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Sample records for diffusion electrical mobility

  1. Electrical transport in a disordered medium: NMR measurement of diffusivity and electrical mobility of ionic charge carriers.

    PubMed

    Heil, S R; Holz, M

    1998-11-01

    Electrical transport in porous media plays an important role in many fields of pure and applied science. The basic microscopic processes of the charge transport have attracted considerable theoretical interest for a long time. However, on a microscopic level there was up to now no experimental access to this problem. In the present paper we demonstrate, by using a suited porous system, that two combined NMR methods can offer such a first experimental access. We apply common PFG NMR methods and the special electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) technique for the measurement of self-diffusion coefficient D+ and electric mobility u+ of a cation ((C4H9)+4) in a disordered gel-like medium (Sephadex LH-20) filled with electrolyte solution. We find a, qualitatively expected, observation time-dependence of D+, but for the first time such a time-dependence is also observed for u+, which means the detection of the phenomenon of "anomalous field assisted diffusion" or "anomalous mobility." For the measurement of the short-time behavior of the mobility a new pulse sequence is presented. The time-dependent mobilities were measured at three different external electrical fields E. From the long-time behavior of D+, u+, and DH2O three independent values for the tortuosity T of the porous system could be derived. We find equality of the tortuosities T(D+) and T(u+), which represents a first experimental proof of the validity of the Einstein relation (D+ approximately u+) in a disordered medium. Finally, we discuss advantages of the possible use of "anomalous field assisted diffusion" over the commonly used "anomalous diffusion" in morphology studies by dynamic imaging in porous media. PMID:9799669

  2. Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. II. Application.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2003-12-01

    We propose a generalized treatment of the drag force of a spherical particle due to its motion in a laminar fluid media. The theory is equally applicable to analysis of particle diffusion and electric mobility. The focus of the current analysis is on the motion of spherical particles in low-density gases with Knudsen number Kn>1. The treatment is based on the gas-kinetic theory analysis of drag force in the specular and diffuse scattering limits obtained in a preceding paper [Z. Li and H. Wang, Phys. Rev. E., 68, 061206 (2003)]. Our analysis considers the influence of van der Waals interactions on the momentum transfer upon collision of a gas molecule with the particle and expresses this influence in terms of an effective, reduced collision integral. This influence is shown to be significant for nanosized particles. In the present paper, the reduced collision integral values are obtained for specular and diffuse scattering, using a Lennard-Jones-type potential energy function suitable for the interactions of a gas molecule with a particle. An empirical formula for the momentum accommodation function, used to determine the effective, reduced collision integral, is obtained from available experimental data. The resulting treatment is shown to be accurate for interpreting the mobility experiments for particles as small as approximately 1 nm in radius. The treatment is subsequently extended to the entire range of the Knudsen number, following a semiempirical, gas-kinetic theory analysis. We demonstrate that the proposed formula predicts very well Millikan's oil-droplet experiments [R. A. Millikan, Philos. Mag. 34, 1 (1917); Phys. Rev. 22, 1 (1923)]. The rigorous theoretical foundation of the proposed formula in the Kn>1 limit makes the current theory far more general than the semiempirical Stokes-Cunningham formula in terms of the particle size and condition of the fluid and, therefore, more attractive than the Stokes-Cunningham formula. PMID:14754192

  3. Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. II. Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2003-12-01

    We propose a generalized treatment of the drag force of a spherical particle due to its motion in a laminar fluid media. The theory is equally applicable to analysis of particle diffusion and electric mobility. The focus of the current analysis is on the motion of spherical particles in low-density gases with Knudsen number Kn≫1. The treatment is based on the gas-kinetic theory analysis of drag force in the specular and diffuse scattering limits obtained in a preceding paper [Z. Li and H. Wang, Phys. Rev. E., 68, 061206 (2003)]. Our analysis considers the influence of van der Waals interactions on the momentum transfer upon collision of a gas molecule with the particle and expresses this influence in terms of an effective, reduced collision integral. This influence is shown to be significant for nanosized particles. In the present paper, the reduced collision integral values are obtained for specular and diffuse scattering, using a Lennard-Jones-type potential energy function suitable for the interactions of a gas molecule with a particle. An empirical formula for the momentum accommodation function, used to determine the effective, reduced collision integral, is obtained from available experimental data. The resulting treatment is shown to be accurate for interpreting the mobility experiments for particles as small as ˜1 nm in radius. The treatment is subsequently extended to the entire range of the Knudsen number, following a semiempirical, gas-kinetic theory analysis. We demonstrate that the proposed formula predicts very well Millikan’s oil-droplet experiments [R. A. Millikan, Philos. Mag. 34, 1 (1917); Phys. Rev. 22, 1 (1923)]. The rigorous theoretical foundation of the proposed formula in the Kn≫1 limit makes the current theory far more general than the semiempirical Stokes-Cunningham formula in terms of the particle size and condition of the fluid and, therefore, more attractive than the Stokes-Cunningham formula.

  4. AEROSOL SIZE MEASUREMENT BY ELECTRICAL MOBILITY AND DIFFUSION ANALYSIS - A COMPARISON OF METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principle of the electrical aerosol analyzer method is reviewed and the diffusion battery method is described in detail. An appendix explains the basis of the calculations used. The diffusion battery method is complicated by counting losses of very small particles, inherent t...

  5. Diffusion and Electric Mobility of KCI within Isolated Cuticles of Citrus aurantium 1

    PubMed Central

    Tyree, Melvin T.; Wescott, Charles R.; Tabor, Christopher A.; Morse, Anne D.

    1992-01-01

    Fick's second law has been used to predict the time course of electrical conductance change in isolated cuticles following the rapid change in bathing solution (KCI) from concentration C to 0.1 C. The theoretical time course is dependent on the coefficient of diffusion of KCI in the cuticle and the cuticle thickness. Experimental results, obtained from cuticles isolated from sour orange (Citrus aurantium), fit with a diffusion model of an isolated cuticle in which about 90% of the conductance change following a solution change is due to salts diffusing from polar pores in the wax, and 10% of the change is due to salt diffusion from the wax. Short and long time constants for the washout of KCI were found to be 0.11 and 3.8 hours, respectively. These time constants correspond to KCI diffusion coefficients of 1 × 10−15 and 3 × 10−17 square meters per second, respectively. The larger coefficient is close to the diffusion coefficient for water in polar pores of Citrus reported elsewhere (M Becker, G Kerstiens, J Schönherr [1986] Trees 1: 54-60). This supports our interpretation of the washout kinetics of KCI following a change in concentration of bathing solution. PMID:16668971

  6. Diffusion and Electric Mobility of KCI within Isolated Cuticles of Citrus aurantium.

    PubMed

    Tyree, M T; Wescott, C R; Tabor, C A; Morse, A D

    1992-07-01

    Fick's second law has been used to predict the time course of electrical conductance change in isolated cuticles following the rapid change in bathing solution (KCI) from concentration C to 0.1 C. The theoretical time course is dependent on the coefficient of diffusion of KCI in the cuticle and the cuticle thickness. Experimental results, obtained from cuticles isolated from sour orange (Citrus aurantium), fit with a diffusion model of an isolated cuticle in which about 90% of the conductance change following a solution change is due to salts diffusing from polar pores in the wax, and 10% of the change is due to salt diffusion from the wax. Short and long time constants for the washout of KCI were found to be 0.11 and 3.8 hours, respectively. These time constants correspond to KCI diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10(-15) and 3 x 10(-17) square meters per second, respectively. The larger coefficient is close to the diffusion coefficient for water in polar pores of Citrus reported elsewhere (M Becker, G Kerstiens, J Schönherr [1986] Trees 1: 54-60). This supports our interpretation of the washout kinetics of KCI following a change in concentration of bathing solution. PMID:16668971

  7. Diffusion and Electric Mobility of Ions within Isolated Cuticles of Citrus aurantium 1

    PubMed Central

    Tyree, Melvin T.; Wescott, Charles R.; Tabor, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    We report a new method for measuring cation and anion permeability across cuticles of sour orange, Citrus aurantium, leaves. The method requires the measurement of two electrical parameters: the diffusion potential arising when the two sides of the cuticle are bathed in unequal concentrations of a Cl− salt; and the electrical conductance of the cuticle measured at a salt concentration equal to the average of that used in the diffusion-potential measurement. The permeabilities of H+, Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+ ranged from 2 × 10−8 to 0.6 × 10−8 meters per second when cuticles were bathed in 2 moles per cubic meter Cl− salts. The permeability of Cl− was 3 × 10−9 meters per second. The permeability of Li+, Na+, and K+ was about five times less when measured in 500 moles per cubic meter Cl− salts. We also report an asymmetry in cuticle-conductance values depending on the magnitude and the direction of current flow. The asymmetry disappears at low current-pulse magnitude and increases linearly with the magnitude of the current pulse. This phenomenon is explained in terms of transport-number effects in a bilayer model of the cuticle. Conductance is not augmented by current carried by exchangeable cations in cuticles; conductance is rate limited by the outer waxy layer of the cuticle. PMID:16668382

  8. Note: the role of external electric fields in enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rates in aqueous electrolyte solutions [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 114504 (2011)].

    PubMed

    Murad, Sohail

    2012-02-21

    The effect of external electric fields on enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift diffusion as a function of solution concentration has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the unusual nonlinear behavior observed when the solution concentration matches seawater is also observed when the concentration is reduced to half of that value. These results are of significance in designing processes for desalinating seawater using electro-deionization in which the concentration would decrease during salt removal, and for purification of brackish waters which also have lower salt content. PMID:22360264

  9. Note: The role of external electric fields in enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rates in aqueous electrolyte solutions [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 114504 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail

    2012-02-01

    The effect of external electric fields on enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift diffusion as a function of solution concentration has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the unusual nonlinear behavior observed when the solution concentration matches seawater is also observed when the concentration is reduced to half of that value. These results are of significance in designing processes for desalinating seawater using electro-deionization in which the concentration would decrease during salt removal, and for purification of brackish waters which also have lower salt content.

  10. Diffusion and Electric Mobility of Ions within Isolated Cuticles of Citrus aurantium: Steady-State and Equilibrium Values.

    PubMed

    Tyree, M T; Wescott, C R; Tabor, C A

    1991-09-01

    We report a new method for measuring cation and anion permeability across cuticles of sour orange, Citrus aurantium, leaves. The method requires the measurement of two electrical parameters: the diffusion potential arising when the two sides of the cuticle are bathed in unequal concentrations of a Cl(-) salt; and the electrical conductance of the cuticle measured at a salt concentration equal to the average of that used in the diffusion-potential measurement. The permeabilities of H(+), Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) ranged from 2 x 10(-8) to 0.6 x 10(-8) meters per second when cuticles were bathed in 2 moles per cubic meter Cl(-) salts. The permeability of Cl(-) was 3 x 10(-9) meters per second. The permeability of Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) was about five times less when measured in 500 moles per cubic meter Cl(-) salts. We also report an asymmetry in cuticle-conductance values depending on the magnitude and the direction of current flow. The asymmetry disappears at low current-pulse magnitude and increases linearly with the magnitude of the current pulse. This phenomenon is explained in terms of transport-number effects in a bilayer model of the cuticle. Conductance is not augmented by current carried by exchangeable cations in cuticles; conductance is rate limited by the outer waxy layer of the cuticle. PMID:16668382

  11. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  12. The role of external electric fields in enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rates in aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Murad, Sohail

    2011-03-21

    Molecular simulations have been carried out using the method of molecular dynamics to investigate the role of external electric fields on the ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rate of ions in aqueous electrolyte solutions. These properties are critical for a range of processes including electrodialysis, electro-deionization, electrophoresis, and electroosmosis. Our results show that external electric fields relax the hydrated ion structure at significantly larger time scales (between 300 and 800 ps), than most other relaxation processes in solutions (generally of the order of 1 ps). Previous studies that did not account for the much longer relaxation times did not observe this behavior for ions even with very high electric fields. External electric fields must also overcome several (at least two or more) activation energy barriers to significantly change the structure of hydrated ions. As a result, the dynamic behavior changes almost in bands as a function of electric field strengths, rather than linearly. Finally, the effect of the field is much less dramatic on water than the ions. Thus electric fields will be of more significance in processes that involve the transport of ions (such as electro-deionization) than the transport of water (electroosmosis). PMID:21428629

  13. The role of external electric fields in enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rates in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail

    2011-03-01

    Molecular simulations have been carried out using the method of molecular dynamics to investigate the role of external electric fields on the ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rate of ions in aqueous electrolyte solutions. These properties are critical for a range of processes including electrodialysis, electro-deionization, electrophoresis, and electroosmosis. Our results show that external electric fields relax the hydrated ion structure at significantly larger time scales (between 300 and 800 ps), than most other relaxation processes in solutions (generally of the order of 1 ps). Previous studies that did not account for the much longer relaxation times did not observe this behavior for ions even with very high electric fields. External electric fields must also overcome several (at least two or more) activation energy barriers to significantly change the structure of hydrated ions. As a result, the dynamic behavior changes almost in bands as a function of electric field strengths, rather than linearly. Finally, the effect of the field is much less dramatic on water than the ions. Thus electric fields will be of more significance in processes that involve the transport of ions (such as electro-deionization) than the transport of water (electroosmosis).

  14. Mobile electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, V.J.; Bloomfield, D.P.; Johnson, B.Q.

    1992-01-30

    Analytic Power has proven the feasibility of a mobile electric power unit in the form of a hydride fueled ion-exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell stack. We have over 5 years experience building and testing IEM fuel cells. The power section of a 350 watt fuel cell stack weighs 4.65 pounds based on our five cell sub-stack component weights. The composite stack structure is fabricated from two components; a unitized flow field and catalyzed membrane. The lightweight unitized flow field concept was proven in the first three months of the contract. A single unit flow field weighs 0.155 pounds and can seal to 60 psi. The single cell catalyzed Nafion membrane exceeded our performance goal of 0.6 volts at 100 ASF. Stack performance points were 0.42 volts at 113 ASF and .75 volts at 96 asf.

  15. Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. I. Theory applicable to the free-molecule regime.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2003-12-01

    The transport of small particles in the free-molecule regime is investigated on the basis of gas kinetic theory. Drag force formulations were derived in two limiting collision models-namely, specular and diffuse scattering-by considering the potential force of interactions between the particle and fluid molecules. A parametrized drag coefficient equation is proposed and accounts for the transition from specular to diffuse scattering as particle size exceeds a critical value. The resulting formulations are shown to be consistent with the Chapman-Enskog theory of molecular diffusion. In the limit of rigid-body interactions, these formulations can be simplified also to Epstein's solutions [P. S. Epstein, Phys. Rev. 23, 710 (1924)]. PMID:14754191

  16. Experimental correlations for transient soot measurement in diesel exhaust aerosol with light extinction, electrical mobility and diffusion charger sensor techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, Vicente; Pastor, José V.; López, J. Javier; Campos, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    A study of soot measurement deviation using a diffusion charger sensor with three dilution ratios was conducted in order to obtain an optimum setting that can be used to obtain accurate measurements in terms of soot mass emitted by a light-duty diesel engine under transient operating conditions. The paper includes three experimental phases: an experimental validation of the measurement settings in steady-state operating conditions; evaluation of the proposed setting under the New European Driving Cycle; and a study of correlations for different measurement techniques. These correlations provide a reliable tool for estimating soot emission from light extinction measurement or from accumulation particle mode concentration. There are several methods and correlations to estimate soot concentration in the literature but most of them were assessed for steady-state operating points. In this case, the correlations are obtained by more than 4000 points measured in transient conditions. The results of the new two correlations, with less than 4% deviation from the reference measurement, are presented in this paper.

  17. Income, Inequality, Market Potential, and Diffusion of Mobile Telephony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sungjoong

    2009-01-01

    The diffusion of many previous innovations eventually slowed down and reached an equilibrium level. Despite continued rapid growth, it is possible that the diffusion of mobile telephony will also begin to decelerate and reach a saturation level. Whether universal service can be achieved with the help of mobile telephony will therefore depend…

  18. Electric wind in a Differential Mobility Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Marus; Meelis Eller; Uin, Janek; Tamm, Eduard

    2015-10-25

    Electric wind -- the movement of gas, induced by ions moving in an electric field -- can be a distorting factor in size distribution measurements using Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs). The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which electric wind occurs in the locally-built VLDMA (Very Long Differential Mobility Analyzer) and TSI Long-DMA (3081) and to describe the associated distortion of the measured spectra. Electric wind proved to be promoted by the increase of electric field strength, aerosol layer thickness, particle number concentration and particle size. The measured size spectra revealed three types of distortion: widening of the size distribution, shift of the mode of the distribution to smaller diameters and smoothing out the peaks of the multiply charged particles. Electric wind may therefore be a source of severe distortion of the spectrum when measuring large particles at high concentrations.

  19. Electric wind in a Differential Mobility Analyzer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Palo, Marus; Meelis Eller; Uin, Janek; Tamm, Eduard

    2015-10-25

    Electric wind -- the movement of gas, induced by ions moving in an electric field -- can be a distorting factor in size distribution measurements using Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs). The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which electric wind occurs in the locally-built VLDMA (Very Long Differential Mobility Analyzer) and TSI Long-DMA (3081) and to describe the associated distortion of the measured spectra. Electric wind proved to be promoted by the increase of electric field strength, aerosol layer thickness, particle number concentration and particle size. The measured size spectra revealed three types of distortion: wideningmore » of the size distribution, shift of the mode of the distribution to smaller diameters and smoothing out the peaks of the multiply charged particles. Electric wind may therefore be a source of severe distortion of the spectrum when measuring large particles at high concentrations.« less

  20. Diffusion and mobility of anisotropic particles in tilted periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-chun; Chen, Qun; Wang, Rang; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-02-01

    We numerically investigated the transport of anisotropic particles in tilted periodic structures. The diffusion and mobility of the particles demonstrate distinct behaviors dependence on the shape of the particles. In two-dimensional (2D) periodic potentials, we find that the mobility is influenced a little by the anisotropy of the particle, while the diffusion increases monotonically with the increasing of the particle anisotropy for large enough biased force. However, due to the sensitivity of the channels for the particle anisotropy, the transport in smooth channels is obviously different from that in energy potentials. The mobility decreases monotonically with the increasing of the particle anisotropy, while the diffusion can be a non-monotonic function of the particle anisotropy with a peak under appropriate biased force.

  1. Mobility and Diffusion-Ordered Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kevin Freeman

    Mobility and diffusion-ordered two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have been developed for the analysis of mixtures. In the mobility -ordered experiments, the full range of positive and negative electrophoretic mobilities is displayed in one dimension and chemical shifts are displayed in the other. A concentric cylindrical tube electrophoresis chamber was designed to reduce the effective pathlength for current and to provide unidirectional flow for ions of interest. Techniques based upon the reverse precession method were also implemented to recover the signs of the mobilities and improved resolution in the mobility dimension was obtained by replacing Fourier transformation of truncated data sets with a linear prediction analysis. In the diffusion-ordered two-dimensional NMR experiments, the conventional chemical shift spectrum is resolved in one dimension and spectra of diffusion rates or molecular radii are resolved in the other. Diffusion dependent pulsed field gradient NMR data sets were inverted by means of the computer programs SPLMOD or DISCRETE, when discrete diffusion coefficients were present, and CONTIN when continuous distributions were present. Since the inversion is ill -conditioned, it was necessary to introduce additional information to limit the range of the solutions. In addition to prior knowledge of the decay kernels and non-negativity of amplitudes and damping constants, a set of rejection criteria was constructed for the discrete analysis case that took into account physical limits on diffusion coefficients, experimentally accessible values, and variations in effective decay kernels resulting from instrumental non-linearities. Examples of analyses of simulated data and experimental data for mixtures are presented as well as two-dimensional spectra generated by CONTIN for polydisperse polymer samples. Also, resolution in the diffusion dimension was increased by performing experiments on hydrophobic molecules in

  2. Drift tube measurements of mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of ions in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chelf, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The zero-field mobilities of Br/sup -/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ in O/sub 2/ were determined as a function of gas temperature in a high pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of the ion-gas combinations Br/sup -/ in Ne and Kr, Li/sup +/ in Xe, and Tl//sup +/ in Kr and Xe were determined as a function of E/N, where E is the electric field strength and N is the gas number density in a low pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The measured longitudinal diffusion coefficients were used for a test and comparison of the generalized Einstein relations of Viehland-Mason and Waldman-Mason theories. The measured mobilities of Br/sup -/ in Kr and Tl//sup +/ in Kr were used in an iterative-inversion scheme from which the ion-neutral interaction potentials were determined.

  3. Solid state cloaking for electrical charge carrier mobility control

    DOEpatents

    Zebarjadi, Mona; Liao, Bolin; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2015-07-07

    An electrical mobility-controlled material includes a solid state host material having a controllable Fermi energy level and electrical charge carriers with a charge carrier mobility. At least one Fermi level energy at which a peak in charge carrier mobility is to occur is prespecified for the host material. A plurality of particles are distributed in the host material, with at least one particle disposed with an effective mass and a radius that minimize scattering of the electrical charge carriers for the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy of peak charge carrier mobility. The minimized scattering of electrical charge carriers produces the peak charge carrier mobility only at the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy, set by the particle effective mass and radius, the charge carrier mobility being less than the peak charge carrier mobility at Fermi level energies other than the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy.

  4. New method for obtaining drift mobility and diffusion coefficient and their relation in photorefractive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, Akiko; Nishizawa, Hideyuki; Tsukamoto, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Kazuki

    1999-10-01

    A new easy method for obtaining a drift mobility and a diffusion coefficient from a nondispersive time-of-flight transient has been developed. Nondispersive transients are described well in the theoretical photocurrent equation (PTE) based on the fact that a carrier packet drifts at a constant velocity and is spread by diffusion, the top electrode acts as a reflecting and partially absorbing wall, and the counter electrode acts as an absorbing wall. The fitting of the PTE to photocurrent transients gives the mobility and the diffusion coefficient (D) simultaneously. These are suitable characteristic values for descriptions of carriers transport because they do not show the thickness dependence and the negative field dependence in a low electric field. The mobility that sometimes shows the thickness dependence and the negative field dependence in a low electric field, however, has usually been measured from the time of the intersection of the asymptotes to the plateau and trailing edge of the transients. In order to obtain (mu) a from photocurrent transients by a simple method, we have tried to describe t0 and tail-broadening parameter W as functions of (mu) a and D, where W is defined as (t1/2 - t0)/t1/2 and t1/2 is the time at which the current is a half of that in the plateau region. The dependences of calculated (mu) k and W on the electric field and the sample thickness agreed well with those of the experimental data. These results verify the PTE and suggest that (mu) a and D can be calculated from t0 and W. We also report that the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the power of 2 of the mobility. This result agrees with a theory based on the Langevin equation which describes motions of carriers in a fluctuated field.

  5. A field method to quantify exchange with less-mobile porosity in streambeds using electrical hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Harvey, J. W.; Lane, J. W., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous streambed materials may be expected to develop two general porosity domains: a more-mobile porosity dominated by advective exchange, and a less-mobile porosity dominated by diffusive exchange. Less-mobile porosity containing unique redox conditions or contaminant mass may be invisible to traditional porewater sampling methods, even using "low-flow" techniques, because these methods sample water preferentially from the mobile porosity domain. Further, most tracer breakthrough curve analyses have only provided indirect information (tailing) regarding the prevalence and connectivity of less-mobile porosity, typically over experimental flowpath scales between 1-10 meters. To address the limitations of conventional methods, we use electrical geophysical methods to aid in the inference of less-mobile porosity parameters. Unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute and can target specific points along subsurface flowpaths. We demonstrate how the geophysical methodology developed for dual-domain groundwater transport can be scaled to the streambed through synthetic, laboratory column, and field experiments; further we show how previously-used numerical modeling techniques can be replaced by a more-simple analytical approach. The new analytical method is based on electrical theory, and involves characteristics of electrical hysteresis patterns (e.g. hinge point values) that are used to quantify (1) the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities, and (2) the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. Lastly, we demonstrate a method of focused solute streambed injection to quantify less-mobile porosity and explain redox zonation in contrasting stream environments.

  6. Communication: Charge, diffusion, and mobility of proteins through nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of Einstein's law connecting charge, diffusion coefficient, and mobility to interpret experimental data on proteins from single molecule electrophoresis through nanopores faces serious difficulties. The protein charge and diffusion coefficient, inferred with the Einstein law, can be orders of magnitude smaller than their bare values depending on the electrolyte concentration, pore diameter, chemical nature of the pore wall, and the externally applied voltage. The main contributors to the discrepancies are the coupled dynamics of the protein and its counterion cloud, confinement effects inside the pore, and the protein-pore-surface interaction. We have addressed these ingredients by harking on classical theories of electrophoresis of macroions and hydrodynamics inside pores, and deriving new results for pore-protein interactions. Putting together various components, we present approximate analytical formulas for the effective charge, diffusion coefficient, and mobility of a protein in the context of single molecule electrophoresis experiments. For the omnipresent pore-protein interactions, nonlinear dependence of the velocity of protein on voltage sets in readily and analytical formulas for this effect are presented. The derived formulas enable the determination of the bare charge and size of a protein from the experimentally measured apparent values. PMID:25172998

  7. Electric Field Enhanced Diffusion of Salicylic Acid through Polyacrylamide Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niamlang, Sumonman; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2008-03-01

    The release mechanisms and the diffusion coefficients of salicylic acid -loaded polyacrylamide hydrogels were investigated experimentally by using a modified Franz-diffusion cell at 37 ^oC to determine the effects of crosslinking ratio and electric field strength. A significant amount of salicylic acid is released within 48 hours from the hydrogels of various crosslinking ratios, with and without electric field. The release characteristic follows the Q vs. t^1/2 linear relationship. Diffusion coefficient initially increases with increasing electric field strength and reaches the maximum value at electric field strength of 0.1 V; beyond that it decreases with electric field strength and becomes saturated at electric field strength of 5 V. The diffusion coefficient increases at low electric field strength (less 0.1 V) as a result of the electrophoresis of the salicylic acid, the expansion of pore size, and the induced pathway in pigskin. For electric field strength higher than 0.1 V, the decrease in the diffusion coefficient is due to the reduction of the polyacrylamide pore size. The diffusion coefficient obeys the scaling behavior D/Do=(drug size/pore size)^m, with the scaling exponent m equal to 0.93 and 0.42 at electric fields of 0 and 0.1 V, respectively.

  8. Electrical Circuit Analogues of Thermal Conduction and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlin, D. H.; Fullarton, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    After briefly reviewing equations of conduction and diffusion, and voltage and charge in electrical circuits, a simple experiment is given that allows students practical experience in a theoretical realm of physics. (MDR)

  9. Modeling the Determinants Influencing the Diffusion of Mobile Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwahaishi, Saleh; Snášel, Václav

    2013-04-01

    Understanding individual acceptance and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is one of the most mature streams of information systems research. In Information Technology and Information System research, numerous theories are used to understand users' adoption of new technologies. Various models were developed including the Innovation Diffusion Theory, Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behavior, Technology Acceptance Model, and recently, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. This research composes a new hybrid theoretical framework to identify the factors affecting the acceptance and use of Mobile Internet -as an ICT application- in a consumer context. The proposed model incorporates eight constructs: Performance Expectancy (PE), Effort Expectancy (EE), Facilitating Conditions (FC), Social Influences (SI), Perceived Value (PV), Perceived Playfulness (PP), Attention Focus (AF), and Behavioral intention (BI). Individual differences-namely, age, gender, education, income, and experience are moderating the effects of these constructs on behavioral intention and technology use.

  10. Interplay between barrier contact, mobility models, and traps in the electrical characteristics of OTFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Aldo; Bolognesi, Alessandro; Berliocchi, Marco; Lugli, Paolo

    2003-11-01

    We have investigated the electrical properties of organic thin-film transistor by using two-dimensional drift-diffusion simulations. The dependence of electrical haracteristics on the mobility model and on the barrier height of the contacts is carried out. We found that the field dependence of the carrier mobility is responsible for non-linearity of the drain current. This non-linear behavior is mainly related to the field-dependence of the mobility and to the barrier height of the contacts. The simulation allow us to clear understand the differences in the mobility derived by the analysis of I-V curve (as done experimentally by using standard MOSFET theory) and the intrinsic mobility of the organic layer. The effects of the interface traps has also be considered. The dependence of the threshold voltage on the density, energy level and model of the traps has been outlined. Results of the simulations have been compared with experimental data. The comparison between experimental data and simulation allow us to clearly identify the physical mechanism responsible for the measured characteristics. Finally we also consider the effect of the device bending on the electrical characteristic of all-plastic OTFT.

  11. Viscoelasticity in the diffuse electric double layer.

    PubMed

    Etchenique, Roberto; Buhse, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    The electroacoustical impedance of the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) in contact with aqueous electrolyte solutions was measured using the transfer function method in a flow injection system . Measurements of both components of the impedance of the QCM, the resistance R and the inductive reactance XL, have been performed for modified and bare gold and silver surfaces and for different concentrations of several aqueous electrolyte solutions. For the experimental concentration range of 0-50 mM, unexpectedly the QCM impedance does not follow the Kanazawa equation, as is usual for bulk newtonian liquids. This behavior indicates the presence of a nanometric sized viscoelastic layer between the piezoelectric crystal and the bulk electrolyte solution. This layer can only be identified as the Gouy-Chapman diffuse double layer (DDL). Its elasticity and viscosity have been estimated by the measurement of R and XL. The viscoelasticity of the DDL appears to be independent of the chemical nature of the surface and of the solution viscosity but strongly dependent on the surface charge, the bulk electrolyte concentration and the dielectric constant of the solvent. PMID:12430608

  12. Effects of extracellular potassium diffusion on electrically coupled neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xing-Xing; Shuai, Jianwei

    2015-02-01

    Potassium accumulation and diffusion during neuronal epileptiform activity have been observed experimentally, and potassium lateral diffusion has been suggested to play an important role in nonsynaptic neuron networks. We adopt a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron network in a zero-calcium condition to better understand the influence of extracellular potassium dynamics on the stimulus-induced activity. The potassium concentration in the interstitial space for each neuron is regulated by potassium currents, Na+-K+ pumps, glial buffering, and ion diffusion. In addition to potassium diffusion, nearby neurons are also coupled through gap junctions. Our results reveal that the latency of the first spike responding to stimulus monotonically decreases with increasing gap-junction conductance but is insensitive to potassium diffusive coupling. The duration of network oscillations shows a bell-like shape with increasing potassium diffusive coupling at weak gap-junction coupling. For modest electrical coupling, there is an optimal K+ diffusion strength, at which the flow of potassium ions among the network neurons appropriately modulates interstitial potassium concentrations in a degree that provides the most favorable environment for the generation and continuance of the action potential waves in the network.

  13. Diffusivities and Atomic Mobilities of Sn-Bi and Sn-Pb Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Min; Zhang, Li-Jun; Liu, Dan-Dan; Du, Yong; Tan, Cheng-Yu

    2013-06-01

    The recently developed Arrhenius formula of the modified Sutherland equation was first employed to calculate the self- and impurity diffusivities in liquid Sn, Bi, and Pb. The reliability of the calculated results was validated in comparison with the critically reviewed literature data. Based on the reliable tracer and chemical diffusivities available in the literature, the atomic mobility parameters in both Sn-Bi and Sn-Pb melts were then evaluated by the DICTRA (DIffusion-Controlled TRAnsformations) software package with the aid of thermodynamic parameters. Comprehensive comparisons show that most of the measured and theoretical diffusivities in Sn-Bi and Sn-Pb melts can be reasonably reproduced by the currently obtained atomic mobilities. Moreover, the atomic mobilities were further verified by comparing the model-predicted concentration profiles and the measured ones in various liquid Sn-Bi and Sn-Pb diffusion couples.

  14. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can promote cognitive learning, personal growth, and mental health enhancement. As key influencers in the mental health social system, counselor educators and professional associations may either help or hinder diffusion of beneficial mHealth technologies. As mental health mobile apps move towards ubiquity, research will continue to be conducted. The studies published thus far, combined with the potential of mental health mobile apps for learning and personal growth, offer enough evidence to compel mental health professionals to infuse these technologies into education and practice. Counselor educators and professional associations must use their influential leadership roles to train students and practitioners in how to research, evaluate, and integrate mental health mobile apps into practice. The objectives of this article are to (1) increase awareness of mHealth and mental health mobile apps, (2) demonstrate the potential for continued growth in mental health mobile apps based on technology use and acceptance theory, mHealth organizational initiatives, and evidence about how humans learn, (3) discuss evidence-based benefits of mental health mobile apps, (4) examine the current state of mHealth diffusion in the mental health profession, and (5) offer solutions for impelling innovation diffusion by infusing mental health mobile apps into education, training, and clinical settings. This discussion has implications for counselor educators, mental health practitioners, associations

  15. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System.

    PubMed

    East, Marlene Lynette; Havard, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can promote cognitive learning, personal growth, and mental health enhancement. As key influencers in the mental health social system, counselor educators and professional associations may either help or hinder diffusion of beneficial mHealth technologies. As mental health mobile apps move towards ubiquity, research will continue to be conducted. The studies published thus far, combined with the potential of mental health mobile apps for learning and personal growth, offer enough evidence to compel mental health professionals to infuse these technologies into education and practice. Counselor educators and professional associations must use their influential leadership roles to train students and practitioners in how to research, evaluate, and integrate mental health mobile apps into practice. The objectives of this article are to (1) increase awareness of mHealth and mental health mobile apps, (2) demonstrate the potential for continued growth in mental health mobile apps based on technology use and acceptance theory, mHealth organizational initiatives, and evidence about how humans learn, (3) discuss evidence-based benefits of mental health mobile apps, (4) examine the current state of mHealth diffusion in the mental health profession, and (5) offer solutions for impelling innovation diffusion by infusing mental health mobile apps into education, training, and clinical settings. This discussion has implications for counselor educators, mental health practitioners, associations

  16. How dangerous are mobile phones, transmission masts, and electricity pylons?

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A W

    2006-01-01

    Electrical power and mobile communications deliver enormous benefit to society, but there are concerns whether the electric and magnetic field (EMF) emissions associated with the delivery of this benefit are linked to cancer or other health hazards. This article reviews the strength of the available epidemiological and laboratory evidence and notes that this falls short of what is normally required to establish a causal link. However, because of scientific uncertainty a cautious approach is often advocated, but here, too, there may be a tendency to judge these risks more harshly than those in other areas with similar strength of evidence. PMID:16551794

  17. How dangerous are mobile phones, transmission masts, and electricity pylons?

    PubMed

    Wood, A W

    2006-04-01

    Electrical power and mobile communications deliver enormous benefit to society, but there are concerns whether the electric and magnetic field (EMF) emissions associated with the delivery of this benefit are linked to cancer or other health hazards. This article reviews the strength of the available epidemiological and laboratory evidence and notes that this falls short of what is normally required to establish a causal link. However, because of scientific uncertainty a cautious approach is often advocated, but here, too, there may be a tendency to judge these risks more harshly than those in other areas with similar strength of evidence. PMID:16551794

  18. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brumfeld, Vlad; Miller, Israel R.; Korenstein, Rafi

    1989-01-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 · 10-5 cm2V-1s-1. The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of ∼5 · 10-9 cm2s-1 was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  19. Diffusion of Electric Vehicles and Novel Social Infrastructure from the Viewpoint of Systems Innovation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki

    This paper describes diffusion of electric vehicles and novel social infrastructure from the viewpoint of systems innovation theory considering both human society aspects and elemental technological aspects. Firstly, fundamentals of the systems innovation theory and the platform theory are mentioned. Secondly, discussion on mobility from the viewpoint of the human-society layer and discussion of electrical vehicles from the viewpoint of the elemental techniques are carried out. Thirdly, based on those, R & D, measures are argued such as establishment of the ubiquitous noncontact feeding and authentication payment system is important. Finally, it is also insisted that after the establishment of this system the super smart grid with temporal and spatial control including demand itself with the low social cost will be expected.

  20. Nanoengineering the built-in electric field of a photonic device by interstitial-ion diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, A.; Makarovsky, O.; Kumar, S.; Fay, M. W.; Campion, R.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O. G.; Eaves, L.; Patanè, A.

    2012-05-01

    We use focused laser annealing to activate the diffusion of Mn-interstitial ions (Mni2+) from a p-(GaMn)As layer towards the intrinsic GaAs/AlAs quantum well (QW) region of a p-i-n light emitting diode (LED). The random clustering of the Mni2+ ions creates a complex potential landscape U and electric field FMn=-∇U in the QW plane, which we probe with nanoscale precision by monitoring the quantum-confined Stark shift of the “natural” quantum dots formed in the QW. The use of focused laser annealing to form electric field landscapes at predetermined positions is potentially applicable to other material systems containing mobile dopant atoms and is relevant to research on nanophotonics and manipulation of quantum devices.

  1. Electric and magnetic contributions to spatial diffusion in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, R.; Belmont, G.; Aunai, N.

    2012-10-15

    We investigate the role played by the different self-consistent fluctuations for particle diffusion in a magnetized plasma. We focus especially on the contribution of the electric fluctuations and how it combines with the (already investigated) magnetic fluctuations and with the velocity fluctuations. For that issue, we compute with a hybrid code the value of the diffusion coefficient perpendicular to the mean magnetic field and its dependence on the particle velocity. This study is restricted to small to intermediate level of electromagnetic fluctuations and focuses on particle velocities on the order of few times the Alfven speed. We briefly discuss the consequences for cosmic ray modulation and for the penetration of thermal solar wind particles in the Earth magnetosphere.

  2. Using Mobile Agents and Overlay Networks to Secure Electrical Netoworks

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, Neal A.; Prosser, Bryan J.; Fulp, Errin W.; McKinnon, Archibald D.

    2013-04-01

    ABSTRACT The use of wandering, mobile agents can provide a robust approach for managing, monitoring, and securing electrical distribution networks. However, the topological structure of electrical networks can affect system performance. For example, if the multi-agent system relies on a regular inspection rate (on average, points of interest are inspected with equal frequency), then locations that are not well connected will on average be inspected less frequently. This paper discusses creation and use of overlay networks that create a virtual grid graph can provide faster coverage and a more uniform average agent sampling rate. Using overlays agents wander a virtual neighborhood consisting of only points of interest that are interconnected in a regular fashion (each point has the same number of neighbors). Experimental results will show that an overlay can often provide better network coverage and a more uniform inspection rate, which can improve cyber security by providing a faster detection of threats

  3. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  4. Contrasting Diffusion Patterns for PC and Mobile Videos: A User-Centric View of the Influencing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Baixue

    2010-01-01

    As both computer and mobile phone reach nearly ubiquity in the U.S. market, the slow uptake of mobile video, in contrast to the thriving usage of PC-based video, warrants a deeper understanding of user-oriented factors contributing to the two diffusion paths. Unlike the majority of existing diffusion research practices, the dissertation…

  5. High precision measurements of carbon disulfide negative ion mobility and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Gauvreau, J.-L.

    2013-05-01

    High precision measurements were made of reduced mobility, lateral and longitudinal diffusion of CS2- ions in 40 Torr CS2 and a 30-10 Torr CS2-CF4 gas mixture. The reduced mobility was found to be 0.4645 ± 0.0006 cm2 atm/s V in CS2 and 0.523 ± 0.001 cm2 atm/s V in the CS2-CF4 gas mixture at STP. The lateral diffusion temperatures for these two gases (295 ± 15 K and 297 ± 6 K) were found to be in good agreement with room temperature. By contrast longitudinal diffusion temperature was found to be slightly elevated (319 ± 10 (stat) ± 8 (sys) K and 310 ± 20 (stat) ± 6 (sys) K) though given the errors, room temperature diffusion cannot be ruled out. For lateral diffusion, significant capture distances (0.21 ± 0.07 mm and 0.15 ± 0.03 mm) were measured while for longitudinal diffusion the results were not conclusive.

  6. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined ‘geometric surface area’ of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60–350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility–mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility–mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility–mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3–10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3. PMID:26692585

  7. Anomalous diffusion due to hindering by mobile obstacles undergoing Brownian motion or Orstein-Ulhenbeck processes.

    PubMed

    Berry, Hugues; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    In vivo measurements of the passive movements of biomolecules or vesicles in cells consistently report "anomalous diffusion," where mean-squared displacements scale as a power law of time with exponent α<1 (subdiffusion). While the detailed mechanisms causing such behaviors are not always elucidated, movement hindrance by obstacles is often invoked. However, our understanding of how hindered diffusion leads to subdiffusion is based on diffusion amidst randomly located immobile obstacles. Here, we have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate transient subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with various modes of mobility. Our simulations confirm that the anomalous regimes rapidly disappear when the obstacles move by Brownian motion. By contrast, mobile obstacles with more confined displacements, e.g., Orstein-Ulhenbeck motion, are shown to preserve subdiffusive regimes. The mean-squared displacement of tracked protein displays convincing power laws with anomalous exponent α that varies with the density of Orstein-Ulhenbeck (OU) obstacles or the relaxation time scale of the OU process. In particular, some of the values we observed are significantly below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles in two dimensions. Therefore, our results show that subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with OU type of motion may account for the large variation range exhibited by experimental measurements in living cells and may explain that some experimental estimates are below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles. PMID:25353510

  8. Anomalous diffusion due to hindering by mobile obstacles undergoing Brownian motion or Orstein-Ulhenbeck processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Hugues; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    In vivo measurements of the passive movements of biomolecules or vesicles in cells consistently report "anomalous diffusion," where mean-squared displacements scale as a power law of time with exponent α <1 (subdiffusion). While the detailed mechanisms causing such behaviors are not always elucidated, movement hindrance by obstacles is often invoked. However, our understanding of how hindered diffusion leads to subdiffusion is based on diffusion amidst randomly located immobile obstacles. Here, we have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate transient subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with various modes of mobility. Our simulations confirm that the anomalous regimes rapidly disappear when the obstacles move by Brownian motion. By contrast, mobile obstacles with more confined displacements, e.g., Orstein-Ulhenbeck motion, are shown to preserve subdiffusive regimes. The mean-squared displacement of tracked protein displays convincing power laws with anomalous exponent α that varies with the density of Orstein-Ulhenbeck (OU) obstacles or the relaxation time scale of the OU process. In particular, some of the values we observed are significantly below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles in two dimensions. Therefore, our results show that subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with OU type of motion may account for the large variation range exhibited by experimental measurements in living cells and may explain that some experimental estimates are below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles.

  9. Degenerate mobilities in phase field models are insufficient to capture surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Münch, Andreas; Süli, Endre

    2015-08-01

    Phase field models frequently provide insight into phase transitions and are robust numerical tools to solve free boundary problems corresponding to the motion of interfaces. A body of prior literature suggests that interface motion via surface diffusion is the long-time, sharp interface limit of microscopic phase field models such as the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a degenerate mobility function. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, we show that the long-time behaviour of degenerate Cahn-Hilliard equation with a polynomial free energy undergoes coarsening, reflecting the presence of bulk diffusion, rather than pure surface diffusion. This reveals an important limitation of phase field models that are frequently used to model surface diffusion.

