoh, M.; Miao, P.; Torii, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kamiyama, T.

    2015-03-01

    Temperature (T) dependence of Bragg reflections of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 (x = 0, 0.02) have been measured in detail on assembled mm-size crystallites to avoid effects of surface and/or externally induced strains with the high-resolution neutron powder diffractometer, where we have found that the profile width of the (400)O/(040)O reflections with the orthorhombic indexing begin to increase, as T decreases, at ~270 K, much higher than the tetragonal (Tet)-orthorhombic (Ort) second order transition temperature TS (-147.5 K) without showing any indication of an phase change above TS. The coexistence of two Ort phases with different orthorhombicity exists in the region of ~140 K < T < 143 K). The profile widths of (hhl)O reflections are nearly T-independent in the entire temperature region studied here (130 K <= T <= 350 K). An additional broadening due to the Co-doping is clearly found. We discuss these results in relation to the breakdown of the 4-fold symmetry of static physical quantities found in the electrical resistivity and band splitting of the 3dyz and 3dzx and orbitals and conclude that the disappearance of the 4-fold symmetry even in the macroscopically tetragonal phase can be understood by the existence of orthorhombic domains induced by crystal defects and/or impurities.

  16. First results from IRENI - Rapid diffraction-limited high resolution imaging across the mid-infrared bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Nasse, Michael J.; Mattson, Eric; Hirschmugl, Carol

    2010-02-03

    First results from IRENI, a new beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, demonstrate that synchrotron chemical imaging, which combines the characteristics of bright, stable, broadband synchrotron source with a multi-element detector, produces diffraction-limited images at all wavelengths simultaneously. A single cell of Micrasterias maintained in a flow cell has been measured, and results show high quality spectra and images demonstrating diffraction limited, and therefore wavelength-dependent, spatial resolution.

  17. PREFACE: XTOP 2004 -- 7th Biennial Conference on High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holý, Vaclav

    2005-05-01

    The 7th Biennial Conference on High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging (XTOP 2004) was held in the Prague suburb of Pruhonice, Czech Republic, during 7-10 September 2004. It was organized by the Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association in cooperation with the Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Masaryk University, Brno, and Charles University, Prague. XTOP 2004 took place just after EPDIC IX (European Powder Diffraction Conference) organised in Prague by the same Association during 2-5 September 2004. The Organizing Committee was supported by an International Programme Committee including about 20 prominent scientists from several European and overseas countries, whose helpful suggestions for speakers are acknowledged. The conference was sponsored by the International Union of Crystallography and by several industrial sponsors; this sponsorship allowed us to support about 20 students and young scientists. In total, 147 official delegates and 8 accompanying persons from 16 countries of three continents attended our conference. The scientific programme of the conference was divided into 11 half-day sessions and 2 poster sessions. The participants presented 147 accepted contributions; of these 9 were 45-minute long invited talks, 34 were 20-minute oral presentations and 104 were posters. All posters were displayed for the whole meeting to ensure maximum exposure and interaction between delegates. We followed the very good experience from the previous conference, XTOP 2002, and also organized pre-conference tutorial lectures presented by experts in the field: `Imaging with hard synchrotron radiation' (J Härtwig, Grenoble), `High-resolution x-ray diffractometry: determination of strain and composition' (J Stangl, Linz), `X-ray grazing-incidence scattering from surfaces and nanostructures' (U Pietsch, Potsdam) and `Hard x-ray optics' (J Hrdý, Prague). According to the recommendation of the International Program Committee

  18. Off-axis illumination in object-rotation diffraction tomography for enhanced alignment and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is a non-invasive method for quantitative measurement of micrometre-sized samples. In ODT a series of multiple holograms captured for various illumination directions with respect to a sample is processed using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The result of tomographic evaluation is 3D distribution of refractive index. Data acquisition in ODT is commonly realized in two ways, either by rotating a sample under fixed illumination and observation directions (object rotation configuration - ORC), or by scanning the illumination direction of a fixed sample (illumination scanning configuration - ISC). From the purely theoretical standpoint, the ORC configuration is superior to ISC due to larger (in terms of volume) and more isotropic optical transfer function. However, the theoretical maximal resolution achievable with ORC is lower than that provided with ISC. Moreover, the quality of tomographic reconstructions in ORC is significantly degraded due to experimental difficulties, including problematic determination of location of the rotation axis. This applies particularly to displacement of the rotation axis from the infocus plane that is either disregarded or detected with object-dependent autofocusing algorithms, which do not provide sufficient accuracy. In this paper we propose a new ODT approach, which provides solution to the both mentioned problems of ORC - the resolution limit and the rotation axis misalignment problem. The proposed tomographic method, besides rotating a sample in a full angle of 360°, uses simultaneous illumination from two fixed, highly off-axis directions. This modification enables enlarging the ORC optical transfer function up to the ISC limit. Moreover, the system enables implementation of an accurate, efficient and object-independent autofocusing method, which takes advantage of the off-axis illumination. The autofocusing method provides accurate and reliable detection of axial location of the

  19. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies. PMID:24406685

  20. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies. PMID:24406685

  1. Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Protein Crystals with Coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    High angular-resolution x-ray diffraction and phase contrast x-ray imaging were combined to study defects and perfection of protein crystals. Imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of a uniformly grown lysozyme crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in diffraction images. X-ray imaging and diffraction characterization of the quality of apoferritin crystals will also be discussed in the presentation.

  2. Ge-diode detector combined with crystal-diffraction spectrometer permits high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namenson, A. I.; Smither, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Crystal-diffraction spectrometer, combined with a lithium-drifted Ge-diode detector, performs high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy on the complicated neutron-capture gamma ray spectra. The system is most useful in the 1-3 MeV energy range and improves the signal to background ratio.

  3. First high dynamic range and high resolution images of the sky obtained with a diffractive Fresnel array telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koechlin, Laurent; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Deba, Paul; Serre, Denis; Raksasataya, Truswin; Gili, René; David, Jules

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents high contrast images of sky sources, obtained from the ground with a novel optical concept: Fresnel arrays. We demonstrate the efficiency of a small 20 cm prototype Fresnel array for making images with high brightness ratios, achieving contrasts up to 4 × 105 on sky sources such as Mars and its satellites, and the Sirius A-B couple. These validation results are promising for future applications in space, for example the 4 m array we have proposed to ESA in the frame of the "Call for a Medium-size mission opportunity for a launch in 2022". Fresnel imagers are the subject of a topical issue of Experimental Astronomy published in 2011, but only preliminary results were presented at the time. Making images of astronomical bodies requires an optical component to focus light. This component is usually a mirror or a lens, the quality of which is critical for sharp and high contrast images. However, reflection on a mirror and refraction through a lens are not the only ways to focus light: an alternative is provided by diffraction through binary masks (opaque foils with multiple precisely etched sub-apertures). Our Fresnel arrays are such diffractive focusers, they offer weight, price and size advantages over traditional optics in space-based astronomical instruments. This novel approach requires only void apertures of special shapes in an opaque material to form sharp images, thus avoiding the wavefront distortion, diffusion and spectral absorption associated with traditional optical media. In our setup, lenses and/or mirrors are involved only downstream (at small sizes) for focal instrumentation and chromatic correction. Fresnel arrays produce high contrast images, the resolution of which reaches the theoretical limit of diffraction. Unlike mirrors, they do not require high precision polishing or positioning, and can be used in a large domain of wavelengths from far IR to far UV, enabling the study of many science cases in astrophysics from exoplanet

  4. Development of an ultra-high resolution diffraction grating forsoft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Cambie, Rossana; Feshchenko, Ruslan M.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Padmore, Howard A.; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-21

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is the one of themost powerful methods for investigation of the electronic structure ofmaterials, specifically of excitations in correlated electron systems.However the potential of the RIXS technique has not been fully exploitedbecause conventional grating spectrometers have not been capable ofachieving the extreme resolving powers that RIXS can utilize. State ofthe art spectrometers in the soft x-ray energy range achieve ~;0.25 eVresolution, compared to the energy scales of soft excitations andsuperconducting gap openings down to a few meV. Development ofdiffraction gratings with super high resolving power is necessary tosolve this problem. In this paper we study the possibilities offabrication of gratings of resolving power of up to 106 for the 0.5 1.5KeV energy range. This energy range corresponds to all or most of theuseful dipole transitions for elements of interest in most correlatedelectronic systems, i.e., oxygen K-edge of relevance to all oxides, thetransition metal L2,3 edges, and the M4,5 edges of the rare earths.Various approaches based on different kinds of diffraction gratings suchas deep-etched multilayer gratings, and multilayer coated echelettes arediscussed. We also present simulations of diffraction efficiency for suchgratings, and investigate the necessary fabricationtolerances.

  5. A preliminary neutron diffraction study of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase enzyme, complexed with 8-azaxanthin

    SciTech Connect

    Budayova-Spano, Monika; Bonneté, Françoise; Ferté, Natalie; El Hajji, Mohamed; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew Paul; Castro, Bertrand

    2006-03-01

    Neutron diffraction data of hydrogenated recombinant urate oxidase enzyme (Rasburicase), complexed with a purine-type inhibitor 8-azaxanthin, was collected to 2.1 Å resolution from a crystal grown in D{sub 2}O by careful control and optimization of crystallization conditions via knowledge of the phase diagram. Deuterium atoms were clearly seen in the neutron-scattering density map. Crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction measurements of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase enzyme expressed by a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, complexed with a purine-type inhibitor (8-azaxanthin) are reported. Neutron Laue diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution using the LADI instrument from a crystal (grown in D{sub 2}O) with volume 1.8 mm{sup 3}. The aim of this neutron diffraction study is to determine the protonation states of the inhibitor and residues within the active site. This will lead to improved comprehension of the enzymatic mechanism of this important enzyme, which is used as a protein drug to reduce toxic uric acid accumulation during chemotherapy. This paper illustrates the high quality of the neutron diffraction data collected, which are suitable for high-resolution structural analysis. In comparison with other neutron protein crystallography studies to date in which a hydrogenated protein has been used, the volume of the crystal was relatively small and yet the data still extend to high resolution. Furthermore, urate oxidase has one of the largest primitive unit-cell volumes (space group I222, unit-cell parameters a = 80, b = 96, c = 106 Å) and molecular weights (135 kDa for the homotetramer) so far successfully studied with neutrons.

  6. Diffractive control of 3D multifilamentation in fused silica with micrometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Doñate-Buendía, Carlos; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Lancis, Jesús

    2016-07-11

    We show that a simple diffractive phase element (DPE) can be used to manipulate at will the positions and energy of multiple filaments generated in fused silica under femtosecond pulsed illumination. The method allows obtaining three-dimensional distributions of controlled filaments whose separations can be in the order of few micrometers. With such small distances we are able to study the mutual coherence among filaments from the resulted interference pattern, without needing a two-arm interferometer. The encoding of the DPE into a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) provides an extra degree of freedom to the optical set-up, giving more versatility for implementing different DPEs in real time. Our proposal might be particularly suited for applications at which an accurate manipulation of multiple filaments is required. PMID:27410807

  7. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  8. An evaluation of the clinical potential of tissue diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, R.; Abuchi, S.; Zheng, Y.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A.; Griffiths, J.

    2015-09-01

    Medical imaging is a long established part of patient management in the treatment of disease. However, in most cases it only provides anatomical detail and does not provide any form of tissue characterisation. This is particularly true for X-ray imaging. Recent studies on tissue diffraction have shown that true molecular signatures can be derived for different tissue types. Breast cancer samples and liver tissue have been studied. It has been shown that diffraction profiles can be traced away from the primary tumour in excised breast tissue samples and that potentially 3mm fat nodules in liver tissue can be identified in patients at acceptable doses.

  9. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  10. Neutron diffraction study of the deuterides of Ti Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Yuan, Xuezhong; Wu, Erdong; Chen, Dongfeng; Gou, Cheng

    2006-11-01

    The structures of the deuterides of seven Ti-Mo alloys with different Mo contents ranging from 5 to 40 at% are studied by neutron diffraction. After deuterization at ∼150 kPa, the saturated deuterides containing ∼1.8-1.9 deuterium per alloy atom with a δ-phase titanium hydride type of structure have formed. The lattice constants of the deuterides decrease consistently with the increase of Mo content. The analysis of the line broadening of the diffraction patterns has revealed the relationship between lattice deformation and the contents of the alloying Mo in the deuterides.

  11. Structural anomalies in undoped gallium arsenide observed in high-resolution diffraction imaging with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Kuriyama, M.; Dobbyn, R. C.; Laor, U.; Larson, D.

    1989-01-01

    Novel, streak-like disruption features restricted to the plane of diffraction have recently been observed in images obtained by synchrotron radiation diffraction from undoped, semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals. These features were identified as ensembles of very thin platelets or interfaces lying in (110) planes, and a structural model consisting of antiphase domain boundaries was proposed. We report here the other principal features observed in high resolution monochromatic synchrotron radiation diffraction images: (quasi) cellular structure; linear, very low-angle subgrain boundaries in (110) directions, and surface stripes in a (110) direction. In addition, we report systematic differences in the acceptance angle for images involving various diffraction vectors. When these observations are considered together, a unifying picture emerges. The presence of ensembles of thin (110) antiphase platelet regions or boundaries is generally consistent not only with the streak-like diffraction features but with the other features reported here as well. For the formation of such regions we propose two mechanisms, operating in parallel, that appear to be consistent with the various defect features observed by a variety of techniques.

  12. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  13. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xian-Hai; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  14. Beamline P02.1 at PETRA III for high-resolution and high-energy powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Dippel, Ann-Christin; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Delitz, Jan Torben; Walter, Peter; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Seeck, Oliver H.; Franz, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction techniques largely benefit from the superior beam quality provided by high-brilliance synchrotron light sources in terms of photon flux and angular resolution. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beamline P02.1 at the storage ring PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) combines these strengths with the power of high-energy X-rays for materials research. The beamline is operated at a fixed photon energy of 60 keV (0.207 Å wavelength). A high-resolution monochromator generates the highly collimated X-ray beam of narrow energy bandwidth. Classic crystal structure determination in reciprocal space at standard and non-ambient conditions are an essential part of the scientific scope as well as total scattering analysis using the real space information of the pair distribution function. Both methods are complemented by in situ capabilities with time-resolution in the sub-second regime owing to the high beam intensity and the advanced detector technology for high-energy X-rays. P02.1’s efficiency in solving chemical and crystallographic problems is illustrated by presenting key experiments that were carried out within these fields during the early stage of beamline operation. PMID:25931084

  15. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  16. Ultra-high resolution zone-doubled diffractive X-ray optics for the multi-keV regime.

    PubMed

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Gorelick, Sergey; Färm, Elina; Kewish, Cameron M; Diaz, Ana; Barrett, Ray; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Ritala, Mikko; David, Christian

    2011-01-01

    X-ray microscopy based on Fresnel zone plates is a powerful technique for sub-100 nm resolution imaging of biological and inorganic materials. Here, we report on the modeling, fabrication and characterization of zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates for the multi-keV regime (4-12 keV). We demonstrate unprecedented spatial resolution by resolving 15 nm lines and spaces in scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and focusing diffraction efficiencies of 7.5% at 6.2 keV photon energy. These developments represent a significant step towards 10 nm spatial resolution for hard X-ray energies of up to 12 keV. PMID:21263555

  17. Expression, Purification and Preliminary Diffraction Studies of CmlS

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, R.; Podzelinska, K; Soares, A; Bhattacharya, A; Vining, L; Jia, Z; Zechel, D

    2009-01-01

    CmlS, a flavin-dependent halogenase (FDH) present in the chloramphenicol-biosynthetic pathway in Streptomyces venezuelae, directs the dichlorination of an acetyl group. The reaction mechanism of CmlS is of considerable interest as it will help to explain how the FDH family can halogenate a wide range of substrates through a common mechanism. The protein has been recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method was used to produce crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction. Data were collected to 2.0 Angstroms resolution. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters

  18. High resolution synchrotron X-radiation diffraction imaging of crystals grown in microgravity and closely related terrestrial crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Fripp, Archibald; Simchik, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Irregularities in three crystals grown in space and in four terrestrial crystals grown under otherwise comparable conditions have been observed in high resolution diffraction imaging. The images provide important new clues to the nature and origins of irregularities in each crystal. For two of the materials, mercuric iodide and lead tin telluride, more than one phase (an array of non-diffracting inclusions) was observed in terrestrial samples; but the formation of these multiple phases appears to have been suppressed in directly comparable crystals grown in microgravity. The terrestrial seed crystal of triglycine sulfate displayed an unexpected layered structure, which propagated during directly comparable space growth. Terrestrial Bridgman regrowth of gallium arsenide revealed a mesoscopic structure substantially different from that of the original Czochralski material. A directly comparable crystal is to be grown shortly in space.

  19. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, I. M.; Urban, Volker S; Gardner, K. H.; Forsyth, V. T.

    2005-04-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar{reg_sign} or Twaron{reg_sign}.

  20. High real-space resolution structure of materials by high-energy x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Petkov, V.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Heising, J.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Shastri, S.; Kycia, S.

    1999-12-10

    Results of high-energy synchrotrons radiation experiments are presented demonstrating the advantages of the atomic Pair Distribution Function technique in determining the structure of materials with high resolution.

  1. A 3-D numerical study of pinhole diffraction to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A. |; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J. |

    1995-12-01

    A 3-D electromagnetic field simulation is used to model the propagation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), 13-nm, light through sub-1500 {Angstrom} dia pinholes in a highly absorptive medium. Deviations of the diffracted wavefront phase from an ideal sphere are studied within 0.1 numerical aperture, to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometersused in at-wavelength testing of nearly diffraction-limited EUV optical systems. Aberration magnitudes are studied for various 3-D pinhole models, including cylindrical and conical pinhole bores.

  2. Neutron diffraction studies on rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Bau, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction data up to a resolution of 1.5 A have been collected at room temperature on two forms of rubredoxin using the BIX-3 diffractometer at the JRR-3 reactor of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Rubredoxin is a small iron-sulfur redox protein with 53 amino acid residues, and the source of this particular protein is the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a microorganism that normally lives at temperatures near that of boiling water. Data were collected on crystals of the wild-type protein and on a mutant in which three of the residues have been replaced. In this paper we will be describing several sets of results arising from these high-resolution neutron structure determinations: (a) the H/D exchange pattern of the N-H bonds of the main backbone, which give information about which regions of the molecule are more exposed to solvent; (b) the orientations of some of the O-D bonds in the protein, information which is often not obtainable from X-ray results; (c) the structure and appearance of water molecules in the protein crystals; and (d) some structural features which may help rationalize the remarkable thermal stability of the wild-type protein from this intriguing microorganism PMID:14646139

  3. X-ray diffraction studies of shocked lunar analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanss, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction experiments on shocked rock and mineral analogs of particular significance to lunar geology are described. Materials naturally shocked by meteorite impact, nuclear-shocked, or artificially shocked in a flat plate accelerator were utilized. Four areas were outlined for investigation: powder diffractometer studies of shocked single crystal silicate minerals (quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, pyroxene), powder diffractometer studies of shocked polycrystalline monomineralic samples (dunite), Debye-Scherrer studies of single grains of shocked granodiorite, and powder diffractometer studies of shocked whole rock samples. Quantitative interpretation of peak shock pressures experienced by materials found in lunar or terrestrial impact structures is presented.

  4. Axial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of a sheet illumination microscope with stimulated emission depletion.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Mike; Harms, Gregory S

    2015-10-01

    Planar illumination imaging allows for illumination of the focal plane orthogonal to the imaging axis in various light forms and is advantageous for high optical sectioning, high imaging speed, low light exposure, and inherently deeper imaging penetration into small organisms and tissue sections. The drawback of the technique is the low inherent resolution, which can be overcome by the incorporation of a dual-sheet stimulated emission depletion (STED) beam to the planar illumination excitation. Our initiative is the implementation of STED into the planar illumination microscope for enhanced resolution. We demonstrate some of our implementations. The depletion of STED in the microscope follows an inverse square root saturation for up to 2.5-fold axial resolution improvements with both high and low numerical aperture imaging objectives. PMID:26469565

  5. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction study on diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Marc-Michael; Koglin, Alexander; Rüterjans, Heinz; Schoenborn, Benno; Langan, Paul; Chen, Julian C.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) effectively hydrolyzes a number of organophosphorus nerve agents, including sarin, cyclohexylsarin, soman and tabun. Neutron diffraction data have been collected from DFPase crystals to 2.2 Å resolution in an effort to gain further insight into the mechanism of this enzyme. The enzyme diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris is capable of decontaminating a wide variety of toxic organophosphorus nerve agents. DFPase is structurally related to a number of enzymes, such as the medically important paraoxonase (PON). In order to investigate the reaction mechanism of this phosphotriesterase and to elucidate the protonation state of the active-site residues, large-sized crystals of DFPase have been prepared for neutron diffraction studies. Available H atoms have been exchanged through vapour diffusion against D{sub 2}O-containing mother liquor in the capillary. A neutron data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution on a relatively small (0.43 mm{sup 3}) crystal at the spallation source in Los Alamos. The sample size and asymmetric unit requirements for the feasibility of neutron diffraction studies are summarized.

  6. Structural Study of PMN-xPT by Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, D.; Gehring, P. M.; Huang, Q.; Ye, Z.-G.; Stock, C.; Xu, G.; Wen, J.

    2009-03-01

    Stark differences between x-ray and neutron measurements of the structures of ferroelectric-relaxors PMN-xPT ((1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3+xPbTiO3) and PZN-xPT (Z=Zn) have been reported [1]. One explanation for these differences is that these crystals have strained surface layers on the order of several tens of μm thick, the crystal structure of which differs from that of the crystal bulk. This phenomenon has been coined the ``anomalous skin effect'' but has been recently challenged [2] and thus remains controversial. We reinvestigated the skin effect in PMN-xPT by considering the possibility that the oxygen stoichiometry might play a role. Two sets of powders (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4) were grown, one with and one without oxygen annealing, and high resolution neutron powder diffraction measurements were carried out for both sets. For a given x, both sets of powders have the same structural phase, suggesting that the effects of oxygen annealing are minimal. For x=0.1 and x=0.2 both sets of powders are rhombohedral, which contrasts with the single crystal neutron diffraction measurements. This supports a skin effect in that the grain size of the powders is small enough that the Bragg peaks are dominated by the strained surface layer. References [1] G. Xu et al., Phase Transitions 79, 135 (2006) [2] E. H. Kisi and J.S. Forrester, J. Phys.:Condens. Matter 17, L381 (2005)

  7. Research of the new optical diffractive super-resolution element of the two-photon microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Guanghong

    2006-11-01

    The new optical diffractive superresolution element (DSE) is being applied to improve the microfabrication radial superresolution in the two-photon three-dimension (3D) microfabrication system, which appeared only a few years ago and can provide the ability to confine photochemical and physical reactions to the order of laser wavelength in three dimensions. The design method of the DSE is that minimizing M if the lowest limit S l of the S and the highest limit G u of the G is set, where Liu [1] explained the definition of the S, M and G. Simulation test result proved that the microfabrication radial superresolution can be improved by the new optical DSE. The phenomenon can only be interpreted as the intensity of high-order and side of the zero-order diffraction peaks have been clapped under the twophoton absorption (TPA) polymerization threshold. In a word the polymerized volume can be chosen because the S l and the G u is correspondingly adjustable, even if the laser wavelength, objective lens and the photosensitive resin is fixed for a given two-photon microfabrication system. That means the radial superresolution of the two-photon microfabrication can be chosen.

  8. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentrup, Martin; Hatui, Nirupam; Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Kneissl, Michael

    2013-12-01

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances dhkl is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112¯2) AlκGa1-κN epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  9. High resolution double-sided diffractive optics for hard X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Karvinen, Petri; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Müller, Elisabeth; Färm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko; Kewish, Cameron M; Somogyi, Andrea; David, Christian

    2015-01-26

    The fabrication of high aspect ratio metallic nanostructures is crucial for the production of efficient diffractive X-ray optics in the hard X-ray range. We present a novel method to increase their structure height via the double-sided patterning of the support membrane. In transmission, the two Fresnel zone plates on the two sides of the substrate will act as a single zone plate with added structure height. The presented double-sided zone plates with 30 nm smallest zone width offer up to 9.9% focusing efficiency at 9 keV, that results in a factor of two improvement over their previously demonstrated single-sided counterparts. The increase in efficiency paves the way to speed up X-ray microscopy measurements and allows the more efficient utilization of the flux in full-field X-ray microscopy. PMID:25835837

  10. Coherent microscopy at resolution beyond diffraction limit using post-experimental data extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana Fink, Hans-Werner

    2013-11-11

    Conventional microscopic records represent intensity distributions whereby local sample information is mapped onto local information at the detector. In coherent microscopy, the superposition principle of waves holds; field amplitudes are added, not intensities. This non-local representation is spread out in space and interference information combined with wave continuity allows extrapolation beyond the actual detected data. Established resolution criteria are thus circumvented and hidden object details can retrospectively be recovered from just a fraction of an interference pattern.

  11. An electron diffraction study of alkali chloride vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Fink, M.; Hartley, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A study of monomers and dimers of the four alkali chlorides NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl in the vapor phase using the counting method of high energy electron diffraction is reported. Nozzle temperatures from 850-960 K were required to achieve the necessary vapor pressures of approximately 0.01 torr. Using harmonic calculations for the monomer and dimer 1 values, a consistent set of structures for all four molecules was obained. The corrected monomer distances reproduce the microwave values very well. The experiment yields information on the amount of dimer present in the vapor, and these results are compared with thermodynamic values.

  12. Diffractive telescope for protoplanetary disks study in UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, W.; Koechlin, L.

    2015-12-01

    The direct observation of exoplanetary systems and their environment remains a technological challenge: on the one hand, because of the weak luminosity of objects surrounding the central star, and on the other hand, because of their small size compared to the distance from Earth. The fresnel imager is a concept of space telescope based on focusing by diffraction, developed by our team in Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (IRAP). Its high photometric dynamics and its low angular resolution make it a competitive candidate. Currently we propose a space mission on board the International Space Station (ISS), observing in the ultraviolet band, in order to validate its capabilities in space and so increase the Technological Readiness Level (TRL), anticipating a larger mission in the future. To reach this goal, we have to provide some evolutions, like improving the design of Fresnel arrays or conceive a new chromatism corrector. This paper presents the evolutions for the ISS prototype and its possible applications like protoplanetary disks imaging.

  13. A Seeman-Bohlin geometry for high-resolution nanosecond x-ray diffraction measurements from shocked polycrystalline and amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milathianaki, D.; Hawreliak, J.; McNaney, J. M.; El-Dasher, B. S.; Saculla, M. D.; Swift, D. C.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-09-01

    We report on a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry capable of high-resolution in situ lattice probing from dynamically loaded polycrystalline and amorphous materials. The Seeman-Bohlin-type camera presented here is ideally suited for time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements performed on high energy multibeam laser platforms. Diffraction from several lattice planes of ablatively shock-loaded 25 μm thick Cu foils was recorded on a focusing circle of diameter D =100 mm with exceptional angular resolution limited only by the spectral broadening of the x-ray source. Excellent agreement was found between the density measured using x-ray diffraction and that inferred from Doppler velocimetry and the known shock Hugoniot of Cu. In addition, x-ray diffraction signal was captured from an amorphous material under static conditions.

  14. A Seeman-Bohlin geometry for high-resolution nanosecond x-ray diffraction measurements from shocked polycrystalline and amorphous materials.

    PubMed

    Milathianaki, D; Hawreliak, J; McNaney, J M; El-Dasher, B S; Saculla, M D; Swift, D C; Lorenzana, H E; Ditmire, T

    2009-09-01

    We report on a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry capable of high-resolution in situ lattice probing from dynamically loaded polycrystalline and amorphous materials. The Seeman-Bohlin-type camera presented here is ideally suited for time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements performed on high energy multibeam laser platforms. Diffraction from several lattice planes of ablatively shock-loaded 25 mum thick Cu foils was recorded on a focusing circle of diameter D=100 mm with exceptional angular resolution limited only by the spectral broadening of the x-ray source. Excellent agreement was found between the density measured using x-ray diffraction and that inferred from Doppler velocimetry and the known shock Hugoniot of Cu. In addition, x-ray diffraction signal was captured from an amorphous material under static conditions. PMID:19791950

  15. A Seeman-Bohlin geometry for high-resolution nanosecond x-ray diffraction measurements from shocked polycrystalline and amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Milathianaki, D.; Hawreliak, J.; McNaney, J. M.; El-Dasher, B. S.; Saculla, M. D.; Swift, D. C.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-09-15

    We report on a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry capable of high-resolution in situ lattice probing from dynamically loaded polycrystalline and amorphous materials. The Seeman-Bohlin-type camera presented here is ideally suited for time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements performed on high energy multibeam laser platforms. Diffraction from several lattice planes of ablatively shock-loaded 25 {mu}m thick Cu foils was recorded on a focusing circle of diameter D=100 mm with exceptional angular resolution limited only by the spectral broadening of the x-ray source. Excellent agreement was found between the density measured using x-ray diffraction and that inferred from Doppler velocimetry and the known shock Hugoniot of Cu. In addition, x-ray diffraction signal was captured from an amorphous material under static conditions.

  16. High-temperature powder synchrotron diffraction studies of synthetic cryolite Na 3AlF 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qingdi; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2004-03-01

    A high-resolution synchrotron diffraction study of the structures of a synthetic sample of cryolite Na 3AlF 6 from room temperature to 800°C is reported. At room temperature Na 3AlF 6 is monoclinic and the structure is described in space group P2 1/n. Heating the sample to 560°C results in only minor changes to the structure. A first-order transition from this monoclinic structure to a high-temperature cubic structure is observed near 567°C. The cubic Fm 3¯m structure is characterized by disorder of the fluoride atoms.

  17. Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ricolleau, C. Alloyeau, D.; Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O.

    2013-12-07

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

  18. Probing of protein localization and shuttling in mitochondrial microcompartments by FLIM with sub-diffraction resolution.

    PubMed

    Söhnel, Anna-Carina; Kohl, Wladislaw; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Rieger, Bettina; Busch, Karin B

    2016-08-01

    The cell is metabolically highly compartmentalized. Especially, mitochondria host many vital reactions in their different microcompartments. However, due to their small size, these microcompartments are not accessible by conventional microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM) classifies not only mitochondria, but different microcompartments inside mitochondria. Sensor proteins in the matrix had a different lifetime than probes at membrane proteins. Localization in the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane could be distinguished by significant differences in the lifetime. The method was sensitive enough to monitor shifts in protein location within mitochondrial microcompartments. Macromolecular crowding induced by changes in the protein content significantly affected the lifetime, while oxidizing conditions or physiological pH changes had only marginal effects. We suggest that FLIM is a versatile and completive method to monitor spatiotemporal events in mitochondria. The sensitivity in the time domain allows for gaining substantial information about sub-mitochondrial localization overcoming diffraction limitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27016377

  19. Ab initio simulation of diffractometer instrumental function for high-resolution X-ray diffraction1

    PubMed Central

    Mikhalychev, Alexander; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Ulyanenkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of the X-ray diffractometer instrumental function for a given optics configuration is important both for planning experiments and for the analysis of measured data. A fast and universal method for instrumental function simulation, suitable for fully automated computer realization and describing both coplanar and noncoplanar measurement geometries for any combination of X-ray optical elements, is proposed. The method can be identified as semi-analytical backward ray tracing and is based on the calculation of a detected signal as an integral of X-ray intensities for all the rays reaching the detector. The high speed of calculation is provided by the expressions for analytical integration over the spatial coordinates that describe the detection point. Consideration of the three-dimensional propagation of rays without restriction to the diffraction plane provides the applicability of the method for noncoplanar geometry and the accuracy for characterization of the signal from a two-dimensional detector. The correctness of the simulation algorithm is checked in the following two ways: by verifying the consistency of the calculated data with the patterns expected for certain simple limiting cases and by comparing measured reciprocal-space maps with the corresponding maps simulated by the proposed method for the same diffractometer configurations. Both kinds of tests demonstrate the agreement of the simulated instrumental function shape with the measured data. PMID:26089760

  20. Synchrotron powder diffraction simplified: The high-resolution diffractometer at 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaud, Lynn; Suchomel, Matthew; von Dreele, Robert; Toby, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotrons have revolutionized powder diffraction through higher resolution and sensitivity and much faster data collection. Few scientists beyond the synchrotron community make use of these capabilities. To help address this, the high resolution powder diffractometer beamline 11-BM at the APS offers rapid and easy mail-in access with world-class quality data 1. This instrument offers the highest resolution available in the Americas and is a free service for non-proprietary users 2. The instrument can collect a superb pattern in an hour, has an automated sample changer, and features variable temperature sample environments. Users of the mail-in program often receive their data within two weeks of sample receipt. The instrument is also available for on-site experiments requiring other conditions. Our poster will describe this instrument, highlight its capabilities, explain the types of measurements available, and discuss plans to improve access and available sample environments and collection protocols. More information about the 11-BM instrument and our mail-in program can be found at: http://11bm.xray.aps.anl.gov.

  1. High Resolution X-ray Diffraction Characterization of III-Nitride Semiconductors: Bulk Crystals and Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobea, Milena Rebeca

    As III-nitrides continue to evolve into a homoepitaxial growth scenario, the development of non-traditional metrologies for the proper study of III-nitride single crystals and homoepitaxial thin films becomes critical. To this purpose, the work presented in this dissertation has focused on the development and application of suitable high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) methods, desirable for their sensitivity, accuracy and non-destructive nature. HRXRD techniques were explored and developed for the identification of polishing-induced damage in processed III-nitride single crystals, the structural analysis of non-polar AlN homoepitaxial films grown on AlN single crystals and the assessment of alloy film characteristics of AlxGa1-xN epilayers deposited on AlN substrates. AlN and GaN substrates were treated to various degrees of mechanical polishing and chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Gross damage created from aggressive polishing was readily quantified using X-ray rocking curve (XRC) peak broadening and diffuse scatter intensity. However, once the wafers were exposed to CMP treatment, it was found that the use of line scanning methods was unable to distinguish the effects of CMP time exposure on the crystal surface. Alternatively, the analysis of surface-related diffraction features recorded from on- and off-axis high-resolution reciprocal space maps (RSMs) allowed the classification of remnant damage in CMP-treated substrates as a function of CMP exposure time. By comparing the crystal truncation rod intensity and the pole diffuse scatter magnitude, differences at the near-surface regions of CMP-processed wafers were qualitatively and quantitatively measured. For AlN, the mapping of the (101¯3) reflection, observable under grazing incidence conditions, was introduced as an effective HRXRD method to analyze the crystal surface of AlN substrates using a laboratory source. HRXRD methods were employed on high-quality non-polar homoepitaxial AlN films grown on

  2. Apparatus and method to achieve high-resolution microscopy with non-diffracting or refracting radiation

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Bingham, Philip R.; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2012-11-06

    An imaging system employing a coded aperture mask having multiple pinholes is provided. The coded aperture mask is placed at a radiation source to pass the radiation through. The radiation impinges on, and passes through an object, which alters the radiation by absorption and/or scattering. Upon passing through the object, the radiation is detected at a detector plane to form an encoded image, which includes information on the absorption and/or scattering caused by the material and structural attributes of the object. The encoded image is decoded to provide a reconstructed image of the object. Because the coded aperture mask includes multiple pinholes, the radiation intensity is greater than a comparable system employing a single pinhole, thereby enabling a higher resolution. Further, the decoding of the encoded image can be performed to generate multiple images of the object at different distances from the detector plane. Methods and programs for operating the imaging system are also disclosed.

  3. X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.M.; Knupp, C.; Roessle, M.; Al-Khayat, H.A.; Irving, T.C.; Eakins, F.; Mok, N.-S.; Harford, J.J.; Reedy, M.K.

    2006-04-24

    In this short review a number of recent X-ray diffraction results on the highly ordered striated muscles in insects and in bony fish have been briefly described. What is clear is that this technique applied to muscles which are amenable to rigorous analysis, taken together with related data from other sources (e.g. protein crystallography, biochemistry, mechanics, computer modelling) can provide not only the best descriptions yet available on the myosin head organisations on different myosin filaments in the relaxed state, but can also show the sequence of molecular events that occurs in the contractile cycle, and may also help to explain such phenomena as stretch-activation. X-ray diffraction is clearly an enormously powerful tool in studies of muscle. It has already provided a wealth of detail on muscle ultrastructure; it is providing ever more fascinating insights into molecular events in the 50-year old sliding filament mechanism, and there remains a great deal more potential that is as yet untapped.

  4. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Irons

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool that can be used to identify the phases present and to measure the spacing of the atomic planes in a material. Thus, the residual stresses can be determined within a component and/or the phases present. New intercritically austempered irons rely on the unique properties of the austenite phase present in their microstructures. If these materials are to see widespread use, methods to verify the quality (behavior consistency) of these materials and to provide guidance for further optimization will be needed. Neutron diffraction studies were performed at the second generation neutron residual stress facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a variety of intercritically austempered irons. For similar materials, such as TRIP steels, the strengthening mechanism involves the transformation of metastable austenite to martensite during deformation. For the intercritically austempered ductile irons two different deformation/strengthening mechanisms, phase transformation and slip, dependent upon the iron chemistry, were observed. Lattice strain and phase fraction data as a function of applied stress are presented.

  5. Super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using photonic nanojets: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Wen, Zhuo-Bin; Wu, Zhe; Pramanik, Manojit

    2014-11-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is important for various biomedical applications, such as the study of cellular structures, microcirculation systems, and tumor angiogenesis. However, the lateral resolution of a conventional ORPAM is limited by optical diffraction. In this work, we report a simulation study to achieve subdiffraction-limited super-resolution in ORPAM using microspheres. Laser radiation is focused through a microsphere to generate a photonic nanojet, which provides the possibility to break the diffraction limit in ORPAM by reducing the size of the excitation volume. In our simulations using microspheres, we observed improvement in the lateral resolution up to ˜fourfold compared to conventional ORPAM. The method is simple, cost effective, and can provide far-field resolution. This approach may provide new opportunities for many biomedical imaging applications that require finer resolution.

