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Sample records for diffuse ionized halo

  1. Sparsepak Observations of Diffuse Ionized Gas Halo Kinematics in NGC891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George H.; Rand, Richard J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    We present WIYN SparsePak observations of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) hallo of NGC891. Preliminary results of an analysis of the halo velocity field reveal a clear gradient of the azimuthal velocity with z which agrees with results for the neutral gas. The magnitude of the gradient has been determined, using two independent methods, to be approximately 15 km s-1 kpc-1.

  2. Integral Field Unit Observations of NGC 891: Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George H.; Rand, Richard J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2006-08-01

    We present high and moderate spectral resolution spectroscopy of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) emission in the halo of NGC 891. The data were obtained with the SparsePak integral field unit at the WIYN Observatory. The wavelength coverage includes the [N II] λλ6548, 6583, Hα, and [S II] λλ6716, 6731 emission lines. Position-velocity (PV) diagrams, constructed using spectra extracted from four SparsePak pointings in the halo, are used to examine the kinematics of the DIG. Using two independent methods, a vertical gradient in azimuthal velocity is found to be present in the northeast quadrant of the halo, with magnitude approximately 15-18 km s-1 kpc-1, in agreement with results from H I observations. The kinematics of the DIG suggests that this gradient begins at approximately 1 kpc above the midplane. In another part of the halo, the southeast quadrant, the kinematics is markedly different and suggest rotation at about 175 km s-1, much slower than the disk but with no vertical gradient. We use an entirely ballistic model of disk-halo flow in an attempt to reproduce the kinematics observed in the northeast quadrant. Analysis shows that the velocity gradient predicted by the ballistic model is far too shallow. Based on intensity cuts made parallel to the major axis in the ballistic model and an Hα image of NGC 891 from the literature, we conclude that the DIG halo is much more centrally concentrated than the model, suggesting that hydrodynamics dominate over ballistic motion in shaping the density structure of the halo. Velocity dispersion measurements along the minor axis of NGC 891 seem to indicate a lack of radial motions in the halo, but the uncertainties do not allow us to set firm limits.

  3. Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Halos of NGC 891 and NGC 5775

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, G. H.; Rand, R. J.; Benjamin, R. A.; Bershady, M. A.; Collins, J. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2005-12-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to characterize the nature of the disk-halo interaction in spiral galaxies, we present an investigation into the kinematics of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) halos of two edge-on spirals, NGC 891 and NGC 5775. Observations of optical emission lines were obtained at high spectral resolution with the SparsePak fiber array at WIYN, and the TAURUS-II Fabry-Perot interferometer at the AAT, respectively. Detailed three-dimensional models of the galaxies were created and compared with the data, revealing the presence of a vertical gradient in rotational velocity in each case. The sense of the gradient corresponds to decreasing rotation speed with increasing height above the disk; the magnitude is approximately 15 km s-1 kpc-1 in NGC 891, and 8 km s-1 kpc-1 in NGC 5775. Qualitatively, this behavior is predicted by models of the disk-halo interaction which consider gas being lifted out of the disk, but quantitative agreement has not yet been achieved. We describe the results of our observations, present a comparison with a purely ballistic model of disk-halo flow, and discuss prospects for a better understanding of this critical process in the evolution of galaxies. This material is based on work partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST 99-86113.

  4. Integral Field Unit Observations of NGC 4302: Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George H.; Rand, Richard J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2007-07-01

    We present moderate-resolution spectroscopy of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (EDIG) emission in the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4302. The spectra were obtained with the SparsePak integral field unit (IFU) at the WIYN Observatory. The wavelength coverage of the observations includes the [N II] λ6548, 6583, Hα, and [S II] λ6716, 6731 emission lines. The spatial coverage of the IFU includes the entirety of the EDIG emission noted in previous imaging studies of this galaxy. The spectra are used to construct position-velocity (PV) diagrams at several ranges of heights above the midplane. Azimuthal velocities are directly extracted from the PV diagrams using the envelope-tracing method and indicate an extremely steep drop-off in rotational velocity with increasing height, with magnitude ~30 km s-1 kpc-1. We find evidence for a radial variation in the velocity gradient on the receding side. We have also performed artificial observations of galaxy models in an attempt to match the PV diagrams. The results of a statistical analysis also favor a gradient of ~30 km s-1 kpc-1. We compare these results with an entirely ballistic model of disk-halo flow and find a strong dichotomy between the observed kinematics and those predicted by the model. The disagreement is worse than we have found for other galaxies in previous studies. The conclusions of this paper are compared to results for two other galaxies, NGC 5775 and NGC 891. We find that the vertical gradient in rotation speed, per unit EDIG scale height, for all three galaxies is consistent with a constant magnitude (within the errors) of approximately 15-25 km s-1 per scale height, independent of radius. This relationship is also true within the galaxy NGC 4302. We also discuss how the gradient depends on the distribution and morphology of the EDIG and the star formation rates of the galaxies, and consequences for the origin of the gas.

  5. The nature and origin of diffuse ionized gas in the halos of nearby edge-on galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott Timothy

    In an effort to constrain the source of ionization and the nature of the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) in nearby edge-on disk galaxies, a number of innovative observational techniques are used to acquire deep narrow- band images and long-slit spectra of these objects down to unprecedented flux levels (few 10-18 erg s-1 cm 2 arcsec-2). 17 edge-on galaxies were imaged in narrowband Hα and Hα + [N II] in an effort to statistically analyze the morphology and general characteristics of the eDIG. Although the galaxies in the imaging sample cover a broad range in total Hα luminosity, the eDIG Hα emission represents a rather constant 10 15% of the total luminosity. A cross-correlation analysis of the intensity of the extraplanar emission with that of the disk emission confirms the existence of a connection between the disk and halo emission in several objects. The second portion of the thesis focuses on the analysis of deep long-slit spectra of 9 previously imaged edge-on galaxies with known eDIG line emission. Hα, [N II]λ6583, and [S II]λ6716 are observed in all 9 galaxies up to |z| = few kpc, and many other lines (such as [O III]λ5007, [O I]λ6300, and He I λ5876) are observed to lower heights in a majority of them. We find that in 7 out of the 9 objects, a general increase in the [N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα line ratios is observed with height, as has been detected previously in other galaxies. Comparing the measured line ratios with a number of ionization models suggests that photoionization by massive OB stars alone is generally inadequate to ionize the halo gas. The best fit to the data is obtained using a combined photoionization/turbulent mixing layer (TML) model. Strong correlations between halo emission and disk H II regions support the theory that OB star associations are the primary source of ionization of the extraplanar gas. TML and shock models suggest that supernovae events play a supporting role as well, in both the ionizing of the gas in

  6. ON THE ORIGINS OF THE DIFFUSE H{alpha} EMISSION: IONIZED GAS OR DUST-SCATTERED H{alpha} HALOS?

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Witt, Adolf N.

    2012-10-20

    It is known that the diffuse H{alpha} emission outside of bright H II regions not only are very extended, but also can occur in distinct patches or filaments far from H II regions, and the line ratios of [S II] {lambda}6716/H{alpha} and [N II] {lambda}6583/H{alpha} observed far from bright H II regions are generally higher than those in the H II regions. These observations have been regarded as evidence against the dust-scattering origin of the diffuse H{alpha} emission (including other optical lines), and the effect of dust scattering has been neglected in studies on the diffuse H{alpha} emission. In this paper, we reexamine the arguments against dust scattering and find that the dust-scattering origin of the diffuse H{alpha} emission cannot be ruled out. As opposed to the previous contention, the expected dust-scattered H{alpha} halos surrounding H II regions are, in fact, in good agreement with the observed H{alpha} morphology. We calculate an extensive set of photoionization models by varying elemental abundances, ionizing stellar types, and clumpiness of the interstellar medium (ISM) and find that the observed line ratios of [S II]/H{alpha}, [N II]/H{alpha}, and He I {lambda}5876/H{alpha} in the diffuse ISM accord well with the dust-scattered halos around H II regions, which are photoionized by late O- and/or early B-type stars. We also demonstrate that the H{alpha} absorption feature in the underlying continuum from the dust-scattered starlight ({sup d}iffuse galactic light{sup )} and unresolved stars is able to substantially increase the [S II]/H{alpha} and [N II]/H{alpha} line ratios in the diffuse ISM.

  7. Diffuse low-ionization gas in the galactic halo casts doubts on z ≃ 0.03 WHIM detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, F.; Senatore, F.; Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.; Elvis, M.; Piro, L.

    2016-05-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the two claims of z ≃ 0.03 O VII K α absorption lines from Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) along the lines of sight to the blazars H 2356-309 (Buote et al.; Fang et al.) and Mkn 501 (Ren, Fang & Buote) are likely misidentifications of the z = 0 O II K β line produced by a diffuse Low-Ionization Metal Medium in the Galaxy's interstellar and circum-galactic mediums. We perform detailed modelling of all the available high signal-to-noise Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) and XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectra of H 2356-309 and Mkn 501 and demonstrate that the z ≃ 0.03 WHIM absorption along these two sightlines is statistically not required. Our results, however, do not rule out a small contribution from the z ≃ 0.03 O VII K α absorber along the line of sight to H 2356-309. In our model the temperature of the putative z = 0.031 WHIM filament is T = 3 × 105 K and the O VII column density is N_{O VII} ≲ 4× 10^{15} cm-2, twenty times smaller than the O VIIcolumn density previously reported, and now more consistent with the expectations from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.

  8. The Extended Ionized Halos and Bridge of the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnarao, Dhanesh; Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Madsen, Gregory J.; Hill, Alex S.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has revealed ubiquitous ionized emission throughout the gas complexes formed by the dynamic history of the Magellanic Clouds. We present an overview of the immediate environment around the galaxies themselves, including ionized halos of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC & LMC) as well as the bridge of material between them. Using WHAM, Barger et al. (2013) found Hα emission extending throughout and beyond H I in the Bridge. We add these new maps of the SMC and LMC to provide the first complete view of the diffuse ionized gas near the interacting system. At R ~ 30,000, WHAM can cleanly separate diffuse emission at Magellanic velocities from the Milky Way and terrestrial sources to the limit of atmospheric line confusion (~ 10s of mR). We find that ionized gas extends at least 5° beyond the traditional boundary of the SMC when compared to recent deep-imaging surveys (e.g., MCELS; Smith et al. 2005). The diffuse ionized emission extent is similar to the neutral gas extent as traced by 21 cm emission. We compare the kinematic signatures between the neutral and ionized components throughout the region. Comprehensive multi-wavelength surveys are also underway to examine how physical parameters and ionization processes vary in these extended systems. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  9. The Contribution of Ionizing Starts to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way: Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo Around the W4 Chimney/Supershell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Normandeau have proposed that W4 is a galactic chimney, the only chimney to-date identified in our Galaxy. Using the recent approx. 1 min resolution IGA (Infrared Galaxy Atlas) and DRAO (Dominion Royal Astrophysical Observatory) CGPS (Canadian Galactic Plane Survey) galactic plane surveys we analyze the far-infrared and radio structure of the W 4 chimney/supershell. We show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis of the dust column density establishes there is dense interstellar material below the shell, directly showing the dense material which caused the lower shell expansion to stall. Due to much lower densities above the Galactic plane, the upper W4 shell achieved 'breakout' to form a Galactic chimney. Although the shell appears ionization bounded, it is very inhomogenous and an ionized halo provides evidence of significant Lyman continuum leakage. A large fraction of the OCl 352 cluster photons escape to large distances and are available to ionize the WIM (warm ionized medium) component of the interstellar medium.

  10. Highly ionized gas in the Galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the values of electron density n(sub e) and gas pressure P/k in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Galactic halo, as inferred from C IV emission and absorption lines and using current C IV atomic data. In a homogeneous model with 4.7 less than or equal to log T less than or equal to 5.3, the data are consistent with 0.01 less than or equal to n(sub e) less than or equal to 0.02/cu cm and 2200 less than or equal to P/k less than or equal to 3700/cu cm K, a factor of 2-3 higher than advocated by Martin & Bowyer (1990) and comparable to the thermal pressure in the disk. If some of the C IV absorption arises from nonemitting, photoionized gas, then the inferred density and pressure will increase accordingly. The volume filling factor for homogeneous models ranges from 0.5% to 5%. Because of the constraints arising from filling factor and radiated power, most of the C IV must arise from gas near the peak of the cooling curve, at log t less than or equal to 5.6. We relate both emission-line and absorption-line observations to recent models in which turbulent mixing layers and isobarically cooling supernova remnants (SNRs) provide significant amounts of halo gas at approximately 10(exp 5.3) K and process 20-40 solar mass/yr with a power of approximately 10(exp 41) ergs/sec. Since the observed C IV and N V absorption scale heights have been reported to differ, at 4.9 kpc and 1.6 kpc, respectively, we examine inhomogeneous models with different exponential scale heights of T, P, and SN energy input. The ISM may change its character with distance above the Galactic plane, as superbubbles and mixing layers dominate over isolated SNRs as the source of the C IV. For appropiate scale heights, the midplane pressure is twice the homogeneous values quoted above. The O IV lambda 1034 diffuse emission line, which can be used as a temperature diagnostic of the hot gas, is predicted to be comparable in strength to that of C IV lambda 1549 (approximately 6000 photons

  11. The ionization conditions in the Milky Way halo - Infalling gas toward the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Observations of gas in the Milky Way halo are studied with an eye toward the theoretical predictions of the Galactic Fountain model for the production of halo gas. Data are shown that indicate significant variations in the ionization conditions in infalling halo gas in the northern galactic hemisphere. Understanding the nature of Milky Way halo gas plays a critical role in interpreting QSO absorption lines in the investigation of galaxies at high redshift.

  12. The kinematics of Milky Way halo gas. I - Observations of low-ionization species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet interstellar line day observed with the IUE toward 70 halo stars and four extragalactic sight lines are analyzed in a study of the large-scale kinematic properties of the Milky Way halo gas. The motions of the low-ionization gas is focused on. Large systematic velocities are found, and a pronounced asymmetry in the absorption characteristics of halo gas toward the Galactic poles is indicated. In the north, substantial amounts of material are falling toward the disk at velocities up to about 120 km/s in the most extreme case. Toward the south, low-ionization material shows no extreme or systematic motions.

  13. The kinematics of the diffuse ionized gas in NGC 4666

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtländer, P.; Kamphuis, P.; Marcelin, M.; Bomans, D. J.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The global properties of the interstellar medium with processes such as infall and outflow of gas and a large scale circulation of matter and its consequences for star formation and chemical enrichment are important for the understanding of galaxy evolution. Aims: In this paper we studied the kinematics and morphology of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the disk and in the halo of the star forming spiral galaxy NGC 4666 to derive information about its kinematical properties. Especially, we searched for infalling and outflowing ionized gas. Methods: We determined surface brightness, radial velocity, and velocity dispersion of the warm ionized gas via high spectral resolution (R ≈ 9000) Fabry-Pérot interferometry. This allows the determination of the global velocity field and the detection of local deviations from this velocity field. We calculated models of the DIG distribution and its kinematics for comparison with the measured data. In this way we determined fundamental parameters such as the inclination and the scale height of NGC 4666, and established the need for an additional gas component to fit our observed data. Results: We found individual areas, especially along the minor axis, with gas components reaching into the halo which we interpret as an outflowing component of the DIG. As the main result of our study, we were able to determine that the vertical structure of the DIG distribution in NGC 4666 is best modeled with two components of ionized gas, a thick and a thin disk with 0.8 kpc and 0.2 kpc scale height, respectively. Therefore, the enhanced star formation in NGC 4666 drives an outflow and also maintains a thick ionized gas layer reminiscent of the Reynold's layer in the Milky Way.

  14. Gaseous Halos and the Interstellar Disk-Halo Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmar, Ralf Jurgen

    The presence of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the halos of spiral galaxies is discussed in the framework of the disk-halo interaction. The halo DIG is typically correlated with the presence of other components of the ISM in the halo including X-ray hot gas, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields. All these tracers of an extraplanar ISM correlate well with star formation in the disk thus corroborating the paradigm of an ISM driven by multiple and clustered supernovae.

  15. Excitation in the ionized diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, J.-P.; Stasińska, G.; Lequeux, J.

    1986-04-01

    Large-scale spectra have been obtained in the diffuse, ionized background of the Sagittarius-Carina arm and in the large complex of loops and filaments located in Orion and Eridanus. The intensity ratios of the emission lines of O III forbidden line, H-beta, H-alpha, N II forbidden line and S II forbidden line have been derived from these spectra, and are analyzed using models of H II regions in ionization equilibrium at very low densities, down to 0.01/cu cm. The confrontation of the observed ratios with the predictions of the models, which have been calibrated against observations of classical H II regions, shows that the S II forbidden line (6717 + 6731)/H-alpha ratio is too large to arise in a gas submitted only to a stellar flux with which it comes into ionization equilibrium, whatever the dilution of the matter. Contribution of shock excitation seems a natural explanation, as shocks are likely to occur considering the chaotic morphology of the studied regions. Some alternative explanations are also suggested. However, this medium is principally ionized by radiation, and it is shown that the forbidden line O III/H-beta ratios are well accounted for by the known population of O stars within the expected uncertainties, while ionization by white dwarfs or by B stars suggested by previous authors are excluded. The mean effective temperature for ionizing stars (less than 35,000 K) is lower than that of stars exciting classical H II regions.

  16. X-ray detection of warm ionized matter in the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, F.; Senatore, F.; Gupta, A.; Guainazzi, M.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.; Elvis, M.; Piro, L.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of the cold and mildly ionized gaseous baryonic metal components of our Galaxy, through the analysis of high-resolution Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra of two samples of Galactic and extragalactic sources. The comparison between lines of sight towards sources located in the disc of our Galaxy and extragalactic sources allows us for the first time to clearly distinguish between gaseous metal components in the disc and halo of our Galaxy. We find that a warm ionized metal medium (WIMM) permeates a large volume above and below the Galaxy's disc, perhaps up to the circum-galactic space. This halo WIMM imprints virtually the totality of the O I and O II absorption seen in the spectra of our extragalactic targets, has a temperature of T_{WIMM}^{Halo}=2900 ± 900 K, a density < n_H > _{WIMM}^{Halo} = 0.023 ± 0.009 cm-3 and a metallicity Z_{WIMM}^{Halo} = (0.4 ± 0.1) Z⊙. Consistently with previous works, we also confirm that the disc of the Galaxy contains at least two distinct gaseous metal components, one cold and neutral (the CNMM: cold neutral metal medium) and one warm and mildly ionized, with the same temperature of the halo WIMM, but higher density (< n_H > _{WIMM}^{Disc} = 0.09 ± 0.03 cm-3) and metallicity (Z_{WIMM}^{Disc} = 0.8 ± 0.1 Z⊙). By adopting a simple disc+sphere geometry for the Galaxy, we estimate masses of the CNMM and the total (disc + halo) WIMM of MCNMM ≲ 8 × 108 M⊙ and MWIMM ≃ 8.2 × 109 M⊙.

  17. Advective and diffusive cosmic ray transport in galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesen, Volker; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer; Stein, Yelena

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D cosmic ray transport models, numerically solving equations of pure advection and diffusion for the electrons and calculating synchrotron emission spectra. We find that for exponential halo magnetic field distributions advection leads to approximately exponential radio continuum intensity profiles, whereas diffusion leads to profiles that can be better approximated by a Gaussian function. Accordingly, the vertical radio spectral profiles for advection are approximately linear, whereas for diffusion they are of `parabolic' shape. We compare our models with deep Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of two edge-on galaxies, NGC 7090 and 7462, at λλ 22 and 6 cm. Our result is that the cosmic ray transport in NGC 7090 is advection dominated with V=150^{+80}_{-30} km s^{-1}, and that the one in NGC 7462 is diffusion dominated with D=3.0± 1.0 × 10^{28}E_GeV^{0.5} cm^2 s^{-1}. NGC 7090 has both a thin and thick radio disc with respective magnetic field scale heights of hB1 = 0.8 ± 0.1 kpc and hB2 = 4.7 ± 1.0 kpc. NGC 7462 has only a thick radio disc with hB2 = 3.8 ± 1.0 kpc. In both galaxies, the magnetic field scale heights are significantly smaller than what estimates from energy equipartition would suggest. A non-negligible fraction of cosmic ray electrons can escape from NGC 7090, so that this galaxy is not an electron calorimeter.

  18. The formation of low-ionization emission in the halo of NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, James; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    Imaging and Spectroscopic study first revealed the presence of a diffuse ionized medium (DIM), having unusual excitation, pervading the lower halo of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891. Emission from this DIM is strongest northeast of the nucleus, at radii between 2 and 8 kpc (hereafter region 1). The (N2)(lambda)6583/H(alpha) and (S2)(lambda) (lambda)6716,6731/H(alpha) ratios increase dramatically with z in region 1, from 0.6 and 0.5 respectively at z is approximately equal to 500 pc to 1.1 and 1.0 at z is approximately equal to 1 kpc, while nondetections of (O1)(lambda)6300 and (O3)(lambda)5007 emission yield upper limits of (O1)(lambda)6300/H(alpha) less than or equal to 0.05 and (O3)(lambda)5007/H(alpha) less than or equal to 0.15 for z less than 1 kpc. Previous photoionization models, using the radiation field from disk O and B stars, have been successful in reproducing the elevated (N2)(lambda)6583/H(alpha) and (S2)(lambda)(lambda)6716.6731/H(alpha) ratios observed. However, these radiation bounded models also produce significant (O3)(lambda)5007 emission, in conflict with the observed upper limit. Here, we report the results of new, matter bounded models for the photoionization of the DIM in region 1 of NGC 891.

  19. Diffuse ionizing radiation within HH jets

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C. E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx

    2013-12-20

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of a time-dependent ejection velocity precessing jet. The parameters used in our models correspond to a high excitation Herbig-Haro object, such as HH 80/81. We have included the transfer of ionizing radiation produced within the shocked regions of the jet. The radiative transfer is computed with a ray-tracing scheme from all the cells with an emissivity above a certain threshold. We show the development of a radiative precursor, and compare the morphology with a model without the diffuse radiation. Our simulations show that the morphology of the Hα emission is affected considerably if the diffuse ionizing radiation is accounted for. The predicted Hα position-velocity diagram (i.e., spatially resolved emission line profiles) from a model with the transfer of ionizing radiation has a relatively strong component at zero velocity, corresponding to the radiative precursor. Qualitatively similar 'zero velocity components' are observed in HH 80/81 and in the jet from Sanduleak's star in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  20. Photoionization of the diffuse interstellar medium and galactic halo by OB associtations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Shull, J. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Assuming smoothly varying H I distributions in te Galactic disk, we have calculated the geometry of diffuse II regions due to OB associations in the Galactic plane. Near the solar circle, OB associations with a Lyman continuum (Lyc) photon luminosity Psi(sub Lyc) = 3.3 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1), produce H II regions that are density bounded in the vertical direction (H II chimneys) allowing Lyc to escape the gaseous disk and penetrate into the Galactic halo. We provide analytic formulae for the Lyc escape fraction as functions of S(sub 0) O-star catalog of Garmany and a new Lyc stellar stellar Lyc stellar flux calibration, we find a production rate of Lyc photons by OB associations within 2.5 kpc of Psi(sub Lyc) = 3.3 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1). Integrating the fraction of Lyc photons that escape the disk over our adopted luminosity function of OB associations, we estimate that approximately 7% of the ionizing photons, or Phi(sub Lyc) = 2.3 x 10(exp 6) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1), escape each side of the H I disk layer and penetrate the diffuse ionized medium ('Reynolds layer'). This flux is sufficient to explain the potoionization of this, although we have not constructed a model for the observed H-alpha emission and pulsar dispersion measures that is fully consistent with the absorption rate of Lyc in the H II layer. Since our quiescent model does not account for the effects of dynamic chimneys and superbubbles, which should enhance Lyc escape, we conclude the O stars are the probable source of ionizing radiation for the Reynolds layer. For a random distribution of OB associations throughout the disk, the Lyc flux is nearly uniform for heights Z is greater than approximately 0.8 kpc above the midplane.

  1. Highly-Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo: A FUSE Survey of O 6 Absorption toward 22 Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsargo, J.; Sembach, K. R.; Howk, J. C.; Savage, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of 22 Galactic halo stars are studied to determine the amount of O 6 in the Galactic halo between ~0.3 and ~10 kpc from the Galactic mid-plane. Strong O 6 λ 1031.93 absorption was detected toward 21 stars, and a reliable 3 σ upper limit was obtained toward HD 97991. The weaker member of the O 6 doublet at 1037.62 Å could be studied toward only six stars. The observed columns are reasonably consistent with a patchy exponential O 6 distribution with a mid-plane density of 1.7x10-8 cm-3 and scale height between 2.3 and 4 kpc. We do not see clear signs of strong high-velocity components in O 6 absorption along the Galactic sight lines, which indicates the general absence of high velocity O 6 within 2-5 kpc of the Galactic mid-plane. The correlation between the H 1 and O 6 intermediate velocity absorption is also poor. The O 6 velocity dispersions are much larger than the value of ~18 km/s expected from thermal broadening for gas at T ~ 3x105 K, the temperature at which O 6 is expected to reach its peak abundance in collisional ionization equilibrium. Turbulence, inflow, and outflow must have an effect on the shape of the O 6 profiles. Kinematical comparisons of O 6 with Ar 1 reveal that 9 of 21 sight lines are closely aligned in LSR velocity (|Δ VLSR| <=5 km/s ), while 8 of 21 exhibit significant velocity differences (|Δ VLSR| >= 15 km/s ). This dual behavior may indicate the presence of two different types of O 6-bearing environments toward the Galactic sight lines. Comparison of O 6 with other highly-ionized species suggests that the high ions are produced primarily by cooling hot gas in the Galactic fountain flow, and that turbulent mixing also has a significant contribution. The role of turbulent mixing is most important toward sight lines that sample supernova remnants like Loop I and IV. We are also able to show that the O 6 enhancement toward the Galactic center region that was observed in the FUSE

  2. No evidence for large-scale outflows in the extended ionized halo of ULIRG Mrk273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, R. A. W.; Zaurín, J. Rodríguez; Tadhunter, C. N.; Rose, M.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Spoon, H.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.

    2016-06-01

    We present deep new Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) narrow-band images and William Herschel Telescope (WHT) long-slit spectroscopy of the merging system Mrk273 that show a spectacular extended halo of warm ionized gas out to a radius of ˜45 kpc from the system nucleus. Outside of the immediate nuclear regions (r > 6 kpc), there is no evidence for kinematic disturbance in the ionized gas: in the extended regions covered by our spectroscopic slits the emission lines are relatively narrow (full width at half-maximum, FWHM ≲ 350 km s-1) and velocity shifts small (|ΔV| ≲ 250 km s-1). This is despite the presence of powerful near-nuclear outflows (FWHM > 1000 km s-1; |ΔV| > 400 km s-1; r < 6 kpc). Diagnostic ratio plots are fully consistent with Seyfert 2 photoionization to the NE of the nuclear region, however to the SW the plots are more consistent with low-velocity radiative shock models. The kinematics of the ionized gas, combined with the fact that the main structures are aligned with low-surface-brightness tidal continuum features, are consistent with the idea that the ionized halo represents tidal debris left over from a possible triple-merger event, rather than a reservoir of outflowing gas.

  3. The Diffuse Ionized Gas in the large telescopes era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    2005-12-01

    In this workshop we summarize the ``state of the art'' of the Diffuse Ionized Gas. We present all the possible situations which can produce ionization outside an H II region, as well as some of the observations that can be performed with the GTC instrumentation and how relevant they can be in the undestanding of the ionization mechanisms of the DIG.

  4. Lithium in halo stars - Constraining the effects of helium diffusion on globular cluster ages and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Demarque, Pierre

    1991-01-01

    Stellar evolutionary models with diffusion are used to show that observations of lithium in extreme halo stars provide crucial constraints on the magnitude of the effects of helium diffusion. The flatness of the observed Li-T(eff) relation severely constrains diffusion Li isochrones, which tend to curve downward toward higher T(eff). It is argued that Li observations at the hot edge of the plateau are particularly important in constraining the effects of helium diffusion; yet, they are currently few in number. It is proposed that additional observations are required there, as well as below 5500 K, to define more securely the morphology of the halo Li abundances. Implications for the primordial Li abundance are considered. It is suggested that a conservative upper limit to the initial Li abundance, due to diffusive effects alone, is 2.35.

  5. HIGHLY IONIZED PLASMA IN THE HALO OF A LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXY NEAR z = 0.225

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Anand; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P. E-mail: savage@astro.wisc.ed

    2010-04-01

    We present analyses of the physical conditions in the z(O{sub VI})=0.22496 and z(O{sub VI})=0.22638 multiphase absorption systems detected in the ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope/STIS and FUSE spectra of the quasar H 1821+643 (m{sub V} = 14.2, z{sub em} = 0.297). Both absorbers are likely associated with the extended halo of a {approx}2L*{sub B} Sbc-Sc galaxy situated at a projected distance of {approx}116 h {sup -1}{sub 71} kpc from the sight line. The z = 0.22496 absorber is detected in C II, C III, C IV, O III, O VI, Si II, Si III, and H I (Ly alpha-Lytheta) at >3sigma significance. The components of Si III and Si II are narrow with implied temperatures of T {approx}< 3 x 10{sup 4} K. The low and intermediate ions in this absorber are consistent with an origin in a T {approx} 10{sup 4} K photoionized gas with [Si/H] and [C/H] of {approx}-0.6 dex. In contrast, the broader O VI absorption is likely produced in collisionally ionized plasma under nonequilibrium conditions. The z(O{sub VI})=0.22638 system has broad Ly alpha (BLA) and C III absorption offset by v = -53 km s{sup -1} from O VI. The H I and C III line widths for the BLA imply T = 1.1 x 10{sup 5} K. For non-equilibrium cooling we obtain [C/H] {approx}-1.5 dex and N(H) = 3.2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} in the BLA. The O VI, offset from the BLA with no detected H I or C III, is likely collisionally ionized at T {approx} 3 x 10{sup 5} K. From the observed multiphase properties and the proximity to a luminous galaxy, we propose that the z = 0.22496 absorber is an extragalactic analog of a highly ionized Galactic HVC, in which the O VI is produced in transition temperature plasma (T {approx} 10{sup 5} K) at the interface layers between the warm (T < 5 x 10{sup 4} K) HVC gas phase and the hot (T {approx}> 10{sup 6} K) coronal halo of the galaxy. The z = 0.22638 O VI-BLA absorber could be tracing a cooling condensing fragment in the nearby galaxy's hot gaseous halo.