  10. Analysing the diffusion and adoption of mobile IT across social worlds.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jeppe Agger; Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw

    2014-06-01

    The diffusion and adoption of information technology innovations (e.g. mobile information technology) in healthcare organizations involves a dynamic process of change with multiple stakeholders with competing interests, varying commitments, and conflicting values. Nevertheless, the extant literature on mobile information technology diffusion and adoption has predominantly focused on organizations and individuals as the unit of analysis, with little emphasis on the environment in which healthcare organizations are embedded. We propose the social worlds approach as a promising theoretical lens for dealing with this limitation together with reports from a case study of a mobile information technology innovation in elderly home care in Denmark including both the sociopolitical and organizational levels in the analysis. Using the notions of social worlds, trajectories, and boundary objects enables us to show how mobile information technology innovation in Danish home care can facilitate negotiation and collaboration across different social worlds in one setting while becoming a source of tension and conflicts in others. The trajectory of mobile information technology adoption was shaped by influential stakeholders in the Danish home care sector. Boundary objects across multiple social worlds legitimized the adoption, but the use arrangement afforded by the new technology interfered with important aspects of home care practices, creating resistance among the healthcare personnel. PMID:24810724

  11. Monte Carlo Demonstration of Solid-State Diffusion in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murch, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the phenomenological and microscopic aspects of solid-state diffusion in an electric field and presents a Monte Carlo method which is used to stimulate an atomistic model of diffusion in an electric field. The Nernst-Einstein relation is also discussed. (HM)

  12. Ammonia mobility in chabazite: insight into the diffusion component of the NH3-SCR process.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Alexander J; Hitchcock, Iain; Sarwar, Misbah; Silverwood, Ian P; Hindocha, Sheena; Catlow, C Richard A; York, Andrew P E; Collier, P J

    2016-06-29

    The diffusion of ammonia in commercial NH3-SCR catalyst Cu-CHA was measured and compared with H-CHA using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to assess the effect of counterion presence on NH3 mobility in automotive emission control relevant zeolite catalysts. QENS experiments observed jump diffusion with a jump distance of 3 Å, giving similar self-diffusion coefficient measurements for both Cu- and H-CHA samples, in the range of ca. 5-10 × 10(-10) m(2) s(-1) over the measured temperature range. Self-diffusivities calculated by MD were within a factor of 6 of those measured experimentally at each temperature. The activation energies of diffusion were also similar for both studied systems: 3.7 and 4.4 kJ mol(-1) for the H- and Cu-chabazite respectively, suggesting that counterion presence has little impact on ammonia diffusivity on the timescale of the QENS experiment. An explanation is given by the MD simulations, which showed the strong coordination of NH3 with Cu(2+) counterions in the centre of the chabazite cage, shielding other molecules from interaction with the ion, and allowing for intercage diffusion through the 8-ring windows (consistent with the experimentally observed jump length) to carry on unhindered. PMID:27306298

  13. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Mobility Support of Elderly.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Winfried

    2015-08-24

    The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within "MOBIL" we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in "compliance data storage" as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC) were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period. Therefore the

  14. Using Measurements of Mobility, Diffusion, and Dispersion to Predict Separation Resolution in DNA Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Electrophoresis of DNA continues to be a key component in a wide variety of genomic analysis assays. In order to customize and optimize these assay systems, much effort has been directed to improve and predict separation resolution using various sieving matrices and experimental platforms. Predicting separation resolution requires a much more detailed understanding of mobility, diffusion, and dispersion phenomena of DNA fragments migrating in the sieving matrix than is currently available in literature. In this study, we address this issue by obtaining a series of systematic measurements of mobility, diffusion, and dispersion using an automated DNA sequencer. Using this data, we are able to isolate key factors governing separation performance, and make comparisons with biased reptation theory to extract information on gel structure and predict achievable resolution under each set of operating conditions. We are also able to predict the separation resolution under specific run conditions, thereby giving researchers and engineers the ability to easily tailor DNA separation systems for required separation performance.

  15. Influence of diffusive porosity architecture on kinetically-controlled reactions in mobile-immobile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, T.; Ginn, T. R.; De Dreuzy, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Solute transport in porous media may be structured at various scales by geological features, from connectivity patterns of pores to fracture networks. This structure impacts solute repartition and consequently reactivity. Here we study numerically the influence of the organization of porous volumes within diffusive porosity zones on different reactions. We couple a mobile-immobile transport model where an advective zone exchanges with diffusive zones of variable structure to the geochemical modeling software PHREEQC. We focus on two kinetically-controlled reactions, a linear sorption and a nonlinear dissolution of a mineral. We show that in both cases the structure of the immobile zones has an important impact on the overall reaction rates. Through the Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) framework, we show that this impact is very well captured by residence times-based models for the kinetic linear sorption, as it is mathematically equivalent to a modification of the initial diffusive structure; Consequently, the overall reaction rate could be easily extrapolated from a conservative tracer experiment. The MRMT models however struggle to reproduce the non-linearity and the threshold effects associated with the kinetic dissolution. A slower reaction, by allowing more time for diffusion to smooth out the concentration gradients, tends to increase their relevance. Figure: Left: Representation of a mobile-immobile model with a complex immobile architecture. The mobile zone is indicated by an arrow. Right: Total remaining mass of mineral in mobile-immobile models and in their equivalent MRMT models during a flush by a highly under-saturated solution. The models only differ by the organization of their immobile porous volumes.

  16. Temperature dependence of diffusion length, lifetime and minority electron mobility in GaInP

    SciTech Connect

    Schultes, F. J.; Haegel, N. M.; Christian, T.; Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Jones-Albertus, R.; Pickett, E.; Liu, T.; Misra, P.; Sukiasyan, A.; Yuen, H.

    2013-12-09

    The mobility of electrons in double heterostructures of p-type Ga{sub 0.50}In{sub 0.50}P has been determined by measuring minority carrier diffusion length and lifetime. The minority electron mobility increases monotonically from 300 K to 5 K, limited primarily by optical phonon and alloy scattering. Comparison to majority electron mobility over the same temperature range in comparably doped samples shows a significant reduction in ionized impurity scattering at lower temperatures, due to differences in interaction of repulsive versus attractive carriers with ionized dopant sites. These results should be useful in modeling and optimization for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.

  17. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Mobility Support of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within “MOBIL” we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in “compliance data storage” as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC) were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period. Therefore the

  18. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane: A study by electrophotoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Brumfeld, V; Miller, I R; Korenstein, R

    1989-09-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 . 10(-5) cm(2)V(-1)s(-1). The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of approximately 5 . 10(-9) cm(2)s(-1) was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  19. Monitoring of gliomas in vivo by diffusion MRI and (1)H MRS during gene therapy-induced apoptosis: interrelationships between water diffusion and mobile lipids.

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Timo; Hakumäki, Juhana M; Kauppinen, Risto A; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2009-04-01

    The measurement of water diffusion by diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in vivo offers a non-invasive method for assessing tissue responses to anti-cancer therapies. The pathway of cell death after anti-cancer treatment is often apoptosis, which leads to accumulation of mobile lipids detectable by (1)H MRS in vivo. However, it is not known how these discrete MR markers of cell death relate to each other. In a rodent tumour model [i.e. ganciclovir-treated herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene-transfected BT4C gliomas], we studied the interrelationships between water diffusion (Trace{D}) and mobile lipids during apoptosis. Water diffusion and water-referenced concentrations of mobile lipids showed clearly increasing and interconnected trends during treatment. Of the accumulating (1)H MRS-visible lipids, the fatty acid --CH==CH-- groups and cholesterol compounds showed the strongest associations with water diffusion (r(2) = 0.30; P < 0.05 and r(2) = 0.48; P < 0.01, respectively). These results indicate that the tumour histopathology and apoptotic processes during tumour shrinkage can be interrelated in vivo by DWI of tissue water and (1)H MRS of mobile lipids, respectively. However, there is considerable individual variation in the associations, particularly at the end of the treatment period, and in the relative compositions of the accumulating NMR-visible lipids. The findings suggest that the assessment of individual treatment response in vivo may benefit from combining DWI and (1)H MRS. Absolute and relative changes in mobile lipids may indicate initiation of tumour shrinkage even when changes in tissue water diffusion are still small. Conversely, greatly increased water diffusion probably indicates that substantial cell decomposition has taken place in the tumour tissue when the (1)H MRS resonances of mobile lipids alone can no longer give a reliable estimate of tissue conditions. PMID:19009568

  20. Thermally Activated Point Defect Diffusion in Methylammonium Lead Trihalide: Anisotropic and Ultrahigh Mobility of Iodine.

    PubMed

    Delugas, P; Caddeo, C; Filippetti, A; Mattoni, A

    2016-07-01

    We study the diffusion of point defects in crystalline methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) at finite temperatures by using all-atoms molecular dynamics. We find that, for what concerns intrinsic defects, iodine diffusion is by far the dominant mechanism of ionic transport in MAPI, with diffusivities as high as 7.4 × 10(-7) and 4.3 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 300 K and single activation energies of 0.24 and 0.10 eV, for interstitials and vacancies, respectively. The comparison with common covalent and oxide crystals reveals the ultrahigh mobility of defects in MAPI. Though at room temperature the vacancies are about 1 order of magnitude more diffusive, the anisotropic interstitial dynamics increases more rapidly with temperature, and it can be dominant at high temperatures. Present results are fully consistent with the involvement of iodide ions in hysteresis and have implications for improvement of the material quality by better control of defect diffusion. PMID:27237630

  1. ELECTROKINETIC PHENOMENA : XI. ACTION OF UNI-UNIVALENT ELECTROLYTES ON ELECTRIC MOBILITY OF PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    Abramson, H A

    1933-03-20

    By assuming that the electric charge of proteins is primarily determined by the hydrogen ion activity of the medium, and by making corrections when necessary for the effect of salt, it is possible to derive a simple relationship between the electric mobility of proteins and the effective reciprocal thickness of the electric double layer. The decrease in electric mobility of proteins in solutions is readily predicted for gelatin in acetate buffers and for egg albumin in the presence of the alkali halides, of acetate buffers, and of hydrochloric acid on the basis of the assumptions made. PMID:19872724

  2. Mechanical analysis of photo-electricity measure equipment shafting in mobile-platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Hu, Hongyi; Tan, Yi; Liu, Ruzhen

    2015-02-01

    Along with the development of technology, photo-electricity measure equipment has been from ground-fixed to mobile-platform borne, So it is need to mechanical analysis of shafting for adapt movement environment of mobile-platform. First listed three kinds of shafting form, then analysis mechanical station of the foremost component bearing in vertical load, radial load, swing load station, last work out the formulas, which was the theory for the shafting design in mobile-platforms photo-electricity equipment.

  3. On the calculation of electric diffusion coefficient of radiation belt electrons with in situ electric field measurements by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlong; Tu, Weichao; Li, Xinlin; Sarris, Theodore; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Fu, Huishan; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Quanqi

    2016-02-01

    Based on 7 years' observations from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), we investigate the statistical distribution of electric field Pc5 ULF wave power under different geomagnetic activities and calculate the radial diffusion coefficient due to electric field, , for outer radiation belt electrons. A simple empirical expression of is also derived. Subsequently, we compare to previous DLL models and find similar Kp dependence with the model, which is also based on in situ electric field measurements. The absolute value of is constantly higher than , probably due to the limited orbital coverage of CRRES. The differences between and the commonly used and models are significant, especially in Kp dependence and energy dependence. Possible reasons for these differences and their implications are discussed. The diffusion coefficient provided in this paper, which also has energy dependence, will be an important contributor to quantify the radial diffusion process of radiation belt electrons.

  4. Discrete-continuous reaction-diffusion model with mobile point-like sources and sinks.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Zimmermann, Olav; Wiechert, Wolfgang; von Lieres, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In many applications in soft and biological physics, there are multiple time and length scales involved but often with a distinct separation between them. For instance, in enzyme kinetics, enzymes are relatively large, move slowly and their copy numbers are typically small, while the metabolites (being transformed by these enzymes) are often present in abundance, are small in size and diffuse fast. It seems thus natural to apply different techniques to different time and length levels and couple them. Here we explore this possibility by constructing a stochastic-deterministic discrete-continuous reaction-diffusion model with mobile sources and sinks. Such an approach allows in particular to separate different sources of stochasticity. We demonstrate its application by modelling enzyme-catalysed reactions with freely diffusing enzymes and a heterogeneous source of metabolites. Our calculations suggest that using a higher amount of less active enzymes, as compared to fewer more active enzymes, reduces the metabolite pool size and correspondingly the lag time, giving rise to a faster response to external stimuli. The methodology presented can be extended to more complex systems and offers exciting possibilities for studying problems where spatial heterogeneities, stochasticity or discreteness play a role. PMID:26830760

  5. Diffusion, Dispersion, and Mobility of Single-stranded DNA in Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Roger; Ugaz, Victor

    2004-03-01

    The ability to perform DNA electrophoresis in miniaturized microfluidic systems has the potential to provide a new generation of low-cost high-throughput genomic analysis technology. Further progress toward improving separation performance under these conditions, however, requires a more detailed understanding of diffusion and dispersion phenomena in the gel matrix. Unfortunately, it has thus far proven difficult to obtain extensive measurements of these quantities due in large part to the lack of a convenient experimental platform. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of microfabricated gel electrophoresis devices to measure diffusion, dispersion, and mobility of single-stranded DNA fragments in crosslinked and uncrosslinked polyacrylamide gels. The microdevice format allows a complete set of diffusion and dispersion data to be collected in approximately one hour, as opposed to experiment times lasting several days using conventional sequencing equipment. By comparing runs using identical DNA samples, gel formulations, and operating conditions in both microfabricated electrophoresis devices and an ALF Express automated DNA sequencer, we are able to isolate the key factors governing separation performance in each system. The results of these experiments are then compared with biased reptation theory to extract information about the gel structure and predict achievable resolution. The effects of gel composition and polymerization chemistry are also explored.

  6. Comparison of the Unique Mobility and DOE-developed ac electric drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison was made between the most recent DOE-developed AC electric vehicle drive systems and that which is independently under development by Unique Mobility of Golden, Colorado. The DOE-developed AC systems compared in this study are the Single-Shaft Electric Propulsion System (ETX-II) developed by Ford Motor Company and the General Electric Company under contract number DE-AC07-85NV10418, the Dual-Shaft Electric Propulsion (DSEP) System developed by Eaton Corporation under contract number DOE-AC08-84NV-10366, and the anticipated results of the Modular Electric Vehicle (MEV) system currently being developed by Ford and General Electric under contract number DE-AC07-90ID13019. The Unique Mobility brushless DC electric vehicle drive system represents their latest electric drive technology and is being developed in cooperation with BMW Technik Gmbh of Germany. Comparisons of specific volume, specific weight, efficiency and expected vehicle performance are made of the different systems based upon measured system performance data where available. One conclusion presented is that the Unique Mobility drive system under development with BMW appears to provide comparable performance to the AC systems studied.

  7. An electrically assisted device for protein crystallization in a vapor-diffusion setup

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Hernández, Edith; Stojanoff, Vivian; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Moreno, Abel; Sánchez-Puig, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    A new easy-to-use device has been designed and implemented for electric field-induced protein crystallization in a vapor-diffusion configuration. The device not only controls crystal nucleation by means of the electrical current, but also favors crystal growth owing to its vapor-diffusion setup. Crystallization was conducted in the presence of an internal electric field and direct current. The proteins investigated were lysozyme, as model protein, and 2TEL–lysozyme (a synthetic protein consisting of two tandem alpha helix motifs connected to a lysozyme moiety). Lysozyme crystals that grew attached to the cathode were larger than those grown attached to the anode or in the absence of an electric current. On the other hand, crystals of 2TEL–lysozyme qualitatively showed a better X-ray diffraction pattern when grown in the presence of an electric current. PMID:23682197

  8. Mobility Measurement Based on Visualized Electric Field Migration in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaka, Takaaki; Liu, Fei; Weis, Martin; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2009-06-01

    Based on the transient electric field migration directly probed by the time-resolved microscopic optical second-harmonic generation (TRM-SHG) technique, we developed a “dynamic” approach to evaluate the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistor (OFET). The accuracy of this potential- and current-independent approach was well confirmed by computational simulations and a comparison with the conventional mobility measured by OFET transfer characteristics.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion and electrical conductivity in montmorillonite interlayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.; Fredrich, Joanne T.; Jerauld, Gary R.

    2016-01-20

    In this study, the diffusion of water and ions in the interlayer region of smectite clay minerals represents a direct probe of the type and strength of clay–fluid interactions. Interlayer diffusion also represents an important link between molecular simulation and macroscopic experiments. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate trends in cation and water diffusion in montmorillonite interlayers, looking specifically at the effects of layer charge, interlayer cation and cation charge (sodium or calcium), water content, and temperature. For Na-montmorillonite, the largest increase in ion and water diffusion coefficients occurs between the one-layer and two-layer hydrates, corresponding to themore » transition from inner-sphere to outer-sphere surface complexes. Calculated activation energies for ion and water diffusion in Na-montmorillonite are similar to each other and to the water hydrogen bond energy, suggesting the breaking of water–water and water–clay hydrogen bonds as a likely mechanism for interlayer diffusion. A comparison of interlayer diffusion with that of bulk electrolyte solutions reveals a clear trend of decreasing diffusion coefficient with increasing electrolyte concentration, and in most cases the interlayer diffusion results are nearly coincident with the corresponding bulk solutions. Trends in electrical conductivities computed from the ion diffusion coefficients are also compared.« less

  10. Progress in utilization of a mobile laboratory for making storm electricity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. David

    1988-01-01

    A mobile atmospheric science laboratory has been used to intercept and track storms on the Great Plains region of the U.S., with the intention of combining the data obtained with those from Doppler and conventional radars, NASA U-2 aircraft overflights, balloon soundings, and fixed-base storm electricity measurements. The mobile lab has proven to be valuable in the gathering of ground truth verifications for the two commercially operated lightning ground-strike locating systems. Data acquisition has recently been expanded by means of mobile ballooning before and during storms.

  11. The influence of electric field and mobility profile on GaAs MESFET characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chung-Hsu; Arch, David K.

    1989-11-01

    Analytical approximations for the drain I-V relationship, including the mobility profile and field distribution in the channel from the drain to the source, of GaAs MESFETs are derived. The model includes the extended depletion from the gate to the drain for nonself-aligned devices. The calculation of the electric field along the channel is in very good agreement with existing analytical models and a two-dimensional numerical simulation. Experimentally, the authors fabricated and tested tilted angle lightly doped drain (LDD) GaAs MESFETs. It was found that the LLD MESFET structure suppresses the peak electric field under the gate near the drain region. A lower output conductance and higher drain-to-source breakdown were observed as expected. In addition to the electric field, the mobility profile is another factor that influences the performance of the devices. The accuracy of describing the low-field transconductance is strongly dependent on the mobility profile. Moreover, the mobility profile modifies the electric field along the channel and also influences the shape of the drain I-V curves. It is found that more accurate I-V curves can be obtained once the mobility profile is taken into account.

  12. Mobile impurities in one-dimensional cold gases: subdiffusive, diffusive and ballistic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantian, Adrian; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2012-02-01

    Advances in cold gases physics are beginning to enable experiments involving the direct manipulation and observation of single- or few-atom mobile impurities [1] within a many-body quantum system, a topic of longstanding interest for condensed matter theory, where it is related to studies of e.g. conductivity and the X-ray edge problem. Further progress in this direction is expected from the latest generation of experiments offering single-site addressability in optical lattices [2,3]. In light of these developments we study the dynamics of mobile impurities in 1D quantum liquids using a DMRG technique. We address the recently proposed subdiffusive regime of impurity motion [4], a class of excitations beyond those described by the standard Tomonaga-Luttinger theory. We study the conditions for observing this regime and its' crossover to the ballistic regime. We furthermore examine the possibilities to observe the intermediate diffusive motion of impurities in these systems. [4pt] [1] J. Catani, G. Lamporesi, D. Naik et. al., arXiv:1106.0828[0pt] [2] W. S. Bakr, J. I. Gillen, A. Peng et. al., Nature 462, 74 (2009)[0pt] [3] J. F. Sherson, C. Weitenberg, M. Endres et. al., Nature, 467, 7311 (2010)[0pt] [4] M. B. Zvonarev, V. V. Cheianov, T. Giamarchi, PRL 99, 240404 (2007); PRL 103, 110401 (2009)

  13. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com; Schweizer, Kenneth S. E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com

    2015-12-28

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry.

  14. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films.

    PubMed

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-12-28

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry. PMID:26723700

  15. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry.

  16. Optimum mobility, contact properties, and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells: A drift-diffusion simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tress, Wolfgang; Leo, Karl; Riede, Moritz

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the role charge carrier mobility plays for loss mechanisms in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. For this purpose, we perform drift-diffusion calculations for several recombination models and properties of the contacts. We show that in case of selective contacts, higher mobilities increase device efficiency, independent of injection barrier heights, energy level bending at the contacts, and the amount of background dark carriers in the device. Nonselective contacts provide a source of photocarrier loss at the “wrong” electrode. This is evident from a decrease of the open-circuit voltage (Voc) with an increased role of charge carrier diffusion, which originates from a higher mobility or from interface barriers reducing the built-in potential. In this case, Voc furthermore depends on the device thickness. Considering the effect of different recombination models, a too high mobility of one charge carrier decreases Voc significantly for Langevin recombination. That is why balanced mobilities are desirable for high efficiency in this case. In presence of recombination via CT states, Voc is mainly governed by the dynamics of the charge transfer state. Based on these differentiations we show that the existence of an optimum mobility derived from simulation depends strongly on the assumptions made for contact and recombination properties and obtain a comprehensive picture how charge carrier mobility influences the parameters of organic solar cells.

  17. Electrical determination of the diffusion barrier for gold in ZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Akkad, Fikry

    2013-12-01

    We report on the effect of Au diffusion on the electrical properties of ZnTe films deposited on Au coated substrates using rf magnetron sputtering. A drop over about 8 decades in the room temperature conductivity is observed for a change in substrate temperature from 60 °C to 325 °C. The results are interpreted in terms of a point-defect model that takes into account the interaction between the in-diffused Au and the intrinsic defects. The analysis of the results on the basis of this model yields a diffusion barrier of 0.40 eV for gold in ZnTe.

  18. Reliability and Validity Study of the Mobile Learning Adoption Scale Developed Based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Aydin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mobile learning adoption scale (MLAS) was developed on the basis of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory. The scale that was developed consists of four sections. These sections are as follows: Stages in the innovation-decision process, Types of m-learning decision, Innovativeness level and attributes of m-learning.…

  19. Reliability and Validity Study of the Mobile Learning Adoption Scale Developed Based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Aydin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mobile learning adoption scale (MLAS) was developed on the basis of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory. The scale that was developed consists of four sections. These sections are as follows: Stages in the innovation-decision process, Types of m-learning decision, Innovativeness level and attributes of m-learning. There…

  20. Effect of mobile ions on the electric field needed to orient charged diblock copolymer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, Ashkan; Shi, An-Chang; Schick, M.

    2015-10-07

    We examine the behavior of lamellar phases of charged/neutral diblock copolymer thin films containing mobile ions in the presence of an external electric field. We employ self-consistent field theory and focus on the aligning effect of the electric field on the lamellae. Of particular interest are the effects of the mobile ions on the critical field, the value required to reorient the lamellae from the parallel configuration favored by the surface interaction to the perpendicular orientation favored by the field. We find that the critical field depends strongly on whether the neutral or charged species is favored by the substrates. In the case in which the neutral species is favored, the addition of charges decreases the critical electric field significantly. The effect is greater when the mobile ions are confined to the charged lamellae. In contrast, when the charged species is favored by the substrate, the addition of mobile ions stabilizes the parallel configuration and thus results in an increase in the critical electric field. The presence of ions in the system introduces a new mixed phase in addition to those reported previously.

  1. A Novel Electrical Model for Advection-Diffusion-Based Molecular Communication in Nanonetworks.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Abouei, Jamshid

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an end-to-end electrical model to characterize the communication between two nanomachines via advection-diffusion motion along the conventional pipe medium. For this modeling, we consider three modules consisting of transmitter, advection-diffusion propagation and receiver. The modulation scheme and releasing molecules through the conventional pipe medium from the transmitter nanomachine is represented in the transmitter module. The advection-diffusion propagation of molecules along the flow-induced path is shown in advection-diffusion propagation module, and the demodulation scheme of bounded particles at the receiver nanomachine is characterized in the receiver module. Our objective is to find an electrical model of each module under the zero initial condition which enables us to represent the electrical circuit related to each module. The transmitter and the signal propagation models are built on the basis of the molecular advection-diffusion physics, whereas the receiver model is interpreted by stemming from the theory of the ligand-receptor binding chemical process. In addition, we employ the transfer function of modules to derive the normalized gain and the delay of each module. Supported by numerical results, we analyze the effect of physical parameters of the pipe medium on the total normalized gain and delay of molecular communications. PMID:27046879

  2. Ion Permeability of Artificial Membranes Evaluated by Diffusion Potential and Electrical Resistance Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and "n"-decane. The electrical resistance and potential…

  3. Cell stimulation and calcium mobilization by picosecond electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Kang, Dongkoo; Schoenbach, Karl H; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2015-10-01

    We tested if picosecond electric pulses (psEP; 190 kV/cm, 500 ps at 50% height), which are much shorter than channel activation time, can activate voltage-gated (VG) channels. Cytosolic Ca(2+) was monitored by Fura-2 ratiometric imaging in GH3 and NG108 cells (which express multiple types of VG calcium channels, VGCC), and in CHO cells (which express no VGCC). Trains of up to 100 psEP at 1 kHz elicited no response in CHO cells. However, even a single psEP significantly increased Ca(2+) in both GH3 (by 114 ± 48 nM) and NG108 cells (by 6 ± 1.1 nM). Trains of 100 psEP amplified the response to 379 ± 33 nM and 719 ± 315 nM, respectively. Ca(2+) responses peaked within 2-15s and recovered for over 100 s; they were 80-100% inhibited by verapamil and ω-conotoxin, but not by the substitution of Na(+) with N-methyl-D-glucamine. There was no response to psEP in Ca(2+)-free medium, but adding external Ca(2+) even 10s later evoked Ca(2+) response. We conclude that electrical stimuli as short as 500 ps can cause long-lasting opening of VGCC by a mechanism which does not involve conventional electroporation, heating (which was under 0.06 K per psEP), or membrane depolarization by opening of VG Na(+) channels. PMID:26011130

  4. Electrical control of Co/Ni magnetism adjacent to gate oxides with low oxygen ion mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y. N.; Zhou, X. J.; Li, F.; Cui, B.; Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, G. Y.; Pan, F.; Song, C.

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the electrical manipulation of Co/Ni magnetization through a combination of ionic liquid and oxide gating, where HfO{sub 2} with a low O{sup 2−} ion mobility is employed. A limited oxidation-reduction process at the metal/HfO{sub 2} interface can be induced by large electric field, which can greatly affect the saturated magnetization and Curie temperature of Co/Ni bilayer. Besides the oxidation/reduction process, first-principles calculations show that the variation of d electrons is also responsible for the magnetization variation. Our work discloses the role of gate oxides with a relatively low O{sup 2−} ion mobility in electrical control of magnetism, and might pave the way for the magneto-ionic memory with low power consumption and high endurance performance.

  5. Data-driven estimation of cardiac electrical diffusivity from 12-lead ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Zettinig, Oliver; Mansi, Tommaso; Neumann, Dominik; Georgescu, Bogdan; Rapaka, Saikiran; Seegerer, Philipp; Kayvanpour, Elham; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Amr, Ali; Haas, Jan; Steen, Henning; Katus, Hugo; Meder, Benjamin; Navab, Nassir; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2014-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is challenging due to a large variety of causes and disease stages. Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology (EP) can be used to improve the assessment and prognosis of DCM, plan therapies and predict their outcome, but require personalization. In this work, we present a data-driven approach to estimate the electrical diffusivity parameter of an EP model from standard 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG). An efficient forward model based on a mono-domain, phenomenological Lattice-Boltzmann model of cardiac EP, and a boundary element-based mapping of potentials to the body surface is employed. The electrical diffusivity of myocardium, left ventricle and right ventricle endocardium is then estimated using polynomial regression which takes as input the QRS duration and electrical axis. After validating the forward model, we computed 9500 EP simulations on 19 different DCM patients in just under three seconds each to learn the regression model. Using this database, we quantify the intrinsic uncertainty of electrical diffusion for given ECG features and show in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation that the regression method is able to predict myocardium diffusion within the uncertainty range. Finally, our approach is tested on the 19 cases using their clinical ECG. 84% of them could be personalized using our method, yielding mean prediction errors of 18.7ms for the QRS duration and 6.5° for the electrical axis, both values being within clinical acceptability. By providing an estimate of diffusion parameters from readily available clinical data, our data-driven approach could therefore constitute a first calibration step toward a more complete personalization of cardiac EP. PMID:24857832

  6. Relationship of the magnetic and electric diffusion of energetic ions in the radiation belts of the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Goryainov, M.F.; Panasyok, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an expression for the electric diffusion coefficient on the basis of analysis of the amplitudes of the power spectra of electric fields within the equatorial radiation belts, which indicate their strong attenuation with a decrease in geocentric distance. Comparison of the obtained electric coefficient with the magnetic coefficient obtained typical of the intermediate disturbed state in the magnetosphere and with the magnetic diffusion coefficient taking into account the presence of inhomogeneities in the high-frequency part of the power spectrum of the geomagnetic field leads to the conclusion that electric diffusion can dominate at L>5 and at L<2.

  7. Spherical Ethylene/Air Diffusion Flames Subject to Concentric DC Electric Field in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Z. -G.; Hegde, U.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that microgravity conditions, by eliminating buoyant flow, enable many combustion phenomena to be observed that are not possible to observe at normal gravity. One example is the spherical diffusion flame surrounding a porous spherical burner. The present paper demonstrates that by superimposing a spherical electrical field on such a flame, the flame remains spherical so that we can study the interaction between the electric field and flame in a one-dimensional fashion. Flames are susceptible to electric fields that are much weaker than the breakdown field of the flame gases owing to the presence of ions generated in the high temperature flame reaction zone. These ions and the electric current of the moving ions, in turn, significantly change the distribution of the electric field. Thus, to understand the interplay between the electric field and the flame is challenging. Numerous experimental studies of the effect of electric fields on flames have been reported. Unfortunately, they were all involved in complex geometries of both the flow field and the electric field, which hinders detailed study of the phenomena. In a one-dimensional domain, however, the electric field, the flow field, the thermal field and the chemical species field are all co-linear. Thus the problem is greatly simplified and becomes more tractable.

  8. Simultaneous and direct measurement of carrier diffusion constant and mobility in organic semiconductors and deviation from standard Einstein relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Awnish K.; Tripathi, Durgesh C.; Mohapatra, Y. N.

    2011-07-01

    We show that the shape of electroluminescence transients in organic semiconductors can be conveniently used to obtain the diffusion constant D of injected charge carriers, enabling the study of generalized Einstein relationship under nonequilibrium conditions as a function of the electric field. The appearance of peak at the onset of transient is shown to be the signature of diffusive regime of transport. We demonstrate it for two representative materials, Alq3 and polymer poly [2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene], with the focus on the role of hot carriers in transport and their diffusivity.

  9. Forced diffusion via electrically induced crystallization for fabricating ZnO–Ti–Si structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Hung, Fei-Yi

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • ZnO–Ti–Si system is very important for the structural design. • The electrically induced crystallization method is useful to diffusion process. • Intermetallic compound characteristics have been presented using electrically induced crystallization. • Interface mechanism about diffusion of TZO–TiSi{sub x}–Si structure is presented. - Abstract: Electrically induced crystallization (EIC) is a recently developed process for material modification. This study is applied to EIC to fabricate ZnO–Ti–Si multi-layer structures of various thicknesses to dope Ti into ZnO thin film and to form TiSi{sub x} intermetallic compound (IMC) in a single step. The IMC layer was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy images. The Ti layer thickness was more than 40 nm, which enhanced electron transmission and decreased the total electrical resistance in the structure. Finally, the diffusion mechanisms of EIC and the annealing process were investigated. This study shows that the EIC process has potential for industrial applications.

  10. a Diffusive-Transport Approach to Determine the Electrical Conductance of AN Imperfect Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grado-Caffaro, Maria Angeles; Grado-Caffaro, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a diffusive-transport-based analytical formulation to calculate the linear electrical conductance through a multiwalled carbon nanotube with defects. In fact, on the one hand, by considerations on diffusive transport and, on the other hand, using the Drude model, we find out that the conductance (at Fermi energy) of an imperfect multiwalled carbon nanotube is approximately equal to the fundamental conductance quantum multiplied by the number of layers (or shells) of the tube. Our result agrees with experimental data.

  11. Self-diffusion measurements by a mobile single-sided NMR sensor with improved magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rata, D. G.; Casanova, F.; Perlo, J.; Demco, D. E.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    A simple and fast method of measuring self-diffusion coefficients of protonated systems with a mobile single-sided NMR sensor is discussed. The NMR sensor uses a magnet geometry that generates a highly flat sensitive volume where a strong and highly uniform static magnetic field gradient is defined. Self-diffusion coefficients were measured by Hahn- and stimulated echoes detected in the presence of the uniform magnetic field gradient of the static field. To improve the sensitivity of these experiments, a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was applied after the main diffusion-encoding period. By adding the echo train the experimental time was strongly shortened, allowing the measurement of complete diffusion curves in less than 1 min. This method has been tested by measuring the self-diffusion coefficients D of various organic solvents and poly(dimethylsiloxane) samples with different molar masses. Diffusion coefficients were also measured for n-hexane absorbed at saturation in natural rubber with different cross-link densities. The results show a dependence on the concentration that is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Moreover, the stimulated-echo sequence was successfully used to measure the diffusion coefficient as a function of the evolution time in systems with restricted diffusion. This type of experiment proves the pore geometry and gives access to the surface-to-volume ratio. It was applied to measure the diffusion of water in sandstones and sheep Achilles tendon. Thanks to the strong static gradient G0, all diffusion coefficients could be measured without having to account for relaxation during the pulse sequence.

  12. Cation diffusion in the electrical double layer enhances the mass transfer rates for Sr2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ in compacted illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaus, M. A.; Aertsens, M.; Appelo, C. A. J.; Kupcik, T.; Maes, N.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    Enhanced mass transfer rates have been frequently observed in diffusion studies with alkaline and earth alkaline elements in compacted clay minerals and clay rocks. Whether this phenomenon - often termed surface diffusion - is also relevant for more strongly sorbing species is an open question. We therefore investigated the diffusion of Sr2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ in compacted illite with respect to variations of the concentration of the background electrolyte, pH and carbonate. New experimental techniques were developed in order to avoid artefacts stemming from the confinement of the clay sample. A distinct dependence of the effective diffusion coefficients on the concentration of the background electrolyte was observed for all three elements. A similar correlation was found for the sorption distribution ratio (Rd) derived from tracer breakthrough in the case of Sr2+, while this dependence was much weaker for Co2+ and Zn2+. Model calculations using Phreeqc resulted in a good agreement with the experimental data when it was assumed that the cationic species, present in the electrical double layer (EDL) of the charged clay surface, are mobile. Species bound to the specific surface complexation sites at the clay edges were assumed to be immobile. An assessment of the mobility of the type of cationic elements studied here in argillaceous media thus requires an analysis of their distribution among specifically sorbed surface species and species in the EDL. The normal approach of deriving unknown effective diffusion coefficients from reference values of an uncharged water tracer may significantly underestimate the mobility of metal cations in argillaceous media.

  13. Electric field driven plasmon dispersion in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ren-Bing; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Wen

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical study on the electric field driven plasmon dispersion of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). By introducing a drifted Fermi—Dirac distribution, we calculate the transport properties of the 2DEG in the AlGaN/GaN interface by employing the balance-equation approach based on the Boltzmann equation. Then, the nonequilibrium Fermi—Dirac function is obtained by applying the calculated electron drift velocity and electron temperature. Under random phase approximation (RPA), the electric field driven plasmon dispersion is investigated. The calculated results indicate that the plasmon frequency is dominated by both the electric field E and the angle between wavevector q and electric field E. Importantly, the plasmon frequency could be tuned by the applied source—drain bias voltage besides the gate voltage (change of the electron density).

  14. Changes in mobile phase ion distribution when combining pressurized flow and electric field.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Björn O; Dahl, Magnus; Andersson, Magnus B O; Blomberg, Lars G

    2004-10-01

    The distribution of ions in a capillary with both pressurized flow and an electric field has been studied. We have earlier reported that the overall concentration of ions increase in a capillary with high electric field and a pressurized flow. Now we describe how the ions are distributed in the capillary both along the capillary length and in the radial direction as a result of the parabolic flow profile. We have combined current measurements with finite element techniques in order to get better understanding of the system. We have found that the concentration of the ions that because of the electric mobility moves towards the flow primarily increases at the beginning of the electric field and close to the capillary wall. In view of the results we have proposed an alterative explanation of earlier published results concerning voltage-induced variation in capacity factors. PMID:15472979

  15. Temperature and electric field dependent mobility in poly(3-hexylthiophene) diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulianini, Michele; Waclawik, Eric R.; Bell, John M.; Motta, Nunzio

    2010-07-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) curves of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) diodes have been collected to investigate the polymer hole-dominated charge transport. At room temperature and at low electric fields the I-V characteristic is purely Ohmic whereas at medium-high electric fields, experimental data shows that the hole transport is trap dominated in the space charge limited current (SCLC) regime. In this regime, it is possible to extract the I-V characteristic of the P3HT/Al junction showing the ideal Schottky diode behavior over five orders of magnitude. At high-applied electric fields, holes' transport is found to be in the trap free SCLC regime. We have measured and modeled in this regime the holes' mobility to evaluate its dependence from the electric field applied and the temperature of the device.

  16. Fractional diffusion models of cardiac electrical propagation: role of structural heterogeneity in dispersion of repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Kay, David; Grau, Vicente; Rodriguez, Blanca; Burrage, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Impulse propagation in biological tissues is known to be modulated by structural heterogeneity. In cardiac muscle, improved understanding on how this heterogeneity influences electrical spread is key to advancing our interpretation of dispersion of repolarization. We propose fractional diffusion models as a novel mathematical description of structurally heterogeneous excitable media, as a means of representing the modulation of the total electric field by the secondary electrical sources associated with tissue inhomogeneities. Our results, analysed against in vivo human recordings and experimental data of different animal species, indicate that structural heterogeneity underlies relevant characteristics of cardiac electrical propagation at tissue level. These include conduction effects on action potential (AP) morphology, the shortening of AP duration along the activation pathway and the progressive modulation by premature beats of spatial patterns of dispersion of repolarization. The proposed approach may also have important implications in other research fields involving excitable complex media. PMID:24920109

  17. Mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders: A case study of Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Truong, Long T; Nguyen, Hang T T; De Gruyter, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Motorcyclist injuries and fatalities are a major concern of many developing countries. In Vietnam, motorcycles are involved in more than 70% of all road traffic crashes. This paper aims to explore the prevalence and factors associated with mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders, using a case study of Hanoi, Vietnam. A cross-sectional observation survey was undertaken at 12 sites, in which each site was surveyed during a two-hour peak period from 16:30 to 18:30 for two weekdays and one weekend day. A total of 26,360 riders were observed, consisting of 24,759 motorcyclists and 1601 electric bike riders. The overall prevalence of mobile phone use while riding was 8.4% (95% CI: 8.06-8.74%) with calling having higher prevalence than screen operation: 4.64% (95% CI: 4.39-4.90%) vs. 3.76% (95% CI: 3.52-3.99%) respectively. Moreover, the prevalence of mobile phone use was higher among motorcyclists than electric bike riders: 8.66% (95%CI: 8.30-9.01%) vs. 4.43% (95% CI: 3.40-5.47%) respectively. Logistic regression analyses revealed that mobile phone use while riding was associated with vehicle type, age, gender, riding alone, weather, day of week, proximity to city centre, number of lanes, separate car lanes, red traffic light duration, and police presence. Combining greater enforcement of existing legislations with extensive education and publicity programs is recommended to reduce potential deaths and injuries related to the use of mobile phones while riding. PMID:27015225

  18. Electrical synapse formation disrupts calcium-dependent exocytosis, but not vesicle mobilization.

    PubMed

    Neunuebel, Joshua P; Zoran, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Electrical coupling exists prior to the onset of chemical connectivity at many developing and regenerating synapses. At cholinergic synapses in vitro, trophic factors facilitated the formation of electrical synapses and interfered with functional neurotransmitter release in response to photolytic elevations of intracellular calcium. In contrast, neurons lacking trophic factor induction and electrical coupling possessed flash-evoked transmitter release. Changes in cytosolic calcium and postsynaptic responsiveness to acetylcholine were not affected by electrical coupling. These data indicate that transient electrical synapse formation delayed chemical synaptic transmission by imposing a functional block between the accumulation of presynaptic calcium and synchronized, vesicular release. Despite the inability to release neurotransmitter, neurons that had possessed strong electrical coupling recruited secretory vesicles to sites of synaptic contact. These results suggest that the mechanism by which neurotransmission is disrupted during electrical synapse formation is downstream of both calcium influx and synaptic vesicle mobilization. Therefore, electrical synaptogenesis may inhibit synaptic vesicles from acquiring a readily releasable state. We hypothesize that gap junctions might negatively interact with exocytotic processes, thereby diminishing chemical neurotransmission. PMID:15765535

  19. Design Of An Electrical Flywheel For Surge Power Applications In Mobile Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David D.

    1987-01-01

    An energy boost system based on a flywheel has been designed to supply the surge power needs of mobile robots for operating equipment like transmitters, drills, manipulator arms, mobility augmenters, and etc. This flywheel increases the average power available from a battery, fuel cell, generator, RPG or solar array by one or more orders of magnitude for short periods. Flywheels can be charged and discharged for thousands of battery lifetimes. Flywheels can deliver more than ten times the power per unit weight of batteries. The electromechanical details of a reliable, energy efficient and (relatively) low cost flywheel are described. This flywheel is the combination of a highly efficient brushless motor and a laminated steel rotor operating in an hermetically sealed container with only electrical input and output. This design approach overcomes the inefficiencies generally associated with mechanically geared devices. Electrical round trip efficiency is 94% under optimum operating conditions.

  20. Diffusion, swelling and electrical properties of polyisoprene/multiwall carbon nanotube composites in organic solvent vapours.

    PubMed

    Knite, M; Sakale, G; Teteris, V

    2012-10-01

    Polyisoprene/nanostructured carbon composites have been fabricated utilizing multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon black nanoparticles as electrically conductive filler materials. Simultaneous measurements of (1) absorbed mass of organic solvent vapours (OSV), (2) swelling predicted elongation of sample and (3) electrical resistance changes versus the time of the presence of polyisoprene/multiwall carbon nanotube composites (PCNTC) in the OSV ambience were carried out by an in-house computerized setup. Non-Fickian anomalous diffusion has been found for all PCNTC samples as well as for reference samples of polyisoprene/high structure carbon black composites (PCBC). Obtained results indicate that the filler material content can play a substantial role in vapour diffusion into the composite. An advanced tunneling-percolation model was developed and used for describing of the OSV sensing effect in PCNTC and PCBC. PMID:23421188

  1. The detection and measurement of the electrical mobility size distributions associated with radon decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Lin

    1996-04-01

    The potential risk of lung cancer has evoked interest in the properties of radon decay products. There are two forms of this progeny: either attached to ambient aerosols, or still in the status of ions/molecules/small clusters. This ``unattached`` activity would give a higher dose per unit of airborne activity than the ``attached`` progeny that are rather poorly deposited. In this thesis, a system for determining unattached radon decay products electrical mobility size distribution by measuring their electrical mobilities was developed, based on the fact that about 88% of {sup 218}Po atoms have unit charge at the end of their recoil after decay from {sup 222}Rn, while the remainder are neutral. Essential part of the setup is the radon-aerosol chamber with the Circular Electrical Mobility Spectrometer (CEMS) inside. CEMS is used for sampling and classifying the charged radioactive clusters produced in the chamber. An alpha- sensitive plastic, CR-39 disk, is placed in CEMS as an inlaid disk electrode and the alpha particle detector. CEMS showed good performance in fine inactive particles` classification. If it also works well for radon decay products, it can offer a convenient size distribution measurement for radioactive ultrafine particles. However, the experiments did not obtain an acceptable resolution. Suggestions are made for solving this problem.