  6. Sub-diffraction-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals a domain of the centrosome critical for pericentriolar material organization

    PubMed Central

    Mennella, V.; Keszthelyi, B.; McDonald, K.L.; Chhun, B.; Kan, F.; Rogers, G.C.; Huang, B; Agard, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    As the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells, the centrosome has a fundamental role in cell function. Surrounding the centrioles, the Pericentriolar material (PCM) provides a dynamic platform for nucleating microtubules. While the PCM’s importance is established, its amorphous electron-dense nature has made it refractory to structural investigation. By using SIM and STORM sub-diffraction resolution microscopies to visualize proteins critical for centrosome maturation, we demonstrate that the PCM is organized into two major structural domains: a layer juxtaposed to the centriole wall, and proteins extending further away from the centriole organized in a matrix. Analysis of Pericentrin-like protein (Plp) reveals that its C-terminus is positioned at the centriole wall, it radiates outward into the matrix and is organized in clusters having quasi-nine-fold symmetry. By RNAi we show that Plp fibrils are required for interphase recruitment and proper mitotic assembly of the PCM matrix. PMID:23086239

  7. Strain mapping for the semiconductor industry by dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction with nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, David; Béché, Armand; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Carron, Veronique; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2010-09-01

    There is a requirement of the semiconductor industry to measure strain in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. Here we show that dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED) are both complementary techniques that can be used to determine the strain in these devices. We show two-dimensional strain maps acquired by dark holography and line profiles that have been acquired by NBED of recessed SiGe sources and drains with a variety of different gate lengths and Ge concentrations. We have also used dark-field electron holography to measure the evolution in strain during the silicidation process, showing that this can reduce the applied uniaxial compressive strain in the conduction channel by up to a factor of 3.

  8. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Studies for Materials Sciences and Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Los Alamos High Pressure Materials Research Team

    2013-05-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials sciences, as well as earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at LANSCE to conduct in situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments. We have worked out a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high-P and low-T. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. Recently, we have developed high-P low-T gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments. These techniques enable in-situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow high-resolution time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equation of state, structural phase transition, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, and hydrogen adsorption of the inclusion compounds such as the recently discovered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map phase diagram, lattice parameters, thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. We are currently developing further high P-T technology with a new "true" triaxial loading press, TAP_6x, to compress cubic sample package to achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in routine experiments. The implementation of TAP_6x300 with high-pressure neutron beamlines is underway for simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based on high

  9. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their

  10. Electron diffraction studies on CVD grown bi-layered graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Kiran; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Quin, Haijun; Rao, Apparao; Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC USA 29634. Team; Advanced Materials Research Laboratories, Clemson University, Anderson, SC USA 29625 Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has generated enormous interest in the scientific community due to its peculiar properties like electron mobility, thermal conductivity etc. Several recent reports on exfoliated graphene emphasized the role of layer stacking on the electronic and optical properties of graphene in case of bi-layered and few layered graphene and several synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Copper foils are employed to prepare graphene for applications at a large scale. However, a correlated study pertinent to the stacking order in CVD grown graphene is still unclear. In this work, using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction analysis we analyzed the preferred misorientation angles in a CVD grown bi-layered graphene and also the role of Cu crystal facets on the graphene stacking order will be presented.

  11. Neutron diffraction studies of liquid iso-propanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterström, P.; Dahlborg, U.; Delaplane, R. G.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of deuterated liquid iso-propanol has been studied with neutron diffraction at the LAD diffractometer at the ISIS spallation source. Measurements were performed at temperatures 190, 220, 250 and 275 K. To correct for inelastic effects a model for the dynamic structure factor which obeys detailed balance and included recoil effects was used. The static molecular structure factor SM(Q) exhibits a pre-peak at about 0.75 Å-1. The origin of the pre-peak, which increases in amplitude with temperature, is presently unknown. The structure of the iso-propanol molecule was obtained from the total pair distribution function and from a fit of the intramolecular form factor f1(Q) to the measured SM(Q) at large Q. The obtained values of the bond length and Debye-Waller factors are in good agreement to those obtained from lower alcohols.

  12. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction study of human deoxyhemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, A. Y.; Chatake, T.; Shibayama, N.; Park, S.-Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Mustyakimov, M.; Fisher, S. Z.; Langan, P.; Morimoto, Y.

    2008-04-01

    In order to investigate the role of the protonation states of protein residues in O{sub 2} binding, large crystals of deoxy HbA (∼20 mm{sup 3}) were grown in D{sub 2}O under anaerobic conditions for neutron diffraction studies. Human hemoglobin (HbA) is an intricate system that has evolved to efficiently transport oxygen molecules (O{sub 2}) from lung to tissue. Its quaternary structure can fluctuate between two conformations, T (tense or deoxy) and R (relaxed or oxy), which have low and high affinity for O{sub 2}, respectively. The binding of O{sub 2} to the heme sites of HbA is regulated by protons and by inorganic anions. In order to investigate the role of the protonation states of protein residues in O{sub 2} binding, large crystals of deoxy HbA (∼20 mm{sup 3}) were grown in D{sub 2}O under anaerobic conditions for neutron diffraction studies. A time-of-flight neutron data set was collected to 1.8 Å resolution on the Protein Crystallography Station (PCS) at the spallation source run by Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The HbA tetramer (64.6 kDa; 574 residues excluding the four heme groups) occupies the largest asymmetric unit (space group P2{sub 1}) from which a high-resolution neutron data set has been collected to date.

  13. SPARTAN high resolution solar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on Contract NAS5-29739, a sub-orbital research program directed toward the study of the geometry of and physical conditions in matter found in the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. The report describes a new sounding rocket payload developed under the contract, presents a guide to the contents of semiannual reports submitted during the contract, discusses the results of the first flight of the payload and the progress on scientific analysis. A bibliography of papers and publications is included.

  14. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction study of bovine [gamma]-chymotrypsin at the Protein Crystallography Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lazar, Louis M.; Fisher, S. Zoe; Moulin, Aaron G.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Novak, Walter R.P.; Langan, Paul; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2012-02-06

    The overarching goal of this research project is to determine, for a subset of proteins, exact hydrogen positions using neutron diffraction, thereby improving H-atom placement in proteins so that they may be better used in various computational methods that are critically dependent upon said placement. In order to be considered applicable for neutron diffraction studies, the protein of choice must be amenable to ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystallography, be able to form large crystals (1 mm{sup 3} or greater) and have a modestly sized unit cell (no dimension longer than 100 {angstrom}). As such, {gamma}-chymotrypsin is a perfect candidate for neutron diffraction. To understand and probe the role of specific active-site residues and hydrogen-bonding patterns in {gamma}-chymotrypsin, neutron diffraction studies were initiated at the Protein Crystallography Station (PCS) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). A large single crystal was subjected to H/D exchange prior to data collection. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction data were collected to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution at the PCS with 85% completeness. Here, the first time-of-flight neutron data collection from {gamma}-chymotrypsin is reported.

  15. Multiple powder diffraction data for an accurate charge density study using synchrotron radiation x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    In recent years multiple synchrotron radiation (SR) powder x-ray diffraction profiles have been successfully applied to advanced structural studies such as an accurate charge density study and a structure determination from powder diffraction. The results have been presented with several examples. Abilities and future prospects have been discussed using state of the art powder diffraction data.

  16. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  17. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of the Protaminobacter rubrum sucrose isomerase SmuA

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaud, Stéphanie; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2006-01-01

    The P. rubrum sucrose isomerase SmuA, a key enzyme in the industrial production of isomaltulose, was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 1.95 Å resolution. Palatinose (isomaltulose, α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,6-d-fructofuranose), a nutritional and acariogenic reducing sugar, is industrially obtained from sucrose by using immobilized cells of Protaminobacter rubrum that produce the sucrose isomerase SmuA. The isomerization of sucrose catalyzed by this enzyme also results in the formation of trehalulose (α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,1-d-fructofuranose) in smaller amounts and glucose, fructose and eventually isomaltose as by-products, which lower the yield of the reaction and complicate the recovery of palatinose. The determination of the three-dimensional structure of SmuA will provide a basis for rational protein-engineering studies in order to optimize the industrial production of palatinose. A recombinant form of the 67.3 kDa SmuA enzyme has been crystallized in the native state by the vapour-diffusion method. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.6, b = 81.4, c = 135.6 Å, and diffract to 1.95 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source.

  18. Characterization of an Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal using X-ray topography, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszkowicz, W.; Romanowski, P.; Bąk-Misiuk, J.; Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Graeff, W.; Iwanowski, R. J.; Heinonen, M. H.; Ermakova, O.; Dąbkowska, H.

    2011-10-01

    Knowledge on the defect and electronic structure allows for improved modeling of material properties. A short literature review has shown that the information on defect structure of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals is limited. In this paper, defect and electronic structure of a needle-shaped Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal grown by the slow cooling method have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction topography employing white synchrotron beam, high-resolution diffraction (HRD) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Topographic investigations show that the crystal is composed of two blocks disoriented by about 1.5° and separated by a narrow deformed region. Some contrasts observed within the crystal volume may be attributed to glide bands and sector boundaries. The contrasts appearing in the vicinity of the surface may be interpreted as due to the presence of small inclusions. The HRD study indicates, in particular, that among point defects, the vacancy type defects dominate and that the density of other defects is small in comparison. The XPS measurements enabled, despite highly insulating properties of the studied crystal, an analysis of its bulk electronic structure, including the main core-levels (O 1 s, V 2 p, Lu 4 f) as well as the valence band range.

  19. An X-ray diffraction study of titanium oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium specimens of commercial purity were exposed at 1100 to 1400 F to laboratory air for times up to 100 hours. The extent of substrate contamination by interstitial oxygen was was determined by a new X-ray diffraction analysis involving transformation of X-ray diffraction intensity bands. The oxygen solid-solubility at the oxide-metal interfaces and its variation with time at temperature were also determined. Diffusion coefficients are deduced from the oxygen depth profiles.

  20. X-ray diffraction study of lead chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsch, K.; Knížek, K.; Rodová, M.

    1994-08-01

    PbCl 2 was examined by X-ray diffraction in order to test information about polymorphism in this compound. X-ray diffraction patterns of PbCl 2 crystallized from the aqueous solution, as well as of PbCl 2 molten and quenched, are the same. Two modifications in PbCl 2 were not found and polymorphism was not confirmed.

  1. A Study of Detonation Propagation and Diffraction with Compliant Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J; Schwendeman, D; Kapila, A; Henshaw, W

    2007-08-13

    A previous computational study of diffracting detonations with the ignition-and-growth model demonstrated that contrary to experimental observations, the computed solution did not exhibit dead zones. For a rigidly confined explosive it was found that while diffraction past a sharp corner did lead to a temporary separation of the lead shock from the reaction zone, the detonation re-established itself in due course and no pockets of unreacted material were left behind. The present investigation continues to focus on the potential for detonation failure within the ignition-and-growth (IG) model, but now for a compliant confinement of the explosive. The aim of the present paper is two fold. First, in order to compute solutions of the governing equations for multi-material reactive flow, a numerical method of solution is developed and discussed. The method is a Godunov-type, fractional-step scheme which incorporates an energy correction to suppress numerical oscillations that would occur near the material interface separating the reactive material and the inert confiner for standard conservative schemes. The numerical method uses adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on overlapping grids, and the accuracy of solutions is well tested using a two-dimensional rate-stick problem for both strong and weak inert confinements. The second aim of the paper is to extend the previous computational study of the IG model by considering two related problems. In the first problem, the corner-turning configuration is re-examined, and it is shown that in the matter of detonation failure, the absence of rigid confinement does not affect the outcome in a material way; sustained dead zones continue to elude the model. In the second problem, detonations propagating down a compliantly confined pencil-shaped configuration are computed for a variety of cone angles of the tapered section. It is found, in accord with experimental observation, that if the cone angle is small enough, the detonation fails

  2. X-ray diffraction study of crystalline barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zali, Nurazila Mat; Mahmood, Che Seman; Mohamad, Siti Mariam; Foo, Choo Thye; Murshidi, Julie Adrianny

    2014-02-12

    In this study, BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics have been prepared via solid-state reaction method. The powders were calcined for 2 hours at different temperatures ranging from 600°C to 1200°C. Using X-ray diffraction with a Rietveld analysis, the phase formation and crystal structure of the BaTiO{sub 3} powders were studied. Change in crystallite size and tetragonality as a function of calcination temperature were also discussed. It has been found that the formation of pure perovskite phase of BaTiO{sub 3} began at calcination condition of 1000 °C for 2 hours. The crystal structure of BaTiO{sub 3} formed is in the tetragonal structure. The second phases of BaCO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} existed with calcination temperature below 1000 °C. Purity, crystallite size and tetragonality of BaTiO{sub 3} powders were found to increase with increasing calcination temperature.

  3. X-ray Diffraction Study of Molybdenum to 900 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Eggert, J.; Boehly, T.; Collins, G. W.; Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a transition metal that is important as a high-pressure standard. Its equation of state, structure, and melting behavior have been explored extensively in both experimental and theoretical studies. Melting data up to the Mbar pressure region from static compression experiments in the diamond anvil cell [Errandonea et al. 2004] are inconsistent with shock wave sound velocity measurements [Hixson et al., 1989]. There are also conflicting reports as to whether body-centered cubic (BCC) Mo transforms to a face-centered cubic (FCC), hexagonal close packed (HCP) or double hexagonal close packed (DHCP) structure at either high pressure or high pressure and temperature conditions [Belonoshko et al. 2008, Mikhaylushkin et al., 2008 and Cazorla et al., 2008]. Recently, a phase transition from BCC to the DHCP phase at 660 GPa and 0 K was predicted using the particle swam optimization (PSO) method (Wang et al, 2013). Here we report an x-ray diffraction study of dynamically compressed molybdenum. Experiments were conducted using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Mo targets were either ramp or shock compressed using a laser drive. In ramp loading, the sample is compressed sufficiently slowly that a shock wave does not form. This results in lower temperatures, keeping the sample in the solid state to higher pressures. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed using quasi-monochromatic x-rays from a highly ionized He-α Cu source and image plate detectors. Upon ramp compression, we found no evidence of phase transition in solid Mo up to 900 GPa. The observed peaks can be assigned to the (110) and (200) or (220) reflections of BCC Mo up to the highest pressure, indicating that Mo does not melt under ramp loading to maximum pressure reached. Under shock loading, we did not observe any evidence for the solid-solid phase transformation around 210 GPa as reported in previous work (Hixson et al, 1989). The BCC

  4. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  5. New Developments at the XMaS Beamline For Magnetic and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.B.J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.D.; Mannix, D.; Paul, D.F.; Lucas, C.; Kervin, J.; Cooper, M.J.; Arakawa, P.; Laughon, G.

    2004-05-12

    We report here on a number of developments that include enhancements of the sample environment on the XMaS beamline and the flux available at low energy. A 4 Tesla superconducting magnet has been designed to fit within the Euler cradle of a six circle Huber diffractometer, allowing scattering in both horizontal and vertical planes. The geometry of the magnet allows the application of longitudinal, transverse horizontal, and vertical fields. A further conventional magnet ({approx} 0.1 T) to minimize air absorption at low energies ({approx} 3KeV) has been designed for two circle applications, such as reflectivity. A novel in-vacuum slit screen has been developed, also minimizing absorption at low energies. New equipment for performing in-situ studies of surfaces in the electrochemical environment has been developed to allow control of the solution and sample temperature over the region of -5C to 80C. Preliminary experiments on the surface reconstructions of Au(111) in an electrolyte have been performed, whilst commissioning at the same time a MAR CCD detector for the beamline.

  6. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The irradiation behavior of high-density uranium silicides has been a matter of interest to the nuclear industry for use in high power or low enrichment applications. Transmission electron microscopy studies have found that heavy ion bombardment renders U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} amorphous at temperatures below about 250 C and that U{sub 3}Si becomes mechanically unstable suffering rapid growth by plastic flow. In this present work, crystallographic changes preceding amorphization by fission fragment damage have been studied by high-resolution neutron diffraction as a function of damage produced by uranium fission at room temperature. Initially, both silicides had tetragonal crystal structures. Crystallographic and amorphous phases were studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering analysis of the non-crystalline scattering component. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Powder Neutron Diffraction Study of HoCoGa5

    SciTech Connect

    Kabayashi, Riki; Kaneko, Koji; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Chi, Songxue; Sanada, Naoyuki; Watanuki, Ryuta; Suzuki, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    We have studied successive magnetic transitions of HoCoGa5 at TN1 = 9.6 K and TN2 = 7.5 K by using powder neutron diffraction. Apparent superlattice peaks were observed at temperatures below TN1. With further decreases temperature, the patterns exhibit a substantial change at temperatures below TN2. The observed magnetic peaks at 8 K (AntiFerromagnetic InCommensurate (AFIC) phase : TN2 < T < TN1) can be represented by the propagation vector qL = (1/2 0 ) with = 0.35(2). In contrast, the magnetic structure becomes commensurate with qC = (1/2 0 1/2) at 4 K (AntiFerromagnetic Commensurate (AFC) phase : T < TN2). The temperature dependence of magnetic intensity shows an apparent temperature hysteresis at TN2, indicates a first-order transition at TN2. Analysis of the integrated intensity at 4 K reveals that the Ho moment with a size of 8.6(2) B, oriented parallel to the c-axis in the AFC phase. While the successive transitions of HoCoGa5 are different from those of TbCoGa5, the magnetic structure in the AFC phase of HoCoGa5 is the same as the AFTb I of TbCoGa5, and may indicate an additional transition at a lower temperature in HoCoGa5.

  8. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni.

    PubMed

    Iles, Gail N; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials. PMID:25053313

  9. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, Gail N. Reinhart, Guillaume; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F. Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  10. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iles, Gail N.; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F.; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-01

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  11. Analytical study of diffraction effects in extremely large segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Yaitskova, Natalia; Dohlen, Kjetil; Dierickx, Philippe

    2003-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffraction effects from a segmented aperture with a very large number of segments-prototype of the next generation of extremely large telescopes. This analysis is based on the point-spread-function analytical calculation for Keck-type hexagonal segmentation geometry. We concentrate on the effects that lead to the appearance of speckles and/or a regular pattern of diffraction peaks. These effects are related to random piston and tip-tilt errors on each segment, gaps between segments, and segment edge distortion. We deliver formulas and the typical numerical values for the Strehl ratio, the relative intensity of higher-order diffraction peaks, and the averaged intensity of speckles associated with each particular case of segmentation error. PMID:12938912

  12. High pressure x-ray diffraction studies on nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-02-01

    Application of the in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2-30 nm in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (<30 nm) are discussed. It is shown that a unique value of the lattice parameter cannot be determined for such small crystals using a standard powder diffraction experiment. It is also shown that, due to the complex structure constituting a two-phase, core/surface shell system, no unique compressibility coefficient can satisfactorily describe the behaviour of nanocrystalline powders under pressure. We offer a tentative interpretation of the distribution of macro- and micro-strains in nanoparticles of different grain size.

  13. Feasibility studies for high pressure neutron powder diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Von Dreele, R.B. ); Parise, J. )

    1990-01-01

    We recently performed two neutron powder diffraction experiments on very small samples on the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer (HIPD). These were done to determine the feasibility of performing in situ high pressure/high temperature neutron diffraction experiments on HIPD at pressures which would exceed the previous limit of {approximately}50 kbar achievable in a neutron diffraction experiment. The first experiment consisted of examining the product from a high pressure preparation done at Stony Brook. The sample, which had been prepared at 65 kbar and 1000{degree}C, consisted of a small platinum capsule filled with CaGeO{sub 3} perovskite. The weights of the capsule included 225 mg of platinum and 49 mg of the germanate. A diffraction experiment taking {approximately}8.6 hrs at a LANSCE proton beam current of {approximately}53 {mu}A gave peaks of good intensity from both Pt and CaGeO{sub 3}; we could begin to see them after only 20 min of beam time. The second experiment was to test the possibility of diffraction from a high pressure apparatus. We placed in the HIPD sample position the central assembly from a 100 kbar octahedral press. Four tungsten carbide anvils and a copper block previously pressed to 65 kbar were held in an aluminum frame. The sample consisted of a small bit of nickel foil (175 mg) placed in a 3 mm hole in the copper block. The active sample volume is defined by the gap between the anvils and the length of the sample. A small portion of the copper block is also seen in this arrangement. This is viewed at 90{degree} 2{Theta} through a similar gap between the anvils by 4 1/2 in. {times} 12 in. {sup 3}He counter tubes. This arrangement simulates the operating conditions of a high pressure run at 100 kbar and takes advantage of the fixed instrument geometry possible in time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments.

  14. Investigations in space-related molecular biology. [cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.; Pritzker, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Improved instrumentation and preparation techniques for high resolution, high voltage cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens are reported. Computer correlated ultrastructural and biochemical work on hydrated and dried cell membranes and related biological systems provided information on membrane organization, ice crystal formation and ordered water, RNA virus linked to cancer, lunar rock samples, and organometallic superconducting compounds. Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 specimens were analyzed

  15. A new method to do time-resolved, x-ray diffraction studies: The rotating crystal Laue method

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.S.; Beno, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    In order to achieve the ultimate time resolution of a synchrotron source we propose a new experimental technique by which time-dependent structural changes can be monitored on the time scale of synchrotron pulse widths. Samples will be studied by a rotating crystal Laue diffraction technique where we rapidly spin the sample and observe the diffraction pattern from a broadband of incident x rays. A computer simulation is presented of the diffraction pattern time evolution using the parameters for an APS undulator of a phase change in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} superconductor. We will discuss the application of this and closely related techniques at other synchrotron sources including bending magnets and insertion devices at NSLS and CHESS.

  16. A new method to do time resolved, x-ray diffraction studies: The rotating crystal Laue method

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.S.; Beno, M.A.

    1991-07-01

    In order to achieve the ultimate time resolution of a synchrotron source we propose a new experimental technique by which time dependent structural changes can be monitored on the time scale of synchrotron pulse widths. Samples will be studied by a rotating crystal Laue diffraction technique where we rapidly spin the sample and observe the diffraction pattern from a broad band of incident x-rays. A computer simulation is presented of the diffraction pattern time evolution using the parameters for an APS undulator of a phase change in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} superconductor. We will discuss the application of this and closely related techniques at other synchrotron sources including bending magnets and insertion devices at NSLS and CHESS. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Diffraction study of duty-cycle error in ferroelectric quasi-phase-matching gratings with Gaussian beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Prashant Povel; Kumar, Challa Sesha Sai Pavan; Choi, Hee Joo; Cha, Myoungsik

    2016-02-01

    Random duty-cycle error (RDE) is inherent in the fabrication of ferroelectric quasi-phase-matching (QPM) gratings. Although a small RDE may not affect the nonlinearity of QPM devices, it enhances non-phase-matched parasitic harmonic generations, limiting the device performance in some applications. Recently, we demonstrated a simple method for measuring the RDE in QPM gratings by analyzing the far-field diffraction pattern obtained by uniform illumination (Dwivedi et al. in Opt Express 21:30221-30226, 2013). In the present study, we used a Gaussian beam illumination for the diffraction experiment to measure noise spectra that are less affected by the pedestals of the strong diffraction orders. Our results were compared with our calculations based on a random grating model, demonstrating improved resolution in the RDE estimation.

  18. Crystal structure of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3} from high-resolution neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Saxin, Stefan; Knee, Christopher S.

    2011-06-15

    Samples of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3}, with x=0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25, have been synthesised by solid state reaction. The crystal structures of the perovskite phases, characterised via Rietveld analysis of high resolution powder neutron diffraction data, reveal a structural transition from the R3c symmetry of the parent phase BiFeO{sub 3} to orthorhombic Pnma symmetry, which is complete for x=0.20. The x=0.10 and 0.15 samples are bi-phasic. The transition from a rhombohedral to orthorhombic unit cell is suggested to be driven by the dilution of the stereochemistry of the Bi{sup 3+} lone pair at the A-site. The G-type antiferromagnetic spin structure, the size of the ordered magnetic moment ({approx}3.8 {mu}{sub B}) and the T{sub N} ({approx}375 deg. C) are relatively insensitive to increasing Tb concentrations at the A-site. - Graphical abstract: High resolution neutron powder diffraction has been used to study the evolution of the RT crystal structure of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (0.05{<=}x{<=}0.25) with terbium content. A transition from polar R3c to centrosymmetric Pnma symmetry is observed. The antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and size of the ordered magnetic moment are relatively insensitive to the change of crystal structure. Highlights: > Structural transition from polar R3c symmetry to non-polar Pnma symmetry occurs. > Behaviour is rationalised via dilution of the stereochemical nature of the Bi lone pair. > Magnetic properties are largely unaffected.

  19. High-resolution CT by diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging: mapping of breast tissue samples and comparison with their histo-pathology.

    PubMed

    Bravin, Alberto; Keyriläinen, Jani; Fernández, Manuel; Fiedler, Stefan; Nemoz, Christian; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Leidenius, Marjut; von Smitten, Karl; Sipilä, Petri; Suortti, Pekka

    2007-04-21

    The aim of this study was to introduce high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of breast tumours using the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging (DEI) technique and to compare results with radiological and histo-pathological examinations. X-ray CT images of tumour-bearing breast tissue samples were acquired by monochromatic synchrotron radiation (SR). Due to the narrow beam and a large sample-to-detector distance scattering is rejected in the absorption contrast images (SR-CT). Large contrast enhancement is achieved by the use of the DEI-CT method, where the effects of refraction and scatter rejection are analysed by crystal optics. Clinical mammograms and CT images were recorded as reference material for a radiological examination. Three malignant and benign samples were studied in detail. Their radiographs were compared with optical images of stained histological sections. The DEI-CT images map accurately the morphology of the samples, including collagen strands and micro-calcifications of dimensions less than 0.1 mm. Histo-pathological examination and reading of the radiographs were done independently, and the conclusions were in general agreement. High-resolution DEI-CT images show strong contrast and permit visualization of details invisible in clinical radiographs. The radiation dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude without compromising image quality, which would make possible clinical in vivo DEI-CT with future compact SR sources. PMID:17404464

  20. Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging for studying pattern recognition in cranial ontogeny of bats and marsupials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, H. S.; Lopes, R. T.; Pessôa, L. M.; Hönnicke, M. G.; Tirao, G.; Cusatis, C.; Mazzaro, I.; Giles, C.

    2005-08-01

    The key to understanding evolution lies in the elucidation of mechanisms responsible for the observed underlying patterns and in the observation of sequences that emerge from those evolutionary landmarks. The comparative development can be used to access the derivation of form and the homology versus the convergence of evolution features. Phylogenetic and biological homologies are necessary to discern the evolutionary origins of these features. This work examined the patterns of cranial formation in pre-born bat specimens as well as post-born opossum by means of microradiography and Diffraction-Enhanced Radiography (DER) techniques. A direct conversion CCD camera was used to provide micrometer spatial resolution in order to acquire highly detailed density images. This technique allows the observation of structures, in early stages of development, which were impossible to be observed with traditional techniques, such as clearing and staining. Some cranial features have been described for adults in the literature, but the detailed description of the appearance sequence of those features in these species is still unknown and obscure. Microradiography and diffraction-enhanced imaging can improve quality of morphological detail analysis and permit the identification of anatomical landmarks that are useful in comparative studies and are still unknown in both species. In this study, we access evolution features in cranial morphology of bats and marsupials using both X-ray techniques.

  1. Neutron diffraction study of a nitrogen martensitic steel 0Kh16N4AB under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, V. V.; Papushkin, I. V.; Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Lukáš, P.

    2008-01-01

    An austenitic-martensitic nitrogen steel 0Kh16N4AB has been studied under load using high-resolution neutron diffraction analysis on an FSD neutron diffractometer at an IBR-2 reactor (Dubna) and on a diffractometer with a focusing monochromator on a reactor of the Nuclear Physics Institute (Czech Republic). Young's moduli calculated from different reflections of the martensite and austenite phases have been obtained. It has been found that the yield strength σ0.2 corresponding to the slip plane (111) of the austenite phase is anomalously low and that with increasing degree of uniaxial tension the width of lines (111)γ strongly grows. In the steel under consideration the plane (111) of the austenite phase appears to be an easy-slip plane that ensures the enhanced properties of the steel, i.e., the combination of a high ultimate strength (1600 MPa) with a high plasticity (δ = 16%).

  2. Atomic resolution studies of carbonic anhydrase II

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, Craig A.; Le Trong, Isolde; Godden, Jeff W.; Merritt, Ethan A.; Teller, David C.; Bajorath, Jürgen; Stenkamp, Ronald E.

    2010-05-01

    The structure of human carbonic anhydrase II has been solved with a sulfonamide inhibitor at 0.9 Å resolution. Structural variation and flexibility is seen on the surface of the protein and is consistent with the anisotropic ADPs obtained from refinement. Comparison with 13 other atomic resolution carbonic anhydrase structures shows that surface variation exists even in these highly ordered isomorphous crystals. Carbonic anhydrase has been well studied structurally and functionally owing to its importance in respiration. A large number of X-ray crystallographic structures of carbonic anhydrase and its inhibitor complexes have been determined, some at atomic resolution. Structure determination of a sulfonamide-containing inhibitor complex has been carried out and the structure was refined at 0.9 Å resolution with anisotropic atomic displacement parameters to an R value of 0.141. The structure is similar to those of other carbonic anhydrase complexes, with the inhibitor providing a fourth nonprotein ligand to the active-site zinc. Comparison of this structure with 13 other atomic resolution (higher than 1.25 Å) isomorphous carbonic anhydrase structures provides a view of the structural similarity and variability in a series of crystal structures. At the center of the protein the structures superpose very well. The metal complexes superpose (with only two exceptions) with standard deviations of 0.01 Å in some zinc–protein and zinc–ligand bond lengths. In contrast, regions of structural variability are found on the protein surface, possibly owing to flexibility and disorder in the individual structures, differences in the chemical and crystalline environments or the different approaches used by different investigators to model weak or complicated electron-density maps. These findings suggest that care must be taken in interpreting structural details on protein surfaces on the basis of individual X-ray structures, even if atomic resolution data are available.

  3. High-resolution diffraction from crystals of a membrane-protein complex: bacterial outer membrane protein OmpC complexed with the antibacterial eukaryotic protein lactoferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Sundara Baalaji, N.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Singh, T. P.; Krishnaswamy, S. E-mail: mkukrishna@rediffmail.com

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of the complex formed between the bacterial membrane protein OmpC and the antibacterial protein lactoferrin suitable for high-resolution structure determination have been obtained. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å. Crystals of the complex formed between the outer membrane protein OmpC from Escherichia coli and the eukaryotic antibacterial protein lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius (camel) have been obtained using a detergent environment. Initial data processing suggests that the crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. This indicated a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a possible molecular complex involving four molecules of lactoferrin and two porin trimers in the unit cell (4832 amino acids; 533.8 kDa) with 63% solvent content. A complete set of diffraction data was collected to 3 Å resolution at 100 K. Structure determination by molecular replacement is in progress. Structural study of this first surface-exposed membrane-protein complex with an antibacterial protein will provide insights into the mechanism of action of OmpC as well as lactoferrin.

  4. Preliminary neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase bound to the anticancer drug methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brad C.; Meilleur, Flora; Myles, Dean A A; Howell, Elizabeth E.; Dealwis, Chris G.

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of H atoms in noncovalent interactions and enzymatic reactions underlies virtually all aspects of biology at the molecular level, yet their 'visualization' is quite difficult. To better understand the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR), a neutron diffraction study is under way to directly determine the accurate positions of H atoms within its active site. Despite exhaustive investigation of the catalytic mechanism of DHFR, controversy persists over the exact pathway associated with proton donation in reduction of the substrate, dihydrofolate. As the initial step in a proof-of-principle experiment which will identify ligand and residue protonation states as well as precise solvent structures, a neutron diffraction data set has been collected on a 0.3 mm{sup 3} D{sub 2}O-soaked crystal of ecDHFR bound to the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) using the LADI instrument at ILL. The completeness in individual resolution shells dropped to below 50% between 3.11 and 3.48 {angstrom} and the I/{sigma}(I) in individual shells dropped to below 2 at around 2.46 {angstrom}. However, reflections with I/{sigma}(I) greater than 2 were observed beyond these limits (as far out as 2.2 {angstrom}). To our knowledge, these crystals possess one of the largest primitive unit cells (P6{sub 1}, a = b = 92, c = 73 {angstrom}) and one of the smallest crystal volumes so far tested successfully with neutrons.

  5. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-01-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270–1480 MPa. PMID:27279765

  6. Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, Michael A.; Hughes, Robert W.; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-15

    Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

  7. Coincidence studies of diffraction structures in binary encounter electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Richard, P.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have measured binary encounter electron (BEe) production in collisions of 0.3 MeV/u Cu{sup q+} (q=4,12) projectiles on H{sub 2} targets from 0 to 70 degrees with respect to the beam direction. Prominent features are the appearance of the BEe peak splitting and a very strong forward peaked angular distribution which are attributed to the diffractive scattering of the quasifree target electrons in the short range potential of the projectile. Using electron-projectile final charge state coincidence techniques, different collision reaction channels can be separated. Measurements of this type are being pursued.

  8. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of Potassium Azide

    SciTech Connect

    C Ji; F Zhang; D Hong; H Zhu; J Wu; M Chyu; V Levitas; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    Crystal structure and compressibility of potassium azide was investigated by in-situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature up to 37.7 GPa. In the body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase, an anisotropic compressibility was observed with greater compressibility in the direction perpendicular to the plane containing N{sub 3}{sup -} ions than directions within that plane. The bulk modulus of the bct phase was determined to be 18.6(7) GPa. A pressure-induced phase transition may occur at 15.5 GPa.

  9. Neutron diffraction studies of welds of aerospace aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Howell, P.R.; Payzant, E.A.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron diffraction and electron microscopy were done on residual stress in various regions comprising variable polarity plasma arc welds of alloys 2219 (Al-6.3Cu) and 2195 (Al-4.0Cu-1.0Li-0.5Mg-0.5Ag). Results indicate that lattice parameter changes in the various weld regions may be attributed to residual stresses generated during welding, as well as local changes in microstructure. Distribution of longitudinal and transverse stress of welded panels shows peaks of tension and compression, respectively, within the HAZ and corroborate earlier theoretical results. Position of these peaks are related to position of minimum strength within the HAZ, and the magnitude of these peaks are a fraction of the local yield strength in this region. Weldments of alloy 2195-T8 exhibited higher peak residual stress than alloy 2219-T87. Comparison of neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis indicate decreased lattice parameters associated with the solid solution of the near HAZ; this results in decreased apparent tensile residual stress within this region and may significantly alter interpretation of residual stress measurements of these alloys. Considerable relaxation of residual stress occurs during removal of specimens from welded panels and was used to aid in differentiating changes in lattice parameters attributed to residual stress from welding and modifications in microstructure.

  10. Theory of optical ellipsometric measurements from muscle diffraction studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1988-01-01

    A theory of optical ellipsometry describing the complete phase shift and ellipticity of light diffracted from a single muscle fiber is developed. We show that both the phase shift information, described commonly by the birefringence of the fiber, and the ellipticity information, described by the differential polarizability ratio, are necessary to provide a complete picture of the complex contributions to the total optical anisotropy spectra from a diffraction pattern derived from the striated muscle cell. Both form and intrinsic contributions play significant roles in either the birefringence measurement or the differential field ratio measurement. However, we show that their relative weights in these two measured quantities are different, and measuring both of these parameters is necessary to obtain a more complete assessment of the cross-bridge structure and dynamics. The theoretical results have been tested for three different situations: solvent index matching, passive stretch of a resting fiber, and cross-bridge changes under isometric conditions. Comparisons between experimental data and simple model calculations provide much information regarding cross-bridge orientation and structure. PMID:3207822

  11. Getting lucky with adaptive optics: diffraction-limited resolution in the visible with current AO systems on large and small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, N. M.; Dekany, R. G.; Mackay, C. D.; Moore, A. M.; Britton, M. C.; Velur, V.

    2008-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated diffraction-limited resolution imaging in the visible on the 5m Palomar Hale telescope. The new LAMP instrument is a Lucky Imaging backend camera for the Palomar AO system. Typical resolutions of 35-40 mas with Strehls of 10-20% were achieved at 700nm, and at 500nm the FWHM resolution was as small as 42 milliarcseconds. In this paper we discuss the capabilities and design challenges of such a system used with current and near future AO systems on a variety of telescopes. In particular, we describe the designs of two planned Lucky Imaging + AO instruments: a facility instrument for the Palomar 200" AO system and its PALM3K upgrade, and a visible-light imager for the CAMERA low-cost LGS AO system planned for the Palomar 60" telescope. We introduce a Monte Carlo simulation setup that reproduces the observed PSF variability behind an adaptive optics system, and apply it to predict the performance of 888Cam and CAMERA. CAMERA is predicted to achieve diffraction-limited resolution at wavelengths as short as 350 nm. In addition to on-axis resolution improvements we discuss the results of frame selection with the aim of improving other image parameters such as isoplanatic patch sizes, showing that useful improvements in image quality can be made by Lucky+AO even with very temporally and spatially undersampled data.

  12. Image reconstruction with sub-diffraction resolution in radio vision devices of millimeter and terahertz range using receiving arrays and image scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vystavkin, Alexander N.; Pestryakov, Andrey V.; Bankov, Sergey E.; Chebotarev, Vladimir M.

    2009-09-01

    The method of image reconstruction with sub-diffraction resolution in radio vision devices (RVD) of shortwave millimeter and terahertz frequency range is proposed. The method is based on image scanning using two-dimensional receiving element array of RVD when array and image move circularly in common plane relatively each to other (rotating or not rotating) with small eccentricity between their centers. The results of scanning are signals reading out by detectors of array receiving elements. Each signal is proportional to the integral of two functions product. One function is a perfect image field distribution of the observed object received by RVD without diffraction distortion. Another one is RVD optical (quasioptical) transfer function comprising beams delivering incident radiation to detectors of array. The second function takes into account whole received radiation beam paths from RVD input to each detector including the effect of diffraction and reciprocal circular scanning of array and image. The image of observed object itself can be found solving inverse ill-posed problem determined by mentioned above integral relations. The estimation using computer simulation has shown that proposed method permits to increase resolution up to ten times in comparison with the case of diffraction restriction. The method is aimed at radioastronomy telescopes and RVD's for the security, medical diagnostics and other systems.

  13. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  14. Powder neutron diffraction studies of a carbonate fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Leventouri, Th.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Moghaddam, H. Y.; Perdikatsis, V.

    2000-02-01

    Atomic positional disorder of a single-phase natural carbonate fluorapatite (francolite) is revealed from analysis of the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) refined from neutron powder diffraction data as a function of temperature and carbonate content. The ADPs of the francolite show a strong disturbance at the P, O3, and F sites. When it is heat treated to partially or completely remove the carbonate, the ADPs as well as the other structural parameters resemble those of a fluorapatite (Harding pegmatite) that was measured under the same conditions. The various structural changes are consistent with a substitution mechanism whereby the planar carbonate group replaces a phosphate group and lies on the mirror plane of the apatite structure. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

  15. Preparation and X-ray diffraction studies of curium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. K.; Haire, R. G.