  6. THE HALO MASS FUNCTION FROM EXCURSION SET THEORY. II. THE DIFFUSING BARRIER

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, Michele; Riotto, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    In excursion set theory, the computation of the halo mass function is mapped into a first-passage time process in the presence of a barrier, which in the spherical collapse model is a constant and in the ellipsoidal collapse model is a fixed function of the variance of the smoothed density field. However, N-body simulations show that dark matter halos grow through a mixture of smooth accretion, violent encounters, and fragmentations, and modeling halo collapse as spherical, or even as ellipsoidal, is a significant oversimplification. In addition, the very definition of what is a dark matter halo, both in N-body simulations and observationally, is a difficult problem. We propose that some of the physical complications inherent to a realistic description of halo formation can be included in the excursion set theory framework, at least at an effective level, by taking into account that the critical value for collapse is not a fixed constant {delta}{sub c}, as in the spherical collapse model, nor a fixed function of the variance {sigma} of the smoothed density field, as in the ellipsoidal collapse model, but rather is itself a stochastic variable, whose scatter reflects a number of complicated aspects of the underlying dynamics. Solving the first-passage time problem in the presence of a diffusing barrier we find that the exponential factor in the Press-Schechter mass function changes from exp{l_brace}-{delta}{sup 2}{sub c}/2{sigma}{sup 2{r_brace}} to exp{l_brace}-a{delta}{sup 2}{sub c}/2{sigma}{sup 2{r_brace}}, where a = 1/(1 + D{sub B}) and D{sub B} is the diffusion coefficient of the barrier. The numerical value of D{sub B} , and therefore the corresponding value of a, depends among other things on the algorithm used for identifying halos. We discuss the physical origin of the stochasticity of the barrier and, from recent N-body simulations that studied the properties of the collapse barrier, we deduce a value D{sub B} {approx_equal} 0.25. Our model then predicts a

  7. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - I. New observations of neutral and ionized gas kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (H I) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for 16 galaxies in the statistically representative Extended Disk Galaxy Explore Science kinematic sample. H I rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The H I rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in 12 galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  8. Baryonic Distributions in Galaxy Dark Matter Haloes I: New Observations of Neutral and Ionized Gas Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (HI) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for sixteen galaxies in the statistically representative EDGES kinematic sample. HI rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The HI rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in twelve galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  9. Helium Ionization in the Diffuse Ionized Gas surrounding Ultra-compact HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish Roshi, D.; Churchwell, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    We observed radio recombination lines (RRLs) from regions surrounding three Ultra-compact HII (UCHII) regions at frequencies near 5 GHz. The observations were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). From existing observations we know that helium in the diffuse ionized gas (DIR), located far from the ionizing source, is not fully ionized. The objectives of our observations are to determine (a) the distance from the ionizing stars where helium is under ionized for a variety of physical conditions and (b) whether the helium ionization depends on the age of the ionizing star. With these objectives, we observed RRLs towards 16 positions in the envelops of UCHII regions G10.15-0.34, G23.46-0.20 and G29.96-0.02. Helium lines were detected toward 10 of the observed positions and hydrogen RRLs were detected toward all the observed positions. The observed ratio of ionized helium to ionized hydrogen (He^+/H^+) at the positions where helium lines are detected range between 0.03 and 0.09. At positions where helium lines are not detected the upper limit on the ratio is ~ 0.05. We discuss the dependence of He^+/H^+ ratio on the distance from and age of the ionizing star clusters in the observed sources.

  10. Properties of the highly ionized disk and halo gas toward two distant high-latitude stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    absorption, part of the C IV absorption, and has very little associated Si IV absorption. In this gas N(C IV)/N(N V) is approximately 1 to 3. This gas is hot (T greater than 2 x 10(exp 5) K) and may be tracing the cooling gas of supernova (SN) bubbles or a Galactic fountain. The relative mixture of these two types of highly ionized gas varies from one sight line to the next. The two sight lines in this study sample halo gas in the solar neighborhood and have a smaller percentage of the more highly ionized gas than inner Galaxy sight lines.

  11. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  12. Beryllium in the Galactic halo - Surface abundances from standard, diffusive, and rotational stellar evolution, and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    1990-01-01

    The recently observed upper limits to the beryllium abundances in population II stars are much lower than population I detections. This difference reflects an intrinsic difference in the initial abundances and is not caused by different degrees of depletion driven by stellar evolution processes from similar initial abundances. Evolutionary sequences of models from the early premain sequence to beyond the turnoff that correspond to halo dwarfs with Fe/H abundances of -1.3, -2.3, and -3.3 are constructed, and standard, diffusive, and rotational mechanisms are used to estimate a maximal possible beryllium depletion. Halo star models in the T(eff) range 6000 to 5000 K might be rotationally depleted by a factor of 1.5-2, and the total depletion should be no more than (conservatively) a factor of 3. Implications for cosmology, cosmic-ray theory, and Galactic chemical evolution are discussed.

  13. Halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nadesalingam, Kavitha; Goodfield, Mark; Emery, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We present a follow-up case report of a 33-year-old lady with juvenile onset arthritis who developed halo naevi while on treatment with tocilizumab. This case report describes the development of halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy following infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Panton–Valentine leukocidin positivity. This is the first case that describes these events and supports previous theories on cellular and humoral immunity as causative factors. The regression of melanocytes during treatment with tocilizumab could also implicate IL-6 and sIL-6R as future targets in the treatment of melanoma through its direct effect of melanocytic cytotoxicity, which supports previous studies. PMID:27516894

  14. Constraints on the Galactic Halo Dark Matter from Fermi-LAT Diffuse Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, Theresa J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Guiriec, Sylvain Germain; McEnery, Julie E.; Scargle. J. D.; Troja, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    We have performed an analysis of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the Milky Way halo region, searching for a signal from dark matter annihilation or decay. In the absence of a robust dark matter signal, constraints are presented. We consider both gamma rays produced directly in the dark matter annihilation/decay and produced by inverse Compton scattering of the e+/e- produced in the annihilation/decay. Conservative limits are derived requiring that the dark matter signal does not exceed the observed diffuse gamma-ray emission. A second set of more stringent limits is derived based on modeling the foreground astrophysical diffuse emission using the GALPROP code. Uncertainties in the height of the diffusive cosmic-ray halo, the distribution of the cosmic-ray sources in the Galaxy, the index of the injection cosmic-ray electron spectrum, and the column density of the interstellar gas are taken into account using a profile likelihood formalism, while the parameters governing the cosmic-ray propagation have been derived from fits to local cosmic-ray data. The resulting limits impact the range of particle masses over which dark matter thermal production in the early universe is possible, and challenge the interpretation of the PAMELA/Fermi-LAT cosmic ray anomalies as the annihilation of dark matter.

  15. The ionization sources of the diffuse ionized gas in nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Erica Susan

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) has been shown to be an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM), with its large filling factor (>= 20%) and a mass that makes it the most massive component of the Galactic ionized ISM. Given that it has been found to be ubiquitous in both the Galaxy and external disk galaxies, the energy source to create and maintain the DIG must necessarily be large. Massive OB stars are the only known sources with enough energy to power the DIG, and DIG is also linked morphologically to OB stars as it is brightest near bright star forming regions. However, the details of the location and spectral types of the ionizing stars, as well as the relevance of other ionizing mechanisms, are still not clear. I present the results of three different studies aimed at exploring the ionization sources of the DIG. Optical spectroscopy of DIG in M33 and NGC 891 using the Gemini-North telescope has been obtained to compare diagnostic emission line ratios with photoionization models. The first detection of (O I] l6300 was made in the DIG of M33. In M33, models in which ionizing photons leaking from H II regions are responsible for the ionization of the DIG best fit our observed line ratios. In NGC 891, we found evidence that shock ionization may need to be included along with photoionization in order to explain our observed emission line ratios. The diffuse Ha fraction in eight nearby galaxies was studied as a function of radius and star formation rate per unit area. We found no correlation with radius, but we did find that regions with higher star formation rates have lower diffuse fractions. Neither of these results had any dependence on galaxy type. These results have implications regarding the circumstances under which H II regions may be leaking ionizing photons and thus ionizing DIG. We also compared observed and predicted ionizing photon emission rates for 39 H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Our results indicate that five of the H II

  16. Emission-Line Ratios and Variations in Temperature and Ionization State in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of Five Edge-on Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, B.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Reynolds, R. J.

    2002-06-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of ionized gas in the disk-halo regions of five edge-on galaxies, covering a wavelength range from [O II] 3727 Å to [S II] 6716.4 Å. The inclusion of the [O II] emission provides additional constraints on the properties of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG), in particular, the origin of the observed spatial variations in the line intensity ratios. We have derived electron temperatures, ionization fractions, and abundances along the slit. Our data include slit positions both parallel and perpendicular to the galactic disks. This allowed us to examine variations in the line intensity ratios with height above the midplane, as well as with distance from the galactic centers. The observed increase in the [O II]/Hα line ratio toward the halo seems to require an increase in electron temperature caused by a nonionizing heating mechanism. We conclude that gradients in the electron temperature can play a significant role in the observed variations in the optical emission-line ratios from extraplanar DIG.

  17. Irradiation spectrum and ionization-induced diffusion effects in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-08-01

    There are two main components to the irradiation spectrum which need to be considered in radiation effects studies on nonmetals, namely the primary knock-on atom energy spectrum and ionizing radiation. The published low-temperature studies on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO suggest that the defect production is nearly independent of the average primary knock-on atom energy, in sharp contrast to the situation for metals. On the other hand, ionizing radiation has been shown to exert a pronounced influence on the microstructural evolution of both semiconductors and insulators under certain conditions. Recent work on the microstructure of ion-irradiated ceramics is summarized, which provides evidence for significant ionization-induced diffusion. Polycrystalline samples of MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} were irradiated with various ions ranging from 1 MeV H{sup +} to 4 MeV Zr{sup +} ions at temperatures between 25 and 650{degrees}C. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the depth-dependent microstructural of the irradiated specimens. Dislocation loop nucleation was effectively suppressed in specimens irradiated with light ions, whereas the growth rate of dislocation loops was enhanced. The sensitivity to irradiation spectrum is attributed to ionization-induced diffusion. The interstitial migration energies in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are estimated to be {le}0.4 eV and {le}0.8 eV, respectively for irradiation conditions where ionization-induced diffusion effects are expected to be negligible.

  18. The diffuse ionized interstellar medium perpendicular to the plane of NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Keppel, Jean; Roberts, Morton S.; Gallagher, John S., III

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to study the structure and the properties of the diffuse ionized interstellar medium perpendicular to the plane of disk galaxies researchers obtained H alpha images and spectra of NGC 891. Perhaps the most remarkable property of the H alpha emission line in NGC 891 is its extension out of the plane of the galaxy: researchers are able to measure the H alpha line out to more than 30 seconds (1.4 kpc) from the midplane. This means that the ionized hydrogen extends at least four times higher than the neutral hydrogen layer. An anomalously large scale-height for the ionized gas of approx. equals 1 kpc is also found in the Milky Way. The echelle spectra show a changing ratio of NII to H alpha. This excludes the possibility that the large scaleheight of the emission is due to scattering of disk emission by dust high above the plane. The z-extent of the H alpha emission is confirmed by the imaging result. The large z-extent of the ionized gas is confined to the inner half of the visible disk. In this inner region the H alpha distribution also shows a filamentary structure of the diffuse ionized medium. These filaments, sticking out of the plane, originate in HII regions in the plane. The H alpha image also shows a large scale asymmetry if the NE and SW parts of the disk are compared. The NE part is more prominent and extended in H alpha. The same asymmetry is also seen in the radio continuum distribution. This correlation between the diffuse ionized medium and the distribution of relativistic electrons is one example of a relation between star formation processes in the disk and the various components of the halo. Thermal filaments or spurs which are related to HII regions are also known in the Galaxy. These filamentary structures perpendicular to the galactic planes may represent the chimneys which result in the supernova dominated model of the Interstellar Medium by Norman and Ikeuchi (1989).

  19. A Rich Globular Cluster System in Dragonfly 17: Are Ultra-diffuse Galaxies Pure Stellar Halos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Eric W.; Lim, Sungsoon

    2016-05-01

    Observations of nearby galaxy clusters at low surface brightness have identified galaxies with low luminosities, but sizes as large as L ⋆ galaxies, leading them to be dubbed “ultra-diffuse galaxies” (UDGs). The survival of UDGs in dense environments like the Coma cluster suggests that UDGs could reside in much more massive dark halos. We report the detection of a substantial population of globular clusters (GCs) around a Coma UDG, Dragonfly 17 (DF17). We find that DF17 has a high GC specific frequency of S N = 26 ± 13. The GC system is extended, with an effective radius of 12″ ± 2″, or 5.6 ± 0.9 kpc at Coma distance, 70% larger than the galaxy itself. We also estimate the mean of the GC luminosity function to infer a distance of {97}-14+17 Mpc, providing redshift-independent confirmation that one of these UDGs is in the Coma cluster. The presence of a rich GC system in DF17 indicates that, despite its low stellar density, star formation was intense enough to form many massive star clusters. If DF17's ratio of total GC mass to total halo mass is similar to those in other galaxies, then DF17 has an inferred total mass of ˜1011 M ⊙, only ˜10% the mass of the Milky Way, but extremely dominated by dark matter, with M/L V ≈ 1000. We suggest that UDGs like DF17 may be “pure stellar halos,” i.e., galaxies that formed their stellar halo components, but then suffered an early cessation in star formation that prevented the formation of any substantial central disk or bulge. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  20. Massive Stars and the Ionization of the Diffuse Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Lauren E.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    2015-08-01

    Diffuse ionized Gas (DIG, sometimes called the warm ionized medium or WIM) has been recognized as a major component of the interstellar medium (ISM) in disk galaxies. A general understanding of the characteristics of the DIG is emerging, but several questions remain unanswered. One of these is the ionization mechanism for this gas, believed to be connected to OB stars and HII regions. Using 5-band (NUV (2750 A), U, V, B, and I) photometric imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Legacy Extragalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS) and ground-based Halpha data from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey and HST Halpha data from LEGUS, we will investigate the photoionization of HII regions and DIG in nearly 50 galaxies. The 5-band photometry will enable us to determine properties of the most massive stars and reddening corrections for specific regions within a galaxy. Luminosities and ages for groups and clusters will be obtained from SED-fitting of photometric data. For individual stars ages will be determined from isochrone-fitting using reddening-corrected color-magnitude diagrams. We can then obtain estimates of the ionizing luminosities by matching these photometric properties for massive stars and clusters to various stellar atmosphere models. We will compare these predictions to the inferred Lyman continuum production rates from reddening-corrected ground- and HST-based Halpha data for HII regions and DIG. This particular presentation will demonstrate the above process for a set of selected regions in galaxies within the LEGUS sample. It will subsequently be expanded to cover the full LEGUS sample, with the overall goals of obtaining a better understanding of the radiative energy feedback from massive stars on the ISM, particularly their ability to ionize the surrounding ISM over a wide range of spatial scales and SFR surface densities, and to connect the ionization of the ISM to HII region morphologies.

  1. A Search for Faint, Diffuse Halo Emission in Edge-On Galaxies with Spitzer/IRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Arendt, R. G.; Pipher, J. L.; Forrest, W. J.; Marengo, M.; Barmby, P.; Willner, S. P.; Stauffer, J. R.; Fazio, G. G.

    2006-12-01

    We present deep infrared mosaics of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 891, 4244, 4565, and 5907. These data were acquired at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns using the Infrared Array Camera aboard Spitzer as part of GTO program number 3. This effort is designed to detect the putative faint, diffuse emission from halos and thick disks of spiral galaxies in the near-mid infrared under the thermally stable, low-background conditions of space. These conditions in combination with the advantageous viewing angles presented by these well-known edge-on spirals provide arguably the best opportunity to characterize the halo/thick disk components of such galaxies in the infrared. In this contribution we describe our observations, data reduction techniques, corrections for artifacts in the data, and the modeling approach we applied to analyze this unique dataset. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  2. Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Dwarf Galaxy DDO 53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    We study the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the M81 group dwarf irregular galaxy DDO 53. We use long-slit spectroscopy in order to determine the most interesting line ratios. We compare these ratios with classical and leaking photoionization, shocks and turbulent layer models. As other dwarf irregular galaxies, the spectral characteristics are very diferent to those of the DIG in spiral galaxies: the excitation is higher and the [SII/Hα] much lower. A combination of leakage photoionization models plus shocks will be able to explain these characteristics.

  3. A reservoir of ionized gas in the galactic halo to sustain star formation in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher

    2011-11-18

    Without a source of new gas, our Galaxy would exhaust its supply of gas through the formation of stars. Ionized gas clouds observed at high velocity may be a reservoir of such gas, but their distances are key for placing them in the galactic halo and unraveling their role. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to blindly search for ionized high-velocity clouds (iHVCs) in the foreground of galactic stars. We show that iHVCs with 90 ≤ |v(LSR)| ≲ 170 kilometers per second (where v(LSR) is the velocity in the local standard of rest frame) are within one galactic radius of the Sun and have enough mass to maintain star formation, whereas iHVCs with |v(LSR)| ≳ 170 kilometers per second are at larger distances. These may be the next wave of infalling material. PMID:21868626

  4. The ATCA REXCESS Diffuse Emission Survey (ARDES) - I. Detection of a giant radio halo and a likely radio relic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouri, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratt, G. W.

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of the radio halo survey of 16 REXCESS southern clusters up to a redshift of 0.2 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 1.4 and 2.1 GHz. This cluster sample called the ATCA REXCESS Diffuse Emission Survey (ARDES) includes clusters in a wide range of X-ray luminosities and is morphologically unbiased. We find two diffuse radio sources in the clusters RXCJ2234.5-3744 (Abell 3888) and RXCJ0225.1-2928. The diffuse radio emission in RXCJ2234.5-3744 is a giant radio halo and the diffuse emission in RXCJ0225.1-2928 is a peculiar radio relic candidate. The radio halo has a spectral index of α = -1.48 ± 0.14 and the K-corrected P1.4 is 1.9 ± 0.2 × 1024 W Hz-1. The properties of the detected halo are consistent with both the current P1.4-LX and P1.4-YSZ correlations. The putative radio relic is located approximately 1 Mpc from the cluster in a filament and has a physical extent of 346 ± 20 kpc and a power of P1.4 = 3.3 ± 0.8 × 1023 W Hz-1, which places it in the lower power region of currently known relics.

  5. WFPC2 Imaging of the Multiphase Halos of Two Spiral Galaxies: Dust and Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueff, Katherine; Pitterle, M.; Hirschauer, A.; Lehner, N.; Howk, C.

    2006-12-01

    We present high-resolution optical images of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our broadband (BVI) images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope’s WFPC2 show extensive extraplanar dust clouds seen in absorption against the background stellar light, while our narrow-band H-alpha images taken with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope show the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies. The dusty, thick disk clouds visible in our WFPC2 images, which can be found to heights approaching 2 kpc from the midplanes of these galaxies, trace a phase of the ISM that shows significant structure on quite small scales. In general this material is seen to be highly filamentary. By contrast, the thick disk DIG in these galaxies has significantly smoother distribution. We note several unresolved knots of H-alpha emission which may represent thick disk H II regions. We discuss the relationship of the dust-bearing clouds and the DIG in these galaxies.

  6. Diffuse Ionized Gas inside the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.; Peimbert, A.

    2007-05-01

    We have studied the differences between the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) and the H II regions along a slit position in the local dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. The slit position passes through the two most prominent H II regions: Hubble V and Hubble X. Important differences have been found in the excitation, ionization, and [N II] λ6584/Hα and [S II] λ6717/Hα line ratios between the DIG and the H II locations. Moreover, the values of all the line ratios are not similar to those in the DIG locations of spiral galaxies but are very similar to the values in other irregular galaxies, such as IC 10. We also determined the rate of recombination using the He I λ5875 line. Finally, we obtained a picture of the ionization sources of the DIG. We consider that the leakage of photons from the H II regions might explain most of the line ratios, except [N II]/Hα, which might be explained by turbulence. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, proposal 69.C-0203(A).

  7. Evidence for Halo Contributions to the 1/4 keV Diffuse Soft X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, E. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1/4-keV diffuse soft X-ray background (SXRB) apparently originates in a thermal plasma at around 106 K, but the location of this emission has proven to be difficult to determine. The finite flux in the Galactic plane and similarity of the spectrum at all latitudes led to a model where essentially all of the observed flux originated in a local hot bubble (LHB) surrounding the Sun. Snowden et al. (1998) have proposed a three-component model of the SXRB from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey R12 (1/4 keV) map which consists of an unabsorbed local component, an absorbed halo component, and an absorbed power law to represent the known contribution from AGN, which is quite small. We have investigated whether this model is consistent with the lower-energy data available from sounding rocket flights in the B and Be bands. We find that the Snowden model provides better correspondence with the low-energy Wisconsin bands than the pure LHB model. The differences are subtle because the bulk of the intensity variation in the Snowden model is still due to differences in the extent of the local bubble. We have also investigated whether the observed band ratios are fit by the emission models used. We find that with current collisional ionization equilibrium models, depleted abundances are necessary to be consistent with the observed band ratios. We also show that the model predictions depend strongly on the model version, which does little to lend confidence to their predictions. This work was supported by a NSF-REU site grant (AST-0139563) to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  8. Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Disk of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Alexander; Howley, K.; Guhathakurta, P.; Dorman, C.; SPLASH Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the flattened rotating diffuse ionized gas (DIG) disk of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). For this we use spectra from 25 multislit masks obtained by the SPLASH collaboration using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck-II 10-meter telescope. Each mask contains 200 slits covering the region around M32 (S of the center of M31), the major axis of M31, and the SE minor axis. DIG emission was serendipitously detected in the background sky of these slits. By creating a normalized "sky spectrum” to remove various other sources of emission (such as night sky lines) in the background of these slits, we have examined the rotation of the DIG disk using individual line-of-sight velocity measurements of Hα, [NII] and [SII] emission. his emission is probably the result of newly formed stars ionizing the gas in the disk. The measured IG rotation will be compared to the rotation of M31's stellar disk and HI gas disk, as well as models of an infinitely thin rotating disk, to better understand the relationship between the components of the galactic disk and its differential rotation. We wish to acknowledge the NSF for funding on this project.

  9. Photoionized Mixing Layer Models of the Diffuse Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, Luc; Flores-Fajardo, Nahiely; Raga, Alejandro C.; Drissen, Laurent; Morisset, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    It is generally believed that O stars, confined near the galactic midplane, are somehow able to photoionize a significant fraction of what is termed the "diffuse ionized gas" (DIG) of spiral galaxies, which can extend up to 1-2 kpc above the galactic midplane. The heating of the DIG remains poorly understood, however, as simple photoionization models do not reproduce the observed line ratio correlations well or the DIG temperature. We present turbulent mixing layer (TML) models in which warm photoionized condensations are immersed in a hot supersonic wind. Turbulent dissipation and mixing generate an intermediate region where the gas is accelerated, heated, and mixed. The emission spectrum of such layers is compared with observations of Rand of the DIG in the edge-on spiral NGC 891. We generate two sequence of models that fit the line ratio correlations between [S II]/Hα, [O I]/Hα, [N II]/[S II], and [O III]/Hβ reasonably well. In one sequence of models, the hot wind velocity increases, while in the other, the ionization parameter and layer opacity increase. Despite the success of the mixing layer models, the overall efficiency in reprocessing the stellar UV is much too low, much less than 1%, which compels us to reject the TML model in its present form.

  10. Diffuse Ionized Gas Line Strengths from Echelle Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terndrup, D. M.; Peterson, R. C.

    1996-05-01

    We discuss serendipitous detections of several emission lines from the diffuse interstellar medium in high-resolution spectra of stars in Baade's Window and globular clusters near the Galactic center. Following Lehnert & Heckman (1994, ApJ, 426, L27), we show that the ratios of the strengths of the emission lines of Hα , [N II], and [S II] are inconsistent with those of H II regions, but match those of the diffuse ionized gas, suggesting this as its origin. We discuss these ratios and upper limits to the line strengths of [O I] lambda 6300 and He I lambda 5879. It is difficult to specify where the emitting gas is located along the line of sight to Baade's Window, since this is along the Galaxy's minor axis where the (low) gas velocity poses no constraint. However, we note that the two spectra acquired 1 arcmin apart in Baade's Window are indistinguishable, with equal line strengths and velocity widths. The emission lines are significantly fainter in the sky spectrum of a star in the globular cluster NGC 5927, where the gas velocity indicates that the emission probably does arise in or near the galactic disk.

  11. The Fornax Deep Survey with VST. I. The Extended and Diffuse Stellar Halo of NGC 1399 out to 192 kpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iodice, E.; Capaccioli, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Spavone, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Paolillo, M.; Peletier, R. F.; Cantiello, M.; Lisker, T.; Wittmann, C.; Venhola, A.; Hilker, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Pota, V.; Schipani, P.

    2016-03-01

    We have started a new, deep multi-imaging survey of the Fornax cluster, dubbed the Fornax Deep Survey (FDS), at the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). In this paper we present the deep photometry inside two square degrees around the bright galaxy NGC 1399 in the core of the cluster. We found that the core of the Fornax cluster is characterized by a very extended and diffuse envelope surrounding the luminous galaxy NGC 1399: we map the surface brightness out to 33 arcmin (˜192 kpc) from the galaxy center and down to μg ˜ 31 mag arcsec-2 in the g band. The deep photometry allows us to detect a faint stellar bridge in the intracluster region on the west side of NGC 1399 and toward NGC 1387. By analyzing the integrated colors of this feature, we argue that it could be due to the ongoing interaction between the two galaxies, where the outer envelope of NGC 1387 on its east side is stripped away. By fitting the light profile, we found that there exists a physical break radius in the total light distribution at R = 10 arcmin (˜58 kpc) that sets the transition region between the bright central galaxy and the outer exponential halo, and that the stellar halo contributes 60% of the total light of the galaxy (Section 3.5). We discuss the main implications of this work on the build-up of the stellar halo at the center of the Fornax cluster. By comparing with the numerical simulations of the stellar halo formation for the most massive bright cluster galaxies (i.e., 13\\lt {log}{M}200/{M}⊙ \\lt 14), we find that the observed stellar halo mass fraction is consistent with a halo formed through the multiple accretion of progenitors with stellar mass in the range 108-1011 M⊙. This might suggest that the halo of NGC 1399 has also gone through a major merging event. The absence of a significant number of luminous stellar streams and tidal tails out to 192 kpc suggests that the epoch of this strong interaction goes back to an early formation epoch. Therefore, different from the Virgo

  12. IONIZED GAS IN THE FIRST 10 kpc OF THE INTERSTELLAR GALACTIC HALO: METAL ION FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Howk, J. Christopher; Consiglio, S. Michelle E-mail: smconsiglio@ucla.edu

    2012-11-10

    We present direct measures of the ionization fractions of several sulfur ions in the Galactic warm ionized medium (WIM). We obtained high-resolution ultraviolet absorption-line spectroscopy of post-asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular clusters Messier 3 [(l, b) = (42.{sup 0}2, +78.{sup 0}7), d = 10.2 kpc, and z = 10.0 kpc] and Messier 5 [(l, b) = (3.{sup 0}9, +46.{sup 0}8), d = 7.5 kpc, and z = +5.3 kpc] with the Hubble Space Telescope and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer to measure, or place limits on, the column densities of S I, S II, S III, S IV, S VI, and H I. These clusters also house millisecond pulsars, whose dispersion measures give an electron column density from which we infer the H II column in these directions. We find fractions of S{sup +2} in the WIM for the M 3 and M 5 sight lines x(S{sup +2}) {identical_to} N(S{sup +2})/N(S) = 0.33 {+-} 0.07 and 0.47 {+-} 0.09, respectively, with variations perhaps related to location. With negligible quantities of the higher ionization states, we conclude that S{sup +} and S{sup +2} account for all of the S in the WIM. We extend the methodology to study the ion fractions in the warm and hot ionized gas of the Milky Way, including the high ions Si{sup +3}, C{sup +3}, N{sup +4}, and O{sup +5}. The vast majority of the Galactic ionized gas is warm (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K) and photoionized (the WIM) or very hot (T > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) and collisionally ionized. The common tracer of ionized gas beyond the Milky Way, O{sup +5}, traces <1% of the total ionized gas mass of the Milky Way.

  13. Analysis of the diffuse ionized gas database: DIGEDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Morisset, C.; Binette, L.

    2009-10-01

    Studies of the Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) have progressed without providing so far any strict criterion to distinguish DIGs from H II regions. In this work, we compile the emission line measurements of 29 galaxies that are available in the scientific literature, thereby setting up the first DIG database (DIGEDA). Making use of this database, we proceed to analyze the global properties of the DIG using the [NII]λ6583/Hα, [O I]λ6300/Hα, [O III]λ5007/Hβ and [SII]λ6716/Hα lines ratios, including the H α emission measure. This analysis leads us to conclude that the [N II]/Hα ratio provides an objective criterion for distinguishing whether an emission region is a DIG or an H II region, while the EM(Hα) is a useful quantity only when the galaxies are considered individually. Finally, we find that the emission regions of Irr galaxies classified as DIG in the literature appear in fact to be much more similar to H II regions than to the DIGs of spiral galaxies.

  14. Supernova remnants and diffuse ionized gas in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, Rene; Braun, Robert

    1990-07-01

    Researchers have compiled an initial list of radio/optical supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31, by searching for radio identifications of emission-line sources with a high (SII)/H alpha ratio (greater than 0.60). The (SII) filter included both sulfur lines and the H alpha filter did not include (NII). This search revealed 11 SNRs, of which only two were known. In addition, researchers detected radio emission from 3 SNRs that were identified in previous optical surveys (D'Odorico et al., 1980), but that were outside the charge coupled device (CCD) fields. The 14 objects only include the most obvious candidates, but a full search is in progress and the researchers expect to find several more SNRs. Also not all optical SNRs show detectable radio emission and a pure optical list of SNR candidates based only on the ratio of (SII)/H alpha emission contains many more objects. Two conclusions are apparent. First, the radio properties of the SNRs in M31 are quite similar to those of Galactic SNRs as is illustrated. The brightnesses are not systematically lower as has been suggested in the past (Dickel and D'Odorico, 1984). Second, the slope of the relation is close to -2; this slope is expected from the intrinsic dependence between surface brightness and diameter. The radio luminosity of the SNRs does not seem to depend strongly on diameter, or age, contrary to model predictions. Selection effects, however, play an important role in these plots. The CCD images show widespread diffuse ionized gas with a ratio of (SII)/H alpha that is higher than that of discrete HII regions. Discrete HII regions typically show ratios between 0.2 to 0.3, while the diffuse gas in the arms consistently shows ratios of 0.5. Researchers can trace this gas across the spiral arms to emission measures below 5 pc cm (-6). Its properties seem to be similar to that of the diffuse gas in the solar neighborhood.

  15. Magnetic fields in halos of spiral galaxies and the interstellar disk-halo connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2005-09-01

    Observations of magnetic fields in halos of edge-on disk galaxies are discussed in relation to the different gaseous phases of the interstellar medium. For this comparison the presence of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is introduced as a valuable tracer for gaseous halos which are originating from the star-formation driven disk-halo connection of the interstellar medium. The distribution of extraplanar DIG correlates on local and global scales with cosmic rays and magnetic fields as inferred from observations of the non-thermal radio continuum radiation and its polarization. From the polarization a large scale and well ordered magnetic field in these gaseous halos can be deduced. These observations indicate the presence of physical processes which generate and maintain magnetic fields on galactic scales. The importance of differential rotation of the gaseous halos for such processes is briefly discussed and the possible influence of magnetic fields on the dynamics of dust particles is addressed.