  2. A study of rock matrix diffusion properties by electrical conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlsson, Y.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-07-01

    Traditional rock matrix diffusion experiments on crystalline rock are very time consuming due to the low porosity and extensive analysis requirements. Electrical conductivity measurements are, on the other hand, very fast and larger samples can be used than are practical in ordinary diffusion experiments. The effective diffusivity of a non-charged molecule is readily evaluated from the measurements, and influences from surface conductivity on diffusion of cations can be studied. A large number of samples of varying thickness can be measured within a short period, and the changes in transport properties with position in a rock core can be examined. In this study the formation factor of a large number of Aespoe diorite samples is determined by electrical conductivity measurements. The formation factor is a geometric factor defined as the ratio between the effective diffusivity of a non-charged molecule, to that of the same molecule in free liquid. The variation of this factor with position among a borecore and with sample length, and its coupling to the porosity of the sample is studied. Also the surface conductivity is studied. This was determined as the residual conductivity after leaching of the pore solution ions. The formation factor of most of the samples is in the range 1E-5 to 1E-4, with a mean value of about 5E-5. Even large samples (4--13 cm) give such values. The formation factor increases with increasing porosity and the change in both formation factor and porosity with position in the borecore can be large, even for samples close to each other. The surface conductivity increases with increasing formation factor for the various samples but the influence on the pore diffusion seems to be higher for samples of lower formation factor. This suggests that the relation between the pore surface area and the pore volume is larger for samples of low formation factor.

  3. Diffusivity and mobility of non-equilibrium carriers in organic semiconductors: Existence of critical field determining temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh C.; Sinha, Dhirendra K.; Mohapatra, Y. N.

    2013-10-01

    The role of disorder in controlling diffusivity and mobility of charge-carriers in the hopping regime of transport within a potential landscape has become especially significant for organic semiconductors. The temperature and field dependence of diffusivity (D) and mobility (μ) of injected charge-carriers have been simultaneously measured using electroluminescence transients for representative organic thin-films of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (III) (Alq3) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO). Significantly, the field dependence of diffusivity at different temperatures is similar except for a shift of a critical field beyond which it shows a sharp increase. The critical field is shown to be linearly decreasing with temperature ultimately vanishing at a characteristic limit T∗, and the slope is a measure of the localization length. The normalization of diffusivity is used to demonstrate the role of field in controlling temperature dependence. The scheme has been used to neatly decouple contributions from energetic (diagonal) and positional (off-diagonal) disorder thus enabling independent experimental determination of all the parameters of standard and correlated versions of Gaussian disorder model. The results demonstrate the validity of Gaussian disorder model even for non-equilibrium carriers, and that the parameters can be obtained with appropriate scaling of the field in such cases.

  4. Electric fields and large-scale undulations in the evening sector of the diffuse auroral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baishev, D. G.; Barkova, E. S.; Stepanov, A. E.; Rich, F.; Yumoto, K.

    2010-02-01

    The synchronous observations of strong electric fields and large-scale undulations observed on December 12, 2004, in the evening sector of the diffuse auroral zone 0900-1000 UT (~1700-1800 MLT) have been analyzed. The appearance of strong northward electric field at ~0900 UT was almost simultaneously registered at Tixie Bay ionospheric station (71.6° N, 128.9° E, L =, 5.6) and on the DMSP F15 satellite. At 0910-1000 UT, the all-sky TV camera at Tixie Bay and the DMSP satellites (F13, F14, and F15) registered eight undulations propagating westward at a velocity of 0.7—0.8 km/s. The undulation parameters registered during the TV observations agree with the satellite measurements. The distinctive feature of the analyzed event consists in that an intense electric field and undulations were localized within the diffuse zone in the region of increased precipitation of keV electrons. A comparison of the ground-based and satellite measurements made it possible to draw the conclusion on the necessary conditions for formation of diffuse undulations.

  5. Basic principles of static proton low-resolution spin diffusion NMR in nanophase-separated materials with mobility contrast.

    PubMed

    Schäler, Kerstin; Roos, Matthias; Micke, Peter; Golitsyn, Yury; Seidlitz, Anne; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Schneider, Horst; Hempel, Günter; Saalwächter, Kay

    2015-11-01

    We review basic principles of low-resolution proton NMR spin diffusion experiments, relying on mobility differences in nm-sized phases of inhomogeneous organic materials such as block-co- or semicrystalline polymers. They are of use for estimates of domain sizes and insights into nanometric dynamic inhomogeneities. Experimental procedures and limitations of mobility-based signal decomposition/filtering prior to spin diffusion are addressed on the example of as yet unpublished data on semicrystalline poly(ϵ-caprolactone), PCL. Specifically, we discuss technical aspects of the quantitative, dead-time free detection of rigid-domain signals by aid of the magic-sandwich echo (MSE), and magic-and-polarization-echo (MAPE) and double-quantum (DQ) magnetization filters to select rigid and mobile components, respectively. Such filters are of general use in reliable fitting approaches for phase composition determinations. Spin diffusion studies at low field using benchtop instruments are challenged by rather short (1)H T1 relaxation times, which calls for simulation-based analyses. Applying these, in combination with domain sizes as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, we have determined spin diffusion coefficients D for PCL (0.34, 0.19 and 0.032nm(2)/ms for crystalline, interphase and amorphous parts, respectively). We further address thermal-history effects related to secondary crystallization. Finally, the state of knowledge concerning the connection between D values determined locally at the atomic level, using (13)C detection and CP- or REDOR-based "(1)H hole burning" procedures, and those obtained by calibration experiments, is summarized. Specifically, the non-trivial dependence of D on the magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequency, with a minimum under static and a local maximum under moderate-MAS conditions, is highlighted. PMID:26404771

  6. BRCA2 diffuses as oligomeric clusters with RAD51 and changes mobility after DNA damage in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Marcel; Zelensky, Alex; Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; de Gruiter, H. Martijn; van Belle, Gijsbert J.; van Royen, Martin E.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Genome maintenance by homologous recombination depends on coordinating many proteins in time and space to assemble at DNA break sites. To understand this process, we followed the mobility of BRCA2, a critical recombination mediator, in live cells at the single-molecule level using both single-particle tracking and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. BRCA2-GFP and -YFP were compared to distinguish diffusion from fluorophore behavior. Diffusive behavior of fluorescent RAD51 and RAD54 was determined for comparison. All fluorescent proteins were expressed from endogenous loci. We found that nuclear BRCA2 existed in oligomeric clusters, and exhibited heterogeneous mobility. DNA damage increased BRCA2 transient binding, presumably including binding to damaged sites. Despite its very different size, RAD51 displayed mobility similar to BRCA2, which indicates physical interaction between these proteins both before and after induction of DNA damage. We propose that BRCA2-mediated sequestration of nuclear RAD51 serves to prevent inappropriate DNA interactions and that all RAD51 is delivered to DNA damage sites in association with BRCA2. PMID:25488918

  7. Oscillation of electron mobility in parabolic double quantum well structure due to applied electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Narayan; Sahu, Trinath

    2014-12-15

    We show that oscillation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be obtained by applying an electric field F along the growth direction of the asymmetrically barrier delta doped Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As parabolic double quantum well structure. The drastic changes in the subband Fermi energies and distributions of subband wave functions as a function of F yield nonmonotonic intra- and intersubband scattering rate matrix elements mediated by intersubband effects. The oscillatory enhancement of μ, which is attributed to the subband mobilities governed by the ionized impurity scattering, magnifies with increase in well width and decrease in height of the parabolic structure potential. The results can be utilized for nanoscale low temperature device applications.

  8. Electrically active centers formed in silicon during the high-temperature diffusion of boron and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Poloskin, D. S.; Shek, E. I.

    2013-02-15

    The parameters of electrically active centers formed during the high-temperature diffusion of boron and aluminum into silicon in various media are studied by the Hall method and capacitance spectroscopy. It is found that the variation in the resistivity of the n base of the structures with p-n junctions fabricated in the study is controlled by the formation of three donor levels Q1, E4, and Q3 with the energies E{sub c} - 0.31, E{sub c} - 0.27, and E{sub c} - 0.16 eV. Diffusion in a chlorine-containing atmosphere introduces only a single level E4, but its concentration is 2.5 times lower, compared with diffusion in air. The values of the ionization energy of the Q3 level, measured under equilibrium (Hall effect) and nonequilibrium (capacitance spectroscopy) conditions, almost coincide. The deepest level E1 with an energy of E{sub c} - 0.54 eV, formed upon diffusion in both media, has no effect on the resistivity in the n base of the structures.

  9. Optical and electrical investigation of a cylindrical diffuse-discharge chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee Cheng, Yong; Ma, Ning; Peng, Ming-yang; Liu, Ming-hai

    2015-03-15

    More and more attention has been attached to atmospheric-pressure air diffuse plasma due to its enormous potential applications. In this paper, we designed a large-scale, cylindrical diffuse-plasma chamber using wire electrodes and a repetitive nanosecond pulse generator. The plasma chamber can be completely exposed in the open air without any barrier dielectric, and the length of cylindrical plasma chamber was extensible. Using optical and electrical measurements, we investigated the effects of electrode distance, electrode length, pulse repetition frequency, and electrode angle on the uniformity of discharge space. Four discharge regions were distinguished based on different spectral characteristics. Additionally, it was found that the discharge uniformity was improved as the electrode distance decreases, but remained almost constant with the variations of electrode length and pulse repetition frequency. Both of the plasma uniformity and the power density increased significantly as the electrode angle reduced.

  10. Diffusion-driven proton exchange membrane fuel cell for converting fermenting biomass to electricity.

    PubMed

    Malati, P; Mehrotra, P; Minoofar, P; Mackie, D M; Sumner, J J; Ganguli, R

    2015-10-01

    A membrane-integrated proton exchange membrane fuel cell that enables in situ fermentation of sugar to ethanol, diffusion-driven separation of ethanol, and its catalytic oxidation in a single continuous process is reported. The fuel cell consists of a fermentation chamber coupled to a direct ethanol fuel cell. The anode and fermentation chambers are separated by a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane. Ethanol generated from fermented biomass in the fermentation chamber diffuses through the RO membrane into a glucose solution contained in the DEFC anode chamber. The glucose solution is osmotically neutral to the biomass solution in the fermentation chamber preventing the anode chamber from drying out. The fuel cell sustains >1.3 mW cm(-2) at 47°C with high discharge capacity. No separate purification or dilution is necessary, resulting in an efficient and portable system for direct conversion of fermenting biomass to electricity. PMID:26208756

  11. Geospatial measurements of soil electrical conductivity to assess soil salinity and diffuse salt loading from irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, James D.; Corwin, Dennis L.; Lesch, Scott M.

    Irrigated agriculture is necessary to meet the food demands of the world, but excessive irrigation has wasted water and drainage from it has degraded the productivity and altered the ecology of vast areas of land. Irrigated agriculture also has polluted associated surface water and groundwater resources. The extent of soil degradation from salinization and waterlogging and, especially, the extent of water salinization resulting from excessive irrigation have not been well quantified. Additionally, the diffuse sources of deep percolation and salt loading from irrigation have not been well established. This paper describes basic principles of soil electrical conductivity, recent technology developed to assess the magnitude and distribution of soil salinity in fields, and ways to infer the areal sources and amounts of diffuse salt loading from irrigation.

  12. Computational studies of coarsening rates for the Cahn-Hilliard equation with phase-dependent diffusion mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shibin; Du, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    We study computationally coarsening rates of the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a smooth double-well potential, and with phase-dependent diffusion mobilities. The latter is a feature of many materials systems and makes accurate numerical simulations challenging. Our numerical simulations confirm earlier theoretical predictions on the coarsening dynamics based on asymptotic analysis. We demonstrate that the numerical solutions are consistent with the physical Gibbs-Thomson effect, even if the mobility is degenerate in one or both phases. For the two-sided degenerate mobility, we report computational results showing that the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 4, independent of the volume fraction of each phase. For the one-sided degenerate mobility, that is non-degenerate in the positive phase but degenerate in the negative phase, we illustrate that the coarsening rate depends on the volume fraction of the positive phase. For large positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 3 and for small positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate becomes l ∼ ct 1 / 4.

  13. Development of a semiclassical method to compute mobility and diffusion coefficient of a Brownian particle in a nonequilibrium environment.

    PubMed

    Shit, Anindita; Ghosh, Pradipta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2011-03-01

    We explore the issue of a quantum-noise-induced directed transport of an overdamped Brownian particle that is allowed to move in a spatially periodic potential. The established system-reservoir model has been employed here to study the quantum-noise-induced transport of a Brownian particle in a periodic potential, where the reservoir is being modulated externally by a Gaussian-colored noise. The mobility of the Brownian particle in the linear response regime has been calculated. Then, using Einstein's relation, the analytical expression for the diffusion rate is evaluated for any arbitrary periodic potential for the high-temperature quantum regime. PMID:21517472

  14. An electrically-activated dynamic tissue-equivalent phantom for assessment of diffuse optical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Hebden, Jeremy C; Brunker, Joanna; Correia, Teresa; Price, Ben D; Gibson, Adam P; Everdell, N L

    2008-01-21

    A novel design of solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains variable regions of contrast which are activated electrically. Reversible changes in absorption are produced by localized heating of targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment. A portable, battery-operated prototype has been constructed, and its optical and temporal characteristics have been investigated. The phantom has been developed as a means of assessing the performance of diffuse optical imaging systems, such as those used to monitor haemodynamic changes in the brain and other tissues. Images of the phantom have been reconstructed using data acquired with a continuous wave optical topography system. PMID:18184989

  15. An electrically-activated dynamic tissue-equivalent phantom for assessment of diffuse optical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Brunker, Joanna; Correia, Teresa; Price, Ben D.; Gibson, Adam P.; Everdell, N. L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel design of solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains variable regions of contrast which are activated electrically. Reversible changes in absorption are produced by localized heating of targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment. A portable, battery-operated prototype has been constructed, and its optical and temporal characteristics have been investigated. The phantom has been developed as a means of assessing the performance of diffuse optical imaging systems, such as those used to monitor haemodynamic changes in the brain and other tissues. Images of the phantom have been reconstructed using data acquired with a continuous wave optical topography system.

  16. The Invisible Hand: Governmental Influences on the Field of Play During the Production and Diffusion of Mobile TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Su-Yi; Chiasson, Mike W.

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how government agencies alter the context around the production and diffusion of technologies, and how this strengthens or weakens particular ICT trajectories. An embedded case is conducted to address this question in Taiwan, as governmental actions affected the early production and diffusion of DVB-H technology and WiMAX technology, both of which enable mobile TV services. The context around and across these two technologies are analyzed from an institutional perspective, including the framework proposed by King et al (1994). The key lesson of this paper is that government agencies are capable of influencing the diffusion of nomadic technologies through their legitimating powers, specific national policies, the allocation of radio frequency spectrum, the implementation of regulations, and the allocation of financial resources. However, the ultimate effects are determined by mixed institutional factors and sometimes contradictory governmental interventions, stemming from historical differences and conflicts across the various government agencies involved. The implications for ICT diffusion research and governmental policy makers are discussed.

  17. Ultrawide electrical tuning of light matter interaction in a high electron mobility transistor structure

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Shovon; Nong, Hanond; Markmann, Sergej; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Valentin, Sascha R.; Scholz, Sven; Ludwig, Arne; Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich; Wieck, Andreas D.; Jukam, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between intersubband resonances (ISRs) and metamaterial microcavities constitutes a strongly coupled system where new resonances form that depend on the coupling strength. Here we present experimental evidence of strong coupling between the cavity resonance of a terahertz metamaterial and the ISR in a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. The device is electrically switched from an uncoupled to a strongly coupled regime by tuning the ISR with epitaxially grown transparent gate. The asymmetric potential in the HEMT structure enables ultrawide electrical tuning of ISR, which is an order of magnitude higher as compared to an equivalent square well. For a single heterojunction with a triangular confinement, we achieve an avoided splitting of 0.52 THz, which is a significant fraction of the bare intersubband resonance at 2 THz. PMID:26578287

  18. Time-of-flight mobility of charge carriers in position-dependent electric field between coplanar electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlica, Egon; Bratina, Gvido

    2012-08-01

    Time-of-flight measurements of the photocurrent in thin organic semiconductor layers represent an effective way to extract charge carrier mobility. A common method to interpret the time-dependence of the photocurrent in these material systems assumes a position-independent electric field between two coplanar electrodes. In this letter, we compare time-dependence of the photocurrent, measured in the samples comprising thin layers of poly-3-hexylthiophene, with the Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations, we have used both, a position-independent and a position-dependent electric field. We obtained a favorable agreement between the simulations and the measurements only in the case of position-dependent electric field. We demonstrate that the charge carrier mobility may be underestimated by more than one order of magnitude, if a position-independent electric field is used in the calculations of the mobility.

  19. Thermal diffusivity of Zn1-xBexSe crystals and it's correlation with electrical conductivity and optical absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzenta, J.; Firszt, F.; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, A.; Pyka, M.; Szperlich, P.; Szydłowski, M.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents results obtained for mixed crystal of Zn{1-x}Be{x}Se. Samples with different Be contents were examined to determine their thermal, optical and electrical properties. The influence of composition of investigated mixed crystals on the value of thermal diffusivity, electrical resistivity and energy gap was checked. An interesting problem is a correlation between thermal properties and other physical parameters. In this work possible correlations between the thermal diffusivity and either the optical band gap determined from photothermal spectra or electrical conductivity are studied. The current investigation is a part of research projects: BK-269/RMF-1/2006 and 1 P03B 092 27.

  20. ELECTROKINETIC PHENOMENA : VI. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRIC MOBILITY, CHARGE, AND TITRATION OF PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    Abramson, H A

    1932-05-20

    1. By combining the theories of Smoluchowski, Debye and Hückel, and Henry it is possible to state explicitly (making necessary assumptions) under what conditions the following simple rule should be valid for proteins: In solutions of the same ionic strength, the electric mobilities of the same protein at different hydrogen ion activities should be proportional to the number of hydrogen (hydroxyl) ions bound. 2. Data of Tiselius and of the writer confirm this rule for (a) egg albumin, (b) serum albumin, (c) deaminized gelatin and gelatin, and (d) casein. 3. On the basis of the confirmed theory the titration curves of certain proteins are predicted from their mobilities. 4. It is shown that when certain proteins are adsorbed by quartz the apparent dissociation constant of the adsorbed protein is practically unchanged. The mass law must also be valid at the phase boundary. 5. The facts of paragraphs (1) to (4) are discussed in connection with the mechanism of (a) protein adsorption, (b) enzyme activity, (c) immune reactions, (d) the calculation of the electric charge of cells, and (e) criteria of surface similarity. PMID:19872668

  1. Terahertz Conductivity within Colloidal CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals: Remarkably High Carrier Mobilities and Large Diffusion Lengths.

    PubMed

    Yettapu, Gurivi Reddy; Talukdar, Debnath; Sarkar, Sohini; Swarnkar, Abhishek; Nag, Angshuman; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Mandal, Pankaj

    2016-08-10

    Colloidal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as an excellent light emitting material in last one year. Using time domain and time-resolved THz spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we establish 3-fold free carrier recombination mechanism, namely, nonradiative Auger, bimolecular electron-hole recombination, and inefficient trap-assisted recombination in 11 nm sized colloidal CsPbBr3 NCs. Our results confirm a negligible influence of surface defects in trapping charge carriers, which in turn results into desirable intrinsic transport properties, from the perspective of device applications, such as remarkably high carrier mobility (∼4500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), large diffusion length (>9.2 μm), and high luminescence quantum yield (80%). Despite being solution processed and possessing a large surface to volume ratio, this combination of high carrier mobility and diffusion length, along with nearly ideal photoluminescence quantum yield, is unique compared to any other colloidal quantum dot system. PMID:27367476

  2. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" technologies and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brett D.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    Starting from the premise that new consumer value must drive hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle (H 2FCV) commercialization, a group of opportunities collectively called "Mobile Electricity" is characterized. Mobile Electricity (Me-) redefines H 2FCVs as innovative products able to import and export electricity across the traditional vehicle boundary. Such vehicles could provide home recharging and mobile power, for example for tools, mobile activities, emergencies, and electric-grid-support services. This study integrates and extends previous analyses of H 2FCVs, plug-in hybrids, and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power. Further, it uses a new electric-drive-vehicle and vehicular-distributed-generation model to estimate zero-emission-power versus zero-emission-driving tradeoffs, costs, and grid-support revenues for various electric-drive vehicle types and levels of infrastructure service. By framing market development in terms of new consumer value flowing from Me-, this study suggests a way to move beyond the battery versus fuel-cell zero-sum game and towards the development of integrated plug-in/plug-out hybrid platforms. As one possible extension of this Me- product platform, H 2FCVs might supply clean, high-power, and profitable Me- services as the technologies and markets mature.

  3. Innovators in Teacher Education: Diffusing Mobile Technologies in Teacher Preparation Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulger, Teresa S.; Waker, Mary L.; Burke, Diane; Hansen, Randall; Williams, Mia Kim; Slykhuis, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish a snapshot of the extent to which teacher educators are preparing teacher candidates to use mobile learning technologies in PK-12 classrooms, with the goal of drawing more teacher credentialing institutions into the conversations surrounding this initiative. We used a questionnaire consisting of open-ended…

  4. An electric scooter simulation program for training the driving skills of stroke patients with mobility problems: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jannink, Michiel J A; Erren-Wolters, C Victorien; de Kort, Alexander C; van der Kooij, Herman

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes an electric scooter simulation program and a first evaluation study in which we explored if it is possible to train the driving skills of future users of electric mobility scooters by means of an electric scooter simulation program in addition to conventional electric scooter training. Within this explorative study,10 stroke survivors were randomly assigned to either the control (n=5) or the electric scooter simulation intervention group (n=5). Participants were assessed twice on the functional evaluating rating scale. During the followup measurement, subjective experiences regarding both forms of electric scooter training were elicited by a questionnaire. After a training period of 5 weeks, both groups improved on the Functional Evaluation Rating Scale. It can be concluded that the patients with stroke were satisfied with the electric scooter simulation training. PMID:18954289

  5. Magmas, Mushes and Mobility: Thermal Histories of Magma Reservoirs from Combined U-Series and Diffusion Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, K. M.; Rubin, A. E.; Schrecengost, K.; Kent, A. J.; Huber, C.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conditions of magma storage control many aspects of the dynamics of a magma reservoir system. For example, the temperature of magma storage directly relates to the crystallinity, and magmas stored at relatively low temperatures in a crystal mush (more than 40-50% crystalline) must be remobilized (e.g., by heating) before they can be erupted. A better understanding of the duration of magma storage at largely-liquid vs. largely-solid conditions is thus critical to understanding crustal magmatic processes such as magma mixing and for quantifying the hazard potential of a given volcano. Although mineral thermometry reflects the conditions of crystal growth or equilibration, these may not correspond to the thermal conditions of crystal storage. The duration of crystal storage at high temperatures can be quantified by comparing U-series crystal ages with the time scales over which disequilibrium trace-element profiles in the same crystals would be erased by diffusion. In the case of Mount Hood, OR, such a comparison for the two most recent eruptions shows that <12% of the total lifetime of plagioclase crystals (minimum 21 kyr) was spent at temperatures high enough that the magma would be easily mobilized. Partial data sets for other systems suggest such behavior is common, although the diffusion and U-series ages in these cases are from different samples and may not be directly comparable. We will present preliminary data combining U-series dating and diffusion timescales on the same samples for other volcanic systems (e.g., Lassen Volcanic Center, Mount St. Helens, Okataina Volcanic Center, New Zealand). Combining these data with numerical models offers additional insights into the controls on the conditions of storage. In addition, extension of this approach to combining U-Th ages with time scales of Li diffusion in zircon offers a promising new method to quantify thermal histories of silicic reservoir systems.

  6. Diffusion in liquid metal systems. [information on electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Physical properties of twenty liquid metals are reported; some of the data on such liquid metal properties as density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity are summarized in graphical form. Data on laboratory handling and safety procedure are summarized for each metal; heat-transfer-correlations for liquid metals under various conditions of laminar and turbulent flow are included. Where sufficient data were available, temperature equations of properties were obtained by the method of least-squares fit. All values of properties given are valid in the given liquid phase ranges only. Additional tabular data on some 40 metals are reported in the appendix. Included is a brief description of experiments that were performed to investigate diffusion in liquid indium-gallium systems.

  7. Magnetically Diffused Radial Electric-Arc Air Heater Employing Water-Cooled Copper Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, R. F.; Davis, D. D., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    A magnetically rotated electric-arc air heater has been developed that is novel in that an intense magnetic field of the order of 10,000 to 25,000 gauss is employed. This field is supplied by a coil that is connected in series with the arc. Experimentation with this heater has shown that the presence of an intense magnetic field transverse to the arc results in diffusion of the arc and that the arc has a positive effective resistance. With the field coil in series with the arc, highly stable arc operation is obtained from a battery power supply. External ballast is not required to stabilize the arc when it is operating at maximum power level. The electrode erosion rate is so low that the airstream contamination is no more than 0.07 percent and may be substantially less.

  8. Electrical and materials characterization of tungsten-titanium diffusion barrier layers and alloyed silver metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Shekhar Kumar

    With the constant miniaturization of semiconductor devices, research is always ongoing to obtain the best materials and/or materials systems which fulfill all the requirements of an ideal interconnect. Silver (Ag) and silver based alloys are front runners among other metals and alloys being investigated. Ag has a low electrical resistivity (1.59 micro-ohm-centimeters for bulk), very high thermal conductivity (4.25 Watt per centimeters per Kelvin), and has better electromigration resistance than aluminum (Al). In the pure form, however, it has several drawbacks (e.g., a tendency to diffuse in silicon substrate at higher temperatures, inadequate adhesion to silicon dioxide, poor corrosion resistance, and agglomeration at higher temperatures). These drawbacks can be circumvented by the addition of diffusion barrier layers and/or alloying in silver. The present study investigates both routes to make silver a legitimate interconnect material. Initially this study focuses on thermal stability and behavior of tungsten-titanium (W-Ti) barrier layers for Ag metallization. It is shown that Ag thin films are thermally stable up to 650 degrees centigrade with the presence of W-Ti under layers. The effect of a W-Ti layer on the {111} texture formation in Ag thin film is also evaluated in detail. Insertion of a thin W-Ti over layer on Ag thin films is investigated with respect to their thermal stability. This research also evaluates the diffusion of Ag into silicon dioxide and W-Ti barriers. This project shows that W-Ti is an effective barrier layer for silver metallization. Later, the study investigates the effect of Cu addition in silver metallization and its impact on electromigration resistance. It is shown that Cu addition enhances the electromigration lifetime for silver metallization.

  9. Thermal relaxation, electrical conductivity, and charge diffusion in a hot QCD medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sukanya; Chandra, Vinod

    2016-08-01

    The response of electromagnetic (EM) fields that are produced in noncentral heavy-ion collisions to electromagnetically charged quark gluon plasma can be understood in terms of charge transport and charge diffusion in the hot QCD medium. This article presents a perspective on these processes by investigating the temperature behavior of the related transport coefficients, viz. electrical conductivity and the charge diffusion coefficients along with charge susceptibility. In the process of estimating them, thermal relaxation times for quarks and gluons have been determined first. These transport coefficients have been studied by solving the relativistic transport equation in the Chapman-Enskog method. For the analysis, 2 →2 , quark-quark, quark-gluon and gluon-gluon scattering processes are taken into account along with an effective description of hot QCD equations of state (EOSs) in terms of temperature dependent effective fugacities of quasiquarks (antiquarks) and quasigluons. Both improved perturbative hot QCD EOSs at high temperature and a lattice QCD EOS are included for the analysis. The hot QCD medium effects entering through the quasiparticle momentum distributions along with an effective coupling, are seen to have significant impact on the temperature behavior of these transport parameters along with the thermal relaxation times for the quasigluons and quasiquarks.

  10. Diffuse, non-polar electropermeabilization and reduced propidium uptake distinguish the effect of nanosecond electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Iurii; Zemlin, Christian; Pakhomova, Olga N; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2015-10-01

    Ca2+ activation and membrane electroporation by 10-ns and 4-ms electric pulses (nsEP and msEP) were compared in rat embryonic cardiomyocytes. The lowest electric field which triggered Ca2+ transients was expectedly higher for nsEP (36 kV/cm) than for msEP (0.09 kV/cm) but the respective doses were similar (190 and 460 mJ/g). At higher intensities, both stimuli triggered prolonged firing in quiescent cells. An increase of basal Ca2+ level by >10 nM in cells with blocked voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and depleted Ca2+ depot occurred at 63 kV/cm (nsEP) or 0.14 kV/cm (msEP) and was regarded as electroporation threshold. These electric field values were at 150-230% of stimulation thresholds for both msEP and nsEP, notwithstanding a 400,000-fold difference in pulse duration. For comparable levels of electroporative Ca2+ uptake, msEP caused at least 10-fold greater uptake of propidium than nsEP, suggesting increased yield of larger pores. Electroporation by msEP started Ca2+ entry abruptly and locally at the electrode-facing poles of cell, followed by a slow diffusion to the center. In a stark contrast, nsEP evoked a "supra-electroporation" pattern of slower but spatially uniform Ca2+ entry. Thus nsEP and msEP had comparable dose efficiency, but differed profoundly in the size and localization of electropores. PMID:26112464

  11. Measurement by nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion of the dimensions of the mobile lipid compartment in C6 cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Yolanda; Lahrech, Hana; Cabañas, Miquel E; Barnadas, Ramon; Sabés, Manel; Rémy, Chantal; Arús, Carles

    2002-10-15

    The (1)H spectrum of certain tumor cells, in vivo tumors, and their biopsies in vitro shows a narrow and intense resonance at 1.26 ppm, which has been assigned to the fatty acyl chain of triglycerides [nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) visible mobile lipids, MLs]. We have used diffusion-weighted NMR spectroscopy to directly address the subcellular origin of MLs in the case of C6 cells in which lactate accumulation had been inhibited by prior iodoacetamide incubation. Borage oil and artificial lipid droplets were used as model systems of free and restricted diffusion, respectively. The characteristic diameter for the ML resonance compartment measured by NMR for the C6 cells was not significantly different from the one obtained with phase contrast microscopy (1.88 +/- 0.04 micro m from NMR versus 1.37 +/- 0.33 micro m from microscopy). We herewith provide direct and noninvasive evidence that the lipid signal at 1.26 ppm in C6 cells, which remains visible in long echo time (T(E) = 136 ms) experiments, mostly originates from subcellular structures with diameters of 1-2 micro m, which correspond to the cytosolic lipid droplets that can be detected in optical microscopy preparations of the same cells. PMID:12384523

  12. Drift-Diffusion Modeling of the Effects of Structural Disorder and Carrier Mobility on the Performance of Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, Benjamin Y.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-01

    We probe the effects of structural disorder on the performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices via drift-diffusion modeling. We utilize ensembles of spatially disordered one-dimensional mobility profiles to approximate the three-dimensional structural disorder present in actual devices. Each replica in our ensemble approximates one high-conductivity pathway through the three-dimensional network(s) present in a polymer-based bulk heterojunction solar cell, so that the ensemble-averaged behavior provides a good approximation to a full three-dimensional structurally disordered device. Our calculations show that the short-circuit current, fill factor, and power conversion efficiency of simulated devices are all negatively impacted by the inclusion of structural disorder, but that the open-circuit voltage is nearly impervious to structural defects. This is in contrast to energetic disorder, where previous studies found that spatial variation in the energy in OPV active layers causes a decrease in the open-circuit voltage. We also show that structural disorder causes the greatest detriment to device performance for feature sizes between 2 and 10 nm. Since this is on the same length scale as the fullerene crystallites in experimental devices, it suggests both that controlling structural disorder is critical to the performance of OPV devices and that the effects of structural disorder should be included in future drift-diffusion modeling studies of organic solar cells.

  13. Monitoring of dust emission on gravel roads: Development of a mobile methodology and examination of horizontal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsson, Karin; Magnusson, Rolf

    Traffic-generated fugitive dust on gravel roads impairs visibility and deposits on the adjacent environment. Particulate matter smaller than 10 μm in diameter (PM 10) is also associated with human health problems. Dust emission strength depends on the composition of granular material, road moisture, relative humidity, local climate (precipitation, wind velocity, etc.), and vehicle characteristics. The objectives of this study were to develop a reliable and rapid mobile methodology to measure dust concentrations on gravel roads, evaluate the precision and repeatability of the methodology and correspondence with the currently used visual assessment technique. Downwind horizontal diffusion was studied to evaluate the risk of exceeding the maximum allowed particulate matter concentration in ambient air near gravel roads according to European Council Directive [European Council Directive 1999/30/EC of 22 April 1999 relating to limit values for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and oxides of nitrogen, particulate matter and lead in ambient air. Official Journal of the European Communities. L163/41.]. A TSI DustTrak Aerosol Monitor was mounted on an estate car travelling along test sections treated with various dust suppressants. Measured PM 10 concentrations were compared to visual assessments performed at the same time. Airborne particles were collected in filters mounted behind the vehicle to compare the whole dust fraction with the PM 10 concentration. For measuring the horizontal diffusion, DustTraks were placed at various distances downwind of a dusty road section. The mobile methodology was vehicle and speed dependent but not driver dependent with pre-specified driving behaviours. A high linear correlation between PM 10 of different vehicles makes relative measurements of dust concentrations possible. The methodology gives continuous data series, mobility, and easy handling and provides fast, reliable and inexpensive measurements for estimating road conditions to

  14. Extrinsic and intrinsic causes of the electrical degradation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulong, Fang; Shaobo, Dun; Bo, Liu; Jiayun, Yin; Shujun, Cai; Zhihong, Feng

    2012-05-01

    Electrical stress experiments under different bias configurations for AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors were performed and analyzed. The electric field applied was found to be the extrinsic cause for the device instability, while the traps were recognized as the main intrinsic factor. The effect of the traps on the device degradation was identified by recovery experiments and pulsed I-V measurements. The total degradation of the devices consists of two parts: recoverable degradation and unrecoverable degradation. The electric field induced traps combined with the inherent ones in the device bulk are mainly responsible for the recoverable degradation.

  15. Efficient Stem Cell Collection after Modified Cisplatin-Based Mobilization Chemotherapy in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lisenko, Katharina; Cremer, Martin; Schwarzbich, Mark-Alexander; Kriegsmann, Mark; Ho, Anthony D; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Wuchter, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    In patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), R-DHAP (rituximab, dexamethasone, cytarabine, and cisplatin) is a commonly used regimen for salvage therapy and for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). At our center, a modified R-DHAP regimen with administration of 25 mg/m(2) cisplatin as a 3-hour infusion over 4 consecutive days, instead of a single infusion of 100 mg/m(2) over 24 hours, has been established. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficiency of this modified R-DHAP regimen plus G-CSF as a mobilization strategy. We retrospectively analyzed clinical characteristics, PBSC collection and autologous stem cell transplantation parameters, and hematologic reconstitution data for 65 patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL who underwent PBSC collection after mobilization with the modified R-DHAP protocol at our institution between 2002 and 2013. Data were evaluated for the overall cohort and with regard to the number of R-DHAP cycles received before PBSC collection. PBSC collection was performed after the first R-DHAP course in 32 patients (49%), after the second course in 30 patients (46%), and after the third course in 3 patients (5%). Sixty-three patients (97%) achieved the collection goal of ≥2.0 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg body weight. A significantly higher median CD34(+) cell collection yield was achieved when cells were collected after the first R-DHAP course compared with after the second course (P < .01). A peripheral blood leukocyte increase of ≥1.0 × 10(9)/L and a platelet increase of ≥20 × 10(9)/L were observed by 11 days after ASCT. In our cohort, the modified R-DHAP regimen proved safe and feasible, showed an overall response rate (complete response, complete response unconfirmed, and partial response) of 66%, and allowed efficient mobilization of CD34(+) cells for PBSC collection. PMID:27060439

  16. Thermal Diffusion Processes in Metal-Tip-Surface Interactions: Contact Formation and Adatom Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Mads R.; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Jónsson, Hannes

    1996-12-01

    We have carried out computer simulations to identify and characterize various thermally activated atomic scale processes that can play an important role in room temperature experiments where a metal tip is brought close to a metal surface. We find that contact formation between the tip and the surface can occur by a sequence of atomic hop and exchange processes which become active on a millisecond time scale when the tip is about 3-5 Å from the surface. Adatoms on the surface are stabilized by the presence of the tip and energy barriers for diffusion processes in the region under the tip are reduced. This can cause adatoms to follow the tip as it is moved over the surface.

  17. Study on electrical characteristics of barrier-free atmospheric air diffuse discharge generated by nanosecond pulses and long wire electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Teng, Yun; Liu, Lun; Pan, Yuan

    2014-07-15

    In room-temperature atmospheric air, the large-scale diffuse plasmas can be generated via high-voltage nanosecond pulses with short rise-time and wire electrodes. Diffuse discharge with the wire electrode length up to 110.0 cm and the discharge spacing of several centimeters has been investigated in this paper. Electrical characteristics of diffuse discharge have been analyzed by their optical photographs and measuring of the voltage and current waveforms. Experimental results show the electrode spacing, and the length of wire electrodes can influence the intensity and mode transition of diffuse discharge. The characteristic of current waveforms is that there are several current oscillation peaks at the time of applied pulsed voltage peak, and at the tail of applied pulse, the conduction current component will compensate the displacement one so that the measured current is unidirectional in diffuse discharge mode. The transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge is always with the increasing of conduction current density. As for nanosecond pulses with long tail, the long wire electrodes are help for generating non-equilibrium diffuse plasmas.

  18. Satellite applications to electric-utility communications needs. [land mobile satellite service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, M.; Barnett, R.

    1981-01-01

    Significant changes in the Nation's electric power systems are expected to result from the integration of new technology, possible during the next decade. Digital communications for monitor and control, exclusive of protective relaying, are expected to double or triple current traffic. A nationwide estimate of 13 Mb/s traffic is projected. Of this total, 8 Mb/s is attributed to the bulk-power system as it is now being operated (4 Mb/s). This traffic could be accommodated by current communications satellites using 3- to 4.5-m-diameter ground terminals costing $35,000 to $70,000 each. The remaining 5-Mb/s traffic is attributed to new technology concepts integrated into the distribution system. Such traffic is not compatible with current satellite technology because it requires small, low-cost ground terminals. Therefore, a high effective isotropic radiated power satellite, such as the one being planned by NASA for the Land Mobile Satellite Service, is required.

  19. Midnight ionosphere collapse at Arecibo and its relationship to the neutral wind, electric field, and ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yun; Zhou, Qihou; Zhang, Shaodong; Aponte, Nestor; Sulzer, Michael; Gonzalez, Sixto

    2012-08-01

    We report the analysis of "midnight collapse," a large drop in the F-layer peak height (HmF2) around midnight, observed at Arecibo during Jan. 14-22, 2010. During the nine nights of observations, the first four nights (Jan. 14-17) exhibited modest drops in HmF2 while the last five nights (Jan. 18-22) showed more severe drops. We examine the roles played by the meridional wind, electric field, and ambipolar diffusion in driving the vertical ion motion. The collapse process can be classified into three stages: preconditioning, initial descent, and sustained descent. Severe collapses occur when HmF2 is preconditioned high prior to the collapse. Ambipolar diffusion is most important during the initial descent. Neutral wind and electric field are responsible for sustaining the collapse. During Jan. 18-22, HmF2 was pushed high by the neutral wind before the collapse started. Neutral wind and electric field were in phase during the sustained severe collapses. The diurnal tide of the meridional wind provided the general condition for the collapses. The terdiurnal tide was most important to cause the difference between the two periods in our observation. Previous studies largely emphasized meridional wind being the dominant mechanism causing midnight collapse. Our study suggests that electric field and ambipolar diffusion also play an important role and the former can be the most dominant factor in some cases.

  20. Simultaneously improving electrical conductivity and thermopower of polyaniline composites by utilizing carbon nanotubes as high mobility conduits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Yi, Su-in; Pu, Xiong; Yu, Choongho

    2015-05-13

    Electrical conductivity and thermopower of isotropic materials typically have inversely proportional correlation because both are strongly affected in the opposite way by the electronic carrier concentration. This behavior has been one of the major hurdles in developing high-performance thermoelectrics whose figure-of-merit enhances with large thermopower and high electrical conductivity. Here we report a promising method of simultaneously improving both properties with polyaniline (PANI) composites filled by carbon nanotubes (CNTs). With addition of double-wall CNTs (DWCNTs), the electronic mobility of PANI doped with camphorsulfonic acid (PANI-CSA) was raised from ∼0.15 to ∼7.3 cm(2)/(V s) (∼50 time improvement) while the carrier concentration was decreased from ∼2.1 × 10(21) to ∼5.6 × 10(20) cm(-3) (∼4 time reduction). The larger increase of mobility increased electrical conductivity despite the carrier concentration reduction that enlarges thermopower. The improvement in the carrier mobility could be attributed to the band alignment that attracts hole carriers to CNTs whose mobility is much higher than that of PANI-CSA. The electrical conductivity of the PANI-CSA composites with 30-wt % DWCNTs was measured to be ∼610 S/cm with a thermopower value of ∼61 μV/K at room temperature, resulting in a power factor value of ∼220 μW/(m K(2)), which is more than two orders higher than that of PANI-CSA as well as the highest among those of the previously reported PANI composites. Further study may result in high performance thermoelectric organic composites uniquely offering mechanical flexibility, light weight, low toxicity, and easy manufacturing. unlike conventional inorganic semiconductors. PMID:25894982

  1. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Rasouli Amirhajeloo, Leila; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m  and 2.23±0.39 v/m , respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23 %and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart  mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz  was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone. PMID:27157169

  2. Origin of the unidentified positive mobile ions causing the bias temperature instability in SiC MOSFETs and their diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Hiroki; Kamiya, Katsumasa; Araidai, Masaaki; Watanabe, Heiji; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    For SiC metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), it has been shown that unidentified positive mobile ions are generated in SiO2 after conventional hydrogen annealing, which leads to significant reliability degradation known as bias temperature instability (BTI). Discovering the origin of these mobile ions is important for fabricating highly reliable SiC MOSFETs. On the basis of first-principles calculations, we verified that the BTI of SiC MOSFETs is caused by hydrogen ions combining with CO3-like defects in SiO2. These hydrogen ions dissociate from the CO3-like defects and diffuse “as protons” in SiO2. These results indicate that the observed positive mobile ions are protons.

  3. Electrical mobility in organic thin-film transistors determined by noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonavolontà, C.; Albonetti, C.; Barra, M.; Valentino, M.

    2011-11-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFET) based on both n-type (perylene derivative) and p-type (α-sexithiophene and pentacene) organic thin films are characterized using low-frequency noise spectroscopy to estimate the charge carrier mobility. The power spectral density shows that the exposure of OFET to air affects the thermal noise fluctuations and that the thermal noise RMS value depends on gate voltage. The power spectral density noise proves that the carrier mobility is gate-voltage dependent. Unlike the I-V measurements, the noise spectroscopy analysis demonstrates the dependence of the mobility on the carrier polarity. We discuss the charge mobility and transport mechanism of a pentacene device with and without electrodes functionalized by an octanethiol chain. The results show that in the functionalized device the carrier mobility is improved and does not depend on the high gate voltage.