    1985-10-01

    Curium hydrides were prepared by reaction of curium-248 metal with hydrogen and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Several of the syntheses resulted in a hexagonal compound with average lattice parameters of a0 = 0.3769(8) nm and c0 = 0.6732(12) nm. These products are considered to be CmH 3-δ by analogy with the behavior of lanthanide-hydrogen and lighter actinide-hydrogen systems. Face-centered cubic products with an average lattice parameter of a0 = 0.5322(4) nm were obtained from other curium hydride preparations. This parameter is slightly smaller than that reported previously for cubic curium dihydride, CmH 2+ x (B. M. Bansal and D. Damien, Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett., 6, 603, 1970). The present results established a continuation of typical heavy trivalent lanthanide-like behavior of the transuranium actinide-hydrogen systems through curium.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  17. Keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI).

    PubMed

    De Caro, Liberato; Carlino, Elvio; Vittoria, Fabio Alessio; Siliqi, Dritan; Giannini, Cinzia

    2012-11-01

    Electron diffractive imaging (EDI) relies on combining information from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of an isolated kinematically diffracting nano-particle with the corresponding nano-electron diffraction pattern. Phase-retrieval algorithms allow one to derive the phase, lost in the acquisition of the diffraction pattern, to visualize the actual atomic projected potential within the specimen at sub-ångström resolution, overcoming limitations due to the electron lens aberrations. Here the approach is generalized to study extended crystalline specimens. The new technique has been called keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI) because it aims to investigate nano-regions of extended specimens at sub-ångström resolution by properly confining the illuminated area. Some basic issues of retrieving phase information from the EDI/KEDI measured diffracted amplitudes are discussed. By using the generalized Shannon sampling theorem it is shown that whenever suitable oversampling conditions are satisfied, EDI/KEDI diffraction patterns can contain enough information to lead to reliable phase retrieval of the unknown specimen electrostatic potential. Hence, the KEDI method has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments performed on an Si crystal cross section in the [112] zone-axis orientation, achieving a resolution of 71 pm. PMID:23075611

  18. High spatial resolution grain orientation and strain mapping in thin films using polychromatic submicron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; MacDowell, A.A.; Celestre, R.S.; Padmore, H.A.; Valek, B.C.; Bravman, J.C.; Spolenak, R.; Brown, W.L.; Marieb, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Batterman, B.W.; Patel, J.R.

    2002-03-26

    The availability of high brilliance synchrotron sources, coupled with recent progress in achromatic focusing optics and large area 2D detector technology, have allowed us to develop an X-ray synchrotron technique capable of mapping orientation and strain/stress in polycrystalline thin films with submicron spatial resolution. To demonstrate the capabilities of this instrument, we have employed it to study the microstructure of aluminum thin film structures at the granular and subgranular level. Owing to the relatively low absorption of X-rays in materials, this technique can be used to study passivated samples, an important advantage over most electron probes given the very different mechanical behavior of buried and unpassivated materials.

  19. HIGH RESOLUTION PHOTOEMISSION STUDIES OF COMPLEX MATERIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON,P.D.

    1999-10-13

    Recent instrumentation developments in photoemission are providing new insights into the physics of complex materials. With increased energy and momentum resolution, it has become possible to examine in detail different contributions to the self-energy or inverse lifetime of the photohole created in the photoexcitation process, Employing momentum distribution and energy distribution curves, a detailed study of the optimally doped cuprate, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub g+{delta}}, shows that the material behaves like a non-Fermi liquid with no evidence for the quasi-particles characteristic of a Fermi liquid.

  20. Neutron-diffraction study of liquid hydrogen iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, C.; Nardone, M.; Ricci, F. P.; Soper, A. K.

    1992-10-01

    Neutron-diffraction experiments on liquid DI, HI, and on an equimolar mixture of HI and DI are presented. All these three samples were in the same thermodynamic state corresponding to the orthobaric liquid at T=253 K. The three partial structure factors SII(Q), SHI(Q), SHH(Q) are derived exploiting the standard isotopic substitution procedure. The corresponding pair correlation functions gII(r), gHI(r), and gHH(r) are evaluated and compared with those given by a model that neglects all orientational correlations. Our data indicate that gII(r) (which is essentially the center-center correlation function) is well reproduced by the pair distribution function of a monatomic Lennard-Jones fluid and that gHI(r) (which should be sensitive to the correlations between molecular and intermolecular axes) is very similar to the one derived neglecting orientational correlations. On the contrary, orientational correlations between the molecular axes are clearly present in the gHH(r), which deviates significantly from the uncorrelated model results. These facts are consistent with the idea that H bonding is not present in liquid HI and indicate also that the only relevant terms of the anisotropic intermolecular potential are those due to the electric multipolar interactions.

  1. Diffraction studies applicable to 60-foot microwave research facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    The principal features of this document are the analysis of a large dual-reflector antenna system by vector Kirchhoff theory, the evaluation of subreflector aperture-blocking, determination of the diffraction and blockage effects of a subreflector mounting structure, and an estimate of strut-blockage effects. Most of the computations are for a frequency of 15.3 GHz, and were carried out using the IBM 360/91 and 360/95 systems at Goddard Space Flight Center. The FORTRAN 4 computer program used to perform the computations is of a general and modular type so that various system parameters such as frequency, eccentricity, diameter, focal-length, etc. can be varied at will. The parameters of the 60-foot NRL Ku-band installation at Waldorf, Maryland, were entered into the program for purposes of this report. Similar calculations could be performed for the NELC installation at La Posta, California, the NASA Wallops Station facility in Virginia, and other antenna systems, by a simple change in IBM control cards. A comparison is made between secondary radiation patterns of the NRL antenna measured by DOD Satellite and those obtained by analytical/numerical methods at a frequency of 7.3 GHz.

  2. Neighborite Under High Pressure: In Situ Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Study Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Chen, J.; Weidner, D.; Hu, J.; Meng, Y.; Mao, H.

    2003-12-01

    The neighborite (NaMgF3) is an ideal analogue model for silicate perovskite (MgSiO3) due to the similarities between their crystal and electronic structures. The advantage of the analogue study is that the weaker bonding feature of neighborite grants us the opportunity to simulate behavior of silicate perovskite at lower mantlei. e.high pressure and high temperature condition, at relatively lower P-T conditions. The previous high pressure studies for neighborite were reported by Zhao et al [1, 2]. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction data were achieved within 10GPa and 1000oC, while angle dispersive x-ray diffraction data were obtained only at 4.9GPa and room temperature.More information of atomic position change is required to reveal the role of MgF6 octahedral framework tilting during its phase transition process responding to heating andcompressing. Thus the high-resolution monochromatic x-ray powder diffraction studies on NaMgF3 perovskite at high pressure were carried out using diamond anvil cell at X17C of National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven) and HPCAT of Advance Photon Source (Argonne). The orthorhombic structure keeps stable under pressure up to 30 GPa, and the crystal structure is refined using Rietveld method. The result indicates that tilting angle of the MgF6 octahedral framework increases continually while the octahedral Mg-F bond length decreases slightly with increasing pressure.Difference between the tilting angles derived from macro-structure (lattice parameters) and from micro-structure (atomic positions), as well as the trend of change in the tilting angle with temperature and pressureare discussed. [1]. Zhao YS, Weidner DJ, Ko JD, Leinenweber K, Liu X, Li BS, Meng Y,Pacalo REG, Vaughan MT, Wang YB, Yeganehhaeri A,J.Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 99 (1994) 2871. [2]. Zhao YS, Parise JB, Wang YB, Kusaba K, Vaughan MT, Weidner DJ, Kikegawa T, Chen J, Shimomura O,Am.Miner., 79 (1994) 615.

  3. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of an ectromelia virus glutaredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Brigley, Angela M.; Channon, Lisa D.; Audette, Gerald F.; Hazes, Bart

    2005-06-01

    Ectromelia virus glutaredoxin has been crystallized in the presence of the reducing agent DTT. A diffraction data set has been collected and processed to 1.8 Å resolution. Ectromelia, vaccinia, smallpox and other closely related viruses of the orthopoxvirus genus encode a glutaredoxin gene that is not present in poxviruses outside of this genus. The vaccinia glutaredoxin O2L has been implicated as the reducing agent for ribonucleotide reductase and may thus play an important role in viral deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. As part of an effort to understand nucleotide metabolism by poxviruses, EVM053, the O2L ortholog of the ectromelia virus, has been crystallized. EVM053 crystallizes in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.98, b = 67.57, c = 108.55 Å. Diffraction data have been processed to 1.8 Å resolution and a self-rotation function indicates that there are two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  5. High spatial resolution, high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction characterization of residual strains and stresses in laser shock peened Inconel 718SPF alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Amrinder S.; Zhou, Zhong; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan; Lahrman, David F.; Mannava, S. R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP) is an advanced surface enhancement technique used to enhance the fatigue strength of metal parts by imparting deep compressive residual stresses. In the present study, LSP was performed on IN718 SPF alloy, a fine grained nickel-based superalloy, with three different power densities and depth resolved residual strain and stress characterization was conducted using high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction in beam line 1-ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source at the Argonne National laboratory. A fine probe size and conical slits were used to non-destructively obtain data from specific gauge volumes in the samples, allowing for high-resolution strain measurements. The results show that LSP introduces deep compressive residual stresses and the magnitude and depth of these stresses depend on the energy density of the laser. The LSP induced residual stresses were also simulated using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element analysis, with employment of the Johnson-Cook model for describing the nonlinear materials constitutive behavior. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated data was obtained. These various results are presented and discussed.

  6. Equation of state and phase transition of deuterated ammonia monohydrate (ND3.D2O) measured by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction up to 500 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Suard, Emmanuelle; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Pickard, Christopher J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2009-10-01

    We describe the results of a neutron powder diffraction study of perdeuterated ammonia monohydrate (AMH, ND3ṡD2O) carried out in the range 102resolution diffractometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin. This paper reports observations of the phase transformation from the low-pressure P212121 phase (AMH I) to the high-pressure Pbca phase (AMH II) at 351 MPa, and measurements which have allowed us to determine the volumetric and axial incompressibilities of both polymorphs. At 180 K, the fitted third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state of AMH I has parameters, V0=248.00(2) Å3, K0=7.33(3) GPa with the first pressure derivative of K0 fixed at the value obtained in ab initio calculations, (∂K0/∂P)T=K0'=5.3; the implied value of the second derivative is therefore (∂2K0/∂P2)T=K0″=-0.94(1) GPa-1. At 351 MPa, we observed that the transition from AMH I to AMH II occurred over a period of 90 min, with an associated reduction in molar volume of 4.6% and an increase in the incompressibility of 19.6%.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of N-acetylglucosamine-phosphate mutase from Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Nishitani, Yuichi; Maruyama, Daisuke; Nonaka, Tsuyoshi; Kita, Akiko; Fukami, Takaaki A.; Mio, Toshiyuki; Yamada-Okabe, Hisafumi; Yamada-Okabe, Toshiko; Miki, Kunio

    2006-04-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies on N-acetylglucosamine-phosphate mutase from C. albicans are reported. N-acetylglucosamine-phosphate mutase (AGM1) is an essential enzyme in the synthesis of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) in eukaryotes and belongs to the α-d-phosphohexomutase superfamily. AGM1 from Candida albicans (CaAGM1) was purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals obtained belong to the primitive monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.2, b = 130.2, c = 78.0 Å, β = 106.7°. The crystals diffract X-rays to beyond 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  8. High Resolution Chemical Study of ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Douglas, Susanne; Kuhlman, Kimberly R.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of a sample of the SNC meteorite ALH84001 using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an energy dispersive chemical analytical detector and a focused ion beam secondary ion mass spectrometer (FIB-SIMS). Here we present the chemical data, both spectra and images, from two techniques that do not require sample preparation with a conductive coating, thus eliminating the possibility of preparation-induced textural artifacts. The FIB-SIMS instrument includes a column optimized for SEM with a quadrupole type mass spectrometer. Its spatial and spectral resolution are 20 nm and 0.4 AMU, respectively. The spatial resolution of the ESEM for chemical analysis is about 100 nm. Limits of detection for both instruments are mass dependent. Both the ESEM and the FIB-SIMS instrument revealed contrasting surficial features; crumbled, weathered appearance of the matrix in some regions as well as a rather ubiquitous presence of euhedral halite crystals, often associated with cracks or holes in the surface of the rock. Other halogen elements present in the vicinity of the NaCl crystals include K and Br. In this report, elemental inventories are shown as mass spectra and as X-ray maps.

  9. Classifying and assembling two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns of a single particle to reconstruct the three-dimensional diffraction intensity function: resolution limit due to the quantum noise

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Taka, Junichiro; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A new two-step algorithm is developed for reconstructing the three-dimensional diffraction intensity of a globular biological macromolecule from many experimentally measured quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The first step is classification of the two-dimensional patterns into groups according to the similarity of direction of the incident X-rays with respect to the molecule and an averaging within each group to reduce the noise. The second step is detection of common intersecting circles between the signal-enhanced two-dimensional patterns to identify their mutual location in the three-dimensional wavenumber space. The newly developed algorithm enables one to detect a signal for classification in noisy experimental photon-count data with as low as ∼0.1 photons per effective pixel. The wavenumber of such a limiting pixel determines the attainable structural resolution. From this fact, the resolution limit due to the quantum noise attainable by this new method of analysis as well as two important experimental parameters, the number of two-dimensional patterns to be measured (the load for the detector) and the number of pairs of two-dimensional patterns to be analysed (the load for the computer), are derived as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule. PMID:22514069

  10. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  11. High-resolution spectrometer for atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Piero; Barone, Massimiliano; D'Altorio, Alfonso; Dari-Salisburgo, Cesare; Pietropaolo, Ermanno

    2009-08-01

    A high-resolution spectrometer (0.0014 nm at 313 nm) has been developed at the University of L'Aquila (Italy) for atmospheric spectroscopic studies. The layout, optics and software for the instrument control are described. Measurements of the mercury low-pressure lamp lines from 200 to 600 nm show the high performances of the spectrometer. Laboratory measurements of OH and NO2 spectrums demonstrate that the system could be used for cross-section measurements and to detect these species in the atmosphere. The first atmospheric application of the system was the observation of direct solar and sky spectrums that shows a filling-in of the sky lines due to rotational Raman scattering. The measurements have been done with clear and cloudy sky and in both there was a strong dependence of the filling-in from the solar zenith angle whereas no dependence from the wavelengths was evident at low solar zenith angles (less than 85°).

  12. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated.

  13. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated. PMID:23797986

  14. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Below-diffract ion-limited hybrid recording using silicon thin film super-resolution structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xin-Bing; Wei, Jing-Song; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-12-01

    We report on new experimental results for below-diffraction-limited hybrid recording. In our experiments, by means of focused laser assisted magnetic recording, the magnetic domains within TbFeCo thin films are obtained under an external perpendicular direct magnetic field. For a single magnetic medium, the domain size is mainly determined by the focused spot, which is about 620 nm for the laser wavelength λ = 406 nm, and a numerical aperture of the lens of 0.80. However, when a silicon thin film structure is inserted between the substrate and the magnetic medium, the recording domains can be reduced obviously. By optimizing the experimental condition, even the size can be reduced to about 100 nm, which is below the diffraction limit, i.e. about 1/6 of the spot size. This is very useful for improving the hybrid recording density in practical applications.

  15. The first protein crystal structure determined from high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data: a variant of T3R3 human insulin-zinc complex produced by grinding.

    PubMed

    Von Dreele, R B; Stephens, P W; Smith, G D; Blessing, R H

    2000-12-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis of protein structure is often limited by the availability of suitable crystals. However, the absence of single crystals need not present an insurmountable obstacle in protein crystallography any more than it does in materials science, where powder diffraction techniques have developed to the point where complex oxide, zeolite and small organic molecular structures can often be solved from powder data alone. Here, that fact is demonstrated with the structure solution and refinement of a new variant of the T(3)R(3) Zn-human insulin complex produced by mechanical grinding of a polycrystalline sample. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data were used to solve this crystal structure by molecular replacement adapted for Rietveld refinement. A complete Rietveld refinement of the 1630-atom protein was achieved by combining 7981 stereochemical restraints with a 4800-step (d(min) = 3.24 A) powder diffraction pattern and yielded the residuals R(wp) = 3.73%, R(p) = 2.84%, R(F)(2) = 8.25%. It was determined that the grinding-induced phase change is accompanied by 9.5 and 17.2 degrees rotations of the two T(3)R(3) complexes that comprise the crystal structure. The material reverts over 2-3 d to recover the original T(3)R(3) crystal structure. A Rietveld refinement of this 815-atom protein by combining 3886 stereochemical restraints with a 6000-step (d(min) = 3.06 A) powder diffraction pattern yielded the residuals R(wp) = 3.46%, R(p) = 2.64%, R(F)(2) = 7.10%. The demonstrated ability to solve and refine a protein crystal structure from powder diffraction data suggests that this approach can be employed, for example, to examine structural changes in a series of protein derivatives in which the structure of one member is known from a single-crystal study. PMID:11092920

  16. Trapping the M sub 1 and M sub 2 substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  17. EXAFS and X-ray diffraction study of LaCoO3 across the spin-state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikolenko, V. V.; Troyanchuk, I. O.; Efimov, V. V.; Efimova, E. A.; Tiutiunnikov, S. I.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Pascarelli, S.; Zaharko, O.; Ignatov, A.; Aquilanti, D.; Selutin, A. G.; Shmakov, A. N.; Prabhakaran, D.

    2016-05-01

    A combined high-resolution Co K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) study has been performed to clarify the detail of anomalous behavior of temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility curve on the LaCoO3 across the spin-state (∼120 K) transition. According to XRD analysis, the Debye-Waller factor of Co-O bond exhibit rapid growth below 20 K whereas the temperature dependence of the average Co-O bond length shows linear behavior from 10 K to 400 K. The EXAFS data show an anomalous decrease of the Co-O bond lengths with respect to those obtained by XRD. No local distortion of CoO6 octahedral as temperature increases up to 400 K has been detected.

  18. Electron diffraction studies of molecular ordering and orientation in phospholipid monolayer domains.

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S W; Yu, H

    1993-01-01

    The molecular order and orientation of phase separated domains in monolayers of DP(Me)PE and DP(Me)2PE were determined by electron diffraction. Dark and bright fluorescent domains at the air-water interface were observed by fluorescence microscopy. The monolayers were transferred to Formvar coated electron microscope grids for electron diffraction studies. The positions of domains on the marker grids were recorded in fluorescence micrographs, which were used as guide maps to locate these domains in the electron microscope. Selected area electron diffraction patterns were obtained from predetermined areas within and outside the dark domains. Sharp hexagonal diffraction patterns were recorded from dark domains, and diffuse diffraction rings from bright areas in between dark domains. The diffraction results indicated that the dark domains and bright areas were comprised of lipid molecules in solid and fluid states, respectively. The orientation of diffraction patterns from adjacent locations within a dark domains changed gradually, indicating a continuous bending of the molecular packing lattice vector within these domains. Orientation directors in U-shaped DP(Me)2PE domains followed the turn of the arm; no vortex nor branching was indicated by electron diffraction. Directors branching from the "stem" of highly invaginated DP(Me)PE domains usually occurred at twinning angles of n pi/3 from the stem director, which would minimize packing defects in the development of thinner branches. Electron diffraction from local areas of individual domains proved that dark fluorescent domains were solid ones, and that pseudo-long range order existed in these solid domains. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8431539

  19. Phase relations in KxFe2-ySe2 and the structure of superconducting KxFe2Se2 via high-resolution synchrotron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Chung, Duck Young; Claus, Helmut; Francisco, Melanie C.; Avci, Sevda; Llobet, Anna; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2012-11-01

    Superconductivity in iron selenides has experienced a rapid growth, but not without major inconsistencies in the reported properties. For alkali-intercalated iron selenides, even the structure of the superconducting phase is a subject of debate, in part because the onset of superconductivity is affected much more delicately by stoichiometry and preparation than in cuprate or pnictide superconductors. If high-quality, pure, superconducting intercalated iron selenides are ever to be made, the intertwined physics and chemistry must be explained by systematic studies of how these materials form and by and identifying the many coexisting phases. To that end, we prepared pure K2Fe4Se5 powder and superconductors in the KxFe2-ySe2 system, and examined differences in their structures by high-resolution synchrotron and single-crystal x-ray diffraction. We found four distinct phases: semiconducting K2Fe4Se5, a metallic superconducting phase KxFe2Se2 with x ranging from 0.38 to 0.58, the phase KFe1.6Se2 with full K occupancy and no Fe vacancy ordering, and a oxidized phase K0.51(5)Fe0.70(2)Se that forms the PbClF structure upon exposure to moisture. We find that the vacancy-ordered phase K2Fe4Se5 does not become superconducting by doping, but the distinct iron-rich minority phase KxFe2Se2 precipitates from single crystals upon cooling from above the vacancy ordering temperature. This coexistence of separate metallic and semiconducting phases explains a broad maximum in resistivity around 100 K. Further studies to understand the solubility of excess Fe in the KxFe2-ySe2 structure will shed light on the maximum fraction of superconducting KxFe2Se2 that can be obtained by solid state synthesis.

  20. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadasan, A. K. Patsha, Avinash; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-04-27

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50.

  1. Diffraction and imaging study of imperfections of crystallized lysozyme with coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray diffraction imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase-contrast radiographic imaging were employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in the symmetric Laue case. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal was approximately 16.7 arcsec and imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <1 1 0> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Inclusions of impurities or formations of foreign particles in the central growth region are resolved in the images with high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in X-ray diffraction images. The details of the observed defects and the significant change in the revealed microstructures with drying provide insight into the nature of imperfections, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  2. A multi-step strategy to obtain crystals of the dengue virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that diffract to high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Thai Leong; Chen, Yen Liang; Xu, Ting; Wen, Daying; Vasudevan, Subhash G.; Lescar, Julien

    2007-02-01

    Crystals of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic domain from the dengue virus NS5 protein have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration. These crystals diffract to 1.85 Å resolution and are thus suitable for a structure-based drug-design program. Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae genus, causes dengue fever, an important emerging disease with several million infections occurring annually for which no effective therapy exists. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5 plays an important role in virus replication and represents an interesting target for the development of specific antiviral compounds. Crystals that diffract to 1.85 Å resolution that are suitable for three-dimensional structure determination and thus for a structure-based drug-design program have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration.

  3. Microstructure of Banded Polymer Spherulites: Studies with Micro-Focus X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Martin; Anokhin, Denis V.; Luchnikov, Valeriy A.; Davies, Richard J.; Riekel, Christian; Burghammer, Manfred; Bar, Georg; Ivanov, Dimitri A.

    2010-11-01

    Micro-beam X-ray diffraction has been used to investigate the texture of banded spherulites of melt-crystallized poly(trimethylene terephthalate), PTT, formed in films of approximately 30 to 50 μm thickness. The WAXS micro-diffraction patterns show that at the local scale, the PTT texture is close to that of a single crystal. In agreement with previous studies using selected-area electron diffraction, it is shown that the crystal growth direction is parallel to the a-axis of the unit cell. When plotted as a function of the distance to the spherulite center, the intensity of different diffraction peaks reveals the same periodicity. This means that the lamellar twist is strictly uniform. The latter observation is more compatible with the model explaining the twist as a result of unbalanced surface stresses than that of isochiral giant screw dislocations. The main features of the experimental diffractograms can be understood using the numerical approach, which is developed in the approximation of a purely geometric broadening of X-ray reflections. In particular, the simulation can predict the sequence of appearance of different diffraction peaks and their shape on the 2D micro-diffraction patterns.

  4. High-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of Zr-rich compositions of Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (0.525⩽x ⩽0.60): Evidence for the absence of the rhombohedral phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Dhananjai; Yoon, Songhak; Baik, Sunggi; Shin, Namsoo

    2007-11-01

    Results of Rietveld analysis of the synchrotron x-ray diffraction data on Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT) for 0.525⩽x ⩽0.60 are presented to show the absence of rhombohedral phase on the Zr-rich side of the morphotropic phase boundary. Our results reveal that the structure of PZT is monoclinic in the Cm space group for 0.525⩽x ⩽0.60. The nature of the monoclinic distortion changes from pseudotetragonal for 0.525⩽x⩽0.54 to pseudo-rhombohedral for x >0.54.

  5. Actin bundles cross-linked with [Formula: see text]-actinin studied by nanobeam X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Töpperwien, M; Priebe, M; Salditt, T

    2016-07-01

    We have performed scanning nano-beam small-angle X-ray scattering (nano-SAXS) experiments on in vitro-formed actin filaments cross-linked with [Formula: see text]-actinin. The experimental method combines a high resolution in reciprocal space with a real space resolution as given by the spot-size of the nano-focused X-ray beam, and opens up new opportunities to study local super-molecular structures of actin filaments. In this first proof-of-concept, we show that the local orientation of actin bundles formed by the cross-linking can be visualized by the X-ray darkfield maps. The filament bundles give rise to highly anisotropic diffraction patterns showing distinct streaks perpendicular to the bundle axes. Interestingly, some diffraction patterns exhibit a fine structure in the form of intensity modulations allowing for a more detailed analysis of the order within the bundles. A first empirical quantification of these modulations is included in the present work. PMID:26715112

  6. The structure study of thin semiconductor and dielectric films by diffraction of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurjev, G. S.; Fainer, N. I.; Maximovskiy, E. A.; Kosinova, M. L.; Sheromov, M. A.; Rumyantsev, Yu. M.

    1998-02-01

    The structure of semiconductor and dielectric thin (100-300 nm) films was studied by diffraction of synchrotron radiation. The diffraction experiments were performed at both the station "Anomalous scattering" of the storage ring synchrotron facility VEPP-3 and DRON-4 diffractometer. The structure of CdS thin films grown on fused silica, single Si(100) and InP(100) substrates was investigated. The structure of Cu 2S thin films grown on fused silica, single Si(100) substrates and CdS/Si(100)-heterostructure was studied. The structure study was performed on Si 3N 4 films grown on GaAs(100) substrates. The structure of thin BN layers grown on single Si(100) substrates was studied. It was established that structural parameters of above-mentioned thin films coincide on the parameters of JCPDS International Centre for Diffraction Data.

  7. In situ powder diffraction study of belite sulfoaluminate clinkering.

    PubMed

    De la Torre, Angeles G; Cuberos, Antonio J M; Alvarez-Pinazo, Gema; Cuesta, Ana; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2011-05-01

    Belite sulfoaluminate (BSA) cements have been proposed as environmentally friendly building materials, as their production may release up to 35% less CO(2) into the atmosphere when compared with ordinary Portland cement fabrication. However, their formation mechanism has not been studied in detail so far. Here, an in situ high-temperature high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study is reported. Two types of BSA clinkers have been characterized, both containing 50-60 wt% C(2)S and 20-30 wt% C(4)A(3)\\underline{\\rm S} as main phases. One type is iron-rich and a second type (with different phase assemblage) is aluminium-rich. Furthermore, the C(2)S phase reacts slowly with water, thus activation of this compound is desirable in order to enhance the mechanical strength development of the resulting cements. To do so, iron-rich BSA clinkers have been doped with minor amounts of B(2)O(3) and Na(2)O to promote stabilization of α-forms of C(2)S, which are more reactive with water. The decarbonated raw materials were loaded into Pt tubes and heated to between 973 K and 1673 K, and patterns were collected using a high-energy synchrotron beam of wavelength λ = 0.30 Å. The thermal stability of Klein's salt in these clinkers has been clarified. Several reactions have been followed: formation and decomposition of Klein's salt, melting of aluminates and ferrite, and polymorphic transformations of dicalcium silicate: alpha'H-C2S → α-C(2)S. Changes in mineralogical phase assemblages at a given temperature owing to the addition of minor amounts of selected elements have also been determined. PMID:21525661

  8. High-energy x-ray diffraction study of pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Laaziri, K.; Kycia, S.; Roorda, S.; Chicoine, M.; Robertson, J.L.; Wang, J.; Moss, S.C.

    1999-11-01

    Medium and high-energy x-ray diffraction has been used to study the atomic structure of pure amorphous Si prepared by MeV Si implantation into crystalline silicon. Both as-implanted and annealed samples were studied. The inelastically scattered x rays were removed by fitting the energy spectrum for the scattered x rays. The atomic scattering factor of silicon, previously known reliably up to 20 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}, has been extended to 55 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}. The radial distribution function of amorphous Si, before and after annealing, has been determined through an unbiased Fourier transformation of the normalized scattering data. Gaussian fits to the first neighbor peak in these functions shows that scattering data out to at least 40 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} is required to reliably determine the radial distribution function. The first-shell coordination number increases from 3.79 to 3.88 upon thermal annealing at 600{degree}C, whereas that of crystalline Si determined from similar measurements on a Si powder analyzed using the same technique is 4.0. Amorphous Si is therefore under coordinated relative to crystalline Si. Noise in the distribution function, caused by statistical variations in the scattering data at high-momentum transfer, has been reduced without affecting the experimental resolution through filtering of the interference function after subtracting the contribution of the first-neighbor peak. The difference induced by thermal annealing in the remainder of the radial distribution functions, thus revealed, is much smaller than previously believed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abramchik, Yu. A. Timofeev, V. I. Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  10. X-ray diffraction study of A- plane non-polar InN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Gil, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Strong polarisation-induced electric fields in C-plane oriented nitrides semiconductor layers reduce the performance of devices. Eliminating the polarization fields can be achieved by growing nitrides along non polar direction. We have grown non polar A-plane oriented InN on R-plane (1‾102) nitridated sapphire substrate by MOCVD. We have studied the structural anisotropy observed in these layers by analyzing High Resolution XRay Diffraction rocking curve (RC) experiments as a function of the in-plane beam orientation. A-plane InN epilayer have a unique epitaxial relationship on R-Plane sapphire and show a strong structural anisotropy. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN(11‾20) XRD RC values are contained between 44 and 81 Arcmin. FWHM is smaller when the diffraction occurs along the [0001] and the largest FWHM values, of the (11‾20) RC, are obtained when the diffraction occurs along the [1‾100] in-plane direction. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed morphologies with well organized crystallites. The grains are structured along a unique crystallographic orientation of InN, leading to larger domains in this direction. This structural anisotropy can be, in first approximation, attributed to the difference in the domain sizes observed. XRD reciprocal space mappings (RSM) were performed in asymmetrical configuration on (13‾40) and (2‾202) diffraction plane. RSM are measured with a beam orientation corresponding to a maximal and a minimal width of the (11‾20) Rocking curves, respectively. A simple theoretical model is exposed to interpret the RSM. We concluded that the dominant contribution to the anisotropy is due to the scattering coherence length anisotropy present in our samples.

  11. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  12. α-Bungarotoxin Binding to Acetylcholine Receptor Membranes Studied by Low Angle X-Ray Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Howard S.; Herbette, Leo G.; Skita, Victor

    2003-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) carries two binding sites for snake venom neurotoxins. α-Bungarotoxin from the Southeast Asian banded krait, Bungarus multicinctus, is a long neurotoxin which competitively blocks the nAChR at the acetylcholine binding sites in a relatively irreversible manner. Low angle x-ray diffraction was used to generate electron density profile structures at 14-Å resolution for Torpedo californica nAChR membranes in the absence and presence of α-bungarotoxin. Analysis of the lamellar diffraction data indicated a 452-Å lattice spacing between stacked nAChR membrane pairs. In the presence of α-bungarotoxin, the quality of the diffraction data and the lamellar lattice spacing were unchanged. In the plane of the membrane, the nAChRs packed together with a nearest neighbor distance of 80 Å, and this distance increased to 85 Å in the presence of toxin. Electron density profile structures were calculated in the absence and presence of α-bungarotoxin, revealing a location for the toxin binding sites. In native, fully-hydrated nAChR membranes, α-bungarotoxin binds to the nAChR outer vestibule and contacts the surface of the membrane bilayer. PMID:12885641

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6322 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, V. I. Abramchik, Yu. A. Zhukhlistova, N. E. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of l-rhamnose isomerase from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Wayoon, Poonperm; Takada, Goro; Izumori, Ken; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2006-06-01

    Recombinant l-rhamnose isomerase from P. stutzeri has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å resolution. l-Rhamnose isomerase from Pseudomonas stutzeri (P. stutzeril-RhI) catalyzes not only the reversible isomerization of l-rhamnose to l-rhamnulose, but also isomerization between various rare aldoses and ketoses. Purified His-tagged P. stutzeril-RhI was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 104.0, c = 107.0 Å, β = 106.8°. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The molecular weight of the purified P. stutzeril-RhI with a His tag at the C-terminus was confirmed to be 47.7 kDa by MALDI–TOF mass-spectrometric analysis and the asymmetric unit is expected to contain four molecules.

  16. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction to study intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 316 stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Meisnar, Martina; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Gholinia, Ali; Moody, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J; Huin, Nicolas; Lozano-Perez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), also known as transmission-electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) is a novel method for orientation mapping of electron transparent transmission electron microscopy specimen in the scanning electron microscope and has been utilized for stress corrosion cracking characterization of type 316 stainless steels. The main advantage of TKD is a significantly higher spatial resolution compared to the conventional EBSD due to the smaller interaction volume of the incident beam with the specimen. Two 316 stainless steel specimen, tested for stress corrosion cracking in hydrogenated and oxygenated pressurized water reactor chemistry, were characterized via TKD. The results include inverse pole figure (IPFZ) maps, image quality maps and misorientation maps, all acquired in very short time (<60 min) and with remarkable spatial resolution (up to 5 nm step size possible). They have been used in order to determine the location of the open crack with respect to the grain boundary, deformation bands, twinning and slip. Furthermore, TKD has been used to measure the grain boundary misorientation and establish a gauge for quantifying plastic deformation at the crack tip and other regions in the surrounding matrix. Both grain boundary migration and slip transfer have been detected as well. PMID:25974882

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutaminyl cyclase from Carica papaya latex

    SciTech Connect

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Clantin, Bernard; Bompard, Coralie; Belrhali, Hassan; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Looze, Yvan; Wintjens, René

    2005-01-01

    The glutaminyl cyclase isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to 1.7 Å resolution. In living systems, the intramolecular cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues is accomplished by glutaminyl cyclase enzymes (EC 2.3.2.5). While in mammals these enzymes are involved in the synthesis of hormonal and neurotransmitter peptides, the physiological role played by the corresponding plant enzymes still remains to be unravelled. Papaya glutaminyl cyclase (PQC), a 33 kDa enzyme found in the latex of the tropical tree Carica papaya, displays an exceptional resistance to chemical and thermal denaturation as well as to proteolysis. In order to elucidate its enzymatic mechanism and to gain insights into the structural determinants underlying its remarkable stability, PQC was isolated from papaya latex, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.82, b = 81.23, c = 108.17 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  18. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Gurjar, Abhijit A.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Hegde, Narasimha V.; Jayarao, Bhushan M.

    2007-06-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin is described. The crystals diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive sporulating anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases in animals, birds and humans. The virulence of C. perfringens is associated with the production of several enterotoxins and exotoxins. β2-toxin is a 28 kDa exotoxin produced by C. perfringens. It is implicated in necrotic enteritis in animals and humans, a disease characterized by a sudden acute onset with lethal hemorrhagic mucosal ulceration. The recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of β2-toxin using the batch-under-oil technique are reported here. Native X-ray diffraction data were obtained to 2.9 Å resolution on a synchrotron beamline at the F2 station at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) using an ADSC Quantum-210 CCD detector. The crystals belong to space group R3, with a dimer in the asymmetric unit; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 103.71, c = 193.48 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120° using the hexagonal axis setting. A self-rotation function shows that the two molecules are related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis with polar angles ω = 90.0, ϕ = 210.3°.

  19. High resolution studies of complex solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na

    Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are energetic events, which can even impact the near-Earth environment and are the principal source of space weather. Most of them originate in solar active regions. The most violent events are produced in sunspots with a complex magnetic field topology. Studying their morphology and dynamics is helpful in understanding the energy accumulation and release mechanisms for flares and CMEs, which are intriguing problems in solar physics. The study of complex active regions is based on high-resolution observations from space missions and new instruments at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). Adaptive optics (AO) in combination with image restoration techniques (speckle masking imaging) can achieve improved image quality and a spatial resolution (about 100 km on the solar surface) close to the diffraction limit of BBSO's 65 cm vacuum telescope. Dopplergrams obtained with a two-dimensional imaging spectrometer combined with horizontal flow maps derived with Local Correlation Tracking (LCT) provide precise measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field in sunspots. Magnetic field measurements from ground- and space-based instruments complement these data. At the outset of this study, the evolution and morphology of a typical round sunspot are described in some detail. The sunspot was followed from disk center to the limb, thus providing some insight into the geometry of the magnetic flux system. Having established a benchmark for a stable sunspot, the attention is turned to changes of the sunspot structure associated with flares and CMEs. Rapid penumbral decay and the strengthening of sunspot umbrae are manifestations of photospheric magnetic field changes after a flare. These sudden intensity changes are interpreted as a result of magnetic reconnection during the flare, which causes the magnetic field lines to be turned from more inclined to more vertical. Strong photospheric shear flows along the flaring magnetic

  20. EMCCD-Based Detector for Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction and Scattering Studies of Biological Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.

    2007-11-26

    Third generation synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne, IL, are outstanding tools for X-ray diffraction and scattering studies of non-crystalline biological materials. However, these studies are hindered by the lack of detectors that provide multiple frames of detailed structural information on the millisecond time scale at the required high spatial resolution, and large active areas. Here we report the development of a cost effective detector for time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) using a cooled, fiberoptically coupled electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD), whose internal gain is selectable in real-time. The performance of the detector was evaluated using a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb scintillator and was compared to a current state-of-the-art SAXS detector developed at Brandeis University. We also report our first results on the fabrication of a novel, microcolumnar, ZnSe(Te) scintillator that has a promise to provide very high emission efficiency of over 100,000 photons/MeV, high spatial resolution in excess of 10 lp/mm, and a fast decay time with virtually absent afterglow. Development of this scintillator will complement the EMCCD design, permitting the advances of a high spatial and temporal resolution, large area detector for time resolved applications.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Seneca Valley Virus-001, a new member of the Picornaviridae family

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P.; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2008-04-01

    Seneca Valley Virus-001 of the Picornavirdae family was crystallized in the space group R3 and X-ray diffraction data was collected to a resolution of 2.3 Å. Rotation-function studies suggested the presence of two distict sets of 20 protomers that belong to two different virus particles in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001) is a newly found species in the Picornaviridae family. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picorna@@virus observed to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+)ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity to the genomes of the members of the Cardiovirus genus. However, based on the distinct characteristics of the genome organization and other biochemical properties, it has been suggested that SVV-001 represents a new genus, namely ‘Senecavirus’, in the Picornaviridae family. In order to understand the oncolytic properties of SVV-001, the native virus was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters (in the hexagonal setting) a = b = 311.5, c = 1526.4 Å. Although the SVV crystals diffracted to better than 2.3 Å resolution, the data quality is acceptable [I/σ(I) > 2.0] to 2.6 Å resolution. The unit-cell volume and the locked rotation-function analysis suggest that six particles could be accommodated in the unit cell, with two distinct sets of one third of a particle, each containing 20 protomers, occupying the crystallographic asymmetric unit.