  16. Highly Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo and the High Velocity Clouds Toward PG 1116+215

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, R.; Sembach, K. R.; Tripp, T. M.; Savage, B. D.

    2003-12-01

    Recent observations of extragalactic objects with FUSE have revealed the presence of high ionization OVI absorption associated with high velocity clouds (HVCs), defined as gas which lies at absolute velocities beyond 100 km/s in the Local Standard of Rest. We have acquired high spectral resolution observations with STIS ( ˜ 10 km/s) and FUSE ( ˜ 20 km/s) of the quasar PG 1116+215. The spectra show absorption at Vlsr=184km/s from a wide range of ionization species:CIV, OI, OVI, MgII, SiII, SiIII, SiIV, and FeII. The strong and broad O VI absorption in this HVC extends from ˜ 120 to 230 km/s with a weak wing of absorption to 300km/s. Although the HVC is not seen in HI 21 cm emission down to N(HI) ˜ 2x1018 cm-2, it is seen in the HI Lyman series up to at least the 918.13Å line. In addition, we have non-detection constraints on the column denisties of CI, NI, NV, and SII. We can rule out photoionization in an ultra-low density (n ˜ 10-6 cm-3) Local Group medium adopted by some investigators to explain the O VI and O VII absorption detected in several directions. We are currently in the process of determining if these data either support or rule out other models of HVCs, such as the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium, Dark Matter dominated mini-halos, or interactions with a low density (10-4-10-5 cm-3) Galactic corona or Local Group medium. In addition, we will also use abundance infomation to study the enrichment history and constrain possible sources for the high velocity gas, such as tidal debris from cannibalized galaxies.

  17. The Lack of Influence of Metallicity on Cooling and Collapse of Ionized Gas in Small Protogalactic Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jappsen, A.-K.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2005-12-01

    We study the influence of low levels of metal enrichment on the cooling and collapse of ionized gas in small protogalactic halos. We use three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, run with the publicly available parallel code GADGET (Springel et al. 2001). We implement a sink particle algorithm. This allows us to safely represent gas that has collapsed beyond the resolution limit without causing numerical errors within the resolved regions of the simulation. We also include the necessary framework for following the non-equilibrium chemistry of H2 in the protogalactic gas, and a treatment of radiative heating and cooling. Our initial conditions represent protogalaxies forming within a fossil H ii region---a previously ionized H ii region that has not yet had time to cool and recombine. Prior to cosmological reionization, such regions should be relatively common, since the characteristic lifetimes of the likely ionizing sources are significantly shorter than a Hubble time. We show that in these regions, H2 is the dominant and most effective coolant, even in the presence of small amounts of metals. It is the amount of H2 which forms that controls whether or not the gas can collapse and form stars. For metallicities Z ≤ 10-3 Z⊙, we find that metal line cooling alters the density and temperature evolution of the gas by less than 1% compared to the metal-free case at densities below 1 cm-3 and temperatures above 2000 K. However, at higher densities and lower temperatures, metal line cooling does become rather more important, and will affect the ability of the gas to fragment. We also show that an external ultraviolet background delays or suppresses the cooling and collapse of the gas regardless of whether or not it is metal-enriched. RSK and A-KJ acknowledge support from the Emmy Noether Program of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (grant no. KL1358/1). M-MML acknowledges support from NSF grants AST99-85392 and AST03-07854, and NASA grant NAG5

  18. Planck early results. XXIV. Dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Blagrave, K.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Joncas, G.; Jones, A.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lockman, F. J.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pinheiro Gonçalves, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the first results from a comparison of Planck dust maps at 353, 545 and 857GHz, along with IRAS data at 3000 (100 μm) and 5000GHz (60 μm), with Green Bank Telescope 21-cm observations of Hi in 14 fields covering more than 800 deg2 at high Galactic latitude. The main goal of this study is to estimate the far-infrared to sub-millimeter (submm) emissivity of dust in the diffuse local interstellar medium (ISM) and in the intermediate-velocity (IVC) and high-velocity clouds (HVC) of the Galactic halo. Galactic dust emission for fields with average Hi column density lower than 2 × 1020 cm-2 is well correlated with 21-cm emission because in such diffuse areas the hydrogen is predominantly in the neutral atomic phase. The residual emission in these fields, once the Hi-correlated emission is removed, is consistent with the expected statistical properties of the cosmic infrared background fluctuations. The brighter fields in our sample, with an average Hi column density greater than 2 × 1020 cm-2, show significant excess dust emission compared to the Hi column density. Regions of excess lie in organized structures that suggest the presence of hydrogen in molecular form, though they are not always correlated with CO emission. In the higher Hi column density fields the excess emission at 857 GHz is about 40% of that coming from the Hi, but over all the high latitude fields surveyed the molecular mass faction is about 10%. Dust emission from IVCs is detected with high significance by this correlation analysis. Its spectral properties are consistent with, compared to the local ISM values, significantly hotter dust (T ~ 20K), lower submm dust opacity normalized per H-atom, and a relative abundance of very small grains to large grains about four times higher. These results are compatible with expectations for clouds that are part of the Galactic fountain in which there is dust shattering and fragmentation. Correlated dust emission in HVCs is not detected

  19. Combined diffusion coefficients for a mixture of three ionized gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. N.; Murphy, A. B.; Li, H. P.; Xia, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    The combined diffusion coefficient method has been demonstrated to greatly simplify the treatment of diffusion in the modelling of thermal plasmas in gas mixtures without loss of accuracy. In this paper, an extension of this method to allow treatment of diffusion of a three-gas mixture has been achieved, provided that the gases are homonuclear and do not react with each other, and satisfy local chemical equilibrium. Formulas for the combined diffusion coefficients are presented, and combined diffusion coefficients for different mixtures of helium, argon and carbon at temperatures up to 30 000 K and at atmosphere pressure are calculated as an example.

  20. Large diffuse halos in time-dependent space-charge potentials with colored noise

    SciTech Connect

    Courtlandt Bohn and Ioannis V. Sideris

    2003-05-22

    We explore the potential impact of colored noise on space-charge-induced halo formation. By coupling particle orbits to parametric resonance, colored noise due to space-charge fluctuations and/or imperfections in the beamline can eject particles to much larger amplitudes than would be inferred from parametric resonance alone.

  1. DIFFUSE Ly{alpha} EMITTING HALOS: A GENERIC PROPERTY OF HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steidel, Charles C.; Bogosavljevic, Milan; Shapley, Alice E.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Erb, Dawn K.; Pettini, Max

    2011-08-01

    Using a sample of 92 UV continuum-selected, spectroscopically identified galaxies with (z) = 2.65, all of which have been imaged in the Ly{alpha} line with extremely deep narrow-band imaging, we examine galaxy Ly{alpha} emission profiles to very faint surface brightness limits. The galaxy sample is representative of spectroscopic samples of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at similar redshifts in terms of apparent magnitude, UV luminosity, inferred extinction, and star formation rate and was assembled without regard to Ly{alpha} emission properties. Approximately 45% (55%) of the galaxy spectra have Ly{alpha} appearing in net absorption (emission), with {approx_equal} 20% satisfying commonly used criteria for the identification of 'Ly{alpha} emitters' (LAEs; W{sub 0}(Ly{alpha}) {>=} 20 A). We use extremely deep stacks of rest-UV continuum and continuum-subtracted Ly{alpha} images to show that all sub-samples exhibit diffuse Ly{alpha} emission to radii of at least 10'' ({approx}80 physical kpc). The characteristic exponential scale lengths for Ly{alpha} line emission exceed that of the {lambda}{sub 0} = 1220 A UV continuum light by factors of {approx}5-10. The surface brightness profiles of Ly{alpha} emission are strongly suppressed relative to the UV continuum light in the inner few kpc, by amounts that are tightly correlated with the galaxies' observed spectral morphology; however, all galaxy sub-subsamples, including that of galaxies for which Ly{alpha} appears in net absorption in the spectra, exhibit qualitatively similar diffuse Ly{alpha} emission halos. Accounting for the extended Ly{alpha} emission halos, which generally would not be detected in the slit spectra of individual objects or with typical narrow-band Ly{alpha} imaging, increases the total Ly{alpha} flux (and rest equivalent width W{sub 0}(Ly{alpha})) by an average factor of {approx}5, and by a much larger factor for the 80% of LBGs not classified as LAEs. We argue that most, if not all, of the observed

  2. IONIZATION SOURCE OF A MINOR-AXIS CLOUD IN THE OUTER HALO OF M82

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubayashi, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Hattori, T.; Ozaki, S.; Yoshikawa, T.; Nagao, T.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2012-12-10

    The M82 ''cap'' is a gas cloud at a projected radius of 11.6 kpc along the minor axis of this well-known superwind source. The cap has been detected in optical line emission and X-ray emission and therefore provides an important probe of the wind energetics. In order to investigate the ionization source of the cap, we observed it with the Kyoto3DII Fabry-Perot instrument mounted on the Subaru Telescope. Deep continuum, H{alpha}, [N II]{lambda}6583/H{alpha}, and [S II]{lambda}{lambda}6716,6731/H{alpha} maps were obtained with subarcsecond resolution. The superior spatial resolution compared to earlier studies reveals a number of bright H{alpha} emitting clouds within the cap. The emission line widths ({approx}< 100 km s{sup -1} FWHM) and line ratios in the newly identified knots are most reasonably explained by slow to moderate shocks velocities (v{sub shock} 40-80 km s{sup -1}) driven by a fast wind into dense clouds. The momentum input from the M82 nuclear starburst region is enough to produce the observed shock. Consequently, earlier claims of photoionization by the central starburst are ruled out because they cannot explain the observed fluxes of the densest knots unless the UV escape fraction is very high (f{sub esc} > 60%), i.e., an order of magnitude higher than observed in dwarf galaxies to date. Using these results, we discuss the evolutionary history of the M82 superwind. Future UV/X-ray surveys are expected to confirm that the temperature of the gas is consistent with our moderate shock model.

  3. The starformation driven interstellar disk-halo connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2005-08-01

    The evidence for starformation in the disks of spiral galaxies driving the disk-halo interaction is briefly reviewed. It is argued that diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the halos of edge-on disk galaxies traces the presence of extraplanar gas well since it correlates with the star formation rate in the underlying disk as well as with other gaseous phases and components of the ISM such as X-ray hot gas, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields. The dependence on the starformation rate is demonstrated using a survey of H+ halos with more than 70 objects. This survey allows us to establish a minimum energy release per unit area that is required to start the disk-halo mass exchange. Observations of extraplanar HII regions let us conclude that also molecular hydrogen must be present. In addition, well ordered magnetic field in the gaseous halos can be deduced from the polarization of synchrotron radiocontinuum maps.

  4. Ionization of the diffuse gas in galaxies: Hot low-mass evolved stars at work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Morisset, C.; Stasinska, G.; Binette, L.

    2011-10-01

    The Diffuse Ionized Medium (DIG) is visible through its faint optical line emission outside classical HII regions (Reynolds 1971) and turns out to be a major component of the interstellar medium in galaxies. OB stars in galaxies likely represent the main source of ionizing photons for the DIG. However, an additional source is needed to explain the increase of [NII]/Hα, [SII]/Hα with galactic height.

  5. The Massive Stellar Population in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    1995-01-01

    We compare Far-UV, H alpha, and optical broadband images of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, to investigate the massive stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas. The H-alpha/FUV ratio is higher in HII regions than in the DIG, possibly indicating that an older population ionizes the DIG. The broad-band colors support this conclusion. The HII region population is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG colors resemble an older population with constant star formation. Our results indicate that there may be enough massive field stars to ionize the DIG, without the need for photon leakage from HII regions.

  6. Spitzer Spectroscopy of Gaseous Halos of Nearby Edge-on Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Richard; Benjamin, Robert; Wood, Kenneth

    2007-05-01

    The majority of ionized gas in galaxies is in a diffuse phase - the so-called Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) - and its maintenance represents a significant power requirement for galaxies. In the past fifteen years, it has been found that DIG layers in spirals are suprisingly thick, and the way in which galaxies maintain these thick ionized layers is not well understood. Diagnostic optical emission line ratios suggest that the dominant ionizing source is photo-ionization by the thin disk of massive stars, but there is evidence that additional sources of ionization in these DIG 'halos' is required. The degree to which such sources are necessary, the nature of the sources, and environment-dependent variations all rely on unambiguous ionization diagnostics. Unfortunately, the optical ratios suffer from complications due to gas temperature, abundance and extinction effects. Spitzer offers access to the [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratio - a diagnostic free of all these complications. A successful pilot IRS study of NGC 891 by us showed the feasibility of detecting these lines in faint gaseous halos and already revealed severe difficulties for pure photo-ionization models. However, this study featured only two positions in the halo of a single spiral. Here we propose to extend this study to observe positions in the halos of three nearby edge-on spiral galaxies, where the optical ratios indicate a variety of ionization requirements, allowing more general conclusions to be drawn about the maintenance of DIG layers, as well as the interpretation of the optical ratios. We will compare results with our own state-of-the-art photo-ionization and shock-ionization models. Our pilot study also featured the first spectroscopic detections of PAHs in an external galaxy halo, and the proposed observations will extend our knowledge of the PAH population in halo environments.

  7. Laser action in runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Panchenko, Nikolai A.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Suslov, Alexei I.

    2015-12-01

    Formation features of run-away electron preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) and REP DD properties in different experimental conditions are studied. It was shown that sufficient uniformity of REP DD allows its application as an excitation source of lasers on different gas mixtures at elevated pressure. Promising results of REP DD application for development of gas lasers are shown. Stimulated radiation in the IR, visible and UV spectral ranges was obtained in the diffuse discharge. Ultimate efficiency of non-chain HF(DF) chemical and nitrogen lasers on mixtures of SF6 with H2(D2) and N2 was achieved. New operation mode of nitrogen laser is demonstrated under REP DD excitation. Kinetic model of the REP DD in mixtures of nitrogen with SF6 is developed allowing to predict the radiation parameters of nitrogen laser at λ = 337,1 nm. Long-pulse operation of rare gas halide lasers was achieved.

  8. Ionization statistics and diffusion: analytical estimate of their contribution to spatial resolution of drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnopolsky, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    The spatial resolution of a drift chamber often is the foremost design parameter. The calculation described here - a design tool - permits us to estimate the contributions of ionization statistics and diffusion to the spatial resolution when actually sampling the drift pulse waveform. Useful formulae are derived for the cylindrical and jet-chamber cell geometries.

  9. Bright gamma-ray Galactic Center excess and dark dwarfs: Strong tension for dark matter annihilation despite Milky Way halo profile and diffuse emission uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Keeley, Ryan E.

    2016-04-01

    We incorporate Milky Way dark matter halo profile uncertainties, as well as an accounting of diffuse gamma-ray emission uncertainties in dark matter annihilation models for the Galactic Center Extended gamma-ray excess (GCE) detected by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The range of particle annihilation rate and masses expand when including these unknowns. However, two of the most precise empirical determinations of the Milky Way halo's local density and density profile leave the signal region to be in considerable tension with dark matter annihilation searches from combined dwarf galaxy analyses for single-channel dark matter annihilation models. The GCE and dwarf tension can be alleviated if: one, the halo is very highly concentrated or strongly contracted; two, the dark matter annihilation signal differentiates between dwarfs and the GC; or, three, local stellar density measures are found to be significantly lower, like that from recent stellar counts, increasing the local dark matter density.

  10. Halo-shaped flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow: a heavenly design for simplified sample introduction and improved ionization in ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Schaper, J Niklas; Shelley, Jacob T; Ray, Steven J; Chan, George C-Y; Bings, Nicolas H; Hieftje, Gary M

    2013-08-01

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) is a promising new source for atmospheric-pressure, ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. However, problems exist with reproducible sample introduction into the FAPA source. To overcome this limitation, a new FAPA geometry has been developed in which concentric tubular electrodes are utilized to form a halo-shaped discharge; this geometry has been termed the halo-FAPA or h-FAPA. With this new geometry, it is still possible to achieve direct desorption and ionization from a surface; however, sample introduction through the inner capillary is also possible and improves interaction between the sample material (solution, vapor, or aerosol) and the plasma to promote desorption and ionization. The h-FAPA operates with a helium gas flow of 0.60 L/min outer, 0.30 L/min inner, and applied current of 30 mA at 200 V for 6 W of power. In addition, separation of the discharge proper and sample material prevents perturbations to the plasma. Optical-emission characterization and gas rotational temperatures reveal that the temperature of the discharge is not significantly affected (<3% change at 450 K) by water vapor during solution-aerosol sample introduction. The primary mass-spectral background species are protonated water clusters, and the primary analyte ions are protonated molecular ions (M + H(+)). Flexibility of the new ambient sampling source is demonstrated by coupling it with a laser ablation unit, a concentric nebulizer, and a droplet-on-demand system for sample introduction. A novel arrangement is also presented in which the central channel of the h-FAPA is used as the inlet to a mass spectrometer. PMID:23808829

  11. Balloon-borne direct search for ionizing massive particles as a component of the galactic halo dark matter (The Arizona-IMAX Collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, P. C.; Bowen, T.; Barker, D. L.; Halverson, P. G.; Kendall, K. R.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Norton, R. S.; Pifer, A. E.; Barbier, L. M.; Christian, E. R.; Krombel, K. E.; Mitchell, J. W.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Davis, A. J.; Labrador, A. W.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Schindler, S. M.; Golden, R. L.; Stochaj, S. J.; Webber, W. R.; Arizona-IMAX Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    A dark matter (DM) search experiment was flown on the IMAX balloon payload to search for a possible minor component of the dark matter in the Galactic halo: ionizing massive particles (IMPs) (mx>~104 GeV/c2) that cannot penetrate the atmosphere due to their low-velocities and high energy-loss. The DM search experiment consisted of a delayed coincidence between four large plastic scintillation detectors arranged in a vertical stack. In order to search for ultra-slow particles which do not slow down in the IMAX telescope, the experiment contained TDCs which measured the time-delay Ti,i+1∈(0.3, 14.0) μs between hits in successive counters to ~2% precision. We present IMP flux limits for non-slowing IMPs and also for IMPs which slow down significantly within the IMAX telescope. This experiment effectively closes much of a previously unconstrained ``window'' in the mass/cross-section joint parameter spaces for massive particles as the dominant halo DM.

  12. The Heavy-Ion Approximation for Ambipolar Diffusion Calcuations for Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P; McKee, C; Klein, R

    2006-07-27

    Ambipolar diffusion redistributes magnetic flux in weakly ionized plasmas and plays a critical role in star formation. Simulations of ambipolar diffusion using explicit MHD codes are prohibitively expensive for the level of ionization observed in molecular clouds ({approx}< 10{sup -6}) since an enormous number of time steps is required to represent the dynamics of the dominant neutral component with a time step determined by the trace ion component. Here we show that ambipolar diffusion calculations can be significantly accelerated by the 'heavy-ion approximation', in which the mass density of the ions is increased and the collisional coupling constant with the neutrals decreased such that the product remains constant. In this approximation, the ambipolar diffusion time and the ambipolar magnetic Reynolds number remain unchanged. We present three tests of the heavy-ion approximation: C-type shocks, the Wardle instability, and the 1D collapse of a magnetized slab. We show that this approximation is quite accurate provided that (1) the square of the Alfven Mach number is small compared to the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number for dynamical problems, and that (2) the ion mass density is negligible for quasi-static problems; a specific criterion is given for the magnetized slab problem. The first condition can be very stringent for turbulent flows with large density fluctuations.

  13. Influence of nonideality of semiconductor plasma on the ambipolar diffusion of ionized impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilevskii, M.I.; Murav'ev, V.A.; Panteleev, V.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Numerous works have been devoted to taking account of the internal electric field in Fick's law, describing the diffusion of ionizational impurity. Doubts have also been considered on the basis that the current-carrier gas screens the ions, which reduces the force acting on them. In this present work, systematic consideration of this problem is attempted, on the basis of the principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

  14. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic Stream with Mapped WHAM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Hernandez, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We present early stages of an Hα survey of the Magellanic Stream using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). While the neutral component of the Stream may extend 200° across the sky (Nidever et al. 2010), its ionized gas has not yet been studied in detail. Fox et al. 2014 find that the tidal debris in the Magellanic System contains twice as much ionized gas as neutral and may extend 30° away from the H I emission. However, such absorption-line studies are not sensitive to the overall morphology of the ionized gas. Using targeted Hα emission observations of the Magellanic Stream, Barger et al. 2015 find that although the warm ionized gas tracks the neutral gas, it often spans a few degrees away from the H I emission at slightly offset velocities. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to diffuse emission (~ 10s of mR) and its velocity resolution (12 km/s) to isolate Stream emission, we are now conducting the first full Hα survey of its ionized component. Here we present early results, including spatial and kinematic comparisons to the well-established neutral profile of the Stream. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  15. Can the Lyman Continuum Leaked Out of H II Regions Explain Diffuse Ionized Gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2009-09-01

    We present an attempt to explain the diffuse Hα emission of a face-on galaxy M 51 with the "standard" photoionization model, in which the Lyman continuum (Lyc) escaping from H II regions propagates large distances into the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). The diffuse Hα emission of M 51 is analyzed using thin slab models and exponential disk models in the context of the "on-the-spot" approximation. The scale height of the ionized gas needed to explain the diffuse Hα emission with the scenario is found to be of the order of ~1-2 kpc, consistent with those of our Galaxy and edge-on galaxies. The model also provides a vertical profile, when the galaxy is viewed edge-on, consisting of two-exponential components. However, it is found that an incredibly low absorption coefficient of κ0 ≈ 0.4-0.8 kpc-1 at the galactic plane, or, equivalently, an effective cross section as low as σeff ~ 10-5 of the photoionization cross section at 912 Å is required to allow the stellar Lyc photons to travel through the H I disk. Such a low absorption coefficient is out of accord with the properties of the ISM. Furthermore, we found that even the model that has the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) phase only and no H I gas phase shows highly concentrated Hα emissions around H II regions, and can account for only lsim26% of the Hα luminosity of the DIG. This result places a strong constraint on the ionizing source of the DIG. We also report that the Hα intensity distribution functions not only of the DIG, but also of H II regions in M 51, appear to be lognormal.

  16. Generation of Diffuse Large Volume Plasma by an Ionization Wave from a Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Razavi, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Low temperature plasma jets emitted in ambient air are the product of fast ionization waves that are guided within a channel of a gas flow, such as helium. This guided ionization wave can be transmitted through a dielectric material and under some conditions can ignite a discharge behind the dielectric material. Here we present a novel way to produce large volume diffuse low pressure plasma inside a Pyrex chamber that does not have any electrodes or electrical energy directly applied to it. The diffuse plasma is ignited inside the chamber by a plasma jet located externally to the chamber and that is physically and electrically unconnected to the chamber. Instead, the plasma jet is just brought in close proximity to the external wall/surface of the chamber or to a dielectric tubing connected to the chamber. The plasma thus generated is diffuse, large volume and with physical and chemical characteristics that are different than the external plasma jet that ignited it. So by using a plasma jet we are able to ``remotely'' ignite volumetric plasma under controlled conditions. This novel method of ``remote'' generation of a low pressure, low temperature diffuse plasma can be useful for various applications including material processing and biomedicine.

  17. Ionization feedback in star formation simulations: the role of diffuse fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolano, Barbara; Gritschneder, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    We compare the three-dimensional gas temperature distributions obtained by a dedicated radiative transfer and photoionization code, MOCASSIN, against those obtained by the recently developed smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) plus ionization code IVINE for snapshots of a hydrodynamical simulation of a turbulent interstellar medium (ISM) irradiated by a nearby O star. Our tests demonstrate that the global ionization properties of the region are correctly reproduced by IVINE, hence validating further application of this code to the study of feedback in star-forming regions. However, we highlight potentially important discrepancies in the detailed temperature distribution. In particular, we show that in the case of highly inhomogeneous density distributions, the commonly employed on-the-spot (OTS) approximation yields unrealistically sharp shadow regions which can affect the dynamical evolution of the system. We implement a simple strategy to include the effects of the diffuse field in future calculations, which makes use of physically motivated temperature calibrations of the diffuse-field-dominated regions and can be readily applied to similar codes. We find that while the global qualitative behaviour of the system is captured by simulations with the OTS approximation, the inclusion of the diffuse field in IVINE (called DIVINE) results in a stronger confinement of the cold gas, leading to denser and less coherent structures. This in turn leads to earlier triggering of star formation. We confirm that turbulence is being driven in simulations that include the diffuse field, but the efficiency is slightly lower than in simulations that use the OTS approximation.

  18. Statistical properties of diffuse Lyα haloes around star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Rieko; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yuma, Suraphong; Mori, Masao; Umemura, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    We present statistical properties of diffuse Lyα haloes (LAHs) around high-z star-forming galaxies with large Subaru samples of Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2. We make subsamples defined by the physical quantities of LAEs' central Lyα luminosities, ultraviolet (UV) magnitudes, Lyα equivalent widths, and UV slopes, and investigate LAHs' radial surface brightness (SB) profiles and scale lengths rn as a function of these physical quantities. We find that there exist prominent LAHs around LAEs with faint Lyα luminosities, bright UV luminosities, and small Lyα equivalent widths in cumulative radial Lyα SB profiles. We confirm this trend with the anticorrelation between rn and Lyα luminosities (equivalent widths) based on the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient that is ρ = -0.9 (-0.7) corresponding to the 96 per cent (93 per cent) confidence level, although the correlation between rn and UV magnitudes is not clearly found in the rank correlation coefficient. Our results suggest that LAEs with properties similar to typical Lyman-break galaxies (with faint Lyα luminosities and small equivalent widths) possess more prominent LAHs. We investigate scenarios for the major physical origins of LAHs with our results. Because we find relatively small Lyα equivalent widths up to 77 Å in LAHs that include LAEs' central components, these results suggest that the cold stream scenario is not preferred. There remain two possible scenarios of Lyα scattering in circumgalactic medium and satellite galaxies that cannot be tested with our observational data.

  19. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas throughout the Magellanic Cloud System with WHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Madsen, Gregory J.; Hill, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    We present early stages of an H-α survey of the Magellanic System using the Wisconsin H-α Mapper (WHAM). Our maps of the Small Magellanic Cloud, Large Magellanic Cloud, and Magellanic Bridge are the most sensitive kinematic maps of ionized gas throughout the System. With a velocity resolution of 12 km/s, WHAM observations can cleanly separate diffuse emission at Magellanic velocities from that of the Milky Way and terrestrial sources. These new maps of the SMC and LMC compliment observations of the Magellanic Bridge by Barger et al. (2013), who found H-alpha emission extending throughout and beyond the observed H I emission. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to the limit of atmospheric line confusion (~ 10s of mR), we find that ionized gas emission extends at least 5 degrees beyond the traditional boundary of the SMC when compared to recent deep-imaging surveys (e.g., MCELS; Smith et al. 2005). The diffuse ionized emission extent is similar to the neutral gas extent as traced by 21 cm. We present spectra comparing H I and H-alpha kinematic signatures throughout the emission region, which are dominated by galactic rotation. Multi-wavelength observations are also underway in [S II] and [N II] for the SMC and LMC. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  20. THE ROLE OF DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION ON NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS. II. EMITTED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick; Raymond, John C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    2010-12-20

    We present a grid of nonequilibrium ionization models for the X-ray spectra from supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration. The calculation follows the hydrodynamics of the blast wave as well as the time-dependent ionization of the plasma behind the shock. The ionization state is passed to a plasma emissivity code to compute the thermal X-ray emission, which is combined with the emission from nonthermal synchrotron emission to produce a self-consistent model for the thermal and nonthermal emission from cosmic-ray dominated shocks. We show how plasma diagnostics such as the G'-ratio of He-like ions, defined as the ratio of the sum of the intercombination, forbidden, and satellite lines to the resonance line, can vary with acceleration efficiency, and discuss how the thermal X-ray emission, when the time-dependent ionization is not calculated self-consistently with the hydrodynamics, can differ from the thermal X-ray emission from models which do account for the hydrodynamics. Finally, we compare the thermal X-ray emission from models which show moderate acceleration ({approx}35%) to the thermal X-ray emission from test-particle models.

  1. The Role of Diffusive Shock Acceleration on Non-Equilibrium Ionization in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel; Ellison, D.; Slane, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present new model simulations which show clear evidence for changes in the non-equilibrium ionization behind a supernova remnant forward shock undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration. The efficient acceleration of particles (i.e., cosmic rays) lowers the shock temperature and raises the density of the shocked gas, thus altering the ionization state of the plasma in comparison to the test-particle approximation where cosmic rays gain an insignificant fraction of the shock energy. The differences between the test-particle and efficient acceleration cases are substantial: in cases of higher efficiency, particular ion states are more populated at lower electron temperatures. We also present results which show that in the efficient shock acceleration case, higher ionization fractions are reached immediately behind the shock front, relative to those in the test particle case. We attribute this to the higher postshock densities which lead to higher ionization rates. We show that these spatial differences are resolvable with current and future X-ray missions, and can be used as diagnostics in estimating the acceleration efficiency in cosmic--ray modified shocks in Galactic supernova remnants such as Tycho and Cassiopeia A.

  2. The Role of Diffusive Shock Acceleration on Nonequilibrium Ionization in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Ellison, Donald C.; Slane, Patrick

    2009-05-01

    We present results of semianalytic calculations which show clear evidence for changes in the nonequilibrium ionization behind a supernova remnant forward shock undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). The efficient acceleration of particles (i.e., cosmic rays (CRs)) lowers the shock temperature and raises the density of the shocked gas, thus altering the ionization state of the plasma in comparison to the test-particle (TP) approximation where CRs gain an insignificant fraction of the shock energy. The differences between the TP and efficient acceleration cases are substantial and occur for both slow and fast temperature equilibration rates: in cases of higher acceleration efficiency, particular ion states are more populated at lower electron temperatures. We also present results which show that, in the efficient shock acceleration case, higher ionization fractions are reached noticeably closer to the shock front than in the TP case, clearly indicating that DSA may enhance thermal X-ray production. We attribute this to the higher postshock densities which lead to faster electron temperature equilibration and higher ionization rates. These spatial differences should be resolvable with current and future X-ray missions, and can be used as diagnostics in estimating the acceleration efficiency in CR-modified shocks.