  4. Theoretical examination of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient and electrical conductivity of polymer electrolyte fuel cell porous components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Gen; Yokoyama, Kouji; Ooyama, Junpei; Terao, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Kubo, Norio; Kawase, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    The reduction of oxygen transfer resistance through porous components consisting of a gas diffusion layer (GDL), microporous layer (MPL), and catalyst layer (CL) is very important to reduce the cost and improve the performance of a PEFC system. This study involves a systematic examination of the relationship between the oxygen transfer resistance of the actual porous components and their three-dimensional structure by direct measurement with FIB-SEM and X-ray CT. Numerical simulations were carried out to model the properties of oxygen transport. Moreover, based on the model structure and theoretical equations, an approach to the design of new structures is proposed. In the case of the GDL, the binder was found to obstruct gas diffusion with a negative effect on performance. The relative diffusion coefficient of the MPL is almost equal to that of the model structure of particle packing. However, that of CL is an order of magnitude less than those of the other two components. Furthermore, an equation expressing the relative diffusion coefficient of each component can be obtained with the function of porosity. The electrical conductivity of MPL, which is lower than that of the carbon black packing, is considered to depend on the contact resistance.

  5. Diffusion zone between high-chromium cast iron and high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, V.P.; Shvartser, A.Y.; Stroganova, G.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigate extending the service lives of components by the method of electric-slag facing of working surfaces. Steel 45 was used in the annealed state. Electric-slag remelting was the method used to determine the bending strength. Metallographic examinations were conducted under an MIM-8m microscope, while x-ray analysis of the built-up and base metals were performed on a DRON-2 diffractometer. BAsic alloying elements, chromium and manganese were studied on a ''Cameca MS-46'' microanalyzer. During the electri-slag facing of a high-chromium cast iron containing 8% of Mn on high-manganese steel 11OG13L diffusion equalization of the manganese content occurs in the fusion zone. Diffusion displacement of carbon, chromium, and manganese from high-chromium cast iron into the high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing gies rise to a smooth change in the structure of the metal in the fusion zone, and to increased strength of the joint between the unlike materials investigated.

  6. Variation in the electrical properties of 100 V/100 a rated mesh and stripe TDMOSFETs (Trench Double-Diffused MOSFETs) for motor drive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Kyoung-Il; Kah, Dong-Ha; Kim, Sang-Gi; Koo, Jin-Gun; Kim, Jongdae; Yang, Yil-Suk; Lee, Jin-Ho

    2012-05-01

    The vertical power metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with deep trench structures are the most promising candidates to overcome the trade-off relationship between the ON-resistance (R ON ) and the blocking voltage (BV DS ). Especially, 100 V/100 A rated trench power MOSFETs are used in components of many power systems, such as motors and LED lighting drive ICs, DC-DC converters in electric vehicles, and so on. In this work, we studied variations of the electrical characteristics, such as threshold voltage (V TH ), BV DS , and drain current drivability, with p-well doping concentration via the SILVACO simulator. From simulation results, we found the BV DS and the drain current (I D ) as functions of the p-well doping concentration at an ion implantation energy of 80 keV. With increasing of p-well doping concentration in the guard ring region, both V TH and BV DS slowly increased, but I D decreased, because the boron lateral diffusion during the fabrication process below gate trench region affected the doping concentration of the p-body at the active region. Additionally, 100 V/100 A rated trench double-diffused MOSFETs (TDMOSFETs) with meshes and stripes were successfully developed by using a silicon deep etching process. The variations in the electrical properties, such as V TH , BV DS , and drain current drivability, of the two different kinds of fabricated devices, with cell design and density in TDMOSFETs were also studied. The BV DS and the V TH in the stripe-type TDMOSFET were 110 and 3 V, respectively. However, the V TH of mesh-type device was smaller 0.5 V than that of stripe-type because of corner effect. The BV DS improved about 20 V compared to stripe-type TDMOSFET due to edge termination, and the maximum drain current (I D.MAX ) was improved by about 10% due to an increase in the gate width at the same chip size. These effects were reflected in devices with different cell densities. When the cell density was increased, however

  7. The role of waves and DC electric fields for electron heating and acceleration in the diffusion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Daniel; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Vaivads, Andris; Norgren, Cecilia; Andre, Mats; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Le Contel, Olivier; Ergun, Robert; Goodrich, Katherine; Torbert, Roy; Burch, James; Russell, Christopher; Magnes, Werner; Giles, Barbara; Pollock, Craig; Mauk, Barry; Fuselier, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in solar and astrophysical plasmas. The processes operating at electron spatial-scales, which enable magnetic field lines to reconnect, are generally difficult to resolve and identify. However, the recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is specifically designed to resolve electron spatial scales. We use the MMS spacecraft to investigate the process operating within the diffusion region to determine the causes of electron heating and acceleration. In particular, we investigate the type of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves that develop and how they affect the electron distributions. We also compare the roles of wave-particle interactions with DC electric fields to determine which is responsible for the electron heating observed in diffusion regions.

  8. Effect of Epidural Electrical Stimulation and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Rats With Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong-Soon; Cho, Kang Hee; Kim, Eun-Sil; Lee, Mi-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of epidural electrical stimulation (EES) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on motor recovery and brain activity in a rat model of diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to the control group. Methods Thirty rats weighing 270-285 g with diffuse TBI with 45 kg/cm2 using a weight-drop model were assigned to one of three groups: the EES group (ES) (anodal electrical stimulation at 50 Hz), the rTMS group (MS) (magnetic stimulation at 10 Hz, 3-second stimulation with 6-second intervals, 4,000 total stimulations per day), and the sham-treated control group (sham) (no stimulation). They were pre-trained to perform a single-pellet reaching task (SPRT) and a rotarod test (RRT) for 14 days. Diffuse TBI was then induced and an electrode was implanted over the dominant motor cortex. The changes in SPRT success rate, RRT performance time rate and the expression of c-Fos after two weeks of EES or rTMS were tracked. Results SPRT improved significantly from day 8 to day 12 in the ES group and from day 4 to day 14 in the MS group (p<0.05) compared to the sham group. RRT improved significantly from day 6 to day 11 in ES and from day 4 to day 9 in MS compared to the sham group. The ES and MS groups showed increased expression of c-Fos in the cerebral cortex compared to the sham group. Conclusion ES or MS in a rat model of diffuse TBI can be used to enhance motor recovery and brain activity. PMID:26161348

  9. A study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-10-01

    We have studied electron conduction mechanisms and the associated roles of the electrically active traps in the AlGaN layer of an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure. By fitting the temperature dependent I-V (Current-Voltage) curves to the Frenkel-Poole theory, we have identified two discrete trap energy levels. Multiple traces of I-V measurements and constant-current injection experiment all confirm that the main role of the traps in the AlGaN layer is to enhance the current flowing through the AlGaN barrier by trap-assisted electron conduction without causing electron trapping.

  10. Improvement of Electrical Properties of Silicon Quantum Dot Superlattice Solar Cells with Diffusion Barrier Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the effects of a niobium-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2:Nb) diffusion barrier layer on the performance of silicon quantum dot superlattice (Si-QDSL) solar cells. The insertion of a 2-nm-thick TiO2:Nb layer significantly reduces phosphorus diffusion from a highly doped n-type layer into a Si-QDSL layer during thermal annealing at 900 °C. The phosphorous concentration in the Si-QDSL layer of the solar cell with the TiO2:Nb diffusion barrier layer was found to be less than 1018 cm-3, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of the solar cell without the diffusion barrier layer. The reduction in phosphorous concentration leads to the improvement of photo-generated carrier collection in the Si-QDSL layer. The short circuit current density of the solar cell with the diffusion barrier layer was dramatically improved to 1.6 mA/cm2 without the degradation of open circuit voltage and fill factor.

  11. Ambipolar diffusion in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzur, I.; Roble, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    In the middle atmosphere above 60 km, the electron concentration increases with altitude, reaching values of 10 to the 10th per cu m in the daytime ionospheric E region near 100 km. The electrons are more mobile than the ions and diffuse more rapidly through the neutral atmosphere. The electron diffusion polarizes the medium, causing an electric field to develop that acts to retard the electron diffusion and enhance the conduction current of ions. A global zonally averaged numerical model of atmosheric electricity from the ground to 100 km is used to examine the effect of ambipolar diffusion and the earth's geomagnetic field on the currents and fields in the middle atmosphere. The results show that above about 65 km, ambipolar diffusion generates local electric fields and conduction currents that balance electron diffusion currents. The electric fields and conduction currents are a few orders of magnitude larger than the vertical fields and currents calculated from the downward mapping of the ionospheric potential without taking electron diffusion into account. Ambipolar diffusion does not alter the total current flowing in the global circuit. It is a local effect where enhanced conduction currens flow to balance the electron diffusion current.

  12. ELECTROKINETIC PHENOMENA : X. ELECTRIC MOBILITY AND CHARGE OF PROTEINS IN ALCOHOL-WATER MIXTURES.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J

    1933-01-20

    1. The electrophoretic velocities of gelatin-, egg-albumin-, and gliadin-covered quartz particles in various alcohol-water solutions are, within the limits employed in usual experimental procedures, proportional to the field strength. 2. The electrophoretic mobilities of small, irregularly shaped quartz particles covered with an adsorbed film of protein in alcohol-water solutions are equal to the electroosmotic mobilities of the liquid past similarly coated flat surfaces. Hence the size and shape of such particles does not influence their mobilities, which depend entirely on the protein film. 3. The corrected mobility and hence presumably the charge of gelatin-covered quartz particles in solutions containing 35 per cent ethyl alcohol is proportional to the combining power of the gelatin; therefore the gelatin is adsorbed with the active groups oriented toward the liquid. The same is true in 60 per cent alcohol. 4. The charge calculated by means of the Debye-Henry approximation from the mobility of gelatin in solutions containing up to 35 per cent ethyl alcohol is, in the neighborhood of the isoelectric point, proportional to the combining power of the gelatin. Therefore the dielectric constant and the viscosity of the bulk of the medium may be used in the Debye-Henry approximation Q = 6 pi eta r v(m) (1 + kappa r) to predict changes in charge from mobility. 5. In the neighborhood of the isoelectric point gelatin is probably completely ionized in buffered ethyl alcohol-water mixtures up to 60 per cent alcohol. 6. In the presence of ethyl alcohol the isoelectric point of gelatin is shifted toward smaller hydrogen ion activities. This shift, like that caused by alcohol in the isoelectric points of certain amino acids, is approximately linearly related to the dielectric constant of the medium. PMID:19872717

  13. Low and moderate dose gamma-irradiation and annealing impact on electronic and electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anupama; Flitsiyan, Elena; Chernyak, Leonid; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Lei, Lei; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen J.; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2015-05-01

    To understand the effects of 60Co gamma-irradiation, systematic studies were carried out on n-channel AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Electrical testing, combined with electron beam-induced current measurements, was able to provide critical information on defects induced in the material as a result of gamma-irradiation. It was shown that at low gamma-irradiation doses, the minority carrier diffusion length in AlGaN/GaN exhibits an increase up to ∼300 Gy. The observed effect is due to longer minority carrier (hole) life time in the material's valence band as a result of an internal electron irradiation by Compton electrons. However, for larger doses of gamma irradiation (above 400 Gy), deteriorations in transport properties and device characteristics were observed. This is consistent with the higher density of deep traps in the material's forbidden gap induced by a larger dose of gamma-irradiation. Moderate annealing of device structures at 200°C for 25 min resulted in partial recovery of transport properties and device performance.

  14. Experimental and numerical modeling study of the electrical resistance of gas diffusion layer-less polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shiro; Shudo, Toshio

    2015-03-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL)-less fuel cell composed of a corrugated-mesh shows low flooding performance even in the high current density region, since the gases are supplied more uniformly to the catalyst layer (CL) compared with the conventional fuel cells that utilize GDLs. On the other hand, the internal electrical resistance of the GDL-less fuel cell is higher than that of the conventional fuel cell, because the corrugated-mesh and the underlying microporous layer (MPL) have a low contact area with point contacts. This can greatly increase the resistance at the interface between the corrugated-mesh and MPL as well as that between the MPL and CL, compared to the conventional fuel cell where GDL can make a good contact with the MPL. In this study, the conductivities and the contact resistances of each material in the GDL-less fuel cell were measured under various mechanical compression pressures, and a coupled mechanical-electric-electrochemical model was developed to investigate the effect of electrical resistance on the fuel cell performance. We found that our model can simulate the GDL-less fuel cell well and the electric resistance contributes significantly to the polarization performance in the GDL-less fuel cell.

  15. ELECTROKINETIC PHENOMENA : VII. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRIC MOBILITY, CHARGE, TITRATION CURVE, AND OPTICAL ROTATION OF PROTEIN.

    PubMed

    Abramson, H A; Grossman, E B

    1932-05-20

    The specific rotation of egg albumin, gliadin, and gelatin (40 degrees C.) is discussed in connection with available data on (a) mobility, (b) titration curve, and (c) osmotic pressure. It seems likely that the change in specific rotation with pH of protein solutions is proportional to the change in net charge. PMID:19872669

  16. Structures, Hydration, and Electrical Mobilities of Bisulfate Ion-Sulfuric Acid-Ammonia/Dimethylamine Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Tsona, Narcisse T; Henschel, Henning; Bork, Nicolai; Loukonen, Ville; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2015-09-17

    Despite the well-established role of small molecular clusters in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation, their thermochemical data are still not completely available due to limitation of the experimental techniques to treat such small clusters. We have investigated the structures and the thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of clusters containing one bisulfate ion, sulfuric acid, base (ammonia or dimethylamine), and water molecules using quantum chemical methods. We found that water facilitates proton transfer from sulfuric acid or the bisulfate ion to the base or water molecules, and depending on the hydration level, the sulfate ion was formed in most of the base-containing clusters. The calculated hydration energies indicate that water binds more strongly to ammonia-containing clusters than to dimethylamine-containing and base-free clusters, which results in a wider hydrate distribution for ammonia-containing clusters. The electrical mobilities of all clusters were calculated using a particle dynamics model. The results indicate that the effect of humidity is negligible on the electrical mobilities of molecular clusters formed in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation. The combination of the results of this study with those previously published on the hydration of neutral clusters by our group provides a comprehensive set of thermochemical data on neutral and negatively charged clusters containing sulfuric acid, ammonia, or dimethylamine. PMID:26304742

  17. Solution processing of transparent conducting epitaxial La:BaSnO3 films with improved electrical mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R. H.; Tang, X. W.; Hui, Z. Z.; Luo, X.; Dai, J. M.; Yang, J.; Song, W. H.; Chen, L.; Zhu, X. G.; Zhu, X. B.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-03-01

    As a type of perovskite transparent conducting oxides, La-doped BaSnO3 is considered as a very important material to construct all transparent perovskite devices. The difficulty in achievement of large-area films with high electrical mobility has hindered the development of La-doped BaSnO3 films. Here, we report the results about chemical solution deposition of Ba0.92La0.08SnO3-δ (BLSO) films. The post-annealing and atmosphere as well as lattice mismatch have been investigated. Post-annealing at 1000 °C can obviously improve the performance due to the enhanced crystallization. Under post-annealing in N2 atmosphere the room-temperature resistivity and electrical mobility can achieve 3.25 mΩ cm and 11.09 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively, for the BLSO on LaAlO3 single crystal substrates due to the enhanced oxygen deficiencies. BLSO films with different orientation can be easily obtained by selection of the substrates, showing isotropic physical properties. Furthermore, the room-temperature resistivity and mobility are optimized to 1.8 mΩ cm and 23.04 cm2 V-1 s-1 when SrTiO3 single crystal substrates with smaller lattice mismatch are used due to the decreased dislocation density. The results will provide an alternative route to fabricate large-area transparent conducting alkaline-earth stannate films with high performance using low-cost chemical solution deposition.

  18. Multi-Instrument Manager Tool for Data Acquisition and Merging of Optical and Electrical Mobility Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritscher, Torsten; Koched, Amine; Han, Hee-Siew; Filimundi, Eric; Johnson, Tim; Elzey, Sherrie; Avenido, Aaron; Kykal, Carsten; Bischof, Oliver F.

    2015-05-01

    Electrical mobility classification (EC) followed by Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) detection is the technique combined in Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers(SMPS) to retrieve nanoparticle size distributions in the range from 2.5 nm to 1 μm. The detectable size range of SMPS systems can be extended by the addition of an Optical Particle Sizer(OPS) that covers larger sizes from 300 nm to 10 μm. This optical sizing method reports an optical equivalent diameter, which is often different from the electrical mobility diameter measured by the standard SMPS technique. Multi-Instrument Manager (MIMTM) software developed by TSI incorporates algorithms that facilitate merging SMPS data sets with data based on optical equivalent diameter to compile single, wide-range size distributions. Here we present MIM 2.0, the next-generation of the data merging tool that offers many advanced features for data merging and post-processing. MIM 2.0 allows direct data acquisition with OPS and NanoScan SMPS instruments to retrieve real-time particle size distributions from 10 nm to 10 μm, which we show in a case study at a fireplace. The merged data can be adjusted using one of the merging options, which automatically determines an overall aerosol effective refractive index. As a result an indirect and average characterization of aerosol optical and shape properties is possible. The merging tool allows several pre-settings, data averaging and adjustments, as well as the export of data sets and fitted graphs. MIM 2.0 also features several post-processing options for SMPS data and differences can be visualized in a multi-peak sample over a narrow size range.

  19. The effect of interfacial diffusion on the electrical resistivity of magnetron sputtered Al-Fe-Sn alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guannan; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Zeng; Zhang, Yong; Yan, Biao

    2016-03-01

    The effect of interfacial diffusion in post-deposition annealing on the electrical resistivity of AlFeSn alloy films was investigated for the first time. The microstructure of the film before and after annealing was characterized by Atomic Force Microscope and Transmission Electron Microscope. The temperature dependence of resistivity in the range from 30 to 300 K suggests the presence of electron localization in both as-deposited and annealed films. The electron localization in the as-deposited film could be attributed to structural discontinuity. However, the electron localization in the annealed samples could probably be attributed to the diffusion of Si atoms into the film. An electrical resistivity as low as 1.43 μΩ cm was achieved for a 60 nm thick sample, which is considerably lower than predicted and previously reported. We propose the supreme conductivity of the annealed films could be partly due to the contribution from the electron localization. Our results provide new insight into developing highly conductive metallic materials.

  20. Electrical effect of titanium diffusion on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seung-Ha; Jung, Woo-Shik; Park, Jin-Hong

    2012-11-19

    In this work, thermal diffusion phenomenon of Ti into amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide ({alpha}-IGZO) was carefully investigated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy, I-V, and R{sub s} measurement systems and HSC chemistry simulation tool. According to the experimental and simulated results, the diffused Ti atoms were easily oxidized due to its lowest oxidation free energy. Since oxygen atoms were decomposed from the {alpha}-IGZO during the oxidation of Ti, the number of oxygen vacancies working as electron-donating sites in {alpha}-IGZO was dramatically increased, contributing to the decrease of resistivity ({rho}) from 1.96 {Omega} cm (as-deposited {alpha}-IGZO) to 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}{Omega} cm (350 Degree-Sign C annealed {alpha}-IGZO).

  1. Physical properties of transparent perovskite oxides (Ba,La)SnO3 with high electrical mobility at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Useong; Kim, Tai Hoon; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Hoon Min; Jeon, Byung-Gu; Lee, Woong-Jhae; Mun, Hyo Sik; Hong, Kwang Taek; Yu, Jaejun; Char, Kookrin; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2012-10-01

    Transparent electronic materials are increasingly in demand for a variety of optoelectronic applications, ranging from passive transparent conductive windows to active thin-film transistors. BaSnO3 is a semiconducting oxide with a large band gap of more than 3.1 eV. Recently, we discovered that BaSnO3 doped with a few percent of La exhibits an unusually high electrical mobility of 320cm2V-1s-1 at room temperature and superior thermal stability at high temperatures [H. J. Kim , Appl. Phys. ExpressAPECE41882-077810.1143/APEX.5.061102 5, 061102 (2012)]. Following that paper, here, we report various physical properties of (Ba,La)SnO3 single crystals and epitaxial films including temperature-dependent transport and phonon properties, optical properties, and first-principles calculations. We find that almost doping-independent mobility of 200-300cm2V-1s-1 is realized in the single crystals in a broad doping range from 1.0×1019 to 4.0×1020 cm-3. Moreover, the conductivity of ˜104Ω-1cm-1 reached at the latter carrier density is comparable to the highest value previously reported in the transparent conducting oxides. We attribute the high mobility to several physical properties of (Ba,La)SnO3: a small effective mass coming from the ideal Sn-O-Sn bonding in a cubic perovskite network, small disorder effects due to the doping away from the SnO6 octahedra, and reduced carrier scattering due to the high dielectric constant. The observation of the reduced mobility of ˜70cm2V-1s-1 in the epitaxial films is mainly attributed to additional carrier scattering due to dislocations and grain boundaries, which are presumably created by the lattice mismatch between the substrate SrTiO3 and (Ba,La)SnO3. The main optical gap coming from the charge transfer from O 2p to Sn 5s bands in (Ba,La)SnO3 single crystals remained at about 3.33 eV, and the in-gap states only slightly increased, thus, maintaining optical transparency in the visible spectral region. Based on all these results, we

  2. Water-Rock Interaction Simulations of Iron Oxide Mobilization and Precipitation: Implications of Cross-diffusion Reactions for Terrestrial and Mars 'Blueberry' Hematite Concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. J.; Chan, M. A.; Parry, W. T.

    2005-12-01

    Modeling of how terrestrial concretions form can provide valuable insights into understanding water-rock interactions that led to the formation of hematite concretions at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Numerical simulations of iron oxide concretions in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah provide physical and chemical input parameters for emulating conditions that may have prevailed on Mars. In the terrestrial example, iron oxide coatings on eolian sand grains are reduced and mobilized by methane or petroleum. Precipitation of goethite or hematite occurs as Fe interacts with oxygen. Conditions that produced Navajo Sandstone concretions can range from a regional scale that is strongly affected by advection of large pore volumes of water, to small sub-meter scale features that are dominantly controlled by diffusive processes. Hematite concretions are results of a small-scale cross-diffusional process, where Fe and oxygen are supplied from two opposite sides from the 'middle' zone of mixing where concretions precipitate. This is an ideal natural system where Liesegang banding and other self-organized patterns can evolve. A complicating variable here is the sedimentologic (both mineralogic and textural) heterogeneity that, in reality, may be the key factor controlling the nucleation and precipitation habits (including possible competitive growth) of hematite concretions. Sym.8 water-rock interaction simulator program was used for the Navajo Sandstone concretions. Sym.8 is a water-rock simulator that accounts for advective and diffusive mass-transfer, and equilibrium and kinetic reactions. The program uses a dynamic composite media texture model to address changing sediment composition and texture to be consistent with the reaction progress. Initial one-dimensional simulation results indicate precipitation heterogeneity in the range of sub-meters, e.g., possible banding and distribution of iron oxide nodules may be centimeters apart for published diffusivities and

  3. Lifetime, mobility, and diffusion of photoexcited carriers in ligand-exchanged lead selenide nanocrystal films measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guglietta, Glenn W; Diroll, Benjamin T; Gaulding, E Ashley; Fordham, Julia L; Li, Siming; Murray, Christopher B; Baxter, Jason B

    2015-02-24

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have been used as building blocks for electronic and optoelectronic devices ranging from field-effect transistors to solar cells. Properties of the nanocrystal films depend sensitively on the choice of capping ligand to replace the insulating synthesis ligands. Thus far, ligands leading to the best performance in transistors result in poor solar cell performance, and vice versa. To gain insight into the nature of this dichotomy, we used time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements to study the mobility and lifetime of PbSe nanocrystal films prepared with five common ligand-exchange reagents. Noncontact terahertz spectroscopy measurements of conductivity were corroborated by contacted van der Pauw measurements of the same samples. The films treated with different displacing ligands show more than an order of magnitude difference in the peak conductivities and a bifurcation of time dynamics. Inorganic chalcogenide ligand exchanges with sodium sulfide (Na2S) or ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) show high mobilities but nearly complete decay of transient photocurrent in 1.4 ns. In contrast, ligand exchanges with 1,2-ethylenediamine (EDA), 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT), and tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBAI) show lower mobilities but longer carrier lifetimes, resulting in longer diffusion lengths. This bifurcated behavior may explain the divergent performance of field-effect transistors and photovoltaics constructed from nanocrystal building blocks with different ligand exchanges. PMID:25644854

  4. Negative Ion Drift Velocity and Longitudinal Diffusion in Mixtures of Carbon Disulfide and Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dion, Michael P.; Son, S.; Hunter, S. D.; deNolfo, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Negative ion drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion has been measured for gas mixtures of carbon disulfide (CS2) and methane (CH4)' Measurements were made as a function of total pressure, CS2 partial pressure and electric field. Constant mobility and thermal-limit longitudinal diffusion is observed for all gas mixtures tested. Gas gain for some of the mixtures is also included.

  5. Electrical detection of biomaterials using AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.

    2008-08-01

    Chemical sensors can be used to analyze a wide variety of environmental and biological gases and liquids and may need to be able to selectively detect a target analyte. Different methods, including gas chromatography, chemiluminescence, selected ion flow tube, and mass spectroscopy, have been used to measure biomarkers. These methods show variable results in terms of sensitivity for some applications and may not meet the requirements for a handheld biosensor. A promising sensing technology utilizes AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). HEMT structures have been developed for use in microwave power amplifiers due to their high two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility and saturation velocity. The conducting 2DEG channel of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs is very close to the surface and extremely sensitive to adsorption of analytes. HEMT sensors can be used for detecting gases, ions, pH values, proteins, and DNA. In this paper we review recent progress on functionalizing the surface of HEMTs for specific detection of glucose, kidney marker injury molecules, prostate cancer, and other common substances of interest in the biomedical field.

  6. Spatio-temporal modelling of electrical supply systems to optimize the site planning process for the "power to mobility" technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Florian; Zink, Roland

    2016-04-01

    The transformation of the energy sector towards decentralized renewable energies (RE) requires also storage systems to ensure security of supply. The new "Power to Mobility" (PtM) technology is one potential solution to use electrical overproduction to produce methane for i.e. gas vehicles. Motivated by these fact, the paper presents a methodology for a GIS-based temporal modelling of the power grid, to optimize the site planning process for the new PtM-technology. The modelling approach is based on a combination of the software QuantumGIS for the geographical and topological energy supply structure and OpenDSS for the net modelling. For a case study (work in progress) of the city of Straubing (Lower Bavaria) the parameters of the model are quantified. The presentation will discuss the methodology as well as the first results with a view to the application on a regional scale.

  7. General electrokinetic model for concentrated suspensions in aqueous electrolyte solutions: Electrophoretic mobility and electrical conductivity in static electric fields.

    PubMed

    Carrique, Félix; Ruiz-Reina, Emilio; Roa, Rafael; Arroyo, Francisco J; Delgado, Ángel V

    2015-10-01

    In recent years different electrokinetic cell models for concentrated colloidal suspensions in aqueous electrolyte solutions have been developed. They share some of its premises with the standard electrokinetic model for dilute colloidal suspensions, in particular, neglecting both the specific role of the so-called added counterions (i.e., those released by the particles to the solution as they get charged), and the realistic chemistry of the aqueous solution on such electrokinetic phenomena as electrophoresis and electrical conductivity. These assumptions, while having been accepted for dilute conditions (volume fractions of solids well below 1%, say), are now questioned when dealing with concentrated suspensions. In this work, we present a general electrokinetic cell model for such kind of systems, including the mentioned effects, and we also carry out a comparative study with the standard treatment (the standard solution only contains the ions that one purposely adds, without ionic contributions from particle charging or water chemistry). We also consider an intermediate model that neglects the realistic aqueous chemistry of the solution but accounts for the correct contribution of the added counterions. The results show the limits of applicability of the classical assumptions and allow one to better understand the relative role of the added counterions and ions stemming from the electrolyte in a realistic aqueous solution, on electrokinetic properties. For example, at low salt concentrations the realistic effects of the aqueous solution are the dominant ones, while as salt concentration is increased, it is this that progressively takes the control of the electrokinetic response for low to moderate volume fractions. As expected, if the solids concentration is high enough the added counterions will play the dominant role (more important the higher the particle surface charge), no matter the salt concentration if it is not too high. We hope this work can help in

  8. Comparison of Three E-Beam Techniques for Electric Field Imaging and Carrier Diffusion Length Measurement on the Same Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Donatini, F; de Luna Bugallo, Andres; Tchoulfian, Pierre; Chicot, Gauthier; Sartel, Corinne; Sallet, Vincent; Pernot, Julien

    2016-05-11

    Whereas nanowire (NW)-based devices offer numerous advantages compared to bulk ones, their performances are frequently limited by an incomplete understanding of their properties where surface effect should be carefully considered. Here, we demonstrate the ability to spatially map the electric field and determine the exciton diffusion length in NW by using an electron beam as the single excitation source. This approach is performed on numerous single ZnO NW Schottky diodes whose NW radius vary from 42.5 to 175 nm. The dominant impact of the surface on the NW properties is revealed through the comparison of three different physical quantities recorded on the same NW: electron-beam induced current, cathodoluminescence, and secondary electron signal. Indeed, the space charge region near the Schottky contact exhibits an unusual linear variation with reverse bias whatever the NW radius. On the contrary, the exciton diffusion length is shown to be controlled by the NW radius through surface recombination. This systematic comparison performed on a single ZnO NW demonstrates the power of these complementary techniques in understanding NW properties. PMID:27105083

  9. Measurement of effective bulk and contact resistance of gas diffusion layer under inhomogeneous compression - Part I: Electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikram, Ajit; Chowdhury, Prabudhya Roy; Phillips, Ryan K.; Hoorfar, Mina

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a measurement technique developed for the determination of the effective electrical bulk resistance of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the contact resistance distribution at the interface of the GDL and the bipolar plate (BPP). The novelty of this study is the measurement and separation of the bulk and contact resistance under inhomogeneous compression, occurring in an actual fuel cell assembly due to the presence of the channels and ribs on the bipolar plates. The measurement of the electrical contact resistance, contributing to nearly two-third of the ohmic losses in the fuel cell assembly, shows a non-linear distribution along the GDL/BPP interface. The effective bulk resistance of the GDL under inhomogeneous compression showed a decrease of nearly 40% compared to that estimated for homogeneous compression at different compression pressures. Such a decrease in the effective bulk resistance under inhomogeneous compression could be due to the non-uniform distribution of pressure under the ribs and the channels. This measurement technique can be used to identify optimum GDL, BPP and channel-rib structures based on minimum bulk and contact resistances measured under inhomogeneous compression.

  10. The study of electrical conductivity and diffusion behavior of water-based and ferro/ferricyanide-electrolyte-based alumina nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Lee, Hyeonseok; Chang, Ya-Huei; Feng, Shien-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Nanofluids are liquids containing suspensions of solid nanoparticles and have attracted considerable attention because they undergo substantial mass transfer and have many potential applications in energy technologies. Most studies on nanofluids have used low-ionic-strength solutions, such as water and ethanol. However, very few studies have used high-ionic-strength solutions because the aggregation and sedimentation of nanoparticles cause a stability problem. In this study, a stable water-based alumina nanofluid was prepared using stirred bead milling and exhibits a high electrical conductivity of 2420 μS/cm at 23 °C and excellent stability after five severe freezing-melting cycles. We then developed a process for mixing the water-based nanofluid with a high-ionic-strength potassium ferro/ferricyanide electrolyte and sodium dodecyl sulfate by using stirred bead milling and ultrasonication, thus forming a stable electrolyte-based nanofluid. According to the rotating disk electrode study, the electrolyte-based alumina nanofluid exhibits an unusual increase in the limiting current at high angular velocities, resulting from a combination of local percolation behavior and shear-induced diffusion. The electrolyte-based alumina nanofluid was demonstrated in a possible thermogalvanic application, since it is considered to be an alternative electrolyte for thermal energy harvesters because of the increased electrical conductivity and confined value of thermal conductivity. PMID:26866885

  11. Electrical Mobility of Protons and Proton-Holes in Pure Water Characterized by Physics-Based Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Binbin; Sah, Chihtang

    Pure water has been characterized empirically for nearly a century, as dissociation into hydronium (H3O)1+ and hydroxide (HO)1- ions. Last March, we reported that the ~40 year experimental industrial standard of chemical equilibrium reaction constant, the ion product, can be accounted for by a statistical-physics-based concentration product of two electrical charge carriers, the positively charged protons, p+, and the negatively charged proton holes or prohols, p-, with a thermal activation energy or proton trapping well depth of Ep + / p - = 576 meV, in the 0-100OC pure liquid water. We now report that the empirically fitted industrial standard experimental data (1985, 1987, 2005) of the two dc ion mobilities in liquid water, can also be accounted for by trapping-limited drift of protons and prohols through proton channels of lower proton electrical potential valleys, Ep+/0 <= Ep-/0 <(Ep + / p -/3), in the tetrahedrally-directed electron-pair-bonded oxygen ions, O2-, in hexagonal lattice based on the 1935 Pauling statistical model using the 1933 Bernal-Fowler water rule.

  12. Diffused and Sustained Inhibitory Effects of Intestinal Electrical Stimulation on Intestinal Motility Mediated via Sympathetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaotuan; Yin, Jieyun; Wang, Lijie; Chen, J D Z

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims was to investigate the energy-dose response effect of IES on small bowel motility, to compare the effect of forward and backward IES; to explore the possibility of using intermittent IES and mechanism of IES on intestinal motility. Material and Methods Five dogs implanted with a duodenal cannula and one pair of intestinal serosal electrodes were studied in 5 sessions: 1) energy-dose response study; 2) forward IES; 3) backward IES; 4) intermittent IES vs. continuous IES; 5) administration of guanethidine. The contractile activity and tonic pressure of the small intestine were recorded. The duration of sustained effect after turning off IES was manually calculated. Results 1) IES with long pulses energy-dose dependently inhibited contractile activity and tonic pressure of the small intestine (p < 0.001). 2) The duration of sustained inhibitory effect of IES on the small intestine depended on the energy of IES delivered (p < 0.001). 3) The potency of the inhibitory effect was the same between forward and backward IES. 4) The efficacy of intermittent IES was the same as continuous IES in inhibiting motility of the small intestine. 5) Guanethidine blocked the inhibitory effect of IES on intestinal motility. Conclusions IES with long pulses inhibits small intestinal motility; the effect is energy-dose dependent, diffused and sustained. Intermittent IES has the same efficacy as the continuous IES in inhibiting small intestinal motility. Forward and backward IES have similar inhibitory effects on small bowel motility. This IES-induced inhibitory effect is mediated via the sympathetic pathway. PMID:23924055

  13. New Technology for Microfabrication and Testing of a Thermoelectric Device for Generating Mobile Electrical Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Kutcher, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) power generation is an increasingly important power generation technology. Major advantages include: no moving parts, low-weight, modularity, covertness/silence, high power density, low amortized cost, and long service life with minimum or no required maintenance. Despite low efficiency of power generation, there are many specialized needs for electrical power that TE technologies can uniquely and successfully address. Recent advances in thermoelectric materials technology have rekindled acute interest in thermoelectric power generation. We have developed single crystalline n- and p- type PbTe crystals and are also, developing PbTe bulk nanocomposites using PbTe nano powders and emerging filed assisted sintering technology (FAST). We will discuss the materials requirements for efficient thermoelectric power generation using waste heat at intermediate temperature range (6500 to 8500 K). We will present our recent results on production of n- and p- type PbTe crystals and their thermoelectric characterization. Relative characteristics and performance of PbTe bulk single crystals and nano composites for thermoelectric power generation will be discussed.

  14. Rapid mapping of soil electrical conductivity by remote sensing: implication for landmine detection and vehicle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsube, T. J.; McNairn, H.; Das, Y.; Gauthier, E.; Holt, R. M.; Singhroy, V.; DiLabio, R.; Connell-Madore, S.; Dyke, L.

    2005-06-01

    Many soil physical and chemical properties interfere with landmine detection signals. Since prior knowledge of these property distributions would allow appropriate technology selection and efficient demining operations, rapid mapping of these properties over wide areas are considered for meeting military and economic constraints. As soil electrical conductivity (EC) interferes with widely used detection systems, such as metal detectors and ground penetrating radar, we have started with developing a rapid mapping technique for EC using remote sensing. Electromagnetic surveys are proven methods for mapping EC, but do not provide all information required for demining. Therefore, EC prediction by imaging of soil moisture change using radar satellite imagery acquired by RADARSAT is being tested in eastern Alberta, Canada; northern Mississippi (U.S.A.). Areas of little soil moisture change with time are associated with high moisture retention and high clay content, suggesting higher EC. These soil characteristics are also associated with trafficability. RADARSAT soil moisture change detection images for eastern Alberta identified five areas with possible high moisture retention characteristics. Validation by soil and trafficability maps verified the predictions for more than half of the areas. Lack of some prediction accuracy is considered due to image acquisition timing and lack of physical property knowledge of some soil constituents.

  15. New Technology for Microfabrication and Testing of a Thermoelectric Device for Generating Mobile Electrical Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narashimha S.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Kutcher, Susan

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of fabrication and testing of a thermoelectric power generation module. The module was fabricated using a new "flip-chip" module assembly technique that is scalable and modular. This technique results in a low value of contact resistivity ( < or = 10(exp 5) Ohms-sq cm). It can be used to leverage new advances in thin-film and nanostructured materials for the fabrication of new miniature thermoelectric devices. It may also enable monolithic integration of large devices or tandem arrays of devices on flexible or curved surfaces. Under mild testing, a power of 22 mW/sq cm was obtained from small (<100 K) temperature differences. At higher, more realistic temperature differences, approx.500 K, where the efficiency of these materials greatly improves, this power density would scale to between 0.5 and 1 Watt/cm2. These results highlight the excellent potential for the generation and scavenging of electrical power of practical and usable magnitude for remote applications using thermoelectric power generation technologies.

  16. Surface Exchange and Bulk Diffusivity of LSCF as SOFC Cathode: Electrical Conductivity Relaxation and Isotope Exchange Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yihong; Gerdes, Kirk; Horita, Teruhisa; Liu, Xingbo

    2013-05-05

    The oxygen diffusion coefficient (D) and surface exchange coefficient (k) of a typical SOFC cathode material, La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) were characterized by both electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) and oxygen isotope exchange (IE) methods. Conductivity relaxation experiments were conducted at 800°C for small step changes in partial pressure of oxygen (P{sub O{sub 2}} ), both decreasing and increasing, from 0.02 atm to 0.20 atm. The results revealed P{sub O{sub 2}} dependent hysteresis with the reduction process requiring more equilibration time than oxidation. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that the surface exchange coefficient is a function of the final oxygen partial pressure in an isothermal system. In addition, both forward and backward oxygen reduction reaction constants, which are vital for the fundamental understanding of SOFC cathode reaction mechanisms, are investigated based on the relationship between surface exchange coefficient and P{sub O{sub 2}} . The direct comparisons between the results from both ECR and IE were presented and the possible experimental errors in both methods were discussed.

  17. Evaluation of mobility in thin Bi2Se3 Topological Insulator for prospects of Local Electrical Interconnects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Liang, Gengchiau

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) has been conjectured as an emerging material to replace copper (Cu) as an interconnect material because of the suppression of elastic scattering from doping and charge impurities for carrier transport on TI surface. We, therefore via full real-space simulation, examine the feasibility of using thin 3D-TI (Bi2Se3) wire for the local electrical interconnects in the presence of edge roughness, vacancies, acoustic phonons and charge impurities across temperature and Fermi-level by simulating quantum transport through Non-Equilibrium Green Function algorithm. We found that because of the scattering induced by the acoustic phonons, the mobility reduces considerably at the room temperature which complemented with the low density of states near Dirac-point does not position Bi2Se3 3D-TI as a promising material to replace Cu for local interconnects. Properties required in suitable TI material for this application have also been discussed. PMID:25354476

  18. Electrical Muscle Stimulation: An Effective Form of Exercise and Early Mobilization to Preserve Muscle Strength in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karatzanos, Eleftherios; Gerovasili, Vasiliki; Zervakis, Dimitrios; Tripodaki, Elli-Sophia; Apostolou, Kleovoulos; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Emmanouil; Mitsiou, Georgios; Tsimpouki, Dimitra; Routsi, Christina; Nanas, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This is a secondary analysis of previously published data to investigate the effects of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) on strength of various muscle groups in critically ill patients. Methods. One hundred forty-two consecutive patients, with APACHE II score ≥ 13, were randomly assigned to the EMS or the control group. EMS sessions were applied daily on vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and peroneus longus of both lower extremities. Various muscle groups were evaluated with the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale for muscle strength. Handgrip strength assessment was also employed. Results. Twenty four patients in the EMS group and 28 patients in the control group were finally evaluated. EMS patients achieved higher MRC scores than controls (P ≤ 0.05) in wrist flexion, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. Collectively, the EMS group performed higher (P < 0.01) in the legs and overall. Handgrip strength correlated (P ≤ 0.01) with the upper and lower extremities' muscle strength and the overall MRC scores. Conclusions. EMS has beneficial effects on the strength of critically ill patients mainly affecting muscle groups stimulated, while it may also affect muscle groups not involved presenting itself as a potential effective means of muscle strength preservation and early mobilization in this patient population. PMID:22545212

  19. Making tuba in the Torres Strait Islands: the cultural diffusion and geographic mobility of an alcoholic drink.

    PubMed

    Brady, Maggie; McGrath, Vic

    2010-01-01

    There is relatively scant evidence of the Indigenous production and consumption of intoxicating drinks on the Australian mainland prior to the arrival of outsiders. Although Australian Aboriginal peoples had mastered fermentation in some regions, the Indigenous manufacture of much stronger drinks by distillation was unknown on the Australian mainland. However, following contact with Pacific Island and Southeast Asian peoples in the 19th century, Islanders in the Torres Strait adopted techniques for fermenting and distilling what became a quasi-indigenous alcoholic drink known as tuba. This paper discusses the historical process of the diffusion of this substance as a result of labour migration and internationalisation in the Strait, and provides present-day accounts of tuba production from Torres Strait Islanders. PMID:21280393

  20. Scanning and mobile multi-axis DOAS measurements of SO2 and NO2 emissions from an electric power plant in Montevideo, Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frins, E.; Bobrowski, N.; Osorio, M.; Casaballe, N.; Belsterli, G.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2014-12-01

    In March 2012 the emissions of NO2 and SO2 from a power station located on the east side of Montevideo Bay (34° 53‧ 10″ S, 56° 11‧ 49″ W) were quantified by simultaneously using mobile and scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (in the following mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS, respectively). The facility produces electricity by means of two technologies: internal combustion motors and steam generators. The motors are powered with centrifuged heavy oil and produce a maximum power of 80 MW approximately. The steam generators produce approximately 305 MW and are powered with heavy fuel oil. We compare the emissions obtained from the measured slant column densities (mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS) with the emissions estimated from fuel mass balance. On one occasion it was possible to distinguish between the two types of sources, observing two plumes with different SO2 and NO2 emission rates. During the period of the campaign the mean SO2 emission flux was determined to be 0.36 (±0.12) kg s-1 and 0.26 (±0.09) kg s-1 retrieved from mobile and scanning DOAS respectively, while the calculated SO2 flux from the sulphur content of the fuel was 0.34 (±0.03) kg s-1. The average NO2 flux calculated from mobile DOAS was determined to be 11 (±3) × 10-3 kg s-1. Using the scanning DOAS approach a mean NO2 flux of 5.4 (±1.7) × 10-3 kg s-1 was obtained, which is significantly lower than by the mobile measurements. The differences between the results of mobile MAX-DOAS measurements and scanning DOAS measurements are most probably caused by the variability and the limited knowledge of the wind speed and direction.