  2. Bulk crystal growth, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction results of LiZnP semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Sunder, Madhana; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Nelson, Kyle A.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2015-06-01

    Nowotny-Juza compounds continue to be explored as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q-value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, an energy easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices fabricated from semiconducting compounds containing either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) may provide a semiconductor material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. Starting material was synthesized by preparing equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and P sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules lined with boron nitride and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The synthesized material showed signs of high impurity levels from material and electrical property characterizations. A static vacuum sublimation in quartz was performed to help purify the synthesized material [2]. Bulk crystalline samples were grown from the purified material. An ingot 9.6 mm in diameter and 4.0 mm in length was harvested. Individual samples were characterized for crystallinity on a Bruker AXS Inc. D2 CRYSO, energy dispersive x-ray diffractometer, and a Bruker AXS D8 DISCOVER, high-resolution x-ray diffractometer with a 0.004° beam divergence. The (220) orientation was characterized as the main orientation with the D2 CRYSO, and confirmed with the D8 DISCOVER. An out-of-plane high-resolution rocking curve yielded a 0.417° full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the (220) LiZnP. In-plane ordering was confirmed by observation of the (311) orientation, where a rocking curve was collected with a FWHM of 0.294°.

  3. An In-situ method for the study of strain broadening usingsynchrotronx-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chiu C.; Lynch, Peter A.; Cheary, Robert W.; Clark, Simon M.

    2006-12-15

    A tensonometer for stretching metal foils has beenconstructed for the study of strain broadening in x-ray diffraction lineprofiles. This device, which is designed for use on the powderdiffractometer in Station 2.3 at Daresbury Laboratory, allows in-situmeasurements to be performed on samples under stress. It can be used fordata collection in either transmission or reflection modes using eithersymmetric or asymmetric diffraction geometries. As a test case,measurements were carried out on a 18mum thick copper foil experiencingstrain levels of up to 5 percent using both symmetric reflection andsymmetric transmission diffraction. All the diffraction profilesdisplayed peak broadening and asymmetry which increased with strain. Themeasured profiles were analysed by the fundamental parameters approachusing the TOPAS peak fitting software. All the observed broadenedprofiles were modelled by convoluting a refineable diffraction profile,representing the dislocation and crystallite size broadening, with afixed instrumental profile pre-determined usinghigh quality LaB6reference powder. The de-convolution process yielded "pure" sampleintegral breadths and asymmetry results which displayed a strongdependence on applied strain and increased almost linearly with appliedstrain. Assuming crystallite size broadening in combination withdislocation broadening arising from fcc a/2<110>111 dislocations,we have extracted the variation of mechanic al property with strain. Theobservation of both peak asymmetry and broadening has been interpreted asa manifestation of a cellular structure with cell walls and cellinteriors possessing high and low dislocation densities.

  4. A computer simulation study of imaging flexural inhomogeneities using plate-wave diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Rohde, A H; Veidt, M; Rose, L R F; Homer, J

    2008-03-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of plate-wave diffraction tomography for the reconstruction of flexural inhomogeneities in plates using the results of computer simulation studies. The numerical implementation of the fundamental reconstruction algorithm, which has recently been developed by Wang and Rose [C.H. Wang, L.R.F. Rose, Plate-wave diffraction tomography for structural health monitoring, Rev. Quant. Nondestr. Eval. 22 (2003) 1615-1622] is investigated addressing the essential effects of applying the discrete form of the Fourier diffraction theorem for solving the inverse problem as discussed by Kak and Slaney [A.C. Kak, M. Slaney, Principles of Computerized Tomographic Imaging, IEEE Press, New York, 1988] for the acoustic case, viz. diffraction limited sensitivity, influence of weak scatterer assumption, damage location and scatter field data processing in time and Fourier space as well as experimental limitations such as finite receiver length and limited views. The feasibility of the imaging technique is investigated for cylindrical inhomogeneities of various severities and relative position within the interrogation space and a normal incident interrogation configuration. The results show that plate-wave diffraction tomography enables the quantitative reconstruction of location, size and severity of plate damage with excellent sensitivity and offers the potential for detecting corrosion thinning, disbonds and delamination damage in structural integrity management applications. PMID:18022207

  5. Experimental study of the thermal and gasdynamic properties of insulation with perforated diffracting screens

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhal'chenko, R.S.; Getmanets, V.F.; Gorshkova, L.A.; Klipach, L.V.; Pershin, N.P.

    1984-06-01

    Presented here are the results of a study of the optical and gasdynamic characteristics of perforated diffraction screens made on the basis of nuclear filters and the thermal conductivity of vacuum-shield thermal insulations with diffraction screens. It is concluded that thanks to their combination of good optical and gasdynamic properties, perforated diffraction screens are the most promising type of shield for low-temperature and cryogenic technologies; and, the new type of vacuum-shield thermal insulation can be recommended for broad practical application in cryogenic systems, the most promising areas of application being those systems which require a maximum reduction in weight and heat flow through the thermal protection, which use vacuum-shield insulation packets of substantial thickness or which require maximum acceleration of the evacuation process. Coatings tested included aluminum, silver and copper.

  6. Low energy electron diffraction study of high index copper surfaces underneath graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chenfang; Tong, Nai; Yang, Weisheng; Zhao, Ruguang; Hu, Zonghai

    2015-08-01

    After growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition on copper foil, Cu(4 1 0) facets were distinguished from Cu(1 0 0) facets using the low energy electron diffraction technique. Evolution of the diffraction patterns was studied after oxidation of the Cu substrate and subsequent annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. An ordered Cu(4 1 0)-O phase was then identified. The distinction between Cu(4 1 0) and Cu(4 1 0)-O is relevant in determination of the coupling between graphene and the substrate.

  7. Recent advances in the study of H environments and behavior in minerals using neutron powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, M. D.

    2002-12-01

    It is now possible to probe the structural environments and behavior of H atoms directly in complex minerals such as amphiboles, micas, chlorites and humites using neutron powder diffraction, in some cases as a function of pressure and/or temperature. A combination of high neutron flux and increased detector sensitivity and size offers the chance to see details of H behaviour. In the last year or so the advent of new gasket designs for the Paris-Edinburgh pressure cell allow the use of ethanol/methanol (EtOD/MeOD) as a pressure medium, removing peak broadening arising from deviatoric stress that occurs above 3 GPa for the standard fluorinert pressure medium. Essentially hydrostatic conditions obtain with EtOD/MeOD to 8 GPa at 298 K. A further recent development has been the design of a high P-T module for use with the Paris-Edinburgh cell. These technological improvements in pressure-cell design now allow us to make meaningful correlations between OH vibrational spectra collected at high P and/or T and detailed structural information on H behaviour obtained from neutron diffraction under similar conditions. In this talk I shall discuss recent neutron diffraction experiments on the effect of pressure upon hydrogen bonding in deuterated chlorite to 5 GPa (298 K), and a high P-T study of hydrogen bonding in deuterated brucite to 7 GPa, 1100 K. These two studies illustrate how far high-pressure neutron diffraction has come in the last 5 years. Finally, I shall describe a neutron powder diffraction study (ambient conditions) of leucophoenicite, Mn7Si3O12(OH)2, a close structural analogue of Phase-B and Superhydrous-B: the structure of leucophoenicite is topologically identical to the hydrous sheet of Phase-B and similar to that of Superhydrous-B. For various reasons it was not possible to deuterate the sample. Nonetheless, the two distinct H atoms were approximately located in difference-Fourier maps and then refined isotropically. The H positions in Phase-B were only

  8. Elastic properties of supported polycrystalline thin films and multilayers: An X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, P.; Villain, P.; Tamura, N.; Renault, P.-O.; Badawi, K.F.; Padmore, H.A.

    2003-08-13

    Numerous experimental and theoretical studies have shown that thin film elastic behavior may be different from the bulk one due to size effects related to grain boundaries, free surfaces and interfaces. In addition, thin films often present high compressive residual stresses which may be responsible of thin film buckling. These two features will be discussed in this communication through recent x-ray diffraction experiments: in situ tensile testing for elastic constant analysis and scanning x-ray micro diffraction for stress relaxation measurements associated with film buckling.

  9. Bone structure studies with HNDT and x-ray diffraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvennoinen, Raimo V. J.; Nygren, Kaarlo; Rouvinen, Juha; Petrova, Valentina V.

    1993-09-01

    Changes in molecular texture and structure of isolated radioulnar bones of subadult European moose collected in various environmental pollution areas of Finland were investigated by using HNDT and x-ray diffraction methods. By using small caudo-cranial bending forces, the bones were tested by using HNDT. For bone molecular texture and structure studies by using x-ray diffraction methods, samples were taken from the ulnar metaphyse (Olecranon). Results show that the bones obtained from the Harjavalta area and one from North Karelia showed changes in molecular texture and structure compared with samples from apparently normal animals.

  10. On the microstructure of nanoporous gold: an x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Van Petegem, S; Brandstetter, S; Maa?, R; Schmitt, B; Borca, C; Van Swygenhoven, H; Hodge, A M; El-Dasher, B S; Biener, J

    2008-08-26

    The evolution of the grain structure, internal stresses, and the lattice misorientations of nanoporous gold (npAu) during dealloying of bulk (3D) Ag-Au alloy samples was studied by various in-situ and ex-situ X-ray diffraction techniques including powder and Laue diffraction. The experiments reveal that the dealloying process preserves the original crystallographic structure, but leads to a small spread in orientations within individual grains. Furthermore, most grains develop in-plane tensile stress. The feature size of the developing nanoporous structure increases with increasing dealloying time.

  11. Crystallization temperature determination of Itokawa particles by plagioclase thermometry with X-ray diffraction data obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Nakato, Aiko; Ishida, Hatsumi; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    The crystallization temperatures of Itokawa surface particles recovered by the space probe Hayabusa were estimated by a plagioclase geothermometer using sodic plagioclase triclinicity. The Δ131-index required for the thermometer, which is the difference in X-ray diffraction peak positions between the 131 and 13¯1 reflections of plagioclase, was obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera developed for the third generation synchrotron radiation beamline, BL15XU at SPring-8. Crystallization temperatures were successfully determined from the Δ131-indices for four particles. The observed plagioclase crystallization temperatures were in a range from 655 to 660 °C. The temperatures indicate crystallization temperatures of plagioclases in the process of prograde metamorphism before the peak metamorphic stage.

  12. High-resolution x-ray diffraction investigation of relaxation and dislocations in SiGe layers grown on (001), (011), and (111) Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhylik, A.; Benediktovich, A.; Ulyanenkov, A.; Guerault, H.; Myronov, M.; Dobbie, A.; Leadley, D. R.; Ulyanenkova, T.

    2011-06-15

    This work presents a detailed characterization, using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, of multilayered Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} heterostructures grown on (001), (011), and (111) Si substrates by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. Reciprocal space mapping has been used to determine both the strain and Ge concentration depth profiles within each layer of the heterostructures after initially determining the crystallographic tilt of all the layers. Both symmetric and asymmetric reciprocal space maps were measured on each sample, and the evaluation was performed simultaneously for the whole data set. The ratio of misfit to threading dislocation densities has been estimated for each individual layer based on an analysis of diffuse x-ray scattering from the defects.

  13. Method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Paranin, V D; Tukmakov, K N

    2014-04-28

    A method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements is proposed, based on measurement of the transmission of interelectrode gaps. The mathematical description of the method, which is approved experimentally, is developed. The instrumental error effects are analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Effect of microfibril twisting in theoretical powder diffraction studies of cellulose Iß

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies of calculated diffraction patterns for cellulose crystallites have suggested that the distortions arising once models have been subjected to MD simulation are likely the result of dimensional changes induced by the empirical force field, but have been unable to determine to what ext...

  15. X-Ray Diffraction Study of L2005 AG17 (IDPs) by Using SR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsumi, K. O.; Hagiya, K. H.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray diffraction study revealed the existence of magnetite and new type of pyrrhotite with the chemical formula of Fe0.56S in L2005 AG17. Considering the total chemical formula of Fe0.83S, residual iron in amorphous state might exist in this sample. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Charge-density distribution and electrostatic flexibility of ZIF-8 based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and periodic calculations.

    PubMed

    Novaković, Sladjana B; Bogdanović, Goran A; Heering, Christian; Makhloufi, Gamall; Francuski, Djordje; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-03-16

    The electron-density distribution in a prototypical porous coordination polymer ZIF-8 has been obtained in an approach combining high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and Invariom refinement. In addition, the periodic quantum-chemical calculation has been used to describe the theoretical density features of ZIF-8 in the same geometry (m1) and also in a "high-pressure" form of ZIF-8 (m2) characterized by conformational change with respect to the methylimidazolate linker. A thorough comparison of the electronic and electrostatic properties in two limiting structural forms of ZIF-8 proposes additional aspects on diffusion and adsorption processes occurring within the framework. The dimensions of the four-membered (FM) and six-membered (SM) apertures of the β cage are reliably determined from the total electron-density distribution. The analysis shows that FM in m2 becomes competitive in size to the SM aperture and should be considered for the diffusion of small molecules and cations. Bader's topological analysis (quantum theory of atoms in molecules) shows similar properties of both ZIF-8 forms. On the other hand, analysis of their electrostatic properties reveals tremendous differences. The study suggests exceptional electrostatic flexibility of the ZIF-8 framework, where small conformational changes lead to a significantly different electrostatic potential (EP) distribution, a feature that could be important for the function and dynamics of the ZIF-8 framework. The cavity surface in m1 contains 38 distinct regions with moderately positive, negative, or neutral EP and weakly positive EP in the cavity volume. In contrast to m1, the m2 form displays only two regions of different EP, with the positive one taking the whole cavity surface and the strong negative one localized entirely in the FM apertures. The EP in the cavity volume is also more positive than that in m1. A pronounced influence of the linker reorientation on the EP of the ZIF-8 forms is related to the

  17. Nepheline: Structure of Three Samples from the Bancroft Area, Ontario, Obtained using Synchrotron High-Resolution Powder X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Antao, Sytle M.; Hassan, Ishmael

    2010-05-25

    The crystal structure of three samples of nepheline (ideally, K{sub 2}Na{sub 6}[Al{sub 8}Si{sub 8}O{sub 32}]) from the Bancroft area of Ontario (1a, b: Egan Chute, 2: Nephton, and 3: Davis Hill), each with different types of superstructure reflections, has been studied using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data and Rietveld structure refinement. The samples have different origins. The structure was refined in space group P6{sub 3}. The R{sub F}{sup 2} index, number of unique observed reflections, pseudohexagonal subcell parameters, and site-occupancy factor (sof) for the K site are as follows: Sample 1b: R{sub F}{sup 2} = 0.0433, N{sub obs} = 1399, a = 9.99567(1), c = 8.37777(1) {angstrom}, V = 724.907(2) {angstrom}{sub 3}, and K (sof) = 0.716(1). Sample 2: R{sub F}{sup 2} = 0.0669, N{sub obs} = 1589, a = 10.00215(1), c = 8.38742(1) {angstrom}, V = 726.684(1) {angstrom}{sub 3}, and K (sof) = 0.920(1). Sample 3: R{sub F}{sup 2} = 0.0804, N{sub obs} = 1615, a = 9.99567(1), c = 8.37873(1) {angstrom}, V = 724.991(1) {angstrom}{sub 3}, and K (sof) = 0.778(2). Sample 2 has the largest sof for K and the largest volume. The satellite reflections in the three nepheline samples were observed in the HRPXRD traces and give rise to different incommensurate superstructures. The Al and Si atoms in the T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} sites are ordered differently in the three samples, which may indicate the presence of a domain structure based on Al-Si order. The positions for the Al and Si atoms were interchanged in two samples because of the resulting distances. The slight excess of Si over Al atoms, characteristically encountered in well-analyzed samples of nepheline, is reflected in the distances.

  18. Preliminary design of a zone plate based hard X-ray monochromatic diffraction nanoprobe for materials studies at APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhonghou; Liu, Wenjun; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Shu, Deming; Xu, Ruqing; Schmidt, Oliver

    2013-09-01

    Aiming at studies of the micro/nano-structures of a broad range materials and electronic devices, Advance Photon Source (APS) is developing a dedicated diffraction nanoprobe (DNP) beamline for the needs arising from a multidiscipline research community. As a part of the APS Upgrade Project, the planed facility, named Sub-micron 3-D Diffraction (S3DD) beamline1, integrates the K-B mirror based polychromatic Laue diffraction and the Fresnel zone-plate based monochromatic diffraction techniques that currently support 3D/2D microdiffraction programs at the 34-ID-E and 2-ID-D of the APS, respectively. Both diffraction nanoprobes are designed to have a 50-nm or better special resolution. The zone-plate based monochromatic DNP has been preliminarily designed and will be constructed at the sector 34-ID. It uses an APS-3.0-cm period or APS-3.3-cm period undulator, a liquid-nitrogen cooled mirror as its first optics, and a water cooled small gap silicon double-crystal monochromator with an energy range of 5-30 keV. A set of zone plates have been designed to optimize for focusing efficiency and the working distance based on the attainable beamline length and the beam coherence. To ensure the nanoprobe performance, high stiffness and high precision flexure stage systems have been designed or demonstrated for optics mounting and sample scanning, and high precision temperature control of the experimental station will be implemented to reduce thermal instability. Designed nanoprobe beamline has a good management on thermal power loading on optical components and allows high degree of the preservation of beam brilliance for high focal flux and coherence. Integrated with variety of X-ray techniques, planed facility provides nano-XRD capability with the maximum reciprocal space accessibility and allows micro/nano-spectroscopy studies with K-edge electron binding energies of most elements down to Vanadium in the periodic table. We will discuss the preliminary design of the zone

  19. Nanosecond Time Resolved Electron Diffraction Studies of the (Alpha) to (Beta) Transition in Pure Ti Thin Films using the Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM)

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrange, T; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; Reed, B; King, W E

    2005-12-09

    The transient events of the {alpha}-{beta} martensitic transformation in nanocrystalline Ti films were explored via single shot electron diffraction patterns with 1.5 ns temporal resolution. The diffraction patterns were acquired with a newly constructed dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), which combines nanosecond pulsed laser systems and pump-probe techniques with a conventional TEM. With the DTEM, the transient events of fundamental material processes, that are far too fast to be studied by conventional bulk techniques, can be captured in the form of electron diffraction patterns or images with nanosecond temporal resolution. The transient phenomena of the martensitic transformations in nanocrystalline Ti is ideally suited for study in the DTEM, with their rapid nucleation, characteristic interface velocities {approx}1 km/s, and significant irreversible microstructural changes. Free-standing 40-nm-thick Ti films were laser-heated at a rate of {approx}10{sup 10} K/s to a temperature above the 1155 K transition point, then probed at various time intervals with a 1.5-ns-long, intense electron pulse. Diffraction patterns show an almost complete transition to the {beta} phase within 500 ns. Postmortem analysis (after the sample is allowed to cool) shows a reversion to the {alpha} phase coupled with substantial grain growth, lath formation, and texture modification. The cooled material also shows a complete lack of apparent dislocations, suggesting the possible importance of a ''massive'' short-range diffusion transformation mechanism.

  20. Study of the spatial resolution for binary readout detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, R.; Maerschalk, T.; Lentdecker, G. De

    2016-07-01

    Often the binary readout is proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume to be readout at the price of a somewhat reduced spatial resolution compared to an analogue readout. We have been studying single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout using simulations as well as analytical approaches. In this note we show that the detector geometry could be optimized to offer an equivalent spatial resolution than with an analogue readout.

  1. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    PubMed Central

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution. PMID:26527268

  2. Computer Simulations to Study Diffraction Effects of Stacking Faults in Beta-SiC: II. Experimental Verification. 2; Experimental Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujar, Vijay V.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Earlier results from computer simulation studies suggest a correlation between the spatial distribution of stacking errors in the Beta-SiC structure and features observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of the material. Reported here are experimental results obtained from two types of nominally Beta-SiC specimens, which yield distinct XRD data. These samples were analyzed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the stacking error distribution was directly determined. The HRTEM results compare well to those deduced by matching the XRD data with simulated spectra, confirming the hypothesis that the XRD data is indicative not only of the presence and density of stacking errors, but also that it can yield information regarding their distribution. In addition, the stacking error population in both specimens is related to their synthesis conditions and it appears that it is similar to the relation developed by others to explain the formation of the corresponding polytypes.

  3. X-ray diffraction analysis of a human tRNAGly acceptor-stem microhelix isoacceptor at 1.18 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Eichert, André; Perbandt, Markus; Schreiber, Angela; Fürste, Jens P.; Betzel, Christian; Erdmann, Volker A.; Förster, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Interest has been focused on comparative X-ray structure analyses of different tRNAGly acceptor-stem helices. tRNAGly/glycyl-tRNA synthetase belongs to the so-called class II system, in which the tRNA identity elements consist of simple and unique determinants that are located in the tRNA acceptor stem and the discriminator base. Comparative structure investigations of tRNAGly microhelices provide insight into the role of tRNA identity elements. Predominant differences in the structures of glycyl-tRNA synthetases and in the tRNA identity elements between prokaryotes and eukaryotes point to divergence during the evolutionary process. Here, the crystallization and high-resolution X-­ray diffraction analysis of a human tRNAGly acceptor-stem microhelix with sequence 5′-G1C2A3U4U5G6G7-3′, 5′-C66C67A68A69U70G71C72-3′ is reported. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.32, b = 37.61, c = 30.47 Å, β = 112.60° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. A data set was collected using synchrotron radiation and data were processed within the resolution range 50.0–1.18 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. PMID:19153458

  4. Powder Diffraction Studies in the YONO 3-Y 2O 3 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelloquin, D.; Louër, M.; Louër, D.

    1994-09-01

    The crystal structure of yttrium oxide nitrate and the microstructure of the oxide obtained from its thermal decomposition have been investigated by modern powder diffraction methods. Sequential high-temperature diffraction studies of the thermal decomposition of two precursors of yttrium oxide nitrate, i.e., neutral yttrium nitrate and yttrium hydroxide nitrate, are reported. The structure of YONO 3 has been determined ab initio from conventional powder diffractometry using monochromatic X-rays. The pattern was indexed by the successive dichotomy method yielding tetragonal unit cell dimensions: a = 3.8590(1) Å and c = 9.7161(6) Å. The space group is P4/ nmm and Z = 2. Most of the atoms were located by direct methods and the remaining ones from a Fourier map. Refinement of the complete diffraction profile parameters converged to final agreement factors Rp = 0.12, Rwp = 0.16 and RF = 0.039. The structure is closely related to the matlockite PbFCl-type structure. The microstructure of ex-oxide-nitrate yttrium oxide has been analysed by total pattern fitting techniques, from which strain-free coherently diffracting nanodomains with a rectangular parallelepipedic shape have been obtained.

  5. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    SciTech Connect

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-10-23

    Bacterial and fungal type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) are evolutionarily connected, as bacterial FAS I is considered to be the ancestor of fungal FAS I. In this work, the production, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of a bacterial FAS I are reported. While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution.

  6. Ice Recrystallization in a Solution of a Cryoprotector and Its Inhibition by a Protein: Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Boris; Fisyuk, Alexander; Fitch, Andy; Watier, Yves; Kostyuchenko, Anastasia; Varshney, Dushyant; Sztucki, Michael; Boldyreva, Elena; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2016-07-01

    Ice formation and recrystallization is a key phenomenon in freezing and freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals. In this investigation, high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the extent of disorder of ice crystals in binary aqueous solutions of a cryoprotectant (sorbitol) and a protein, bovine serum albumin. Ice crystals in more dilute (10 wt%) solutions have lower level of microstrain and larger crystal domain size than these in more concentrated (40 wt%) solutions. Warming the sorbitol-water mixtures from 100 to 228 K resulted in partial ice melting, with simultaneous reduction in the microstrain and increase in crystallite size, that is, recrystallization. In contrast to sorbitol solutions, ice crystals in the BSA solutions preserved both the microstrain and smaller crystallite size on partial melting, demonstrating that BSA inhibits ice recrystallization. The results are consistent with BSA partitioning into quasi-liquid layer on ice crystals but not with a direct protein-ice interaction and protein sorption on ice surface. The study shows for the first time that a common (i.e., not-antifreeze) protein can have a major impact on ice recrystallization and also presents synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a unique tool for quantification of crystallinity and disorder in frozen aqueous systems. PMID:27287516

  7. Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary Diffraction Studies of the Sulfolobus solfataricu PCNA Proteins in Different Oligomeric Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Guangxin,X.; Vladena, H.; Hong, L.

    2007-01-01

    PCNA is a ring-shaped protein that encircles DNA and is essential for DNA metabolism, including DNA replication and repair. PCNA is either a homotrimer in eukaryotes and euryarchaeotes or a heterotrimer in some crenarchaeotes. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus encodes three PCNA homologues (PCNA1, PCNA2, and PCNA3). PCNA1 and PCNA2 form a stable dimer. The dimer then recruits PCNA3 to form the trimeric ring-shaped molecule that is typical for all PCNA proteins. We crystallized the PCNA3 monomer, the PCNA1-PCNA2 heterodimer, and the PCNA1-PCNA2-PCNA3 heterotrimer. The crystals diffract X-ray to 1.9, 2.6, and 2.5 Angstroms resolutions, respectively. SAD phasing and molecular replacement solutions have confirmed that the crystals do contain the corresponding monomer, dimer, and trimer.

  8. Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary Diffraction Studies of the Sulfolobus solfataricus PCNA Proteins in Different Oligomeric Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,G.; Hlinkova, V.; Ling, H.

    2007-01-01

    PCNA is a ring-shaped protein that encircles DNA and is essential for DNA metabolism, including DNA replication and repair. PCNA is either a homotrimer in eukaryotes and euryarchaeotes or a heterotrimer in some crenarchaeotes. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus encodes three PCNA homologues (PCNA1, PCNA2, and PCNA3). PCNA1 and PCNA2 form a stable dimer. The dimer then recruits PCNA3 to form the trimeric ring-shaped molecule that is typical for all PCNA proteins. We crystallized the PCNA3 monomer, the PCNA1-PCNA2 heterodimer, and the PCNA1-PCNA2-PCNA3 heterotrimer. The crystals diffract X-ray to 1.9, 2.6, and 2.5 Angstroms resolutions, respectively. SAD phasing and molecular replacement solutions have confirmed that the crystals do contain the corresponding monomer, dimer, and trimer.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a catechol-O-methyltransferase/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. L.; Bonifácio, M. J.; Soares-da-Silva, P.; Carrondo, M. A.; Archer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase has been co-crystallized with a novel inhibitor, which has potential therapeutic application in the Parkinson’s disease therapy. Inhibitors of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) are used as co-adjuvants in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease. A recombinant form of the soluble cytosolic COMT from rat has been co-crystallized with a new potent inhibitor, BIA 8-176 [(3,4-dihydroxy-2-nitrophenyl)phenylmethanone], by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6K as precipitant. Crystals diffract to 1.6 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.77, b = 79.63, c = 61.54 Å, β = 91.14°.

  10. The ferroelectric phase of CdTiO{sub 3}: A powder neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Brendan J.; Zhou Qingdi; Avdeev, Maxim

    2011-11-15

    The synthesis of bulk samples of polycrystalline CdTiO{sub 3} in both the rhombohedral ilmenite and orthorhombic perovskite forms is described and the structures of these have been refined using powder neutron diffraction data. This involved the preparation of samples enriched in {sup 114}Cd. Cooling perovskite-type CdTiO{sub 3} to 4 K induces a ferroelectric phase transition, with the neutron data suggesting the low temperature structure is in Pna2{sub 1}. Mode analysis shows the polar mode to be dominant at low temperatures. The ilmenite-structure of CdTiO{sub 3} is compared with that of ZnTiO{sub 3}. The refined scattering length of the {sup 114}Cd is estimated to be 5.56 fm. Attempts to dope CdTiO{sub 3} with Ca and Sr are described. - Graphical abstract: The structure of three phases of CdTiO{sub 3} have been refined using high resolution powder neutron diffraction data. This involved the preparation of samples enriched in {sup 114}Cd. Cooling perovskite-type CdTiO{sub 3} to 4 K results in a ferroelectric phase in Pna2{sub 1}. Highlights: > Both the ilmenite and perovskite forms of CdTiO{sub 3} have been prepared using {sup 114}Cd. > Cooling the perovskite form results in a ferroelectric phase. > The structures of these are refined from powder neutron diffraction data. > Attempts to dope CdTiO{sub 3} are described.

  11. Magnetic ordering and transitions of EuSe studied by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, B.; Granado, E.; Abramof, E.; Torres, L.; Lechner, R. T.; Springholz, G.; Bauer, G.

    2010-05-01

    The magnetic phase diagram and thermal expansion of EuSe is revisited using a high-quality 3200-Å -thick epitaxial film grown over a (111)BaF2 substrate. Resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction experiments reveal a highly hysteretic magnetic phase diagram between 1.8 and TN˜4.7K , in which two antiferromagnetic phases with propagation vectors k⃗I=[(1)/(4),(1)/(4),-(1)/(4)] (represented by ↑↑↓↓ ) and k⃗II=[(1)/(2),(1)/(2),-(1)/(2)](↑↓↑↓) are observed. In addition, a defective phase with k⃗III=[h,h,-h]((1)/(4)resolution x-ray diffraction experiments show unit-cell hysteretic distortions that correlate with the transitions to the different magnetic phases existing below TN .

  12. In Situ Powder Diffraction Studies of Electrode Materials in Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; Pang, Wei Kong; Guo, Zaiping; Peterson, Vanessa K

    2015-09-01

    The ability to directly track the charge carrier in a battery as it inserts/extracts from an electrode during charge/discharge provides unparalleled insight for researchers into the working mechanism of the device. This crystallographic-electrochemical information can be used to design new materials or modify electrochemical conditions to improve battery performance characteristics, such as lifetime. Critical to collecting operando data used to obtain such information in situ while a battery functions are X-ray and neutron diffractometers with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to capture complex and subtle structural changes. The number of operando battery experiments has dramatically increased in recent years, particularly those involving neutron powder diffraction. Herein, the importance of structure-property relationships to understanding battery function, why in situ experimentation is critical to this, and the types of experiments and electrochemical cells required to obtain such information are described. For each battery type, selected research that showcases the power of in situ and operando diffraction experiments to understand battery function is highlighted and future opportunities for such experiments are discussed. The intention is to encourage researchers to use in situ and operando techniques and to provide a concise overview of this area of research. PMID:26223736

  13. Theoretical study on the interference pattern of femtosecond pulses diffracted by a phase mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, A.; Kinet, D.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Caucheteur, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a theoretical study on the interference created by a phase mask when a femtosecond laser is used. The limitations of the phase mask-to-fiber distance are discussed and the optimal inscription range is established. Femtosecond lasers have the unique feature of short coherence length and thus the diffraction orders do not interfere after a certain distance travelled from the phase mask even if the phase mask has a poor zero order suppression. The equation describing this behaviour is presented and simulations are included for validation. The intensity profile of the overlapping +/-1 diffraction orders after the phase mask is also studied for 1st order (1070 nm pitch) and for 2nd order (2140 nm pitch) phase masks.

  14. X-ray diffraction studies of phase transformations in heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.; Doremus, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the crystallization properties of five ZrF4-based glass compositions have indicated that the crystalline phase in Zr-Ba-La-Pb fluoride glass is beta-BaZrF6; no such identification of crystal phases was obtainable, however, for the other glasses. Reversible polymorphic phase transformations occur in Zr-Ba-La-Li and Zr-Ba-La-Na fluoride glasses, upon heating to higher temperatures.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of antigen--antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Chitarra-Guillon, V; Souchon, H; Boulot, G; Riottot, M M; Mariuzza, R; Tello, D; Poljak, R J

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity have been purified and crystallized as single components or complexed with their specific antigens. The intersegmental flexibility of antibody molecules has imposed the strategy of attempting to crystallize their Fab fragments separately. Intrasegmental mobility in Fabs has rarely been an obstacle to their crystallization. The immune system, however, provides a large functional and structural diversity of antibody molecules suitable for crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:3147699

  16. Simultaneous fluorescence and phase imaging with extensions toward sub-diffraction resolution via structured-illumination (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-03-01

    In the biological sciences, there is much emphasis on elucidating the functions of various biological components and processes. To do so, advances in general microscopy have yielded various imaging modalities to probe such processes under specific visualization and contrast requirements. Examples of modalities that are popularly integrated into conventional biological studies include fluorescent, dark-field, phase-contrast, and polarization-sensitive microscopies, with each modality offering unique insights into the biological function of the sample. Often times, however, a comprehensive understanding of biological phenomena requires the integration of the unique and separate visualizations of various modalities. Unfortunately, conventional microscopes typically support only one modality and rarely allow multiple modalities to be used in conjunction. Though high-end microscopes may support multimodal visualization, they often require either mechanical (and often manual) toggling, which obstruct real-time multimodal imaging, or simultaneous detection via multiple cameras, which dramatically increases the microscope's cost. Here, we present a one-shot technique that allows multiple imaging channels, of potentially different modalities, to be simultaneously detected by a single camera. We experimentally demonstrate this method on transparent cells that have been tagged for F-actin and nuclear fluorescence. Our multimodal system consists of 2-channel fluorescence and 1-channel quantitative-phase (QP) imaging, and clearly demonstrates ability for simultaneous fluorescent and QP visualization. Though we experimentally verify our framework using dual fluorescent/QP imaging, we emphasize that our framework for single-shot, simultaneous single-camera detection is applicable to an arbitrary number of widefield imaging modalities so long as they fulfill criteria for Fourier spectra separation, SNR, and detector dynamic range

  17. Synthesis, growth, spectral, X-ray diffraction, magnetic and thermal studies of metal-organic complex: Diiodobis(2-aminopyridine)Cadmium(II) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, G.; Anandha Babu, G.; Ramasamy, P.; Rajnikant

    2013-06-01

    The metal-organic hybrid complex, [Cd(2ap)2I2] (DIAC), (2ap = 2-aminopyridine) was synthesized, DIAC single crystal has been grown and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, FT-1H NMR, single crystal X-ray diffraction, high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), UV-Vis-NIR transmission, magnetic and thermal studies. The metal-ligand formation of the title complex was analyzed by FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies. The DIAC crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system, space group P21/n. The coordination geometry around the Cd(II) center is a distorted tetrahedral. The single-crystal structure analysis showed that DIAC displayed three-dimensional structures containing inorganic-organic motifs with two-dimensional layers pillar-connected through hydrogen bonding framework. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies (HRXRD) reveals that the crystalline perfection of as grown single crystal is fairly good. Thermal stability of title compound was studied by TG/DTA analysis.

  18. Possibilities and limitations of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with double crystal and double multilayer monochromators for microscopic speciation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nolf, Wout; Jaroszewicz, Jakub; Terzano, Roberto; Lind, Ole Christian; Salbu, Brit; Vekemans, Bart; Janssens, Koen; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2009-08-01

    The performance of a combined microbeam X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction (XRF/XRPD) measurement station at Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) Beamline L is discussed in comparison to that at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID18F/ID22. The angular resolution in the X-ray diffractograms is documented when different combinations of X-ray source, optics and X-ray diffraction detectors are employed. Typical angular resolution values in the range 0.3-0.5° are obtained at the bending magnet source when a 'pink' beam form of excitation is employed. A similar setup at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beamlines ID18F and ID22 allows to reach angular resolution values of 0.1-0.15°. In order to document the possibilities and limitations for speciation of metals in environmental materials by means of Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor Beamline L X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction setup, two case studies are discussed, one involved in the identification of the crystal phases in which heavy metals such as chromium, iron, barium and lead are present in polluted soils of an industrial site (Val Basento, Italy) and another involved in the speciation of uranium in depleted uranium particles (Ceja Mountains, Kosovo). In the former case, the angular resolution is sufficient to allow identification of most crystalline phases present while in the latter case, it is necessary to dispose of an angular resolution of ca. 0.2° to distinguish between different forms of oxidized uranium.

  19. Neutron diffraction study of hydrogen-bond symmetrization in δ-AlOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano-Furukawa, A.; Hattori, T.; Kuribayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    δ-AlOOH, a high-pressure polymorph of diaspore, is an important hydrous mineral in the deep earth that has the ability to transport hydrogen into the lower mantle. Theoretical studies have pointed out that hydrogen would locate at the center between two oxygen atoms at high pressure, which is so called hydrogen-bond symmetrization [1]. It was also suggested that the symmetrization would trigger the increase of bulk modulus, which is one of the important parameters of minerals at high pressure. The transition of δ-AlOOH(D) at high pressure has been suggested by X-ray and neutron diffraction [2, 3]. X-ray diffraction study found that the axes a and b where the hydrogen bond is oriented become less compressible above 12 GPa in δ-AlOOD. Neutron diffraction study on δ-AlOOD up to 9.2 GPa showed the increase of O-D bond distance, that is considered as a precousor phenomena of the symmetrization. However, the pressure was insufficient to observe the symmetrization. To investigate the symmetrization of hydrogen bond directly, we conducted neutron diffraction experiments to 16.7 GPa at PLANET, MLF in J-PARC. Powder sample of δ-AlOOD was loaded in Paris-Edinburgh press with double-toroid sintered diamond anvils with methanol-ethanol mixture of pressure medium. In the experiments, the disappearance of 120 refrection was observed at 12.1 GPa, indicating the transition from P21nm to Pnnm, which can be attributed to the disorder of hydrogen bond or the symmtrization. Results of Rietveld refienment will be shown in the presentation. [1] Tsuchiya et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1909, 2002. [2] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 93, 1558-1567, 2008. [3] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 94, 1255-1261, 2009.

  20. A study of spatial resolution in pollution exposure modelling

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, Emilie; Harrie, Lars; Gustafsson, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    Background This study is part of several ongoing projects concerning epidemiological research into the effects on health of exposure to air pollutants in the region of Scania, southern Sweden. The aim is to investigate the optimal spatial resolution, with respect to temporal resolution, for a pollutant database of NOx-values which will be used mainly for epidemiological studies with durations of days, weeks or longer periods. The fact that a pollutant database has a fixed spatial resolution makes the choice critical for the future use of the database. Results The results from the study showed that the accuracy between the modelled concentrations of the reference grid with high spatial resolution (100 m), denoted the fine grid, and the coarser grids (200, 400, 800 and 1600 meters) improved with increasing spatial resolution. When the pollutant values were aggregated in time (from hours to days and weeks) the disagreement between the fine grid and the coarser grids were significantly reduced. The results also illustrate a considerable difference in optimal spatial resolution depending on the characteristic of the study area (rural or urban areas). To estimate the accuracy of the modelled values comparison were made with measured NOx values. The mean difference between the modelled and the measured value were 0.6 μg/m3 and the standard deviation 5.9 μg/m3 for the daily difference. Conclusion The choice of spatial resolution should not considerably deteriorate the accuracy of the modelled NOx values. Considering the comparison between modelled and measured values we estimate that an error due to coarse resolution greater than 1 μg/m3 is inadvisable if a time resolution of one day is used. Based on the study of different spatial resolutions we conclude that for urban areas a spatial resolution of 200–400 m is suitable; and for rural areas the spatial resolution could be coarser (about 1600 m). This implies that we should develop a pollutant database that allows

  1. X-ray and neutron diffraction study of nanocrystalline Ti-Ru-Fe-O compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, M.; Guay, D.; Huot, J.; Schulz, R.; Swainson, I.P.