  3. Low-background balloon-borne direct search for ionizing massive particles as a component of the dark galactic halo matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Patrick Charles

    A dark matter (DM) search experiment was flown on the IMAX balloon payload, which tested the hypothesis that a minor component of the dark matter in the Galactic halo is composed of ionizing (dE/dx greater than 1 MeV/g/cm2 or sigma greater than 2 x 10-20 sq cm supermassive particles (mx is an element of (104, 1012)GeV/c2 that cannot penetrate the atmosphere due to their low velocities (beta belongs to (0.0003, 0.00025)). The DM search experiment consisted of a delayed coincidence between four approximately 2400 cm2 plastic scintillation detectors, with a total acceptance of approximately 100 cm2 sr. In order to search for ultra-slow particles which do not slow down in the IMAX telescope, the experiment contained TDCs which measured the time-delays Ti,i+1is an element of (0.3, 14.0)microseconds between hits in a successive counters to approximately 1 percent precision. Using the first 5 hours of data at float altitude (5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere), we observed approximately 5 candidate non-slowing dark matter events, consistent with the background from accidental coincidences of 4 events. This implies that the DM flux is less than 6.5 x 10-6 cm-2s-1sr-1 (95 percent C.L.). Similar results were also obtained for particles which slow down in the counter telescope. This experiment effectively closes much of a previously unconstrained 'window' in the mass/cross-section joint parameter space for massive particles as the dominant halo DM, and implies that for certain regions of this parameter space massive particles cannot be more than one part in 105 by mass of all the DM. These results can also directly constrain 'light' magnetic monopoles and neutra CHAMPs in a previously unconstrained mass region mx belongs to (106, 109) GeV.

  4. The Impact of Diffuse Ionized Gas on Emission-line Ratios and Gas Metallicity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of galaxies observed by MaNGA, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impact the measurements of emission line ratios, hence the gas-phase metallicity measurements and the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams. We demonstrate that emission line surface brightness (SB) is a reasonably good proxy to separate HII regions from regions dominated by diffuse ionized gas. For spatially-adjacent regions or regions at the same radius, many line ratios change systematically with emission line surface brightness, reflecting a gradual increase of dominance by DIG towards low SB. DIG could significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradient. Because DIG tend to have a higher temperature than HII regions, at fixed metallicity DIG displays lower [NII]/[OII] ratios. DIG also show lower [OIII]/[OII] ratios than HII regions, due to extended partially-ionized regions that enhance all low-ionization lines ([NII], [SII], [OII], [OI]). The contamination by DIG is responsible for a substantial portion of the scatter in metallicity measurements. At different surface brightness, line ratios and line ratio gradients can differ systematically. As DIG fraction could change with radius, it can affect the metallicity gradient measurements in systematic ways. The three commonly used strong-line metallicity indicators, R23, [NII]/[OII], O3N2, are all affected in different ways. To make robust metallicity gradient measurements, one has to properly isolate HII regions and correct for DIG contamination. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves HII regions towards composite or LINER-like regions.

  5. Diffusion of alkali species in porous tungsten substrates used in contact ionization sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Golcher, E.; Kwan, J.; Morse, E. C.

    2002-01-01

    Contact ionization (doped) sources used in current Heavy Ion Fusion experiments consist of a porous tungsten substrate doped with an alkali carbonate. In the early stages of the heating cycle (T - 600 C), the carbonate breaks down and releases the alkali atoms that then diffuse through the substrate. At the emitter surface there is a balance between the fast desorption rate of the alkali atoms (mostly as neutrals) and the slower replenishment rate from the substrate by diffusion. Time-resolved measurements of neutral particle evaporation rates at the emitter surface have been used to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient (D) that characterizes the migration of alkali species in the substrate. These estimates are consistent with the observed source lifetimes (tens of hrs.) and establish the alkali migration in the bulk as a diffusion-limited process. The measurements suggest that the faster migration rates (D {approx} 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -6} cm2/s) occur early during the heating cycle when the dominant species are the neutral alkali atoms. At operating temperatures there is a slower migration rate (D x 10-7cm2/sd) ue to the dominance of ions, which difise by a slower surface diffusion process.

  6. Facilitated Diffusion of Acetonitrile Revealed by Quantitative Breath Analysis Using Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Ding, Jianhua; Gu, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Susu; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen; Li, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    By using silver cations (Ag+) as the ionic reagent in reactive extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS), the concentrations of acetonitrile in exhaled breath samples from the volunteers including active smokers, passive smokers, and non-smokers were quantitatively measured in vivo, without any sample pretreatment. A limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.16 ng/L and 3.5% (n = 8), respectively, for the acetonitrile signals in MS/MS experiments. Interestingly, the concentrations of acetonitrile in human breath continuously increased for 1–4 hours after the smoker finished smoking and then slowly decreased to the background level in 7 days. The experimental data of a large number of (> 165) samples indicated that the inhaled acetonitrile is excreted most likely by facilitated diffusion, instead of simple diffusion reported previously for other volatile compounds. PMID:23386969

  7. Implementation of cost-effective diffuse light source mechanism to reduce specular reflection and halo effects for resistor-image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Sheng; Wang, Jeng-Yau

    2015-09-01

    Light source plays a significant role to acquire a qualified image from objects for facilitating the image processing and pattern recognition. For objects possessing specular surface, the phenomena of reflection and halo appearing in the acquired image will increase the difficulty of information processing. Such a situation may be improved by the assistance of valuable diffuse light source. Consider reading resistor via computer vision, due to the resistor's specular reflective surface it will face with a severe non-uniform luminous intensity on image yielding a higher error rate in recognition without a well-controlled light source. A measurement system including mainly a digital microscope embedded in a replaceable diffuse cover, a ring-type LED embedded onto a small pad carrying a resistor for evaluation, and Arduino microcontrollers connected with PC, is presented in this paper. Several replaceable cost-effective diffuse covers made by paper bowl, cup and box inside pasted with white paper are presented for reducing specular reflection and halo effects and compared with a commercial diffuse some. The ring-type LED can be flexibly configured to be a full or partial lighting based on the application. For each self-made diffuse cover, a set of resistors with 4 or 5 color bands are captured via digital microscope for experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio from the segmented resistor-image is used for performance evaluation. The detected principal axis of resistor body is used for the partial LED configuration to further improve the lighting condition. Experimental results confirm that the proposed mechanism can not only evaluate the cost-effective diffuse light source but also be extended as an automatic recognition system for resistor reading.

  8. Diffuse Ionized Gas in Irregular Galaxies. I. GR 8 and ESO 245-G05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    2006-04-01

    We have studied the spectral characteristics of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in two irregular galaxies with low metallicities and intermediate star formation rates: ESO 245-G05 and GR 8. The [O III]/Hβ ratio in these galaxies is higher than in the DIG of spiral galaxies but not as high as in other irregular galaxies previously studied, such as IC 10 and NGC 6822. The [N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα ratios have very small values, indicating the absence of shocks as the ionization source for this gas. This ionization can be explained in both galaxies with photon leakage from the H II regions as the only source. The percentage of photons that have escaped from the H II regions is small in ESO 245-G05, only 35%, but varies from 35% up to 60% in GR 8. We also investigated whether the differences found between spiral and irregular galaxies in the [O III]/Hβ and the [N II]/Hα ratios are due to differences in the metal content between these types of galaxies. Although the number of galaxies studied is not very large, it can be concluded that the [O III]/Hβ ratio is not related to the oxygen content, while the situation is more ambiguous for the [N II]/Hα ratio.

  9. Heating of the Interstellar Diffuse Ionized Gas via the Dissipation of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minter, Anthony H.; Spangler, Steven R.

    1997-08-01

    We have recently published observations that specify most of the turbulent and mean plasma characteristics for a region of the sky containing the interstellar diffuse ionized gas (DIG). These observations have provided virtually all of the information necessary to calculate the heating rate from dissipation of turbulence. We have calculated the turbulent dissipation heating rate employing two models for the interstellar turbulence. The first is a customary modeling as a superposition of magnetohydrodynamic waves. The second is a fluid-turbulence-like model based on the ideas of Higdon. This represents the first time that such calculations have been carried out with full and specific interstellar turbulence parameters. The wave model of interstellar turbulence encounters the severe difficulty that plausible estimates of heating by Landau damping exceed the radiative cooling capacity of the interstellar DIG by 3-4 orders of magnitude. Clearly interstellar turbulence does not behave like an ensemble of obliquely propagating fast magnetosonic waves. The heating rate due to two other wave dissipation mechanisms, ion-neutral collisional damping and the parametric decay instability, are comparable to the cooling capacity of the diffuse ionized medium. We find that the fluid-like turbulence model is an acceptable and realistic model of the turbulence in the interstellar medium once the effects of ion-neutral collisions are included in the model. This statement is contingent on an assumption that the dissipation of such turbulence because of Landau damping is several orders of magnitude less than that from an ensemble of obliquely propagating magnetosonic waves with the same energy density. Arguments as to why this may be the case are made in the paper. Rough parity between the turbulent heating rate and the radiative cooling rate in the DIG also depends on the hydrogen ionization fraction being in excess of 90% or on a model-dependent lower limit to the heating rate being

  10. The edge of the M 87 halo and the kinematics of the diffuse light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, M.; Arnaboldi, M.; Das, P.; Gerhard, O.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Ciardullo, R.; Feldmeier, J. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Jacoby, G. H.; Murante, G.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: We study the kinematics and dynamics of the extreme outer halo of M 87, the central galaxy in the Virgo cluster, and its transition to the intracluster light (ICL). Methods: We present high resolution FLAMES/VLT spectroscopy of intracluster planetary nebula (PN) candidates, targeting three new fields in the Virgo cluster core with surface brightness down to μB = 28.5. Based on the projected phase space information (sky positions and line-of-sight velocities) we separate galaxy and cluster components in the confirmed PN sample. We then use the spherical Jeans equation and the total gravitational potential as traced by the X-ray emission to derive the orbital distribution in the outer stellar halo of M 87. We determine the luminosity-specific PN number for the M 87 halo and the ICL from the photometric PN catalogs and sampled luminosities, and discuss the origin of the ICL in Virgo based on its measured PN velocities. Results: We confirm a further 12 PNs in Virgo, five of which are bound to the halo of M 87, and the remainder are true intracluster planetary nebulas (ICPNs). The M 87 PNs are confined to the extended stellar envelope of M 87, within a projected radius of ~160 kpc, while the ICPNs are scattered across the whole surveyed region between M 87 and M 86, supporting a truncation of M 87's luminous outer halo at a 2σ level. The line-of-sight velocity distribution of the M 87 PNs at projected radii of 60 kpc and 144 kpc shows (i) no evidence for rotation of the halo along the photometric major axis; and (ii) that the velocity dispersion decreases in the outer halo, down to σ_last = 78±25 km s-1 at 144 kpc. The Jeans model for the M 87 halo stars fits the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile only if the stellar orbits are strongly radially anisotropic (β ≃ 0.4 at r ≃ 10 kpc increasing to 0.8 at the outer edge), and if additionally the stellar halo is truncated at ≃ 150 kpc average elliptical radius. The α-parameters for the M 87

  11. Filling factors and scale heights of the diffuse ionized gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Mitra, D.; Mueller, P.

    2006-01-01

    The combination of dispersion measures of pulsars, distances from the model of Cordes & Lazio (\\cite{cordes+lazio02}) and emission measures from the WHAM survey enabled a statistical study of electron densities and filling factors of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the Milky Way. The emission measures were corrected for absorption and contributions from beyond the pulsar distance. For a sample of 157 pulsars at |b|>5° and 60° < ℓ < 360°, located in mainly interarm regions within about 3 kpc from the Sun, we find that: (1) The average volume filling factor along the line of sight /line{f}v and the mean density in ionized clouds /line{n}c are inversely correlated: /line{f}v(/line{n}c ) = (0.0184± 0.0011) /line{n}c{ -1.07± 0.03} for the ranges 0.03 < /line{n}c < 2 {cm-3 and 0.8 > /line{f}v > 0.01. This relationship is very tight. The inverse correlation of /line{f}v and /line{n}c causes the well-known constancy of the average electron density along the line of sight. As /line{f}v(z) increases with distance from the Galactic plane |z|, the average size of the ionized clouds increases with |z|. (2) For |z| < 0.9 kpc the local density in clouds nc (z) and local filling factor f(z) are inversely correlated because the local electron density ne (z) = f(z) nc (z) is constant. We suggest that f(z) reaches a maximum value of >0.3 near |z| = 0.9 kpc, whereas nc (z) continues to decrease to higher |z|, thus causing the observed flattening in the distribution of dispersion measures perpendicular to the Galactic plane above this height. (3) For |z| < 0.9 kpc the local distributions nc (z), f(z) and ne2(z) have the same scale height which is in the range 250 < h ⪉ 500 pc. (4) The average degree of ionization of the warm atomic gas /line{I}w (z) increases towards higher |z| similarly to /line{f}v (z). Towards |z| = 1 kpc, /line{f}v (z) = 0.24± 0.05 and /line{I}w (z) = 0.24± 0.02. Near |z| = 1 kpc most of the warm, atomic hydrogen is ionized.

  12. On the Dynamical and Physical State of the ``Diffuse Ionized Medium'' in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew D.

    1997-12-01

    We report the initial results from a program to study the morphology, physical state, and kinematics of the ``diffuse ionized medium'' (DIM) in a sample of the nearest and brightest late-type galaxies. For each of five galaxies (NGC 2403, M81, NGC 4395, M51, and M101), we have analyzed deep narrowband Hα images of the entire star-forming disk and long-slit spectra of the inner (~10 kpc) disk with a resolution of 40-75 km s-1. We find that the DIM covers most of the star-forming disk and is morphologically related to the presence of high surface brightness gas (the giant H II regions). The DIM and the giant H II regions differ systematically in their physical and dynamical state. The DIM is characterized by enhanced emission in the low-ionization forbidden lines ([O I], [N II], and [S II]), and even the high-ionization [O III] λ5007 line is moderately strong in the DIM in at least three cases. This last result contrasts with upper limits on the [O III] surface brightness in the local DIM of our own Galaxy (the ``Reynolds Layer''). We directly verify the inference made by Lehnert and Heckman that the DIM contributes significantly to the spatially integrated (global) emission-line ratios measured in late-type galaxies. We also find that the DIM is more disturbed kinematically than the gas in the giant H II regions. The deconvolved (intrinsic) widths of the Hα and [N II] λ6584 lines range from 30 to 100 km s-1 (FWHM) in the DIM compared to 20-50 km s-1 in the giant H II regions. The high-ionization gas in the DIM is more kinematically disturbed than the low-ionization gas: the [O III] λ5007 lines have intrinsic widths of 70-150 km s-1. The differing kinematics implies that the DIM is not a single monolithic phase of the ISM. Instead, it may consist of a ``quiescent'' DIM with a low ionization state and small scale height (few hundred parsec) and a ``disturbed'' DIM with a high ionization state and moderate scale height (0.5-1 kpc). We argue that the quiescent DIM

  13. Directional Degradation of Spectralon Diffuser Under Ionizing Radiation for Calibration of Space-Based Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, G. T.; Butler, J. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Ding, L.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) irradiation on the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of Spectralon is presented in this paper. The sample was a 99% white Spectralon calibration standard irradiated with VUV source positioned at 60o off the irradiation direction for a total of 20 hours. The BRDF before and after VUV irradiation was measured and compared at number of wavelengths in the UV, VIS and IR. Non-isotropic directional degradation of Spectralon diffuser under ionizing radiation was detected at different BRDF measurement geometries primarily at UV spectral range. The 8o directional/hemispherical reflectance of the same sample was also measured and compared from 200nm to 2500nm. Index Terms BRDF, Reflectance, Multiangular, Spectralon, Remote Sensing

  14. Injection to Rapid Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Perpendicular Shocks in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and upstream ionization fraction are v sh ≈ 1333 km s‑1 and f i ˜ 0.5, which are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results showing that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region and are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed DSA can be interpreted as shock drift acceleration with scattering. In this simulation, particles are accelerated to v ˜ 100 v sh ˜ 0.3 c within ˜100 gyroperiods. The acceleration timescale is faster than that of DSA in parallel shocks. Our simulation results suggest that SNRs can accelerate cosmic rays to 1015.5 eV (the knee) during the Sedov phase.

  15. Injection to Rapid Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Perpendicular Shocks in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and upstream ionization fraction are v sh ≈ 1333 km s‑1 and f i ∼ 0.5, which are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results showing that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region and are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed DSA can be interpreted as shock drift acceleration with scattering. In this simulation, particles are accelerated to v ∼ 100 v sh ∼ 0.3 c within ∼100 gyroperiods. The acceleration timescale is faster than that of DSA in parallel shocks. Our simulation results suggest that SNRs can accelerate cosmic rays to 1015.5 eV (the knee) during the Sedov phase.

  16. Implementation of a 3D halo neutral model in the TRANSP code and application to projected NSTX-U plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, S. S.; Liu, D.; Gorelenkova, M. V.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Stagner, L.

    2016-02-01

    A 3D halo neutral code developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and implemented for analysis using the TRANSP code is applied to projected National Spherical Torus eXperiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U plasmas). The legacy TRANSP code did not handle halo neutrals properly since they were distributed over the plasma volume rather than remaining in the vicinity of the neutral beam footprint as is actually the case. The 3D halo neutral code uses a ‘beam-in-a-box’ model that encompasses both injected beam neutrals and resulting halo neutrals. Upon deposition by charge exchange, a subset of the full, one-half and one-third beam energy components produce first generation halo neutrals that are tracked through successive generations until an ionization event occurs or the descendant halos exit the box. The 3D halo neutral model and neutral particle analyzer (NPA) simulator in the TRANSP code have been benchmarked with the Fast-Ion D-Alpha simulation (FIDAsim) code, which provides Monte Carlo simulations of beam neutral injection, attenuation, halo generation, halo spatial diffusion, and photoemission processes. When using the same atomic physics database, TRANSP and FIDAsim simulations achieve excellent agreement on the spatial profile and magnitude of beam and halo neutral densities and the NPA energy spectrum. The simulations show that the halo neutral density can be comparable to the beam neutral density. These halo neutrals can double the NPA flux, but they have minor effects on the NPA energy spectrum shape. The TRANSP and FIDAsim simulations also suggest that the magnitudes of beam and halo neutral densities are relatively sensitive to the choice of the atomic physics databases.

  17. Artificial halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmke, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Judged by their frequency and beauty, ice halos easily rival rainbows as a prominent atmospheric optics phenomenon. This article presents experimental halo demonstrations of varying complexity. Using a single commercially available hexagonal glass prism, a variety of artificial halos can be simulated. The experiments include laser beam path analysis, a modified classic spinning prism experiment, and a novel Monte-Carlo machine for three-dimensional rotations. Each of these experiments emulates different conditions of certain halo displays, and in combination, they allow a thorough understanding of these striking phenomena.

  18. Densities and filling factors of the diffuse ionized gas in the Solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Müller, P.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We analyse electron densities and filling factors of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the Solar neighbourhood. Methods: We have combined dispersion measures and emission measures towards 38 pulsars at distances known to better than 50%, from which we derived the mean density in clouds, N_c, and their volume filling factor, F_v, averaged along the line of sight. The emission measures were corrected for absorption by dust and contributions from beyond the pulsar distance. Results: The scale height of the electron layer for our sample is 0.93± 0.13 kpc and the midplane electron density is 0.023± 0.004 cm-3, in agreement with earlier results. The average density along the line of sight is < n_e> = 0.018± 0.002 cm-3 and is nearly constant. Since < n_e> = F_vN_c, an inverse relationship between Fv and Nc is expected. We find F_v(N_c) = (0.011± 0.003) N_c-1.20± 0.13, which holds for the ranges N_c= 0.05-1 cm-3 and F_v= 0.4-0.01. Near the Galactic plane the dependence of Fv on Nc is significantly stronger than away from the plane. Fv does not systematically change along or perpendicular to the Galactic plane, but the spread about the mean value of 0.08± 0.02 is considerable. The total pathlength through the ionized regions increases linearly to about 80 pc towards |z| = 1 kpc. Conclusions: Our study of Fv and Nc of the DIG is the first one based on a sample of pulsars with known distances. We confirm the existence of a tight, nearly inverse correlation between Fv and Nc in the DIG. The exact form of this relation depends on the regions in the Galaxy probed by the pulsar sample. The inverse F_v-Nc relation is consistent with a hierarchical, fractal density distribution in the DIG caused by turbulence. The observed near constancy of < n_e> then is a signature of fractal structure in the ionized medium, which is most pronounced outside the thin disk.

  19. Identifying Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in a Sample of MaNGA Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Ryan J.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency with which galaxies convert gas into stars is driven by the continuous cycle of accretion and feedback processes within the circumgalactic medium. Extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) can provide insights into the tumultuous processes that govern the evolution of galactic disks because eDIG emission traces both inflowing and outflowing gas. With the help of state-of-the-art, spatially-resolved spectroscopy from MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), we developed a computational method to identify eDIG based on the strength of and spatial extent of optical emission lines for a diverse sample of 550 nearby galaxies. This sample includes roughly half of the MaNGA galaxies that will become publicly available in summer 2016 as part of the Thirteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We identified signatures of eDIG in 8% of the galaxies in this sample, and we found that these signatures are particularly common among galaxies with active star formation and inclination angles >45 degrees. Our analysis of the morphology, incidence, and kinematics of eDIG has important implications for current models of accretion and feedback processes that regulate star formation in galaxies. We acknowledge support from the Astrophysics REU program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the National Astronomy Consortium, and The Grainger Foundation.

  20. An Unusual Lunar Halo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Bartley L.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a photograph of an unusual combination of lunar halos: the 22-degree refraction halo, the circumscribed halo, and a reflection halo. Deduces the form and orientations of the ice crystals responsible for the observed halo features. (MLH)

  1. Warm and Diffuse Gas and High Ionization Rate Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Morong, C. P.; Geballe, T. R.; Indriolo, N.; McCall, B. J.; Goto, M.; Usuda, T.

    2011-06-01

    Using 12 newly found bright dust-embedded stars distributed from 140 pc West to 120 pc East of Sgr A*, we have observed spectra of H_3^+ and CO in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic center. Sightlines toward the 12 stars have been observed at the Gemini South Observatory on Cerro Pachon, Chile, and those for 2 of the stars at the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea Hawaii. This has extended our previous longitudinal coverage by a factor of 7. Although complete coverage of various transitions have yet to be made for some stars, almost all sightlines showed high total column densities of H_3^+ and highly populated (J, K) = (3, 3) metastable level, demonstrating the prevalence of the warm and diffuse gas previously observed from the center to 30 pc East and high ionization rate in the environment. A few sightlines did not show strong H_3^+ absorptions. It remains to be seen whether this is due to the radial and transverse location of the stars or lack of H_3^+. While the velocity profiles of H_3^+ toward stars from the center to 30 pc East are similar apart from subtle variations, the velocity profiles of the wider regions vary greatly ^a. A remarkable similarity has been noted between the velocity profile of H_3^+ toward a star nicknamed Iota and those of H_2O^+ and 13CH^+ observed toward Sgr B2 by the HIFI instrument of the Herschel Space Observatory. Although all these ions exist in diffuse environment, this is surprising since H_3^+ favors environments with high H_2 fraction f(H_2) while H_2O^+ and CH^+ favors low f(H_2). Also the peak of Sgr B2 and Iota are separated by 17 pc. Possible interpretations of this will be discussed. T. R. Geballe and T. Oka, ApJ, 709, L70 (2010). M. Goto, T. Usuda, T. R. Geballe, N. Indriolo, B. J. McCall, Th. Henning, and T. Oka, PASJ (2011) in press. P. Schilke, et al., A&A, 521, L11 (2010). E. Falgarone, private communication

  2. Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Multiphase Halo of NGC 4631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher; Kern, Brian

    2001-07-01

    We have performed narrowband imaging of NGC 4631 in the [O III] 5007 and Hα lines, and long-slit spectroscopy using the Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. Hα and [O III] λ5007 are detected far from the disk, with the highest [O III]/Hα ratios coincident with the soft X-ray emission. Spectroscopy reveals that the ionization is higher than that of the Milky Way diffuse ionized gas (DIG), with an average ratio [O III]/Hβ~1, rising to 6 in one region. We use the Balmer decrement to probe extinction in the halo. Extinction appears as high as 5 kpc above the disk. Distinct smaller scale variations of [O III], Hβ, and [S II] indicate that we are viewing multiple zones with distinct ionization conditions along the line of sight, in some cases separated by dust. This suggests that the gas has multiple phases and that the ionization may be much higher in some zones. A model using photoionized clouds reproduces the average trends in the line ratios. The inferred densities and pressures are high for halo gas but consistent with observations of other phases that may be colocated with this gas. A combination of high- and low-ionization gas is best for explaining the majority of the fluctuations. The high-ionization phase could be in shocks, but the velocity resolution is not adequate to prove or reject this possibility. Gas at 6×105 K discovered by ROSAT by Wang and colleagues in 1995 could be a source of radiatively cooling gas. We present a new model of optical line emission from cooling clouds and compare it to the data. We show that it can produce part or all of the observed [O III] and fluctuations, may generate part or all of the EDIG gas itself, and may contribute to the photoionization of the upper halo. Our most important conclusions are that the halo is complex and multicomponent and that average line-of-sight line ratios alone cannot be used to determine the ionization conditions. Based on observations obtained at the W. H. Keck

  3. Diffuse Lyα haloes around galaxies at z = 2.2-6.6: implications for galaxy formation and cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Rieko; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yuma, Suraphong; Mori, Masao; Umemura, Masayuki

    2014-07-01

    We present diffuse Lyα haloes (LAHs) identified in the composite Subaru narrow-band images of 100-3600 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2, 3.1, 3.7, 5.7, and 6.6. First, we carefully examine potential artefacts mimicking LAHs that include a large-scale point-spread function made by instrumental and atmospheric effects. Based on our critical test with composite images of non-LAE samples whose narrow-band-magnitude and source-size distributions are the same as our LAE samples, we confirm that no artefacts can produce a diffuse extended feature similar to our LAHs. After this test, we measure the scalelengths of exponential profile for the LAHs estimated from our z = 2.2-6.6 LAE samples of LLyα ≳ 2 × 1042 erg s-1. We obtain the scalelengths of ≃5-10 kpc at z = 2.2-5.7, and find no evolution of scalelengths in this redshift range beyond our measurement uncertainties. Combining this result and the previously known UV-continuum size evolution, we infer that the ratio of LAH to UV-continuum sizes is nearly constant at z = 2.2-5.7. The scalelength of our z = 6.6 LAH is larger than 5-10 kpc just beyond the error bar, which is a hint that the scalelengths of LAHs would increase from z = 5.7 to 6.6. If this increase is confirmed by future large surveys with significant improvements of statistical and systematical errors, this scalelength change at z ≳ 6 would be a signature of increasing fraction of neutral hydrogen scattering Lyα photons, due to cosmic reionization.

  4. The kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect of the milky way halo

    SciTech Connect

    Birnboim, Yuval; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-06-01

    We calculate the expected imprint of the ionized gas in the Milky-Way halo on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) through the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect. Unlike other Galactic foregrounds, the halo kSZ signature covers the full sky, generates anisotropies on large angular scales, is not accompanied by spectral distortions, and could therefore be confused with primordial CMB anisotropies. We construct theoretical models for various halo components, including smooth diffuse gas, filaments of cold inflowing gas and high velocity clouds. We find that the kSZ effect for all components is above the sensitivity of the Planck satellite, over a range of angular scales. However, the typical halo contribution is well below the cosmic variance noise in the primordial CMB power spectrum. High velocity clouds could dominate the halo contribution and better observational data is required to mask them out. We derive expected kSZ maps based on existing data from tracers of the halo gas distribution, such as 21cm maps of neutral hydrogen and H{sub α} maps of recombining gas. The cross-correlation of these maps with the WMAP5 data does not yield any statistically significant signal.

  5. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  6. Thinking outside the halo: tracing the large-scale distribution of diffuse cosmic metals with semi-analytic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattow, Genevieve M.; Croton, Darren J.; Bibiano, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    With the installation of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, measurements of the metal content of the low-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) are now available. Using a new grid-based model for diffuse gas coupled to the SAGE semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, we examine the impact of supernova feedback on the pollution of the IGM. We consider different assumptions for the reheating and ejection of gas by supernovae and their dependence on galaxy circular velocity and gas surface density. Where metals are present, we find the most likely metallicity to be -1.5

  7. Ionization losses of the Earth's radiation belt protons according to the radial diffusion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtyukh, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Using modern models of the plasmasphere and exosphere, radial profiles of the rates of ionization losses of protons with μ = 0.3-10 keV/nT (μ is the first adiabatic invariant) of the Earth's radiation belts (ERBs) have been constructed. To calculate Coulomb losses of protons, we used the ISEE-1 satellite data at L = 3-9 and CRRES satellite data at L ≤ 3 ( L is the McIlwain parameter). The relation of contributions of Coulomb losses and charge exchange in the rate of ionization losses of protons has been considered. We have discovered the effect of subtracting Coulomb losses from charge exchange of ERB protons for small μ and L, which can imitate a local particle source. It has been demonstrated that, with decreasing L, the rate of ionization losses of ERB protons decreases as a whole. The radial dependence of this rate only has a negative gradient in the narrow range (Δ L ~ 0.5) in the region of the plasmapause and only for protons with μ > 1.2 keV/nT.

  8. PAHs in the halo of NGC 5529

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, J. A.; Kennedy, H.; Parkin, T.; Madden, S.

    2007-11-01

    We present sensitive ISO λ 6.7~μm observations of the edge-on galaxy, NGC 5529, finding an extensive MIR halo around NGC 5529. The emission is dominated by PAHs in this band. The PAH halo has an exponential scale height of 3.7 kpc but can still be detected as far as ≈10 kpc from the plane to the limits of the high dynamic range (1770/1) data. This is the most extensive PAH halo yet detected in a normal galaxy. This halo shows substructure and the PAHs likely originate from some type of disk outflow. PAHs are long-lived in a halo environment and therefore continuous replenishment from the disk is not required (unless halo PAHs are also being destroyed or removed), consistent with the current low SFR of the galaxy. The PAHs correlate spatially with halo Hα emission, previously observed by Miller & Veilleux (2003, ApJS, 148, 383); both components are likely excited/ionized by in-disk photons that are leaking into the halo. The presence of halo gas may be related to the environment of NGC 5529 which contains at least 17 galaxies in a small group of which NGC 5529 is the dominant member. Of these, we have identified two new companions from the SDSS.

  9. CAN NEUTRAL AND IONIZED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BE CARRIERS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION BUMP AND THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS?

    SciTech Connect

    Steglich, M.; Huisken, F.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th.

    2011-11-20

    Up to now, no laboratory-based study has investigated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) species as potential carriers of both the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and the 2175 A UV bump. We examined the proposed correlation between these two features by applying experimental and theoretical techniques on two specific medium-sized/large PAHs (dibenzorubicene C{sub 30}H{sub 14} and hexabenzocoronene C{sub 42}H{sub 18}) in their neutral and cationic states. It was already shown that mixtures of sufficiently large, neutral PAHs can partly or even completely account for the UV bump. We investigated how the absorption bands are altered upon ionization of these molecules by interstellar UV photons. The experimental studies presented here were realized by performing matrix isolation spectroscopy with subsequent far-UV irradiation. The main effects were found to be a broadening of the absorption bands in the UV combined with slight redshifts. The position of the complete {pi}-{pi}* absorption structure around 217.5 nm, however, remains more or less unchanged, which could explain the observed position invariance of the interstellar bump for different lines of sight. This favors the assignment of this feature to the interstellar PAH population. As far as the DIBs are concerned, neither our investigations nor the laboratory studies carried out by other research groups support a possible connection with this class of molecules. Instead, there are reasonable arguments that neutral and singly ionized cationic PAHs cannot be held responsible for the DIBs.