  1. A simple method for assessment and minimization of errors in determination of electrophoretic or electroosmotic mobilities and velocities associated with the axial electric field distortion.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Paweł Mateusz; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2015-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that the modern CE instruments equipped with efficient cooling system enable accurate determination of electrophoretic or electroosmotic mobilities. It is also often assumed that velocity of migration in a given buffer is constant throughout the capillary length. It is simultaneously neglected that the noncooled parts of capillary produce extensive Joule heating leading to an axial electric field distortion, which contributes to a difference between the effective and nominal electric field potentials and between velocities in the cooled and noncooled parts of capillary. This simplification introduces systematic errors, which so far were however not investigated experimentally. There was also no method proposed for their elimination. We show a simple and fast method allowing for estimation and elimination of these errors that is based on combination of a long-end and short-end injections. We use it to study the effects caused by variation of temperature, electric field, capillary length, and pH. PMID:26383237

  2. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  3. Measurement of Fine Particles From Mobile and Stationary Sources, and Reducing the Air Conditioner Power Consumption in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Eli Henry

    We study the PM2.5and ultrafine exhaust emissions from a new natural gas-fired turbine power facility to better understand air pollution in California. To characterize the emissions from new natural gas turbines, a series of tests were performed on a GE LMS100 gas turbine. These tests included PM2.5 and wet chemical tests for SO2/SO 3 and NH3, as well as ultrafine (less than 100 nm in diameter) particulate matter measurements. The turbine exhaust had an average particle number concentration that was 2.3x103 times higher than ambient air. The majority of these particles were nanoparticles; at the 100 nm size, stack particle concentrations were about 20 times higher than ambient, and increased to 3.9x104 times higher on average in the 2.5 - 3 nm particle size range. This study also found that ammonia emissions were higher than expected, but in compliance with permit conditions. This was possibly due to an ammonia imbalance entering the catalyst, some flue gas bypassing the catalyst, or not enough catalyst volume. SO3 accounted for an average of 23% of the total sulfur oxides emissions measured. Some of the SO3 is formed in the combustion process, it is likely that the majority formed as the SO2 in the combustion products passed across the oxidizing CO catalyst and SCR catalyst. The 100 MW turbine sampled in this study emitted particle loadings similar to those previously measured from turbines in the SCAQMD area, however, the turbine exhaust contained far more particles than ambient air. The power consumed by an air conditioner accounts for a significant fraction of the total power used by hybrid and electric vehicles especially during summer. This study examined the effect of recirculation of cabin air on power consumption of mobile air conditioners both in-lab and on-road. Real time power consumption and vehicle mileage were recorded by an On Board Diagnostic monitor and carbon balance method. Vehicle mileage improved with increased cabin air recirculation. The

  4. Soil phosphorus mobility and solid-to-solution phase resupply studied by diffusive gradients in thin films: background soil properties driving their variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney; George, Timothy; Shand, Charlie; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Stutter, Marc; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan; Wearing, Catherine; Philip, Haygarth

    2015-04-01

    The mobility and resupply of inorganic phosphorus (P) from the solid phase was studied in 32 representative soils from the UK. The objective was to identify the background soil properties driving the variation of soil inorganic P desorption kinetics across different soil types. Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) and the DGT-induced fluxes in sediments model (DIFS) were used as tools for exploring solid-to-solution desorption kinetics. Previously characterized physicochemical properties of the same soils were used for correlation analysis. On average and across soil types, the inorganic P maximum distance of depletion was 0.42±0.10 cm, the equilibration time (Tc) was 3.63 h, the desorption rate constant (k-1) was 0.0046 h-1, and the desorption rate was 4.71 nmol l-1 s-1. The correlation between P in Olsen extractcs (POlsen) with PDGT, PDET and phosphorus effective concentration (PE) was enhanced when similar soils were isolated and used in the comparison, clearly showing that these parameters are affected differently by soil types. The PE was better correlated to Ptot, POlsen, PFeO, and PNaOH/EDTA than PDGT. This may indicate that PE is a better representation of P availability across soil types than PDGT. While the relative DGT-induced inorganic P flux in the first hour is mainly a function of soil wetting properties and % Corg, at longer times it is a function of the resupply capacity (R-Rdiff) of the soil solid phase. In general, resupply of P from the solid phase was less than that for other chemical elements, as shown by high Tc and low k-1 values. Desorption rates and resupply from the solid phase were fundamentally influenced by P saturation status, as reflected by their strong correlation with P concentration in water, FeO strips, Olsen and NaOH-EDTA extracts. Soil pH and particle size distribution had little or no effect on the evaluated parameters. The DGT and DET techniques, along with the DIFS model

  5. Long-term exposure to mobile communication radiation: an analysis of time-variability of electric field level in GSM900 downlink channels.

    PubMed

    Miclaus, Simona; Bechet, Paul; Gheorghevici, Marius

    2013-04-01

    Interest for knowing long-term human exposure levels due to mobile communications has increased in the last years. It has been shown that short-term exposure assessment made under standard procedural restrictions is not reliable when it comes to conclusions on long-term exposure levels. The present work is the result of a several week analysis of time variability of electric field level inside traffic and control channels of the GSM900 mobile communication downlink band and it indicates that a temporal model to allow future predictions of exposure on the long run is obtainable. Collecting, processing and statistically analysing the data provide expression of the maximum and weighted field strengths and their evolution in time. Specific electromagnetic footprints of the channels have been extracted, differentiations between their characteristics have been emphasised and practical advice is provided, with the scope of contributing to the development of reliable procedures for long-term exposure assessment. PMID:22908352

  6. Precise determination of the chemical diffusion coefficient of calcium-doped lanthanum chromites by means of electrical conductivity relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Isamu; Hikita, Tomoji . Fundamental Technology Research Lab.)

    1994-05-01

    Chemical relaxation experiments were conducted on sintered samples of calcium-doped lanthanum chromites by abruptly changing the oxygen partial pressure in the atmosphere and following the time change of conductivity. The re-equilibration kinetics was analyzed by fitting the relaxation data to the solutions of Fick's second law for appropriate boundary conditions. The diffusion equation ignoring the effect of surface reaction failed to describe the transient behavior especially for the initial stage, while that taking the surface effect into account gave a satisfactory interpretation of the overall relaxation process and allowed a precise determination of the two kinetic parameters: oxygen chemical diffusion coefficient and surface reaction rate constant. The chemical diffusion coefficients increased with a decrease of the oxygen partial pressure due to the corresponding change in the concentration of the moving species. The activation energy was similar to that of oxygen vacancy diffusion coefficients in other monocrystalline perovskites, suggesting that the measured diffusion coefficients were attributable to lattice diffusion. The surface reaction rate constant increased with a decrease of the oxygen partial pressure similarly to the reported oxygen nonstoichiometry, which implies that the presence of oxygen vacancies plays an important role in the surface reaction kinetics.

  7. One sign ion mobile approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, G.

    2011-12-01

    The electrical response of an electrolytic cell to an external excitation is discussed in the simple case where only one group of positive and negative ions is present. The particular case where the diffusion coefficients of the negative ions, Dm, is very small with respect to that of the positive ions, Dp, is considered. In this framework, it is discussed under what conditions the one mobile approximation, in which the negative ions are assumed fixed, works well. The analysis is performed by assuming that the external excitation is sinusoidal with circular frequency ω, as that used in the impedance spectroscopy technique. In this framework, we show that there exists a circular frequency, ω*, such that for ω > ω*, the one mobile ion approximation works well. We also show that for Dm ≪ Dp, ω* is independent of Dm.

  8. Self-consistent modeling for estimation of the reduced electric field in a DC excited diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhagat, M. S.; Biswas, A. K.; Rana, L. B.; Pakhare, Jagdish; Rawat, B. S.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-07-01

    The results of a numerical simulation method that estimate various discharge parameters in the positive column of a DC glow discharge controlled by ambipolar diffusion are presented. The parameters like reduced electric field (E/N), electron temperature, ionization rates, ambipolar diffusion losses and the average gas temperature were numerically evaluated for several mixtures of CO2, N2 and He in low pressure regime. The estimated E/N value which is a primary governing parameter of positive column was verified experimentally using a double probe in diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser for a variety of CO2, N2 and He mixtures. The role of auxiliary ionization source like pulser used for pre-ionization and its effect on the steady state E/N value was also studied. A reasonably good agreement was found between the theoretical and the experimental results. Based on the results of this simulation a zigzag folded, diffusion-cooled, 500 W CW CO2 laser has been designed and developed for research in gas phase nanoparticle synthesis.

  9. A study of the properties of beryllium doped silicon with particular emphasis on diffusion mechanisms: Profiles of depth dependent conductivity as determined by electrical surface probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franks, R. K.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Very large diffusion coefficients were encountered and required the determination of impurity profiles for samples approximately 1 cm thick. Since conductivity values are readily converted into concentrations of electrically active impurities, the major problem became that of accurately determining the conductivity profiles of beryllium diffused silicon samples. Four-point probe measurements on samples having depth conductivities are interpreted in terms of conductivity profiles, based on an exact solution of the problem of exponentially depth dependent conductivity. Applications include surface conductivity determination where the form of the conductivity profile is known, and conductivity profile determination from probe measurements taken as the sample surface is progressively lapped away. The application is limited to samples having conductivity monotonically decreasing with depth from the probed surface.

  10. Electrical properties of magnesium oxide layers with different surface pretreatment on high mobility Ge1-xSnx and Ge MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chen-Yi; Lieten, Ruben; Bakalov, Petar; Tseng, Wei-Jhih; Dillemans, Leander; Menghini, Mariela; Smets, Tomas; Seo, Jin Won; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Germanium based channels are interesting for high performance CMOS devices because of their high carrier mobility. In this study, the electrical properties of MgO on both GeSn and Ge MOS capacitors have been investigated. The low equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of 2.1 nm for MgO on GeSn with a Ge cap layer indicates the high potential for MOSFET applications. A surface treatment prior to oxide deposition is found essential to reduce the gate leakage. It is shown that HCl and H2O2 dipping followed by ozone treatment improves the leakage and leads to good capacitance-voltage (C-V) behavior.

  11. Diffusion of hydrogen interstitials in the near-surface region of Pd(111) under the influence of surface coverage and external static electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Rey, M.; Tremblay, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    Past scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments of H manipulation on Pd(111), at low temperature, have shown that it is possible to induce diffusion of surface species as well as of those deeply buried under the surface. Several questions remain open regarding the role of subsurface site occupancies. In the present work, the interaction potential of H atoms with Pd(111) under various H coverage conditions is determined by means of density functional theory calculations in order to provide an answer to two of these questions: (i) whether subsurface sites are the final locations for the H impurities that attempt to emerge from bulk regions, and (ii) whether penetration of the surface is a competing route of on-surface diffusion during depletion of surface H on densely covered Pd(111). We find that a high H coverage has the effect of blocking resurfacing of H atoms travelling from below, which would otherwise reach the surface fcc sites, but it hardly alters deeper diffusion energy barriers. Penetration is unlikely and restricted to high occupancies of hcp hollows. In agreement with experiments, the Pd lattice expands vertically as a consequence of H atoms being blocked at subsurface sites, and surface H enhances this expansion. STM tip effects are included in the calculations self-consistently as an external static electric field. The main contribution to the induced surface electric dipoles originates from the Pd substrate polarisability. We find that the electric field has a non-negligible effect on the H-Pd potential in the vicinity of the topmost Pd atomic layer, yet typical STM intensities of 1-2 VÅ-1 are insufficient to invert the stabilities of the surface and subsurface equilibrium sites.

  12. Diffusion of hydrogen interstitials in the near-surface region of Pd(111) under the influence of surface coverage and external static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Rey, M.; Tremblay, J. C.

    2015-04-21

    Past scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments of H manipulation on Pd(111), at low temperature, have shown that it is possible to induce diffusion of surface species as well as of those deeply buried under the surface. Several questions remain open regarding the role of subsurface site occupancies. In the present work, the interaction potential of H atoms with Pd(111) under various H coverage conditions is determined by means of density functional theory calculations in order to provide an answer to two of these questions: (i) whether subsurface sites are the final locations for the H impurities that attempt to emerge from bulk regions, and (ii) whether penetration of the surface is a competing route of on-surface diffusion during depletion of surface H on densely covered Pd(111). We find that a high H coverage has the effect of blocking resurfacing of H atoms travelling from below, which would otherwise reach the surface fcc sites, but it hardly alters deeper diffusion energy barriers. Penetration is unlikely and restricted to high occupancies of hcp hollows. In agreement with experiments, the Pd lattice expands vertically as a consequence of H atoms being blocked at subsurface sites, and surface H enhances this expansion. STM tip effects are included in the calculations self-consistently as an external static electric field. The main contribution to the induced surface electric dipoles originates from the Pd substrate polarisability. We find that the electric field has a non-negligible effect on the H-Pd potential in the vicinity of the topmost Pd atomic layer, yet typical STM intensities of 1-2 VÅ{sup −1} are insufficient to invert the stabilities of the surface and subsurface equilibrium sites.

  13. Surface morphology and electrical transport of rapid thermal annealed chromium-doped indium zinc oxides: The influence of zinc interstitials and out-diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C. Y.

    2013-12-09

    We investigate the complex impedance (CI) spectra of chromium-doped indium zinc oxide (CIZO) films with different rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperatures. The CI spectra drawn from the impedance contributions of Zn-O and In-O bondings in CIZO films were analyzed by two sets of parallel resistance and capacitance components in series. The result demonstrates that zinc interstitials controls electron concentration and transition of electrical transport from semiconducting to metallic. At higher RTA temperature, high-density zinc interstitial promotes Zn atom diffusion from the surface, modifying surface morphology.

  14. Surface morphology and electrical transport of rapid thermal annealed chromium-doped indium zinc oxides: The influence of zinc interstitials and out-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C. Y.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the complex impedance (CI) spectra of chromium-doped indium zinc oxide (CIZO) films with different rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperatures. The CI spectra drawn from the impedance contributions of Zn-O and In-O bondings in CIZO films were analyzed by two sets of parallel resistance and capacitance components in series. The result demonstrates that zinc interstitials controls electron concentration and transition of electrical transport from semiconducting to metallic. At higher RTA temperature, high-density zinc interstitial promotes Zn atom diffusion from the surface, modifying surface morphology.

  15. Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

  16. Electrical Mobility Spectrometer Using a Diethylene Glycol Condensation Particle Counter for Measurement of Aerosol Size Distributions Down to 1 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Attoui, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01

    We report a new scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) for measuring number size distributions of particles down to {approx}1 nm mobility diameter. This SMPS includes an aerosol charger, a TSI 3085 nano differential mobility analyzer (nanoDMA), an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid, and a conventional butanol CPC (the 'booster') to detect the small droplets leaving the DEG UCPC. The response of the DEG UCPC to negatively charged sodium chloride particles with mobility diameters ranging from 1-6 nm was measured. The sensitivity of the DEG UCPC to particle composition was also studied by comparing its response to positively charged 1.47 and 1.70 nm tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, sodium chloride, and silver particles. A high resolution differential mobility analyzer was used to generate the test particles. These results show that the response of this UCPC to sub-2 nm particles is sensitive to particle composition. The applicability of the new SMPS for atmospheric measurement was demonstrated during the Nucleation and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (NCCN) field campaign (Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2009). We operated the instrument at saturator and condenser temperatures that allowed the efficient detection of sodium chloride particles but not of air ions having the same mobility. We found that particles as small as 1 nm were detected during nucleation events but not at other times. Factors affecting size distribution measurements, including aerosol charging in the 1-10 nm size range, are discussed. For the charger used in this study, bipolar charging was found to be more effective for sub-2 nm particles than unipolar charging. No ion induced nucleation inside the charger was observed during the NCCN campaign.

  17. Simplification of physics-based electrochemical model for lithium ion battery on electric vehicle. Part I: Diffusion simplification and single particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuebing; Ouyang, Minggao; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu

    2015-03-01

    Now the lithium ion batteries are widely used in electrical vehicles (EV). The battery modeling and state estimation is of great significance. The rigorous physic based electrochemical model is too complicated for on-line simulation in vehicle. In this work, the simplification of physics-based model lithium ion battery for application in battery management system (BMS) on real electrical vehicle is proposed. Approximate method for solving the solid phase diffusion and electrolyte concentration distribution problems is introduced. The approximate result is very close to the rigorous model but fewer computations are needed. An extended single particle model is founded based on these approximated results and the on-line state of charge (SOC) estimation algorithm using the extended Kalman filter with this single particle model is discussed. This SOC estimation algorithm could be used in the BMS in real vehicle.

  18. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: "Mobile electricity" technologies, early California household markets, and innovation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brett David

    Starting from the premise that new consumer value must drive hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle (H2FCV) commercialization, a group of opportunities collectively called "Mobile Electricity" (Me-) is characterized. Me- redefines H2 FCVs as innovative products able to provide home recharging and mobile power, for example for tools, mobile activities, emergencies, and electric-grid-support services. To characterize such opportunities, this study first integrates and extends previous analyses of H2FCVs, plug-in hybrids, and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power. It uses a new model to estimate zero-emission-power vs. zero-emission-driving tradeoffs, costs, and grid-support revenues for various electric-drive vehicle types and levels of infrastructure service. Next, the initial market potential for Me- enabled vehicles, such as H2FCVs and plug-in hybrids, is estimated by eliminating unlikely households from consideration for early adoption. 5.2 million of 33.9 million Californians in the 2000 Census live in households pre-adapted to Me-, 3.9 million if natural gas is required for home refueling. The possible sales base represented by this population is discussed. Several differences in demographic and other characteristics between the target market and the population as a whole are highlighted, and two issues related to the design of H2FCVs and their supporting infrastructure are discussed: vehicle range and home hydrogen refueling. These findings argue for continued investigation of this and similar target segments-which represent more efficient research populations for subsequent study by product designers and other decision-makers wishing to understand the early market dynamics facing Me- innovations. Next, Me-H2FCV commercialization issues are raised from the perspectives of innovation, product development, and strategic marketing. Starting with today's internalcombustion hybrids, this discussion suggests a way to move beyond the battery vs. fuel-cell zero-sum game and towards the

  19. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m(-1) and 111 kV m(-1) in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form. PMID:26388374

  20. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  1. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed. PMID:19391727

  2. A mobile Sn nanowire inside a β-Ga2 O3 tube: a practical nanoscale electrically/thermally driven switch.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Tian, Qiwei; Ma, Guanxing; Song, Guosheng; Chen, Zhigang; Hu, Junqing

    2011-12-01

    Nanoelectromechanical system switches are seen as key devices for fast switching in communication networks since they can be switched between transmitting and receiving states with an electrostatic command. Herein, the fabrication of practical, nanoscale electrically/thermally driven switches is reported based on a mobile Sn nanowire inside a β-Ga2 O3 tube. The melting point of Sn inside the Ga2 O3 tube is found to be as low as 58 °C-far below the value of bulk Sn (231.89 °C)-and its crystal phase (β-Sn) remains unchanged even at temperatures as low as -170 °C. Thus a miniaturization of the unique wide-temperature-range thermometer based on the linear thermal expansion of liquid Sn fillings in the Ga2 O3 tube is realized. In addition, the electrical properties of the Sn-nanowire-filled β-Ga2 O3 tubes are carefully determined: importantly, the resistance demonstrates a sudden drop (rise) when two Sn nanowires contact (separate), due to the thermally driven motion of the liquid Sn fillings inside the tube. Thus this structure can be switched between its on and off states by controlling the motion, merging or splitting, of the Sn nanowires inside the tube, either electrically, by applying a current, or thermally, at a predetermined temperature. PMID:21972087

  3. Dielectric Properties and Ion Mobility in Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, H.; Schwan, H. P.

    1966-01-01

    The impedance of erythrocytes of man, cattle, sheep, dog, cat, rabbit, and chicken was measured in the range from 0.5 to 250 Mc. The dielectric constant of the red cell interior is 50 at 250 Mc, varies but little with species, and can readily be accounted for by the cells' hemoglobin content. The electrical conductivity of the red cell interior was determined between 70 and 100 Mc. The values differ from species to species within the rather limited range from 4.4 to 5.3 mmho/cm. Removal of the cell membranes does not affect the conductivity. Hence, the cell interior behaves, from an electrical point of view, like a highly concentrated hemoglobin solution. A theoretical value for the electrical conductivity of erythrocyte interiors, which is calculated on the basis of the salt content of the cell, ion mobility, and the volume concentration of the hemoglobin, is roughly twice as large as the measured value. This discrepancy is typical not only of the red blood cell. Pertinent measurements show that it is probably caused by hydrodynamic and possibly by electrostatic effects also, which lower the mobility of the ions. From the lower electrical mobility it appears that a lowered diffusion constant of the electrolytes and nonelectrolytes within the cell is indicated. PMID:5970566

  4. In Situ XPS Chemical Analysis of MnSiO3 Copper Diffusion Barrier Layer Formation and Simultaneous Fabrication of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Electrical Test MOS Structures.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Conor; Brennan, Barry; McCoy, Anthony P; Bogan, Justin; Brady, Anita; Hughes, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Copper/SiO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices both with and without a MnSiO3 barrier layer at the Cu/SiO2 interface have been fabricated in an ultrahigh vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system, which allows interface chemical characterization of the barrier formation process to be directly correlated with electrical testing of barrier layer effectiveness. Capacitance voltage (CV) analysis, before and after tube furnace anneals of the fabricated MOS structures showed that the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer significantly improved electric stability of the device structures. Evidence of improved adhesion of the deposited copper layer to the MnSiO3 surface compared to the clean SiO2 surface was apparent both from tape tests and while probing the samples during electrical testing. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling measurements of the MOS test structures reveal distinct differences of copper diffusion into the SiO2 dielectric layers following the thermal anneal depending on the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer. PMID:26732185

  5. CsSnI3: Semiconductor or metal? High electrical conductivity and strong near-infrared photoluminescence from a single material. High hole mobility and phase-transitions.

    PubMed

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J; Kenney, John T; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-05-23

    CsSnI(3) is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI(3) have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI(3), coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI(3). The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI(3) demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI(3) indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of ∼ 10(17) cm(-3) and a hole mobility of ∼585 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from Sn defects in the crystal structure, which arise

  6. Review and recent advances in battery health monitoring and prognostics technologies for electric vehicle (EV) safety and mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvanizaniani, Seyed Mohammad; Liu, Zongchang; Chen, Yan; Lee, Jay

    2014-06-01

    As hybrid and electric vehicle technologies continue to advance, car manufacturers have begun to employ lithium ion batteries as the electrical energy storage device of choice for use in existing and future vehicles. However, to ensure batteries are reliable, efficient, and capable of delivering power and energy when required, an accurate determination of battery performance, health, and life prediction is necessary. This paper provides a review of battery prognostics and health management (PHM) techniques, with a focus on major unmet needs in this area for battery manufacturers, car designers, and electric vehicle drivers. A number of approaches are presented that have been developed to monitor battery health status and performance, as well as the evolution of prognostics modeling methods. The goal of this review is to render feasible and cost effective solutions for dealing with battery life issues under dynamic operating conditions.

  7. Multiple mobility edges in a 1D Aubry chain with Hubbard interaction in presence of electric field: Controlled electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Srilekha; Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic behavior of a 1D Aubry chain with Hubbard interaction is critically analyzed in presence of electric field. Multiple energy bands are generated as a result of Hubbard correlation and Aubry potential, and, within these bands localized states are developed under the application of electric field. Within a tight-binding framework we compute electronic transmission probability and average density of states using Green's function approach where the interaction parameter is treated under Hartree-Fock mean field scheme. From our analysis we find that selective transmission can be obtained by tuning injecting electron energy, and thus, the present model can be utilized as a controlled switching device.

  8. Electric field induced oscillating electron mobility in asymmetric wide GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As quantum well structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Narayan; Sahu, Trinath

    2014-07-28

    For the first time, we show that an oscillatory enhancement of low temperature electron mobility μ can be achieved in an asymmetric GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As wide quantum well structure by applying an external electric field F perpendicular to the interface plane. We show that the oscillating nature of μ as a function of F is mostly due to the contribution of the higher subband through intersubband effects when there is double subband occupancy. We further show that the wavy nature of μ can be enhanced by increasing the well width, surface electron density, and also by considering a double quantum well structure. Our results can be utilized for low temperature device applications.

  9. ESHAP + fixed dose G-CSF as autologous peripheral blood stem cell mobilization regimen in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell and Hodgkin's lymphoma: a single institution result of 127 patients.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Tbakhi, A; Humaidan, H; El Weshi, A; Rahal, M; Maghfoor, I

    2006-02-01

    From 1996 to November 2004, 131 consecutive patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HD) received ESHAP as mobilization chemotherapy before autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant (ASCT). Patients received fixed dose G-CSF 300 microg SC bid starting 24-36 h after finishing mobilizing ESHAP. In all, four patients failed mobilization and are excluded. Characteristics of 127 patients: 68 males: 59 females. DLCL 49: HD 78. Initial stage I:II:III:IV:unknown was 15:34:33:42:3. Median age at ASCT 26 years. Median prior chemotherapy cycles were six [<6 (17 patients), 6-8 (90 patients), >8 (20 patients)]. Median ESHAP cycle used as mobilizer was third. Patients required 1, 2, 3, 4 apheresis were 93:25:8:1. Median total CD34+ cells/kg collected were 6.9 x 10(6) (DLCL 5.17 x 10(6) and HD 7.6 x 10(6)), patients weighing < or = 70 kg (93 patients) 6.54 x 10(6) and >70 kg (34 patients) 7.44 x 10(6) (P = 0.59), one apheresis (93 patients) 8.6 x 10(6)/kg and >1 apheresis (34 patients) 4.5 x 10(6) (P = 0.001). We conclude that ESHAP and G-CSF 300 microg SC bid is an effective mobilizing regimen even in patients >70 kg and most patients require only 1-2 apheresis. PMID:16400345

  10. Global properties and propensity to dimerization of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment through the modeling of its monomer and dimer diffusion coefficients and electrophoretic mobilities.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused mainly by amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment (monomer) and its dimer are characterized at low pH through the modeling of their diffusion coefficients and effective electrophoretic mobilities. Translational diffusion coefficient experimental values of monomer and dimer analogs of this peptide fragment and monomer and dimer mixtures at thermodynamic equilibrium are used as reported in the literature for different monomer initial concentrations. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are employed to evaluate the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment propensity to dimerization through a thermodynamic theoretical framework. Therefore equilibrium constants are considered at pH 2.9 to elucidate one of the amyloidogenic mechanisms involving the central hydrophobic region LVFFA of the peptide spanning residues 17-21 associated with phenylalanine at positions 19 and 20 in the amino acid sequence of amyloid-beta peptides. An analysis demonstrating that peptide aggregation is a concentration-dependent process is provided, where both pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena become relevant. It is shown that the modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment is crucial to understand the effect of hydrophobic region LVFFA in the amyloidogenic process. PMID:25403948

  11. Specific absorption rate and electric field measurements in the near field of six mobile phone base station antennas.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Puranen, Lauri; Jokela, Kari

    2009-05-01

    In this article, the exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields was studied in close proximity (distances of 10, 100, 300, and 600 mm) to six base station antennas. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in 800 mm x 500 mm x 200 mm box phantom as well as unperturbed electric field (E) in air was measured. The results were used to determine whether the measurement of local maximum of unperturbed electric field can be used as a compliance check for local exposure. Also, the conservativeness of this assessment method compared to the ICNIRP basic restriction was studied. Moreover, the assessment of whole-body exposure was discussed and the distance ranges presented in which the ICNIRP limit for local exposure could be exceeded before the limit for whole-body SAR. These results show that the electric field measurement alone can be used for easy compliance check for the local exposure at all distances and for all antenna types studied. However, in some cases when the local peak value of E was compared directly to the ICNIRP reference level for unperturbed E, the exposure was overestimated only very slightly (by factor 1.1) compared to the basic restriction for localized SAR in a human, and hence these results can not be generalized to all antenna types. Moreover, it was shown that the limit for localized exposure could be exceeded before the limit for the whole-body average SAR, if the distance to the antenna was less than 240 mm. PMID:19194889

  12. Electrical detection of kidney injury molecule-1 with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. T.; Kang, B. S.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-11-26

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), an important biomarker for early kidney injury detection. The gate region consisted of 5 nm gold deposited onto the AlGaN surface. The gold was conjugated to highly specific KIM-1 antibodies through a self-assembled monolayer of thioglycolic acid. The HEMT source-drain current showed a clear dependence on the KIM-1 concentration in phosphate-buffered saline solution. The limit of detection was 1 ng/ml using a 20x50 {mu}m{sup 2} gate sensing area. This approach shows potential for both preclinical and clinical kidney injury diagnosis with accurate, rapid, noninvasive, and high throughput capabilities.

  13. Hall mobility, electrical resistivity, and dielectric properties of reduced La0.01Ba0.99TiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed. I.; Abdel Moez, A.; Kim, Yong Soo

    2013-04-01

    The La0.01Ba0.99TiO3 sample was reduced at 1380 °C under about a 10-14-atmosphere oxygen partial pressure. After the sample had been reduced under these conditions, the resistivity and the Hall mobility of the reduced La0.01Ba0.99TiO3 were investigated experimentally within a temperature range of 300 to 600 K. The electrical resistivity decreased linearly with increasing measurement temperature, indicating that the conduction mechanism in this system was thermally activated. Evidence of an excess of charge carriers was observed at high temperatures. The dielectric property data showed that the known phase-transition temperature shifted to a higher temperature (425 K). Thus the reduction of the sample has an influence on both the dielectric constant and the transition temperature. In-situ high-temperature electrical-conductivity and Hall measurements are useful tools for establishing the donor-doping effect in perovskite La0.01Ba0.99TiO3 and for screening it for more industrial applications.

  14. Fixed Electrical Charges and Mobile Ions Affect the Measurable Mechano-Electrochemical Properties of Charged-Hydrated Biological Tissues: The Articular Cartilage Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Leo Q.; Miller, Chester; Guo, X. Edward; Mow, Van C.

    2009-01-01

    The triphasic constitutive law [Lai, Hou and Mow (1991)] has been shown in some special 1D cases to successfully model the deformational and transport behaviors of charged-hydrated, porous-permeable, soft biological tissues, as typified by articular cartilage. Due to nonlinearities and other mathematical complexities of these equations, few problems for the deformation of such materials have ever been solved analytically. Using a perturbation procedure, we have linearized the triphasic equations with respect to a small imposed axial compressive strain, and obtained an equilibrium solution, as well as a short-time boundary layer solution for the mechano- electrochemical (MEC) fields for such a material under a 2D unconfined compression test. The present results show that the key physical parameter determining the deformational behaviors is the ratio of the perturbation of osmotic pressure to elastic stress, which leads to changes of the measurable elastic coefficients. From the short-time boundary layer solution, both the lateral expansion and the applied load are found to decrease with the square root of time. The predicted deformations, flow fields and stresses are consistent with the analysis of the short time and equilibrium biphasic (i.e., the solid matrix has no attached electric charges) [Armstrong, Lai and Mow (1984)]. These results provide a better understanding of the manner in which fixed electric charges and mobile ions within the tissue contribute to the observed material responses. PMID:16783948

  15. Electrical and structural degradation of GaN high electron mobility transistors under high-power and high-temperature Direct Current stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. Alamo, J. A. del; Chen, C.-Y.

    2015-01-14

    We have stressed AlGaN/GaN HEMTs (High Electron Mobility Transistors) under high-power and high-temperature DC conditions that resulted in various levels of device degradation. Following electrical stress, we conducted a well-established three-step wet etching process to remove passivation, gate and ohmic contacts so that the device surface can be examined by SEM and AFM. We have found prominent pits and trenches that have formed under the gate edge on the drain side of the device. The width and depth of the pits under the gate edge correlate with the degree of drain current degradation. In addition, we also found visible erosion under the full extent of the gate. The depth of the eroded region averaged along the gate width under the gate correlated with channel resistance degradation. Both electrical and structural analysis results indicate that device degradation under high-power DC conditions is of a similar nature as in better understood high-voltage OFF-state conditions. The recognition of a unified degradation mechanism provides impetus to the development of a degradation model with lifetime predictive capabilities for a broad range of operating conditions spanning from OFF-state to ON-state.

  16. Propagation of Epileptiform Activity Can Be Independent of Synaptic Transmission, Gap Junctions, or Diffusion and Is Consistent with Electrical Field Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingming; Ladas, Thomas P.; Qiu, Chen; Shivacharan, Rajat S.; Gonzalez-Reyes, Luis E.

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of activity in neural tissue is generally associated with synaptic transmission, but epileptiform activity in the hippocampus can propagate with or without synaptic transmission at a speed of ∼0.1 m/s. This suggests an underlying common nonsynaptic mechanism for propagation. To study this mechanism, we developed a novel unfolded hippocampus preparation, from CD1 mice of either sex, which preserves the transverse and longitudinal connections and recorded activity with a penetrating microelectrode array. Experiments using synaptic transmission and gap junction blockers indicated that longitudinal propagation is independent of chemical or electrical synaptic transmission. Propagation speeds of 0.1 m/s are not compatible with ionic diffusion or pure axonal conduction. The only other means of communication between neurons is through electric fields. Computer simulations revealed that activity can indeed propagate from cell to cell solely through field effects. These results point to an unexpected propagation mechanism for neural activity in the hippocampus involving endogenous field effect transmission. PMID:24453330

  17. Dielectric Dispersion, Diffuse Phase Transition, and Electrical Properties of BCT-BZT Ceramics Sintered at a Low-Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yongshang; Gong, Yansheng; Meng, Dawei; Li, Yuanjian; Kuang, Boya

    2015-08-01

    Lead-free ceramics 0.50Ba0.9Ca0.1TiO3-0.50BaTi1- x Zr x O3 (BCT-BZT) were prepared via sintering BCT and BZT nanoparticles, which were synthesized using a modified Pechini polymeric precursor method, at a low temperature of 1260°C. The relative densities of the ceramics prepared with different zirconium contents ( x) were all above 95.3%, reaching a maximum of 97% when x = 0.08. X-ray diffraction results confirmed the onset of phase transformation from orthorhombic to rhombohedral symmetry with increasing zirconium contents, and the polymorphic phase transition was observed at x = 0.10. The dielectric dispersion, diffuse phase transition (DPT), and relaxor-like ferroelectric characteristics as a function of zirconium content were thoroughly studied. Optimum physical properties, remnant polarization ( P r) = 16.4 μC/cm2, piezoelectric constant ( d 33) = ~240 pC/N, and electromechanical coupling factor ( k p) = 0.22, were obtained at x = 0.10. The findings of the current DPT behavior study of BCT-BZT ceramics are believed to be insightful to the development of ferroelectric materials.

  18. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  19. Chiral selection and frequency response of spiral waves in reaction-diffusion systems under a chiral electric field.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Wei; Cai, Mei-Chun; Zhang, Hong; Panfilov, Alexander V; Dierckx, Hans

    2014-05-14

    Chirality is one of the most fundamental properties of many physical, chemical, and biological systems. However, the mechanisms underlying the onset and control of chiral symmetry are largely understudied. We investigate possibility of chirality control in a chemical excitable system (the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction) by application of a chiral (rotating) electric field using the Oregonator model. We find that unlike previous findings, we can achieve the chirality control not only in the field rotation direction, but also opposite to it, depending on the field rotation frequency. To unravel the mechanism, we further develop a comprehensive theory of frequency synchronization based on the response function approach. We find that this problem can be described by the Adler equation and show phase-locking phenomena, known as the Arnold tongue. Our theoretical predictions are in good quantitative agreement with the numerical simulations and provide a solid basis for chirality control in excitable media. PMID:24832300

  20. Chiral selection and frequency response of spiral waves in reaction-diffusion systems under a chiral electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing-Wei; Cai, Mei-Chun; Zhang, Hong; Panfilov, Alexander V.; Dierckx, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Chirality is one of the most fundamental properties of many physical, chemical, and biological systems. However, the mechanisms underlying the onset and control of chiral symmetry are largely understudied. We investigate possibility of chirality control in a chemical excitable system (the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction) by application of a chiral (rotating) electric field using the Oregonator model. We find that unlike previous findings, we can achieve the chirality control not only in the field rotation direction, but also opposite to it, depending on the field rotation frequency. To unravel the mechanism, we further develop a comprehensive theory of frequency synchronization based on the response function approach. We find that this problem can be described by the Adler equation and show phase-locking phenomena, known as the Arnold tongue. Our theoretical predictions are in good quantitative agreement with the numerical simulations and provide a solid basis for chirality control in excitable media.

  1. Instrument and method to determine the electrophoretic mobility of nanoparticles and proteins by combining electrical and flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Schuch, Horst; Rösch, Ulrich

    2015-04-21

    A new FFF method is presented which combines asymmetrical flow-FFF (AF4) and electrical FFF (ElFFF) in one channel to electrical asymmetrical flow-FFF (EAF4) to overcome the restrictions of pure ElFFF. It allows for measuring electrophoretic mobility (μ) as a function of size. The method provides an absolute value and does not require calibration. Results of μ for two particle standards are in good agreement with values determined by phase analysis light scattering (PALS). There is no requirement for low ionic strength carriers with EAF4. This overcomes one of the main limitations of ElFFF, making it feasible to measure proteins under physiological conditions. EAF4 has the capability to determine μ for individual populations which are resolved into separate peaks. This is demonstrated for a mixture of three polystyrene latex particles with different sizes as well as for the monomer and dimer of BSA and an antibody. The experimental setup consists of an AF4 channel with added electrodes; one is placed beneath the frit at the bottom wall and the other covers the inside of the upper channel plate. This design minimizes contamination from the electrolysis reactions by keeping the particles distant from the electrodes. In addition the applied voltage range is low (1.5-5 V), which reduces the quantity of gaseous electrolysis products below a threshold that interferes with the laminar flow profile or detector signals. Besides measuring μ, the method can be useful to improve the separation between sample components compared to pure flow-FFF. For two proteins (BSA and a monoclonal antibody), enhanced resolution of the monomer and dimer is achieved by applying an electric field. PMID:25789885

  2. Integrated architecture for the electrical detection of plasmonic resonances based on high electron mobility photo-transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammito, Davide; de Salvador, Davide; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Biasiol, Giorgio; Ongarello, Tommaso; Massari, Michele; Ruffato, Gianluca; Morpurgo, Margherita; Silvestri, Davide; Maggioni, Gianluigi; Bovo, Gianluca; Gaio, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    We report the design of an integrated platform for on-chip electrical transduction of the surface plasmon resonance supported by a nanostructured metal grating. The latter is fabricated on the active area of a GaAs/AlGaAs photo-HEMT and simultaneously works as the electronic gate of the device. The gold plasmonic crystal has a V-groove profile and has been designed by numerical optical simulations. By showing that the numerical models accurately reproduce the phototransistors experimental response, we demonstrate that the proposed architecture is suitable for the development of a new class of compact and scalable SPR sensors.We report the design of an integrated platform for on-chip electrical transduction of the surface plasmon resonance supported by a nanostructured metal grating. The latter is fabricated on the active area of a GaAs/AlGaAs photo-HEMT and simultaneously works as the electronic gate of the device. The gold plasmonic crystal has a V-groove profile and has been designed by numerical optical simulations. By showing that the numerical models accurately reproduce the phototransistors experimental response, we demonstrate that the proposed architecture is suitable for the development of a new class of compact and scalable SPR sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HEMTs optical response, device fabrication flow chart, estimate of device resolution based on numerical simulations, synthesis of thiolated biotin, biotin functionalization and avidin binding procedure. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04666d

  3. Study of mechanisms of electric field-induced DNA transfection. I. DNA entry by surface binding and diffusion through membrane pores.

    PubMed

    Xie, T D; Sun, L; Tsong, T Y

    1990-07-01

    A study of mechanisms of electrotransfection using Escherichia coli (JM 105) and the plasmid DNA pBR322 as model system is reported. pBR322 DNA carries an ampicillin resistance gene: E. coli transformants are conveniently assayed by counting colonies in a selection medium containing 50 micrograms/ml ampicillin and 25 micrograms/ml streptomycin. Samples not exposed to the electric field showed no transfection. In the absence of added cations, the plasmid DNA remains in solution and the efficiency of the transfection was 2 x 10(6)/micrograms DNA for cells treated with a 8-kV/cm, 1-ms electric pulse (square wave). DNA binding to the cell membrane greatly enhanced the efficiency of the transfection and this binding was increased by milimolar concentrations of CaCl2, MgCl2, or NaCl (CaCl2 greater than MgCl2 greater than NaCl). For example, in the presence of 2.5 mM CaCl2, 55% of the DNA added bound to E. coli and the transfection efficiency was elevated by two orders of magnitude (2 x 10(8)/micrograms DNA). These ions did not cause cell aggregation. With a low ratio of DNA to cells (less than 1 copy/cell), transfection efficiency correlated with the amount of DNA bound to the cell surface irrespective of salts. When the DNA binding ratio approached zero, the transfection efficiency was reduced by two to three orders, indicating that DNA entry by diffusion through the bulk solution was less than 1%. Square pulses of up to 12 kV/cm and 1 ms were used in the electrotransfection experiments. When cell concentration was 1 x 1010 cell/ml and DNA was added before the pulse, a transfection efficiency of up to 5 x 108/ microg DNA was obtained under optimum conditions (a single pulse of 8 kV/cm, 1 ms, in the presence of 5 mM CaCl2). When DNA was added to E. coli after the electric pulse, the efficiency of the transfection was dramatically reduced owing to the resealing of pores. Transfection was reduced to zero when DNA was added 2 h after the electroporation. However

  4. Exciton diffusion in disordered small molecules for organic photovoltaics: insights from first-principles simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhang, X; Lu, G

    2014-05-01

    Exciton diffusion in small molecules 3,6-bis(5-(benzofuran-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione [DPP(TBFu)2] is studied using first-principles simulations. We have examined dependence of exciton diffusion on structure disorder, temperature and exciton energy. We find that exciton diffusion length and diffusivity increase with structural order, temperature and the initial exciton energy. Compared to conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), DPP(TBFu)2 small molecules exhibit a much higher exciton diffusivity, but a shorter lifetime. The exciton diffusion length in DPP(TBFu)2 is 50% longer than that in P3HT, yielding a higher exciton harvesting efficiency; the physical origin behind these differences is discussed. The time evolutions of exciton energy, electron-hole distance, and exciton localization are explored, and the widely speculated exciton diffusion mechanism is confirmed theoretically. The connection between exciton diffusion and carrier mobilities is also studied. Finally we point out the possibility to estimate exciton diffusivity by measuring carrier mobilities under AC electric fields. PMID:24759042

  5. Measuring the effect of ion-induced drift-gas polarization on the electrical mobilities of multiply-charged ionic liquid nanodrops in air.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Juan; Fernández de la Mora, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The electrical mobilities of multiply-charged nanodrops of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMI-N[CN]2) were accurately measured in air at 20 °C for mass-selected clusters of composition [EMI-N[CN]2] n [EMI(+)] z , with 2 ≤ n ≤ 369 and 1 ≤ z ≤ 10. We confirm prior reports that the mobility Z of a globular ion of mass m is given approximately by the modified Stokes-Millikan law for spheres, Z  =  Z SM,mod (d m   +  d g , z, m), where d m   =  (6m/πρ)(1/3) is the nanodrop mass-diameter based on the density ρ of the liquid (corrected for the capillary compression and electrostatic deformation of the nanodrop), and d g is an effective air molecule diameter. There is however a measurable (up to 7%) and systematic z-dependent departure of Z from Z SM,mod . As theoretically expected at small ε (*) , this effect is accurately described by a simple correction factor of the form Z/Z SM,mod   =  δ(1  -  βε (*)), where kTε (*) is the potential energy due to the ion-induced dipole (polarization) attraction between a perfectly-conducting charged nanodrop and a polarized neutral gas-molecule at a distance (d m   +  d g )/2 from its center. An excellent fit of this model to hundreds of data points is found for d g ≈ 0.26 nm, β ≈ 0.36, and δ ≈ 0.954. Accounting for the effect of polarization decreases d g considerably with respect to values inferred from earlier nanodrop measurements that ignored this effect. In addition, and in spite of ambiguities in the mobility calibration scale, the measured constant δ smaller than unity increases Millikan's drag enhancement factor from the accepted value ξ m ≈ 1.36 to the new value ξ ≈ ξ m /δ ≈ 1.42  ± 0.03. PMID:24048890

  6. Measuring the Effect of Ion-Induced Drift-Gas Polarization on the Electrical Mobilities of Multiply-Charged Ionic Liquid Nanodrops in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-García, Juan; Fernández de la Mora, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The electrical mobilities of multiply-charged nanodrops of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMI-N[CN]2) were accurately measured in air at 20 °C for mass-selected clusters of composition [EMI-N[CN]2] n [EMI+] z , with 2 ≤ n ≤ 369 and 1 ≤ z ≤ 10. We confirm prior reports that the mobility Z of a globular ion of mass m is given approximately by the modified Stokes-Millikan law for spheres, Z = Z SM, mod ( d m + d g , z, m), where d m = (6 m/ πρ)1/3 is the nanodrop mass-diameter based on the density ρ of the liquid (corrected for the capillary compression and electrostatic deformation of the nanodrop), and d g is an effective air molecule diameter. There is however a measurable (up to 7 %) and systematic z-dependent departure of Z from Z SM,mod . As theoretically expected at small ɛ * , this effect is accurately described by a simple correction factor of the form Z/ Z SM, mod = δ(1 - βɛ *), where kTɛ * is the potential energy due to the ion-induced dipole ( polarization) attraction between a perfectly-conducting charged nanodrop and a polarized neutral gas-molecule at a distance ( d m + d g )/2 from its center. An excellent fit of this model to hundreds of data points is found for d g ≈ 0.26 nm, β ≈ 0.36, and δ ≈ 0.954. Accounting for the effect of polarization decreases d g considerably with respect to values inferred from earlier nanodrop measurements that ignored this effect. In addition, and in spite of ambiguities in the mobility calibration scale, the measured constant δ smaller than unity increases Millikan's drag enhancement factor from the accepted value ξ m ≈ 1.36 to the new value ξ ≈ ξ m / δ ≈ 1.42 ± 0.03.