    1998-11-01

    The effect of adding oxygen on the structure of nanocrystalline Ti-Ru-Fe compounds obtained by high-energy ball-milling has been studied by X-ray and neutron diffraction using a Rietveld refinement analysis. It is shown that oxygen atoms readily oxidize Ti to form various types of titanium oxides depending on the oxygen content. In each case, a simple cubic structure (cP2-CsCl) is also formed during milling but with a concentration higher than expected on the basis of various reaction schemes. Through a detailed analysis of the neutron and X-ray diffraction peaks, it is shown that the 1a site of the CsCl-type unit cell is depleted from Ti atoms by preferential substitution with Fe. At high oxygen concentration, the alloy is a multiphase material containing Ti{sub 2{minus}x}Ru{sub 1+y}Fe{sub 1+z}, Ti oxides, Ru, and Fe.

  2. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kulriya, P. K.; Singh, F.; Tripathi, A.; Ahuja, R.; Kothari, A.; Dutt, R. N.; Mishra, Y. K.; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D. K.

    2007-11-15

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90 MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C{sub 60} was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C{sub 60} film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T=255 K.

  3. Structural studies of homoisoflavonoids: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievänen, Elina; Toušek, Jaromír; Lunerová, Kamila; Marek, Jaromír; Jankovská, Dagmar; Dvorská, Margita; Marek, Radek

    2010-08-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for five homoisoflavonoids, molecules important from the pharmacological point of view. For studying the electron distribution as well as its influence on the physicochemical properties, NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations have been used. Nuclear magnetic shieldings obtained by using DFT calculations for optimized molecular geometries are correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The theoretical data are well in agreement with the experimental values. The single crystal X-ray structures of homoisoflavonoid derivatives 1, 3, and 4 have been solved. The molecular geometries and crystal packing determined by X-ray diffraction are used for characterizing the intermolecular interactions. Electron distribution is crucial for the stability of radicals and hence the antioxidant efficiency of flavonoid structures. The hydrogen bonding governs the formation of complexes of homoisoflavonoids with biological targets.

  4. In-Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R; Walker, Larry R; Ostrander, M

    2012-01-01

    Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This paper reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Further, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite as a function of applied stress were determined using in-situ loading with neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  5. Ultrafast lattice response of photoexcited thin films studied by X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Marc; Bojahr, André; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Hertwig, Andreas; Bargheer, Matias

    2014-01-01

    Using ultrafast X-ray diffraction, we study the coherent picosecond lattice dynamics of photoexcited thin films in the two limiting cases, where the photoinduced stress profile decays on a length scale larger and smaller than the film thickness. We solve a unifying analytical model of the strain propagation for acoustic impedance-matched opaque films on a semi-infinite transparent substrate, showing that the lattice dynamics essentially depend on two parameters: One for the spatial profile and one for the amplitude of the strain. We illustrate the results by comparison with high-quality ultrafast X-ray diffraction data of SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates. PMID:26798784

  6. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction study of skutterudite thermoelectrics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, H.; Kirkham, M. J.; Watkins, T. R.; Payzant, E. A.; Salvador, J. R.; Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J.; Brown, D.; Miller, D.

    2016-02-17

    N- and p-type filled-skutterudite materials prepared for thermoelectric power generation modules were analyzed by neutron diffraction at the POWGEN beam line of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The skutterudite powders were processed by melt spinning, followed by ball milling and annealing. The n-type material consists of Ba–Yb–Co–Sb and the p-type material consists of Di–Fe–Ni–Sb or Di–Fe–Co–Sb (Di = didymium, an alloy of Pr and Nd). Powders for prototype module fabrication from General Motors and Marlow Industries were analyzed in this study. XRD and neutron diffraction studies confirm that both the n- and p-type materials have cubicmore » symmetry. Structural Rietveld refinements determined the lattice parameters and atomic parameters of the framework and filler atoms. The cage filling fraction was found to depend linearly on the lattice parameter, which in turn depends on the average framework atom size. Ultimately, this knowledge may allow the filling fraction of these skutterudite materials to be purposefully adjusted, thereby tuning the thermoelectric properties.« less

  7. Design and application of a high-temperature microfurnace for an in situ X-ray diffraction study of phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Eu, W S; Cheung, W H; Valix, M

    2009-11-01

    Thermal treatment of mineral ores such as ilmenite can initiate phase transformations that could affect their activation or deactivation, subsequently influencing their ability to dissolve in a leaching agent. Most laboratory-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out ex situ in which realistic diffraction patterns could not be obtained simultaneously with occurring reactions and were time-consuming. The availability of synchrotron-radiation-based XRD not only allows in situ analysis, but significantly shortens the data recording time. The present study details the design of a robust high-temperature microfurnace which allows thermal processing of mineral ore samples and the simultaneous collection of high-resolution synchrotron XRD data. In addition, the application of the manufactured microfurnace for in situ study of phase transformations of ilmenite ore under reducing conditions is demonstrated. PMID:19844022

  8. Capability of X-ray diffraction for the study of microstructure of metastable thin films.

    PubMed

    Rafaja, David; Wüstefeld, Christina; Dopita, Milan; Motylenko, Mykhaylo; Baehtz, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Metastable phases are often used to design materials with outstanding properties, which cannot be achieved with thermodynamically stable compounds. In many cases, the metastable phases are employed as precursors for controlled formation of nanocomposites. This contribution shows how the microstructure of crystalline metastable phases and the formation of nanocomposites can be concluded from X-ray diffraction experiments by taking advantage of the high sensitivity of X-ray diffraction to macroscopic and microscopic lattice deformations and to the dependence of the lattice deformations on the crystallographic direction. The lattice deformations were determined from the positions and from the widths of the diffraction lines, the dependence of the lattice deformations on the crystallographic direction from the anisotropy of the line shift and the line broadening. As an example of the metastable system, the supersaturated solid solution of titanium nitride and aluminium nitride was investigated, which was prepared in the form of thin films by using cathodic arc evaporation of titanium and aluminium in a nitrogen atmosphere. The microstructure of the (Ti,Al)N samples under study was tailored by modifying the [Al]/[Ti] ratio in the thin films and the surface mobility of the deposited species. PMID:25485125

  9. A structural study of cyanotrichite from Dachang by conventional and automated electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventruti, Gennaro; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Capitani, Giancarlo; Scordari, Fernando; Pinto, Daniela; Lausi, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of cyanotrichite, having general formula Cu4Al2(SO4)(OH)12·2H2O, from the Dachang deposit (China) was studied by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy, automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). ADT revealed the presence of two different cyanotrichite-like phases. The same phases were also recognized in the XRPD pattern, allowing the perfect indexing of all peaks leading, after refinement to the following cell parameters: (1) a = 12.417(2) Å, b = 2.907(1) Å, c = 10.157(1) Å and β = 98.12(1); (2) a = 12.660(2) Å, b = 2.897(1) Å, c = 10.162(1) Å and β = 92.42(1)°. Only for the former phase, labeled cyanotrichite-98, a partial structure, corresponding to the [Cu4Al2(OH){12/2+}] cluster, was obtained ab initio by direct methods in space group C2/ m on the basis of electron diffraction data. Geometric and charge-balance considerations allowed to reach the whole structure model for the cyanotrichite-98 phase. The sulfate group and water molecule result to be statistically disordered over two possible positions, but keeping the average structure consistent with the C-centering symmetry, in agreement with ADT results.

  10. Molecular geometry of 2-nitrotoluene from gas phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkov, Igor F.; Vilkov, Lev V.; Kovács, Attila; Hargittai, István

    1998-04-01

    The molecular geometry of 2-nitrotoluene has been determined by gas phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical computations at the MP2/6-31G∗ and Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3-LYP)/6-31G∗ levels of theory. Computed differences in CC bond lengths were utilized as constraints in the electron diffraction structure analysis. The scaled B3-LYP/6-31G∗ force field was used to generate the initial set of vibrational amplitudes. The electron diffraction study yielded the following bond lengths ( rg) and bond angles: C 1C 2, 1.405(8) Å; NO, 1.231(3) Å; C 1C 7, 1.508(8) Å; CN, 1.490(9) Å; C 7C 1C 2, 127.3(7)°; NC 2C 3, 113.8(6)°; C 1C 2C 3, 124.2(9)°; C 6C 1C 2, 114.8(6)°; C 5C 6C 1, 123.1(10)°; O-N-O, 124.9(3)°; ϕ(CN), 38(1)°. The structural features of the molecule point to steric interactions prevailing between the methyl and nitro groups.

  11. Single-crystal neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen-bonded systems: Two recent examples from IPNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetzle, Thomas F.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Schultz, Arthur J.

    2009-02-01

    Beginning with work in the 1950s at the first generation of research reactors, studies of hydrogen-bonded systems have been a prime application for single-crystal neutron diffraction. The range of systems studied was extended in the 1960s and 1970s, with the advent of high flux reactor sources, and beginning around 1980 studies at pulsed neutron sources have made increasingly important contributions. Recently at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), working with collaborators, we completed two studies of hydrogen-bonded systems that will serve to illustrate topics of current interest. In the first study, on andrographolide, an active diterpenoid natural product, our neutron diffraction results definitively characterize the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The second IPNS study is on tetraacetylethane (TAE), a β-diketone enol system with a very short, strong intramolecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. At IPNS, we have determined the neutron crystal structure of TAE at five temperatures between 20 and 298 K to investigate changes in the structure with temperature and to probe for disorder. Despite the successes illustrated by the two examples presented here and by many other studies, at present applications of single-crystal neutron diffraction continue to be extremely flux limited and constrained by the requirement for mm-size crystals for many problems. These limitations are being addressed through the realization of powerful instruments at a new generation of pulsed neutron sources, including in the USA the TOPAZ and MaNDi single-crystal diffractometers that are under development at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  12. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy for High-Resolution Membrane Studies

    PubMed Central

    Huckabay, Heath A.; Armendariz, Kevin P.; Newhart, William H.; Wildgen, Sarah M.; Dunn, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The desire to directly probe biological structures on the length scales that they exist has driven the steady development of various high-resolution microscopy techniques. Among these, optical microscopy and, in particular, fluorescence-based approaches continue to occupy dominant roles in biological studies given their favorable attributes. Fluorescence microscopy is both sensitive and specific, is generally noninvasive toward biological samples, has excellent temporal resolution for dynamic studies, and is relatively inexpensive. Light-based microscopies can also exploit a myriad of contrast mechanisms based on spectroscopic signatures, energy transfer, polarization, and lifetimes to further enhance the specificity or information content of a measurement. Historically, however, spatial resolution has been limited to approximately half the wavelength due to the diffraction of light. Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is one of several optical approaches currently being developed that combines the favorable attributes of fluorescence microscopy with superior spatial resolution. NSOM is particularly well suited for studies of both model and biological membranes and application to these systems is discussed. PMID:23086886

  13. Low-temperature phase diagram of Fe1+yTe studied using x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Cevriye; Rößler, Sahana; Tsirlin, Alexander A.; Wirth, Steffen; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    We used low-temperature synchrotron x-ray diffraction to investigate the structural phase transitions of Fe1+yTe in the vicinity of a tricitical point in the phase diagram. A detailed analysis of the powder diffraction patterns and temperature dependence of the peak widths in Fe1+yTe showed that two-step structural and magnetic phase transitions occur within the compositional range 0.11≤y≤0.13. The phase transitions are sluggish, indicating a strong competition between the orthorhombic and the monoclinic phases. We combine high-resolution diffraction experiments with specific heat, resistivity, and magnetization measurements and present a revised temperature-composition phase diagram for Fe1+yTe.

  14. High pressure x-ray diffraction study of Mn-bearing dolomite, kutnohorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaich, S.; Heffern, R.; Watenphul, A.; Beavers, C.; Kavner, A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the deep Earth's role in the global carbon cycle requires knowledge of the phase stability of carbon-bearing minerals at the high pressures and temperatures relevant to the mantle. Carbon is recycled into the deep Earth via subduction where carbonate phases dominate the carbon-rich mineralogy. Recent studies have demonstrated that iron-rich dolomite transforms to a new structure at 17 GPa (dolomite II) and then to new high pressure carbonate structure above 35 GPa (dolomite III) (Mao et al. 2011; Merlini et al. 2012). These phases may act as carbon carriers in whole mantle carbon cycling. The goal of this study is to extend the compositional range by examining phase stability of a Mn-rich dolomite Kutnohorite (Ca(Mn,Mg,Fe)(CO3)2 at lower mantle conditions. The phase stability of natural kutnohorite from Franklin, NJ was investigated at high pressures and temperatures. Powdered samples were compressed in a diamond anvil cell to pressures up to 50 GPa using neon gas as hydrostatic pressure medium. Monochromatic X-ray diffraction data were collected at beamline 12.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source. In a first experiment the sample was brought up in pressure steps of 2-3 GPa with diffraction patterns taken at every pressure step until 21 GPa, where the sample was laser heated to achieve a stable phase assemblage. In a second experiment, the sample was pressurized to 36 GPa and then brought up in 5 GPa steps to 50 GPa while being heated by infrared lasers at each pressure step. We observed a phase transformation to the dolomite II phase between 15 and 21 GPa , consistent with previous studies (Santillan et al. 2003; Mao et al. 2011; Merlini et al. 2012) As pressure was increased, the diffraction pattern changed, indicating a different high pressure phase stable in the range of 36 to 46 GPa after laser annealing. We will present our X-ray diffraction data, including compressibility of kutnohorite to 15 GPa, density of the dolomite II phase, and

  15. Structural Study of Liquid Se-Te Alloys by Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tamaki, Shigeru; Waseda, Yoshio

    1986-12-01

    The neutron diffraction study of liquid Se-Te system has been carried out to reveal the origin of characteristic temperature dependence of various properties related to the structural order in atomic scale. The temperature dependence of measured structural functions of liquid SexTe1-x system could be explained by a gradual transition from two-fold coordinated component (non-metallic) to the three-fold coordinated one (metallic). The partial structure factors of these two-fold and three-fold coordinations are separated with the help of the thermodynamic data. A configurational model satisfying these situations is also presented.

  16. Study of an ultrafast analog-to-digital conversion scheme based on diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Johansson, M; Löfving, B; Hård, S; Thylén, L; Mokhtari, M; Westergren, U; Pala, C

    2000-06-10

    A potentially ultrafast optical analog-to-digital (A/D) converter scheme is proposed and was partly studied experimentally. In the A/D converter scheme the input signal controls the wavelength of a diode laser, whose output beam is incident on a grating. The beam from the grating hits a diffractive optical element in an array. The wavelength determines which element is illuminated. Each element fans out a unique spot-pattern bit code to be read out in parallel by individual detectors. In the experiment all patterns but one from 64 array elements were read out correctly. PMID:18345212

  17. X-ray powder diffraction study of poly/carbon monofluoride/, CF/1.12/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, V. K.; Badachhape, R. B.; Margrave, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Data from X-ray diffraction studies of the poly(carbon monofluoride) with empirical formula CF(1.09-1.15) are reported, and possible intercalation arrangements for the substance are discussed. The data do not conform to true hexagonal symmetry, indicating that the carbon atoms are not coplanar. Each bond angle of carbon is 118.8 deg, and the carbon-carbon distance is 1.47 A. The interlayer distance is 5.76 A. A total absence of (hkl) reflections in the X-ray pattern shows that the separate CF layers are not regularly arranged with respect to one another.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Tomomi; Goda, Yuko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005 has been crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and microseeding. The crystals contained one dimeric molecule per asymmetric unit and diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution. Maleylacetate reductase (EC 1.3.1.32), which catalyzes the reduction of maleylacetate to 3-oxoadipate, plays an important role in the aerobic microbial catabolism of resorcinol. The enzyme has been crystallized at 293 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method supplemented with a microseeding technique, using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.85, b = 121.13, c = 94.09 Å, β = 101.48°, and contained one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. It diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a ferredoxin reductase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ying; Xu, Feng; Bell, Stephen G.; Wong, Luet-Lok; Rao, Zihe

    2007-05-01

    Palustrisredoxin reductase (RPA3782, PuR), a flavin-dependent ferredoxin reductase, is an essential component of the Class I cytochrome P450 systems in Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009. Crystals of PuR that diffract to 2.2 Å resolution have been obtained. Palustrisredoxin reductase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009, a member of the oxygenase-coupled NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase (ONFR) family, catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ferredoxins. It is an essential component of the cytochrome P450 systems in R. palustris CGA009, a model organism with diverse metabolic pathways. Here, the crystallization of palustrisredoxin reductase is reported. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.5, b = 107.5, c = 69.9 Å, and diffract to 2.2 Å resolution on a synchrotron source.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of d-tagatose 3-epimerase from Pseudomonas cichorii

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Nishitani, Takeyori; Takada, Goro; Izumori, Ken; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2007-02-01

    Recombinant d-tagatose 3-epimerase from P. cichorii was purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. d-Tagatose 3-epimerase (D-TE) from Pseudomonas cichorii catalyzes the epimerization of various ketohexoses at the C3 position. The epimerization of d-psicose has not been reported with epimerases other than P. cichorii D-TE and d-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Recombinant P. cichorii D-TE has been purified and crystallized. Crystals of P. cichorii D-TE were obtained by the sitting-drop method at room temperature. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.80, b = 94.92, c = 91.73 Å, β = 102.82°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit is expected to contain four molecules.

  1. Studies of clays and clay minerals using x-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    The Rietveld method was originally developed (Rietveld, 1967, 1969) to refine crystal structures using neutron powder diffraction data. Since then, the method has been increasingly used with X-ray powder diffraction data, and today it is safe to say that this is the most common application of the method. The method has been applied to numerous natural and synthetic materials, most of which do not usually form crystals large enough for study with single-crystal techniques. It is the ability to study the structures of materials for which sufficiently large single crystals do not exist that makes the method so powerful and popular. It would thus appear that the method is ideal for studying clays and clay minerals. In many cases this is true, but the assumptions implicit in the method and the disordered nature of many clay minerals can limit titsapplicability. This chapter will describe the Rietveld method, emphasizing the assumptions important for the study of disordered materials, and it will outline the potential applications of the method to these minerals. These applications include, in addition to the refinement of crystal structures, quantitative analysis of multicomponent mixtures, analysis of peak broadening, partial structure solution, and refinement of unit-cell parameters.

  2. Signature of dislocations and stacking faults of face-centred cubic nanocrystals in coherent X-ray diffraction patterns: a numerical study1

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, Maxime; Beutier, Guillaume; Rodney, David; Mordehai, Dan; Verdier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Crystal defects induce strong distortions in diffraction patterns. A single defect alone can yield strong and fine features that are observed in high-resolution diffraction experiments such as coherent X-ray diffraction. The case of face-centred cubic nanocrystals is studied numerically and the signatures of typical defects close to Bragg positions are identified. Crystals of a few tens of nanometres are modelled with realistic atomic potentials and ‘relaxed’ after introduction of well defined defects such as pure screw or edge dislocations, or Frank or prismatic loops. Diffraction patterns calculated in the kinematic approximation reveal various signatures of the defects depending on the Miller indices. They are strongly modified by the dissociation of the dislocations. Selection rules on the Miller indices are provided, to observe the maximum effect of given crystal defects in the initial and relaxed configurations. The effect of several physical and geometrical parameters such as stacking fault energy, crystal shape and defect position are discussed. The method is illustrated on a complex structure resulting from the simulated nanoindentation of a gold nanocrystal. PMID:26089755

  3. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a two-domain laccase from Streptomyces griseoflavus.

    PubMed

    Tishchenko, Svetlana; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Trubitsina, Liubov; Lisov, Alexander; Zakharova, Marina; Leontievsky, Alexey

    2015-09-01

    Laccase (EC 1.10.3.2) is one of the most common copper-containing oxidases; it is found in many organisms and catalyzes the oxidation of primarily phenolic compounds by oxygen. Two-domain laccases have unusual thermostability, resistance to inhibitors and an alkaline optimum of activity. The causes of these properties in two-domain laccases are poorly understood. A recombinant two-domain laccase (SgfSL) was cloned from the genome of Streptomyces griseoflavus Ac-993, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The crystals of SgfSL belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.64, b = 94.72, c = 117.40 Å, β = 90.672°, and diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Two functional trimers per asymmetric unit correspond to a Matthews coefficient of 1.99 Å(3) Da(-1) according to the monomer molecular weight of 35.6 kDa. PMID:26323308

  4. Crystal-structure analysis of four mineral samples of anhydrite, CaSO[subscript 4], using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Antao, Sytle M.

    2014-05-28

    The crystal structures of four samples of anhydrite, CaSO{sub 4}, were obtained by Rietveld refinements using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data and space group Amma. As an example, for one sample of anhydrite from Hants County, Nova Scotia, the unit-cell parameters are a = 7.00032(2), b = 6.99234(1), c = 6.24097(1) {angstrom}, and V = 305.487(1) {angstrom}{sup 3} with a > b. The eight-coordinated Ca atom has an average distance of 2.4667(4) {angstrom}. The tetrahedral SO{sub 4} group has two independent S-O distances of 1.484(1) to O1 and 1.478(1) {angstrom} to O2 and an average distance of 1.4810(5) {angstrom}. The three independent O-S-O angles [108.99(8) x 1, 110.38(3) x 4, 106.34(9){sup o} x 1; average [6] = 109.47(2){sup o}] and S-O distances indicate that the geometry of the SO{sub 4} group is quite distorted in anhydrite. The four anhydrite samples have structural trends where the a, b, and c unit-cell parameters increase linearly with increasing unit-cell volume, V, and their average and distances are nearly constant. The grand mean = 2.4660(2) {angstrom}, and grand mean = 1.4848(3) {angstrom}, the latter is longer than 1.480(1) {angstrom} in celestite, SrSO{sub 4}, as expected.

  5. Grid resolution study of ground water flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Bower, Kathleen M; Gable, Carl W; Zyvoloski, George A

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional grids representing a heterogeneous, ground water system are generated at 10 different resolutions in support of a site-scale flow and transport modeling effort. These grids represent hydrostratigraphy near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of 18 stratigraphic units with contrasting fluid flow and transport properties. The grid generation method allows the stratigraphy to be modeled by numerical grids of different resolution so that comparison studies can be performed to test for grid quality and determine the resolution required to resolve geologic structure and physical processes such as fluid flow and solute transport. The process of generating numerical grids with appropriate property distributions from geologic conceptual models is automated, thus making the entire process easy to implement with fewer user-induced errors. The series of grids of various resolutions are used to assess the level at which increasing resolution no longer influences the flow and solute transport results. Grid resolution is found to be a critical issue for ground water flow and solute transport. The resolution required in a particular instance is a function of the feature size of the model, the intrinsic properties of materials, the specific physics of the problem, and boundary conditions. The asymptotic nature of results related to flow and transport indicate that for a hydrologic model of the heterogeneous hydrostratigraphy under Yucca Mountain, a horizontal grid spacing of 600 m and vertical grid spacing of 40 m resolve the hydrostratigraphic model with sufficient precision to accurately model the hypothetical flow and solute transport to within 5% of the value that would be obtained with much higher resolution. PMID:15726930

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies on the bicupin YwfC from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Rajavel, M.; Gopal, B.

    2006-12-01

    The bicupin YwfC from B. subtilis was crystallized in two crystal forms and diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution. A central tenet of evolutionary biology is that proteins with diverse biochemical functions evolved from a single ancestral protein. A variation on this theme is that the functional repertoire of proteins in a living organism is enhanced by the evolution of single-chain multidomain polypeptides by gene-fusion or gene-duplication events. Proteins with a double-stranded β-helix (cupin) scaffold perform a diverse range of functions. Bicupins are proteins with two cupin domains. There are four bicupins in Bacillus subtilis, encoded by the genes yvrK, yoaN, yxaG and ywfC. The extensive phylogenetic information on these four proteins makes them a good model system to study the evolution of function. The proteins YvrK and YoaN are oxalate decarboxylases, whereas YxaG is a quercetin dioxygenase. In an effort to aid the functional annotation of YwfC as well as to obtain a complete structure–function data set of bicupins, it was proposed to determine the crystal structure of YwfC. The bicupin YwfC was crystallized in two crystal forms. Preliminary crystallographic studies were performed on the diamond-shaped crystals, which belonged to the tetragonal space group P422. These crystals were grown using the microbatch method at 298 K. Native X-ray diffraction data from these crystals were collected to 2.2 Å resolution on a home source. These crystals have unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.7, c = 211.5 Å. Assuming the presence of two molecules per asymmetric unit, the V{sub M} value was 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was approximately 45%. Although the crystals appeared less frequently than the tetragonal form, YwfC also crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.7, b = 106.3, c = 48.7 Å, β = 92.7°.

  7. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wess, T.J.; Wess, L.; Miller, A.

    1994-12-31

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon.

  8. Photoelectron diffraction studies of Cu on Pd(111) random surface alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Siervo, A. de; Landers, R.; Soares, E. A.; Kleiman, G.G.

    2005-03-15

    The study of surface alloys is motivated by their use in many applications of different segments of industry, such as in the search for new catalysts and sensors, in surface protection against corrosion, in lowering friction, and in testing electronic devices. An important aspect of surface alloys studies is that of the precise quantification of segregation and diffusion processes as well as the determination of surface structure. In this paper we report a combined low-energy electron diffraction and photoelectron diffraction (PED) (using synchrotron radiation) study of surface alloy formation when Cu ultrathin films are evaporated onto Pd(111) single-crystal surfaces. We present results for two different coverages (1 and 3 ML) and three annealing temperatures (300, 600, and 800 K). For these preparation conditions, a random alloy phase with different concentrations seems to form in the first few layers. Through the analysis of PED data performed using a multiple scattering formalism and the average T-matrix approximation it was possible to determine the atomic structure and the atomic concentration of the first three layers.

  9. Neutron diffraction study of water freezing on aircraft engine combustor soot.

    PubMed

    Tishkova, V; Demirdjian, B; Ferry, D; Johnson, M

    2011-12-14

    The study of the formation of condensation trails and cirrus clouds on aircraft emitted soot particles is important because of its possible effects on climate. In the present work we studied the freezing of water on aircraft engine combustor (AEC) soot particles under conditions of pressure and temperature similar to the upper troposphere. The microstructure of the AEC soot was found to be heterogeneous containing both primary particles of soot and metallic impurities (Fe, Cu, and Al). We also observed various surface functional groups such as oxygen-containing groups, including sulfate ions, that can act as active sites for water adsorption. Here we studied the formation of ice on the AEC soot particles by using neutron diffraction. We found that for low amount of adsorbed water, cooling even up to 215 K did not lead to the formation of hexagonal ice. Whereas, larger amount of adsorbed water led to the coexistence of liquid water (or amorphous ice) and hexagonal ice (I(h)); 60% of the adsorbed water was in the form of ice I(h) at 255 K. Annealing of the system led to the improvement of the crystal quality of hexagonal ice crystals as demonstrated from neutron diffraction. PMID:21996755

  10. An analytical study on the diffraction quality factor of open cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Yeh, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    Open cavities are often employed as interaction structures in a new generation of coherent millimeter, sub-millimeter, and terahertz (THz) radiation sources called the gyrotron. One of the open ends of the cavity is intended for rapid extraction of the radiation generated by a powerful electron beam. Up to the sub-THz regime, the diffraction loss from this open end dominates over the Ohmic losses on the walls, which results in a much lower diffraction quality factor (Q{sub d}) than the Ohmic quality factor (Q{sub ohm}). Early analytical studies have led to various expressions for Q{sub d} and shed much light on its properties. In this study, we begin with a review of these studies, and then proceed with the derivation of an analytical expression for Q{sub d} accurate to high order. Its validity is verified with numerical solutions for a step-tunable cavity commonly employed for the development of sub-THz and THz gyrotrons. On the basis of the results, a simplified equation is obtained which explicitly expresses the scaling laws of Q{sub d} with respect to mode indices and cavity dimensions.

  11. An analytical study on the diffraction quality factor of open cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Yeh, L. H.; Chu, K. R.

    2014-10-01

    Open cavities are often employed as interaction structures in a new generation of coherent millimeter, sub-millimeter, and terahertz (THz) radiation sources called the gyrotron. One of the open ends of the cavity is intended for rapid extraction of the radiation generated by a powerful electron beam. Up to the sub-THz regime, the diffraction loss from this open end dominates over the Ohmic losses on the walls, which results in a much lower diffraction quality factor (Qd) than the Ohmic quality factor (Qohm). Early analytical studies have led to various expressions for Qd and shed much light on its properties. In this study, we begin with a review of these studies, and then proceed with the derivation of an analytical expression for Qd accurate to high order. Its validity is verified with numerical solutions for a step-tunable cavity commonly employed for the development of sub-THz and THz gyrotrons. On the basis of the results, a simplified equation is obtained which explicitly expresses the scaling laws of Qd with respect to mode indices and cavity dimensions.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 from C. sativa has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1.

  13. 18 CFR 5.14 - Formal study dispute resolution process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formal study dispute resolution process. 5.14 Section 5.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.14 Formal study...

  14. Intensity and phase fields behind Phase Shifting Masks studied with High Resolution Interference Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Weichelt, Tina; Zeitner, Uwe; Vogler, Uwe; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    The proximity printing industry is in real need of high resolution results and it can be done using Phase Shift Mask (PSM) or by applying Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). In our research we are trying to find out details of how light fields behind the structures of photo masks develop in order to determine the best conditions and designs for proximity printing. We focus here on parameters that are used in real situation with gaps up to 50 μm and structure sizes down to 2 μm. The light field evolution behind the structures is studied and delivers insight in to precisions and tolerances that need to be respected. It is the first time that an experimental analysis of light propagation through mask is presented in detail, which includes information on intensity and phase. The instrument we use is known as High Resolution Interference Microscopy (HRIM). HRIM is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer which is capable of recording three dimensional distributions of intensity and phase with diffraction limited resolution. Our characterization technique allows plotting the evolution of the desired light field and therefore printable structure till the desired proximity gap. In this paper we discuss in detail the evolution of intensity and phase fields of elbow or corner structure at different position behind a phase mask and interpret the main parameters. Of particular interest are tolerances against proximity gap variation and the resolution in printed structures.

  15. Diffraction Studies from Minerals to Organics - Lessons Learned from Materials Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, Pamela S

    2014-01-01

    In many regards the study of materials and minerals by powder diffraction techniques are complimentary, with techniques honed in one field equally applicable to the other. As a long-time materials researcher many of the examples are of techniques developed for materials analysis applied to minerals. However in a couple of cases the study of new minerals was the initiation into techniques later used in materials-based studies. Hopefully they will show that the study of new minerals structures can provide opportunities to add new methodologies and approaches to future problems. In keeping with the AXAA many of the examples have an Australian connection, the materials ranging from organics to battery materials.

  16. Study of the defect structure of paratellurite crystal using multiwave diffraction and normal X-ray diffractometry methods

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenkov, N. V. Blagov, A. E.; Lomonov, B. A.; Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-03-15

    Multiwave X-ray diffraction has been used to study the structure of crystalline samples. A cycle of local measurements of rocking curves (RCs) of the (220) and (371) reflections under conditions of multiwave diffraction (MD) has been carried out in a paratellurite crystal. The data obtained are used to compare the sensitivity to structure defects of two-beam diffraction with that of MD, which makes it possible to study the X-ray wave phase. The comparison has revealed a higher ability of the phase-sensitive method to detect defects.

  17. The beta-SiC(100) surface studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-SiC(100) surface has been studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS), and core level excitation EELS. Two new Si-terminated phases have been discovered, one with (3 x 2) symmetry, and the other with (2 x 1) symmetry. Models are presented to describe these phases. New results, for the C-rich surface, are presented and discussed. In addition, core level excitation EELS results are given and compared with theory.

  18. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi2O6) to analcime (NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ mol-1. Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  19. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction study of EuVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Alka B.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-03-15

    The high-pressure structural behavior of europium orthovanadate has been studied using in-situ, synchrotron based, high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction technique. Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at room temperature up to 34.7 GPa using a diamond-anvil cell, extending the pressure range reported in previous experiments. We confirmed the occurrence of zircon–scheelite phase transition at 6.8 GPa and the coexistence of low- and high-pressure phases up to 10.1 GPa. In addition, clear evidence of a scheelite–fregusonite transition is found at 23.4 GPa. The fergusonite structure remains stable up to 34.7 GPa, the highest pressure reached in the present measurements. A partial decomposition of EuVO{sub 4} was also observed from 8.1 to 12.8 GPa; however, this fact did not preclude the identification of the different crystal structures of EuVO{sub 4}. The crystal structures of the different phases have been Rietveld refined and their equations of state (EOS) have been determined. The results are compared with the previous experimental data and theoretical calculations. - Graphical abstract: The high-pressure structural sequence of EuVO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • EuVO{sub 4} is studied under pressure up to 35 GPa using synchrotron XRD. • The zircón–scheelite–fergusonite structural sequence is observed. • Crystal structures are refined and equations of state determined.

  20. Magnetic Structure of Goethite α-FeOOH: A Neutron Diffraction Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Nakotte, H.; Vogel, S. C.; Wenk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) is found in diverse natural ecosystems, it is by far the most common oxyhydroxide in terrestrial soils, sediments and clays and an important mineral in the biogeochemical cycle of iron at the Earth's surface. Neutron diffraction studies have found that the iron magnetic moments are collinear in a two sublattice antiferromagnetic structure, aligned parallel to the c axis in space group Pbnm (Forsyth et. al. 1968). However, goethite shows superparamagnetic behavior and also a weak ferromagnetic component that has been attributed to the presence of lattice distortions. It is thought that these changes in magnetic ordering could be due to a 13° canting of the magnetic moment with respect to the c-axis, which enables the flipping of the spins due to small perturbations in the lattice (Coey et. al. 1995). In this study we used neutron diffraction at HIPPO and NPDF beamlines at LANSCE of Los Alamos National Laboratory on a powder of natural goethite provided by A. Gualtieri. The nuclear and magnetic structures were determined by means of a Rietveld refinement with GSAS and it was found that the spins of the iron atoms are aligned parallel to the c-axis, with no evidence of spin canting. The net magnetic moment is lower than what has previously been found. These results provide further insight into the magnetic ordering of this mineral and can be important in understanding the physical processes responsible for goethite's intriguing magnetic behavior.

  1. Energy and dose considerations for diffraction enhanced CT in small animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Dean; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Parham, Christopher; Kao, Teresa; Zhong, Zhong

    2007-03-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) uses monochromatic x-rays coupled to an analyzer crystal to extract information about the refraction of x-rays within the object. Studies of excised biological tissues show that DEI has significant contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) advantages for soft tissue when compared to standard radiography. DEI differs from conventional CT in that its refraction contrast depends on x-ray energy as 1/E, thus the energy and dose considerations for conventional CT will be inappropriate. The goal of this study was to assess the optimal energy for in vivo CT imaging of a mouse head to obtain the largest soft tissue refraction CNR. Through a theoretical model, optimum refraction CNR for mouse brain imaging was found to be about 20 keV. The findings were tested experimentally using the DEI system at the X15A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. Using the parameters for optimized refraction CNR (20 keV, silicon [333] reflection), large image artifacts were caused by DEI's scatter-rejection properties. By increasing the x-ray energy and using a lower order diffraction, silicon [111], soft tissue features within the brain, including the hippocampus, could be resolved.

  2. In-situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Kumar, R. S.; Grinblat, F.; Aphesteguy, J. C.; Saccone, F. D.; Errandonea, D.

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the high-pressure structural behavior of zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles by powder X-ray diffraction measurements up to 47 GPa. We found that the cubic spinel structure of ZnFe2O4 remains up to 33 GPa and a phase transition is induced beyond this pressure. The high-pressure phase is indexed to an orthorhombic CaMn2O4-type structure. Upon decompression the low- and high-pressure phases coexist. The compressibility of both structures was also investigated. We have observed that the lattice parameters of the high-pressure phase behave anisotropically upon compression. Further, we predict possible phase transition around 55 GPa. For comparison, we also studied the compression behavior of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles by X-ray diffraction up to 23 GPa. Spinel-type ZnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles have a bulk modulus of 172 (20) GPa and 152 (9) GPa, respectively. This indicates that in both cases the nanoparticles do not undergo a Hall-Petch strengthening.

  3. Neutron Diffraction Study of LaSr3Fe3O10 in the Temperature Range 25 - 650 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Neov, S.; Prokhnenko, O.; Velinov, N.; Kozhukharov, V.; Neov, D.; Dabrowski, L.

    2007-04-23

    The effect of high temperature on the structure of LaSr3Fe3O10 has been studied by neutron diffraction. Neutron data have been correlated with Moessbauer spectroscopy results and electrical conductivity measurements.

  4. Dual resolution cone beam breast CT: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingyun; Shen, Youtao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Han, Tao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Liu, Xinming; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated the feasibility of a dual resolution volume-of-interest (VOI) cone beam breast CT technique and compared two implementation approaches in terms of dose saving and scatter reduction. Methods: With this technique, a lead VOI mask with an opening is inserted between the x-ray source and the breast to deliver x-ray exposure to the VOI while blocking x rays outside the VOI. A CCD detector is used to collect the high resolution projection data of the VOI. Low resolution cone beam CT (CBCT) images of the entire breast, acquired with a flat panel (FP) detector, were used to calculate the projection data outside the VOI with the ray-tracing reprojection method. The Feldkamp–Davis–Kress filtered backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct the dual resolution 3D images. Breast phantoms with 180 μm and smaller microcalcifications (MCs) were imaged with both FP and FP-CCD dual resolution CBCT systems, respectively. Two approaches of implementing the dual resolution technique, breast-centered approach and VOI-centered approach, were investigated and evaluated for dose saving and scatter reduction with Monte Carlo simulation using a GEANT4 package. Results: The results showed that the breast-centered approach saved more breast absorbed dose than did VOI-centered approach with similar scatter reduction. The MCs in fatty breast phantom, which were invisible with FP CBCT scan, became visible with the FP-CCD dual resolution CBCT scan. Conclusions: These results indicate potential improvement of the image quality inside the VOI with reduced breast dose both inside and outside the VOI. PMID:19810473

  5. Detecting liquid threats with x-ray diffraction imaging (XDi) using a hybrid approach to navigate trade-offs between photon count statistics and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skatter, Sondre; Fritsch, Sebastian; Schlomka, Jens-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The performance limits were explored for an X-ray Diffraction based explosives detection system for baggage scanning. This XDi system offers 4D imaging that comprises three spatial dimensions with voxel sizes in the order of ~(0.5cm)3, and one spectral dimension for material discrimination. Because only a very small number of photons are observed for an individual voxel, material discrimination cannot work reliably at the voxel level. Therefore, an initial 3D reconstruction is performed, which allows the identification of objects of interest. Combining all the measured photons that scattered within an object, more reliable spectra are determined on the object-level. As a case study we looked at two liquid materials, one threat and one innocuous, with very similar spectral characteristics, but with 15% difference in electron density. Simulations showed that Poisson statistics alone reduce the material discrimination performance to undesirable levels when the photon counts drop to 250. When additional, uncontrolled variation sources are considered, the photon count plays a less dominant role in detection performance, but limits the performance also for photon counts of 500 and higher. Experimental data confirmed the presence of such non-Poisson variation sources also in the XDi prototype system, which suggests that the present system can still be improved without necessarily increasing the photon flux, but by better controlling and accounting for these variation sources. When the classification algorithm was allowed to use spectral differences in the experimental data, the discrimination between the two materials improved significantly, proving the potential of X-ray diffraction also for liquid materials.