  10. Triangulation of sprites, associated halos and their possible relation to causative lightning and micrometeors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Sentman, D. D.; Heavner, M. J.; Moudry, D. R.; Sabbas, F. T. São

    2001-06-01

    Sprite halos were recently identified as an impulsive but spatially diffuse phenomenon that sometimes occurs just prior to, but distinct from, sprites. The lack of discernible spatial structure and the temporal development sequence in halos differs markedly from the highly structured bodies and tendrils and the complex development sequences of sprites. However, both phenomena are thought to result from an electric field due to charge moment changes usually associated with large positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning but also following negative CG flashes. Three-dimensional triangulations of sprites and sprite halos were made between stations in South Dakota and Wyoming in August 1999 during the NASA Sprites99 balloon campaign. Halos were found to have a Gaussian 1/e diameter of ~66 km and 1/e thickness of ~4 km. Comparison with the location of the underlying lightning strokes, as recorded by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), confirms that the horizontal position of sprites may be laterally offset by as much as 50 km from the underlying parent lightning discharge, as has been previously reported. The point of maximum apparent brightness for sprite halos occurs at an altitude of ~78 km, similar to that of sprites. However, unlike sprites, this point tends to be centered directly above the underlying parent lightning discharge, 4.6+/-2.7km mean distance from the center of the halo to the NLDN location. This difference in spatial location relative to the underlying lightning suggests that the electrical breakdown associated with discrete sprites may require a random ionizing event such as a micrometeor. In contrast, sprite halos do not appear to require such a random component.

  11. Modeling of Pickup Ion Distributions in the Halley Cometo-Sheath: Empirical Rates of Ionization, Diffusion, Loss and Creation of Fast Neutral Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B.

    1994-01-01

    The shape of the velocity distribution of water-group ions observed by the Giotto ion mass spectrometer on its approach to comet Halley is modeled to derive empirical values for the rates on ionization, energy diffusion, and loss in the mid-cometosheath.

  12. INVESTIGATING THE COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE IN THE GALACTIC DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF H{sup +}{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-20

    Observations of H{sup +}{sub 3} in the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium have led to various surprising results, including the conclusion that the cosmic-ray ionization rate ({zeta}{sub 2}) is about one order of magnitude larger than previously thought. The present survey expands the sample of diffuse cloud sight lines with H{sup +}{sub 3} observations to 50, with detections in 21 of those. Ionization rates inferred from these observations are in the range (1.7 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1} < {zeta}{sub 2} < (10.6 {+-} 8.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1} with a mean value of {zeta}{sub 2} = (3.5{sup +5.3}{sub -3.0}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. Upper limits (3{sigma}) derived from non-detections of H{sup +}{sub 3} are as low as {zeta}{sub 2} < 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. These low upper limits, in combination with the wide range of inferred cosmic-ray ionization rates, indicate variations in {zeta}{sub 2} between different diffuse cloud sight lines. A study of {zeta}{sub 2} versus N{sub H} (total hydrogen column density) shows that the two parameters are not correlated for diffuse molecular cloud sight lines, but that the ionization rate decreases when N{sub H} increases to values typical of dense molecular clouds. Both the difference in ionization rates between diffuse and dense clouds and the variation of {zeta}{sub 2} among diffuse cloud sight lines are likely the result of particle propagation effects. The lower ionization rate in dense clouds is due to the inability of low-energy (few MeV) protons to penetrate such regions, while the ionization rate in diffuse clouds is controlled by the proximity of the observed cloud to a site of particle acceleration.

  13. Temperature, Density, Ionization Rate, and Morphology of Diffuse Gas Near the Galactic Center Probed by H_3^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Geballe, Thomas R.; Goto, Miwa; Usuda, Tomonori

    2014-06-01

    Since last year, infrared spectra of H_3^+ and CO have been obtained toward nine stars (designated by us α+, β, γ, γ-, δ, θ, κ, λ, and λ-) along the Galactic plane from 138 pc to the west of Sgr A* to 115 pc east, using IRCS of the Subaru Telescope and GNIRS of the Gemini North Observatory. All of the objects lie within the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), a region of radius ˜150 pc at the center of the Galaxy. All sightlines except that toward λ (a red giant not suitable for H_3^+ spectroscopy) have high H_3^+ column densities on the order of a few times 1015 cm-2. The metastable R(3,3)^l absorption line was sought on seven sightlines (α+, β, γ, γ-, δ, θ, κ), each of which showed significant signal except κ for which detection of this line was inconclusive. These results indicate that the long (at least several tens of parsecs) columns of warm (T ˜ 250 K) and diffuse (n ≤ 100 cm-3) gas in which a high ionization rate of ζ of a few times 10-15 s-1 exists, found earlier by us on sightlines passing through the central 30 pc of the CMZ are present over nearly the entire CMZ. The velocity profiles of the H_3^+ absorption lines provide information on the morphology of the diffuse gas in the CMZ. The velocity profile toward star λ- (2MASS J17482472-2824313) observed by GNIRS is particularly noteworthy. The sightline toward this star, located 115 pc to the east of Sgr A*, shows the presence of warm diffuse gas near 0 radial velocity and complements an identical result at the west end (on sightlines toward α+ and previously observed sources α and β). Stars nearer to the center of the CMZ show the warm diffuse gas at negative velocities only. Although many more stars need to be observed, the results to date suggest the existence of an expanding molecular ring of diffuse gas which is, unlike previously reported, not rotating but purely expanding. Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., and McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632 882 Goto, M., Usuda, T

  14. Universality in molecular halo clusters.

    PubMed

    Stipanović, P; Markić, L Vranješ; Bešlić, I; Boronat, J

    2014-12-19

    The ground state of weakly bound dimers and trimers with a radius extending well into the classically forbidden region is explored, with the goal to test the predicted universality of quantum halo states. The focus of the study is molecules consisting of T↓, D↓, ^{3}He, ^{4}He, and alkali atoms, where the interaction between particles is much better known than in the case of nuclei, which are traditional examples of quantum halos. The study of realistic systems is supplemented by model calculations in order to analyze how low-energy properties depend on the interaction potential. The use of variational and diffusion Monte Carlo methods enabled a very precise calculation of both the size and binding energy of the trimers. In the quantum halo regime, and for large values of scaled binding energies, all clusters follow almost the same universal line. As the scaled binding energy decreases, Borromean states separate from tango trimers. PMID:25554880

  15. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  16. Neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, diffuse interstellar bands and the ultraviolet extinction curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis John

    1993-01-01

    Neutral naphthalene C10H8, phenanthrene C14H10 and pyrene C16H10 absorb strongly in the ultraviolet region and may contribute to the extinction curve. High abundances are required to produce detectable structures. The cations of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorb in the visible C10H8(+) has 13 discrete absorption bands which fall between 6800 and 4500 A. The strongest band at 6741 A falls close to the weak 6742 A diffuse interstellar band (DIB). Five other weaker bands also match DIBs. The possibility that C10H8(+) is responsible for some of the DIBs can be tested by searching for new DIBs at 6520 and 6151 A, other strong naphthalene cation band positions. If C10H8(+) is indeed responsible for the 6742 A feature, it accounts for 0.3% of the cosmic carbon. The spectrum of C16H10(+) is dominated by a strong band at 4435 A in an Ar matrix and 4395 A in Ne, wavelengths which fall very close to the strongest DIB at 4430 A. If C16H10(+) or a closely related pyrene-like ion, is indeed responsible for the 4430 A feature, it accounts for 0.2% of the cosmic carbon. An intense, very broad UV-to-visible continuum is reported which is associated with both ions and could explain how PAHs convert interstellar UV and visible radiation into IR radiation.

  17. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C; Liu, Stanley K

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  18. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  19. Detection of [O I] λ6300 and Other Diagnostic Emission Lines in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33 with Gemini-North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, E. S.; Walterbos, R. A. M.

    2006-06-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in M33 near the H II region NGC 604. We present the first detection of [O I] λ6300 in the DIG of M33, one of the critical lines for distinguishing photoionization from shock ionization models. We measure [O I]/Hα in the range of 0.04-0.10 and an increase in this ratio with decreasing emission measure. Our measurements of [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα also rise with decreasing emission measure, while our [O III]/Hβ measurements remain fairly constant. We have one tentative detection of He I in the region of brightest emission measure, with a ratio of He I/Hα = 0.033 +/- 0.019, indicating that the helium is at least partially ionized. We compare our observed emission-line ratios to photoionization models and find that field star ionization models do not fit our data well. Leaky H II region models are consistent with our data, without the need to invoke additional ionization mechanisms to fit our [O I] or [O III] measurements. The closest large H II region is NGC 604 and is therefore a likely candidate for the source of the ionizing photons for the gas in this region.

  20. The halo Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Desjacques, Vincent; Kehagias, Alex; Racco, Davide; Riotto, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Dark matter halos are the building blocks of the universe as they host galaxies and clusters. The knowledge of the clustering properties of halos is therefore essential for the understanding of the galaxy statistical properties. We derive an effective halo Boltzmann equation which can be used to describe the halo clustering statistics. In particular, we show how the halo Boltzmann equation encodes a statistically biased gravitational force which generates a bias in the peculiar velocities of virialized halos with respect to the underlying dark matter, as recently observed in N-body simulations.

  1. Accretion in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Alex Courtney

    2000-10-01

    The Milky Way disk is enveloped in a diffuse, dynamically-hot collection of stars and star clusters collectively known as the ``stellar halo''. Photometric and chemical analyses suggest that these stars are ancient fossils of the galaxy formation epoch. Yet, little is known about the origin of this trace population. Is this system merely a vestige of the initial burst of star formation within the decoupled proto-Galaxy, or is it the detritus of cannibalized satellite galaxies? In an attempt to unravel the history of the Milky Way's stellar halo, I performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 55 metal-poor stars possessing ``extreme'' kinematic properties. It is thought that stars on orbits that either penetrate the remote halo or exhibit large retrograde velocities could have been associated with assimilated (or ``accreted'') dwarf galaxies. The hallmark of an accreted halo star is presumed to be a deficiency (compared with normal stars) of the α-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) with respect to iron, a consequence of sporadic bursts of star formation within the diminutive galaxies. Abundances for a select group of light metals (Li, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), iron-peak nuclides (Cr, Fe, Ni), and neutron-capture elements (Y, Ba) were calculated using line-strengths measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectral observations collected with the Keck I 10-m and KPNO 4-m telescopes. The abundances extracted from the spectra reveal: (1)The vast majority of outer halo stars possess supersolar [α/Fe] > 0.0) ratios. (2)The [α/Fe] ratio appears to decrease with increasing metallicity. (3)The outer halo stars have lower ratios of [α/Fe] than inner halo stars at a given metallicity. (4)At the largest metallicities, there is a large spread in the observed [α/Fe] ratios. (5)[α/Fe] anti-correlates with RAPO. (6)Only one star (BD+80° 245) exhibits the peculiar abundances expected of an assimilated star. The general conclusion extracted from these data is that the

  2. MHF: MLAPM Halo Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Stuart P. D.; Knebe, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    MHF is a Dark Matter halo finder that is based on the refinement grids of MLAPM. The grid structure of MLAPM adaptively refines around high-density regions with an automated refinement algorithm, thus naturally "surrounding" the Dark Matter halos, as they are simply manifestations of over-densities within (and exterior) to the underlying host halo. Using this grid structure, MHF restructures the hierarchy of nested isolated MLAPM grids into a "grid tree". The densest cell in the end of a tree branch marks center of a prospective Dark Matter halo. All gravitationally bound particles about this center are collected to obtain the final halo catalog. MHF automatically finds halos within halos within halos.

  3. "Invisible" Galactic Halos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugt, Karel Vander

    1993-01-01

    Develops a simple core-halo model of a galaxy that exhibits the main features of observed rotation curves and quantitatively illustrates the need to postulate halos of dark matter. Uses only elementary mechanics. (Author/MVL)

  4. The Gaseous Halo of NGC 891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund

    2014-08-01

    The halos of disk galaxies contain a substantial mass of diffuse gas whose properties (temperature, density, structure, and metallicity) are important to understanding how the intergalactic medium was enriched and the long-term star-formation potential of the galaxy. However, we still do not know whether most of the halo material was expelled from the galaxy in a 'galactic fountain' or is fresh infall from the circum/intergalactic medium. NGC 891 is a nearby (D=10 Mpc), edge-on Milky Way analog whose halo has been intensively studied. I will present our recent work in the X-ray and UV bands aimed at trying to determine the origin of the hot and cool components of the halo gas by measuring their metal content, and discuss whether results from NGC 891 can be generalized to other galaxies.

  5. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  6. Lyman-Werner UV escape fractions from primordial haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-12-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby haloes, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own haloes, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H2 in other haloes, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic haloes by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9-120 M⊙ Pop III stars in 105-107 M⊙ haloes with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H2 in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0 to 85 per cent. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18-13.6 eV energy range, which can be redshifted into the LW lines at cosmological distances, are generally much higher, being above 60 per cent for all but the least massive stars in the most massive haloes. We find that shielding of H2 by neutral hydrogen, which has been neglected in most studies to date, produces escape fractions that are up to a factor of 3 smaller than those predicted by H2 self-shielding alone.

  7. Numerical models for the diffuse ionized gas in galaxies. I. Synthetic spectra of thermally excited gas with turbulent magnetic reconnection as energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lieb, S.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Lesch, H.; Hultzsch, P. J. N.; Birk, G. T.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to verify whether turbulent magnetic reconnection can provide the additional energy input required to explain the up to now only poorly understood ionization mechanism of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in galaxies and its observed emission line spectra. Methods: We use a detailed non-LTE radiative transfer code that does not make use of the usual restrictive gaseous nebula approximations to compute synthetic spectra for gas at low densities. Excitation of the gas is via an additional heating term in the energy balance as well as by photoionization. Numerical values for this heating term are derived from three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic two-fluid plasma-neutral-gas simulations to compute energy dissipation rates for the DIG under typical conditions. Results: Our simulations show that magnetic reconnection can liberate enough energy to by itself fully or partially ionize the gas. However, synthetic spectra from purely thermally excited gas are incompatible with the observed spectra; a photoionization source must additionally be present to establish the correct (observed) ionization balance in the gas.

  8. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Using the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W. Va., has produced the best cross-section ever of the Milky Way Galaxy's diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. This image confirms the presence of discrete hydrogen clouds in the halo, and could help astronomers understand the origin and evolution of the rarefied atmosphere that surrounds our Galaxy. Lockman presented his findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of cross-section of neutral atomic Hydrogen Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation Patricia Smiley, NRAO. "The first observations with the Green Bank Telescope suggested that the hydrogen in the lower halo, the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, is very clumpy," said Lockman. "The latest data confirm these results and show that instead of trailing away smoothly from the Galactic plane, a significant fraction of the hydrogen gas in the halo is concentrated in discrete clouds. There are even some filaments." Beyond the star-filled disk of the Milky Way, there exists an extensive yet diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. For years, astronomers have speculated about the origin and structure of this gas. "Even the existence of neutral hydrogen in the halo has been somewhat of a puzzle," Lockman remarked. "Unlike the Earth's atmosphere, which is hot enough to hold itself up against the force of gravity, the hydrogen in the halo is too cool to support itself against the gravitational pull of the Milky Way." Lockman points out that some additional factor has to be involved to get neutral hydrogen to such large distances from the Galactic plane. "This force could be cosmic rays, a supersonic wind, the blast waves from supernovae, or something we have not thought of

  9. Modeling of pickup ion distributions in the Halley cometosheath: Empirical limits on rates of ionization, diffusion, loss and creation of fast neutral atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    The shape of the velocity distribution of water group ions observed by the Giotto ion mass spectrometer on its approach to comet Halley is modeled to derive empirical values for the rates of ionization, energy diffusion, and loss in the midcometosheath. The model includes the effect of rapid pitch angle scattering into a bispherical shell distribution as well as the effect of the magnetization of the plasma on the charge exchange loss rate. It is found that the average rate of ionization of cometary neutrals in this region of the cometosheath appears to be of the order of a factor 3 faster than the `standard' rates approx. 1 x 10(exp -6)/s that are generally assumed to model the observations in most regions of the comet environment. For the region of the coma studied in the present work (approx. 1 - 2 x 10(exp 5) km from the nucleus), the inferred energy diffusion coefficient is D(sub 0) approx. equals 0.0002 to 0.0005 sq km/cu s, which is generally lower than values used in other models. The empirically obtained loss rate appears to be about an order of magnitude greater than can be explained by charge exchange with the `standard' cross section of approx. 2 x 10(exp -15)sq cm. However such cross sections are not well known and for water group ion/water group neutral interactions, rates as high as 8 x 10(exp -15) sq cm have previously been suggested in the literature. Assuming the entire loss rate is due to charge exchange yields a rate of creation of fast neutral atoms of the order of approx. 10(exp -4)/s or higher, depending on the level of velocity diffusion. The fast neutrals may, in turn, be partly responsible for the higher-than-expected ionization rate.

  10. The Halo of NGC 2438 scrutinized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettl, Silvia; Kimeswenger, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Haloes and multiple shells around planetary nebulae trace the mass-loss history of the central star. The haloes provide us with information about abundances, ionization or kinematics. Detailed investigations of these haloes can be used to study the evolution of the old stellar population in our galaxy and beyond.Different observations show structures in the haloes like radial rays, blisters and rings (e.g., Ramos-Larios et al. 2012, MNRAS 423, 3753 or Matsuura et al. 2009, ApJ, 700, 1067). The origin of these features has been associated with ionization shadows (Balick 2004, AJ, 127, 2262). They can be observed in regions, where dense knots are opaque to stellar ionizing photons. In this regions we can see leaking UV photons.In this work, we present a detailed investigation of the multiple shell PN NGC 2438. We derive a complete data set of the main nebula. This allows us to analize the physical conditions from photoionization models, such as temperature, density and ionization, and clumping.Data from ESO (3.6m telescope - EFOSC1 - direct imaging and long slit spectroscopy) and from SAAO (spectroscopic observations using a small slit) were available. These data were supplemented by imaging data from the HST archive and by archival VLA observations. The low-excitation species are found to be dominated by clumps. The emission line ratios show no evidence for shocks. We find the shell in ionization equilibrium: a significant amount of UV radiation infiltrates the inner nebula. Thus the shell still seems to be ionized.The photoionization code CLOUDY was used to model the nebular properties and to derive a more accurate distance and ionized mass. The model supports the hypothesis that photoionization is the dominant process in this nebula, far out into the shell.If we want to use extragalactic planetary nebulae as probes of the old stellar population, we need to assess the potential impact of a halo on the evolution. Also the connection of observations and models must

  11. Initial Stage of the Microwave Ionization Wave Within a 1D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of the microwave breakdown in a gas is simulated numerically within a simple 1D model which takes into account such processes as the impact ionization of gas molecules, the attachment of electrons to neutral molecules, and plasma diffusion. Calculations are carried out for different spatial distributions of seed electrons with account for reflection of the incident electromagnetic wave from the plasma. The results reveal considerable dependence of the ionization wave evolution on the relation between the field frequency and gas pressure, as well as on the existence of extended rarefied halo of seed electrons. At relatively low gas pressures (or high field frequencies), the breakdown process is accompanied by the stationary ionization wave moving towards the incident electromagnetic wave. In the case of a high gas pressure (or a relatively low field frequency), the peculiarities of the breakdown are associated with the formation of repetitive jumps of the ionization front.

  12. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  13. N-body dark matter haloes with simple hierarchical histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lilian; Helly, John C.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2014-05-01

    We present a new algorithm which groups the subhaloes found in cosmological N-body simulations by structure finders such as SUBFIND into dark matter haloes whose formation histories are strictly hierarchical. One advantage of these `Dhaloes' over the commonly used friends-of-friends (FoF) haloes is that they retain their individual identity in the cases when FoF haloes are artificially merged by tenuous bridges of particles or by an overlap of their outer diffuse haloes. Dhaloes are thus well suited for modelling galaxy formation and their merger trees form the basis of the Durham semi-analytic galaxy formation model, GALFORM. Applying the Dhalo construction to the Λ cold dark matter Millennium II Simulation, we find that approximately 90 per cent of Dhaloes have a one-to-one, bijective match with a corresponding FoF halo. The remaining 10 per cent are typically secondary components of large FoF haloes. Although the mass functions of both types of haloes are similar, the mass of Dhaloes correlates much more tightly with the virial mass, M200, than FoF haloes. Approximately 80 per cent of FoF and bijective and non-bijective Dhaloes are relaxed according to standard criteria. For these relaxed haloes, all three types have similar concentration-M200 relations and, at fixed mass, the concentration distributions are described accurately by log-normal distributions.

  14. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P. )

    1993-12-25

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. We describe what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. We present initial results from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  15. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-06-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  16. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  17. The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, S.; Fich, M.; Taylor, R.

    1999-01-01

    A summary of research activities carried out in this eighth and final progress report. The final report includes: this summary document, copies of three published research papers, plus a draft manuscript of a fourth research paper entitled "The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the FarInfrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way; Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo around the W4 Chimney/Supershell." The main activity during the final quarterly reporting period was research on W4, including analysis of the radio and far-infrared images, generation of shell models, a literature search, and preparation of a research manuscript. There will be additional consultation with co-authors prior to submission of the paper to the Astrophysical Journal. The results will be presented at the 4th Tetons Summer Conference on "Galactic Structure, Stars, and the ISM" in May 2000. In this fourth and last paper we show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis shows there is dense interstellar material directly below the shell, evidence that that the lower W4 shell "ran into a brick wall" and stalled, whereas the upper W4 shell achieved "breakout" to form a Galactic chimney. An ionized halo is evidence of Lyman continuum leakage which ionizes the WIM (warm ionized medium). It has long been postulated that the strong winds and abundant ionizing photons from massive stars are responsible for much of the large scale structure in the interstellar medium (ISM), including the ISM in other galaxies. However standard HII region theory predicts few photons will escape the local HII region. The significance of W4 and this work is it provides a direct example of how stellar winds power a galactic chimney, which in turn leads to a low density cavity from which ionizing photons can escape to large distances to ionize the WIM.

  18. Tokamak halo currents

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2013-08-15

    A halo current flows for part of its path through the plasma edge and for part through the chamber walls and can be as large as tenths of the plasma current. The primary interest in halo currents is the large force that they can exert on machine components. Two discordant constraints are central to the theory: (1) Halo currents must produce the magnetic field distribution required to maintain plasma force balance—a distribution that depends on the two angular coordinates of a torus. (2) Halo currents must flow along the magnetic field lines in the plasma, which implies a dependence on a linear combination of the two angular coordinates—only one angular coordinate is free. The physics basis of these two constraints is explained as is their application to the calculation of the properties of halo currents, such as their broad toroidal spectrum. Existing codes could be used to (1) provide detailed comparisons with experiments to validate that the critical elements of physics are adequately included, (2) allow more complete predictions for future machines such as ITER, and (3) design shunts and resistive elements to ensure halo currents follow paths that are the least damaging to the machine. The physics of halo currents implies that it may be possible to feedback stabilize resistive wall modes beyond the ideal-wall limit.

  19. Optical and ultraviolet absorption studies of cool gas in the Milky Way halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contributions from absorption techniques to the knowledge of halo gas with temperatures below 10 to the 5th K. The results from observations of the neutral and singly ionized species on the nature of cool gas in the halo, its structure and its kinematics are presented. An overview of past and optical and ultraviolet observational studies of halo gas is included.

  20. Weakly ionized cosmic gas: Ionization and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.; Chow, V. W.

    1994-01-01

    Since collective plasma behavior may determine important transport processes (e.g., plasma diffusion across a magnetic field) in certain cosmic environments, it is important to delineate the parameter space in which weakly ionized cosmic gases may be characterized as plasmas. In this short note, we do so. First, we use values for the ionization fraction given in the literature, wherein the ionization is generally assumed to be due primarily to ionization by cosmic rays. We also discuss an additional mechanism for ionization in such environments, namely, the photoelectric emission of electrons from cosmic dust grains in an interstellar Far Ultra Violet (FUV) radiation field. Simple estimates suggest that under certain conditions this mechanism may dominate cosmic ray ionization, and possibly also the photoionization of metal atoms by the interstellar FUV field, and thereby lead to an enhanced ionization level.

  1. On the dynamical and physical state of the {open_quotes}diffuse ionized medium{close_quotes} in nearby spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Heckman, T.M.; Lehnert, M.D.

    1997-12-01

    We report the initial results from a program to study the morphology, physical state, and kinematics of the {open_quotes}diffuse ionized medium{close_quotes} (DIM) in a sample of the nearest and brightest late-type galaxies. For each of five galaxies (NGC 2403, M81, NGC 4395, M51, and M101), we have analyzed deep narrowband H{alpha} images of the entire star-forming disk and long-slit spectra of the inner ({approximately}10kpc) disk with a resolution of 40{endash}75kms{sup {minus}1}. We find that the DIM covers most of the star-forming disk and is morphologically related to the presence of high surface brightness gas (the giant HII regions). The DIM and the giant HII regions differ systematically in their physical and dynamical state. The DIM is characterized by enhanced emission in the low-ionization forbidden lines ([OI], [NII], and [SII]), and even the high-ionization [OIII] {lambda}5007 line is moderately strong in the DIM in at least three cases. This last result contrasts with upper limits on the [OIII] surface brightness in the local DIM of our own Galaxy (the {open_quotes}Reynolds Layer{close_quotes}). We directly verify the inference made by Lehnert and Heckman that the DIM contributes significantly to the spatially integrated (global) emission-line ratios measured in late-type galaxies. We also find that the DIM is more disturbed kinematically than the gas in the giant HII regions. The deconvolved (intrinsic) widths of the H{alpha} and [NII] {lambda}6584 lines range from 30 to 100kms{sup {minus}1} (FWHM) in the DIM compared to 20{endash}50kms{sup {minus}1} in the giant HII regions. The high-ionization gas in the DIM is more kinematically disturbed than the low-ionization gas: the [OIII] {lambda}5007 lines have intrinsic widths of 70{endash}150kms{sup {minus}1}. The differing kinematics implies that the DIM is not a single monolithic phase of the ISM. Instead, it may consist of a {open_quotes}quiescent{close_quotes} DIM with a low ionization state and

  2. The age of the halo as determined from halo field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Cheng; Liu, Chao; Liu, Ji-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The age of the Galactic halo is a critical parameter that can constrain the origin of the stellar halo. In general, the Galactic stellar halo is believed to be very old. However, different independent measurements and techniques based on various types of stars are required so that the age estimates of the Galactic halo are accurate, robust, and reliable. In this work, we provide a novel approach to determine the age of the halo with turn-off stars. We first carefully select 63 field halo turn-off stars from the literature. Then, we compare them with the GARSTEC model, which takes the process of atomic diffusion into account in the B - V vs. metallicity plane. Finally, we run Monte Carlo simulations to consider the uncertainty of the color index and obtain the age of 10.5 ± 1.5 Gyr. This result is in agreement with previous studies. Future works are needed to collect more turn-off samples with more accurate photometry to reduce the uncertainty of the age.

  3. THE DIAGNOSTIC O VI ABSORPTION LINE IN DIFFUSE PLASMAS: COMPARISON OF NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION STRUCTURE SIMULATIONS TO FUSE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    De Avillez, Miguel A.; Breitschwerdt, Dieter

    2012-12-20

    The nature of the interstellar O VI in the Galactic disk is studied by means of a multi-fluid hydrodynamical approximation, tracing the detailed time-dependent evolution of the ionization structure of the plasma. Our focus is to explore the signature of any non-equilibrium ionization condition present in the interstellar medium using the diagnostic O VI ion. A detailed comparison between the simulations and FUSE data is carried out by taking lines of sight (LOS) measurements through the simulated Galactic disk, covering an extent of 4 kpc from different vantage points. The simulation results bear a striking resemblance with the observations: (1) the N(O VI) distribution with distance and angle fall within the minimum and maximum values of the FUSE data; (2) the column density dispersion with distance is constant for all the LOS, showing a mild decrease at large distances; (3) O VI has a clumpy distribution along the LOS; and (4) the time-averaged midplane density for distances >400 pc has a value of (1.3-1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} cm{sup -3}. The highest concentration of O VI by mass occurs in the thermally stable (10{sup 3.9} K < T {<=} 10{sup 4.2} K; 20%) and unstable (10{sup 4.2} K < T < 10{sup 5} K; 50%) regimes, both well below its peak temperature in collisional ionization equilibrium, with the corresponding volume filling factors oscillating with time between 8%-20% and 4%-5%, respectively. These results may also be relevant for intergalactic metal absorption systems at high redshifts.

  4. Abundances of Neutral and Ionized PAH Along The Lines-of-Sight of Diffuse and Translucent Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Galazutdinov, Gazinur; Krewloski, Jacek; Biennier, Ludovic; Beletsky, Yuri; Song, In-Ok

    2013-01-01

    The spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs isolated in the gas phase at low temperature have been measured in the laboratory under conditions that mimic interstellar conditions and are compared with a set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data provide upper limits for the abundances of neutral PAH molecules and ions along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from infrared observations. We present the characteristics of the laboratory facility (COSmIC) that was developed for this study and discuss the findings resulting from the comparison of the laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. COSmIC combines a supersonic jet expansion with discharge plasma and cavity ringdown spectroscopy and provides experimental conditions that closely mimic the interstellar conditions. The column densities of the individual PAH molecules and ions probed in these surveys are derived from the comparison of the laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data lead to clear conclusions regarding the expected abundances for PAHs in the interstellar environments probed in the surveys. Band profile comparisons between laboratory and astronomical spectra lead to information regarding the molecular structures and characteristics associated with the DIB carriers in the corresponding lines-of-sight. These quantitative surveys of neutral and ionized PAHs in the optical range open the way for quantitative searches of PAHs and complex organics in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments.

  5. Halo vest instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Dryver R.; Krag, Martin

    1996-05-01

    The halo vest is a head and neck immobilization system that is often used on patients that are recovering from cervical trauma or surgery. The halo vest system consists of a rigid halo that is firmly attached to the skull, an upright support structure for stabilization and immobilization, and a torso-enveloping vest. The main purpose of this study was to measure the forces that are carried by the halo-vest structure as the subject undergoes various activities of daily living and external loading for different vest designs. A tethered strain gage load cell based instrumentation system was used to take these load measurements on ten different subjects. Three different halo-vest systems were evaluated. The primary difference between the vests was the amount of torso coverage and the use of shoulder straps. The loads were measured, analyzed and used to compare the vests and to create a model of halo-vest-neck mechanics. Future applications of this technology to standalone data logging, pin-load measuring and biofeedback applications are discussed.

  6. Haloes seen in UVIS reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Bradley, E. T.; Colwell, J. E.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-12-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright 'haloes' around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn's A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). We investigate the Janus 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances can cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities at particular azimuths greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. Diffusion can explain the morphology of these haloes, although they are not well-resolved spatially by UVIS. Spectra determine the relative contributions of particle size and purity at these locations, for comparison to estimates from the regolith evolution models.