  7. Study of mechanisms of electric field-induced DNA transfection. I. DNA entry by surface binding and diffusion through membrane pores

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, T.D.; Sun, L.; Tsong, T.Y. )

    1990-07-01

    A study of mechanisms of electrotransfection using Escherichia coli (JM 105) and the plasmid DNA pBR322 as model system is reported. pBR322 DNA carries an ampicillin resistance gene: E. coli transformants are conveniently assayed by counting colonies in a selection medium containing 50 micrograms/ml ampicillin and 25 micrograms/ml streptomycin. Samples not exposed to the electric field showed no transfection. In the absence of added cations, the plasmid DNA remains in solution and the efficiency of the transfection was 2 x 10(6)/micrograms DNA for cells treated with a 8-kV/cm, 1-ms electric pulse (square wave). DNA binding to the cell membrane greatly enhanced the efficiency of the transfection and this binding was increased by milimolar concentrations of CaCl2, MgCl2, or NaCl (CaCl2 greater than MgCl2 greater than NaCl). For example, in the presence of 2.5 mM CaCl2, 55% of the DNA added bound to E. coli and the transfection efficiency was elevated by two orders of magnitude (2 x 10(8)/micrograms DNA). These ions did not cause cell aggregation. With a low ratio of DNA to cells (less than 1 copy/cell), transfection efficiency correlated with the amount of DNA bound to the cell surface irrespective of salts. When the DNA binding ratio approached zero, the transfection efficiency was reduced by two to three orders, indicating that DNA entry by diffusion through the bulk solution was less than 1%. Square pulses of up to 12 kV/cm and 1 ms were used in the electrotransfection experiments.

  8. DNA electrophoresis in agarose gels: Effects of electric field and gel concentration on the exponential dependence of reciprocal mobility on DNA length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti, Afshin; van Winkle, David; Randolph, Rill

    2002-03-01

    Electrophoresis was performed on double stranded DNA fragments ranging in length from 200 bp to 48502 bp at agarose gel concentrations T = 0.5% - 1.5% and electric fields E = 0.71 V/cm to 5 V/cm. A wide range of electric fields and gel concentrations were used to find what range of conditions work with the new interpolation equation, 1/μ(L) = 1/μl - (1/μl - 1/μ_s)e^-L/γ. The equation fit extremely well (\\chi^2 >= 0.999) to data with E = 2.5 V/cm to 5 V/cm and for lower fields (E < 2.5 V/cm) at low gel concentrations (T = 0.5% and 0.7%). This exponential relation seemed to hold when there is a smooth transition from the Ogston sieving regime to the reptation regime when looking at the “reptation plots” (plotting 3μL/μo vs. L) (Rousseau, J., Drouin, G., and Slater, G. W., Phys Rev Lett. 1997, 79, 1945-1948). For separations of single-stranded DNA in polyacrylamide, similar reptation plots have a region with a negative slope between the Ogston sieving regime and the reptation regime which has been interpreted as the signature of entropic trapping. When separating double-stranded DNA in agarose it was observed that fits deviate from the data when three different slopes are observed in the reptation plots. Failure of the simple exponential relationship between reciprocal mobility and DNA length appears to be the consequence of entropic trapping.

  9. Direct label-free electrical immunodetection of transplant rejection protein biomarker in physiological buffer using floating gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors.

    PubMed

    Tulip, Fahmida S; Eteshola, Edward; Desai, Suchita; Mostafa, Salwa; Roopa, Subramanian; Evans, Boyd; Islam, Syed Kamrul

    2014-06-01

    Monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG/CXCL9) is used as an immune biomarker for early monitoring of transplant or allograft rejection. This paper demonstrates a direct electrical, label-free detection method of recombinant human MIG with anti-MIG IgG molecules in physiologically relevant buffer environment. The sensor platform used is a biologically modified GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device. Biomolecular recognition capability was provided by using high affinity anti-MIG monoclonal antibody to form molecular affinity interface receptors on short N-hydroxysuccinimide-ester functionalized disulphide (DSP) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the gold sensing gate of the HEMT device. A floating gate configuration has been adopted to eliminate the influences of external gate voltage. Preliminary test results with the proposed chemically treated GaN HEMT biosensor show that MIG can be detected for a wide range of concentration varying from 5 ng/mL to 500 ng/mL. PMID:24803243

  10. Improved electrical mobility in highly epitaxial La:BaSnO3 films on SmScO3(110) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadekar, P. V.; Alaria, J.; O'Sullivan, M.; Flack, N. L. O.; Manning, T. D.; Phillips, L. J.; Durose, K.; Lozano, O.; Lucas, S.; Claridge, J. B.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth of BaSnO3 and Ba1-xLaxSnO3 (x = 7%) lanthanum doped barium stannate thin films on different perovskite single crystal (SrTiO3 (001) and SmScO3 (110)) substrates has been achieved by pulsed laser deposition under optimized deposition conditions. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the films on either of these substrates are relaxed due to the large mismatch and present a high degree of crystallinity with narrow rocking curves and smooth surface morphology while analytical quantification by proton induced X-ray emission confirms the stoichiometric La transfer from a polyphasic target, producing films with measured La contents above the bulk solubility limit. The films show degenerate semiconducting behavior on both substrates, with the observed room temperature resistivities, Hall mobilities, and carrier concentrations of 4.4 mΩ cm, 10.11 cm2 V-1 s-1, and 1.38 × 1020 cm-3 on SmScO3 and 7.8 mΩ cm, 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1, and 1.36 × 1020 cm-3 on SrTiO3 ruling out any extrinsic contribution from the substrate. The superior electrical properties observed on the SmScO3 substrate are attributed to reduction in dislocation density from the lower lattice mismatch.

  11. Mobile Genetic Elements Related to the Diffusion of Plasmid-Mediated AmpC β-Lactamases or Carbapenemases from Enterobacteriaceae: Findings from a Multicenter Study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, L.; Miró, E.; Juan, C.; Gómez, L.; Bou, G.; González-López, J. J.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Aracil, B.; Conejo, M. C.; Oliver, A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the genetic context of 74 acquired ampC genes and 17 carbapenemase genes from 85 of 640 Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected in 2009. Using S1 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization, 37 of 74 blaAmpC genes were located on large plasmids of different sizes belonging to six incompatibility groups. We used sequencing and PCR mapping to investigate the regions flanking the acquired ampC genes. The blaCMY-2-like genes were associated with ISEcp1; the surrounding blaDHA genes were similar to Klebsiella pneumoniae plasmid pTN60013 associated with IS26 and the psp and sap operons; and the blaACC-1 genes were associated with IS26 elements inserted into ISEcp1. All of the carbapenemase genes (blaVIM-1, blaIMP-22, and blaIMP-28) were located in class 1 integrons. Therefore, although plasmids are the main cause of the rapid dissemination of ampC genes among Enterobacteriaceae, we need to be aware that other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequences, transposons, or integrons, can be involved in the mobilization of these genes of chromosomal origin. Additionally, three new integrons (In846 to In848) are described in this study. PMID:26077249

  12. Mobile genetic elements related to the diffusion of plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases or carbapenemases from Enterobacteriaceae: findings from a multicenter study in Spain.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, L; Miró, E; Juan, C; Gómez, L; Bou, G; González-López, J J; Martínez-Martínez, L; Aracil, B; Conejo, M C; Oliver, A; Navarro, F

    2015-09-01

    We examined the genetic context of 74 acquired ampC genes and 17 carbapenemase genes from 85 of 640 Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected in 2009. Using S1 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization, 37 of 74 bla AmpC genes were located on large plasmids of different sizes belonging to six incompatibility groups. We used sequencing and PCR mapping to investigate the regions flanking the acquired ampC genes. The bla CMY-2-like genes were associated with ISEcp1; the surrounding bla DHA genes were similar to Klebsiella pneumoniae plasmid pTN60013 associated with IS26 and the psp and sap operons; and the bla ACC-1 genes were associated with IS26 elements inserted into ISEcp1. All of the carbapenemase genes (bla VIM-1, bla IMP-22, and bla IMP-28) were located in class 1 integrons. Therefore, although plasmids are the main cause of the rapid dissemination of ampC genes among Enterobacteriaceae, we need to be aware that other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequences, transposons, or integrons, can be involved in the mobilization of these genes of chromosomal origin. Additionally, three new integrons (In846 to In848) are described in this study. PMID:26077249

  13. CO/sub 2/ laser processing of diffusion induced lattice imperfections in silicon: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.B.; Geist, G.A.; Young, R.T.; Christie, W.H.; Greulich, F.A.

    1987-10-01

    The high-temperature diffusion of phosphorus into crystalline silicon causes the formation of electrically inactive phosphorus-rich precipitates near the surface. These precipitates decrease the carrier lifetime and mobility in the diffused layer, and thus lead to less than optimal diode characteristics of electrical junctions formed by diffusion of phosphorus into a p-type substrate. We show that the free-carrier absorption of a CO/sub 2/ laser pulse can be used to completely dissolve the precipitates and remove dislocations in the diffused layer. Furthermore, we find that there are distinct advantages in depositing the pulse energy by way of free-carrier transitions, since the energy can be preferentially deposited in either confined doped layers or diffusion wells that are surrounded by lightly doped material. Our transmission electron microscopy results show that the annealing of the extended lattice defects is caused by melting of the near-surface region and subsequent liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth. Van der Pauw measurements are used to study the carrier concentration, mobility, and sheet resistivity of the samples before and after laser irradiation. The results of the electrical measurements show that there is a large increase in the carrier concentrations and a corresponding drop in the sheet resistivities of the laser irradiated samples. Using a Fourier transform

  14. Ion-cage interpretation for the structural and dynamic changes of ionic liquids under an external electric field.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Yanting

    2013-05-01

    In many applications, ionic liquids (ILs) work in a nonequilibrium steady state driven by an external electric field. However, how the electric field changes the structure and dynamics of ILs and its underlying mechanism still remain poorly understood. In this paper, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the structure and dynamics of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ([EMIm][NO3]) under a static electric field. The ion cage structure was found to play an essential role in determining the structural and dynamic properties of the IL system. With a weak or moderate electric field (0-10(7) V/m), the external electric field is too weak to modify the ion cage structure in an influential way and thus the changes of structural and dynamic properties are negligible. With a strong electric field (10(7)-10(9) V/m) applied, ion cages expand and deform apparently, leading to the increase of ion mobility and self-diffusion coefficient with electric field, and the self-diffusion of ions along the electric field becomes faster than the other two directions due to the anisotropic deformation of ion cages. In addition, the Einstein relation connecting diffusion and mobility breaks down at strong electric fields, and it also breaks down for a single ion species even at moderate electric fields (linear-response region). PMID:23557150

  15. Improved electrical mobility in highly epitaxial La:BaSnO{sub 3} films on SmScO{sub 3}(110) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wadekar, P. V.; O'Sullivan, M.; Flack, N. L. O.; Manning, T. D.; Claridge, J. B.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Alaria, J.; Phillips, L. J.; Durose, K.; Lozano, O.; Lucas, S.

    2014-08-04

    Heteroepitaxial growth of BaSnO{sub 3} and Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}SnO{sub 3} (x = 7%) lanthanum doped barium stannate thin films on different perovskite single crystal (SrTiO{sub 3} (001) and SmScO{sub 3} (110)) substrates has been achieved by pulsed laser deposition under optimized deposition conditions. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the films on either of these substrates are relaxed due to the large mismatch and present a high degree of crystallinity with narrow rocking curves and smooth surface morphology while analytical quantification by proton induced X-ray emission confirms the stoichiometric La transfer from a polyphasic target, producing films with measured La contents above the bulk solubility limit. The films show degenerate semiconducting behavior on both substrates, with the observed room temperature resistivities, Hall mobilities, and carrier concentrations of 4.4 mΩ cm, 10.11 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, and 1.38 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} on SmScO{sub 3} and 7.8 mΩ cm, 5.8 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, and 1.36 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} on SrTiO{sub 3} ruling out any extrinsic contribution from the substrate. The superior electrical properties observed on the SmScO{sub 3} substrate are attributed to reduction in dislocation density from the lower lattice mismatch.

  16. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M. J. E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Ng, G. I. E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X.; Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C.

    2015-02-23

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-R{sub DS[ON]}) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔV{sub th}) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (I{sub DS}-V{sub DS}) and drain current (I{sub D}) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (L{sub gd}) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (L{sub gd} = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a small ΔV{sub th} (∼120 mV). However, at low-EF (L{sub gd} = 5 μm), smaller dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a larger ΔV{sub th} (∼380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔV{sub th}. A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by I{sub D}-transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations.

  17. Electric field-induced deformation of polyelectrolyte gels

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Hance, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    Water-swollen polyelectrolyte gels deform in an electric field. We observed that the sign and magnitude of the deformation is dependent on the nature of the salt bath in which the gel is immersed and electrocuted. These results are compatible with a deformation mechanism based upon creation of ion density gradients by the field which, in turn, creates osmotic pressure gradients within the gel. A consistent interpretation results only if gel mobility is allowed as well as free ion diffusion and migration.

  18. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  19. 63. Mobile Learning in Developing Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motlik, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This paper looks at the diffusion and applications of mobile phone technology in Asia and Africa, compared with North America. It indicates that Asian distance education can be the global leader in the development of educational uses for the mobile phone; and it considers the potential for mobile learning in Africa and other developing regions.…

  20. The influence of orientations and external electric field on charge carrier mobilities in CuPc and F16CuPc films on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and octane-1-thiol terminated Au(111) substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Ma, Jing

    2010-10-14

    The lying-down and standing-up CuPc and F(16)CuPc films on HOPG (highly ordered pyrolytic graphite) and C8-SAM/Au(111) (octane-1-thiol terminated Au(111)) substrates are investigated by using a hybrid strategy combing the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, in order to understand the influence of packing orientation on charge carrier mobilities. On the basis of the periodic slab model and consistent-valence force field, MD simulations show the populations of various packing configurations and radial distribution of intermolecular distance in the films at room temperature. It is also demonstrated that the external electric field (parallel or perpendicular to the substrate) perturbs the intermolecular distances in CuPc and F(16)CuPc films, especially for the slipped edge-to-face stackings. DFT calculations are then used to evaluate two key charge-transfer parameters, reorganization energy and transfer integral. An electrostatics embedding model is employed to approximately consider the external electrostatics contributions to reorganization energy. The thermal-averaged mobility is consequently estimated by taking account of both electronic structures of charge-hopping pairs and dynamic fluctuations in film morphologies under various experimental conditions. It is found that CuPc has smaller reorganization energy and larger hole (electron) mobilities than F(16)CuPc. Under the external electric field of 10(4)-10(7) V cm(-1), both hole and electron mobilities of CuPc and F(16)CuPc films would decrease to 1-3 orders of magnitude. CuPc (F(16)CuPc) films show substantial orientation dependence of mobilities on the ratio of standing-up versus lying-down orientations falling in the range of 10-1000. PMID:20714578

  1. Drift and diffusion of spin and charge density waves in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi; Koralek, J. D.; Orenstein, J.; Tibbetts, D. R.; Reno, J. L.; Lilly, M. P.

    2011-03-01

    We use transient grating spectroscopy (TGS) to study the persistent spin helix (PSH) state and electron-hole density wave (EHDW) in a 2D electron gas in the presence of an in-plane electric field parallel to the wavevector of the PSH or EHDW. By directly measuring the phase, we can measure the PSH and EHDW displacement with 10 nm spatial and sub-picosecond time resolution. We obtain both the spin diffusion and mobility and ambipolar diffusion and mobility from the TGS measurements of PSH and EHDW, respectively. The spin transresistivity extracted from the spin diffusion is in excellent agreement with the RPA theory of spin Coulomb drag (SCD). The spin mobility data indicate that SCD may also play a role in the spin wave drifting process. From the ambipolar diffusion and mobility, we obtain the transresistivity of electrons and holes in the same layer, which is much stronger than is typically seen in the conventional Coulomb drag experiments on coupled quantum wells.

  2. Development of a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system for outdoor tree measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takeshi; Geya, Yuto; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2011-05-01

    By combining a 0.3 T permanent magnet with flexible rotation and translation mechanism, a probe with a local electromagnetic shielding, several electrical units, a mobile lift, and an electric wagon, a mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was developed for outdoor tree measurements. 2D cross-sectional images of normal and diseased branches of a pear tree were acquired for measurements of T1, T2, proton density, and apparent diffusion constant (ADC). The ADC map clearly differentiated diseased from normal branches. A whole-day measurement of the ADC map demonstrated that microscopic water flow in the normal branch changed proportionally with solar radiation. Therefore, we have concluded that our mobile MRI system is a powerful tool for studies of plants in outdoor environments.

  3. Electricity in the Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampath, S.; Kumar, V. Sasi

    1991-01-01

    The theory of the atmospheric electric circuit and a discussion of the fair-weather electrical are presented. The ion concentration, mobility, conductivity, and electric field altitudinal profiles are explained. An outline of the electrical processes inside thunderstorms along with a description of the lightning strike are included. (Author)

  4. Real space mapping of ionic diffusion and electrochemical activity in energy storage and conversion materials

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Kumar, Amit; Dudney, Nancy J; Jesse, Stephen

    2014-05-06

    A method and system for probing mobile ion diffusivity and electrochemical reactivity on a nanometer length scale of a free electrochemically active surface includes a control module that biases the surface of the material. An electrical excitation signal is applied to the material and induces the movement of mobile ions. An SPM probe in contact with the surface of the material detects the displacement of mobile ions at the surface of the material. A detector measures an electromechanical strain response at the surface of the material based on the movement and reactions of the mobile ions. The use of an SPM tip to detect local deformations allows highly reproducible measurements in an ambient environment without visible changes in surface structure. The measurements illustrate effective spatial resolution comparable with defect spacing and well below characteristic grain sizes of the material.

  5. Molecular modeling of diffusion coefficient and ionic conductivity of CO2 in aqueous ionic solutions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ratés, Miquel; de Hemptinne, Jean-Charles; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Nieto-Draghi, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Mass diffusion coefficients of CO(2)/brine mixtures under thermodynamic conditions of deep saline aquifers have been investigated by molecular simulation. The objective of this work is to provide estimates of the diffusion coefficient of CO(2) in salty water to compensate the lack of experimental data on this property. We analyzed the influence of temperature, CO(2) concentration,and salinity on the diffusion coefficient, the rotational diffusion, as well as the electrical conductivity. We observe an increase of the mass diffusion coefficient with the temperature, but no clear dependence is identified with the salinity or with the CO(2) mole fraction, if the system is overall dilute. In this case, we notice an important dispersion on the values of the diffusion coefficient which impairs any conclusive statement about the effect of the gas concentration on the mobility of CO(2) molecules. Rotational relaxation times for water and CO(2) increase by decreasing temperature or increasing the salt concentration. We propose a correlation for the self-diffusion coefficient of CO(2) in terms of the rotational relaxation time which can ultimately be used to estimate the mutual diffusion coefficient of CO(2) in brine. The electrical conductivity of the CO(2)-brine mixtures was also calculated under different thermodynamic conditions. Electrical conductivity tends to increase with the temperature and salt concentration. However, we do not observe any influence of this property with the CO(2) concentration at the studied regimes. Our results give a first evaluation of the variation of the CO(2)-brine mass diffusion coefficient, rotational relaxation times, and electrical conductivity under the thermodynamic conditions typically encountered in deep saline aquifers. PMID:22292779

  6. Electrical characterization of fluorinated benzothiadiazole based conjugated copolymer – a promising material for high-performance solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Toušek, J. Toušková, J.; Chomutová, R.; Remeš, Z.; Čermák, J.; Helgesen, M.; Carlé, J. E.; Krebs, F. C.

    2015-12-15

    Measurements of electrical conductivity, electron work function, carrier mobility of holes and the diffusion length of excitons were performed on samples of conjugated polymers relevant to polymer solar cells. A state of the art fluorinated benzothiadiazole based conjugated copolymer (PBDT{sub THD} − DTBTff) was studied and benchmarked against the reference polymer poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT). We employed, respectively, four electrode conductivity measurements, Kelvin probe work function measurements, carrier mobility using charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage (CELIV) measurements and diffusion length determinaton using surface photovoltage measurements.

  7. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  8. Limits of social mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  9. Diffusion-Barrier Contacts For Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Pool, Frederick S.; Nicolet, Marc; Iles, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrically conductive diffusion barriers of TaSiN prevent diffusion of metal from overlying metal contacts into underlying silicon during processing at high temperature, improving performance during subsequent use in low-intensity light at low temperature.

  10. Mg dopant in Cu2ZnSnSe4: An n-type former and a promoter of electrical mobility up to 120 cm2 V-1 s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Dong-Hau; Wubet, Walelign

    2014-07-01

    Mg-doped Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) bulk materials with the (Cu2-xMgx)ZnSnSe4 formula at x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 were prepared at 600 °C for 2 h with soluble sintering aids of Sb2S3 and Te. Defect chemistry was studied by measuring structural and electrical properties of Mg-doped CZTSe as a function of dopant concentration. Except at x=0, all Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. The Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. n-Type Mg-CZTSe pellets at x=0.1 showed the highest electrical conductivity of 24.6 S cm-1 and the net hole mobility of 120 cm2 V-1 s-1, while they were 11.8 S cm-1 and 36.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the undoped p-type CZTSe. Mg dopant is a strong promoter of electrical mobility. Mg dopant behaves as a donor defect in CZTSe at a 5% doping content, but is also used as an acceptor at a high content above 5%. Mg doping has further developed CZTSe into a promising semiconductor.

  11. Anisotropic fractional diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Magin, Richard L; Ye, Allen Q

    2015-01-01

    Traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps brain structure by fitting a diffusion model to the magnitude of the electrical signal acquired in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fractional DTI employs anomalous diffusion models to obtain a better fit to real MRI data, which can exhibit anomalous diffusion in both time and space. In this paper, we describe the challenge of developing and employing anisotropic fractional diffusion models for DTI. Since anisotropy is clearly present in the three-dimensional MRI signal response, such models hold great promise for improving brain imaging. We then propose some candidate models, based on stochastic theory.

  12. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  13. Approximate Solutions Of Equations Of Steady Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1992-01-01

    Rigorous analysis yields reliable criteria for "best-fit" functions. Improved "curve-fitting" method yields approximate solutions to differential equations of steady-state diffusion. Method applies to problems in which rates of diffusion depend linearly or nonlinearly on concentrations of diffusants, approximate solutions analytic or numerical, and boundary conditions of Dirichlet type, of Neumann type, or mixture of both types. Applied to equations for diffusion of charge carriers in semiconductors in which mobilities and lifetimes of charge carriers depend on concentrations.

  14. STM imaging of electrically floating islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Realpe, H.; Shamir, N.; Mintz, M. H.; Manassen, Y.

    2006-07-01

    Appearances and disappearances of Gd islands grown on top of a W(1 1 0) substrate were observed in time scales of hours after exposing the surface to a few Langmuirs of hydrogen. The phenomenon is presented and explained in terms of (temporary) creation of electrically floating islands, due to electrical decoupling of the island and substrate by the hydrogen that diffuses into the island/substrate interface. The disappearance of such an island is explained by forming a double barrier junction consisting of two tunneling barriers in series, causing, by charging, the potential of the island to become equal to that of the tip. The island then becomes "invisible" and the tip follows the corrugation of the surface under the substrate. The reappearance follows hydrogen mobility that retains the electrical conductivity of the island-substrate interface.

  15. Fabrication and Electrical Characterization of Strained Si-on-insulator/Strained SiGe-on-insulator Dual Channel CMOS structures with High-Mobility Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Tsutomu; Nakaharai, Shu; Moriyama, Yoshihiko; Hirashita, Norio; Toyoda, Eiji; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Mizuno, Tomohisa; Takagi, Shinichi

    Mobility enhancement technologies by incorporating strain in MOSFETs have been recognized as key technologies for scaled CMOS devices. The most promising channel materials for n- and p-channel MOSFETs are tensily-strained Si and compressively-strained Ge (SiGe), respectively, from the viewpoint of their high mobility values. In this paper, dual channel CMOS structures with strained Si-on-insulator (strained-SOI)-nMOSFETs and strained SiGe-on-insulator (strained-SGOI)-pMOSFETs are demonstrated as well as their high channel mobility and current drive enhancements. Strained Si channels on a relaxed SGOI substrate and Ge-rich strained SGOI channels are located on the nMOS and pMOS regions of the same wafer, respectively. The dual channel structure was fabricated by a CMOS process combined with the Ge condensation process, in which the epitaxially grown SiGe layer on the SOI substrate was locally oxidized at high temperatures. As a result, significant electron- and hole-mobility enhancements for the strained SOI and SGOI channels were observed as well as the drain current enhancements. Based on the measured mobility for the nMOS and pMOS channels in the CMOS devices, CMOS performance enhancement of 30% was estimated.

  16. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, Steve L.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chen, Fang C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  17. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  18. The diffusion of ions in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion in unconsolidated sediments generally proceeds at rates ranging from half to one twentieth of those applying to diffusion of ions and molecules in free solution. Diffusion rates are predictable with respect to porosity and path tortuosity in host sediments, and can be conveniently measured by determinations of electrical resistivity on bulk sediment samples. Net ion flux is further influenced by reactions of diffusing species with enclosing sediments, but such influences should not be confused with or lumped with diffusion processes. ?? 1970.

  19. Holographic diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadle, Stephen; Wuest, Daniel; Cantalupo, John; Lakes, Roderic S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic diffusers are prepared using silver halide (Agfa 8E75 and Kodak 649F) and photopolymer (Polaroid DMP 128 and DuPont 600, 705, and 150 series) media. It is possible to control the diffusion angle in three ways: by selection of the properties of the source diffuser, by control of its subtended angle, and by selection of the holographic medium. Several conventional diffusers based on refraction or scattering of light are examined for comparison.

  20. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  1. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF FOODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foods, especially liquid foods, conduct electricity. Unlike in metals, the charge carriers in foods are ions, instead of electrons. Under normal applications, ions carry the charges as the mass of ions moves along the electrical field. The concentration and mobility of ions determine the electrical ...

  2. Electrotransport and diffusivity of molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten, and zirconium in beta-thorium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, F. A.; Beck, M. S.; Rehbein, D. K.; Conzemius, R. J.; Carlson, O. N.

    1984-01-01

    The electric mobilities, diffusivities, and effective valences were determined for molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten, and zirconium in beta-thorium. All four solutes migrated in the same direction as the electron flow. Rhenium and molybdenum were found to be very mobile, with tungsten somewhat slower. Zirconium was found to move at a rate near that of the self-diffusion of beta-thorium, viz., about 10 to the -11th sq m/s at 1500 C. The electromigration velocities showed a similar trend. A comparison was made between experimental data obtained by scanning laser mass spectrometry and theoretical transport equations for two purification experiments. Good agreement was obtained with both the concentration profile predicted by DeGroot and the purification ratio predicted by Verhoeven.

  3. Nuclear powerplants for mobile applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. This paper examines the technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  4. Simulation of Electrical Transport in Rocks under Mechanical Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro da Silva, M. A.; Seixas, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Rock's electrical properties can be changed by mechanical action, especially when deformation is accompanied by micro-fracturing processes. Knowing how electrical charge is generated in inelastically deformed rocks, the nature and properties of the generated charge carriers, and their spatial distribution and propagation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of seismo-electromagnetic signals. In this work, we describe briefly a model for the numerical simulation of electrical transport in rocks under mechanical action, assuming that high and low mobility charge carriers of opposite signs can be simultaneously generated by micro-fracturing processes and recombine, diffuse and drift across the sample rock. The electrical behavior can then be described using an adaptation of the formalism applied to semiconductors. We provide simulation results on a one-dimensional lattice using finite-difference discretization. Our results show that a large mobility contrast among charge carriers allows charge separation inside the deformation region, which leads to the formation of charged layers of alternate signs. Inside these layers, rapid electric field variations are observed which can lead to the emission of electromagnetic radiation. With proper positioning of current electrodes inside the deformation region, it is possible to collect electrical current even without any applied voltage. We discuss our results in the light of available experimental results on the generation of electrical and electromagnetic signals in deformed rocks.

  5. Influence of high voltage electric fields applied across a horizontal liquid-liquid interface on the rate of metal extraction using a rotating diffusion cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kuipa, P.K.; Hughes, M.A.

    1999-09-01

    The effect of an applied electrical field across a plane liquid-liquid interface on the rate of metal extraction using hydroxyoximes and dialkylphosphoric acids as extractants is examined. The results indicate that applied electric fields have no marked influence on the observed rate of metal extraction when aliphatic hydrocarbons are employed as the diluents in the organic phase. Increases in mass transfer rates of up to 250% were observed when mixtures of octanol and an aliphatic hydrocarbon were employed as the diluent in the organic phase. The mechanism of transfer is thought to be a combination of movement of charges in the bulk of the nonconducting organic phase and electrohydrodynamic flows due to local variations in the effective interfacial tension as a result of the applied electric fields.

  6. Hydrogen Diffusion in Forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S.; Mackwell, S.

    2002-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of Earth's mantle are readily modified by interaction with volatiles, such as water. Thus, characterization of solubility and kinetics of incorporation for water in nominally anhydrous minerals is important in order to understand the behavior of Earth's interior under hydrous conditions. Experimental studies on the olivine-water system indicate that significant amounts of OH can dissolve within olivine as point defects (Bell and Rossman, 1992; Kohlstedt et al. 1996). Extending Kohlstedt and Mackwell's (1998) work, our study concerns the kinetics of hydrogen transport in the iron-free olivine-water system. This study is based on hydrogenation of forsterite samples during piston-cylinder and TZM cold-seal vessel experiments. We use infrared analyses in order to constrain the speciation of the mobile water-derived defects in forsterite single-crystal sample, and the rates of diffusion of such species under uppermost mantle conditions (0.2 to 1.5 GPa, 900 to 1100° C). Hydrogen defect transport in single crystals of forsterite is investigated for diffusion parallel to each crystallographic axis. Defect diffusivities are obtained by fitting a diffusion law to the OH content as a function of position in the sample. Our current results indicate that incorporation of hydroxyl species into iron-free olivine is a one-stage process with hydrogen diffusion linked to magnesium vacancy self-diffusion DV, such that DV = D~/3 = 10-12 m2/s at 1000° C parallel to [001], where D~ represents the chemical diffusivity. Those diffusion rates are slightly lower than in iron-bearing olivine for the same incorporation mechanism. The different concentration profiles show a clear anisotropy of diffusion, with fastest diffusion parallel to [001] as in iron-bearing olivine. Thus, while hydrogen solubilities are dependent on iron content, the rate of incorporation of water-derived species in olivine is not strongly coupled to the concentration of iron. This

  7. Mg dopant in Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3}: An n-type former and a promoter of electrical mobility up to 387 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Dong-Hau Wubet, Walelign

    2014-10-15

    Mg-doped Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} bulk materials with the (Cu{sub 2−x}Mg{sub x})SnSe{sub 3} (Mg-x-CTSe) formula at x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 were prepared at 550 °C for 2 h with soluble sintering aids of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Te. Defect chemistry was studied by measuring structural and electrical properties of Mg-doped Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} as a function of dopant concentration. Mg-x-CTSe pellets show p-type at x=0, 0.05 and 0.1 and n-type at x=0.15 and 0.2. The low hole concentration of 3.2×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and high mobility of 387 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} were obtained for (Cu{sub 2−x}Mg{sub x})SnSe{sub 3} bulks at x=0.1 (5% Mg) as compared to 2.2×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and 91 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the undoped one. The explanation based upon the Mg-to-Cu antisite donor defect for the changes in electrical property was declared. A high Mg content for Mg-x-CTSe at x≥0.1 can lead to the formation of second phases. The study in bulk Mg-x-CTSe has been based upon defect states and is consistent and supported by the data of structural and electrical properties. - Graphical abstract: The effects of extrinsic doping of Mg{sup 2+} on the electrical properties of Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} bulks. - Highlights: • p-Type Mg-CTSe with n{sub p} of 3.2×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and μ{sub p} of 387 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} was obtained. • This p-type occurred for 5%Mg-doped CTSe with the (Cu{sub 1.9}Mg{sub 0.1})SnSe{sub 3} formula. • Mg dopant acts as a donor to lower n{sub p} and an accelerator to increase mobility. • High Mg content leads to the p-to-n transitions. • Defect was explored by measuring electrical property and lattice parameter.

  8. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH‑ = U4+ + O2‑ + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  9. Thermal diffusivity measurements on composite porosity samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A phase lag technique is used to make quantitative measurements of diffusivity in composite porosity samples. Changes in through-ply diffusivity in a graphite composite due to varying porosity levels are examined. The relationship between the amount of porosity and the change in diffusivity is analyzed using an electrical analog for modeling heat flow in the composite.

  10. Mg dopant in Cu2SnSe3: An n-type former and a promoter of electrical mobility up to 387 cm2 V-1 s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Dong-Hau; Wubet, Walelign

    2014-10-01

    Mg-doped Cu2SnSe3 bulk materials with the (Cu2-xMgx)SnSe3 (Mg-x-CTSe) formula at x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 were prepared at 550 °C for 2 h with soluble sintering aids of Sb2S3 and Te. Defect chemistry was studied by measuring structural and electrical properties of Mg-doped Cu2SnSe3 as a function of dopant concentration. Mg-x-CTSe pellets show p-type at x=0, 0.05 and 0.1 and n-type at x=0.15 and 0.2. The low hole concentration of 3.2×1017 cm-3 and high mobility of 387 cm2 V-1 s-1 were obtained for (Cu2-xMgx)SnSe3 bulks at x=0.1 (5% Mg) as compared to 2.2×1018 cm-3 and 91 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the undoped one. The explanation based upon the Mg-to-Cu antisite donor defect for the changes in electrical property was declared. A high Mg content for Mg-x-CTSe at x≥0.1 can lead to the formation of second phases. The study in bulk Mg-x-CTSe has been based upon defect states and is consistent and supported by the data of structural and electrical properties.

  11. CsSnI[subscript 3]: Semiconductor or Metal? High Electrical Conductivity and Strong Near-Infrared Photoluminescence from a Single Material. High Hole Mobility and Phase-Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D.; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J.; Kenney, John T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2012-10-29

    CsSnI{sub 3} is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI{sub 3} have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI{sub 3}, coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI{sub 3}. The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI{sub 3} demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI{sub 3} indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and a hole mobility of {approx} 585 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from

  12. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e. peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression, i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species. This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, and which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion driven peak spreading over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. PMID:27052738

  13. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  14. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Sandilya V B; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K; Baker, Erin S; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27052738

  15. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-04-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  16. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oterkus, Selda; Madenci, Erdogan; Agwai, Abigail

    2014-05-01

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  17. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Oterkus, Selda; Madenci, Erdogan; Agwai, Abigail

    2014-05-15

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  18. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  19. Influence of gamma irradiation on the electrical properties of LiClO4-gelatin solid polymer electrolytes: Modelling anomalous diffusion through generalized calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Tania; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2016-08-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes with gelatin as host polymer are subjected to gamma irradiation with dose varying from 0 to 100 kGy. Two sets of samples are studied, one with and one without addition of lithium perchlorate as ionic salt. The effect of varying plasticizer content, salt fraction and radiation dose on the impedance is measured. The dc (direct current) ion-conductivity is determined from impedance spectroscopy results. It is shown that relative to the unirradiated sample, the room temperature dc ion-conductivity decreases in general on irradiation, by an order of magnitude. However on comparing results for the irradiated samples, a dose of 60 kGy is seen to produce the highest ion-conductivity. Considering the variation of all parameters, the highest dc-conductivity of 6.06x10-2 S/m is obtained for the un-irradiated sample at room temperature, with 12.5 wt% LiClO4 and 35.71 wt% of glycerol as plasticizer. The samples are characterized in addition by XRD, SEM and FTIR respectively. Cyclic voltametry is performed for the confirmation of the electrolytic performance for pristine and gamma irradiated samples. To understand the experimental results, a model incorporating normal, as well as anomalous diffusion has been applied. Generalized calculus is used to model the anomalous diffusion. It is shown that this model successfully reproduces the experimental frequency dependence of the complex impedance for samples subjected to varying gamma dose. The physical interpretation of the model parameters and their variation with sample composition and irradiation dose is discussed.

  20. Diffuse phase transition and electrical properties of lead-free piezoelectric (LixNa1-x)NbO3 (0.04 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) ceramics near morphotropic phase boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Kulkarni, A. R.; Prakash, Om

    2013-08-01

    Temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity of lead-free (LixNa1-x)NbO3 for nominal x = 0.04-0.20, prepared by solid state reaction followed by sintering, was studied to resolve often debated issue pertaining to exactness of morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) location besides structural aspects and phase stability in the system near MPB. Interestingly, a diffuse phase transition has been observed in the dielectric permittivity peak arising from the disorder induced in A-site and structural frustration in the perovskite cell due to Li substitution. A partial phase diagram has been proposed based on temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity studies. The room temperature piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties were investigated and the ceramics with x = 0.12 showed relatively good electrical properties (d33 = 28 pC/N, kp = 13.8%, Qm = 440, Pr = 12.5 μC/cm2, Ec = 43.2 kV/cm, and Tm = 340 °C). These parameter values make this material suitable for piezoelectric resonator and filter applications. Moreover, a high dielectric permittivity (ɛ'r = 2703) with broad diffuse peak near transition temperature, and low dielectric loss (<4%) over a wide temperature range (50-250 °C) found in this material may also have a potential application in high-temperature multilayer capacitors in automotive and aerospace related industries.

  1. Analysis of the polarity effects in the electrical breakdown of liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Qian, J.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Schamiloglu, Edl; Gaudet, John A.; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2005-03-01

    Electrical breakdown simulations are carried out for liquids in response to a sub-microsecond ({approx}100-200 ns) voltage pulse. This model builds on our previous analysis and focuses particularly on the polarity effect seen experimentally in point-plane geometries. The flux-corrected transport approach is used for the numerical implementation. Our model adequately explains experimental observations of pre-breakdown current fluctuations, streamer propagation and branching as well as disparities in hold-off voltage and breakdown initiation times between the anode and cathode polarities. It is demonstrated that polarity effects basically arise from the large mobility difference between electrons and ions. The higher electron mobility leads to greater charge smearing and diffusion that impacts the local electric field distributions. Non-linear couplings between the number density, electric field and charge generation rates then collectively affect the formation of ionized channels and their temporal dynamics.