  6. Existence of ferroelectric ice on planets—A neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Hoshikawa, Akinori; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.

    2009-02-01

    From neutron powder-diffraction experiments, we have studied the growth process of ferroelectric ice XI (eleven) with deuteron-ordered arrangements. We measured time-resolved neutron diffraction of 0.001-M KOD-doped D2O ice. We observed the growth of ice XI at 72-74 K. The mass fraction f (the ratio of mass of ice XI to that of the doped ice) linearly increased with time for about 2 days. The de-transformed ice Ih, obtained after warming above the transition temperature of 76 K, retransformed to ice XI at 66 K. The observed increase of f with time is in good agreement with the nucleation process of the ordering and the constant growth of the ordered domain. A large fraction of ice Ih sample doped with sodium hydroxide changed to ice XI at 68 K. The results suggest that large quantities of ice on cold icy bodies in our solar system are able to transform to ice XI, which may be detectable by space telescope and planetary exploration.

  7. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A; Klug, Dennis D; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F; Karotsis, Georgios; Guthrie, Malcolm; Molaison, Jamie J; Pradhan, Neelam

    2012-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  8. Neutron diffraction studies of nickel-containing perovskite oxide catalysts exposed to autothermal reforming environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Mawdsley, J. R.; Vaughey, J. T.; Krause, T. R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-10-27

    Six nickel-containing perovskite oxides (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x})M{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}O{sub 3{+-}{delta}}, where x = 0 or 0.2 and M = Cr, Fe, or Mn were used to catalyze the autothermal reforming of isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) into a hydrogen-rich gas during short-term tests at 700 C. To determine the phase stability of the samples in the reducing environment of the reforming reactor, characterization studies of the as-prepared and tested perovskite samples were conducted using powder X-ray diffraction, powder neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. We determined that the reducing conditions of the microreactor caused metallic nickel to form in all six compositions. However, the extent of the nickel loss from the perovskite lattices varied: the chromium-containing compositions lost the least nickel, compared to the manganese- and iron-containing compositions, and the strontium-free compositions lost more nickel than their strontium-containing analogs. Five of the six perovskite compositions tested showed no breakdown of the perovskite lattice despite the loss of nickel from the B-sites, producing only the third example of a B-cation-deficient, 3d transition-metal-containing perovskite.

  9. Local structure reconstruction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon from angular correlation and synchrotron diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, D. T.; Minani, E.; Knoesen, D.; Schut, H.; Eijt, S. W. H.; Furlan, F.; Giles, C.; Härting, M.

    2006-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a widely used thin film semiconductor material which is still incompletely understood. It is generally assumed to form a continuous random network, with a high concentration of coordination defects (dangling bonds), which are hydrogen terminated. Neither the exact nature of these sites nor the degree of medium range order has been fully determined. In this paper, we present the first results for the local structure, from a combined study using angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR) and synchrotron radiation diffraction. Reciprocal space information is obtained directly, for the mesoscale structure and the local defect structure, from the orientation dependent diffraction and 2D-ACAR patterns, respectively. Furthermore, inversion of both patterns yields a comparison of real space information through maps of the silicon-silicon pair correlation function and the electron-positron autocorrelation function B2 γ( r). From this information, it is possible to identify the dominant structural defect as a vacancy-size dangling bond cluster, around which the network strain is fully relaxed.

  10. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction study of EuVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Alka B.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-03-01

    The high-pressure structural behavior of europium orthovanadate has been studied using in-situ, synchrotron based, high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction technique. Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at room temperature up to 34.7 GPa using a diamond-anvil cell, extending the pressure range reported in previous experiments. We confirmed the occurrence of zircon-scheelite phase transition at 6.8 GPa and the coexistence of low- and high-pressure phases up to 10.1 GPa. In addition, clear evidence of a scheelite-fregusonite transition is found at 23.4 GPa. The fergusonite structure remains stable up to 34.7 GPa, the highest pressure reached in the present measurements. A partial decomposition of EuVO4 was also observed from 8.1 to 12.8 GPa; however, this fact did not preclude the identification of the different crystal structures of EuVO4. The crystal structures of the different phases have been Rietveld refined and their equations of state (EOS) have been determined. The results are compared with the previous experimental data and theoretical calculations.

  11. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    SciTech Connect

    Post,J.; Bish, D.; Heaney, P.

    2007-01-01

    Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to study the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room-temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic H{sub 2}O site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only {approx}1/8 of the zeolitic H{sub 2}O and the volume decreased by 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic H{sub 2}O is lost by {approx}390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above {approx}600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound H{sub 2}O is lost. Rietveld refinements of the 'anhydrous' sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a and b and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at {approx}820 K suggesting a phase transformation coinciding with the loss of the remaining bound H{sub 2}O molecule.

  12. Preparation and neutron diffraction study of polycrystalline Cu-Zn-Fe materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darul, J.; Nowicki, W.

    2009-10-01

    Polycrystalline oxides Cu1-xZnxFe2O4 (0.0≤x≤0.05) have been successfully prepared by a simple combustion method using citrate-nitrate precursors. The nature of structural transition in inverse spinels and ferrimagnetic behavior of the materials have been investigated by the neutron diffraction technique. At room temperature neutron diffraction study confirms the presence of a single-phase structure, where tetragonal unit cell with c/a>1 is observed. In these distorted spinel ferrites it is found that tetragonal → cubic transformation is attributed to the decrease of the concentration of Jahn-Teller ions Cu2+ (d9) in the host structure at the octahedral sites as a result of zinc substitution. The introduction of non-magnetic ion in place of Cu2+ in the spinel unit cell results in the reduction of intersublattice contributions, this in turn decreases temperature of the magnetic ordering (Curie point) in these diluted ferrimagnets.

  13. Structure of molten Al and eutectic Al-Si alloy studied by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlborg, U.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Besser, M.; Morris, J. R.; Calvo-Dahlborg, M.

    2012-11-24

    The structure of molten eutectic Al87.8Si12.2 alloy has been studied by neutron diffraction during a temperature cycle. For comparison measurements were performed on pure molten Al. The measurements show that the alloy after heating above the liquidus contains particles of two kinds, aluminum-rich and silicon-rich. The silicon-rich particles are partly dissolved after a further heating. Earlier published data obtained by the γ-ray absorption technique of the density of the molten eutectic Al–Si alloy had demonstrated the existence of two temperatures above the liquidus temperature: A dissolution temperature Td, at which the microstructure of the melt inherited from the ingot starts to dissolve and a branching temperature, Tb, at which the melt reaches a fully mixed state. The highest temperature that was possible to reach during the neutron experiments lies between Td and Tb. The obtained results support these conclusions that molten alloys after melting are inhomogeneous up to a temperature well above the liquidus. Moreover, the difference in shape between the static structure factors measured by neutron and X-ray diffraction on molten aluminum is observed and is found to be more accentuated and to extend to larger wavevectors than in earlier works.

  14. In-situ time resolved synchrotron powder diffraction studies of synthesis and chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, P.

    1995-09-01

    Equipment for time and temperature dependent powder diffraction has been developed, especially in order to be able to study hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites. The system is very versatile and has so far been used to study e.g. hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites and aluminophosphates, syntheses of layered phosphates, formation of Sorel cements, dehydration and phase transformations of zeolites, solid state synthesis of lanthanum manganites, ion exchange of zeolites using molten salt, and oxidation/reduction of lanthanum manganites at high temperatures. The sample is contained in quartz capillaries and is heated using a stream of hot air. External pressure can be applied allowing hydrothermal syntheses at temperatures up to 200 C to be performed. Controlled atmosphere is obtained by flowing gas or a mixture of gases through the capillary.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of GIM-1, a class B carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-­lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Myoung-Ki; Lee, Jung Hun; Kwon, Dae Beom; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Tran, Thi-Huyen; Nguyen, Dinh-Duc; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2012-01-01

    GIM-1 is a member of the class B carbapenemases (metallo-β-lactamases; MBLs) and has a wide spectrum of activity against carbapenems, penicillins and extended-spectrum cephalosporins, but not aztreonam. GIM-1 presents an enormous challenge to infection control, particularly in the eradication of Gram-negative pathogens including Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and nonfermenters. There are presently few or no drugs in late-stage development for these pathogens and GIM-1 is a potential target for the development of antimicrobial agents against pathogens producing MBLs. In this study, GIM-1 was cloned, overexpressed and crystallized. The GIM-1 crystals diffracted to 1.4 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.5, b = 67.6, c = 72.8 Å. One molecule is present in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding V M of 1.69 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 27.1%. PMID:23027753

  16. Trapping the M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  17. Purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies of great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, G.; Malathy, P.; Gunasekaran, K.; Harikrishna Etti, S.; Aravindhan, S.

    2014-10-25

    The great cormorant hemoglobin has been isolated, purified and crystallized and the three dimensional structure is solved using molecular replacement technique. Haemoglobin is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein that is present in the red blood cells of all vertebrates. In recent decades, there has been substantial interest in attempting to understand the structural basis and functional diversity of avian haemoglobins. Towards this end, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies have been carried out on cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350, NaCl and glycerol as precipitants. The crystals belonged to the trigonal system P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.64, c = 153.38 Å, β = 120.00°; a complete data set was collected to a resolution of 3.5 Å. Matthews coefficient analysis indicated that the crystals contained a half-tetramer in the asymmetric unit.

  18. A Study of Detonation Diffraction in the Ignition-and-Growth Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A K; Schwendeman, D W; Bdzil, J B; Henshaw, W D

    2006-04-14

    Heterogeneous high-energy explosives are morphologically, mechanically and chemically complex. As such, their ab-initio modeling, in which well-characterized phenomena at the scale of the microstructure lead to a rationally homogenized description at the scale of observation, is a subject of active research but not yet a reality. An alternative approach is to construct phenomenological models, in which forms of constitutive behavior are postulated with an eye on the perceived picture of the micro-scale phenomena, and which are strongly linked to experimental calibration. Most prominent among these is the ignition-and-growth model conceived by Lee and Tarver. The model treats the explosive as a homogeneous mixture of two distinct constituents, the unreacted explosive and the products of reaction. To each constituent is assigned an equation of state, and a single reaction-rate law is prescribed for the conversion of the explosive to products. It is assumed that the two constituents are always in pressure and temperature equilibrium. The purpose of this paper is to investigate in detail the behavior of the model in situations where a detonation turns a corner and undergoes diffraction. A set of parameters appropriate for the explosive LX-17 is selected. The model is first examined analytically for steady, planar, 1-D solutions and the reaction-zone structure of Chapman-Jouguet detonations is determined. A computational study of two classes of problems is then undertaken. The first class corresponds to planar, 1-D initiation by an impact, and the second to corner turning and diffraction in planar and axisymmetric geometries. The 1-D initiation, although interesting in its own right, is utilized here as a means for interpretation of the 2-D results. It is found that there are two generic ways in which 1-D detonations are initiated in the model, and that these scenarios play a part in the post-diffraction evolution as well. For the parameter set under study the model

  19. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  20. High-pressure X-ray diffraction studies of potassium chlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan

    2012-03-15

    Two static high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of potassium chlorate have been performed at pressures of up to {approx}14.3 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature using the 16 ID-B undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source for the X-ray source. The first experiment was conducted to ascertain decomposition rates of potassium chlorate as a function of pressure. Below 2 GPa, the sample was observed to decompose rapidly in the presence of the X-ray beam and release oxygen. Above 2 GPa (near the phase I phase II transition), the decomposition rate dramatically slowed so that good quality XRD patterns could be acquired. This suggests a phase-dependent decomposition rate. In the second study, X-ray diffraction spectra were collected at pressures from 2 to 14.3 GPa by aligning virgin portions of the sample into the focused X-ray beam at each pressure. The results suggest the co-existence of mixed monoclinic (I) and rhombohedral (II) phases of potassium chlorate near 2 GPa. At pressures beyond 4 GPa, the XRD patterns show a very good fit to KClO{sub 3} in the rhombohedral phase with space group R3m, in agreement with earlier studies. No further phase transitions were observed with pressure. Decompression of the sample to ambient pressure indicated mixed phases I and II coupled with a small amount of synchrotron X-ray-induced decomposition product. The equation of state within this pressure regime has been determined.

  1. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  2. Energy-selective neutron imaging with high spatial resolution and its impact on the study of crystalline-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Peetermans, S.; Josic, L.; Leber, H.; van Swygenhoven, H.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline-structured materials with preferentially large grains were investigated by means of energy-selective neutron imaging methods (transmission radiography and tomography) under the conditions of the best possible spatial resolution at the ICON facility, SINQ, and PSI. Because of the cold spectrum at that beam line, access to the Bragg diffraction features was possible even when the energy resolution of the used selector device was only 15%. Grains with a size below the detector resolution (approximately 25 μm) are not visible, and a quasi-homogeneous contrast variation is found when the neutron energy is varied.In the cases of welded stainless steel samples and rolled Al plates, we obtained structural information from a very short exposure of approximately 60 s. Tomographic examinations of these samples at suitable neutron energies qualitatively verified the radiographic findings by showing the same features in the bulk. Comparison to common electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) investigations in selected regions of the samples provided a complete verification of the neutron-image data with respect to the grain size and the different grain orientations. The method of energy-selective neutron imaging provides an easy and straightforward approach for non-invasive material research that can be performed without any sample preparation if the most suitable neutron energy is chosen. Further studies will be necessary to extend the experimental data base to other materials with different crystal structures and grain sizes. A comparison to diffraction data will enhance the quantitative value of the investigations.

  3. Tensile behavior of TRIP-aided multi-phase steels studied by in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomota, Y. . E-mail: tomota@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp; Tokuda, H.; Adachi, Y.; Wakita, M.; Minakawa, N.; Moriai, A.; Morii, Y.

    2004-12-01

    TRIP-aided multi-phase steels were made by thermo-mechanically controlled process, where the ferrite grain size and the amount of the retained austenite were changed by controlling process conditions. The tensile behavior of four steels was studied by in situ neutron diffraction. It is found that the retained austenite bearing about 1.0 wt% C is plastically harder than the ferrite matrix. The steel with a ferrite grain size of {approx}2.0 {mu}m showed tensile strength of 1.1 GPa and a uniform elongation of 18.4%, in which stress-induced martensitic transformation occurs during plastic deformation but a considerable amount of austenite remains even after the onset of necking. It is concluded that the enhancement of uniform elongation is caused mainly by the work-hardening due to the hard austenite and martensite, where the contribution of the transformation strain is negligible.

  4. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM studies on chromium (III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Dwivedi, Jagrati; Shukla, Kritika

    2015-06-01

    Five Chromium (III) complexes have been prepared using Schiff base ligands which derived from benzoin and five different amino acids (H2N-R). Samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM method. X-Ray diffraction pattern analyzed that all chromium (III) complexes have hexagonal structure and crystalline, in nature, using Bruker D8 Advance instrument. Using VERTAX 70, FTIR spectroscopy reveals that Samples have (C=N), (C-O), (M-N) and (M-O) bonds in the range of 4000-400cm-1. UV-VIS spectroscopy give information that samples absorb the visible light which is in the range of 380-780nm. For this, Lambda 960 spectrometer used. SEM is designed for studying of the solid objects, using JEOL JSM 5600 instrument.

  5. A neutron diffraction study of local stress concentrations surrounding defects in pipeline steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapham, L.; Sabet-Sharghi, R.; Holden, T.; Atherton, D. L.

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) is the most commonly used technique for the in-service inspection of both gas and oil pipelines. However, MFL is sensitive to the stress state of the pipe wall and the area surrounding defects. MFL tools are often calibrated using pipe sections with defects artificially introduced into the pipe wall prior to the pipe being pressurized. Naturally occurring defects, however, occur while the pipe wall is under stress due to line pressure. In this study, neutron diffraction is used to map the strain surrounding the two defects that have been introduced into plates of pipeline grade steel, one into a plate prior to uniaxial loading, the second into a plate held at a constant background load high enough to ensure that stress at the edge of the defect exceeds the elastic limit of the material.

  6. Pressure apparatus of split-octahedron type for x-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, A; Onodera, A; Kawai, N

    1979-03-01

    An apparatus of split-octahedron type has been developed for the study of x-ray diffraction at high pressure. The apparatus consists of a cylinder, a sphere, and an octahedron, all split up and assembled in a multistaged arrangement. Three ways of splitting the innermost octahedron are utilized in matching the cell geometry to the standard camera method. High pressures in excess of 220 kilobars can be generated in the center of the split octahedron by using a composite mixture of diamond powder and epoxy resin as a pressure-transmitting medium. The pressures required for the semiconductor-to-metal transitions of ZnTe, ZnS, GaAs, and GaP are determined by simultaneously monitoring the electrical resistance of the semiconductors and the lattice parameter of sodium chloride. PMID:18699497

  7. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, Olivier F.; Motta, Arthur T.; Piotrowski, Christopher J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2015-06-01

    As a result of in-reactor corrosion during operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold spots so that the distribution of hydrides in the cladding is inhomogeneous. The hydrogen precipitation kinetics plays a strong role in the spatial distribution of the hydrides in the cladding. The precipitation rate is normally described as proportional to the supersaturation of hydrogen in solid solution. The proportionality constant, α2, for hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 is measured directly using in situ synchrotron X-Ray diffraction, at different temperatures and with three different initial hydrogen concentrations. The results validate the linear approximation of the phenomenological model and a near constant value of α2 = 4.5 × 10-4 s-1 was determined for the temperature range studied.

  8. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM studies on chromium (III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Dwivedi, Jagrati Shukla, Kritika

    2015-06-24

    Five Chromium (III) complexes have been prepared using Schiff base ligands which derived from benzoin and five different amino acids (H{sub 2}N-R). Samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM method. X-Ray diffraction pattern analyzed that all chromium (III) complexes have hexagonal structure and crystalline, in nature, using Bruker D8 Advance instrument. Using VERTAX 70, FTIR spectroscopy reveals that Samples have (C=N), (C-O), (M-N) and (M-O) bonds in the range of 4000-400cm{sup −1}. UV-VIS spectroscopy give information that samples absorb the visible light which is in the range of 380-780nm. For this, Lambda 960 spectrometer used. SEM is designed for studying of the solid objects, using JEOL JSM 5600 instrument.

  9. Bone mineral change during experimental calcination: an X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Galeano, Sergio; García-Lorenzo, Mari Luz

    2014-11-01

    The effects of calcination (400-1200°C) on pig bones have been studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary modifications, such as color change and weight loss. The characterisation by powder XRD confirmed the presence of the crystalline phase of hydroxyapatite, and comparison of the results obtained at different temperatures suggested that at 650°C, all the organic components and carbonate substitutions were completely removed. Accordingly, these samples were white. In addition, the crystallinity degree and the crystallite size progressively increased with the calcination temperature until 650°C, remaining stable until 1200°C. Below 650°C, bone samples presented organic compounds, resulting in background noise in the diffractogram and gray or black color. In addition, impurities in the lattice correspond to low crystallite sizes. PMID:24962811

  10. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  11. Positron diffraction study of SiC(0 0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasuso, A.; Maekawa, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Ichimiya, A.

    2005-05-01

    Surface structures of 6H SiC(0 0 0 1) after heat treatment in a UHV has been studied using reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD). After heat treatment at 900 °C, a typical interference effect of positron waves due to Si adatoms appears in the total reflection region of the rocking curve. The further heat treatment at 1100 °C results in surface graphitization. The rocking curve is well reproduced by theoretical calculation assuming the graphite monolayer on SiC substrate. The interlayer distance is fairly large (2.5-3.2 Å), which is comparable to that in the graphite monocrystal suggesting that the weak binding of the graphite monolayer to the SiC surface by the van der Waals force.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown in hydrogen atmosphere: An x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Maniwa, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Ryuji; Kira, Hiroshi; Tou, Hideki; Nishibori, Eiji; Takata, Masaki; Sakata, Makoto; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Zhao, Xinluo; Iijima, Sumio

    2001-08-15

    X-ray diffraction study of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) grown by arc discharge in hydrogen atmosphere is presented. It is found that the thermal-expansion coefficient along the radial direction of MWNT is widely distributed in a range from 1.6 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} to 2.6 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}, indicating the existence of both of Russian doll MWNT and highly defective MWNT. Russian doll MWNT is suggested to have the outer diameter less than {approx}100 Aa. Thicker MWNT's are typically highly defective, and may have the jelly roll (scroll) or defective polygonal structure consisting of flat graphite domains.

  13. A study of swing-curve physics in diffraction-based overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kaustuve; den Boef, Arie; Storms, Greet; van Heijst, Joost; Noot, Marc; An, Kevin; Park, Noh-Kyoung; Jeon, Se-Ra; Oh, Nang-Lyeom; McNamara, Elliott; van de Mast, Frank; Oh, SeungHwa; Lee, Seung Yoon; Hwang, Chan; Lee, Kuntack

    2016-03-01

    With the increase of process complexity in advanced nodes, the requirements of process robustness in overlay metrology continues to tighten. Especially with the introduction of newer materials in the film-stack along with typical stack variations (thickness, optical properties, profile asymmetry etc.), the signal formation physics in diffraction-based overlay (DBO) becomes an important aspect to apply in overlay metrology target and recipe selection. In order to address the signal formation physics, an effort is made towards studying the swing-curve phenomena through wavelength and polarizations on production stacks using simulations as well as experimental technique using DBO. The results provide a wealth of information on target and recipe selection for robustness. Details from simulation and measurements will be reported in this technical publication.

  14. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Courty, Olivier Fabrice; Motta, Arthur T.; Piotrowski, Christopher J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of in-reactor corrosion during operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold spots so that the distribution of hydrides in the cladding is inhomogeneous. The hydrogen precipitation kinetics plays a strong role in the spatial distribution of the hydrides in the cladding. The precipitation rate is normally described as proportional to the supersaturation of hydrogen in solid solution. The proportionality constant, α2, for hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 is measured directly using in situ synchrotron X-Ray diffraction, at different temperatures and with three different initial hydrogen concentrations. The results validate the linear approximation of the phenomenological model and a near constant value of α2 = 4.5 × 10-4 s-1 was determined for the temperature range studied.

  15. Shocked single crystals studied via nanosecond Laue diffraction and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suggit, Matthew J.

    Under shock compression it is believed that crystalline materials undergo complex, rapid, micro-structural changes to relieve the large applied shear stresses. The mechanisms involved, such as dislocation flow and deformation twinning, under the generated high strain rates are not fully understood and in situ measurements of defects have proven elusive. This work presents the development of a nanosecond x-ray diffraction technique based on the white-light Laue method, and its first use in studying shock compressed copper. Observations of diffuse scattering are interpreted as stress-dependent lattice rotations due to dislocation glide. The results are compared with MD simulations of shocks in copper which are shown not to agree. Simulations of tantalum, shocked along the [001] axis, are demonstrated to undergo deformation twinning. A novel order parameter for identifying twin variants is developed and the deformation twinning mechanism under shock compression is identified.

  16. An Atomistic study of Helium Resolution in bcc Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Stewart, David M

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gas-stabilized bubbles in irradiated materials can be a significant factor in the microstructural processes that lead to mechanical property and dimensional changes in structural materials exposed to high-energy neutrons. Helium generation and accumulation is particularly important under DT fusion irradiation conditions. Although the process of ballistic resolutioning of gas from bubbles has been long-discussed in the literature, there have been few computational studies of this mechanism. Resolutioning could limit bubble growth by ejecting gas atoms back into the metal matrix. A detailed atomistic study of ballistic He resolutioning from bubbles in bcc iron has been carried out using molecular dynamics. A newly-developed Fe-He interatomic potential was employed, with the iron matrix described by the potential of Ackland and co-workers from 1997. The primary variables examined were: irradiation temperature (100 and 600K), iron knock-on atom energy (5 and 20 keV), bubble radius (~0.5 and 1.0 nm), and He-to-vacancy ratio in the bubble (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0) in order to obtain an assessment of this dynamic resolutioning mechanism. The results presented here focus on the 5 keV cascades which indicate a modest, but potentially significant level of He removal by this process.

  17. Revisit: High resolution charge density study of α-rhombohedral boron using third-generation SR data at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibori, Eiji; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kaoru; Takata, Masaki

    2015-09-01

    Experimental charge density of α-rhombohedral boron (α-B12) by a Maximum entropy method (MEM) has been re-investigated using the high resolution powder diffraction data measured at third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) source, SPring-8. The present MEM charge density has many discrepancies from the previous MEM charge densities reported by Fujimori et al. and Hosoi et al. The data-resolution dependence of the MEM charge density was investigated using the present data. We found that diffraction data with d > 0.4 Å resolution range were needed to reveal qualitative bonding nature of α-B12 at 100 K. The peculiar bonding natures, such as a bend B-B bond and a propeller-shaped bond, which were found in the previous studies have disappeared by using d > 0.4 Å data. The bonding nature of MEM charge density using the full data with d > 0.327 Å d-spacing range is well agreed with those of theoretical calculations. The present study suggests that resolution test is important for an accurate charge density study of boron related materials.

  18. In-situ non-ambient X-ray diffraction studies of indium tungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Baiz, Tamam I.; Heinrich, Christophe P.; Banek, Nathan A.; Vivekens, Boris L.; Lind, Cora

    2012-03-15

    In situ variable temperature and high pressure X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on indium tungstate (In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12}). This material displays positive volume expansion in both its low temperature monoclinic and high temperature orthorhombic phases, with negative thermal expansion along the a axis and positive thermal expansion along the b and c axes. Upon hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell, one crystalline to crystalline phase transition is observed in the range 1.9 to 2.7 GPa, and progressive irreversible amorphization occurs at pressures above 4.3 GPa. The crystalline high pressure phase appears to be isostructural to previously observed high pressure phases in other A{sub 2}M{sub 3}O{sub 12} compounds. - Graphical abstract: Variable pressure X-ray diffraction patterns of In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12} collected in a diamond anvil cell. A phase transition is clearly observed between 2.2 and 2.7 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphization. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12} was studied as a function of temperature and pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uniaxial negative thermal expansion was observed above 250 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A pressure-induced phase transition occurred between 2.2 and 2.7 GPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pressure-induced irreversible amorphization was observed above 4.3 GPa.

  19. A high temperature diffraction-resistance study of chalcopyrite, CuFeS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, T.E.; Powell, A.V.; Hull, S.

    2011-08-15

    The electrical, magnetic and structural properties of synthetic chalcopyrite, CuFeS{sub 2}, have been studied up to 873 K using DC resistance measurements performed in-situ during neutron powder diffraction experiments. Under ambient conditions the material adopts the accepted structural model for CuFeS{sub 2} in the space group I4-bar 2d, with the magnetic moment of the Fe{sup 3+} cations aligned along [001]. The electrical resistivity is around 0.3 {Omega} cm under ambient conditions, consistent with semiconductor character, and decreases slightly with increase in temperature until a more abrupt fall occurs in the region 750-800 K. This abrupt change in resistivity is accompanied by a structural transition to a cubic zinc blende structured phase (space group F4-bar 3m) in which Cu{sup +} and Fe{sup 3+} cations are disordered over the same tetrahedral crystallographic sites and by a simultaneous loss of long-range magnetic order. The implications of these results are discussed in the context of previous studies of the chalcopyrite system. - Graphical abstract: Structural, magnetic and electrical properties of CuFeS{sub 2} to 873 K have been investigated using DC resistance measurements, performed in-situ during the collection of powder neutron diffraction data. Highlights: > Structural, magnetic and electronic properties are probed simultaneously. > A fall in resistivity at high temperatures is associated with cation disorder. > The order-disorder transition is accompanied by the loss of magnetic order. > The structural and magnetic phase transition is preceded by a 2-phase region. > Sulphur loss at high temperatures causes the phase transitions to be irreversible.

  20. X-ray micro-diffraction studies on biological samples at the BioCAT Beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source

    PubMed Central

    Barrea, R. A.; Antipova, O.; Gore, D.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Kujala, N. G.; Irving, T. C.; Orgel, J. P. R. O.

    2014-01-01

    The small source sizes of third-generation synchrotron sources are ideal for the production of microbeams for diffraction studies of crystalline and non-crystalline materials. While several such facilities have been available around the world for some time now, few have been optimized for the handling of delicate soft-tissue specimens under cryogenic conditions. Here the development of a new X-ray micro-diffraction instrument at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source, and its use with newly developed cryo-diffraction techniques for soft-tissue studies, are described. The combination of the small beam sizes delivered by this instrument, the high delivered flux and successful cryo-freezing of rat-tail tendon has enabled us to record data to better than 4 Å resolution. The ability to quickly raster scan samples in the beam allows selection of ordered regions in fibrous samples for markedly improved data quality. Examples of results of experiments obtainable using this instrument are presented. PMID:25178013

  1. Crystal symmetry of BiMnO3 : Electron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokosawa, Tadahiro; Belik, Alexei A.; Asaka, Toru; Kimoto, Koji; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Matsui, Yoshio

    2008-01-01

    The crystal symmetry of BiMnO3 was investigated by convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). CBED, which was used in order to discriminate the crystal axes of BiMnO3 in this study, showed that BiMnO3 belongs to point group 2/m with the c -glide plane perpendicular to the b axis, resulting in space group C2/c . In the SAED patterns, however, the very weak but sharp h0l (l=2n+1) and broader h0l (h=2n+1) reflections were observed, indicating the noncentrosymmetric long-range (space group C2 ) and short-range ordered structures ( P2 or P21 ), respectively. This implies that the weak reflections had quite little influence on the CBED patterns. By substituting Sc for Mn, the long-range ordered structure persisted up to BiMn0.6Sc0.4O3 at 300K , but short-range ordered structure disappeared already in BiMn0.9Sc0.1O3 . In BiMnO3 at 673K , the long-range ordered structure persisted while the short-range ordered structure disappeared. Both h0l ( l=2n+1 and h=2n+1 ) reflections could not be detected in structurally related BiScO3 and BiCrO3 at 300K indicating that they belong to centrosymmetric C2/c . This strongly suggests that the noncentrosymmetric long-range ordered structure (C2) of BiMnO3 is attributed not only to Bi3+ ions with lone electron pair but also to Mn3+ ions, that is, to correlation between Bi3+ and Mn3+ ions. The results of this work are important for understanding multiferroic properties of BiMnO3 .

  2. Optical and resonant X-ray diffraction studies of molecular arrangements in several liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suntao

    Using optical and x-ray techniques, we have studied several selected liquid crystal compounds formed by three types of molecules: rod-like; hockey-stick-shaped and bent-core-shaped molecules. This thesis describes four research projects. The first one is a study of the molecular arrangements in freestanding films of three chiral compounds showing no-layer-shrinkage behavior above their bulk SmA-SmC* transition temperatures. Upon cooling under a proper electric field, novel nonplanar-anticlinic-synclinic and nonplanar-synclinic transitions have been observed in two compounds. Increasing electric field can induce a rare transition from a synclinic to an anticlinic structure. Results from both x-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that different molecular packing arrangements exist within the Sm A phase window. The second project is to investigate three achiral meta-substituted three-ring compounds. These compounds exhibit two different tilted smectic phases, Sm C1 and SmC2. A recent paper has reported that mirror symmetry is broken in one of these compounds. However, no mirror symmetry breaking has been observed in our studies of the same compound. Our studies of another two compounds confirmed previous results that the Sm C1 and SmC2 phases are Sm C and SmCA, respectively. Thirdly, we confirmed the SM C*FI2 -SmC* phase sequence reversal in one liquid crystal compound and specially prepared binary mixtures. This phase sequence reversal was predicted by a recent phenomenological model. Moreover, the temperature range for the SM C*FI2 phase increases significantly in the mixture suggesting that such a phase sequence may exist in other compounds. The last project is to study the B2 phase formed by bent-core molecules using polarization-analyzed resonant x-ray diffraction. The B2 phase has three possible arrangements which show a two-layer unit cell. We analyzed the polarization of the resonant peaks at different Bragg orders. By comparing a theoretical

  3. Nanostructures of Mg0.65Ti0.35Dx studied with x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and magic-angle-spinning H2 NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Magusin, P. C. M. M.; Kalisvaart, W. P.; Notten, P. H. L.; Cuevas, F.; Latroche, M.; van Santen, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    Magnesium transition-metal alloys have a high hydrogen-storage capacity and show improved hydrogen-uptake and -release kinetics compared to magnesium alone. In the present study we have investigated the structure of bulk magnesium-titanium deuteride Mg0.65Ti0.35Dx prepared via mechanical alloying and gas-phase deuterium absorption by combined use of x-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction, and magic-angle-spinning H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The initial ball-milled alloy has two XRD-distinct Mg and Ti fcc phases. Even after prolonged exposure to deuterium gas at 75 bar and 175°C the materials with and without palladium catalyst are only partly deuterated. Deuterium loading causes the formation of, on the one hand, bct (rutile) MgD2 nanodomains with interdispersed TiDy layers and, on the other hand, a separate fcc (fluorite) TiDz phase. The TiDy phase is XRD invisible, but shows clearly up at a H2 NMR shift of -43ppm between the shift of MgD2 (3 ppm) and the Knight shift of the TiDz phase (-143ppm) . Exchange NMR indicates complete deuterium exchange at 25°C between the MgD2 and TiDy phase within 1 s, as consistent with intimate contacts between these phases. Combined analysis of the XRD and NMR peak areas suggests that the deuterium concentrations y and z in the TiDy and TiDz domains are about 1.5 and 2.0, respectively. Comparing the intrinsic cell parameters of rutile MgH2 and fluorite TiH2 , we propose that stabilization of the mixed nanocomposite may arise from a coherent coupling between the crystal structures of the rutile MgD2 nanodomains and the thin layers of fcc TiDy .

  4. High resolution studies of atoms and small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, B.A.; Tonkyn, R.G.; Miller, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    High resolution, continuous wave lasers have been utilized successfully in studies of small molecules. Examples of two-photon excitation schemes and of multiple resonance excitation sequences will be discussed within the framework of the spectroscopy and dynamics of selected Rydberg states of nitric oxide. Initial results on the circular dichroism of angular distributions in photoelectron spectra of individual hyperfine states of cesium will also be discussed, but no data given.

  5. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  6. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-05-14

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory, where the effect of the Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern is explained in detail. A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997 ▸). Acta Cryst. A53, 810–812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general.

  7. InSitu X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Daniel H.; Ingersoll, David; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    1999-07-13

    In this paper numerical simulations of Mach 10 air flow over a hollow cylinder flare are presented in comparison with recent experimental results. The numerical study is performed using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code and the experimental results were obtained in the ONERA R5Ch wind tunnel. The flow phenomena involved include shock wave boundary layer interaction in hypersonic laminar flow. An analysis of the requirements on the grid resolution, number of particle simulators and run time is performed. Measured and calculated surface properties including pressure and heat transfer are compared.

  8. High-resolution thermal imaging with a combination of nano-focus X-ray diffraction and ultra-fast chip calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Martin; Doblas, David; Hernandez, Jaime J; Odarchenko, Yaroslav I; Burghammer, Manfred; Di Cola, Emanuela; Spitzer, Denis; Antipov, A E; Aldoshin, L S; Ivanov, Dimitri A

    2014-01-01

    A microelectromechanical-systems-based calorimeter designed for use on a synchrotron nano-focused X-ray beamline is described. This instrument allows quantitative DC and AC calorimetric measurements over a broad range of heating/cooling rates (≤100000 K s(-1)) and temperature modulation frequencies (≤1 kHz). The calorimeter was used for high-resolution thermal imaging of nanogram-sized samples subjected to X-ray-induced heating. For a 46 ng indium particle, the measured temperature rise reaches ∼0.2 K, and is directly correlated to the X-ray absorption. Thermal imaging can be useful for studies of heterogeneous materials exhibiting physical and/or chemical transformations. Moreover, the technique can be extended to three-dimensional thermal nanotomography. PMID:24365940

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Internal Structure of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Boyd, Bemrose

    1951-01-01

    A Bragg X-ray spectrometer equipped with a volume-sensitive Geiger counter and Soller slits and employing filtered molybdenum Ka radiation was used to obtain a set of diffracted intensity curves as a Punction of angle for supercooled water. Diffracted intensity curves in the temperature region of 21 to -16 C were obtained. The minimum between the two main diffraction peaks deepened continuously with lowering temperature, indicating a gradual change in the internal structure of the water. No discontinuity in this trend was noted at the melting point. The internal structure of supercooled water was concluded to become progressively more ice-like as the temperature is lowered.

  10. Development of High Pressure Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction Study at ESRF ID 30 Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaussy, A.C.; Mezouar, M.; Mentre, O.

    2004-05-12

    We report about the newly single crystal diffraction set-up development at ID30 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To illustrate the experimental performance of this set-up, we also present X-ray diffraction spectra recorded at high pressure (HP) using dedicated diamond anvil cell (DAC). Using this new setup, high quality synchrotron single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements of Pb2V3O9 have been performed at HP. We evidenced a reordering in the distorted system by resorbing the existing twin. The structure was partially solved by direct methods and refined by the use of the BRUKER suite of programs package.