  7. Dark matter annihilation in the first galaxy haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, S.; Mack, K. J.; Avram, C. A.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Barberio, E.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the impact of energy released from self-annihilating dark matter (DM) on heating of gas in the small, high-redshift DM haloes thought to host the first stars. A supersymmetric (SUSY)-neutralino-like particle is implemented as our DM candidate. The PYTHIA code is used to model the final, stable particle distributions produced during the annihilation process. We use an analytic treatment in conjunction with the code MEDEA2 to find the energy transfer and subsequent partition into heating, ionizing and Lyman α photon components. We consider a number of halo density models, DM particle masses and annihilation channels. We find that the injected energy from DM exceeds the binding energy of the gas within a 105-106 M⊙ halo at redshifts above 20, preventing star formation in early haloes in which primordial gas would otherwise cool. Thus we find that DM annihilation could delay the formation of the first galaxies.

  8. The gamma-ray-flux PDF from galactic halo substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Samuel K.; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-07-01

    One of the targets of the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a diffuse gamma-ray background from dark-matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic halo. N-body simulations and theoretical arguments suggest that the dark matter in the Galactic halo may be clumped into substructure, rather than smoothly distributed. Here we propose the gamma-ray-flux probability distribution function (PDF) as a probe of substructure in the Galactic halo. We calculate this PDF for a phenomenological model of halo substructure and determine the regions of the substructure parameter space in which the PDF may be distinguished from the PDF for a smooth distribution of dark matter. In principle, the PDF allows a statistical detection of substructure, even if individual halos cannot be detected. It may also allow detection of substructure on the smallest microhalo mass scales, ~ M⊕, for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Furthermore, it may also provide a method to measure the substructure mass function. However, an analysis that assumes a typical halo substructure model and a conservative estimate of the diffuse background suggests that the substructure PDF may not be detectable in the lifespan of Fermi in the specific case that the WIMP is a neutralino. Nevertheless, for a large range of substructure, WIMP annihilation, and diffuse background models, PDF analysis may provide a clear signature of substructure.

  9. Determination of characteristic constants for some basic processes in plasma—diffusion, Penning ionization, asymmetric charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.; Ekov, R. P.; Sabotinov, N. V.

    2008-05-01

    The diffusion coefficients of ten chemical element atoms in the binary system with helium and neon are calculated on the basis of 12-6 Lennard-Jones and rigid sphere inter-atomic interaction approximations. Cross-sections and rate constants for thermal energy charge transfer and Penning collisions are calculated for all Tl+ and I+ excited states possibly populated via these reactions. For the case of the charge transfer process the theoretical results are compared with the experimentally obtained ones. Since the characteristic constants considered depend on the gas temperature, the gas temperature distribution is also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation for the gas discharges studied.

  10. PARAMETERS FOR QUANTIFYING BEAM HALO

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. ALLEN; T.P. WANGLER

    2001-06-01

    Two different parameters for the quantitative description of beam halo are introduced, both based on moments of the particle distribution. One parameter is a measure of spatial halo formation and has been defined previously by Wangler and Crandall [3], termed the profile parameter. The second parameter relies on kinematic invariants to quantify halo formation in phase space; we call it the halo parameter. The profile parameter can be computed from experimental beam profile data. The halo parameter provides a theoretically more complete description of halo in phase space, but is difficult to obtain experimentally.

  11. HALOE Science Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris

    1998-01-01

    This cooperative agreement has investigated a number of spectroscopic problems of interest to the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE). The types of studies performed are in two parts, namely, those that involve the testing and characterization of correlation spectrometers and those that provide basic molecular spectroscopic information. In addition, some solar studies were performed with the calibration data returned by HALOE from orbit. In order to accomplish this a software package was written as part of this cooperative agreement. The HALOE spectroscopic instrument package was used in various tests of the HALOE flight instrument. These included the spectral response test, the early stages of the gas response test and various spectral response tests of the detectors and optical elements of the instruments. Considerable effort was also expended upon the proper laboratory setup for many of the prelaunch tests of the HALOE flight instrument, including the spectral response test and the gas response test. These tests provided the calibration and the assurance that the calibration was performed correctly.

  12. Renormalized halo bias

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of renormalization in models of halo biasing. Building on work of McDonald, we show that Eulerian biasing is only consistent with renormalization if non-local terms and higher-derivative contributions are included in the biasing model. We explicitly determine the complete list of required bias parameters for Gaussian initial conditions, up to quartic order in the dark matter density contrast and at leading order in derivatives. At quadratic order, this means including the gravitational tidal tensor, while at cubic order the velocity potential appears as an independent degree of freedom. Our study naturally leads to an effective theory of biasing in which the halo density is written as a double expansion in fluctuations and spatial derivatives. We show that the bias expansion can be organized in terms of Galileon operators which aren't renormalized at leading order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss how the renormalized bias parameters impact the statistics of halos.

  13. The Outer Halo -- Halo Origins and Mass of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Heather; Arabadjis, John; Dohm-Palmer, Robbie; Freeman, Ken; Harding, Paul; Mateo, Mario; Norris, John; Olszewski, Ed; Sneden, Chris

    2000-02-01

    Through our detection of distant halo stars, we are now well placed to map the regions of the Galactic halo where previously only satellite galaxies and a few globular clusters were known. Mapping this region is crucial for answering questions like: How and over what timescales was the Milky Way's stellar halo assembled? What is the total mass and shape of its dark halo? The Sagittarius dwarf has demonstrated that at least some of the stellar halo was accreted. But, HOW MUCH of the halo was accreted? Our previous efforts have proven that the Washington photometric system, in conjuction with spectroscopy, is capable of efficiently and unambiguously identifying halo stars out to 100 kpc or more. We require followup spectroscopy to map velocity substructure, which is more likely visible in the outer halo because of the long dynamical timescales, and to identify the rare objects in the extreme outer halo which will constrain the shape and size of its dark halo. We are applying for 4m/RCSP time at both CTIO and KPNO to observe faint outer-halo giant and BHB candidates.

  14. Detection of ultraviolet halos around highly inclined galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Bregman, Joel N.

    2014-07-10

    We report the discovery of diffuse ultraviolet light around late-type galaxies out to 5-20 kpc from the midplane using Swift and GALEX images. The emission is consistent with the stellar outskirts in the early-type galaxies but not in the late-type galaxies, where the emission is quite blue and consistent with a reflection nebula powered by light escaping from the galaxy and scattering off dust in the halo. Our results agree with expectations from halo dust discovered in extinction by Ménard et al. to within a few kpc of the disk and imply a comparable amount of hot and cold gas in galaxy halos (a few× 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉} within 20 kpc) if the dust resides primarily in Mg II absorbers. The results also highlight the potential of UV photometry to study individual galaxy halos.

  15. The flatness and sudden evolution of the intergalactic ionizing background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Joseph A.; Oh, S. Peng; Davies, Frederick B.; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    The ionizing background of cosmic hydrogen is an important probe of the sources and absorbers of ionizing radiation in the post-reionization universe. Previous studies show that the ionization rate should be very sensitive to changes in the source population: as the emissivity rises, absorbers shrink in size, increasing the ionizing mean free path and, hence, the ionizing background. By contrast, observations of the ionizing background find a very flat evolution from z ˜ 2-5, before falling precipitously at z ˜ 6. We resolve this puzzling discrepancy by pointing out that, at z ˜ 2-5, optically thick absorbers are associated with the same collapsed haloes that host ionizing sources. Thus, an increasing abundance of galaxies is compensated for by a corresponding increase in the absorber population, which moderates the instability in the ionizing background. However, by z ˜ 5-6, gas outside of haloes dominates the absorption, the coupling between sources and absorbers is lost, and the ionizing background evolves rapidly. Our halo-based model reproduces observations of the ionizing background, its flatness and sudden decline, as well as the redshift evolution of the ionizing mean free path. Our work suggests that, through much of their history, both star formation and photoelectric opacity in the universe track halo growth.

  16. Large Picture of the Galactic Center Studied by H_3^+: High Ionization Rate, Prevailing Warm and Diffuse Gas, and Non-Rotating Expanding Molecular Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Geballe, Thomas R.; Indriolo, Nick

    2013-06-01

    Following our initial studies of the diffuse interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Galactic center (GC) toward two remarkable sightlines--one 140 pc to the West of Sgr A* near Sgr E, and the other 85 pc to the East of Sgr A* near Sgr B --we are in the process of using newly identified bright stars with smooth continua suitable for H_3^+ spectroscopy to both fill the gap between these sightlines and expand coverage to wider regions of the CMZ. So far we have identified 43 qualified stars, of which 24 have been at least partially observed (i.e., in at least one spectral setting). The high ionization rate (on the order of ζ˜3×10^{-15} s^{-1}) and the existence of warm (T˜250 K) and diffuse (n≤100 cm^{-3}) gas previously reported in the GC have also been observed in some of the new sightlines, indicating these conditions fill a large portion of the CMZ. The velocity profiles observed in the diffuse clouds, some of which show absorption extending ˜ 140 km s^{-1}, allow us to draw a velocity-longitude diagram. The high-velocity fronts of such a diagram reveal the existence of an expanding molecular ring (EMR) with radius of ˜ 140 pc and velocity of ˜ 140 km s^{-1}. This ring is similar to those previously reported but is qualitatively different in that it is not rotating, suggesting an expulsion rather than the gravitational potential as causing the EMR. Possible relations between our observations and other high energy events will be discussed. T. R. Geballe and T. Oka, ApJ, 709, L70 (2010). T. Oka, T. R. Geballe, M. Goto, T. Usuda, and B. J. McCall ApJ, 632, 882 (2005). N. Kaifu, T. Kato, and T. Iguchi, Nature, 238, 105 (1972). N. Z. Scoville, ApJ, 175, L127 (1972). Y. Sofue, PASJ, 47, 551 (1995).

  17. Benchmark of 3D halo neutral simulation in TRANSP and FIDASIM and application to projected neutral-beam-heated NSTX-U plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Medley, S. S.; Gorelenkova, M. V.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Stagner, L.

    2014-10-01

    A cloud of halo neutrals is created in the vicinity of beam footprint during the neutral beam injection and the halo neutral density can be comparable with beam neutral density. Proper modeling of halo neutrals is critical to correctly interpret neutral particle analyzers (NPA) and fast ion D-alpha (FIDA) signals since these signals strongly depend on local beam and halo neutral density. A 3D halo neutral model has been recently developed and implemented inside TRANSP code. The 3D halo neutral code uses a ``beam-in-a-box'' model that encompasses both injected beam neutrals and resulting halo neutrals. Upon deposition by charge exchange, a subset of the full, one-half and one-third beam energy components produce thermal halo neutrals that are tracked through successive halo neutral generations until an ionization event occurs or a descendant halo exits the box. A benchmark between 3D halo neural model in TRANSP and in FIDA/NPA synthetic diagnostic code FIDASIM is carried out. Detailed comparison of halo neutral density profiles from two codes will be shown. The NPA and FIDA simulations with and without 3D halos are applied to projections of plasma performance for the National Spherical Tours eXperiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and the effects of halo neutral density on NPA and FIDA signal amplitude and profile will be presented. Work supported by US DOE.

  18. The Relationship between the Dense Neutral and Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Thick Disks of Two Edge-on Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueff, Katherine M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Pitterle, Marissa; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Savage, Blair D.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution, optical images (BVI + Hα) of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Large Binocular Telescope, and WIYN 3.5 m telescope reveal an extensive population of filamentary dust absorption seen to z ~2-2.5 kpc. Many of these dusty thick disk structures have characteristics reminiscent of molecular clouds found in the Milky Way disk. Our Hα images show that the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies is dominated by a smooth, diffuse component. The strongly filamentary morphologies of the dust absorption have no counterpart in the smoothly distributed Hα emission. We argue that the thick disk DIG and dust-bearing filaments trace physically distinct phases of the thick disk ISM, the latter tracing a dense, warm or cold neutral medium. The dense, dusty matter in the thick disks of spiral galaxies is largely tracing matter ejected from the thin disk via energetic feedback from massive stars. The high densities of the gas may be a result of converging gas flows. This dense material fuels some thick disk star formation, as evidenced by the presence of thick disk H II regions. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope operated at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also, based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the US, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona, on behalf of the Arizona University System; Instituto Nazionale do Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute of Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; Ohio State University, and the Research Corporation, on

  19. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  20. Mixing between High Velocity Clouds and the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  1. PROBING THE STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE TRANSITION LAYER BETWEEN THE MAGELLANIC STREAM AND THE HALO IN H I

    SciTech Connect

    Nigra, Lou; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Gallagher, John S. III; Wood, Kenneth; Nidever, David; Majewski, Steven E-mail: sstanimi@astro.wisc.edu E-mail: kw25@st-andrews.ac.uk E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu

    2012-11-20

    The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a nearby laboratory for studying the fate of cool gas streams injected into a gaseous galactic halo. We investigate properties of the boundary layer between the cool MS gas and the hot Milky Way halo with 21 cm H I observations of a relatively isolated cloud having circular projection in the northern MS. Through averaging and modeling techniques, our observations, obtained with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, reach unprecedented 3{sigma} sensitivity of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, while retaining the telescope's 9.'1 resolution in the essential radial dimension. We find an envelope of diffuse neutral gas with FWHM of 60 km s{sup -1}, associated in velocity with the cloud core having FWHM of 20 km s{sup -1}, extending to 3.5 times the core radius with a neutral mass seven times that of the core. We show that the envelope is too extended to represent a conduction-dominated layer between the core and the halo. Its observed properties are better explained by a turbulent mixing layer driven by hydrodynamic instabilities. The fortuitous alignment of the NGC 7469 background source near the cloud center allows us to combine UV absorption and H I emission data to determine a core temperature of 8350 {+-} 350 K. We show that the H I column density and size of the core can be reproduced when a slightly larger cloud is exposed to Galactic and extragalactic background ionizing radiation. Cooling in the large diffuse turbulent mixing layer envelope extends the cloud lifetime by at least a factor of two relative to a simple hydrodynamic ablation case, suggesting that the cloud is likely to reach the Milky Way disk.

  2. Methods for Identifying Pair Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Brendan; Caputo, Regina; Atwood, William; Ritz, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The flux of very high energy gamma rays from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is attenuated via interactions with extragalactic background photons and is converted into e+e- pairs. With non-zero intergalactic magnetic fields, the electrons and positrons will deflect as they propagate and simultaneously lose energy by upscattering cosmic microwave background photons. "Pair halos," the visible consequences of these electromagnetic cascades, are faint and difficult to observe against their AGN counterparts. We investigate three methods for indirectly identifying pair halos, using a two-component approach to model the AGN core/halo image. We estimate each method's sensitivity by utilizing a new, detailed Monte Carlo pair-halo simulation.

  3. Column density profiles of multiphase gaseous haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cameron J.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Agertz, Oscar

    2016-05-01

    We analyse circumgalactic medium (CGM) in a suite of high-resolution cosmological re-simulations of a Milky Way size galaxy and show that CGM properties are quite sensitive to details of star formation-feedback loop modelling. The simulation that produces a realistic late-type galaxy, fails to reproduce existing observations of the CGM. In contrast, simulation that does not produce a realistic galaxy has the predicted CGM in better agreement with observations. This illustrates that properties of galaxies and properties of their CGM provide strong complementary constraints on the processes governing galaxy formation. Our simulations predict that column density profiles of ions are well described by an exponential function of projected distance d: N ∝ e^{-d/h_s}. Simulations thus indicate that the sharp drop in absorber detections at larger distances in observations does not correspond to a `boundary' of an ion, but reflects the underlying steep exponential column density profile. Furthermore, we find that ionization energy of ions is tightly correlated with the scaleheight hs: h_s ∝ E_ion^{0.74}. At z ≈ 0, warm gas traced by low-ionization species (e.g. Mg II and C IV) has hs ≈ 0.03 - 0.07Rvir, while higher ionization species (O VI and Ne VIII) have hs ≈ 0.32 - 0.45Rvir. Finally, the scaleheights of ions in our simulations evolve slower than the virial radius for z ≤ 2, but similarly to the halo scale radius, rs. Thus, we suggest that the column density profiles of galaxies at different redshifts should be scaled by rs rather than the halo virial radius.

  4. The Impacts of Halo-CMEs on the Ionospheric Critical Frequency foF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawad, Ramy; Farid, Hussein M.; Yousef, Shahinaz

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the impact of Halo-CMEs on the ionospheric critical frequency foF2 during the period 1996-2013. We have correlated the monthly maximum values of foF2 with monthly averages of Halo-CME's energy, mass and speed; we found that the correlation coefficient R is 74%, 52% and 65% respectively. This indicates that the energetic, massive and fast Halo-CMEs can affect the ionospheric critical frequency foF2 more efficiently. In addition, the monthly average Halo-CME's width correlates with the monthly maximum foF2 with R~57%. This implies that as the width of the Halo-CME increases, the possibility of this event to hit the Earth increases and the ionospheric-targeted area increases, thus the foF2 values; as an implication of increasing the ionization of the ionosphere; subsequently increases.

  5. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  6. Profile, Current, and Halo Monitors of the PROSCAN Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, Rudolf

    2004-11-10

    PROSCAN, an extended medical facility using proton beams for the treatment of deep-seated tumors and eye melanoma, is under construction at PSI. Ionization chambers and secondary emission monitors will be used as current monitors and in a multi-strip configuration as profile monitors at the PROSCAN beam lines. A thin and a thick version of these detectors are in preparation as well as a 4-segment ionization chamber to detect the beam halo. Electromagnetic and microphonic noise from the signal and high-voltage cables, saturation due to recombination, and the evaluation of the profiles are discussed, as well as measures to detect failures of the detectors during operation.

  7. Toward a universal formulation of the halo mass function.

    PubMed

    Corasaniti, P S; Achitouv, I

    2011-06-17

    We compute the dark matter halo mass function using the excursion set formalism for a diffusive barrier with linearly drifting average which captures the main features of the ellipsoidal collapse model. We evaluate the non-Markovian corrections due to the sharp filtering of the linear density field in real space with a path-integral method. We find an unprecedented agreement with N-body simulation data with deviations ≲5% over the range of masses probed by the simulations. This indicates that the excursion set in combination with a realistic modeling of the collapse threshold can provide a robust estimation of the halo mass function. PMID:21770562

  8. HALOE test and evaluation software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, W.; Natarajan, S.

    1987-01-01

    Computer programming, system development and analysis efforts during this contract were carried out in support of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) at NASA/Langley. Support in the major areas of data acquisition and monitoring, data reduction and system development are described along with a brief explanation of the HALOE project. Documented listings of major software are located in the appendix.

  9. The FUSE Survey of 0 VI in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Savage, B. D.; Wakker, B. P.; Sembach, K. R.; Jenkins, E. B.; Moos, H. W.; Shull, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) program to study 0 VI in the Milky Way halo. Spectra of 100 extragalactic objects and two distant halo stars are analyzed to obtain measures of O VI absorption along paths through the Milky Way thick disk/halo. Strong O VI absorption over the velocity range from -100 to 100 km/s reveals a widespread but highly irregular distribution of O VI, implying the existence of substantial amounts of hot gas with T approx. 3 x 10(exp 5) K in the Milky Way thick disk/halo. The overall distribution of O VI is not well described by a symmetrical plane-parallel layer of patchy O VI absorption. The simplest departure from such a model that provides a reasonable fit to the observations is a plane-parallel patchy absorbing layer with an average O VI mid-plane density of n(sub 0)(O VI) = 1.7 x 10(exp -2)/cu cm, a scale height of approx. 2.3 kpc, and a approx. 0.25 dex excess of O VI in the northern Galactic polar region. The distribution of O VI over the sky is poorly correlated with other tracers of gas in the halo, including low and intermediate velocity H I, Ha emission from the warm ionized gas at approx. l0(exp 4) K, and hot X-ray emitting gas at approx. l0(exp 6) K . The O VI has an average velocity dispersion, b approx. 60 km/s and standard deviation of 15 km/s. Thermal broadening alone cannot explain the large observed profile widths. A combination of models involving the radiative cooling of hot fountain gas, the cooling of supernova bubbles in the halo, and the turbulent mixing of warm and hot halo gases is required to explain the presence of O VI and other highly ionized atoms found in the halo. The preferential venting of hot gas from local bubbles and superbubbles into the northern Galactic polar region may explain the enhancement of O VI in the North.

  10. Near Ballistic Halo-to-Halo Transfers between Planetary Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantoine, Gregory; Russell, Ryan P.

    2011-07-01

    Intermoon transfers are important components of planetary tour missions. However, these transfers are challenging to design due in part to the chaotic environment created by the multi-body dynamics. The specific objective of this work is to develop a systematic methodology to find fuel optimal, near ballistic Halo-to-Halo trajectories between planetary moons, and we achieve this goal by combining dynamical systems theory with a variety of nonlinear programming techniques. The spacecraft is constrained to start at a Halo orbit of a moon and end at another Halo orbit of a second moon. Our approach overcomes the obstacles of the chaotic dynamics by combining multiple "resonant-hopping" gravity assists with manifolds that control the low-energy transport near the Halo orbits of the moons. To help construct good initial guesses, contours of semimajor axes that can be reached by falling off a Halo orbit are presented. An empirical relationship is then derived to find quickly the boundary conditions on the Halo orbits that lead to ballistic capture and escape trajectories, and connect to desired resonances. The overall optimization procedure is broken into four parts of increasing fidelity: creation of the initial guess from unstable resonant orbits and manifolds, decomposition and optimization of the trajectory into two independent ideal three-body portions, end-to-end refinement in a patched three-body model, and transition to an ephemeris model using a continuation method. Each step is based on a robust multiple shooting approach to reduce the sensitivities associated with the close approach trajectories. Numerical results of an intermoon transfer in the Jovian system are presented. In an ephemeris model, using only 55 m/s and 205 days, a spacecraft can transfer between a Halo orbit of Ganymede and a Halo orbit of Europa.

  11. Dark-Matter Halos of Tenuous Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    A series of recent deep-imaging surveys has revealed dozens of lurking ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in nearby galaxy clusters. A new study provides key information to help us understand the origins of these faint giants.What are UDGs?There are three main possibilities for how UDGs galaxies with the sizes of giants, but luminosities no brighter than those of dwarfs formed:They are tidal dwarfs, created in galactic collisions when streams of matter were pulled away from the parent galaxies and halos to form dwarfs.They are descended from normal galaxies and were then altered by tidal interactions with the galaxy cluster.They are ancient remnant systems large galaxies whose gas was swept away, putting an early halt to star formation. The gas removal did not, however, affect their large dark matter halos, which permitted them to survive in the cluster environment.The key to differentiating between these options is to obtain mass measurements for the UDGs how large are their dark matter halos? In a recent study led by Michael Beasley (Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, University of La Laguna), a team of astronomers has determined a clever approach for measuring these galaxies masses: examine their globular clusters.Masses from Globular ClustersVCC 1287s mass measurements put it outside of the usual halo-mass vs. stellar-mass relationships for nearby galaxies: it has a significantly higher halo mass than is normal, given its stellar mass. [Adapted from Beasley et al. 2016]Beasley and collaborators selected one UDG, VCC 1287, from the Virgo galaxy cluster, and they obtained spectra of the globular clusters around it using the OSIRIS spectrograph on the Great Canary Telescope. They then determined VCC 1287s total halo mass in two ways: first by using the dynamics of the globular clusters, and then by relying on a relation between total globular cluster mass and halo mass.The two masses they found are in good agreement with each other; both are around 80

  12. THE DUAL ORIGIN OF STELLAR HALOS. II. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AS TRACERS OF FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James E-mail: bwillman@haverford.ed

    2010-09-20

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [{alpha}/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local L{sup *} galaxies.

  13. The Dual Origin of Stellar Halos. II. Chemical Abundances as Tracers of Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Governato, Fabio; Hogg, David W.; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2010-09-01

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [α/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local Lsstarf galaxies.

  14. Kinematically Detected Halo Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Martin C.

    Clues to the origins and evolution of our Galaxy can be found in the kinematics of stars around us. Remnants of accreted satellite galaxies produce over-densities in velocity-space, which can remain coherent for much longer than spatial over-densities. This chapter reviews a number of studies that have hunted for these accretion relics, both in the nearby solar-neighborhood and the more-distant stellar halo. Many observational surveys have driven this field forwards, from early work with the Hipparcos mission, to contemporary surveys like RAVE and SDSS. This active field continues to flourish, providing many new discoveries, and will be revolutionized as the Gaia mission delivers precise proper motions for a billion stars in our Galaxy.

  15. BEAM DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FLILLER,R.P.,IIIDREES,A.GASSNER,D.MCINTYRE,G.PEGGS,S.TRBOJEVIC,D.

    2003-05-12

    During a store, particles from the beam core continually diffuse outwards into the halo through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the diffusion rate as a function of particle amplitude can help discover which processes are important to halo growth. A collimator can be used to measure the amplitude growth rate as a function of the particle amplitude. In this paper we present results of diffusion measurements performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with fully stripped gold ions, deuterons, and protons. We compare these results with measurements from previous years, and simulations, and discuss any factors that relate to beam growth in RHIC.

  16. Evidence for core-halo decoupling in halo systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, E. F.; Kolata, J. J.; Acosta, L.

    2010-01-15

    Evidence is presented showing that for the {sup 6}He+{sup 209}Bi system, the reaction cross sections can be entirely accounted for by interactions of the halo state of {sup 6}He plus reactions that occur with the {sup 4}He core. These and similar conclusions about core-halo decoupling reported earlier for {sup 8}B+{sup 58}Ni are further supported by proving that no such decoupling occurs for reactions with {sup 17}O, whose valence neutron is rather weakly bound but does not form a halo. The preceding conclusions are based on comparisons with purely experimental data, using a quite reasonable scaling. Thus such a decoupling seems to stand out as a characteristic feature of true halo systems.

  17. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  18. Halo model and halo properties in Galileon gravity cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Lombriser, Lucas; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: llo@roe.ac.uk E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the performance of semi-analytical modelling of large-scale structure in Galileon gravity cosmologies using results from N-body simulations. We focus on the Cubic and Quartic Galileon models that provide a reasonable fit to CMB, SNIa and BAO data. We demonstrate that the Sheth-Tormen mass function and linear halo bias can be calibrated to provide a very good fit to our simulation results. We also find that the halo concentration-mass relation is well fitted by a power law. The nonlinear matter power spectrum computed in the halo model approach is found to be inaccurate in the mildly nonlinear regime, but captures reasonably well the effects of the Vainshtein screening mechanism on small scales. In the Cubic model, the screening mechanism hides essentially all of the effects of the fifth force inside haloes. In the case of the Quartic model, the screening mechanism leaves behind residual modifications to gravity, which make the effective gravitational strength time-varying and smaller than the standard value. Compared to normal gravity, this causes a deficiency of massive haloes and leads to a weaker matter clustering on small scales. For both models, we show that there are realistic halo occupation distributions of Luminous Red Galaxies that can match both the observed large-scale clustering amplitude and the number density of these galaxies.

  19. The Outer Halo Metallicity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MA, ZHIBO; Morrison, H.; Harding, P.; Xue, X.; Rix, H.; Rockosi, C.; Johnson, J.; Lee, Y.; Cudworth, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new determination of the metallicity distribution function in the Milky Way halo, based on an in situ sample of more than 5000 K giants from SDSS/SEGUE. We have also measured the metallicity gradient in the halo, using our sample which stretches from 5 kpc to more than 100 kpc from the galactic center. The halo metallicity gradient has been a controversial topic in recent studies, but our in-situ study overcomes the problems caused in these studies by their extrapolations from local samples to the distant halo. We also describe our extensive checks of the log g and [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters pipeline, using globular and open cluster stars and SEGUE stars with follow-up high-resolution analysis. In addition, we present a new Bayesian estimate of distances to the K giants, which avoids the distance bias introduced by the red giant branch luminosity function.

  20. Supernumerary ice-crystal halos?

    PubMed

    Berry, M V

    1994-07-20

    Geometric-optics singularities in the intensity profiles of refraction halos formed by randomly oriented ice crystals are softened by diffraction and decorated with fine supernumerary fringes. If the crystals have a fixed symmetry axis (as in parhelia), the geometric singularity is a square-root divergence, as in the rainbow. However, the universal curve that describes diffraction is different from the rainbow's Airy function, with weak maxima (supernumerary fringes) on the geometrically dark region inside the halo (and even fainter fringes outside); these are much smaller than their counterparts on the light side of rainbows. If the crystals have no preferred orientation (as in the 22° halo), the geometric singularity is a step. In this case the universal diffraction function has no maxima, and its supernumeraries are shoulders rather than maxima. The low contrast of the fringes is probably the main reason why supernumerary halos are rarely if ever seen. PMID:20935824

  1. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  2. Frost halos from supercooled water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Stefan; Tiwari, Manish K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-01-01

    Water freezing on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature. Even though icing/frosting impairs the performance and safety in many processes, its mechanism remains inadequately understood. Changing atmospheric conditions, surface properties, the complexity of icing physics, and the unorthodox behavior of water are the primary factors that make icing and frost formation intriguing and difficult to predict. In addition to its unquestioned scientific and practical importance, unraveling the frosting mechanism under different conditions is a prerequisite to develop “icephobic” surfaces, which may avoid ice formation and contamination. In this work we demonstrate that evaporation from a freezing supercooled sessile droplet, which starts explosively due to the sudden latent heat released upon recalescent freezing, generates a condensation halo around the droplet, which crystallizes and drastically affects the surface behavior. The process involves simultaneous multiple phase transitions and may also spread icing by initiating sequential freezing of neighboring droplets in the form of a domino effect and frost propagation. Experiments under controlled humidity conditions using substrates differing up to three orders of magnitude in thermal conductivity establish that a delicate balance between heat diffusion and vapor transport determines the final expanse of the frozen condensate halo, which, in turn, controls frost formation and propagation. PMID:23012410

  3. Probing Milky Way's hot gas halo density distribution using the dispersion measure of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhezher, Ya. V.; Nugaev, E. Ya.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-03-01

    A number of recent studies indicates a significant amount of ionized gas in a form of the hot gas halo around the Milky Way. The halo extends over the region of 100 kpc and may be acountable for the missing baryon mass. In this paper we calculate the contribution of the proposed halo to the dispersion measure (DM) of the pulsars. The Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW), Maller and Bullock (MB), and Feldmann, Hooper, and Gnedin (FHG) density distibutions are considered for the gas halo. The data set includes pulsars with the distance known independently from the DM, e.g., pulsars in globular clusters, LMC, SMC and pulsars with known parallax. The results exclude the NFW distribution for the hot gas, while the more realisticMB and FHG models are compatible with the observed dispersion measure.

  4. Low-redshift Lyman-alpha absorption lines and the dark matter halos of disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the low-redshift quasar 3C 273 using the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed many more Lyman-alpha absorption lines than would be expected from extrapolation of the absorption systems seen toward QSOs at z about 2. It is shown here that these absorption lines can plausibly be produced by gas at large radii in the disks of spiral and irregular galaxies; the gas is confined by the dark matter halos and ionized and heated by the extragalactic radiation field. This scenario does not require the extragalactic ionizing radiation field to decline as rapidly with decreasing z as the QSO emissivity. Observations of Ly-alpha absorption through the halos of known galaxies at low redshift will constrain both the extragalactic background and the properties of galactic halos.