  2. Relevance of Pore Structure and Diffusion-Accessible Porosity for Calcium-Bromide Diffusion in Na-Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bentonite is an important hydraulic barrier material in many geotechnical applications, such as geosynthetic clay liners at solid waste landfills, or as proposed backfill material in engineered barrier systems at nuclear waste repositories. The limited permeability of bentonite is at least partially the result of its low porosity and the swelling of Na-montmorillonite, its major mineralogical component, in water. Due to these characteristics, the transport of contaminants through bentonite layers is expected to be limited and dominated by diffusion processes. In bentonite, the majority of the connected porosity is associated with montmorillonite particles, which consist of stacks of negatively-charged smectite layers. As a result, compacted smectite has two types of porosities: (1) large pores between clay particles, where diffusion is less affected by electric-double-layer forces, and (2) very thin interlayer spaces within individual clay particles, where diffusion is strongly impacted by surface charge and ionic strength. As diffusion is expected to take place differently in these two volumes, this essentially creates two 'small-scale diffusion pathways', where each may become dominant under different system conditions. Furthermore, for surface-reactive solutes, these two porous regimes differ with regards to surface complexation reactions. Electrostatic and hydration forces only are thought to govern interlayer binding, whereas chemical bonding with surface ligands is dominant for reactions at edge sites of layered clay particles and for iron oxide nanoparticles on outer basal planes. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the relevance of clay pore structure and diffusion-accessible porosity for solute diffusion rates, and hence, contaminant mobility in bentonites. First, we will discuss the effects of chemical solution conditions on montmorillonite properties, such as clay surface charge, diffusion-accessible porosity, clay tortuosity and constrictivity

  3. Electrically facilitated molecular transport. Analysis of the relative contributions of diffusion, migration, and electroosmosis to solute transport in an ion-exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Bath, B D; White, H S; Scott, E R

    2000-02-01

    Electrically facilitated molecular transport in an ion-exchange membrane (Nafion, 1100 equiv wt) has been studied using a scanning electrochemical microscope. The transport rates of ferrocenylmethyltrimethylammonium (a cation), acetaminophen (a neutral molecule), and ascorbate (an anion) through approximately 120-micron-thick membranes were measured as a function of the iontophoretic current passed across the membrane (-1.0 to +1.0 A/cm2). Transport rates were analyzed by employing the Nernst-Planck equation, modified to account for electric field-driven convective transport. Excellent agreement between experimental and theoretical values of the molecular flux was obtained using a single fitting parameter for each molecule (electroosmotic drag coefficient). The electroosmotic velocity of the neutral molecule, acetaminophen, was shown to be a factor of approximately 500 larger than that of the cation ferrocenylmethyltrimethylammonium, a consequence of the electrostatic interaction of the cation with the negatively charged pore walls of the ion-exchange membrane. Electroosmotic transport of ascorbate occurred at a negligible rate due to repulsion of the anion by the cation-selective membrane. These results suggest that electroosmotic velocities of solute molecules are determined by specific chemical interactions of the permeant and membrane and may be very different from the average solution velocity. The efficiency of electroosmotic transport was also shown to be a function of the membrane thickness, in addition to membrane/solute interactions. PMID:10695125

  4. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  5. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  6. Ti Diffusion in Pyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    ), but more than two orders of magnitude slower than those of Fe-Mg (ter Heege et al., 2006) and Cr (Ganguly et al., 2007). These respective variations may reflect the interplay of cation size and charge, or may point to the substitution of Ti on the tetrahedral site. Measurements of diffusion under a broader range of conditions and for other high field strength elements are underway to better interpret these findings. Major and trace element zoning in pyroxenes have been observed in residual peridotites and mafic cumulates. The large differences in cation mobility among Ti, Cr, and Fe-Mg in pyroxene may allow us to distinguish the dominant process that gives rise to the chemical disequilibria. In contrast to those produced by subsolidus reequilibration during cooling, the apparent diffusive boundary layer thicknesses as measured by major and trace elements in a pyroxene grain are not sensitive to the respective cation diffusion rates if zoning is produced by magmatic processes that involves dissolution- precipitation. Examples of zoning in pyroxenes produced by magmatic and subsolidus processes will be discussed. Ganguly et al. (2007) GCA 71, 3915-3925; ter Heege et al. (2006) Eos Trans. AGU 87, Fall Mtg. Suppl. MR21A-0004; Cherniak and Liang (2007) GCA 71, 1324-1340

  7. Human mobility and epidemic invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria

    2010-03-01

    The current H1N1 influenza pandemic is just the latest example of how human mobility helps drive infectious diseases. Travel has grown explosively in the last decades, contributing to an emerging complex pattern of traffic flows that unfolds at different scales, shaping the spread of epidemics. Restrictions on people's mobility are thus investigated to design possible containment measures. By considering a theoretical framework in terms of reaction-diffusion processes, it is possible to study the invasion dynamics of epidemics in a metapopulation system with heterogeneous mobility patterns. The system is found to exhibit a global invasion threshold that sets the critical mobility rate below which the epidemic is contained. The results provide a general framework for the understanding of the numerical evidence from detailed data-driven simulations that show the limited benefit provided by travel flows reduction in slowing down or containing an emerging epidemic.

  8. Regulatory frameworks for mobile medical applications.

    PubMed

    Censi, Federica; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    A mobile application (app) is a software program that runs on mobile communication devices such as a smartphone. The concept of a mobile medical app has gained popularity and diffusion but its reference regulatory context has raised discussion and concerns. Theoretically, a mobile app can be developed and uploaded easily by any person or entity. Thus, if an app can have some effects on the health of the users, it is mandatory to identify its reference regulatory context and the applicable prescriptions. PMID:25644202

  9. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  10. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  11. Gridless overtone mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Steven M; Ewing, Michael A; Clemmer, David E

    2013-11-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions toward the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  12. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  13. Research and development of electric vehicles for clean transportation.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masayoshi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the research and development of an electric vehicle (EV) in Department of Human-Robotics Saitama Institute of Technology, Japan. Electric mobile systems developed in our laboratory include a converted electric automobile, electric wheelchair and personal mobile robot. These mobile systems contribute to realize clean transportation since energy sources and devices from all vehicles, i.e., batteries and electric motors, does not deteriorate the environment. To drive motors for vehicle traveling, robotic technologies were applied. PMID:19803077

  14. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  15. Some notes on hydrogen-related point defects and their role in the isotope exchange and electrical conductivity in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2015-11-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine dissolve hydrogen in a variety of forms including free (or interstitial) proton (Hrad) and two protons trapped at the M-site ((2 H)M×). The strength of chemical bonding between protons and the surrounding atoms are different among different species, and consequently protons belonging to different species likely have different mobility (diffusion coefficients). I discuss the role of diffusion of protons in different species in the isotope exchange and hydrogen-assisted electrical conductivity adding a few notes to the previous work by Karato (2013) including a new way to test the model. I conclude that in the case of isotope exchange, the interaction among these species is strong because diffusion is heterogeneous, whereas there is no strong interaction among different species in electrical conduction where diffusion is homogeneous (in an infinite crystal). Consequently, the slowest diffusing species controls the rate of isotope exchange, whereas the fastest diffusing species controls electrical conductivity leading to a different temperature dependence of activation energy and anisotropy. This model explains the differences in the activation energy and anisotropy between isotope diffusion and electrical conductivity, and predicts that the mechanism of electrical conductivity changes with temperature providing an explanation for most of the discrepancies among different experimental observations at different temperatures except for those by Poe et al. (2010) who reported anomalously high water content dependence and highly anisotropic activation energy. When the results obtained at high temperatures are used, most of the geophysically observed high and highly anisotropic electrical conductivity in the asthenosphere can be explained without invoking partial melting.

  16. Solvation structure and transport properties of alkali cations in dimethyl sulfoxide under exogenous static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Vijayakumar, M. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov

    2015-06-14

    A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the role of exogenous electric fields on the solvation structure and dynamics of alkali ions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and as a function of temperature. Good agreement was obtained, for select alkali ions in the absence of an electric field, between calculated and experimentally determined diffusion coefficients normalized to that of pure DMSO. Our results indicate that temperatures of up to 400 K and external electric fields of up to 1 V nm{sup −1} have minimal effects on the solvation structure of the smaller alkali cations (Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}) due to their relatively strong ion-solvent interactions, whereas the solvation structures of the larger alkali cations (K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}) are significantly affected. In addition, although the DMSO exchange dynamics in the first solvation shell differ markedly for the two groups, the drift velocities and mobilities are not significantly affected by the nature of the alkali ion. Overall, although exogenous electric fields induce a drift displacement, their presence does not significantly affect the random diffusive displacement of the alkali ions in DMSO. System temperature is found to have generally a stronger influence on dynamical properties, such as the DMSO exchange dynamics and the ion mobilities, than the presence of electric fields.

  17. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  18. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  19. Social Mobility and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    Social mobility is generally studied in three different ways: stratum mobility, intergenerational social mobility, and intragenerational or career mobility. This paper deals with the first two types of mobility and more with intergenerational mobility than with stratum mobility. The working hypothesis of both discussions is that, in general, a…

  20. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  1. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  2. Electricity unplugged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karalis, Aristeidis

    2009-02-01

    The judge was driving back late one cold winter night. Entering the garage, the battery-charging indicator in his wirelessly powered electric car came on. "Home at last," crossed his mind. He swiped his personal smartcard on the front-door detector to be let in. He heard a "charging" beep from his mobile phone. The blinking cursor on the half-finished e-mail on the laptop had been waiting all day on the side table. He picked the computer up and walked towards his desk. "Good evening, your honour. Your wirelessly heated robe," said the butler-robot as it approached from the kitchen. Putting on the electric garment, he sat on the medical desk chair. His artificial heart was now beating faster.

  3. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m(-2) and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  4. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V−1 s−1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m−2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  5. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-12-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V-1 s-1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m-2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics.

  6. Mobile telemedicine: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Feng

    2012-04-01

    Telemedicine involves the use of advanced and reliable communication techniques to deliver biomedical signals over long distances. In such systems, biomedical information is transmitted using wireline or wireless communication systems. Mobile telemedicine is an improved form of telemedicine, in which advanced wireless communication systems are used to deliver the biomedical signals of patients at any place and any time. Mobile telemedicine employs advanced concepts and techniques from the fields of electrical engineering, computer science, biomedical engineering, and medicine to overcome the restrictions involved in conventional telemedicine and realize an improvement in the quality of service of medicine. In this paper, we study several mobile telemedicine systems, and it is important to gain a good understanding of mobile telemedicine systems because in the further, such systems are expected to become ubiquitous for the delivery of biomedical signals for medicine. PMID:20703699

  7. Ion mobility spectrometers and methods for ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, David A; Scott, Jill R; Appelhans, Anthony D; McJunkin, Timothy R; Olson, John E

    2009-04-14

    An ion mobility spectrometer may include an inner electrode and an outer electrode arranged so that at least a portion of the outer electrode surrounds at least a portion of the inner electrode and defines a drift space therebetween. The inner and outer electrodes are electrically insulated from one another so that a non-linear electric field is created in the drift space when an electric potential is placed on the inner and outer electrodes. An ion source operatively associated with the ion mobility spectrometer releases ions to the drift space defined between the inner and outer electrodes. A detector operatively associated with at least a portion of the outer electrode detects ions from the drift space.

  8. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  9. Diffusion of lithium in titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Ye, Jianchao; Wood, Brandon; Bonev, Stanimir

    Titanium oxide has generated interest lately as a promising anode candidate for use in lithium-ion batteries. We report first principles calculations on the mobility of lithium atoms in both crystalline and amorphous phases of titanium oxide. Density functional theory calculations of structural properties and diffusion energy barriers are combined with rate theory and a lattice gas model to study diffusion of lithium over a range of concentrations. A summary of results, including significant differences in the mobility between amorphous and crystalline phases, will be presented and discussed.

  10. Achieving an intense enough maintenance electric field in a low-pressure discharge sustained by a microwave field under ambipolar diffusion regime such that periodic parametric instabilities are generated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, M.; Nowakowska, H.

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of the maintenance electric field of a given discharge is one of its internal parameters. Under ambipolar diffusion conditions, it is almost exclusively set by particle losses, which are related to the dimensions of the discharge vessel and to the gas pressure, and ultimately are determined by the electron energy distribution function. For instance, raising the density of microwave power absorbed in a discharge tube essentially increases the electron density without much increasing the amplitude of the maintenance E-field. To raise the intensity of this E-field in such a case, one needs to reduce the volume into which electromagnetic power is absorbed relative to the diffusion volume, i.e. the volume within which electrons transfer their power through collisions with heavy particles. To show this point, we consider a power balance based on the power lost per electron through collisions with heavy particles, θ L, to the power absorbed (over a period of the microwave field) per electron in the discharge, θ A. The power θ A, which depends on E02 , the square of the amplitude (intensity) of the maintenance electric field, adjusts to compensate for the power lost θ L. The analysis presented is achieved for a particular microwave discharge configuration that is known to provide an intense E 0-field, which means x  ⩾  λ De, where x is the oscillation amplitude of electrons in the E 0-field and λ De the electron Debye length. Such a condition allows one to observe periodic parametric instabilities at, or close to, the electron-plasma frequency f pe and at their corresponding ion-plasma frequency f pi, these oscillations being caused by the simultaneous propagation of an electron-plasma wave and an ion-plasma wave in the discharge as a result of an applied ‘pump’ power, which also sustains the discharge. A 2D hydrodynamic calculation of the specific plasma discharge system is performed, which yields the value of the x/λ De ratio in

  11. Flux Control in Networks of Diffusion Paths

    SciTech Connect

    A. I. Zhmoginov and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-08

    A class of optimization problems in networks of intersecting diffusion domains of a special form of thin paths has been considered. The system of equations describing stationary solutions is equivalent to an electrical circuit built of intersecting conductors. The solution of an optimization problem has been obtained and extended to the analogous electrical circuit. The interest in this network arises from, among other applications, an application to wave-particle diffusion through resonant interactions in plasma.

  12. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  13. Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

  14. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  15. Nuclear power plants for mobile applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. The technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants are examined. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  16. 46 CFR 111.105-33 - Mobile offshore drilling units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobile offshore drilling units. 111.105-33 Section 111.105-33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-33 Mobile offshore drilling units. (a) Applicability. This section applies to...

  17. Computational study of atomic mobility for the bcc phase of the U-Pu-Zr ternary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weibang; Hu, Rui; Cui, Y.-W.; Zhong, Hong; Chang, Hui; Li, Jinshan; Zhou, Lian

    2010-12-01

    Experimental diffusion data in literature has been evaluated to assess the atomic mobility for the bcc phase in the U-Pu-Zr system by means of the DICTRA-type (Diffusion Controlled TRAnsformation) phenomenological treatment. The developed mobility database has been validated by comprehensive comparisons made between the experimental and calculated diffusion coefficients, as well as other interesting details resulting from interdiffusion, e.g. the concentration profile and the diffusion path of diffusion couples.

  18. Quantum diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, S.

    1994-10-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ``quantum diffusion`` terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source.

  19. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  20. The values of minority carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes in GaN and their implications for bipolar devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandić, Z. Z.; Bridger, P. M.; Piquette, E. C.; McGill, T. C.

    2000-02-01

    The wide bandgap semiconductors GaN and AlGaN show promise as the high voltage standoff layers in high power heterostructure bipolar transistors and thyristors due to their electric breakdown characteristics. Material properties which significantly influence the design and performance of these devices are electron and hole diffusion lengths and recombination lifetimes. We report direct measurements of minority carrier diffusion lengths for both holes and electrons by electron beam induced current. For planar Schottky diodes on unintentionally doped n-type and p-type GaN grown by metal organic vapor phase deposition (MOCVD), the diffusion lengths were found to be (0.28±0.03) μm for holes and (0.2±0.05) μm for electrons. Minority carrier lifetimes of approximately 7 ns for holes and 0.1 ns for electrons were estimated from these measured diffusion lengths and mobilities. In the case of GaN grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) diffusion lengths in the 1-2 μm range were found. We attempt to correlate the measured diffusion lengths and lifetimes with the structural properties of GaN and to explain why linear dislocations might act as a recombination centers. We calculate the performance of nitride based bipolar devices, in particular thyristor switches. The forward voltage drop across standoff layer of the nitride based thyristor switch is shown to significantly depend on the minority carrier (hole) lifetime.

  1. Electrical properties of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdnyakova, Larisa A.

    In this study, thorough analysis is conducted for soil electrical properties, i.e. electrical resistivity, conductivity, and potential. Soil electrical properties are the parameters of natural and artificially created electrical fields in soils and influenced by distribution of mobile electrical charges, mostly inorganic ions, In soils. Distributions of electrical charges and properties in various soil profiles were shown to be results of the soil-forming processes. Soil properties influencing the density of mobile electrical charges were found to be exponentially related with electrical resistivity and potential based on Boltzmann's law of statistical thermodynamics. Relationships were developed between electrical properties and other soil physical and chemical properties, such as texture, stone content, bulk density, water content, cation exchange capacity, salinity, humus content, and base saturation measured in-situ and in soil samples. Geophysical methods of vertical electrical sounding, four-electrode probe, non-contact electromagnetic profiling, and self-potential were modified for measuring soil electrical properties and tested in different soil studies. The proposed methods are extremely efficient, reliable, and non-disturbing. Compared with conventional methods of soil analysis, the electrical geophysical methods allowed evaluating groundwater table, salt content, depth and thickness of soil horizons, Polluted or disturbed layers in soil profiles, and stone content with an estimation error <10%. The methods provide extensive data on spatial and temporal variations in soil electrical properties, which relate to the distributions of other essential soil properties. The electrical properties were incorporated with the data from conventional soil analyses to enhance the estimation of a number of soil physical and chemical properties and to assist soil survey. The study shows various applications of the modified geophysical methods in soil physics, soil

  2. Space charge relaxation in polyetherimides by the electric modulus formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudarra, M.; Belana, J.; Cañadas, J. C.; Diego, J. A.; Sellarès, J.; Díaz-Calleja, R.; Sanchís, M. J.

    2000-10-01

    Dynamic electrical analysis shows that at high temperatures (above the glass transition temperature), the electrical properties of polyetherimide are strongly influenced by space charge. In this article we have studied the relaxation of space charge in two commercial varieties of polyetherimide: Ultem 1000 and Ultem 5000. Their conductive properties were determined by dynamic electrical analysis, using the electric modulus formalism. The complex part of the electric modulus was fitted to Coelho's model which considers ohmic conductivity and diffusion as the prevailing charge transport mechanisms. The complex part of the electric modulus exhibits a peak in the low frequency range that can be associated with space charge. A good agreement between experimental and calculated data is observed after the fitting process to Coelho's model. Differences in the electrode behavior were required: blocking electrode conditions in the case of Ultem 5000 and partially blocking electrode for Ultem 1000. In both cases the conductivity determined is thermally activated and it increases with the temperature due to an increasing mobility, as their carrier densities do not vary significantly in the temperature range studied.

  3. Mobile Recommendation Based on Link Community Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianpei; Yang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Since traditional mobile recommendation systems have difficulty in acquiring complete and accurate user information in mobile networks, the accuracy of recommendation is not high. In order to solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel mobile recommendation algorithm based on link community detection (MRLD). MRLD executes link label diffusion algorithm and maximal extended modularity (EQ) of greedy search to obtain the link community structure, and overlapping nodes belonging analysis (ONBA) is adopted to adjust the overlapping nodes in order to get the more accurate community structure. MRLD is tested on both synthetic and real-world networks, and the experimental results show that our approach is valid and feasible. PMID:25243204

  4. Effect of atmospheric electricity on dry deposition of airborne particles from atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Kimmel, V.; Israelsson, S.

    The electric mechanism of dry deposition is well known in the case of unattached radon daughter clusters that are unipolar charged and of high mobility. The problematic role of the electric forces in deposition of aerosol particles is theoretically examined by comparing the fluxes of particles carried by different deposition mechanisms in a model situation. The electric mechanism of deposition appears essential for particles of diameter 10-200 nm in conditions of low wind speed. The electric flux of fine particles can be dominant on the tips of leaves and needles even in a moderate atmospheric electric field of a few hundred V m -1 measured over the plane ground surface. The electric deposition is enhanced under thunderclouds and high voltage power lines. Strong wind suppresses the relative role of the electric deposition when compared with aerodynamic deposition. When compared with diffusion deposition the electric deposition appears less uniform: the precipitation particulate matter on the tips of leaves and especially on needles of top branches of conifer trees is much more intensive than on the ground surface and electrically shielded surfaces of plants. The knowledge of deposition geometry could improve our understanding of air pollution damage to plants.

  5. Diffusion of multi-isotopic chemical species in molten silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James M.; Liang, Yan; Richter, Frank; Ryerson, Frederick J.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion experiments in a simplified Na2O-CaO-SiO2 liquid system are used to develop a general formulation for the fractionation of Ca isotopes during liquid-phase diffusion. Although chemical diffusion is a well-studied process, the mathematical description of the effects of diffusion on the separate isotopes of a chemical element is surprisingly underdeveloped and uncertain. Kinetic theory predicts a mass dependence on isotopic mobility, but it is unknown how this translates into a mass dependence on effective binary diffusion coefficients, or more generally, the chemical diffusion coefficients that are housed in a multicomponent diffusion matrix. Our experiments are designed to measure Ca mobility, effective binary diffusion coefficients, the multicomponent diffusion matrix, and the effects of chemical diffusion on Ca isotopes in a liquid of single composition. We carried out two chemical diffusion experiments and one self-diffusion experiment, all at 1250 °C and 0.7 GPa and using a bulk composition for which other information is available from the literature. The self-diffusion experiment is used to determine the mobility of Ca in the absence of diffusive fluxes of other liquid components. The chemical diffusion experiments are designed to determine the effect on Ca isotope fractionation of changing the counter-diffusing component from fast-diffusing Na2O to slow-diffusing SiO2. When Na2O is the main counter-diffusing species, CaO diffusion is fast and larger Ca isotopic effects are generated. When SiO2 is the main counter-diffusing species, CaO diffusion is slow and smaller Ca isotopic effects are observed. In both experiments, the liquid is initially isotopically homogeneous, and during the experiment Ca isotopes become fractionated by diffusion. The results are used as a test of a new general expression for the diffusion of isotopes in a multicomponent liquid system that accounts for both self diffusion and the effects of counter-diffusing species. Our

  6. Education Policy Mobility: Reimagining Sustainability in Neoliberal Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Marcia; Bieler, Andrew; McNeil, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the twinning of sustainability with priorities of economic neoliberalization in education, and in particular via the mobility or diffusion of education policy. We discuss the literature on policy mobility as well as overview concerns regarding neoliberalism and education. The paper brings these analyses to bear in…

  7. Observation of separate cation and anion electrophoretic mobilities in pure ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Madsen, Louis A.

    2014-02-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) continue to show relevance in many fields, from battery electrolytes, to carbon capture, to advanced separations. These highly ion-dense fluids present unique challenges in understanding their electrochemical properties due to deviations in behavior from existing electrolyte theories. Here we present a novel characterization of ILs using electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to determine separate cation and anion mobilities. This method uses an applied electric field coincident with a pulsed magnetic field gradient to encode the E-field driven flow into NMR signals for cations (1H) and anions (19F). We describe the detailed design of these experiments, including quantitative analysis of artifact mitigation and necessary control experiments. We then explore mobilities and diffusion coefficients for two representative ILs: 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C2mim][TfO]). We further use the individual ion mobilities to calculate the bulk net conductivity, which closely agrees with bulk conductivity measurements obtained using impedance spectroscopy. These observations represent the first reliable measurements of cation and anion mobilities in pure ILs, with errors of ±7%. We discuss this advanced experimental methodology in detail, as well as implications of these sensitive measurements for understanding conduction mechanisms in ion-dense electrolytes.

  8. Observation of separate cation and anion electrophoretic mobilities in pure ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Madsen, Louis A

    2014-02-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs) continue to show relevance in many fields, from battery electrolytes, to carbon capture, to advanced separations. These highly ion-dense fluids present unique challenges in understanding their electrochemical properties due to deviations in behavior from existing electrolyte theories. Here we present a novel characterization of ILs using electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to determine separate cation and anion mobilities. This method uses an applied electric field coincident with a pulsed magnetic field gradient to encode the E-field driven flow into NMR signals for cations ((1)H) and anions ((19)F). We describe the detailed design of these experiments, including quantitative analysis of artifact mitigation and necessary control experiments. We then explore mobilities and diffusion coefficients for two representative ILs: 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C2mim][TfO]). We further use the individual ion mobilities to calculate the bulk net conductivity, which closely agrees with bulk conductivity measurements obtained using impedance spectroscopy. These observations represent the first reliable measurements of cation and anion mobilities in pure ILs, with errors of ±7%. We discuss this advanced experimental methodology in detail, as well as implications of these sensitive measurements for understanding conduction mechanisms in ion-dense electrolytes. PMID:24588161

  9. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2012-04-25

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.

  10. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  11. Mobile shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  12. Do TFSA anions slither? Pressure exposes the role of TFSA conformational exchange in self-diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, Sophia N.; Wishart, James F.; Rua, Armando; Cuffari, David; Pilar, Kartik; Hatcher, Jasmine L.; Ramati, Sharon

    2015-10-28

    Multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 19F) magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques as functions of temperature and pressure were applied to the study of selectively deuterated 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (EMIM TFSA) ionic liquid isotopologues and related ionic liquids. For EMIM TFSA, temperature-dependent 2H T1 data indicate stronger electric field gradients in the alkyl chain region compared to the imidazolium ring. Most significantly, the pressure dependences of the EMIM and TFSA self-diffusion coefficients revealed that the displacements of the cations and anions are independent, with diffusion of the TFSA anions being slowed much more by increasing pressure than for the EMIM cations, as shown by their respective activation volumes (28.8 ± 2.5 cm³/mol for TFSA vs. 14.6 ± 1.3 cm³/mol for EMIM). Increasing pressure may lower the mobility of the TFSA anion by hindering its interconversion between trans and cis conformers, a process that is coupled to diffusion according to published molecular dynamics simulations. Measured activation volumes (ΔV) for ion self-diffusion in EMIM bis(fluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and EMIM tetrafluoroborate support this hypothesis.

  13. Do TFSA anions slither? Pressure exposes the role of TFSA conformational exchange in self-diffusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Suarez, Sophia N.; Wishart, James F.; Rua, Armando; Cuffari, David; Pilar, Kartik; Hatcher, Jasmine L.; Ramati, Sharon

    2015-10-28

    Multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 19F) magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques as functions of temperature and pressure were applied to the study of selectively deuterated 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (EMIM TFSA) ionic liquid isotopologues and related ionic liquids. For EMIM TFSA, temperature-dependent 2H T1 data indicate stronger electric field gradients in the alkyl chain region compared to the imidazolium ring. Most significantly, the pressure dependences of the EMIM and TFSA self-diffusion coefficients revealed that the displacements of the cations and anions are independent, with diffusion of the TFSA anions being slowed much more by increasing pressure than for the EMIM cations, as shown bymore » their respective activation volumes (28.8 ± 2.5 cm³/mol for TFSA vs. 14.6 ± 1.3 cm³/mol for EMIM). Increasing pressure may lower the mobility of the TFSA anion by hindering its interconversion between trans and cis conformers, a process that is coupled to diffusion according to published molecular dynamics simulations. Measured activation volumes (ΔV‡) for ion self-diffusion in EMIM bis(fluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and EMIM tetrafluoroborate support this hypothesis.« less

  14. D-H Interdiffusion Coefficients in Olivine: Implications for Electrical Conductivity in the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, W. L.; Tyburczy, J. A.; Sharp, T. G.

    2010-12-01

    hydrous olivine for comparison to experimental values. These calculations incorporate polaron and metal vacancy mobility estimates from anhydrous conductivity experiments. For 100 ppmw H_{2}O, 2 GPa and 900 °C, the calculated electrical conductivity by hydrogen is 0.7-2.4 log units lower and activation energy is 60% higher than reported electrical conductivity measurements (Wang et al., 2006; Yoshino et al., 2006; Yoshino et al., 2009, Poe et al., 2010). Thus current estimates of defect concentrations and mobilities from diffusion experiments and measured dry and wet electrical conductivities are not mutually consistent. The calculation presented here would require unrealistically high amounts of H_{2}O to account for high electrical conductivity anomalies measured at asthenosphere depths. However, the apparent differences in activation energy suggest that multiple types of hydrogen defects/species may occur and would need to be considered in the relationship between hydrogen diffusion and conduction in olivine.

  15. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  16. Mobile access control vestibule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePoy, Jennifer M.

    1998-12-01

    The mobile access control vestibule (MACV) is an adaptation of techniques developed for mobile military command centers. The overall configuration of modules acts as an entry control/screening facility or transportable command center. The system would provide the following capabilities: (1) A key element for force protection, rapid deployment units sent to areas having no prepositioned equipment or where there has been a degradation of that equipment as a result of natural disasters or civil unrest. (2) A rapidly deployable security control center to upgrade the security at nonmilitary sites (e.g., diplomatic or humanitarian organizations). (3) Personnel screening, package screening, badge/identification card production for authorized personnel, centralized monitoring of deployed perimeter sensors, and centralized communications for law enforcement personnel. (4) Self-contained screening and threat detection systems, including explosives detection using the system developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the FAA. When coupled with transportable electric generators, the system is self-sufficient. The communication system for the MACV would be a combination of physically wired and wireless communication units that supports by ad hoc networking.

  17. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  18. Transport coefficients of gaseous ions in an electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, J. H.; Mason, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    A general theory of ion mobility formulated by Kihara (1953) is extended to ion diffusion and to mixtures of neutral gases. The theory assumes that only binary collisions between ions and neutral particles need to be taken into account and that the velocity distribution function of the neutral particles is Maxwellian. These assumptions make it possible to use a linearized Boltzmann equation. Questions of mobility are considered along with aspects of diffusion and deviations from Fick's law of diffusion.

  19. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    DOEpatents

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  20. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  1. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  2. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  3. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  4. Perpendicular diffusion of a dilute beam of charged particles in the PK-4 dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, John

    2015-09-01

    We study the random walk of a dilute beam of projectile dust particles that drift through a target dusty plasma. This random walk is a diffusion that occurs mainly due to Coulomb collisions with target particles that have a different size. In the direction parallel to the drift, projectiles exhibit mobility-limited motion with a constant average velocity. We use a 3D molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the dust particle motion to determine the diffusion and mobility coefficients for the dilute beam. The dust particles are assumed to interact with a shielded Coulomb repulsion. They also experience gas drag. The beam particles are driven by a prescribed net force that is not applied to the target particles; in the experiments this net force is due to an imbalance of the electric and ion drag forces. This simulation is motivated by microgravity experiments, with the expectation that the scattering of projectiles studied here will be observed in upcoming PK-4 experiments on the International Space Station. Supported by NASA and DOE.

  5. Electrical Systems. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This electrical systems manual is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids for training in the servicing of electrical systems on mobile machines. Materials provide basic information and illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. The ten chapters focus on (1) Electricity: How It…

  6. 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for arc calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Tanaka, M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes the use of the 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for predicting the properties of electric arcs. Under this approximation, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is assumed, with a particular mesh size near the electrodes chosen to be equal to the 'diffusion length', based on De/W, where De is the electron diffusion coefficient and W is the electron drift velocity. This approximation overcomes the problem that the equilibrium electrical conductivity in the arc near the electrodes is almost zero, which makes accurate calculations using LTE impossible in the limit of small mesh size, as then voltages would tend towards infinity. Use of the LTE-diffusion approximation for a 200 A arc with a thermionic cathode gives predictions of total arc voltage, electrode temperatures, arc temperatures and radial profiles of heat flux density and current density at the anode that are in approximate agreement with more accurate calculations which include an account of the diffusion of electric charges to the electrodes, and also with experimental results. Calculations, which include diffusion of charges, agree with experimental results of current and heat flux density as a function of radius if the Milne boundary condition is used at the anode surface rather than imposing zero charge density at the anode.

  7. Coupling human mobility and social ties.

    PubMed

    Toole, Jameson L; Herrera-Yaqüe, Carlos; Schneider, Christian M; González, Marta C

    2015-04-01

    Studies using massive, passively collected data from communication technologies have revealed many ubiquitous aspects of social networks, helping us understand and model social media, information diffusion and organizational dynamics. More recently, these data have come tagged with geographical information, enabling studies of human mobility patterns and the science of cities. We combine these two pursuits and uncover reproducible mobility patterns among social contacts. First, we introduce measures of mobility similarity and predictability and measure them for populations of users in three large urban areas. We find individuals' visitations patterns are far more similar to and predictable by social contacts than strangers and that these measures are positively correlated with tie strength. Unsupervised clustering of hourly variations in mobility similarity identifies three categories of social ties and suggests geography is an important feature to contextualize social relationships. We find that the composition of a user's ego network in terms of the type of contacts they keep is correlated with mobility behaviour. Finally, we extend a popular mobility model to include movement choices based on social contacts and compare its ability to reproduce empirical measurements with two additional models of mobility. PMID:25716185

  8. Coupling human mobility and social ties

    PubMed Central

    Toole, Jameson L.; Herrera-Yaqüe, Carlos; Schneider, Christian M.; González, Marta C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using massive, passively collected data from communication technologies have revealed many ubiquitous aspects of social networks, helping us understand and model social media, information diffusion and organizational dynamics. More recently, these data have come tagged with geographical information, enabling studies of human mobility patterns and the science of cities. We combine these two pursuits and uncover reproducible mobility patterns among social contacts. First, we introduce measures of mobility similarity and predictability and measure them for populations of users in three large urban areas. We find individuals' visitations patterns are far more similar to and predictable by social contacts than strangers and that these measures are positively correlated with tie strength. Unsupervised clustering of hourly variations in mobility similarity identifies three categories of social ties and suggests geography is an important feature to contextualize social relationships. We find that the composition of a user's ego network in terms of the type of contacts they keep is correlated with mobility behaviour. Finally, we extend a popular mobility model to include movement choices based on social contacts and compare its ability to reproduce empirical measurements with two additional models of mobility. PMID:25716185

  9. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. MAGNETIC ADVECTION DUE TO DIFFUSIVITY GRADIENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    We derive and discuss an important source of advection of magnetic fields in plasmas, for a completely general case. Magnetic diffusivity is proportional to electrical resistivity: where the value this parameter is high, it is well known that magnetic fields can leak (or diffuse) rapidly into (or out) of the plasma. Magnetohydrodynamic lore has it that where gradients, or changes in space, of the value of the diffusivity are high, magnetic fields can have enhanced flow (or advection). We derive this phenomenon rigorously, compare our results to other work in the literature, and discuss its implications, especially for kinematic dynamos. As an extra mathematical bonus, we find that the magnetic advection due to diffusivity gradients can be expressed in terms of a diffusion equation within the induction equation, making its computational implementation especially simple.

  11. Preliminary report on the diffusion of solids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Orstrand, C. E.; Dewey, F.P.

    1916-01-01

    Although 19 years has elapsed since Roberts-Austen published his classical paper on the diffusion of solid metals, no attempt seems to have been made to verify his important results and conclusions or to extend the investigations to minerals and to the great number of solids in which diffusion may be expected to occur. Progress has been made by means of chemical and electrical methods in the detection of diffusion in a number of metals in the solid state, some progress has been made in explaining the phenomena of diffusion on the basis of osmotic pressure and the kinetic theory, and recent measurements of the vapor pressures of solids have contributed indirectly to the progress of the science, but investigators have not undertaken the difficult and essential task of making definitive determinations of the coefficients of diffusivity at various pressures and temperatures.

  12. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  13. Segmental dynamic heterogeneity of short-chain grafted-poly(dimethylsiloxane) by 1H spin-diffusion NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertmer, Marko; Demco, Dan E.; Wang, Mingfei; Melian, Claudiu; Marcean-Chelcea, Ramona I.; Fechete, Radu; Baias, Maria; Blümich, Bernhard

    2006-11-01

    Segmental dynamic heterogeneity of short-chain grafted poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) on pyrogenic silica was investigated using 1H NMR spin-diffusion. A double-quantum dipolar filter was employed for selection of the interface (rigid) region. One-dimensional spin-diffusion equations were solved numerically for a space distribution of spin diffusivity D( x) of the mobile PDMS chains. The degree of heterogeneity can be quantified by the parameters of Gaussian and exponential diffusivity distribution functions which yield similar diffusivities. The rigid and mobile domain sizes and spin diffusivities were correlated with the PDMS chain length, the temperature, and 1H residual dipolar couplings.

  14. Mg dopant in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4}: An n-type former and a promoter of electrical mobility up to 120 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Dong-Hau Wubet, Walelign

    2014-07-01

    Mg-doped Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) bulk materials with the (Cu{sub 2−x}Mg{sub x})ZnSnSe{sub 4} formula at x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 were prepared at 600 °C for 2 h with soluble sintering aids of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Te. Defect chemistry was studied by measuring structural and electrical properties of Mg-doped CZTSe as a function of dopant concentration. Except at x=0, all Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. The Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. n-Type Mg-CZTSe pellets at x=0.1 showed the highest electrical conductivity of 24.6 S cm{sup −1} and the net hole mobility of 120 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, while they were 11.8 S cm{sup −1} and 36.5 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the undoped p-type CZTSe. Mg dopant is a strong promoter of electrical mobility. Mg dopant behaves as a donor defect in CZTSe at a 5% doping content, but is also used as an acceptor at a high content above 5%. Mg doping has further developed CZTSe into a promising semiconductor. - Graphical abstract: The effects of extrinsic doping of Mg{sup 2+} on the electrical properties of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulks. - Highlights: • (Cu{sub 2−x}Mg{sub x})ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulks were fabricated by liquid-phase sintering at 600 °C. • All Mg-x-CZTSe pellets except at x=0 exhibited n-type conductivity. • Electrical properties of CZTSe pellets changed with the Cu and Mg ratios. • Mg{sup 2+} goes to the Cu{sup 1+} site to form the Mg{sub Cu}{sup 1+} donor defect for the n-type CZTSe. • n-Type Mg-0.1-CZTSe bulk with 5% Mg showed the highest mobility of 120 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}.

  15. Structural Proton Diffusion along Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Serowy, Steffen; Saparov, Sapar M.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Kozlovsky, Wladas; Hagen, Volker; Pohl, Peter

    2003-01-01

    For H+ transport between protein pumps, lateral diffusion along membrane surfaces represents the most efficient pathway. Along lipid bilayers, we measured a diffusion coefficient of 5.8 × 10−5 cm2 s−1. It is too large to be accounted for by vehicle diffusion, considering proton transport by acid carriers. Such a speed of migration is accomplished only by the Grotthuss mechanism involving the chemical exchange of hydrogen nuclei between hydrogen-bonded water molecules on the membrane surface, and the subsequent reorganization of the hydrogen-bonded network. Reconstitution of H+-binding sites on the membrane surface decreased the velocity of H+ diffusion. In the absence of immobile buffers, structural (Grotthuss) diffusion occurred over a distance of 100 μm as shown by microelectrode aided measurements of the spatial proton distribution in the immediate membrane vicinity and spatially resolved fluorescence measurements of interfacial pH. The efficiency of the anomalously fast lateral diffusion decreased gradually with an increase in mobile buffer concentration suggesting that structural diffusion is physiologically important for distances of ∼10 nm. PMID:12547784

  16. Long-term impacts of battery electric vehicles on the German electricity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrichs, H. U.; Jochem, P.

    2016-05-01

    The emerging market for electric vehicles gives rise to an additional electricity demand. This new electricity demand will affect the electricity system. For quantifying those impacts a model-based approach, which covers long-term time horizons is necessary in order to consider the long lasting investment paths in electricity systems and the market development of electric mobility. Therefore, we apply a bottom-up electricity system model showing a detailed spatial resolution for different development paths of electric mobility in Germany until 2030. This model is based on a linear optimization which minimizes the discounted costs of the electricity system. We observe an increase of electricity exchange between countries and electricity generated by renewable energy sources. One major result turns out to be that electric vehicles can be integrated in the electricity system without increasing the system costs when a controlled (postponing) charging strategy for electric vehicles is applied. The impact on the power plant portfolio is insignificant. Another important side effect of electric vehicles is their substantial contribution to decreasing CO2 emissions of the German transport sector. Hence, electric mobility might be an integral part of a sustainable energy system of tomorrow.

  17. The ionic DTI model (iDTI) of dynamic diffusion tensor imaging (dDTI)

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Nikos; Gasic, Gregory P.; Garrido, Leoncio

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of water molecule diffusion along fiber tracts in CNS by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides a static map of neural connections between brain centers, but does not capture the electrical activity along axons for these fiber tracts. Here, a modification of the DTI method is presented to enable the mapping of active fibers. It is termed dynamic diffusion tensor imaging (dDTI) and is based on a hypothesized “anisotropy reduction due to axonal excitation” (“AREX”). The potential changes in water mobility accompanying the movement of ions during the propagation of action potentials along axonal tracts are taken into account. Specifically, the proposed model, termed “ionic DTI model”, was formulated as follows.•First, based on theoretical calculations, we calculated the molecular water flow accompanying the ionic flow perpendicular to the principal axis of fiber tracts produced by electrical conduction along excited myelinated and non-myelinated axons.•Based on the changes in molecular water flow we estimated the signal changes as well as the changes in fractional anisotropy of axonal tracts while performing a functional task.•The variation of fractional anisotropy in axonal tracts could allow mapping the active fiber tracts during a functional task. Although technological advances are necessary to enable the robust and routine measurement of this electrical activity-dependent movement of water molecules perpendicular to axons, the proposed model of dDTI defines the vectorial parameters that will need to be measured to bring this much needed technique to fruition. PMID:25431757

  18. Characterizing Unsaturated Diffusion in Porous Tuff Gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Kneafsey, T J; Roberts, J J; Tomutsa, L; Wang, J S

    2003-11-12

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (e.g., the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent of surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents are calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could significantly hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel.

  19. Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

    2003-11-12

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

  20. Electrophoretic mobility of particles in concentrated solutions of electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deinega, Yu.F.; Polyakova, V.M.; Aleksandrova, L.N.

    1986-11-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of particles of phenol-formaldehyde and aniline-formaldehyde resins in zinc sulfate solutions has been investigated. It is shown that as the electrolyte concentration rises, the electrophoretic mobility falls, reaches a minimum, and then increases. A possible mechanism for the formation of an electric double layer on the surface of particles in concentrated solutions of electrolytes is proposed.

  1. Counterion Effects on Ion Mobility and Mobile Ion Concentration of Doped Polyphosphazenes and Polyphosphazene Ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runt, Jim; Klein, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Previous investigations have shed some light on the ion conduction process in polymer electrolytes, yet ion transport is still not well understood. Here, upon the application of a physical model of electrode polarization to two systems with nearly identical chemical structure, one composed of an ionomer (MI) with a single mobile cation, and the other a salt-doped polymer (M+S) with mobile cation and mobile anion, quantitative comparison of the conductivity parameters is achieved. The polymer electrolyte chemistries of both MI and M+S are based on poly(methoxyethoxy-ethoxy phosphazene) (MEEP). The glass transition was found to be an important factor governing the conductivity and ion mobility. However, even accounting for the glass transition, the mobility of ions in the M+S system is 10 times larger than that in the MI system, which must arise from faster diffusion of the anion than the cation. Values for mobile ion concentration are also approximately 10 times higher in M+S than MI. These differences originate from free volume available for diffusion and local environment surrounding the ion pairs, demonstrating that the location of the ion pairs in the polymer matrix has a crucial effect on both conductivity parameters. Research supported by NSF Polymers Program.