  11. Simulation and study of Fresnel diffraction for arbitrary two-dimensional apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Dauger, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    A stable, efficient algorithm to calculate numerically a Fresnel diffraction image, given any two-dimensional aperture or obstacle, is introduced. The algorithm predicts both the intensity and relative phase of the image. An alternate faster algorithm is presented for a limited class of apertures. Also examined are images formed from a variety of aperture shapes. Using this computational technique, plots on the complex plane are shown to give insight into Fresnel diffraction. With additional modifications to accept parameters from an experimental apparatus, the algorithms model Fresnel diffraction for laboratory situations. In addition, the algorithms are suitable for numerical implementation on personal computers. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. STEM Electron Diffraction and High Resolution Images Used in the Determination of the Crystal Structure of Au144(SR)60 Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bahena, Daniel; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Santiago, Ulises; Tlahuice, Alfredo; Ponce, Arturo; Bach, Stephan B. H.; Yoon, Bokwon; Whetten, Robert L.; Landman, Uzi; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Determination of the total structure of molecular nanocrystals is an outstanding experimental challenge that has been met, in only a few cases, by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Described here is an alternative approach that is of most general applicability and does not require the fabrication of a single crystal. The method is based on rapid, time-resolved nanobeam electron diffraction (NBD) combined with high-angle annular dark field scanning/transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images in a probe corrected STEM microscope, operated at reduced voltages. The results are compared with theoretical simulations of images and diffraction patterns obtained from atomistic structural models derived through first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The method is demonstrated by application to determination of the structure of the Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 cluster. PMID:23687562

  14. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Phillips, N. W.; Hofmann, F.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Vine, D. J.; Abbey, B.

    2015-04-29

    For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources.

  15. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Phillips, N. W.; Hofmann, F.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Vine, D. J.; Abbey, B.

    2015-01-01

    For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources. PMID:26798804

  16. Single crystal x-ray diffraction: optical and micro hardness studies on chalcone derivative single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crasta, Vincent; Ravindrachary, V.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Naveen, S.; Shridar, M. A.; Shashidhara Prasad, J.

    2005-08-01

    1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(4- N, N dimethyl amino phenyl)-2-propen-1-one, a chalcone derivative nonlinear optical material has been synthesized by standard method. FT-IR and NMR spectral studies have been performed to confirm the molecular structure of the synthesized compound. The single crystals up to a dimension of 13 x 9 x 3 mm3 were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were transparent in the entire visible region and absorbs in the UV-region. The refractive index has been measured using a He-Ne laser. The grown crystals have been subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction studies to determine the crystal structure and hence the cell parameters of the crystal. From this study it is found that this compound crystallizes in orthorhombic system with a space group P212121 and corresponding lattice parameters are, a = 7.3610(13) Å, b = 11.651(2) Å, c = 17.6490(17) Å. The Kurtz powder second harmonic generation test shows that the compound is a potential candidate for Photonic application. The micro hardness test on these crystals were carried out and the load dependence hardness was observed

  17. High resolution spectroscopic study of Be10Lambda;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Danagoulian, S.; de Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fujita, M.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Han, Y.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman, Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.; Hksjlab E05-115 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopy of a Be10Lambda; hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the (e ,e'K+) reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of ˜0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using p (e ,e'K+)Λ ,Σ0 reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels; and the binding energy of the ground-state peak (mixture of 1- and 2- states) was found to be BΛ=8.55 ±0.07 (stat . ) ±0.11 (sys . ) MeV. The result indicates that the ground-state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on the charge symmetry breaking effect in the Λ N interaction.

  18. Best Technology Practices of Conflict Resolution Specialists: A Case Study of Online Dispute Resolution at United States Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Kimberli Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to remedy the paucity of knowledge about higher education's conflict resolution practice of online dispute resolution by providing an in-depth description of mediator and instructor online practices. Telephone interviews were used as the primary data collection method. Eleven interview questions were relied upon to…

  19. Neutron diffraction studies of Gd 2Zr 2O 7 pyrochlore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Brendan J.; Zhou, Qingdi; Avdeev, Maxim

    2011-07-01

    The structure of Gd 2Zr 2O 7 pyrochlore over the temperature range 4-300 K has been refined from powder neutron diffraction data. The sample was enriched in 160Gd to avoid the high neutron absorption of naturally occurring Gd. The diffraction pattern showed well resolved superlattice reflections indicative of the pyrochlore structure and no evidence is found for anion-disorder from the structural refinements.

  20. Numerical studies and optimization of magnetron with diffraction output (MDO) using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, Alireza

    The first magnetron as a vacuum-tube device, capable of generating microwaves, was invented in 1913. This thesis research focuses on numerical simulation-based analysis of magnetron performance. The particle-in-cell (PIC) based MAGIC software tool has been utilized to study the A6 and the Rising-Sun magnetron structures, and to obtain the optimized geometry for optimizing the device performance. The A6 magnetron is the more traditional structure and has been studied more often. The Rising-Sun geometry, consists of two alternating groups of short and long vanes in angular orientation, and was created to achieve mode stability. The effect of endcaps, changes in lengths of the cathode, the location of cathodes with respect to the anode block, and use of transparent cathodes have been probed to gauge the performance of the A6 magnetron with diffraction output. The simulations have been carried out with different types of endcaps. The results of this thesis research demonstrate peak output power in excess of 1GW, with efficiencies on the order of 66% for magnetic (B)-fields in the range of 0.4T - 0.42T. In addition, particle-in-cell simulations have been performed to provide a numerical evaluation of the efficiency, output power and leakage currents for a 12-cavitiy, Rising-Sun magnetron with diffraction output with transparent cathodes. The results demonstrate peak output power in excess of 2GW, with efficiencies on the order of 68% for B-fields in the 0.42T - 0.46T range. While slightly better performance for longer cathode length has been recorded. The results show the efficiency in excess of 70% and peak output power on the order of 2.1GW for an 18 cm cathode length at 0.45T magnetic field and 400 kV applied voltage. All results of this thesis conform to the definite advantage of having endcaps. Furthermore, the role of secondary electron emission (SEE) on the output performance of the12-cavity, 12-cathodes Rising-Sun magnetron has been probed. The results indicate

  1. Preliminayr Study on Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging for a Canine Model of Cartilage Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Muehleman,C.; Li, J.; Zhong, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the ability of a novel radiographic technique, Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging (DEI), to render high contrast images of canine knee joints for identification of cartilage lesions in situ. Methods: DEI was carried out at the X-15A beamline at Brookhaven National Laboratory on intact canine knee joints with varying levels of cartilage damage. Two independent observers graded the DE images for lesions and these grades were correlated to the gross morphological grade. Results: The correlation of gross visual grades with DEI grades for the 18 canine knee joints as determined by observer 1 (r2=0.8856, P=0.001) and observer 2 (r2=0.8818, P=0.001) was high. The overall weighted ? value for inter-observer agreement was 0.93, thus considered high agreement. Conclusion: The present study is the first study for the efficacy of DEI for cartilage lesions in an animal joint, from very early signs through erosion down to subchondral bone, representing the spectrum of cartilage changes occurring in human osteoarthritis (OA). Here we show that DEI allows the visualization of cartilage lesions in intact canine knee joints with good accuracy. Hence, DEI may be applicable for following joint degeneration in animal models of OA.

  2. Disorder-driven nonequilibrium melting studied by electron diffraction, brillouis scattering, and molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, P. R.; Lam, N. Q.; Grimsditch, M.

    1999-12-21

    In the present paper, a brief overview of the electron diffraction, Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics studies of radiation-induced amorphization of ordered intermetallic compounds is presented. In these studies, measured changes in the velocity of surface acoustic phonons, lattice constant, and the Bragg-Williams long-range order parameter induced by irradiation were compared with the results of computer simulations of defect-induced amorphization. The results indicate that progressive chemical disordering of the superlattice structure during irradiation is accompanied by an expansion of the lattice and a large change in sound velocity corresponding to a {approximately} 50% decrease in the average shear modulus. The onset of amorphization occurs when the average shear modulus of the crystalline compound becomes equal to that of the amorphous phase. This elastic softening criterion for the onset of amorphization and the dependence of the average shear modulus on the long-range-order parameter are in excellent agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. Both the experimental observations and computer simulations confirm the predictions of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion which stipulates that thermodynamic melting of a defective crystal occurs when the sum of the dynamic and static mean-square atomic displacements reaches a critical value identical to that for melting of the defect-free crystal. In this broader view of melting, the crystal-to-glass transformation is a disorder-driven nonequilibrium melting process occurring at temperatures below the Kauzmann isentropic glass-transition temperature.

  3. Interactions of fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine membranes: X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics studies

    PubMed Central

    Cordomí, Arnau; Prades, Jesús; Frau, Juan; Vögler, Oliver; Funari, Sérgio S.; Perez, Juan J.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE) membranes containing fatty acids (FAs) was performed by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The study was aimed at understanding the interactions of several structurally related FAs with biomembranes, which is necessary for further rational lipid drug design in membrane-lipid therapy. The main effect of FAs was to promote the formation of a HII phase, despite a stabilization of the coexisting Lα + HII phases. Derivatives of OA exhibited a specific density profile in the direction perpendicular to the bilayer that reflects differences in the relative localization of the carboxylate group within the polar region of the membrane as well as in the degree of membrane penetration of the FA acyl chain. Hydroxyl and methyl substituents at carbon-2 in the FA acyl chain were identified as effective modulators of the position of carboxylate group in the lipid bilayer. Our data highlight the specific potential of each FA in modulating the membrane structure properties. PMID:19965616

  4. In-situ early-age hydration study of sulfobelite cements by synchrotron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Cuesta, A.; García-Maté, M.; Santacruz, I.; Losilla, E.R.; Fauth, F.; Aranda, M.A.G.; De la Torre, A.G.

    2014-02-15

    Eco-friendly belite calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement hydration behavior is not yet well understood. Here, we report an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study for the first hours of hydration of BCSA cements. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has been used to establish the degree of reaction (α). The hydration of a mixture of ye'elimite and gypsum revealed that ettringite formation (α ∼ 70% at 50 h) is limited by ye'elimite dissolution. Two laboratory-prepared BCSA cements were also studied: non-active-BCSA and active-BCSA cements, with β- and α′{sub H}-belite as main phases, respectively. Ye'elimite, in the non-active-BCSA system, dissolves at higher pace (α ∼ 25% at 1 h) than in the active-BCSA one (α ∼ 10% at 1 h), with differences in the crystallization of ettringite (α ∼ 30% and α ∼ 5%, respectively). This behavior has strongly affected subsequent belite and ferrite reactivities, yielding stratlingite and other layered phases in non-active-BCSA. The dissolution and crystallization processes are reported and discussed in detail. -- Highlights: •Belite calcium sulfoaluminate cements early hydration mechanism has been determined. •Belite hydration strongly depends on availability of aluminum hydroxide. •Orthorhombic ye’elimite dissolved at a higher pace than cubic one. •Ye’elimite larger reaction degree yields stratlingite formation by belite reaction. •Rietveld method quantified gypsum, anhydrite and bassanite dissolution rates.

  5. Elastic deformations in hexagonal phases studied by small-angle X-ray diffraction and simulations.

    PubMed

    Perutková, Šárka; Daniel, Matej; Rappolt, Michael; Pabst, Georg; Dolinar, Gregor; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-02-28

    In this study we present experimental and theoretical results which concern the deviations from circularity of the pivotal plane in the inverse hexagonal phases (H(II)) of phospholipid self-assemblies. Due to packing constraints, the cross-section of the polar/apolar interface deviates from a circle, which we studied in minute detail by analysing small-angle X-ray diffraction data of dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (SOPE), respectively. On this structural basis, Monte Carlo (MC) simulated annealing variations of the free energy were carried out, both on the formation of the H(II)-phase and on the particular shape of the cross-section in the H(II)-phase. The equilibrium of the H(II)-phase pivotal plane contour and the corresponding values of the mean intrinsic curvature, H(m), and the hydrocarbon chain stiffness, τ, were determined from MC calculations. The results of these calculations were tested by solving the corresponding system of non-linear differential equations derived using variational calculus. Here our main aim is to predict the range of possible values of H(m) and τ. Comparing the measured structural data with predictions from MC calculations including lipid anisotropy, and accounting for the elastic deformations of the pivotal plane allowed us to determine a relationship between the bending deformation and stretching of hydrocarbon chains. PMID:21063616

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from M. tuberculosis crystallizing in space group P32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Crystals of M. tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 2.00-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P32 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 106.47 Å, c = 71.32 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 120°. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. There are six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is a biologically active form of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from M. tuberculosis.

  7. Diffraction Effects in a Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of diffraction effects in the AIRES optical system using GLAD by Applied Optics Research. AIRES (or Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer) employs two gratings in series. The small, first-order (i.e., predisperser) grating sorts orders for the large, high-order echelle grating, thus providing moderately high spectral resolution over 3.6 octaves in wavelength. The AIRES' optical design includes three field stops (i.e., a circular aperture and two long, narrow slits) and four pupil stops. A detailed diffraction analysis is required to evaluate critical trade-offs between spectral resolution, optical throughput, detector background, scattered light, and system size and weight. Such an analysis must consider diffraction effects at the pupil stops (edge diffraction), at the field stops (spatial filtering), and at intermediate positions where other optical elements are located. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing of the second slit relative to the first, baffling at the Lyot stop and subsequent pupil stops, and the necessity for oversizing other optical elements are presented and discussed. It is found that for narrow slits, the downstream energy distribution is significantly broadened relative to that for large slits, where telescope diffraction dominates, leading to significantly more light loss than anticipated, unless other key optical elements are oversized. The importance of performing a proper diffraction analysis is emphasized and the suitability of GLAD for this task is discussed.

  8. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  9. Spatial and spectral resolution necessary for remotely sensed vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    An outline is presented of the required spatial and spectral resolution needed for accurate vegetation discrimination and mapping studies as well as for determination of state of health (i.e., detection of stress symptoms) of actively growing vegetation. Good success was achieved in vegetation discrimination and mapping of a heterogeneous forest cover in the ridge and valley portion of the Appalachians using multispectral data acquired with a spatial resolution of 15 m (IFOV). A sensor system delivering 10 to 15 m spatial resolution is needed for both vegetation mapping and detection of stress symptoms. Based on the vegetation discrimination and mapping exercises conducted at the Lost River site, accurate products (vegetation maps) are produced using broad-band spectral data ranging from the .500 to 2.500 micron portion of the spectrum. In order of decreasing utility for vegetation discrimination, the four most valuable TM simulator VNIR bands are: 6 (1.55 to 1.75 microns), 3 (0.63 to 0.69 microns), 5 (1.00 to 1.30 microns) and 4 (0.76 to 0.90 microns).

  10. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Tenchov, Boris G.; Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro

    1989-01-01

    The phase transitions in fully hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/water/ethanol phases have been studied by lowangle time-resolved x-ray diffraction under conditions similar to those employed in calorimetry (scan rates 0.05-0.5°C/min and uniform temperature throughout the samples). This approach provides more adequate characterization of the equilibrium transition pathways and allows for close correlations between structural and thermodynamic data. No coexistence of the rippled gel (Pβ') and liquid-crystalline (Lα) phases was found in the main transition of DPPC; rather, a loss of correlation in the lamellar structure, observed as broadening of the lamellar reflections, takes place in a narrow temperature range of ∼100 mK at the transition midpoint. Formation of a long-living metastable phase, denoted by Pβ'(mst), differing from the initial Pβ' was observed in cooling direction by both x-ray diffraction and calorimetry. No direct conversion of Pβ'(mst) into Pβ' occurs for over 24 h but only by way of the phase sequence Pβ'(mst) → Lβ' → Pβ'. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the enthalpy of the Pβ'(mst)-Lα transition is by ∼5% lower than that of the Pβ'-Lα transition. The effects of ethanol (Rowe, E. S. 1983. Biochemistry. 22:3299-3305; Simon, S. A., and T. J. McIntosh. 1984. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 773:169-172) on the mechanism and reversibility of the DPPC main transition were clearly visualized. At ethanol concentrations inducing formation of interdigitated gel phase, the main transition proceeds through a coexistence of the initial and final phases over a finite temperature range. During the subtransition in DPPC recorded at scan rate 0.3°C/min, a smooth monotonic increase of the lamellar spacing from its subgel (Lc) to its gel (Lβ') phase value takes place. The width of the lamellar reflections remains unchanged during this transformation. This provides grounds to propose a

  11. Expression, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of the Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P450cam operon repressor CamR

    SciTech Connect

    Maenaka, Katsumi; Fukushi, Kouji; Aramaki, Hironori; Shirakihara, Yasuo

    2005-08-01

    The P. putida cytochrome P450cam operon repressor CamR has been expressed in E. coli and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The Pseudomonas putida cam repressor (CamR) is a homodimeric protein that binds to the camO DNA operator to inhibit the transcription of the cytochrome P450cam operon camDCAB. CamR has two functional domains: a regulatory domain and a DNA-binding domain. The binding of the inducer d-camphor to the regulatory domain renders the DNA-binding domain unable to bind camO. Native CamR and its selenomethionyl derivative have been overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Native CamR was crystallized under the following conditions: (i) 12–14% PEG 4000, 50 mM Na PIPES, 0.1 M KCl, 1% glycerol pH 7.3 at 288 K with and without camphor and (ii) 1.6 M P{sub i}, 50 mM Na PIPES, 2 mM camphor pH 6.7 at 278 K. The selenomethionyl derivative CamR did not crystallize under either of these conditions, but did crystallize using 12.5% PEG MME 550, 25 mM Na PIPES, 2.5 mM MgCl{sub 2} pH 7.3 at 298 K. Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies revealed the space group to be orthorhombic (P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = 48.0, b = 73.3, c = 105.7 Å. Native and selenomethionyl derivative data sets were collected to 3 Å resolution at SPring-8 and the Photon Factory.

  12. Application of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to the study of aragonite crystallography and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haywick, D.W. . Geology Dept.); Ness, S.E. . Instrumentation Centre)

    1993-03-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is a valuable technique by which to study the ultrastructure of various organic and inorganic compounds. Some biogeological minerals, including skeletal aragonite, have proven to be relatively unstable under an electron beam. Nevertheless, these compounds can be examined by HRTEM provided that minimal exposure techniques are employed. The authors have successfully applied HRTEM to examine diagenetically altered Plio-Pleistocene aragonitic faunas from New Zealand. To date, they have obtained high-resolution images of lattice-fringes with a spacing of 3.7 [angstrom] using a defocused, low-intensity electron beam. At least two of the samples imaged revealed clusters of lattice planes which together, form an interlocking mosaic of variably oriented micro-domains between 5 and 100 nm across. These micro-domains suggest that at least some of the aragonite is heterogeneous at a nm-scale; however, the individual micro-domains, when averaged together, generate single crystal electron diffraction patterns typical of well-ordered aragonite. The origin of the micro-domains is presently unclear. They may be an artifact of diagenetic alteration of an ultrastructurally homogeneous crystal. It is more likely, however, that the micro-domains were produced during aragonite precipitation. If this scenario is correct, it could have major implications for carbonate diagenesis, particularly if micro-domains prove to be ubiquitous within biogenic carbonate minerals. Inter-domains boundaries would be zones of comparative weakness and may provide nucleation points for diagenetic alteration. The intent now is to apply HRTEM in conjunction with other analytical techniques (e.g. x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, stable isotope geochemistry) to characterize crystallographic changes during progressive diagenesis of aragonite, especially the aragonite-calcite transformation.

  13. Kinetics of methane hydrate decomposition studied via in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Everett, S Michelle; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy J

    2013-05-01

    Gas hydrate is known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Based on results from the decomposition of three nominally similar methane hydrate samples, the kinetics of two regions, 180-200 and 230-260 K, within the overall decomposition range 140-260 K, were studied by in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic rate constants, k(a), and the reaction mechanisms, n, for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region, and activation energies, E(a), were determined by the Arrhenius plot. E(a) determined from the data for 180-200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230-260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher E(a) in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions. PMID:23557375

  14. High temperature X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and dielectric studies on yttrium orthochromites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mall, Ashish Kumar; Garg, Ashish; Gupta, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    The structural, thermal and dielectric properties of YCrO3 ceramic prepared by solid state reaction method have been investigated by a combination of XRD, Raman spectroscopy and permittivity measurement. The X-ray diffraction spectra shows single phase orthorhombically distorted perovskite structure with Pnma symmetry over a wide range of temperature 300K to 1100K. Impedance spectroscopy study on the sample showed that the dielectric constant, tangent loss and ac conductivity with frequency increases on increasing the temperature. Dielectric measurement shows a relaxor like transition at about 460K. Non-Debye type relaxation is observed with activation energy of 0.25 eV extracted from ac conductivity at 11 kHz frequency. We believe that the oxygen ion vacancies play an important role in conduction processes in addition to polaron hopping at higher temperatures. Raman scattering measurements were performed over a wide temperature range from 300K to 600 K. The line width of the modes due to CrO6 bending and in-plane O2 stretching broadens with increasing temperature.

  15. In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Large Monotonic Deformations of Superelastic Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebner, Aaron P.; Paranjape, Harshad M.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brinson, L. Catherine; Pelton, Alan R.

    2015-06-01

    Superelastic Nitinol micromechanics are studied well into plastic deformation regimes using neutron diffraction. Insights are made into the nature of initial transformation, bulk transformation, plastic deformation, and unloading. Schmid factor predictions based on habit plane variants are found to best describe the very first grains that transform, prior to the transformation plateaus. However, the bulk transformation behavior that gives rise to transformation plateaus violates single crystal Schmid factor analyses, indicating that in bulk polycrystals, it is the effect of grain neighborhoods, not the orientations of individual grains, that drives transformation behaviors. Beyond the plateaus, a sudden shift in micromechanical deformation mechanisms is observed at ~8.50 %/4.75 % tension/compression engineering strain. This mechanism results in reverse-phase transformation in both cases, indicating a strong relaxation in internal stresses of the samples. It is inferred that this mechanism is most likely initial bulk plastic flow, and postulated that it is the reason for a transition from fatigue life enhancement to detriment when pre-straining superelastic Nitinol. The data presented in this work provide critical datasets for development and verification of both phenomenological internal variable-driven and micromechanical theories of transformation-plasticity coupling in shape memory alloys.

  16. Neutron diffraction studies of the interaction between amphotericin B and lipid-sterol model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Lawrence, M. Jayne; Demeė, Bruno; Fragneto, Giovanna; Barlow, David

    2012-10-01

    Over the last 50 years or so, amphotericin has been widely employed in treating life-threatening systemic fungal infections. Its usefulness in the clinic, however, has always been circumscribed by its dose-limiting side-effects, and it is also now compromised by an increasing incidence of pathogen resistance. Combating these problems through development of new anti-fungal agents requires detailed knowledge of the drug's molecular mechanism, but unfortunately this is far from clear. Neutron diffraction studies of the drug's incorporation within lipid-sterol membranes have here been performed to shed light on this problem. The drug is shown to disturb the structures of both fungal and mammalian membranes, and co-localises with the membrane sterols in a manner consistent with trans-membrane pore formation. The differences seen in the membrane lipid ordering and in the distributions of the drug-ergosterol and drug-cholesterol complexes within the membranes are consistent with the drug's selectivity for fungal vs. human cells.

  17. High-temperature X-ray diffraction study of uranium-neptunium mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Mélanie; Belin, Renaud C; Richaud, Jean-Christophe; Reynaud, Muriel; Adenot, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    Incorporating minor actinides (MAs = Am, Np, Cm) in UO2 fertile blankets is a viable option to recycle them. Despite this applied interest, phase equilibria between uranium and MAs still need to be thoroughly investigated, especially at elevated temperatures. In particular, few reports on the U-Np-O system are available. In the present work, we provide for the first time in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction results obtained during the oxidation of (U1-yNpy)O2 uranium-neptunium mixed oxides up to 1373 K and discuss subsequent phase transformations. We show that (i) neptunium stabilizes the UO2-type fluorite structure at high temperature and that (ii) the U3O8-type orthorhombic structure is observed in a wide range of compositions. We clearly demonstrate the incorporation of neptunium in this phase, which was a controversial question in previous studies up to now. We believe it is the particular stability of the tetravalent state of neptunium that is responsible for the observed phase relationships. PMID:23409700

  18. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-21

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55 GPa at 300 K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B{sub 0} = 174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, γ{sub G}{sup TO }= 1.26 and γ{sub G}{sup LO }= 1.13, just like in the case of other A{sup III}B{sup V} diamond-like phases, for which γ{sub G}{sup TO }> γ{sub G}{sup LO }≅ 1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant α is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from I{sub TO}/I{sub LO} ∼ 0.25 at 0.1 MPa to I{sub TO}/I{sub LO} ∼ 2.5 at 45 GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  19. X-ray diffraction studies of the contractile mechanism in single muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Vincenzo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Reconditi, Massimo; Linari, Marco; Lucii, Leonardo; Stewart, Alex; Sun, Yin-Biao; Boesecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Irving, Tom; Irving, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of muscle contraction was investigated in intact muscle fibres by X-ray diffraction. Changes in the intensities of the axial X-ray reflections produced by imposing rapid changes in fibre length establish the average conformation of the myosin heads during active isometric contraction, and show that the heads tilt during the elastic response to a change in fibre length and during the elementary force generating process: the working stroke. X-ray interference between the two arrays of myosin heads in each filament allows the axial motions of the heads following a sudden drop in force from the isometric level to be measured in situ with unprecedented precision. At low load, the average working stroke is 12 nm, which is consistent with crystallographic studies. The working stroke is smaller and slower at a higher load. The compliance of the actin and myosin filaments was also determined from the change in the axial spacings of the X-ray reflections following a force step, and shown to be responsible for most of the sarcomere compliance. The mechanical properties of the sarcomere depend on both the motor actions of the myosin heads and the compliance of the myosin and actin filaments. PMID:15647164

  20. Temperature dependent x-ray diffraction and dielectric studies of multiferroic GaFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mall, Ashish Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Polycrystalline GaFeO3 (GFO) samples were synthesized by sol-gel method. The structural and dielectric properties of GaFeO3 ceramic have been investigated by a combination of XRD and permittivity measurement. The X-ray diffraction spectra shows single phase orthorhombically distorted perovskite structure with Pc21n symmetry over a wide range of temperature 300K to 600K, with no evidence of any phase transition. Refined lattice parameters (a, b, c and V) increases with increasing temperature. Temperature dependent dielectric properties were investigated in the frequency range from 100Hz-5MHz. Impedance spectroscopy study on the sample showed that the dielectric constant and ac conductivity with frequency increases on increasing the temperature. Cole-Cole plots suggest that the response from grain is dominant at low temperature whereas grain boundary response overcomes as temperature increases. The relaxation activation energy (calculated from Cole-Cole plots) value is found to be 0.32 eV for the grain boundary. We believe that the oxygen ion vacancies play an important role in conduction processes at higher temperatures.

  1. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Schuren, Jay C.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models. PMID:23556825

  2. Rearrangement of twin variants in ferromagnetic shape memory alloy polyurethane composites studied by stroboscopic neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuchtwanger, J.; Lázpita, P.; Vidal, N.; Barandiaran, J. M.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hansen, T.; Peel, M.; Mondelli, C.; O'Handley, R. C.; Allen, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    The use of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) particles as fillers in polymeric matrix composites has been proposed for vibration damping. The large pseudo-plastic recoverable deformation of the FSMA particles due to the rearrangement of twin variants can dissipate a large amount of energy, both under compression and tension. The composites studied are made by mixing particles of NiMnGa with a polyurethane matrix. A magnetic field is applied to the composite while the matrix sets, to achieve a strong [112] texture in the field direction. In situ strobed neutron diffraction measurements were carried out while the composites were subjected to a cyclic deformation. They show that the intensity of certain peaks varies during the deformation cycle. All the peaks that show this behavior can be grouped into pairs that stem from a single austenitic peak. The (020) and (112) martensite peaks correspond to the splitting of the (220) austenite peak, and the intensity of one increases as that of the other decreases. The neutron measurements show directly that there is a change in the texture of the composite during the stress cycle applied to the composite and confirm that the large mechanical loss observed in the stress-strain cycles is in good part due to the rearrangement of twin variants in the FSMA filler used in the composites.

  3. Polymorphism in Photoluminescent KNdW2O8: Synthesis, Neutron Diffraction, and Raman Study

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Bhat, Swetha; Swain, Diptikanta; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Sundaram, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphs of KNdW2O8 ( -KNdW2O8 and -KNdW2O8) phosphors were synthesized by an efficient solution combustion technique for the first time. The crystal structure of the polymorphs analyzed from Rietveld refinement of neutron diffraction data confirms that -KNdW2O8 crystallizes in the tetragonal system (space group I4 ), and -KNdW2O8 crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group C2/m). The local structure of both polymorphs was elucidated using combined neutron pair distribution function (PDF) and Raman scattering techniques. Photoluminescence measurements of the polymorphs showed broadened emission line width and increased intensity for -KNdW2O8 in the visible region compared to -KNdW2O8. This phenomenon is attributed to the increased distortion in the coordination environment of the luminescing Nd3+ ion. Combined PDF, Rietveld, and Raman measurements reveal distortions of the WO6 octahedra and NdO8 polyhedra in -KNdW2O8. This crystal structure photoluminescence study suggests that this class of tungstates can be exploited for visible light emitting devices by tuning the crystal symmetry.

  4. Neutron diffraction study of the magnetic structure of Na2 RuO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogare, K. M.; Sheptyakov, D. V.; Bircher, R.; Güdel, H.-U.; Jansen, M.

    2006-08-01

    Nuclear and magnetic structures of sodium ruthenate (VI) have been studied by neutron powder diffraction in the temperature range 1.5 200 K. Na2RuO4 crystallizes in the monoclinic structure, with space group P 21/c. The structure consists of apical corner sharing RuO5 trigonal bipyramids forming infinite chains running along the b axis. These infinite [ RuO3O2/2] chains form a pseudo hexagonal close packing of rods with Ru Ru distances of 3.51 Å within the chains and 5.30 5.47 Å between the chains. At TN=37.2 K a magnetic transition leads to an antiferromagnetic state. The Ru6+ magnetic moments are ordered antiferromagnetically along the chains (b-axis), while the inter-chain interaction is ferromagnetic. A classical infinite chain model was fitted to the magnetic susceptibility data in order to estimate the strength of the nearest-neighbor exchange interactions along and between the chains, resulting in an intrachain coupling parameter of 2J=-86 K, and an interchain parameter J⊥ with \\vert 2J⊥ \\vert = 3 K.

  5. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of new uranyl malonate and oxalate complexes with carbamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor'ev, M. S.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Two new malonate-containing uranyl complexes with carbamide of the formulas [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2] ( I) and [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)3] ( II), where Urea is carbamide, and one uranyl oxalate complex of the formula [UO2(C2O4)( Urea)3] ( III) were synthesized, and their crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction. The main structural units in crystals I are the electroneutral chains [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2]∞ belonging to the crystal-chemical group AT 11 M 2 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , T 11 = C3H2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea) of uranyl complexes. Crystals II and III are composed of the molecular complexes [UO2( L)( Urea)3], where L = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB 01 M 3 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , B 01 = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea). The characteristic features of the packing of the uranium-containing complexes are discussed in terms of molecular Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra. The effect of the Urea: U ratio on the structure of uranium-containing structural units is considered.

  6. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, S. C.; Reddy, K. R. C; Sastry, G. V. S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe3O4 of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe2O3. The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc. PMID:23049200

  7. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, S C; Reddy, K R C; Sastry, G V S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe(3)O(4) of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe(2)O(3). The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc. PMID:23049200

  8. Deformation in metallic glasses studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dmowski, Wojciech; Egami, Takeshi; Tong, Yang

    2016-01-11

    In this study, high mechanical strength is one of the superior properties of metallic glasses which render them promising as a structural material. However, understanding the process of mechanical deformation in strongly disordered matter, such as metallic glass, is exceedingly difficult because even an effort to describe the structure qualitatively is hampered by the absence of crystalline periodicity. In spite of such challenges, we demonstrate that high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement under stress, using a two-dimensional detector coupled with the anisotropic pair-density function (PDF) analysis, has greatly facilitated the effort of unraveling complex atomic rearrangements involved in the elastic, anelastic,more » and plastic deformation of metallic glasses. Even though PDF only provides information on the correlation between two atoms and not on many-body correlations, which are often necessary in elucidating various properties, by using stress as means of exciting the system we can garner rich information on the nature of the atomic structure and local atomic rearrangements during deformation in glasses.« less

  9. X-ray diffraction study into the effects of liming on the structure of collagen.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Clark A; Wess, Tim J; Kennedy, Craig J

    2006-08-01

    The manufacture of parchment from animal skin involves processes that remove hair, fats, and other macromolecules. Although it is well understood that the collagen fibers "open up" during processing, this study uses small and wide-angle X-ray diffraction to measure quantitatively the changes induced at the nanoscopic and microscopic levels. The axial rise per residue distance within the collagen molecules is unaffected by salt and lime treatments. Salting of the hides appears to remove noncollagenous materials. The intermolecular lateral packing distance between the hydrated collagen molecules (1.4 nm) increases after salting ( approximately 1.5 nm) and liming ( approximately 1.55 nm); drying is responsible for a reduction to approximately 1.2 nm in all samples. The axial staggered array (d spacing) is reduced by 1 nm after liming and is unaffected by drying. The average fibril diameter increases from 103.2 to 114.5 nm following liming, and the fibril-to-fibril distance increases from 122.6 to 136.1 nm. PMID:16903677

  10. Neutron-diffraction study up to 1600 °C of 3:2 mullite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunauer, G.; Frey, F.; Boysen, H.; Schneider, H.; Fischer, P.; Hansen, Th.; Többens, D.; Ehrenberg, H.

    Neutron-diffraction studies were carried out on pure and Cr-doped 3:2 (`sinter') mullite. To learn about structure-property relationships of this refractory material, thermal expansion coefficients and structural parameters were determined by in situ high-temperature investigations. Neutron experiments were performed at the powder diffractometers D2B/ILL, E9/HMI, and HRPT/PSI. All data gave a rather uniform picture of the thermal expansion coefficients: a linear behaviour below 1000 °C and significantly increased (mean) expansion between 1000 and 1600 °C. There is a marked anisotropy of the highest values along the b-axis of the orthorhombic mullite structure. Concerning the structural parameters and the derived bond lengths, there is an expansion of the Al1O6 octahedra, whereas the cross-linking Al2SiO4 tetrahedra stay more or less rigid, but may slightly rotate. Thus a major expansion along the b direction may be qualitatively understood. A structural discussion, however, is affected by the presence of disorder in mullite, in particular in Cr-doped mullite, as it is also reflected by the presence of a modulated diffuse background in the powder patterns.

  11. The magnetic and crystal structures of Sr2IrO4: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Feng; Chi, Songxue; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Qi, Tongfei; Cao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    We report a single-crystal neutron diffraction study of the layered Sr2IrO4. This work unambigu- ously determines the magnetic and crystal structures, and reveals that the spin orientation rigidly tracks the staggered rotation of the IrO6 octahedra in Sr2IrO4. The long-range antiferromagnetic order has a canted spin configuration with an ordered moment of 0.208(3) B/Ir site within the basal plane; a detailed examination of the spin canting yields 0.202(3) and 0.049(2) B/site for the a-axis and the b-axis, respectively. It is intriguing that forbidden nuclear reflections of space group I41/acd are also observed in a wide temperature range from 4 K to 600 K, which suggests a reduced crystal structure symmetry. This neutron scattering work provides a direct, well-refined experimen- tal characterization of the magnetic and crystal structures that are crucial to the understanding of the unconventional magnetism existent in this unusual magnetic insulator.

  12. Iron-metal multilayers studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, RBS and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, R.; Murayama, M.; Nagata, S.; Takahiro, K.; Yamaguchi, S.

    1994-12-01

    Fe/M (M = Ag, Zn and Sn) multilayers prepared by a vacuum evaporation method are studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). For the case of an M = Ag multilayer, MS reveals that Fe in the multilayer remains as an α-phase down to the layer thickness of 10 nm. This result is in agreement with the RBS result that Fe and Ag form a completely discrete layer structure without any mutual mixing. For the case of M = Zn and Sn, RBS reveals that a considerable mixing has taken place between Fe and Sn during the specimen preparation. MS on Fe/Sn specimens with different layer thickness shows that an alloy phase of about 5 nm thickness is formed at the interface. Structural as well as magnetic properties of the alloy phase are discussed based on MS at different temperatures and on reported results of the intermetallic compound FeSn.

  13. X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Crystallized Lysozyme with Coherent X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zheng-Wei; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging and high angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase contrast radiographic imaging are employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in symmetric Laue case. The fill width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal is approximately 16.7 arcseconds, and defects, which include point defects, line defects, and microscopic domains, have been clearly observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front, and they have been found to originate mostly at a central growth area and occasionally at outer growth regions. Individual point defects trapped at a crystal nucleus are resolved in the images of high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration has led to the broadening of the 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.4. A significant change of the defect structure and configuration with drying has been revealed, which suggests the dehydration induced migration and evolution of dislocations and lattice rearrangements to reduce overall strain energy. The sufficient details of the observed defects shed light upon perfection, nucleation and growth, and properties of protein crystals.

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase from Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Nishitani, Yuichi; Nonaka, Tsuyoshi; Kita, Akiko; Fukami, Takaaki A.; Mio, Toshiyuki; Yamada-Okabe, Hisafumi; Yamada-Okabe, Toshiko; Miki, Kunio

    2006-12-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase was purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAP) is an essential enzyme in the synthesis of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UAP from Candida albicans was purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals of the substrate and product complexes both diffract X-rays to beyond 2.3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals of the substrate complex belong to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.77, b = 62.89, c = 90.60 Å, α = 90.01, β = 97.72, γ = 92.88°, whereas those of the product complex belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.95, b = 90.87, c = 94.88 Å.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of FHA domains of Dun1 and Rad53 protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, H; Fontes, M R; Hammet, A; Pike, B L; Teh, T; Gleichmann, T; Gooley, P R; Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J

    2001-03-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are modular protein-protein interaction domains of approximately 130 amino acids present in numerous signalling proteins. FHA-domain-dependent protein interactions are regulated by phosphorylation of target proteins and FHA domains may be multifunctional phosphopeptide-recognition modules. FHA domains of the budding yeast cell-cycle checkpoint protein kinases Dun1p and Rad53p have been crystallized. Crystals of the Dun1-FHA domain exhibit the symmetry of the space group P6(1)22 or P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.3, c = 386.3 A; diffraction data have been collected to 3.1 A resolution on a synchrotron source. Crystals of the N-terminal FHA domain (FHA1) of Rad53p diffract to 4.0 A resolution on a laboratory X-ray source and have Laue-group symmetry 4/mmm, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.7, c = 104.3 A. PMID:11223532

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 A resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 A, alpha = 69, beta = 81, gamma = 80 degrees. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 A resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 A. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1. PMID:18323613

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1. PMID:18323613

  18. In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Complex Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, William B.