  5. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-15

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity v{sub a}(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, v{sub k}, where v{sub a}(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, v{sub pl}=v{sub a}+v{sub k}, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy {delta}{phi}<{+-}{pi}/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  6. Halo modelling in chameleon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Lombriser, Lucas; Koyama, Kazuya; Li, Baojiu E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We analyse modelling techniques for the large-scale structure formed in scalar-tensor theories of constant Brans-Dicke parameter which match the concordance model background expansion history and produce a chameleon suppression of the gravitational modification in high-density regions. Thereby, we use a mass and environment dependent chameleon spherical collapse model, the Sheth-Tormen halo mass function and linear halo bias, the Navarro-Frenk-White halo density profile, and the halo model. Furthermore, using the spherical collapse model, we extrapolate a chameleon mass-concentration scaling relation from a ΛCDM prescription calibrated to N-body simulations. We also provide constraints on the model parameters to ensure viability on local scales. We test our description of the halo mass function and nonlinear matter power spectrum against the respective observables extracted from large-volume and high-resolution N-body simulations in the limiting case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a vanishing Brans-Dicke parameter. We find good agreement between the two; the halo model provides a good qualitative description of the shape of the relative enhancement of the f(R) matter power spectrum with respect to ΛCDM caused by the extra attractive gravitational force but fails to recover the correct amplitude. Introducing an effective linear power spectrum in the computation of the two-halo term to account for an underestimation of the chameleon suppression at intermediate scales in our approach, we accurately reproduce the measurements from the N-body simulations.

  7. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-01

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity va(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, vk, where va(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, vpl=va+vk, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy δϕ <±π/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  8. Statistics of substructures in dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, E.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.

    2012-03-01

    We study the amount and distribution of dark matter substructures within dark matter haloes, using a large set of high-resolution simulations ranging from group-size to cluster-size haloes, and carried out within a cosmological model consistent with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 7-year data. In particular, we study how the measured properties of subhaloes vary as a function of the parent halo mass, the physical properties of the parent halo and redshift. The fraction of halo mass in substructures increases with increasing mass: it is of the order of 5 per cent for haloes with M200˜ 1013 M⊙ and of the order of 10 per cent for the most massive haloes in our sample, with M200˜ 1015 M⊙. There is, however, a very large halo-to-halo scatter that can be explained only in part by a range of halo physical properties, e.g. concentration. At a given halo mass, less concentrated haloes contain significantly larger fractions of mass in substructures because of the reduced strength of tidal disruption. Most of the substructure mass is located at the outskirts of the parent haloes, in relatively few massive subhaloes. This mass segregation appears to become stronger at increasing redshift, and should reflect into a more significant mass segregation of the galaxy population at different cosmic epochs. When haloes are accreted on to larger structures, their mass is significantly reduced by tidal stripping. Haloes that are more massive at the time of accretion (these should host more luminous galaxies) are brought closer to the centre on shorter time-scales by dynamical friction, and therefore suffer a more significant stripping. The halo merger rate depends strongly on the environment with substructure in more massive haloes suffering more important mergers than their counterparts residing in less massive systems. This should translate into a different morphological mix for haloes of different mass.

  9. Are Radio Halos Common in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, J. A.; Markovic, T.; Owen, F. N.

    2002-05-01

    Diffuse synchrotron radio halos are known to exist in several rich clusters of galaxies. The detection of a cluster-wide halo demonstrates that the ICM in that cluster has a non-thermal component, namely, relativistic particles and magnetic field. Some authors have suggested that radio halos are rare, and that their host clusters are unusual, having recently undergone a strong merger. We propose a different picture. We suspect that halos may be more common than has been thought, and are a simple by-product of cluster 'weather'. The radio and X-ray powers of known halos are roughly correlated. We find that this correlation is to be expected if the ratio of non-thermal pressure to thermal pressure is the same for the ICM in all rich clusters. We expect this to be the case if ongoing minor mergers maintain flows and turbulence in the ICM. We will discuss constraints the radio-Xray correlation imposes on the turbulence, and how the turbulence is driven. Our speculation can be tested by observations. We are using the VLA at 1.4 GHz to search for radio halos in a set of 30 Abell clusters. They have been chosen based on their X-ray power, angular size and redshift, but irregardless of their structure. We have neither excluded cooling cores nor specialized to clusters undergoing major mergers. All of our targets will be detected at or above a few mJy if they obey the current radio-Xray correlation. Those not detected will give us upper limits which also tell us about the turbulence and re-energization in the ICM of those clusters.

  10. The formation of the smooth halo component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    The detection and characterization of debris in the integral-of-motion space is a promising avenue to uncover the hierarchical formation of the Milky Way. Yet, the fact that the integrals do not remain constant during the assembly process adds considerable complexity to this approach. Indeed, in time-dependent potentials tidal substructures tend to be effaced from the integral-of-motion space through an orbital diffusion process, which naturally leads to the formation of a `smooth' stellar halo. In this talk I will introduce a new probability theory that describes the evolution of collisionless systems subject to a time-dependent potential. The new theory can be used to reconstruct the hierarchical assembly of our Galaxy through modelling the observed distribution of accreted stars in the integral-of-motion space.

  11. Matter Radii of Light Halo Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khalili, J. S.; Tostevin, J. A.

    1996-05-01

    We reexamine the matter radii of diffuse halo nuclei, as deduced from reaction cross section measurements at high energy. Careful consideration is given to the intrinsic few-body structure of these projectiles and the adiabatic nature of the projectile-target interaction. Using 11Li, 11Be, and 8B as examples we show that data require significantly larger matter radii than previously reported. The revised value for 11Li of 3.55 fm is consistent with three-body models with significant 1s-intruder state components, which reproduce experimental 9Li momentum distributions following 11Li breakup, but were hitherto thought to be at variance with cross section data.

  12. Building Halos by Digesting Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    We think galactic halos are built through the addition of material from the smaller subhalos of satellites digested by their hosts. Though most of the stars in Milky-Way-mass halos were probably formed in situ, many were instead accumulated over time, as orbiting dwarf galaxies were torn apart and their stars flung throughout the host galaxy. A recent set of simulations has examined this brutal formation process.In the authors simulations, a subhalo first falls into the host halo. At this point, it can either survive to present day as a satellite galaxy, or it can be destroyed, its stars scattering throughout the host halo. [Deason et al. 2016]Subhalo FateThere are many open questions about the growth of Milky-Way-mass halos from the accretion of subhalos. Which subhalos are torn apart and accreted, and which ones survive intact? Are more small or large subhalos accreted? Does subhalo accretion affect the host galaxys metallicity? And what can we learn from all of this about the Milky Ways formation history?In a recently published study, a team of scientists from Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory set out to answer these questions using a suite of 45 zoom-in simulations of Milky-Way-mass halos. Led by Alis Deason, the team tracked the accretion history of these 45 test galaxies to determine how their halos were built.Piecing Together HistoryDeason and collaborators reach several new and interesting conclusions based on the outcomes of their simulations.Average accreted stellar mass from destroyed dwarfs for each host halo, as a function of the time of the last major accretion event. More stellar mass is accreted in more recent accretion events. [Deason et al. 2016]Most of the stellar mass accreted by the Milky-Way-mass halos typically comes from only one or two destroyed dwarfs. The accreted dwarfs are usually low-mass if they were accreted early on in the simulation (i.e., in the early universe), and high-mass if they were accreted

  13. Mapping Baryons in the Halo of NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David

    2012-10-01

    We propose observing 5 background QSOs whose sightlines pass through the halo of NGC 1097 at impact parameters of 53-183 kpc. NGC 1097 is a bright {-21.1} spiral galaxy that has the highest surface density of background, UV-bright QSOs in the nearby Universe. The galaxy hosts a low luminosity AGN at its core, surrounded by a ring of intense star-forming regions; there is also evidence from stellar tidal streams that the galaxy has recently cannibalized a number of dwarf galaxies, and a companion dwarf elliptical is still clearly merging with the outer disk. We aim to examine the physical conditions of gas that fills the halo of such an active galaxy. We will search primarily for Lya and SiIV absorption lines in the spectra of the background QSOs, as well as weak NV from hot gas. At the lowest impact parameters, we may also be able to find absorption lines from low ionization species. Our goals are to test whether the halo of NGC 1097 contains the same distribution of Lyman-alpha forest clouds seen at higher redshifts out to large distances from galaxies, and determine how the HI column density, covering fraction, and temperature of the gas decline with radius in a single galaxy halo. We will examine whether the velocities of the absorbers are consistent with those expected from gas co-rotating in the dark matter halo of the galaxy, or whether there exists a distribution of velocities that might indicate outflows from the galactic disk or from the central AGN, or, alternatively, from inflows from the IGM. Our map of Lya and SiIV around NGC 1097 will provide an important template for understanding the origin of higher redshift QSO absorption line systems.

  14. WARM IONIZED GAS REVEALED IN THE MAGELLANIC BRIDGE TIDAL REMNANT: CONSTRAINING THE BARYON CONTENT AND THE ESCAPING IONIZING PHOTONS AROUND DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J. E-mail: haffner@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-07-10

    The Magellanic System includes some of the nearest examples of galaxies disturbed by galaxy interactions. These interactions have redistributed much of their gas into the halos of the Milky Way (MW) and the Magellanic Clouds. We present Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper kinematically resolved observations of the warm ionized gas in the Magellanic Bridge over the velocity range of +100 to +300 km s{sup -1} in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full H{alpha} intensity map and the corresponding intensity-weighted mean velocity map of the Magellanic Bridge across (l, b) = (281 Degree-Sign .5, -30 Degree-Sign .0) to (302. Degree-Sign 5, -46. Degree-Sign 7). Using the H{alpha} emission from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-Tail and the Bridge, we estimate that the mass of the ionized material is between (0.7-1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, compared to 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} for the neutral mass over the same region. The diffuse Bridge is significantly more ionized than the SMC-Tail, with an ionization fraction of 36%-52% compared to 5%-24% for the Tail. The H{alpha} emission has a complex multiple-component structure with a velocity distribution that could trace the sources of ionization or distinct ionized structures. We find that incident radiation from the extragalactic background and the MW alone are insufficient to produced the observed ionization in the Magellanic Bridge and present a model for the escape fraction of the ionizing photons from both the SMC and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). With this model, we place an upper limit of 4.0% for the average escape fraction of ionizing photons from the LMC and an upper limit of 5.5% for the SMC. These results, combined with the findings of a half a dozen other studies for dwarf galaxies in different environments, provide compelling evidence that only a small percentage of the ionizing photons escape from dwarf galaxies in the present epoch to

  15. On the Contribution of Fluorescence to Lyα Halos around Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Ribas, Lluís; Dijkstra, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We quantify the contribution of Lyα fluorescence to observed spatially extended Lyα halos around Lyα emitters at redshift z = 3.1. The key physical quantities that describe the fluorescent signal include (i) the distribution of cold gas in the circumgalactic medium (CGM); we explore simple analytic models and fitting functions to recent hydrodynamical simulations; and (ii) local variations in the ionizing background due to ionizing sources that cluster around the central galaxy. We account for clustering by boosting the observationally inferred volumetric production rate of ionizing photons, {ɛ }{{LyC}}, by a factor of 1+{ξ }{{LyC}}(r), in which {ξ }{{LyC}}(r) quantifies the clustering of ionizing sources around the central galaxy. We compute {ξ }{{LyC}}(r) by assigning an “effective” bias parameter to the ionizing sources. This novel approach allows us to quantify our ignorance of the population of ionizing sources in a simple parametrized form. We find a maximum enhancement in the local ionizing background in the range 50–200 at r ˜ 10 physical kpc. For spatially uncorrelated ionizing sources and fluorescing clouds we find that fluorescence can contribute up to ˜ 50%–60% of the observed spatially extended Lyα emission. We briefly discuss how future observations can shed light on the nature of Lyα halos around star-forming galaxies.

  16. BEAM HALO IN PROTON LINAC BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    T. WANGLER; K. CRANDALL

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we review the present picture of km halo in proton linacs. Space-charge forces acting in mismatched beams have been identified as a major cause of beam-halo. We present a definition of halo based on a ratio of moments of the distribution of the beam coordinates. We find from our initial studies that for halo detined in this way, a beam can have rms emittance growth without halo growth, but halo growth is always accompanied by rms emittance growth. We describe the beam-halo experiment that is in preparation at Los Alamos, which will address questions about the beam profiles, maximum particle amplitudes, and rms emittance growth associated with the halo.

  17. Simulation of halo particles with Simpsons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Shinji

    2003-12-01

    Recent code improvements and some simulation results of halo particles with Simpsons will be presented. We tried to identify resonance behavior of halo particles by looking at tune evolution of individual macro particle.

  18. Halo Nucleus Be11: A Spectroscopic Study via Neutron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, K. T.; Jones, K. L.; Bey, A.; Ahn, S. H.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Brown, S. M.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hahn, K. I.; Kolata, J. J.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Matei, C.; Matoš, M.; Matyas, D.; Moazen, B.; Nesaraja, C.; Nunes, F. M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Roberts, A.; Shapira, D.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.; Spassova, I.; Stracener, D. W.; Villano, A. N.; Wilson, G. L.

    2012-05-01

    The best examples of halo nuclei, exotic systems with a diffuse nuclear cloud surrounding a tightly bound core, are found in the light, neutron-rich region, where the halo neutrons experience only weak binding and a weak, or no, potential barrier. Modern direct-reaction measurement techniques provide powerful probes of the structure of exotic nuclei. Despite more than four decades of these studies on the benchmark one-neutron halo nucleus Be11, the spectroscopic factors for the two bound states remain poorly constrained. In the present work, the Be10(d,​p) reaction has been used in inverse kinematics at four beam energies to study the structure of Be11. The spectroscopic factors extracted using the adiabatic model were found to be consistent across the four measurements and were largely insensitive to the optical potential used. The extracted spectroscopic factor for a neutron in an nℓj=2s1/2 state coupled to the ground state of Be10 is 0.71(5). For the first excited state at 0.32 MeV, a spectroscopic factor of 0.62(4) is found for the halo neutron in a 1p1/2 state.

  19. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Springel, V; White, S D M; Frenk, C S; Navarro, J F; Jenkins, A; Vogelsberger, M; Wang, J; Ludlow, A; Helmi, A

    2008-11-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species. In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at a level that may soon be observable. Previous work has argued that the annihilation signal will be dominated by emission from very small clumps (perhaps smaller even than the Earth), which would be most easily detected where they cluster together in the dark matter haloes of dwarf satellite galaxies. Here we report that such small-scale structure will, in fact, have a negligible impact on dark matter detectability. Rather, the dominant and probably most easily detectable signal will be produced by diffuse dark matter in the main halo of the Milky Way. If the main halo is strongly detected, then small dark matter clumps should also be visible, but may well contain no stars, thereby confirming a key prediction of the cold dark matter model. PMID:18987737

  20. A panoramic VISTA of the stellar halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, L.; Rejkuba, M.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Arnaboldi, M.; Iodice, E.; Irwin, M.; Neeser, M. J.; Emerson, J.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Outskirts of large galaxies contain important information about galaxy formation and assembly. Resolved star count studies can probe the extremely low surface brightness of the outer halos. Aims: NGC 253 is a nearly edge-on disk galaxy in the Sculptor group, of which we resolved the halo stars from ground-based images, with the aim of studying its stellar population content, the structure and the overall extent of the halo. Methods: We use Z and J-band images from the VIRCAM camera mounted on the VISTA telescope to construct the spatially resolved J vs. Z-J color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The very deep photometry and the wide area covered allow us to trace the red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars that belong to the halo of NGC 253 out to 50 kpc along the galaxy's minor axis. Results: We confirm the existence of an extra-planar stellar component of the disk, with a very prominent southern shelf and a symmetrical feature on the north side. The only additional visible substructure is an overdensity in the north-west part of the halo ~28 kpc distant from the plane and extending over 20 kpc parallel with the disk of the galaxy. Our data are not deep enough to distinguish its stellar population from that of the surrounding halo, but the excess of stars above the smooth halo traces the mass of the parent population of ~7.5 × 106M⊙. From stellar counts, we measure the transition from the disk to the halo at a radial distance of about 25 kpc with a clear break in the number density profile. The isodensity contours show that the inner halo is a flattened structure that blends with a more extended, diffuse, rounder outer halo. Such external structure can be traced to the very edge of our image out to 50 kpc from the disk plane. The number density profile of the stars in the stellar halo follows a power law with index -1.6, as a function of radius. The CMD shows a very homogeneous stellar population across the field. By comparing

  1. Escape fraction of ionizing photons from high-redshift galaxies in cosmological SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2011-03-01

    Combing the three-dimensional radiative transfer (RT) calculation and cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we study the escape fraction of ionizing photons (fesc) of high-redshift galaxies at z= 3-6. Our simulations cover the halo mass range of Mh= 109-1012 M⊙. We post-process several hundred simulated galaxies with the Authentic Radiative Transfer (ART) code to study the halo mass dependence of fesc. In this paper, we restrict ourselves to the transfer of stellar radiation from local stellar population in each dark matter halo. We find that the average fesc steeply decreases as the halo mass increases, with a large scatter for the lower-mass haloes. The low-mass haloes with Mh˜ 109 M⊙ have large values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.4), whereas the massive haloes with Mh˜ 1011 M⊙ show small values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.07). This is because in our simulations, the massive haloes show more clumpy structure in gas distribution, and the star-forming regions are embedded inside these clumps, making it more difficult for the ionizing photons to escape. On the other hand, in low-mass haloes, there are often conical regions of highly ionized gas due to the shifted location of young star clusters from the centre of dark matter halo, which allows the ionizing photons to escape more easily than in the high-mass haloes. By counting the number of escaped ionizing photons, we show that the star-forming galaxies can ionize the intergalactic medium at z= 3-6. The main contributor to the ionizing photons is the haloes with Mh≲ 1010 M⊙ owing to their high fesc. The large dispersion in fesc suggests that there may be various sizes of H II bubbles around the haloes even with the same mass in the early stages of reionization. We also examine the effect of UV background radiation field on fesc using simple, four different treatments of UV background.

  2. Early annihilation and diffuse backgrounds in models of weakly interacting massive particles in which the cross section for pair annihilation is enhanced by 1/upsilon.

    PubMed

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-12-31

    Recent studies have considered modifications to the standard weakly interacting massive particle scenario in which the pair annihilation cross section (times relative velocity v) is enhanced by a factor 1/upsilon to approximately 10(-3) in the Galaxy, enough to explain several puzzling Galactic radiation signals. We show that in these scenarios a burst of weakly interacting massive particle annihilation occurs in the first collapsed dark-matter halos. We show that severe constraints to the annihilation cross section derive from measurements of the diffuse extragalactic radiation and from ionization and heating of the intergalactic medium. PMID:19437633

  3. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE OUTER HALO OF THE MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL M49

    SciTech Connect

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Rudick, Craig S.; Feldmeier, John J. E-mail: paul.harding@case.edu E-mail: jjfeldmeier@ysu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use deep surface photometry of the giant elliptical M49 (NGC 4472), obtained as part of our survey for diffuse light in the Virgo Cluster, to study the stellar populations in its outer halo. Our data trace M49's stellar halo out to {approx}100 kpc (7r{sub e}), where we find that the shallow color gradient seen in the inner regions becomes dramatically steeper. The outer regions of the galaxy are quite blue (B - V {approx} 0.7); if this is purely a metallicity effect, it argues for extremely metal-poor stellar populations with [Fe/H] < -1. We also find that the extended accretion shells around M49 are distinctly redder than the galaxy's surrounding halo, suggesting that we are likely witnessing the buildup of both the stellar mass and metallicity in M49's outer halo due to late time accretion. While such growth of galaxy halos is predicted by models of hierarchical accretion, this growth is thought to be driven by more massive accretion events which have correspondingly higher mean metallicity than inferred for M49's halo. Thus the extremely metal-poor nature of M49's extended halo provides some tension against current models for elliptical galaxy formation.

  4. Ionizing radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  5. Analytical Estimates of the Dispersion Curve in Planar Ionization Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L.; Fontelos, Marco A.

    2009-04-27

    Fingers from ionization fronts for a hydrodynamic plasma model result from a balance between impact ionization and electron diffusion in a non-attaching gas. An analytical estimation of the size of the fingers and its dependence on both the electric field and electron diffusion coefficient can be done when the diffusion is low and the electric field is strong.

  6. Model images of radio halos around supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    I present model calculations of profiles and two-dimensional images of the radio synchrotron emission of young supernova remnants, concentrating on observable effects of relativistic eletrons diffusing upstream of the shock wave. If the preshock electron scattering mean free path is sufficiently long, observable synchrotron halos outside the bulk of the radio emission can potentially result; their absence can constrain the mean free path from above. If scattering is primarily due, as expected, to Alfven waves with amplitude detla(B), the halo is expected to extend a distance of order r(sub g)c(delta(B)/B)(exp 2)/v(sub s) beyond the shock, where r(sub g) is the gyroradius of the electrons emitting at the observed frequency, B is the upstream magnetic field strength, v(sub s) is the shock velocity, and the amplitude delta(B) refers to wave with wavelength comparable to r(sub g), of order 10(exp 13) cm for typical supernova-remnant parameters. However, the detailed geometry of the halo varies with the assumptions about particle acceleration in the shock wave. I present an atlas of model profiles and images as a function of preshock diffusion length, of aspect angle between the magnetic field and the line of sight, and of other relevant parameters.

  7. Stellar haloes of simulated Milky-Way-like galaxies: chemical and kinematic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, Patricia B.; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Beers, Timothy C.; Carollo, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the chemical and kinematic properties of the diffuse stellar haloes of six simulated Milky-Way-like galaxies from the Aquarius Project. Binding energy criteria are adopted to define two dynamically distinct stellar populations: the diffuse inner and outer haloes, which comprise different stellar subpopulations with particular chemical and kinematic characteristics. Our simulated inner- and outer-halo stellar populations have received contributions from debris stars (formed in subgalactic systems while they were outside the virial radius of the main progenitor galaxies) and endo-debris stars (those formed in gas-rich subgalactic systems inside the dark matter haloes of the main progenitor galaxy). The inner haloes possess an additional contribution from disc-heated stars, in the range ˜3-30 per cent, with a mean of ˜20 per cent. Disc-heated stars might exhibit signatures of kinematical support, in particular among the youngest ones. Endo-debris plus disc-heated stars define the so-called in situ stellar populations. In both the inner- and outer-halo stellar populations, we detect contributions from stars with moderate to low [α/Fe] ratios, mainly associated with the endo-debris or disc-heated subpopulations. The observed abundance gradients in the inner-halo regions are influenced by both the level of chemical enrichment and the relative contributions from each stellar subpopulation. Steeper abundance gradients in the inner-halo regions are related to contributions from the disc-heated and endo-debris stars, which tend to be found at lower binding energies than debris stars. In the case of the outer-halo regions, although [Fe/H] gradients are relatively mild, the steeper profiles arise primarily due to contributions from stars formed in more massive satellites, which sink farther into the main halo system, and tend to have higher levels of chemical enrichment and lower energies. Our findings support the existence of (at least) two distinct diffuse

  8. Visibility of halos and rainbows.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, S D

    1980-09-15

    A theory for the visibility of halos and rainbows is presented. The light reaching the observer's eye from the direction of the halo or rainbow is assumed to consist of two parts: (1) a beam of singly scattered sunlight (or moonlight) from a cloud of ice crystals or a rainswath, which, in turn, has suffered depletion by scattering or absorption in its passage to the observer, and (2) the general background brightness. The model is able to account for several long-known qualitative observations concerning halos, namely, that the brightest halos are produced by optically thin cirrostratus clouds (i.e., for which the cloud optical depth tau(c), halo is visible much more frequently than the bottom. (This is shown to result in good part from extinction by the turbid atmosphere.) With the rainbow the brightness of the beam increases monotonically with the optical depth tau(R) of the sunlit part of the rainswath, but the increase is quite small for tau(R) >/=1. On the other hand, the brightness of the background increases more rapidly with tau(R) for tau(R)> 1 so that the rainbow appears most easily visible for tau(R) less, similar1. This implies that the most easily visible rainbows are produced by light or moderate showers rather than heavy downpours. Finally, suggestions are made for applying the theory to other atmospheric optical phenomena, such as coronas and glories. PMID:20234562

  9. Axial Ratio of Edge-On Spiral Galaxies as a Test for Bright Radio Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, J.; Kogut, A.; Jones, E.; Dunlap, H.

    2015-01-01

    We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan & Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo.

  10. AXIAL RATIO OF EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES AS A TEST FOR BRIGHT RADIO HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Jones, E.; Dunlap, H.; Kogut, A.

    2015-01-20

    We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan and Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo. (letters)

  11. Radio halo and relic candidates from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, G.; Tordi, M.; Feretti, L.

    1999-03-01

    We present the first results of the search of new halo and relic candidates in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. We have inspected a sample of 205 clusters from the X-ray-brightest Abell-type clusters presented by Ebeling et al. (1996), and found 29 candidates. Out of them, 11 clusters are already known from the literature to contain a diffuse cluster-wide source, while in 18 clusters this is the first indication of the existence of this type of sources. We classify these sources as halos or relics according to their location in the cluster center or periphery, respectively. We find that the occurrence of cluster halos and relics is higher in clusters with high X-ray luminosity and high temperature. We also confirm the correlation between the absence of a cooling flow and the presence of a radio halo at the cluster center.

  12. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, I show that the discrepancies in the geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) reported in the literature arise due to the varied definitions of halo CMEs used by different authors. In particular, I show that the low geoeffectiveness rate is a direct consequence of including partial halo CMEs. The geoeffectiveness of partial halo CMEs is lower because they are of low speed and likely to make a glancing impact on Earth. Key words: Coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic storms, geoeffectiveness, halo CMEs.

  13. The interstellar disk-halo connection in the spiral galaxy NGC 3079

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Cecil, Gerald; Bland-Hawthorne, J.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the morphology and excitation of ionized gas in the nearby Sc galaxy NGC 3079. The almost edge-on orientation is ideal for studying the vertical structure of the gaseous disk, and especially the diffuse ionized medium (DIM) found between the bright H II regions. We used the Hawaii Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (HIFI) to map 150,000 H-alpha + (N II) lambda lambda 6548, 6583 emission-line profiles across the entire disk, with resolution 70 km/s at subarcsecond steps, down to a flux level of approximately 10(exp -17) ergs/s/sq cm (EM approximately equal to 4 cm(exp -6) pc). The DIM contributes approximately 30% of the total disk H-alpha emission within a radius of 10 kpc. The DIM has broader emission lines and larger (N II) H-alpha flux ratios than the adjacent H II regions. Within a radius of 5 kpc, we find that the X-shaped filaments reported in previous studies emerge from the inner (R approximately equal to 1.5 kpc) disk, and rise more than 4 kpc above the disk plane. The morphology, kinematics, and excitation of the filaments suggest that they form a biconic interface between the undisturbed disk gas, and gas entrained in the wide-angle outflow. The DIM beyond 5 kpc radius is more vertically extended than the thick ionized disk detected in our Galaxy and in a few nearby edge-on systems. After correcting for dust, the vertical profile of this DIM has an exponential scale height of about 1.1 kpc, similar to that of the H I disk. The (N II) lambda 6538/H-alpha flux ratio of the DIM increases monotonically with vertical height, reaching unity for absolute value of z greater than or approximately equal to 2.5 kpc. The flux required to keep the DIM ionized at R = 8 kpc is similar to that near the solar circle of our Galaxy. Highly dilute radiation from O stars in the galactic plane probably maintains the DIM. The total mass of the DIM is of order 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) solar mass, representing less than 1% of the total dynamical mass of NGC 3079

  14. On the electrostatic field created at ground level by a halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Invernón, F. J.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Luque, A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effect of halo activity on the electrostatic field measured at ground level. We use electrostatic arguments as well as self-consistent simulations to show that, due to the screening charge in the ionosphere, the distant electrostatic field created by the uncompensated charge in a thundercloud decays exponentially rather than as the third power of the distance. Furthermore, significative ionization around the lower edge of the ionosphere slightly reduces the electrostatic field at ground level. We conclude that halos do not extend the range of detectability of lightning-induced electrostatic fields.

  15. Wart with Depigmented Halo and Generalized Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takamichi; Yoshida, Yuichi; Adachi, Koji; Furue, Masutaka; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Depigmented haloes sometimes appear around melanocytic tumors or non-melanocytic tumors, but coexistence of warts and depigmented haloes is extremely rare. We report here an unusual case of warts accompanied by depigmented haloes and subsequently-triggered generalized vitiligo. A 55-year-old Japanese man presented with a 3-year history of brown nodules on the back, upper eyelid and dorsum of the left hand. Depigmented haloes appeared around the noldules and then gradually spread over a wide area, resulting in the development of generalized vitiligo. He had no history of antecedent treatment for these lesions before consultation. Histopathologically, the lesion showed papillomatosis and hyperkeratosis with lymphocytic exocytosis into the epidermis, which compatible to warts. Based on these clinical and histopathologic findings, a diagnosis of warts with depigmented halo and subsequently-triggered generalized vitiligo was made. None of the warts had resolved spontaneously after the appearance of haloes, and the depigmented haloes and generalized vitiligo remain unchanged. PMID:24031144

  16. The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey. II. Further results and analysis of the full sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Cuciti, V.; Macario, G.; Athreya, R.

    2015-07-01

    The intra-cluster medium contains cosmic rays and magnetic fields that are manifested through the large scale synchrotron sources, termed radio haloes, relics, and mini-haloes. The Extended Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS) is an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS) designed to search for radio haloes using GMRT 610/235 MHz observations. The GRHS and EGRHS consists of 64 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4 that have an X-ray luminosity larger than 5 × 1044 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV band and declination, δ > -31° in the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray cluster catalogues. In this second paper in the series, GMRT 610/235 MHz data on the last batch of 11 galaxy clusters and the statistical analysis of the full sample are presented. A new mini-halo in RX J2129.6+0005 and candidate diffuse sources in Z5247, A2552, and Z1953 have been discovered. A unique feature of this survey are the upper limits on the detections of 1 Mpc sized radio haloes; 4 new are presented here, making a total of 31 in the survey. Of the sample, 58 clusters with adequately sensitive radio information were used to obtain the most accurate occurrence fractions so far. The occurrence fractions of radio haloes, mini-haloes and relics in our sample are ~22%, ~16% and ~5%, respectively. The P1.4 GHz-LX diagrams for the radio haloes and mini-haloes are presented. The morphological estimators - centroid shift (w), concentration parameter (c), and power ratios (P3/P0) derived from the Chandra X-ray images - are used as proxies for the dynamical states of the GRHS and EGRHS clusters. The clusters with radio haloes and mini-haloes occupy distinct quadrants in the c-w, c-P3/P0 and w-P3/P0 planes, corresponding to the more and less morphological disturbance, respectively. The non-detections span both the quadrants. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Reionization histories of Milky Way mass halos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tony Y.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Abel, Tom; Alvarez, Marcelo A. E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu E-mail: malvarez@cita.utoronto.ca

    2014-04-20

    We investigate the connection between the reionization era and the present-day universe by examining the mass reionization histories of z = 0 dark matter halos. In a 600{sup 3} Mpc{sup 3} volume, we combine a dark matter N-body simulation with a three-dimensional seminumerical reionization model. This tags each particle with a reionization redshift, so that individual present-day halos can be connected to their reionization histories and environments. We find that the vast majority of present-day halos with masses larger than ∼ few × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} reionize earlier than the rest of the universe. We also find significant halo-to-halo diversity in mass reionization histories, and find that in realistic inhomogeneous models, the material within a given halo is not expected to reionize at the same time. In particular, the scatter in reionization times within individual halos is typically larger than the scatter among halos. From our fiducial reionization model, we find that the typical 68% scatter in reionization times within halos is ∼115 Myr for 10{sup 12±0.25} M {sub ☉} halos, decreasing slightly to ∼95 Myr for 10{sup 15±0.25} M {sub ☉} halos. We find a mild correlation between reionization history and environment: halos with shorter reionization histories are typically in more clustered environments, with the strongest trend on a scale of ∼20 Mpc. Material in Milky Way mass halos with short reionization histories is preferentially reionized in relatively large H II regions, implying reionization mostly by sources external to the progenitors of the present-day halo. We investigate the impact on our results of varying the reionization model parameters, which span a range of reionization scenarios with varying timing and morphology.

  18. Predator-Prey model for haloes in Saturn's A ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, E. Todd; Colwell, Joshua E.; Madhusudhanan, Prasanna; Sremcevic, Miodrag

    2013-04-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright 'haloes' around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn's A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). The correspondence of IR, UV spectroscopy, HSP wavelet analysis indicate that we detect the same phenomenon. We investigate the Janus 2:1. 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances can cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities at particular azimuths greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials: In the perturbed region, collisions erode the regolith, removing smaller particles. The released regolith material settles in the less perturbed neighboring regions. Diffusion spreads these ring particles with smaller regolith into a 'halo'. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. Diffusion can explain the morphology of these haloes, although they are not well-resolved spatially by UVIS.

  19. Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites in the Common Surface-density Dark Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Yusuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the growth histories of dark matter halos associated with dwarf satellites in Local Group galaxies and the resultant evolution of the baryonic component. Our model is based on the recently proposed property that the mean surface density of a dark halo inside a radius at maximum circular velocity {V}{{\\max }} is universal over a large range of {V}{{\\max }}. Given that a surface density of 20 M ⊙ pc‑2 well explains dwarf satellites in the Milky Way and Andromeda, we find that the evolution of the dark halo in this common surface-density scale is characterized by the rapid increase of the halo mass assembled by the redshift {z}{{TT}} of the tidal truncation by its host halo, at early epochs of {z}{{TT}}≳ 6 or {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s‑1. This mass growth of the halo is slow at lower {z}{{TT}} or larger {V}{{\\max }}. Taking into account the baryon content in this dark halo evolution, under the influence of the ionizing background radiation, we find that the dwarf satellites are divided into roughly two families: those with {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s‑1 having high star formation efficiency and those with larger {V}{{\\max }} having less efficient star formation. This semianalytical model is in agreement with the high-resolution numerical simulation for galaxy formation and with the observed star formation histories for Fornax and Leo II. This suggests that the evolution of a dark halo may play a key role in understanding star formation histories in dwarf satellites.

  20. Bar Instability in Disk-Halo Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    We show that the exponential growth rate of a bar in a stellar disk is substantially greater when the disk is embedded in a live halo than in a rigid one having the same mass distribution. We also find that the vigor of the instability in disk-halo systems varies with the shape of the halo velocity ellipsoid. Disks in rigid halos that are massive enough to be stable by the usual criteria, quickly form bars in isotropic halos and much greater halo mass is needed to avoid a strong bar; thus stability criteria derived for disks in rigid halos do not apply when the halo is responsive. The study presented here is of an idealized family of models with near uniform central rotation and that lack an extended halo; we present more realistic models with extended halos in a companion paper. The puzzle presented by the absence of strong bars in some galaxies having gently rising inner rotation curves is compounded by the results presented here.

  1. The Anemic Stellar Halo of M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, Benne

    2014-10-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context predict that massive disk galaxies should have richly-structured extended stellar halos, containing ~10% of a galaxy's stars, originating in large part from the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies. Observations of a number of nearby disk galaxies have generally agreed with these expectations. Recent new observations in integrated light with a novel array of low scattered-light telephoto lenses have failed to convincingly detect a stellar halo in the nearby massive face-on disk galaxy M101 (van Dokkum et al. 2014). They argue that any halo has to have <0.3% of the mass of the galaxy. This halo would be the least massive of any massive disk galaxy in the local Universe (by factors of several) -- such a halo is not predicted or naturally interpreted by the models, and would present a critical challenge to the picture of ubiquitous stellar halos formed from the debris of disrupting dwarf galaxies.We propose to resolve the stellar populations of this uniquely anemic stellar halo for 6 orbits with HST (ACS and WFC3), allowing us to reach surface brightness limits sufficient to clearly detect and characterize M101's stellar halo if it carries more than 0.1% of M101's mass. With resolved stellar populations, we can use the gradient of stellar populations as a function of radius to separate stellar halo from disk, which is impossible using integrated light observations. The resolved stellar populations will reveal the halo mass to much greater accuracy, measure the halo radial profile, constrain any halo lopsidedness, estimate the halo's stellar metallicity, and permit an analysis of outer disk stellar populations.

  2. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  3. Halo Microlensing and Dark Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, A. P. S.

    1993-12-01

    (While Pierce lectures review past accomplishments, customarily, this talk concerns efforts which we have pursued for some years and which are now reaching fruition. We present elsewhere at this meeting results from research cited for the Prize.) Dark matter exists in the halos of spiral galaxies, and the least radical alternative for its identity is normal matter produced by primordial nucleosynthesis. This matter could easily be hidden in large, condensed objects. Paczynski pointed out in 1986 that if condensations of Galactic halo matter are sufficiently massive, they will produce detectable amplification of background starlight by gravitational lensing. Several groups recently reported possible detections of this effect after surveying large numbers of stars in the Galactic Bulge and LMC. The connection between these events and massive, dark halos is unclear and likely to remain so for some time, given the rate at which they are detected. Following Paczynski's realization, we stressed that a much higher event rate, a statistical control sample, sensitivity to a much broader mass range, and modulation of the predicted lensing rate with galactocentric distance can all be realized by a different experiment: observing the halo of M31 (and the Galaxy) using stars in M31. In some ways, M31 is a more difficult target than the LMC or the Bulge, given the faintness of its stars, but our observations in 1991 and 1993 indicate that these problems have been surmounted. We can detect stellar variability even under extremely crowded conditions like those in M31's inner disk, and can monitor a sufficient number of stars to study halo lensing. We present results from our initial survey which indicates that the required sensitivity can be reached to confirm or reject the hypothesis that sub-solar masses like those detected in our Galaxy make up the missing spiral galaxy mass. It is possible that we may use the data already obtained (and still being analyzed) to place

  4. Gas phase abundances and conditions along the sight line to the low-halo, inner galaxy star HD 167756

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, Jason A.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.

    1995-01-01

    We present high-resolution (3.5 km/s) Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) measurements of the Mg II, Si II, Cr II, Fe II, and Zn II lines toward HD 167756, a low-latitude halo star at a distance of 4 kpc in the direction l = 351.5 deg, b = -12.3 and at a Galactic altitude of z = -0.85 kpc. Supplemental Na I, Ca II, and H I data are also presented for comparison with the UV lines. Our analysis centers on converting the observed absoprtion-line data into measures of the apparent column density per unit velocity. N(sub a)(v), over the velocity range -25 less than or = v(sub lsr) less than 30 km/s for each species observed. We use these N(sub a)(v) profiles to construct logarithmic abundance ratios of Mg II, Si II, Cr II, Fe II, and Ca II relative to Zn II, normalized to solar abundances, as a function of velocity. Compared to Zn, these species show an underabundance relative to their solar values, with the largest underabundances occurring in the v(sub lsr) approximately equals 5 km/s component(s), for which we find logarithmic abundances A(sub Si/Zn) greater than -0.38, A(Mg/Zn) = -0.82, A(sub Cr/Zn) = -1.18, and A(sub Fe/Zn) greater than 1.40 dex. We show that ionization effects, abundance gradients, or intrinsic abundance variability cannot be significant sources for the underabundances observed. The most likely explanation is gas phase depletion of elements onto dust grains. Comparisons with the gas phase abundances along other diffuse, warm gas sight lines, like the halo sight line to HD 93521, support this interpretation as do the derived physical properties of the sight line.

  5. Procedure for simulating divergent-light halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislén, Lars

    2003-11-01

    Divergent-light halos are halos produced by light from nearby light sources, like street lamps being scattered by small crystals of ice floating in the air. The use of ``brute-force'' Monte Carlo methods to simulate such halos is extremely inefficient, as most scattered rays will not hit the eye of the observer. I present a new procedure for Monte Carlo simulations of divergent-light halos. This procedure uses rotational symmetries to make a selected sampling of events that greatly improves the computational efficiency of the algorithm. We can typically generate a simulated halo display in minutes using a personal computer, several orders of magnitude more rapid than a simple brute-force method. The algorithm can also optionally generate three-dimensional pictures of divergent-light halo displays.

  6. Magnetized galactic haloes and velocity lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Irwin, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas (not with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height z. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, r.

  7. Halo of NGC 4631 and models of cosmic-ray transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsik, R.; Sukamar, S.

    1985-01-01

    The halo of edge on spiral galaxy of NGC 4631 is studied from 327 MHz to 10700 MHz to delineate the models of cosmic ray transport. Preliminary studies show that the spectral steepening as a function of height above the plane can be understood in terms of the simplest cosmic ray transport models, viz., simple isotropic diffusion in an infinite medium.

  8. Predator-Prey Model for Haloes in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Colwell, Joshua; Sremcevic, Miodrag; Madhusudhanan, Prasanna

    Particles in Saturn’s rings have a tripartite nature: (1) a broad distribution of fragments from the disruption of a previous moon that accrete into (2) transient aggregates, resembling piles of rubble, covered by a (3) regolith of smaller grains that result from collisions and meteoritic grinding. Evidence for this triple architecture of ring particles comes from a multitude of Cassini observations. In a number of ring locations (including Saturn’s F ring, the shepherded outer edges of rings A and B and at the locations of the strongest density waves) aggregation and dis-aggregation are operating now. ISS, VIMS, UVIS spectroscopy and occultations show haloes around the strongest density waves. Based on a predator-prey model for ring dynamics, we offer the following explanation: •Cyclic velocity changes cause the perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; •This forms a bright halo around the ILR, if the forcing is strong enough; •Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect; they diffuse away to form the halo. The most rapid time scale is for forcing/aggregate growth/disaggregation; then irreversible regolith erosion; diffusion and/or ballistic transport; and slowest, meteoritic pollution/darkening. We observe both smaller and larger particles at perturbed regions. Straw, UVIS power spectral analysis, kittens and equinox objects show the prey (mass aggregates); while the haloes’ VIMS spectral signature, correlation length and excess variance are created by the predators (velocity dispersion) in regions stirred in the rings. Moon forcing triggers aggregation to create longer-lived aggregates that protect their interiors from meteoritic darkening and recycle the ring material to maintain the current purity of the rings. It also provides a mechanism for creation of new moons at resonance locations in the Roche zone, as proposed by Charnoz etal and

  9. Halotools: Galaxy-Halo connection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearin, Andrew; Tollerud, Erik; Robitaille, Thomas; Droettboom, Michael; Zentner, Andrew; Bray, Erik; Craig, Matt; Bradley, Larry; Barbary, Kyle; Deil, Christoph; Tan, Kevin; Becker, Matthew R.; More, Surhud; Günther, Hans Moritz; Sipocz, Brigitta

    2016-04-01

    Halotools builds and tests models of the galaxy-halo connection and analyzes catalogs of dark matter halos. The core functions of the package include fast generation of synthetic galaxy populations using HODs, abundance matching, and related methods; efficient algorithms for calculating galaxy clustering, lensing, z-space distortions, and other astronomical statistics; a modular, object-oriented framework for designing galaxy evolution models; and end-to-end support for reducing halo catalogs and caching them as hdf5 files.

  10. Halo Effective Field Theory of 6He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapaliya, Arbin; Ji, Chen; Phillips, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    6He has a cluster structure with a tight 4He (α) core surrounded by two loosely bound neutrons (n) making it a halo nucleus. The leading-order (LO) Halo Effective Field Theory (EFT) [1, 2] calculations using momentum-space Faddeev equations pertinent to a bound 6He were carried out in [3]. In this work, we investigate 6He up to next-to-leading order (NLO) within Halo EFT.

  11. NOT DEAD YET: COOL CIRCUMGALACTIC GAS IN THE HALOS OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Christopher; Tumlinson, Jason; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Werk, Jessica K.; Xavier Prochaska, J.; Peeples, Molly S.; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal S.; O'Meara, John M.; Ford, Amanda Brady; Dave, Romeel; Weinberg, David H.

    2012-10-20

    We report new observations of circumgalactic gas in the halos of early-type galaxies (ETGs) obtained by the COS-Halos Survey with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that detections of H I surrounding ETGs are typically as common and strong as around star-forming galaxies, implying that the total mass of circumgalactic material is comparable in the two populations. For ETGs, the covering fraction for H I absorption above 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} is {approx}40%-50% within {approx}150 kpc. Line widths and kinematics of the detected material show it to be cold (T {approx}< 10{sup 5} K) in comparison to the virial temperature of the host halos. The implied masses of cool, photoionized circumgalactic medium baryons may be up to 10{sup 9}-10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. Contrary to some theoretical expectations, strong halo H I absorbers do not disappear as part of the quenching of star formation. Even passive galaxies retain significant reservoirs of halo baryons that could replenish the interstellar gas reservoir and eventually form stars. This halo gas may feed the diffuse and molecular gas that is frequently observed inside ETGs.

  12. How unusual is the cool-core radio halo cluster CL1821+643?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Ruta; Parekh, Viral

    2016-07-01

    Massive galaxy clusters with cool cores typically host diffuse radio sources called mini-haloes, whereas, those with non-cool cores host radio haloes. We attempt to understand the unusual nature of the cool-core galaxy cluster CL1821+643, which hosts a megaparsec-scale radio halo, using new radio observations and morphological analysis of its intra-cluster medium. We present the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) 610-MHz image of the radio halo. The spectral index α, defined as S ∝ ν-α, of the radio halo is 1.0 ± 0.1 over the frequency range of 323-610-1665 MHz. Archival Chandra X-ray data were used to make surface brightness and temperature maps. The morphological parameters Gini, M20 and concentration (C) were calculated on X-ray surface brightness maps by including and excluding the central quasar (H1821+643) in the cluster. We find that the cluster CL1821+643, excluding the quasar, is a non-relaxed cluster as seen in the morphological parameter planes. It occupies the same region as other merging radio halo clusters in the temperature versus morphology parameter plane. We conclude that this cluster has experienced a non-core-disruptive merger.

  13. Not Dead Yet: Cool Circumgalactic Gas in the Halos of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thom, Christopher; Tumlinson, Jason; Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Peeples, Molly S.; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal S.; O'Meara, John M.; Ford, Amanda Brady; Davé, Romeel; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Weinberg, David H.

    2012-10-01

    We report new observations of circumgalactic gas in the halos of early-type galaxies (ETGs) obtained by the COS-Halos Survey with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that detections of H I surrounding ETGs are typically as common and strong as around star-forming galaxies, implying that the total mass of circumgalactic material is comparable in the two populations. For ETGs, the covering fraction for H I absorption above 1016 cm-2 is ~40%-50% within ~150 kpc. Line widths and kinematics of the detected material show it to be cold (T <~ 105 K) in comparison to the virial temperature of the host halos. The implied masses of cool, photoionized circumgalactic medium baryons may be up to 109-1011 M ⊙. Contrary to some theoretical expectations, strong halo H I absorbers do not disappear as part of the quenching of star formation. Even passive galaxies retain significant reservoirs of halo baryons that could replenish the interstellar gas reservoir and eventually form stars. This halo gas may feed the diffuse and molecular gas that is frequently observed inside ETGs. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO11598.

  14. The local density of halo giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Heather L.

    1993-01-01

    A new estimate of the local density of halo giants - 36 +/- 7 with M(V) less than 0.5 per cu kpc - is presented. This number is derived from an objective-prism survey for nearby metal-weak stars, and so is free from many of the assumptions needed to derive the local halo density in the traditional way, from high proper motion surveys. This number agrees well with estimates of the local density of halo horizontal-branch stars, but is approximately a factor of 2 smaller than the density derived by Bahcall and Casertano (1986). This may be due to the inclusion of some thick disk stars in their proper-motion selected sample. The halo density derived from giants can be expressed as a disk-to-halo ratio of 850:1 (+/- 35 percent). Using these results, a simple model is built to predict numbers of halo giants in specified directions in the Galaxy. It is shown that it performs much better than the Bahcall-Soniera model, in the specific case of halo giants. The surface brightness due to the halo at the solar radius is calculated to be 27.7 V magnitudes per sq arcsec, if the Galaxy was viewed from the outside, edge-on, thus raising the possibility of detecting light from halo field stars in other galaxies similar to our own.

  15. Studying Stellar Halos with Future Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Falomo, Renato; Uslenghi, Michela

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos around galaxies retain fundamental evidence of the processes which lead to their build up. Sophisticated models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context yield quantitative predictions about various observable characteristics, including the amount of substructure, the slope of radial mass profiles and three dimensional shapes, and the properties of the stellar populations in the galaxies halos. The comparison of such models with the observations leads to constraints on the general picture of galaxy formation in the hierarchical Universe, as well as on the physical processes taking place in the halos formation. With the current observing facilities, stellar halos can be effectively probed only for a limited number of nearby galaxies. In this contribution we illustrate the progress which we expect in this field with the future large aperture ground based telescopes (E-ELT and TNT), and with JWST. In particular we adress the following issues: (I) the characterization of the stellar populations in the halos innermost regions and substructures, (ii) the measurement of the halos profiles and shapes , and the halos mass content, (iii) the study of Globular Clusters inhabiting the halos of distant galaxies. In order to assess the expected capabilities of future facilities we present the results of a set of simulated images to evaluate to which level of accuracy it will be possible to probe the halos of distant galaxies.

  16. X-ray Haloes and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2003-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred f r o m the general extinction of starlight, the diffuse infrared emission, and the elemental abundance constraints. X-ray haloes around X-ray sources, produced by small angle scattering from intervening interstellar dust particles provide a new probe into the nature of interstellar dust. In this talk I will review the physics of X-ray scattering by dust particles, and present an analysis of dust properties around select X-ray sources.

  17. Characterizing the X-Ray Spectrum of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine the spectrum of the Galactic halo's soft X-ray emission. These photons are emitted by hot, diffuse gas hundreds to thousands of parsecs from the Galactic plane. Thus, the emission is weak, can be confused with locally produced photons, and must be distinguished from noise. My co-I has made significant progress on determining the background. I have been working on a complementary aspect of the project: computer simulations of the hot gas in the local and distant regions.

  18. X-ray Haloes and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2003-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred from the general extinction of starlight, the diffuse infrared emission, and the elemental abundance constraints. X-ray haloes around X-ray sources, produced by small angle scattering from intervening interstellar dust particles provide a new probe into the nature of interstellar dust. In this talk I will review the physics of X-ray scattering by dust particles, and present an analysis of dust properties around select X-ray sources.

  19. Computation of the halo mass function using physical collapse parameters: application to non-standard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Achitouv, I.; Weller, J.; Wagner, C.; Rasera, Y. E-mail: cwagner@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE E-mail: yann.rasera@obspm.fr

    2014-10-01

    In this article we compare the halo mass function predicted by the excursion set theory with a drifting diffusive barrier against the results of N-body simulations for several cosmological models. This includes the standard ΛCDM case for a large range of halo masses, models with different types of primordial non-Gaussianity, and the Ratra-Peebles quintessence model of Dark Energy. We show that in all those cosmological scenarios, the abundance of dark matter halos can be described by a drifting diffusive barrier, where the two parameters describing the barrier have physical content. In the case of the Gaussian ΛCDM, the statistics are precise enough to actually predict those parameters at different redshifts from the initial conditions. Furthermore, we found that the stochasticity in the barrier is non-negligible making the simple deterministic spherical collapse model a bad approximation even at very high halo masses. We also show that using the standard excursion set approach with a barrier inspired by peak patches leads to inconsistent predictions of the halo mass function.

  20. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  1. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  2. The dust scattering halo of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, L. R.; Paerels, F.

    2015-10-01

    Dust grains scatter X-ray light through small angles, producing a diffuse halo image around bright X-ray point sources situated behind a large amount of interstellar material. We present analytic solutions to the integral for the dust scattering intensity, which allow for a Bayesian analysis of the scattering halo around Cygnus X-3. Fitting the optically thin 4-6 keV halo surface brightness profile yields the dust grain size and spatial distribution. We assume a power-law distribution of grain sizes (n ∝ a-p) and fit for p, the grain radius cut-off amax, and dust mass column. We find that a p ≈ 3.5 dust grain size distribution with amax ≈ 0.2 μm fits the halo profile relatively well, whether the dust is distributed uniformly along the line of sight or in clumps. We find that a model consisting of two dust screens, representative of foreground spiral arms, requires the foreground Perseus arm to contain 80 per cent of the total dust mass. The remaining 20 per cent of the dust, which may be associated with the outer spiral arm of the Milky Way, is located within 1 kpc of Cyg X-3. Regardless of which model was used, we found τ_sca ˜ 2 E_keV^{-2}. We examine the energy resolved haloes of Cyg X-3 from 1 to 6 keV and find that there is a sharp drop in scattering halo intensity when E < 2-3 keV, which cannot be explained with multiple scattering effects. We hypothesize that this may be caused by large dust grains or material with unique dielectric properties, causing the scattering cross-section to depart from the Rayleigh-Gans approximation that is used most often in X-ray scattering studies. The foreground Cyg OB2 association, which contains several evolved stars with large extinction values, is a likely culprit for grains of unique size or composition.

  3. The Properties of Interstellar Dust From a Survey of X-ray Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2016-04-01

    Small-angle scattering of X-rays off interstellar dust grains produce X-ray halos around bright sources along absorbed lines of sight. While many studies have examined these halos, no systematic study has compared the available halo data to the large number of dust models that are commonly used. To address this, we have obtained the largest sample yet of X-ray halos from XMM-Newton and Chandra and fitted them with 14 dust grain models. We have also compared our results with the optical extinction, AV, when it is available in the literature. Our results can be summarized as follows. (1) Comparing AV with NH values measured by X-ray spectral fitting, we find a ratio of AV/NH (1021 cm-2) = 0.48 ± 0.06, similar to what has been found by previous workers. (2) Out of 35 halos, 27 could be fit by one or more grain models, with the most successful models having maximum grain radius amax < 0.4 μm and fewer large grains than the less successful models. This suggests that the diffuse ISM does not contain a signicant presence of grains with amax > 0.5 μm. (3) Most halos were best fit assuming a single dust cloud dominated the scattering, as opposed to smoothly distributed dust along the sight line. (4) Eight sources could not be fit with the models considered here; these tended to be distant (d > 5 kpc) sight lines through the Galactic thin disk. 5) Some sight lines had halos with observed X-ray scattering optical depth τsca/AV that were significantly different than expected, which may be indicative of an inhomogeneous dust distribution across the halo extraction area on the sky.

  4. X-ray scattered halo around IGR J17544–2619

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Junjie; Ling, Zhixing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2014-04-10

    X-ray photons coming from an X-ray point source not only arrive at the detector directly, but also can be strongly forward-scattered by the interstellar dust along the line of sight (LOS), leading to a detectable diffuse halo around the X-ray point source. The geometry of small-angle X-ray scattering is straightforward, namely, the scattered photons travel longer paths and thus arrive later than the unscattered ones; thus, the delay time of X-ray scattered halo photons can reveal information of the distances of the interstellar dust and the point source. Here we present a study of the X-ray scattered halo around IGR J17544–2619, which is one of the so-called supergiant fast X-ray transients. IGR J17544–2619 underwent a striking outburst when observed with Chandra on 2004 July 3, providing a near δ-function light curve. We find that the X-ray scattered halo around IGR J17544–2619 is produced by two interstellar dust clouds along the LOS. The one that is closer to the observer gives the X-ray scattered halo at larger observational angles, whereas the farther one, which is in the vicinity of the point source, explains the halo with a smaller angular size. By comparing the observational angle of the scattered halo photons with that predicted by different dust grain models, we are able to determine the normalized dust distance. With the delay times of the scattered halo photons, we can determine the point source distance, given a dust grain model. Alternatively, we can discriminate between the dust grain models, if the point source distance is known independently.

  5. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF M31'S STELLAR HALO FROM THE SPLASH SURVEY. I. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bullock, James; Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kirby, Evan N.; Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi

    2012-11-20

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 {+-} 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least {approx}175 kpc ({approx}2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects.

  6. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  7. The Dark Matter halo of the Milky Way, AD 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Nesti, Fabrizio; Salucci, Paolo E-mail: salucci@sissa.it

    2013-07-01

    We derive the mass model of the Milky Way (MW), crucial for Dark Matter (DM) direct and indirect detection, using recent data and a cored dark matter (DM) halo profile, which is favoured by studies of external galaxies. The method used consists in fitting a spherically symmetric model of the Galaxy with a Burkert DM halo profile to available data: MW terminal velocities in the region inside the solar circle, circular velocity as recently estimated from maser star forming regions at intermediate radii, and velocity dispersions of stellar halo tracers for the outermost Galactic region. The latter are reproduced by integrating the Jeans equation for every modeled mass distribution, and by allowing for different velocity anisotropies for different tracer populations. For comparison we also consider a Navarro-Frenk-White profile. We find that the cored profile is the preferred one, with a shallow central density of ρ{sub H} ∼ 4 × 10{sup 7}M{sub ☉}/kpc{sup 3} and a large core radius R{sub H} ∼ 10 kpc, as observed in external spirals and in agreement with the mass model underlying the Universal Rotation Curve of spirals. We describe also the derived model uncertainties, which are crucially driven by the poorly constrained velocity dispersion anisotropies of halo tracers. The emerging cored DM distribution has implications for the DM annihilation angular profile, which is much less boosted in the Galactic center direction with respect to the case of the standard ΛCDM, NFW profile. Using the derived uncertainties we discuss finally the limitations and prospects to discriminate between cored and cusped DM profile with a possible observed diffuse DM annihilation signal. The present mass model aims to characterize the present-day description of the distribution of matter in our Galaxy, which is needed to frame current crucial issues of Cosmology, Astrophysics and Elementary Particles.

  8. THE PSEUDO-EVOLUTION OF HALO MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; More, Surhud

    2013-03-20

    A dark matter halo is commonly defined as a spherical overdensity of matter with respect to a reference density, such as the critical density or the mean matter density of the universe. Such definitions can lead to a spurious pseudo-evolution of halo mass simply due to redshift evolution of the reference density, even if its physical density profile remains constant over time. We estimate the amount of such pseudo-evolution of mass between z = 1 and 0 for halos identified in a large N-body simulation, and show that it accounts for almost the entire mass evolution of the majority of halos with M{sub 200{rho}-bar} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and can be a significant fraction of the apparent mass growth even for cluster-sized halos. We estimate the magnitude of the pseudo-evolution assuming that halo density profiles remain static in physical coordinates, and show that this simple model predicts the pseudo-evolution of halos identified in numerical simulations to good accuracy, albeit with significant scatter. We discuss the impact of pseudo-evolution on the evolution of the halo mass function and show that the non-evolution of the low-mass end of the halo mass function is the result of a fortuitous cancellation between pseudo-evolution and the absorption of small halos into larger hosts. We also show that the evolution of the low-mass end of the concentration-mass relation observed in simulations is almost entirely due to the pseudo-evolution of mass. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the interpretation of the evolution of various scaling relations between the observable properties of galaxies and galaxy clusters and their halo masses.

  9. Alignments between galaxies, satellite systems and haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shi; Cautun, Marius; Frenk, Carlos S.; Gao, Liang; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-08-01

    The spatial distribution of the satellite populations of the Milky Way and Andromeda are puzzling in that they are nearly perpendicular to the disks of their central galaxies. To understand the origin of such configurations we study the alignment of the central galaxy, satellite system and dark matter halo in the largest of the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments" (EAGLE) simulation. We find that centrals and their satellite systems tend to be well aligned with their haloes, with a median misalignment angle of $33^{\\circ}$ in both cases. While the centrals are better aligned with the inner $10$ kpc halo, the satellite systems are better aligned with the entire halo indicating that satellites preferentially trace the outer halo. The central - satellite alignment is weak (median misalignment angle of $52^{\\circ}$) and we find that around $20\\%$ of systems have a misalignment angle larger than $78^{\\circ}$, which is the value for the Milky Way. The central - satellite alignment is a consequence of the tendency of both components to align with the dark matter halo. As a consequence, when the central is parallel to the satellite system, it also tends to be parallel to the halo. In contrast, if the central is perpendicular to the satellite system, as in the case of the Milky Way and Andromeda, then the central - halo alignment is much weaker. Dispersion-dominated (spheroidal) centrals have a stronger alignment with both their halo and their satellites than rotation-dominated (disk) centrals. We also found that the halo, the central galaxy and the satellite system tend to be aligned with the surrounding large-scale distribution of matter, with the halo being the better aligned of the three.

  10. Alignments between galaxies, satellite systems and haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shi; Cautun, Marius; Frenk, Carlos S.; Gao, Liang; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-08-01

    The spatial distribution of the satellite populations of the Milky Way and Andromeda are puzzling in that they are nearly perpendicular to the discs of their central galaxies. To understand the origin of such configurations we study the alignment of the central galaxy, satellite system and dark matter halo in the largest of the `Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments' (EAGLE) simulation. We find that centrals and their satellite systems tend to be well aligned with their haloes, with a median misalignment angle of 33° in both cases. While the centrals are better aligned with the inner 10 kpc halo, the satellite systems are better aligned with the entire halo indicating that satellites preferentially trace the outer halo. The central-satellite alignment is weak (median misalignment angle of 52°) and we find that around 20 per cent of systems have a misalignment angle larger than 78°, which is the value for the Milky Way. The central-satellite alignment is a consequence of the tendency of both components to align with the dark matter halo. As a consequence, when the central is parallel to the satellite system, it also tends to be parallel to the halo. In contrast, if the central is perpendicular to the satellite system, as in the case of the Milky Way and Andromeda, then the central-halo alignment is much weaker. Dispersion-dominated (spheroidal) centrals have a stronger alignment with both their halo and their satellites than rotation-dominated (disc) centrals. We also found that the halo, the central galaxy and the satellite system tend to be aligned with the surrounding large-scale distribution of matter, with the halo being the better aligned of the three.