    2013-05-13

    The thrust of this project was to investigate the structures of important materials with potential application to hydrogen storage, in an effort to meet the DOE goals for 2010 and 2015, namely 9% (wt) and 15% (wt) respectively. Unfortunately, no material has been found, despite the efforts of many laboratories, including our own, that achieves these goals in a reversible complex hydride such as ammonia borane (NH{sub 4}BH{sub 4}), and other ammonia based compounds, or with light hydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}, due either to their irreversibility or to the high decomposition temperatures and residual simple hydrides such as LiH from the decomposition of the last named compound. Nevertheless, several important technical goals have been accomplished that could be valuable to other DOE programs and would be available for collaborative research. These include the development of a high quality glove box with controlled (low) oxygen and water content, which we continue to employ for the synthesis of potential new materials (unfunded research) and the development of a high quality neutron diffraction furnace with controlled gas environment for studies of hydrogen uptake and loss as well as for studies with other gasses. This furnace was initially constructed with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) center tube to contain the sample and the flowing gas. The heaters are located in the vacuum space outside the tube and it was found that, for the low temperatures required for the study of hydrogen storage materials, the heat transfer was too poor to allow good control. At temperatures in excess of about 400C (and up to more than 1200C) the heat transfer and control are excellent. For the lower temperatures, however, the center tube was replaced by stainless steel and temperature control to 1C became possible. The paired heaters, above and below the neutron beam window allowed control of the temperature gradient to a similar precision. The high temperature capability of the furnace

  19. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997 ▸). Acta Cryst. A53, 810–812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general. PMID:25970298

  20. Resonant double photoionization of lithium studied with medium energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehlitz, R.; Juranić, P. N.

    2006-10-01

    We have measured the relative photoionization cross section for the formation of Li2+ ions between 148 and 161eV photon energy with higher photon-energy resolution than in previous Li2+ studies. This energy region is characterized by double and triple excitations that lead to strong enhancements in the Li2+ cross section. As a result, the double-to-single photoionization ratio shows a dramatic resonance structure not seen before. We have determined the resonance positions and widths using Fano-profile fits to the Li2+ data and compare them to previously published values and a calculated Li2+ cross-section curve.

  1. Study of radar pulse compression for high resolution satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, R. P.; Nathanson, F. E.; Brooks, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Pulse compression techniques are studied which are applicable to a satellite altimeter having a topographic resolution of + 10 cm. A systematic design procedure is used to determine the system parameters. The performance of an optimum, maximum likelihood processor is analysed, which provides the basis for modifying the standard split-gate tracker to achieve improved performance. Bandwidth considerations lead to the recommendation of a full deramp STRETCH pulse compression technique followed by an analog filter bank to separate range returns. The implementation of the recommended technique is examined.

  2. Advanced sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Helmut Matthias

    Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts, such as the supercritical-water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR), are actively researched internationally. Operating conditions above the critical point of water (374°C, 22.1 MPa) and fuel core temperature that potentially exceed 1850°C put a high demand on the surrounding materials. For their safe application, it is essential to characterize and understand the material properties on an atomic scale such as crystal structure and grain orientation (texture) changes as a function of temperature and stress. This permits the refinement of models predicting the macroscopic behavior of the material. Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool in characterizing such crystallographic properties due to their deep penetration depth into condensed matter. This leads to the ability to study bulk material properties, as opposed to surface effects, and allows for complex sample environments to study e.g. the individual contributions of thermo-mechanical processing steps during manufacturing, operating or accident scenarios. I present three sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies that provide such crystallographic information and have been successfully commissioned and integrated into the user program of the High Pressure -- Preferred Orientation (HIPPO) diffractometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) user facility. I adapted a sample changer for reliable and fast automated texture measurements of multiple specimens. I built a creep furnace combining a 2700 N load frame with a resistive vanadium furnace, capable of temperatures up to 1000°C, and manipulated by a pair of synchronized rotation stages. This combination allows following deformation and temperature dependent texture and strain evolutions in situ. Utilizing the presented sample changer and creep furnace we studied pressure tubes made of Zr-2.5wt%Nb currently employed in CANDURTM nuclear reactors and proposed for future SCWRs, acting as the primary

  3. Scanning force microscope for in situ nanofocused X-ray diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhe; Mastropietro, Francesca; Davydok, Anton; Langlais, Simon; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Furter, Jean-Jacques; Thomas, Olivier; Dupraz, Maxime; Verdier, Marc; Beutier, Guillaume; Boesecke, Peter; Cornelius, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    A compact scanning force microscope has been developed for in situ combination with nanofocused X-ray diffraction techniques at third-generation synchrotron beamlines. Its capabilities are demonstrated on Au nano-islands grown on a sapphire substrate. The new in situ device allows for in situ imaging the sample topography and the crystallinity by recording simultaneously an atomic force microscope (AFM) image and a scanning X-ray diffraction map of the same area. Moreover, a selected Au island can be mechanically deformed using the AFM tip while monitoring the deformation of the atomic lattice by nanofocused X-ray diffraction. This in situ approach gives access to the mechanical behavior of nanomaterials. PMID:25178002

  4. Setup for in situ X-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, K.; Mientus, R.; Weiß, V.; Rossner, H.

    2001-07-01

    A novel method is described for the in situ-investigation of nucleation and growth of thin films during magnetron sputtering. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction with synchrotron light is used for the structural analysis during film growth. An in situ-magnetron sputtering chamber was constructed and installed at a synchrotron radiation beam line with a bending magnet. The white synchrotron light (1-70 keV) passes the sputtering chamber through Kapton windows and hits one of the substrates on a four-fold sample holder. The diffracted beam, observed under a fixed diffraction angle between 3° and 10°, is energy analyzed by a high purity Ge-detector. The in situ-EDXRD setup is demonstrated for the growth of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metallic target.

  5. A comparison study of tropical Pacific ocean state estimation: Low-resolution assimilation vs. high-resolution simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Weiwei; Zhu, Jiang; Zhou, Guangqing; Wang, Huijun

    2005-03-01

    A comparison study is performed to contrast the improvements in the tropical Pacific oceanic state of a low-resolution model respectively via data assimilation and by an increase in horizontal resolution. A low resolution model (LR) (1°lat by 2°lon) and a high-resolution model (HR) (0.5°lat by 0.5°lon) are employed for the comparison. The authors perform 20-yr numerical experiments and analyze the annual mean fields of temperature and salinity. The results indicate that the low-resolution model with data assimilation behaves better than the high-resolution model in the estimation of ocean large-scale features. From 1990 to 2000, the average of HR’s RMSE (root-mean-square error) relative to independent Tropical Atmosphere Ocean project (TAO) mooring data at randomly selected points is 0.97°C compared to a RMSE of 0.56°C for LR with temperature assimilation. Moreover, the LR with data assimilation is more frugal in computation. Although there is room to improve the high-resolution model, the low-resolution model with data assimilation may be an advisable choice in achieving a more realistic large-scale state of the ocean at the limited level of information provided by the current observational system.

  6. Feasibility Study on Neutron Diffraction Method for Evaluation of Residual Strain Distribution of Regenerative Cooled Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuoka, Tadashi; Moriya, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Masaki; Yoshida, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    The regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine is exposed to a large temperature difference between the hot gas (about 3500K) and the liquid hydrogen (about 20K). This induces thermal stress, and strain is accumulated in the chamber wall throughout the cyclic firing tests. Evaluation of the stress and the strain distribution in a chamber wall is essential since chamber life is usually related to such stress and strain. In this study, the residual strain in a regenerative cooled combustion chamber wall was measured by applying the neutron diffraction method and the X-ray diffraction method. The measured data were compared with the numerical data by finite element analysis, and the feasibility of the neutron diffraction method for the regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine was evaluated.

  7. High-Pressure Effects on Boron Nitride Multi-Walled Nanotubes: An X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu, D.; Midgley, A; Petruska, E; Sood, A; Bando, Y; Golberg, D; Kruger, M

    2008-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction study has been carried out on boron nitride multi-walled nanotubes up to 19.1 GPa. The fit to the unit cell volumes yields a zero pressure bulk modulus K0 = 34.9 {+-} 1 GPa and its pressure derivative K{prime}{sub 0} {+-} 0.3. The compression is highly anisotropic, with the intertube-axis being close to 19 times more compressible than the a-axis. At the highest pressure the diffraction peaks were present even though they were weak and broad, which is in contrast to previous high-pressure Raman results.

  8. Calcination products of gibbsite studied by X-ray diffraction, XPS and solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Malki, A.; Mekhalif, Z.; Detriche, S.; Fonder, G.; Boumaza, A.; Djelloul, A.

    2014-07-01

    The changes caused by heat treatment of gibbsite powder at 300–1473 K were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR). XRD analysis indicates that the transformation sequence involves the formation of κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an intermediate phase between χ- and α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. XPS analysis indicates that the ratio of aluminium atoms to oxygen atoms in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases, whereas the expected ratio is observed in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in the transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Graphical abstract: The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Highlights: • Calcination products of gibbsite studied by XRD, XPS and solid-state NMR. • The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. • The Al/O atomic ratio determined by XPS is larger than 2/3 in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • The percentage of AlO{sub 4} in the aluminas follows the same behaviour as the Al/O atomic ratio.

  9. Study of archaeological iron objects by PGAA, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F. E.; Gebhard, R.; Häusler, W.; Wagner, U.; Albert, P.; Hess, H.; Révay, Z.; Kudejová, P.; Kleszcz, K.

    2016-12-01

    Archaeological iron objects often corrode rapidly after their excavation, even though they have survived long times of burial in the ground. Chlorine that accumulates during burial is thought to play a major role in this destructive post-excavation corrosion. It is therefore important for the conservation of such objects to determine the chlorine content in a non-destructive manner and, if necessary, to remove the chlorine from the artefacts by appropriate methods. Such methods are leaching in alkaline solutions or heating in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures up to 800 ∘C. We have studied the efficiency of the heating method using prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) for monitoring the Cl content and Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) and 4.2 K as well as X-ray diffraction to study the mineralogical transformations of the rust layers. The heat treatments were performed a N2/H2 (90/10) mixture at temperatures up to 750 ∘C. As test specimens sections of iron rods from the Celtic oppidum of Manching (Bavaria) were used. The initial Cl contents of the pieces varied in the range of several hundred ppm, referring to the iron mass. Annealing for 24 h at 350, 550 and 750 ∘C was found to reduce the Cl contents of the specimens, to about 70, 30 and 15 % of the original values, respectively. The rust consists mainly of goethite with admixtures of magnetite, lepidocrocite and akaganeite, which is thought to be a major carrier of chlorine, probably together with iron chlorides. Much of the goethite is so fine-grained that it does not split magnetically at RT. Annealing converts the rust mainly to maghemite at 350 ∘C, to magnetite at 550 ∘C and to wüstite plus magnetite and metallic iron at 750 ∘C. Pure akaganeite behaves in nearly the same manner.

  10. Chromatic confocal microscopy using staircase diffractive surface.

    PubMed

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-08-10

    A chromatic confocal microscope (CCM) is a high-dynamic-range noncontact distance measurement sensor; it is based on a hyperchromatic lens. The vast majority of commercial CCMs use refractive-based chromatic dispersion to chromatically code the optical axis. This approach significantly limits the range of applications and performance of the CCM. In order to be a suitable alternative to a laser triangulation gauge and laser encoder, the performance of the CCM must be improved. In this paper, it is shown how hybrid aspheric diffractive (HAD) lenses can bring the CCM to its full potential by increasing the dynamic range by a factor of 2 and the resolution by a factor of 5 while passively athermizing and increasing the light throughput efficiency of the optical head [M. Rayer, U.S. patent 1122052.2 (2011)]. The only commercially suitable manufacturing process is single-point diamond turning. However, the optical power carried by the diffractive side of a hybrid aspheric diffractive lens is limited by the manufacturing process. A theoretical study of manufacturing losses has revealed that the HAD configuration with the highest diffraction efficiency is for a staircase diffractive surface (SDS). SDS lenses have the potential to reduce light losses associated with manufacturing limits by a factor of 5 without increasing surface roughness, allowing scalar diffraction-limited optical design with a diffractive element. PMID:25320920

  11. On increasing protein-crystallization throughput for X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashit K; Liu, Zhi Jie; Stewart, Patrick D; Schubot, Florian D; Rose, John P; Newton, M Gary; Wang, Bi Cheng

    2005-02-01

    Two recent developments, a novel screening/optimization strategy that considerably reduces the number of trials required to produce diffraction-size crystals and a simple modification that doubles the screening capacity of the Douglas Instruments ORYX 1-6 protein-crystallization robot, have been implemented into a structural genomics project. The new two-step screening/optimization strategy yields diffraction-quality crystals directly from the screening process, reducing the need for further optimization. The ORYX modification involves the addition of extensions to the sample- and oil-delivery arms and software modifications that allow two plates to be set up simultaneously. PMID:15681862

  12. Synchrotron diffraction studies of TiC/FeTi cermets obtained by SHS

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, L.; Turrillas, X.; Mas-Guindal, M.J.; Vaughan, G.B.M.; Kvick, A.; Rodriguez, M.A. . E-mail: mar@icv.csic.es

    2005-05-15

    TiC/FeTi composites have been obtained in situ by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS) of an intimate mixture of compacted powders of elemental carbon, titanium and iron. The reaction has been followed in real time by X-ray diffraction at the ESRF. The mechanism of the reaction is discussed in terms of the formation of a liquid phase corresponding to the eutectic of the Fe/Ti system prior to the TiC synthesis. Temperatures of reaction have been estimated by correlating thermal expansion coefficients with diffraction peaks shifts. The microstructures obtained by this method, suitable for cutting tools and wear resistant applications, are presented.

  13. The molecular structure of barium dibromide: an electron diffraction and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargittai, Magdolna; Kolonits, Mária; Schultz, György

    2001-06-01

    The molecular structure of barium dibromide was determined by gas-phase electron diffraction, ab initio quantum chemical calculations, and joint electron diffraction/vibratonal spectroscopic analyses. All techniques yield consistently an unambiguously bent geometry. The following geometrical parameters were obtained: rg(Ba-Br) 2.911±0.006 Å, re(Ba-Br) 2.899±0.007 Å, ∠ aBr-Ba-Br 137.0±2.5° and ∠ eBr-Ba-Br 137.1±4.9°.

  14. New design studies for TRIUMF's ARIEL High Resolution Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Marchetto, M.

    2016-06-01

    As part of its new Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL), TRIUMF is designing a novel High Resolution Separator (HRS) (Maloney et al., 2015) to separate rare isotopes. The HRS has a 180° bend, separated into two 90° magnetic dipoles, bend radius 1.2 m, with an electrostatic multipole corrector between them. Second order correction comes mainly from the dipole edge curvatures, but is intended to be fine-tuned with a sextupole component and a small octupole component in the multipole. This combination is designed to achieve 1:20,000 resolution for a 3 μm (horizontal) and 6 μm (vertical) emittance. A design for the HRS dipole magnets achieves both radial and integral flatness goals of <10-5. A review of the optical design for the HRS is presented, including the study of limiting factors affecting separation, matching and aberration correction. Field simulations from the OPERA-3D (OPERA) [2] models of the dipole magnets are used in COSY Infinity (COSY) (Berz and Makino, 2005) [3] to find and optimize the transfer maps to 3rd order and study residual nonlinearities to 8th order.

  15. Electron and X-Ray Diffraction Study of K 2SrTi 10O 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Granvalet-Mancini, Maryline; Brohan, Luc

    1993-11-01

    The single-phase compound K 2SrTi 10O 22 was prepared by solid-state reaction. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/ m with a = 15.314(2), b = 3.7865(6), and c = 15.439(2) Å, β 102.68(1)°, and Z = 2. The structure was determined from 1674 reflections collected on a Enraf-Nonius CAD4 automatic diffractometer with Mo Kα radiation. The final R index and weighted Rw index are 0.057 and 0.061, respectively. K 2SrTi 10O 22 belongs to the family of titanates ( A2Ti 6O 13) n- A'Ti 4O 9 with A = Na, K, Rb, A' = Ba, Sr, Pb, and n = 1, 2, 3, …, first described by Raveau et al., with n = 1. The covalent framework is built up of the intergrowth of two types of structural units: A 2Ti 6O 13 and hypothetical A' Ti 4O 9. Both units are characterized by zigzag ribbons of, respectively, 2 × 3 and 2 × 2 edge-sharing octahedra joined by corners sharing to form tunnels along the [001] direction. The tunnels accommodate the K + cation on the A' site, whereas the A site is occupied by Sr 2+/K + cations. Electron diffraction study shows diffuse streaks parallel to the ( a, c ) plane leading to a doubling of the b parameter. This suggests a one-dimensional ordering of K atoms and vacancies along the b axis, on the one hand, and Sr/K atoms on the other hand.

  16. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction study of synthetic sodium-hydronium jarosite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najorka, Jens; Lewis, James M. T.; Spratt, John; Sephton, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    Na-H3O jarosite was synthesized hydrothermally at 413 K for 8 days and investigated using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). The chemical composition of the studied crystal is [Na0.57(3) (H3O)0.36 (H2O)0.07]A Fe2.93(3) (SO4)2 (OH)5.70 (H2O)0.30, and Fe deficiency was confirmed by both EMPA and XRD analysis. The single-crystal XRD data were collected at 298 and 102 K, and crystal structures were refined in space group Roverline{3}m. The room-temperature data match structural trends of the jarosite group, which vary linearly with the c axis. The low-temperature structure at 102 K shows an anisotropic decrease in the unit cell parameters, with c and a decreasing by 0.45 and 0.03 %, respectively. Structural changes are mainly confined to the A site environment. Only minor changes occur in FeO6 and SO4 polyhedra. The structure responds upon cooling by increasing bond length distortion and by decreasing quadratic elongation of the large AO12 polyhedra. The structural parameters at low temperature follow very similar patterns to structural changes that correspond to compositional variation in the jarosite group, which is characterised by the flexibility of AO12 polyhedra and rigidity of Fe(OH)4O2-SO4 layers. The most flexible areas in the jarosite structure are localized at AO12 edges that are not shared with neighbouring FeO6 octahedra. Importantly, for the application of XRD in planetary settings, the temperature-related changes in jarosite can mimic compositional change.

  17. Neutron diffraction study of the beta' and gamma phases of LiFeO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Barre, Maud; Catti, Michele

    2009-09-15

    The beta, beta', gamma and alpha phases of LiFeO{sub 2}, synthesized as powders, were annealed at different temperatures and characterized by X-ray measurements. The beta' and gamma modifications were also studied by time-of-flight neutron diffraction (ISIS Facility, UK). The structure of the beta' phase was refined in the monoclinic C2/c space group (a=8.566(1), b=11.574(2), c=5.1970(5) A, beta=146.064(5){sup o}) to wR{sub p}=0.071-0.080 (data from four counter banks). Fe and Li atoms are ordered over two of the four independent sites, and partially disordered over the other two. The ordered Li has a distorted tetrahedral coordination. The gamma structure was refined at RT (a=4.047(1), c=8.746(2) A) and at 570 deg. C (a=4.082(3), c=8.822(6) A) in the I4{sub 1}/amd symmetry, showing full order with Li in octahedral coordination at RT, and in a split-atom configuration at high temperature. On annealing, the beta' polymorph was found to transform to gamma at 550 deg. C, thus suggesting that it is a metastable phase. Electrostatics is discussed as the driving force for the alpha->beta'->gamma ordering process of LiFeO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of beta'-LiFeO{sub 2} (monoclinic C2/c). Lithium and iron atoms are both ordered (blue and yellow balls) and partially disordered (green balls) over four independent sites. The beta' phase transforms to fully ordered gamma (tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd) at 550 deg. C.

  18. Determination of mineral abundances in samples from the exploratory studies facility using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.; Viani, R.

    1998-01-13

    Tuff samples collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) were X-rayed to estimate relative mineral abundances. X-ray analysis was performed on sub-samples of specimens collected from both the Single Heater Test (SHT) and Drift Scale Heater Test (DST) that were used for thermomechanical measurements, as well as samples collected from cores retrieved from boreholes in the Drift Scale Test Area. The abundance of minerals that could affect the behavior of the host rock at repository relevant temperatures is of particular interest. These minerals include crystobalite, which undergoes a phase transition and volume change at elevated temperature (-250 `C), and smectite and clinoptilolite that can dehydrate at elevated temperature with accompanying volume reduction. In addition, the spatial distribution of SiO, polymorphs and secondary minerals may provide evidence for deducing past fluid pathways. The mineral abundances tabulated here include data reported previously in three milestone reports (Roberts and Viani, 1997a,b; Viani and Roberts, 1996) but re-analyzed (see below), as well as previously unreported data. Previous X-ray diffraction analyses of samples from the ESF (Roberts and Viani, 1997a; Viani and Roberts, 1996) utilized the matrix flushing method of Chung (1974) and an internal intensity standard (corundum) to quantify the abundances of the phases present. Although the method is adequate for obtaining relative abundances, its accuracy and precision is limited by the inherent differences between the external standards used to compute the reference intensity ratio and the mineral phases in the sample. In a subsequent report (Roberts and Viani, 1997b) mineral abundances were obtained using the Rietveld method of whole X-ray pattern fitting (Snyder and Bish, 1989; Young, 1993). The Rietveld technique has the potential to be both more accurate and more precise for estimating mineral abundances (Snyder and Bish, 1989).

  19. An x-ray diffraction study of microstructural deformation induced by cyclic loading of selected steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourspring, Patrick Michael

    X-ray double crystal diffractometry (XRDCD) and X-ray scanning diffractometry (XRSD) were used to assess cyclic microstructural deformation in a face centered cubic (fcc) steel (AISI304) and a body centered cubic (bcc) steel (SA508 class 2). The objectives of the investigation were to determine if X-ray diffraction could be used effectively to monitor cyclic microstructural deformation in polycrystalline Fe alloys and to study the distribution of the microstructural deformation induced by cyclic loading in these alloys. The approach used in the investigation was to induce fatigue damage in a material and to characterize the resulting microstructural deformation at discrete fractions of the fatigue life of the material. Also, characterization of microstructural deformation was carried out to identify differences in the accumulation of damage from the surface to the bulk, focusing on the following three regions: near surface (0-10 mum), subsurface (10-300 mum), and bulk. Characterization of the subsurface region was performed only on the AISI304 material because of the limited availability of the SA508 material. The results from the XRDCD data indicate a measurable change induced by fatigue from the initial state to subsequent states of both the AISI304 and the SA508 materials. The results from the XRSD data show similar but less coherent trends than the results from the XRDCD data. Therefore, the XRDCD technique was shown to be sensitive to the microstructural deformation caused by fatigue in steels; thus, the technique can be used to monitor fatigue damage in steels. In addition, for the AISI304 material, the level of cyclic microstructural deformation in the bulk material was found to be greater than the level in the near surface material. In contrast, previous investigations have shown that the deformation is greater in the near surface than the bulk for Al alloys and bcc Fe alloys.

  20. 75 FR 7469 - Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute Resolution; Notice Extending Filing Date...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute Resolution; Notice Extending Filing Date for Applications for Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute... in the Commission's hydropower integrated licensing process (ILP) study dispute resolution...

  1. Neutron diffraction residual stress studies for aero-engine component applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, K.; Small, C.

    1991-12-01

    Computer graphics for a presentation describing how Rolls-Royce is refining the method of residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction to suit the characteristic stress fields of components are presented. Results to date are given. An outline of how this residual stress data is to be used in developing stress models for critical rotating components is given.

  2. THE STUDY OF WHEAT STARCH SIZE DISTRIBUTION USING IMAGE ANALYSIS AND LASER DIFFRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is the most abundant storage reserve in the wheat caryopsis yet little is known about its influence on end-use properties. Starch was isolated from wheats of four different classes and analyzed using digital image analysis (IA) coupled to a light microscope and several laser diffraction sizi...

  3. Influence of conversion material morphology on electrochemistry studied with operando X-ray tomography and diffraction.

    PubMed

    Villevieille, Claire; Ebner, Martin; Gómez-Cámer, Juan Luis; Marone, Federica; Novák, Petr; Wood, Vanessa

    2015-03-11

    X-ray diffraction and X-ray tomography are performed on intermetallic particles undergoing lithiation in a porous electrode. Differences between ensemble phase evolution and that at a single-particle level are explored. It is found that all particles evidence core-shell lithiation; however, particles with internal porosity are more mechanically robust and exhibit less fracture. PMID:25619158

  4. X-ray diffraction study of short-period AlN/GaN superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kyutt, R. N. Shcheglov, M. P.; Ratnikov, V. V.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Smirnov, A. N.; Rozhavskaya, M. M.; Zavarin, E. E.; Lundin, V. V.

    2013-12-15

    The structure of short-period hexagonal GaN/AlN superlattices (SLs) has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. The samples have been grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) in a horizontal reactor at a temperature of 1050°C on (0001)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates using GaN and AlN buffer layers. The SL period changes from 2 to 6 nm, and the thickness of the structure varies in a range from 0.3 to 1 μm. The complex of X-ray diffraction techniques includes a measurement of θ-2θ rocking curves of symmetric Bragg reflection, the construction of intensity maps for asymmetric reflections, a measurement and analysis of peak broadenings in different diffraction geometries, a precise measurement of lattice parameters, and the determination of radii of curvature. The thickness and strain of separate SL layers are determined by measuring the θ-2θ rocking curves subsequent simulation. It is shown that most SL samples are completely relaxed as a whole. At the same time, relaxation is absent between sublayers, which is why strains in the AlN and GaN sublayers (on the order of 1.2 × 10{sup −2}) have different signs. An analysis of diffraction peak half-widths allows us to determine the densities of individual sets of dislocations and observe their change from buffer layers to SLs.

  5. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Olivine from Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed a collection of the Comet Wild 2 coma grains returned by the NASA Stardust Mission, using micro-area Laue diffraction equipment. The purpose of the diffraction experiment is to permit the structure refinement of olivine including site occupancies. In addition to the intrinsic importance of the olivine structures for revealing the thermal history of Wild 2 materials, we wish to test reports that olivine recovered after hypervelocity capture in silica aerogel has undergone a basic structural change due to capture heating [1]. The diffraction equipment placed at beam line BL- 4B1 of PF, KEK was developed with a micropinhole and an imaging plate (Fuji Co. Ltd.) using the Laue method combined with polychromatic X-ray of synchrotron radiation operated at energy of 2.5 GeV. The incident beam is limited to 1.6 m in diameter by a micropinhole set just upstream of the sample [2, 3]. It is essential to apply a microbeam to obtain diffracted intensities with high signal to noise ratios. This equipment has been successfully applied to various extraterrestrial materials, including meteorites and interplanetary dust particles [4]. The Laue pattern of the sample C2067,1,111,4 (Fig. 1) was successfully taken on an imaging plate after a 120 minute exposure (Fig. 2).

  6. X-ray diffraction study of the mineralogy of microinclusions in fibrous diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; Kopylova, Maya; Dubrovinksy, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Fibrous diamond, occurring both as cuboids and as coatings over non-fibrous diamond nuclei, is translucent due to the presence of millions of sub-micron-sized mineral and fluid inclusions. Diamond is strong and relatively inert, making it an excellent vessel to preserve trapped materials. These microinclusions represent direct samples of natural diamond-forming mantle fluids, and are critical for our understanding of diamond genesis. Traditionally, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron microprobe, and FIB-TEM techniques have proven to be effective for the study of microinclusions in diamond. The abundance and random orientation of included minerals in fibrous diamond make them amenable to a powder-type X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. This technique provides an accurate way to identify included minerals. It also has the advantage of analyzing thousands of inclusions simultaneously, rather than analyzing one inclusion at a time, as with common FIB-TEM techniques. XRD provides a bulk analysis, giving a superior measure of relative abundances of included minerals, as well as potentially accounting for small quantities of minerals that might otherwise be overlooked. We studied fibrous cuboid diamonds with microinclusions from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) (23 samples), Brazil (4 samples), Jericho (1 sample), and Wawa conglomerates (9 samples). XRD analysis was performed at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut (BGI), University of Bayreuth, Germany. The unique XRD setup consists of a RIGAKU FR-D high-brilliance source, OSMIC Inc. Confocal Max-Flux optics, and a SMART APEX 4K CCD area detector. Preliminary XRD studies of microinclusions 8 fibrous diamonds from the DRC showed a prevalence of silicates with structural and coordinated H2O. Sheet silicates constituted 9 out of 13 detected minerals, with phlogopite-biotite micas being present in 4 out of 8 samples. Other detected minerals were 2 chlorite minerals, 2 clay

  7. High resolution spectroscopic study of BeΛ10

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; et al

    2016-03-10

    Spectroscopy of amore » $$^{10}_{\\Lambda}$$Be hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the $$(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})$$ reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of 0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using the $$p(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})\\Lambda,\\Sigma^{0}$$ reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels, and the binding energy of the ground state peak (mixture of 1$$^{-}$$ and 2$$^{-}$$ states) was obtained to be B$$_{\\Lambda}$$=8.55$$\\pm$$0.07(stat.)$$\\pm$$0.11(sys.) MeV. Furthermore, the result indicates that the ground state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on charge symmetry breaking effect in the $$\\Lambda N$$ interaction.« less

  8. Study on GASTOF - A 10 ps resolution timing detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Luc; Liao, Junhui; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof

    2014-10-01

    GASTOF (Gas Time Of Flight) is a type of fast-time detector affiliated to the HPS (High Precision Spectrometer) project which is a forward physics collaborator within CMS. It is a picosecond time resolution Cherenkov gas detector using very fast single anode micro-channel plate photomultiplier (Hamamatsu R3809U-50 or Photek 210) as a photon detector. We firstly measured characteristics of these two types of MCP-PMTs by a fast laser pulse in lab. Then two GASTOF detectors both equipped with a Hamamatsu R3809U-50 tube were studied in a beam test at CERN. According to the analysis of beam test data, the average number of photoelectrons (phe) was 2.0 for both phototubes. By making a cut on the number of photoelectrons such that the mean phe was 3.6 in one phototube and 3.2 in another, we obtained a time resolution of σ ~ 11.7 picosecond (ps) and σ ~ 8.2 ps.

  9. Peace studies and conflict resolution: the need for transdisciplinarity.

    PubMed

    Galtung, Johan

    2010-02-01

    Peace studies seeks to understand the negation of violence through conflict transformation, cooperation and harmony by drawing from many disciplines, including psychology, sociology and anthropology, political science, economics, international relations, international law and history. This raises the problem of the complementarity, coexistence and integration of different systems of knowledge. In fact, all of the human and social sciences are products of the post-Westphalian state system and so reify the state and its internal and international system and focus on this as the main source of political conflict. Conflicts, however, can arise from other distinctions involving gender, generation, race, class and so on. To contribute to peace building and conflict resolution, the social sciences must be globalized, developing theories that address conflicts at the levels of interpersonal interaction (micro), within countries (meso), between nations (macro ), and between whole regions or civilizations (mega). Psychiatry and the "psy" disciplines can contribute to peace building and conflict resolution through understanding the interactions between processes at each of these levels and the mental health or illness of individuals. PMID:20511249

  10. Mn incorporation in as-grown and annealed (Ga,Mn)As layers studied by x-ray diffraction and standing-wave fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Holy, V.; Matej, Z.; Pacherova, O.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Olejnik, K.; Jungwirth, T.

    2006-12-15

    A combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction and a technique of x-ray standing-wave fluorescence at grazing incidence is employed to study the structure of a (Ga,Mn)As-diluted magnetic semiconductor and its changes during post-growth annealing steps. We find that the film is formed by a uniform, single-crystallographic phase epilayer covered by a thin surface layer with enhanced Mn concentration to Mn atoms at random noncrystallographic positions. In the epilayer, Mn incorporated at the interstitial position has a dominant effect on lattice expansion as compared to substitutional Mn. The expansion coefficient of interstitial Mn estimated from our data is consistent with theory predictions. The concentration of interstitial Mn and the corresponding lattice expansion of the epilayer are reduced by annealing, accompanied by an increase of the density of randomly distributed Mn atoms in the disordered surface layer. Substitutional Mn atoms remain stable during the low-temperature annealing.

  11. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Bohndiek, Sarah E; Cook, Emily J; Arvanitis, Costas D; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J; Clark, Andy T; Prydderch, Mark L; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D

    2008-02-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable. PMID:18199908

  12. High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yongtao E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng; Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Welch, David

    2014-07-07

    In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4 GPa and temperatures up to 1073 K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (ΔP{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ´} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}=174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (∂K{sub T}/∂T){sub P}=-0.060(8) GPa K⁻¹ and at constant volume (∂K{sub T}/∂T){sub V}=-0.046(8) GPa K⁻¹, the volumetric thermal expansivity α{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10⁻⁵+0.3(2)×10⁻⁸T (K⁻¹), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (∂α/∂P){sub T}=(₋2.0±0.4)×10⁻⁶ K⁻¹ GPa⁻¹. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature Θ₀=276.6 K gives γ₀=1.27(8) and K{sub T0}=171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q=3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ~5 GPa as has been reported previously.

  13. High resolution surface wave dispersion studies in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.E.; Patton, H.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory regional calibration project is actively assembling a database of surface-wave dispersion information for China and surrounding areas. As part of the effort to characterize surface wave dispersion in China, we integrate prior long period results from the University of Colorado with our shorter period dispersion measurements in a high resolution survey of key monitoring areas. Focusing on western China initially, we employ broadband data recorded on CDSN stations, and regional events (m{sub b} 4 and above). Our approach is twofold, employing path specific calibration of key stations and well-recorded reference events, and tomographic inference to provide group velocity curves for regions with sparse station distribution and little seismic activity. Initial dispersion studies at Chinese stations WMQ and LZH show substantial azimuthal variation in dispersion, reinforcing the need for careful determination of source regions for path-specific calibration.

  14. A numerical study of shock wave diffraction by a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Lomax, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nonstationary shock wave diffraction patterns generated by a blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder are numerically simulated using a second-order hybrid upwind method for solving the two-dimensional inviscid compressible Euler equations of gasdynamics. The complete diffraction patterns, including the transition from regular to Mach reflection, trajectory of the Mach triple point and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the cylinder are reported in detail. Pressure-time history and various contour plots are also included. Comparison between the work of Bryson and Gross (1961) which included both experimental schlieren pictures and theoretical calculations using Whitham's ray-shock theory and results of the present finite difference computation indicate good agreement in every aspect except for some nonideal gas and viscous effects which are not accounted for by the Euler equations.

  15. Diffraction and coherence in breast ultrasound tomography: a study with a toroidal array

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Simonetti, Francesco; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound is commonly used as an adjunct to mammography for diagnostic evaluation of suspicions arising from breast cancer screening. As an alternative to conventional sonography that uses hand-held transducers, toroidal array probes that encircle the breast immersed in a water bath have been investigated for ultrasound tomography. In this paper, two sets of experiments performed with a prototype ultrasound scanner on a phantom and a human breast in vivo are used to investigate the effects of diffraction and coherence in ultrasound tomography. Reconstructions obtained with transmission diffraction tomography (TDT) are compared with conventional reflection imaging and computerized ultrasound tomography showing a substantial improvement. The in vivo tests demonstrate that TDT can image the complex boundary of a cancer mass and suggest that it can reveal the anatomy of milk ducts and Cooper's ligaments.

  16. Neutron diffraction study of NiTi during compressive deformation and after shape-memory recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dunand, D.C.; Mari, D.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements of internal elastic strains and texture were performed during compressive deformation of martensitic NiTi deforming by twinning. Rietveld refinement of the diffraction spectrum was performed in order to obtain lattice parameter variations and preferred orientation of martensitic variants. The elastic internal strains, are proportional to the externally applied stress but strongly dependent on crystallographic orientation. Plastic deformation by matrix twinning is consistent with type I (1-1-1) twinning, whereby (100) and (011) planes tend to align perpendicular and parallel to the stress axis, respectively. The preferred orientation ratio r according to the model by March and Dollase is proportional to the macroscopic plastic strain for (100) and (011) planes for loading, unloading and shape-memory recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first in situ bulk measurement of reversible twinning in NiTi. Finally, shape-memory recovery results in a marked change of NiTi cell parameters.

  17. X-ray diffraction study of thermotropic liquid crystalline polyesters and diester model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, H. H.; Azaroff, L. V.; Griffin, A. C.

    1987-10-01

    Two nematic liquid crystalline polyesters were examined by X-ray diffraction following quenching from the nematic temperature in a magnetic field of 15 tesla. It was not possible to quench an aligned nematic glass; instead a polycrystalline phase showing some preferred orientation or an unoriented nematic melt yielded monodomain nematic diffraction patterns with one resembling that of a fiber (crystalline) photograph while the other showed good nematic alignment which could be enhanced slightly by annealing. A series of Siamese-twin diester model compounds also examined at their respective nematic temperatures in a magnetic field of compounds also were examined at their crystalline phase at room temperature. All displayed well-aligned nematic monodomains above the crystallization point.

  18. A study of phase transitions in lead difluoride by use of polychromatic X-ray diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, V. K.; Chang, P. T.; Margrave, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A polychromatic X-ray diffraction technique was used to obtain patterns of alpha-PbF2 and beta-PbF2. The results obtained at room temperature and 314 C at 1 atm, and at room temperature at 5.5 kbar, are in good agreement with published data. The advantages of the technique for high-temperature and high-pressure work are discussed.

  19. Monte-Carlo sorption and neutron diffraction study of the filling isotherm in clathrate hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Klapproth, Alice; Kuhs, Werner F.; Chazallon, Bertrand

    1999-06-15

    We are interested in the thermodynamics of the gas filling of clathrate hydrates. In order to determine the pressure-dependent filling of the cages, neutron powder diffraction experiments on N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} clathrates were performed. Interaction potentials were refined by comparing the experimentally determined fillings with those generated by MC-sorption calculations. Unsatisfactory agreement between experiment and simulation is observed when using the widely employed SPC water-water interaction potential.

  20. Powder diffraction studies in the YONO{sub 3}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect

    Pelloquin, D.; Loueer, M.; Loueer, D.

    1994-09-01

    The crystal structure of yttrium oxide nitrate and the microstructure of the oxide obtained from its thermal decomposition have been investigated by modern powder diffraction methods. Sequential high-temperature diffraction studies of the thermal decomposition of two precursors of yttrium oxide nitrate, i.e., neutral yttrium nitrate and yttrium hydroxide nitrate, are reported. The structure of YONO{sub 3} has been determined ab initio from conventional powder diffractometry using monochromatic X-rays. The pattern was indexed by the successive dichotomy method yielding tetragonal unit cell dimensions: a = 3.8590(1) {angstrom} and c = 9.7161(6) {angstrom}. The space group is P4/nmm and Z = 2. Most of the atoms were located by direct methods and the remaining ones from a Fourier map. Refinement of the complete diffraction profile parameters converged to final agreement factors R{sub p} = 0.12, R{sub wp} = 0.16 and R{sub F} = 0.039. The structure is closely related to the matlockite PbFCl-type structure. The microstructure of ex-oxide-nitrate yttrium oxide has been analysed by total pattern fitting techniques, from which strain-free coherently diffracting nanodomains with a rectangular parallelepipedic shape have been obtained.