  2. Electrodynamics of soft multilayered particles dispersions: dielectric permittivity and dynamic mobility.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jenny; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2014-08-01

    We report a theory for the evaluation of the electrodynamics of dispersions of spherical soft multilayered (bio)particles, with microorganisms and polyelectrolyte multilayers-coated particles as illustrative paradigms. These particles generally consist of a hard (ion- and water-impermeable) core component supporting a succession of step-function or diffuse-like concentric soft (permeable) polymeric layers defined by distinct electrostatic, hydrodynamic and structural properties. The formalism is based on a rigorous numerical resolution of the coupled Navier-Stokes-Brinkman equation, continuity equations for the flow and for the ionic species present in solution, and the non-linear Poisson equation corrected for the multilayered nature of the soft interphase. The frequency-dependent dynamic mobility and dielectric permittivity of such soft particles suspensions are discussed as a function of the key electrohydrodynamic features of the constituting particulate peripheral layers and solution salinity. It is shown that the frequency dependent permittivity is mostly affected by the total charge carried by the overall soft interphase. In contrast, the dynamic mobility is mainly determined by the charge and friction characteristics of the layers located within an electrokinetically-active outer particle region whose extension is defined by the electric double layer thickness and the Brinkman length. Results highlight that under particular electrolyte concentration and layer-to-layer thickness ratio conditions, the dynamic mobility may reflect the physico-chemical and structural properties of the only innermost layers of the soft particle coating. PMID:24935405

  3. Ion mobility imaging and contrast mechanism of apparent conductivity in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Young Tae; Minhas, Atul; Seo, Jin Keun; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to produce high-resolution cross-sectional images of conductivity distribution inside the human body. Injected current into an imaging object induces a distribution of internal magnetic flux density, which is measured by using an MRI scanner. We can reconstruct a conductivity image based on its relation with the measured magnetic flux density. In this paper, we explain the contrast mechanism in MREIT by performing and analyzing a series of numerical simulations and imaging experiments. We built a stable conductivity phantom including a hollow insulating cylinder with holes. Filling both inside and outside the hollow cylinder with the same saline, we controlled ion mobilities to create a conductivity contrast without being affected by the ion diffusion process. From numerical simulations and imaging experiments, we found that slopes of induced magnetic flux densities change with hole diameters and therefore conductivity contrasts. Associating the hole diameter with apparent conductivity of the region inside the hollow cylinder with holes, we could experimentally validate the contrast mechanism in MREIT. Interpreting reconstructed apparent conductivity images of the phantom as ion mobility images, we discuss the meaning of the apparent conductivity seen by a certain probing method. In designing MREIT imaging experiments, the ion mobility imaging method using the proposed stable conductivity phantom will enable us to estimate a distinguishable conductivity contrast for a given set of imaging parameters. PMID:21411866

  4. Tiny Molybdenites Tell Diffusion Tales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion invokes micron-scale exchange during crystal growth and dissolution in magma chambers on short time-scales. Fundamental to interpreting such data are assumptions on magma-fluid dynamics at all scales. Nevertheless, elemental diffusion profiles are used to estimate time scales for magma storage, eruption, and recharge. An underutilized timepiece to evaluate diffusion and 3D mobility of magmatic fluids is high-precision Re-Os dating of molybdenite. With spatially unique molybdenite samples from a young ore system (e.g., 1 Ma) and a double Os spike, analytical errors of 1-3 ka unambiguously separate events in time. Re-Os ages show that hydrous shallow magma chambers locally recharge and expel Cu-Mo-Au-silica as superimposed stockwork vein networks at time scales less than a few thousand years [1]. Re-Os ages provide diffusion rates controlled by a dynamic crystal mush, accumulation and expulsion of metalliferous fluid, and magma reorganization after explosive crystallization events. Importantly, this approach has broad application far from ore deposits. Here, we use Re-Os dating of molybdenite to assess time scales for generating and diffusing metals through the deep crust. To maximize opportunity for chemical diffusion, we use a continental-scale Sveconorwegian mylonite zone for the study area. A geologically constrained suite of molybdenite samples was acquired from quarry exposures. Molybdenite, previously unreported, is extremely scarce. Tiny but telling molybdenites include samples from like occurrences to assure geologic accuracy in Re-Os ages. Ages range from mid-Mesoproterozoic to mid-Neoproterozoic, and correspond to early metamorphic dehydration of a regionally widespread biotite-rich gneiss, localized melting of gneiss to form cm-m-scale K-feldspar ± quartz pods, development of vapor-rich, vuggy mm stringers that serve as volatile collection surfaces in felsic leucosomes, and low-angle (relative to foliation) cross-cutting cm-scale quartz veins

  5. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  6. Diffusivity and porosity in rock matrix-laboratory methods using artificial and natural tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Valkiainen, M.; Olin, M.; Uusheimo, K.; Kumpulainen, H.; Lehikoinene, J.; Muurinen, A.

    1993-12-31

    The nature of diffusivity and porosity in crystalline rock was studied by electrical conductivity measurements, steady-state diffusion experiments, saturation-leaching of tracers with cylindrical rock samples and analysis of the concentrations of different elements from core samples or pore water near fractures. The phenomena of main interest were dead-end porosity, ion-exclusion, sorption, and the continuity of pore networks. The modelling of experimental results was based on a modified Fick`s second law for diffusion, which was solved either by analytical or numerical methods. The measured D{sub e} and {epsilon} were found to statistically follow an exponential presentation: Archie`s law. The existence of ion-exclusion for anions was confirmed. The connectivity of the pore network extended in the laboratory experiments at least six centimetres, in coarse of the pore network extended in the laboratory experiments at least six centimetres, in coarse-grained granite in nature several metres but in fine-grained rock samples of a uranium deposit the element mobilization effects could be seen only to the depth of 2-3 centimetres.

  7. Cell shape-dependent rectification of surface receptor transport in a sinusoidal electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R C; Gowrishankar, T R; Basch, R M; Patel, P K; Golan, D E

    1993-01-01

    In the presence of an extracellular electric field, transport dynamics of cell surface receptors represent a balance between electromigration and mutual diffusion. Because mutual diffusion is highly dependent on surface geometry, certain asymmetrical cell shapes effectively create an anisotropic resistance to receptor electromigration. If the resistance to receptor transport along a single axis is anisotropic, then an applied sinusoidal electric field will drive a net time-average receptor displacement, effectively rectifying receptor transport. To quantify the importance of this effect, a finite difference mathematical model was formulated and used to describe charged receptor transport in the plane of a plasma membrane. Representative values for receptor electromigration mobility and diffusivity were used. Model responses were examined for low frequency (10(-4)-10 Hz) 10-V/cm fields and compared with experimental measurements of receptor back-diffusion in human fibroblasts. It was found that receptor transport rectification behaved as a low-pass filter; at the tapered ends of cells, sinusoidal electric fields in the 10(-3) Hz frequency range caused a time-averaged accumulation of receptors as great as 2.5 times the initial uniform concentration. The extent of effective rectification of receptor transport was dependent on the rate of geometrical taper. Model studies also demonstrated that receptor crowding could alter transmembrane potential by an order of magnitude more than the transmembrane potential directly induced by the field. These studies suggest that cell shape is important in governing interactions between alternating current (ac) electric fields and cell surface receptors. PMID:8381681

  8. Electrical characterization of silicon produced by electrochemical purification

    SciTech Connect

    Kibbler, A.E.

    1981-12-01

    An overall procedure and specific methodology are described for the electrical characterization of small single crystal and polycrystalline silicon specimens. The tested material is manufactured by electrowinning or electrorefining processes in quantities ranging from 10 to 1000 milligrams. Since the specimen source is limited and individual samples vary in size, shape, and physical structure, specific techniques have to be employed for successful utilization of the measurement procedure. The development of this procedure, therefore, necessitates a measurement pressure which is nondestructive, and yet reliable, as possible. The ultimate goal of these measurements is to give an indication of the material's potential for application in solar cell fabrication. The minimum measurement format includes: majority carrier type, resistivity, minority carrier diffusion length, minority carrier lifetime, Hall mobility, and Hall carrier density. Existing techniques were either directly applied, modified, or totally discarded. In addition, specialized preparation techniques were experimentally developed, insuring measurement compatibility. After testing, the outlined methods prove to be reasonably reliable, reproducible (allowing for experimental variances), and usually successful in obtaining reportable results. Besides these essential measurements, the beginnings of device fabrication and measurement are being investigated with promising results for the materials in question. These include: Schottky diodes, diffused junction diodes, MOS structures, conventionally diffused photocells, and ITO or SnO/sub 2/ photocells.

  9. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: The origin of Bohm diffusion, investigated by a comparison of different modelling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultinck, E.; Mahieu, S.; Depla, D.; Bogaerts, A.

    2010-07-01

    'Bohm diffusion' causes the electrons to diffuse perpendicularly to the magnetic field lines. However, its origin is not yet completely understood: low and high frequency electric field fluctuations are both named to cause Bohm diffusion. The importance of including this process in a Monte Carlo (MC) model is demonstrated by comparing calculated ionization rates with particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) simulations. A good agreement is found with a Bohm diffusion parameter of 0.05, which corresponds well to experiments. Since the PIC/MCC method accounts for fast electric field fluctuations, we conclude that Bohm diffusion is caused by fast electric field phenomena.

  10. Role of impurities on diffusion-induced defective states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Giannotte, E.

    1992-12-01

    The defective states induced in floating zone Si by the heavy diffusion of dopants have been investigated by means of the electron beam-induced current method. By measuring the minority carrier diffusion length with the first order moment method, and by directly imaging the defects, their electrical activity has been analyzed. The diffused samples have subsequently been dry oxidized, so that the evolution of the electrical and morphological properties of the induced defects could be followed. Two sets of samples, one diffused with B and the other with B and Al, have been investigated in order to study the effects of the presence of Al. Significant improvements in the diffusion length have been observed in samples where Al had been codiffused, thus providing indication for the role played by Al on the electrical activity of bulk defective states.

  11. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  12. Innovative island mobile vet.

    PubMed

    Forster, Dan

    2016-06-11

    One of the UK's first mobile veterinary clinics was recently awarded a Queen's Award for Innovation. Mobile Vet was launched on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by Dan Forster and his wife Kirsty, a veterinary nurse. PMID:27288178

  13. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  14. Modelling dengue epidemic spreading with human mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, D. H.; Dorso, C. O.; Otero, M.

    2016-04-01

    We explored the effect of human mobility on the spatio-temporal dynamics of Dengue with a stochastic model that takes into account the epidemiological dynamics of the infected mosquitoes and humans, with different mobility patterns of the human population. We observed that human mobility strongly affects the spread of infection by increasing the final size and by changing the morphology of the epidemic outbreaks. When the spreading of the disease is driven only by mosquito dispersal (flight), a main central focus expands diffusively. On the contrary, when human mobility is taken into account, multiple foci appear throughout the evolution of the outbreaks. These secondary foci generated throughout the outbreaks could be of little importance according to their mass or size compared with the largest main focus. However, the coalescence of these foci with the main one generates an effect, through which the latter develops a size greater than the one obtained in the case driven only by mosquito dispersal. This increase in growth rate due to human mobility and the coalescence of the foci are particularly relevant in temperate cities such as the city of Buenos Aires, since they give more possibilities to the outbreak to grow before the arrival of the low-temperature season. The findings of this work indicate that human mobility could be the main driving force in the dynamics of vector epidemics.

  15. InAlN high electron mobility transistor Ti/Al/Ni/Au Ohmic contact optimisation assisted by in-situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. D.; Parbrook, P. J.; O'Mahony, D.; Conroy, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-09-14

    This paper correlates the micro-structural and electrical characteristics associated with annealing of metallic multi-layers typically used in the formation of Ohmic contacts to InAlN high electron mobility transistors. The multi-layers comprised Ti/Al/Ni/Au and were annealed via rapid thermal processing at temperatures up to 925 °C with electrical current-voltage analysis establishing the onset of Ohmic (linear IV) behaviour at 750–800 °C. In-situ temperature dependent transmission electron microscopy established that metallic diffusion and inter-mixing were initiated near a temperature of 500 °C. Around 800 °C, inter-diffusion of the metal and semiconductor (nitride) was observed, correlating with the onset of Ohmic electrical behaviour. The sheet resistance associated with the InAlN/AlN/GaN interface is highly sensitive to the anneal temperature, with the range depending on the Ti layer thickness. The relationship between contact resistivity and measurement temperature follow that predicted by thermionic field emission for contacts annealed below 850 °C, but deviated above this due to excessive metal-semiconductor inter-diffusion.

  16. Modelling fines mobilization, migration and clogging

    SciTech Connect

    Wennberg, K.E.; Batrouni, G.; Hansen, A.

    1995-12-31

    The authors introduce and discuss a model for fines mobilization, migration and clogging in porous media based on the convection-diffusion equation. Their model contains two fields: The concentration of fine particles deposited on the pore walls and the concentration of fines suspended in the ambient liquid. The model contains four parameters--or seven if certain nonlinearities in the clogging process are important. They discuss the physical contents of the model and test it numerically in two dimensions.

  17. Diffusion on spatial network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zi; Tang, Xiaoyue; Li, Wei; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study the problem of diffusing a product (idea, opinion, disease etc.) among agents on spatial network. The network is constructed by random addition of nodes on the planar. The probability for a previous node to be connected to the new one is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of α. The diffusion rate between two connected nodes is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of β as well. Inspired from the Fick's first law, we introduce the diffusion coefficient to measure the diffusion ability of the spatial network. Using both theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, we get the fact that the diffusion coefficient always decreases with the increasing of parameter α and β, and the diffusion sub-coefficient follows the power-law of the spatial distance with exponent equals to -α-β+2. Since both short-range diffusion and long-range diffusion exist, we use anomalous diffusion method in diffusion process. We get the fact that the slope index δ in anomalous diffusion is always smaller that 1. The diffusion process in our model is sub-diffusion.

  18. Phase transitions in contagion processes mediated by recurrent mobility patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcan, Duygu; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    Human mobility and activity patterns mediate contagion on many levels, including the spatial spread of infectious diseases, diffusion of rumours, and emergence of consensus. These patterns however are often dominated by specific locations and recurrent flows and poorly modelled by the random diffusive dynamics generally used to study them. Here we develop a theoretical framework to analyse contagion within a network of locations where individuals recall their geographic origins. We find a phase transition between a regime in which the contagion affects a large fraction of the system and one in which only a small fraction is affected. This transition cannot be uncovered by continuous deterministic models because of the stochastic features of the contagion process and defines an invasion threshold that depends on mobility parameters, providing guidance for controlling contagion spread by constraining mobility processes. We recover the threshold behaviour by analysing diffusion processes mediated by real human commuting data.

  19. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  20. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  1. Sodium diffusion in 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Linnarsson, M. K. Hallén, A.

    2014-09-01

    Sodium diffusion has been studied in p-type 4H-SiC. Heat treatments have been performed from 1200 °C to 1800 °C for 1 min to 4 h. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has been used to measure the sodium distribution. We show that sodium has a considerable mobility at 1200 °C in p-type 4H-SiC. On the other hand for sodium atoms trapped at suitable sites the mobility is limited up to 1800 °C. Trap limited diffusion kinetics is suggested and an effective diffusivity has been extracted with an activation energy of 4 eV for sodium diffusion in p-type 4H-SiC.

  2. UPDATING APPLIED DIFFUSION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, the American Meteorological Socie...

  3. Diffusion model of the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Emily; Guéneau, Christine; Crocombette, Jean-Paul

    2013-07-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO2), which is used in light water reactors, exhibits a large range of non-stoichiometry over a wide temperature scale up to 2000 K. Understanding diffusion behavior of uranium oxides under such conditions is essential to ensure safe reactor operation. The current understanding of diffusion properties is largely limited by the stoichiometric deviations inherent to the fuel. The present DICTRA-based model considers diffusion across non-stoichiometric ranges described by experimentally available data. A vacancy and interstitial model of diffusion is applied to the U-O system as a function of its defect structure derived from CALPHAD-type thermodynamic descriptions. Oxygen and uranium self and tracer diffusion coefficients are assessed for the construction of a mobility database. Chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen are derived with respect to the Darken relation and migration energies of defects are evaluated as a function of stoichiometric deviation.

  4. A Simple Single Step diffusion and Emitter Etching Process for High Efficiency Gallium Antimonide Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rajagopalan; N.S. Reddy; E. Ehsani; I.B. Bhat; P.S. Dutta; R.J. Gutmann; G. Nichols; G.W. Charache; O. Sulima

    2003-08-29

    A single step diffusion followed by precise etching of the diffused layer has been developed to obtain a diffusion profile appropriate for high efficiency GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells. The junction depth was controlled through monitoring of light current-voltage (I-V) curves (photovoltaic response) during the post diffusion emitter etching process. The measured photoresponses (prior to device fabrication) have been correlated with the quantum efficiencies and the open circuit voltages in the fabricated devices. An optimum junction depth for obtaining highest quantum efficiency and open circuit voltage is presented based on diffusion lengths (or monitoring carrier lifetimes), carrier mobility and typical diffused impurity profile in GaSb.

  5. 30 CFR 56.12005 - Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment. 56.12005 Section 56.12005 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... MINES Electricity § 56.12005 Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment. Mobile...

  6. 30 CFR 57.12005 - Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of power conductors from mobile... NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12005 Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment. Mobile equipment shall not run over power conductors, nor shall loads be dragged over...

  7. 30 CFR 56.12005 - Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment. 56.12005 Section 56.12005 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... MINES Electricity § 56.12005 Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment. Mobile...

  8. 30 CFR 57.12005 - Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection of power conductors from mobile... NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12005 Protection of power conductors from mobile equipment. Mobile equipment shall not run over power conductors, nor shall loads be dragged over...

  9. Electrical conductivity of solutions of copper(II) nitrate crystalohydrate in dimethyl sulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamyrbekova, Aigul K.; Mamitova, A. D.; Mamyrbekova, Aizhan K.

    2016-06-01

    Conductometry is used to investigate the electric conductivity of Cu(NO3)2 ṡ 3H2O solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide in the 0.01-2.82 M range of concentrations and at temperatures of 288-318 K. The limiting molar conductivity of the electrolyte and the mobility of Cu2+ and NO 3 - ions, the effective coefficients of diffusion of copper(II) ions and nitrate ions, and the degree and constant of electrolytic dissociation are calculated for different temperatures from the experimental results. It is established that solutions containing 0.1-0.6 M copper nitrate trihydrate in DMSO having low viscosity and high electrical conductivity can be used in electrochemical deposition.

  10. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  11. Grain boundary mobility of carbon in Earth's mantle: A possible carbon flux from the core

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Leslie A.; Watson, E. Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The importance of carbon in Earth's mantle greatly exceeds its modest abundance of ≈1,000–4,000 ppm. Carbon is a constituent of key terrestrial volatiles (CO, CO2, CH4), it forms diamonds, and it may also contribute to the bulk electrical properties of the silicate Earth. In contrast to that of the mantle, the carbon content of Earth's metallic core may be quite high (≈5 wt %), raising the possibility that the core has supplied carbon to the mantle over geologic time. The plausibility of this process depends in part upon the mobility of carbon atoms in the solid mantle. Grain boundaries of mantle minerals could represent fast pathways for transport as well as localized sites for enrichment and storage of carbon. Here, we report the results of an experimental study of grain-boundary diffusion of carbon through polycrystalline periclase (MgO) and olivine ([Mg,Fe]2SiO4) that were obtained by determining the extent of solid solution formation between a graphite source and a metal sink (Ni or Fe) separated by the polycrystalline materials. Experimental materials were annealed at 1,373–1,773 K and 1.5–2.5 GPa pressure. Calculated diffusivities, which range up to 10−11 m2·s−1, are fast enough to allow transport over geologically significant length scales (≈10 km) over the age of the Earth. Mobility and enrichment of carbon on grain boundaries may also explain the high electrical conductivity of upper mantle rocks, and could result in the formation of C-H-O volatiles through interactions of core-derived C with recycled H2O in subduction zones. PMID:18559860

  12. Static electricity of polymers reduced by treatment with iodine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, A. M.; Landel, R. F.; Rembaum, A.

    1967-01-01

    Treating organic polymers with iodine improves the electrical conductivity. Diffusion enables products of desired properties to be custom formulated. This eliminates a buildup of static electricity and the need for fillers or bound metal salts.

  13. Evaporation through a capillary allows electrically determined rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Lawrence R.

    1998-10-01

    Using a capillary to suppress diffusion allowed construction of an electrically calibrated vapor dispenser for organic solvent vapors. The rate of flow was essentially the applied electric power divided by the heat of vaporization.

  14. Fluctuations of DNA mobility in nanofluidic entropic traps

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingling; Levy, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We studied the mobility of DNA molecules driven by an electric field through a nanofluidic device containing a periodic array of deep and shallow regions termed entropic traps. The mobility of a group of DNA molecules was measured by fluorescent video microscopy. Since the depth of a shallow region is smaller than the DNA equilibrium size, DNA molecules are trapped for a characteristic time and must compress themselves to traverse the boundary between deep and shallow regions. Consistent with previous experimental results, we observed a nonlinear relationship between the mobility and electric field strength, and that longer DNA molecules have larger mobility. In repeated measurements under seemingly identical conditions, we measured fluctuations in the mobility significantly larger than expected from statistical variation. The variation was more pronounced for lower electric field strengths where the trapping time is considerable relative to the drift time. To determine the origin of these fluctuations, we investigated the dependence of the mobility on several variables: DNA concentration, ionic strength of the solvent, fluorescent dye staining ratio, electroosmotic flow, and electric field strength. The mobility fluctuations were moderately enhanced in conditions of reduced ionic strength and electroosmotic flow. PMID:25379088

  15. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  16. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  17. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  18. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  19. Hydrogen diffusion on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, J. H. G.; Bowler, D. R.; Goringe, C. M.; Miki, K.; Briggs, G. A. D.

    1996-11-01

    We have imaged hydrogen on Si(001) at low coverages in a variable-temperature STM from 300 K up to 700 K. Individual hydrogen atoms were imaged which became mobile at around 570 K. The observed rate of hopping along the dimer rows was consistent with an activation energy of 1.68 +/- 0.15 eV. Motion across dimer rows was rarely observed, even at the higher temperatures. The diffusion barrier for motion along the dimer rows has been calculated using tight-binding and density-functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated barrier is 1.65 eV from tight binding and 1.51 eV from GGA.

  20. Grain boundary diffusion in olivine (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, K.; Dohmen, R.

    2013-12-01

    Olivine is the main constituent of Earth's upper mantle. The individual mineral grains are separated by grain boundaries that have very distinct properties compared to those of single crystals and strongly affect large-scale physical and chemical properties of rocks, e.g. viscosity, electrical conductivity and diffusivity. Knowledge on the grain boundary physical and chemical properties, their population and distribution in polycrystalline materials [1] is a prerequisite to understand and model bulk (rock) properties, including their role as pathways for element transport [2] and the potential of grain boundaries as storage sites for incompatible elements [3]. Studies on selected and well characterized single grain boundaries are needed for a detailed understanding of the influence of varying grain boundaries. For instance, the dependence of diffusion on the grain boundary structure (defined by the lattice misfit) and width in silicates is unknown [2, 4], but limited experimental studies in material sciences indicate major effects of grain boundary orientation on diffusion rates. We characterized the effect of grain boundary orientation and temperature on element diffusion in forsterite grain boundaries by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The site specific TEM-foils were cut using the focused ion beam technique (FIB). To study diffusion we prepared amorphous thin-films of Ni2SiO4 composition perpendicular to the grain boundary using pulsed laser deposition. Annealing (800-1450°C) leads to crystallization of the thin-film and Ni-Mg inter-diffuse into the crystal volume and along the grain boundary. The inter-diffusion profiles were measured using energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the TEM, standardized using the Cliff-Lorimer equation and EMPA measurements. We obtain volume diffusion coefficients that are comparable to Ni-Mg inter-diffusion rates in forsterite determined in previous studies at comparable temperatures, with similar activation energies

  1. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  2. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  3. Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed numerical simulations of multicomponent plasmas require tractable expressions for species diffusion fluxes, which must be consistent with the given plasma current density J{sub q} to preserve local charge neutrality. The common situation in which J{sub q} = 0 is referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The use of formal kinetic theory in this context leads to results of formidable complexity. We derive simple tractable approximations for the diffusion fluxes in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas by means of a generalization of the hydrodynamical approach used by Maxwell, Stefan, Furry, and Williams. The resulting diffusion fluxes obey generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations that contain driving forces corresponding to ordinary, forced, pressure, and thermal diffusion. The ordinary diffusion fluxes are driven by gradients in pressure fractions rather than mole fractions. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are systematically exploited and lead to a general expression for the ambipolar electric field in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity. We present a self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation for the diffusion fluxes. This approximation is well suited to numerical implementation and is currently in use in our LAVA computer code for simulating multicomponent thermal plasmas. Applications to date include a successful simulation of demixing effects in an argon-helium plasma jet, for which selected computational results are presented. Generalizations of the diffusion theory to finite electrical conductivity and nonzero magnetic field are currently in progress.

  4. Optical and electrical step-recovery study of minority-carrier transport in an InGaN /GaN quantum-well light-emitting diode grown on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplar, R. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Koleske, D. D.

    2004-11-01

    Forward-to-reverse bias step-recovery experiments were performed on an InGaN /GaN single-quantum-well light-emitting diode grown on sapphire. With the quantum well sampling the minority-carrier hole density at a single position, the optical emission displayed a two-stage decay. Using a solution to the diffusion equation to self-consistently describe both the optical and electrical recovery data, we estimated values for the hole lifetime (758±44ns), diffusion length (588±45nm), and mobility (0.18±0.02cm2/Vs) in GaN grown on sapphire. This low value of the minority-carrier mobility may reflect trap-modulated transport, and the lifetime is suggestive of slow capture and emission processes occurring through deep levels.

  5. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelmann, Karsten; Silveira, Joshua A.; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a relatively new gas-phase separation method that has been coupled to quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The TIMS analyzer is a segmented rf ion guide wherein ions are mobility-analyzed using an electric field that holds ions stationary against a moving gas, unlike conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometry where the gas is stationary. Ions are initially trapped, and subsequently eluted from the TIMS analyzer over time according to their mobility ( K). Though TIMS has achieved a high level of performance ( R > 250) in a small device (<5 cm) using modest operating potentials (<300 V), a proper theory has yet to be produced. Here, we develop a quantitative theory for TIMS via mathematical derivation and simulations. A one-dimensional analytical model, used to predict the transit time and theoretical resolving power, is described. Theoretical trends are in agreement with experimental measurements performed as a function of K, pressure, and the axial electric field scan rate. The linear dependence of the transit time with 1/ K provides a fundamental basis for determination of reduced mobility or collision cross section values by calibration. The quantitative description of TIMS provides an operational understanding of the analyzer, outlines the current performance capabilities, and provides insight into future avenues for improvement.

  6. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  7. Mobile ions on carbonate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Treavor A.; Martin, Scot T.

    2005-07-01

    Surface ions move during the dissolution and growth of minerals. The present study investigates the density and the mobility of surface ions and the structure of the adsorbed water layer with changes in relative humidity (RH). The time evolution of the polarization force, which is induced by an electrically biased tip of an atomic force microscope, shows that the density and the mobility of surface ions increase with rising humidity, a finding which is consistent with increasing surface hydration. A marked change in the observations above 55% RH indicates a transition from a water layer formed by heteroepitaxial two-dimensional growth at low RH to one formed by multilayer three-dimensional growth at high RH. A comparison of the results of several rhombohedral carbonates ( viz. CaCO 3, FeCO 3, ZnCO 3, MgCO 3, and MnCO 3) shows that a long relaxation time of the polarization force at high RH is predictive of a rapid dissolution rate. This finding is rationalized by long lifetimes in terrace positions and hence greater opportunities for detachment of the ion to aqueous solution (i.e., dissolution). Our findings on the density and the mobility of surface ions therefore help to better constrain mechanistic models of hydration, ion exchange, and dissolution/growth.

  8. Electrical injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage, especially to the heart, muscles, or brain. Electric current can cause injury in three ways: Cardiac arrest ... How long you were in contact with the electricity How the electricity moved through your body Your ...

  9. 46 CFR 111.105-33 - Mobile offshore drilling units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-33 Mobile offshore drilling units. (a... electric equipment. (d) The following are Class I, Division 1 locations: (1) An enclosed space that... space and that has no hold-back device; (ii) Ventilation causes the air to flow with the door open...

  10. 46 CFR 111.105-33 - Mobile offshore drilling units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-33 Mobile offshore drilling units. (a... electric equipment. (d) The following are Class I, Division 1 locations: (1) An enclosed space that... space and that has no hold-back device; (ii) Ventilation causes the air to flow with the door open...

  11. 46 CFR 111.105-33 - Mobile offshore drilling units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-33 Mobile offshore drilling units. (a... electric equipment. (d) The following are Class I, Division 1 locations: (1) An enclosed space that... space and that has no hold-back device; (ii) Ventilation causes the air to flow with the door open...

  12. 46 CFR 111.105-33 - Mobile offshore drilling units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-33 Mobile offshore drilling units. (a... electric equipment. (d) The following are Class I, Division 1 locations: (1) An enclosed space that... space and that has no hold-back device; (ii) Ventilation causes the air to flow with the door open...

  13. Miniature Ion-Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would be fabricated by micromachining. Unlike prior ion-mobility spectrometers, the proposed instrument would not be based on a time-of-flight principle and, consequently, would not have some of the disadvantageous characteristics of prior time-of-flight ion-mobility spectrometers. For example, one of these characteristics is the need for a bulky carrier-gas-feeding subsystem that includes a shutter gate to provide short pulses of gas in order to generate short pulses of ions. For another example, there is need for a complex device to generate pulses of ions from the pulses of gas and the device is capable of ionizing only a fraction of the incoming gas molecules; these characteristics preclude miniaturization. In contrast, the proposed instrument would not require a carrier-gas-feeding subsystem and would include a simple, highly compact device that would ionize all the molecules passing through it. The ionization device in the proposed instrument would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several megavolts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. Ionization (but not avalanche arcing) would occur because the distance between the ionizing electrodes would be less than the mean free path of gas molecules at the operating pressure of instrument. An accelerating grid would be located inside the instrument, downstream from the ionizing membrane. The electric potential applied to this grid would be negative relative to the potential on the inside electrode of the ionizing membrane and would be of a magnitude sufficient to

  14. Aqueous diffusion in repository and backfill environments

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.; Apted, M.; Arthur, R.

    1993-12-31

    Aqueous diffusion coefficients have been experimentally determined in a variety of porous/fractured geologic and engineered media. For performance assessment applications, the purely diffusive flux must be separated from retardation effects. The simple diffusion coefficient, D, does not include any transient chemical effects, e.g., sorption, which lower the diffusion coefficient for some finite time period until equilibrium is reached. D is primarily a function of volumetric water content, {theta}, and not material characteristics. At high water contents, D gradually declines as water content decreases, from 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/sec at {theta} {approximately}0.5%. Although surface diffusion has a strong experimental basis in the transport of gases along metal surfaces experimental evidence for aqueous geologic/backfill/engineered systems strongly indicates that surface diffusion is not important, even in bentonite, because of the extremely poor connectivity among electric double-layers and the extremely low diffusivities and high {partial_derivative}C/{partial_derivative}x at small area/point contacts which more than negate the increased flux along intragrain surfaces.

  15. Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dayananda, M.A.

    1986-05-23

    During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

  16. Influence of water on the mobility of small molecules dispersed in a polymeric system.

    PubMed

    Le Meste, M; Voilley, A; Colas, B

    1991-01-01

    The rotational mobility of paramagnetic solutes dispersed in partially hydrated macromolecules (proteins, polysaccharides, synthetic polymers) was measured using Electron Spin Resonance. A critical minimum amount of water was observed to be necessary for these molecules to reach a level of mobility of the same order as in dilute solutions. This amount of water depended on the size of the diffusing solute and on the microporosity of the macromolecule. Above this critical moisture range, a progressive increase of the proportion of mobile solute occurred over a hydration range determined by the size of the diffusing solute. At the same time, the rotational diffusivity of the mobile solute increased linearly with water content. The mobilization pattern of spin-labelled side chains of caseinates was observed to be similar to that of the solute. Results are discussed with reference to free volume theory. PMID:1660672

  17. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper. PMID:16777784

  18. Social mobility and fertility.

    PubMed

    Kasarda, J D; Billy, J O

    1985-01-01

    This review examines 4 possible causal links between social mobility and fertility: 1) fertility affects social mobility; 2) social mobility affects fertility; 3) fertility and social mobility simultaneously affect each other; and 4) social mobility and fertility are unrelated. Due to the lack of systematic theory guiding the research, conceptualizations and measures of social mobility and fertility vary markedly from study to study, leading to inconsistent findings. The review focuses on theoretical perspectives underpinning the research, causal operators proposed to interpret observed associations, and analytical methods used. The selectivity perspective is based on the contention that a family must be small in order to rise on the social scale. This has found little support, however. In fact, studies suggest that children induce slightly higher levels of status achievement and family responsibilities may stimulate the energy and ambition of some so that they achieve more than they would have done without a family. Most studies have concerned the hypothesis that social mobility affects fertility. 4 theoretical perspectives have emerged: status enhancement; relative economic status; social isolation; and stress and disorientation. At any time in a couple's reproductive life cycle the decision or actual experience of either social mobility or fertility may influence the decision or actual experience of the other variable. Mobility-fertility research has defined an individual's or couple's position in terms of income, education, or occupation with occupation used most often as a single index of social class and indexes of social mobility developed by comparing persons' changes in occupational position. A common theme in much of the research literature is that the existence of an effect of social mobility on fertility depends on the societal conditions of a given population. Most studies through the mid-60s used a common measurement method to assess whether a

  19. Dynamic TWDM-PON for mobile radio access networks.

    PubMed

    Iida, Daisuke; Kuwano, Shigeru; Kani, Jun-ichi; Terada, Jun

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, the diffusion of mobile terminals has brought about an explosive increase in communication traffic of mobile RANs. The number of radio base stations and optical fiber lines between them is becoming larger. For this reason, we studied effective optical network technologies for mobile RANs and propose the use of TWDM-PON as a means of enabling RANs to be operated flexibly and have wideband communication capability. We confirmed the feasibility of TWDM-PON for this application by numerical simulation. The results show that TWDM-PON can accommodate the bandwidth more than TDM-PON and completely eliminate unused bandwidth in TDM-PON. PMID:24216845

  20. Diffusion of zinc vacancies and interstitials in zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhart, Paul; Albe, Karsten

    2006-05-01

    The self-diffusion coefficient of zinc in ZnO is derived as a function of the chemical potential and Fermi level from first-principles calculations. Density functional calculations in combination with the climbing image-nudged elastic band method are used in order to determine migration barriers for vacancy, interstitial, and interstitialcy jumps. Zinc interstitials preferentially diffuse to second nearest neighbor positions. They become mobile at temperatures as low as 90-130K and therefore allow for rapid defect annealing. Under predominantly oxygen-rich and n-type conditions self-diffusion occurs via a vacancy mechanism.

  1. Test and evaluation of electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power currently operates 11 electric vehicles: 6 G-Vans, 4 Chrysler TEVans, and 1 Hybrid minivan. LADWP's participation in US DOE's site operator program involves the Hybrid electric minivan (manufactured by Unique Mobility, Englewood, CO) and one Chrysler TEVan. The program efforts are described.

  2. Electrical aspects of rainout

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenkilde, C.E.

    1981-11-23

    Rainout commonly denotes the aggregate of phenomena associated with precipitation scavenging of radioactivity from a cloud of nuclear debris that is within a natural rain cloud. (In contrast, the term, washout, is applicable when the nuclear cloud is below the rain cloud and the term, fallout, commonly denotes the direct gravitational settling of contaminated solid material from a nuclear cloud.) Nuclear debris aerosols may be scavenged within natural clouds by a variety of different physical processes which may involve diffusion, convection, impaction, nucleation, phoresis, turbulence, and/or electricity among others. Processes which involve electrical aspects are scrutinized for their susceptibility to the intimate presence of the radioactive-cloud environment. This particular choice of electrical processes is not accidental. Nearly all of the listed processes were examined earlier by Williams. His rough estimates suggested that electrical effects, and to a lesser extent turbulence, could enhance the scavenging of those submicron aerosols which reside in the size-range that bridges the minimum in the scavenging rate coefficient which is commonly called the Greenfield gap. This minimum in the scavenging-rate coefficient is created by the simultaneous reduction of scavenging via diffusion and the reduction of scavenging via inertial impaction. However, Williams omitted the specific influence of a radioactive environment. This report aims to remedy this omission.

  3. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  4. Atomic Mobilities and Interdiffusivities for fcc Ni-Cr-Nb Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gaochi; Liu, Yajun; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-06-01

    The atomic mobilities and diffusion characteristics for fcc Ni-Cr-Nb alloys are explored by diffusion couples annealed at 1273 K (1000 °C) for 200 hours. The interdiffusion coefficients are extracted from intersection points of two diffusion paths, after which the atomic mobilities of Ni, Cr, and Nb in fcc Ni-Cr-Nb alloys are inversely obtained within the CALPHAD framework with the aid of related thermodynamic descriptions. In order to verify the quality of obtained kinetic parameters so that an accurate Ni-based atomic mobility database can be established, the composition profiles in diffusion couples and the diffusion paths superimposed upon Gibbs triangle are explored, where the experimentally measured and calculated values show good agreement.

  5. Longitudinal diffusion of a polar tracer in the outer segments of rod photoreceptors from different species.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingqing; Chen, Chunhe; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrate rod photoreceptors are the ultimate light sensors, as they can detect a single photon. In darkness, rods maintain a high concentration of the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which binds to and keeps open cationic channels on the plasma membrane of the outer segment. Absorption of a photon by the visual pigment of the rod, rhodopsin, initiates a biochemical amplification cascade that leads to a reduction in the concentration of cGMP and closure of the channels, thereby converting the incoming light to an electrical signal. Because the absorption of a photon and the ensuing reactions are localized events, the magnitude of the response of the rod to a single photon depends on the spread of the decrease in the cGMP concentration along the length of the outer segment. The longitudinal diffusion of cGMP depends on the structural parameters of the rod outer segment, specifically the area and the volume available for diffusion. To characterize the effect of rod outer segment cytoarchitecture on diffusion, we have used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and examined the mobility of a fluorescent polar tracer, calcein, in the rod outer segments from three species with different outer segment structures: frog (Rana pipiens), mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) and gecko (Gekko gekko). We found that the diffusion coefficient is similar for all three species, in the order of 8-17 microm(2) s(-1), in broad agreement with the predictions by Holcman and Korenbrot (Biophys. J. 2004:86;2566-2582) based on the known cytoarchitecture of rod outer segments. Consequently, the results also support their prediction that the longitudinal spread of light excitation in rods is similar across species. PMID:16906792

  6. Do TFSA Anions Slither? Pressure Exposes the Role of TFSA Conformational Exchange in Self-Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Sophia N; Rúa, Armando; Cuffari, David; Pilar, Kartik; Hatcher, Jasmine L; Ramati, Sharon; Wishart, James F

    2015-11-19

    Multinuclear ((1)H, (2)H, and (19)F) magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques as functions of temperature and pressure were applied to the study of selectively deuterated 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (EMIM TFSA) ionic liquid isotopologues and related ionic liquids. For EMIM TFSA, temperature-dependent (2)H T1 data indicate stronger electric field gradients in the alkyl chain region compared to the imidazolium ring. Most significantly, the pressure dependences of the EMIM and TFSA self-diffusion coefficients revealed that the displacements of the cations and anions are independent, with diffusion of the TFSA anions being slowed much more by increasing pressure than for the EMIM cations, as shown by their respective activation volumes (28.8 ± 2.5 cm(3)/mol for TFSA vs 14.6 ± 1.3 cm(3)/mol for EMIM). Increasing pressure may lower the mobility of the TFSA anion by hindering its interconversion between trans and cis conformers, a process that is coupled to diffusion according to published molecular dynamics simulations. Measured activation volumes (ΔV(‡)) for ion self-diffusion in EMIM bis(fluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and EMIM tetrafluoroborate support this hypothesis. In addition, (2)H T1 data suggest increased ordering with increasing pressure, with two T1 regimes observed for the MD3 and D2 isotopologues between 0.1-100 and 100-250 MPa, respectively. The activation volumes for T1 were 21 and 25 cm(3)/mol (0-100 MPa) and 11 and 12 cm(3)/mol (100-250 MPa) for the MD3 and D2 isotopologues, respectively. PMID:26509865

  7. Conduction of Electricity through Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. J.; Thomson, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    1. Electrical conductivity of gases in a normal state; 2. Properties of a gas when in a conducting state; 3. Mobility of ions; 4. Mathematical theory of the conduction of electricity through a gas containing ions; 5. Effect produced by a magnetic field on the motion of the ions; 6. Determination of the ratio of the charge to the mass of an ion; 7. Determination of the charge carried by the negative ion; 8. On some physical properties of gaseous ions; 9. Ionisation by incandescent solids; 10. Ionisation in gases from flames; 11. Ionisation by light. Photo-electric effects; Name index; Subject index.

  8. Personalized Popular Blog Recommender Service for Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pei-Yun; Liu, Duen-Ren

    Weblogs have emerged as a new communication and publication medium on the Internet for diffusing the latest useful information. Providing value-added mobile services such as blog articles is increasingly important to attract mobile users to mobile commerce. There are, however, a tremendous number of blog articles, and mobile users generally have difficulty in browsing weblogs. Accordingly, providing mobile users with blog articles that suit their interests is an important issue. Very little research, however, focuses on this issue. In this work, we propose a Customized Content Service on a mobile device (m-CCS) to filter and push blog articles to mobile users. The m-CCS can predict the latest popular blog topics by forecasting the trend of time-sensitive popularity of weblogs. Furthermore, to meet the diversified interest of mobile users, m-CCS further analyzes users’ browsing logs to derive their interests, which are then used to recommend their preferred popular blog topics and articles. The prototype system of m-CCS demonstrates that the system can effectively recommend mobile users desirable blog articles with respect to both popularity and personal interests.

  9. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  10. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. PMID:24200475

  11. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  12. Diffusion in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo; Ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion in disordered systems does not follow the classical laws which describe transport in ordered crystalline media, and this leads to many anomalous physical properties. Since the application of percolation theory, the main advances in the understanding of these processes have come from fractal theory. Scaling theories and numerical simulations are important tools to describe diffusion processes (random walks: the 'ant in the labyrinth') on percolation systems and fractals. Different types of disordered systems exhibiting anomalous diffusion are presented (the incipient infinite percolation cluster, diffusion-limited aggregation clusters, lattice animals, and random combs), and scaling theories as well as numerical simulations of greater sophistication are described. Also, diffusion in the presence of singular distributions of transition rates is discussed and related to anomalous diffusion on disordered structures.

  13. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-03-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma. PMID:24892564

  14. Doctors going mobile.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Having a Web page and a blog site are the minimum requirements for an Internet presence in the new millennium. However, a Web page that loads on a personal computer or a laptop will be ineffective on a mobile or cellular phone. Today, with more existing and potential patients having access to cellular technology, it is necessary to reconfigure the appearance of your Web site that appears on a mobile phone. This article discusses mobile computing and suggestions for improving the appearance of your Web site on a mobile or cellular phone. PMID:25807610

  15. Development of an advanced mobile base for personal mobility and manipulation appliance generation II robotic wheelchair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwu; Candiotti, Jorge; Shino, Motoki; Chung, Cheng-Shiu; Grindle, Garrett G.; Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper describes the development of a mobile base for the Personal Mobility and Manipulation Appliance Generation II (PerMMA Gen II robotic wheelchair), an obstacle-climbing wheelchair able to move in structured and unstructured environments, and to climb over curbs as high as 8 inches. The mechanical, electrical, and software systems of the mobile base are presented in detail, and similar devices such as the iBOT mobility system, TopChair, and 6X6 Explorer are described. Findings The mobile base of PerMMA Gen II has two operating modes: “advanced driving mode” on flat and uneven terrain, and “automatic climbing mode” during stair climbing. The different operating modes are triggered either by local and dynamic conditions or by external commands from users. A step-climbing sequence, up to 0.2 m, is under development and to be evaluated via simulation. The mathematical model of the mobile base is introduced. A feedback and a feed-forward controller have been developed to maintain the posture of the passenger when driving over uneven surfaces or slopes. The effectiveness of the controller has been evaluated by simulation using the open dynamics engine tool. Conclusion Future work for PerMMA Gen II mobile base is implementation of the simulation and control on a real system and evaluation of the system via further experimental tests. PMID:23820149

  16. Assessing reliable human mobility patterns from higher order memory in mobile communications.

    PubMed

    Matamalas, Joan T; De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how people move within a geographical area, e.g. a city, a country or the whole world, is fundamental in several applications, from predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of an epidemic to inferring migration patterns. Mobile phone records provide an excellent proxy of human mobility, showing that movements exhibit a high level of memory. However, the precise role of memory in widely adopted proxies of mobility, as mobile phone records, is unknown. Here we use 560 million call detail records from Senegal to show that standard Markovian approaches, including higher order ones, fail in capturing real mobility patterns and introduce spurious movements never observed in reality. We introduce an adaptive memory-driven approach to overcome such issues. At variance with Markovian models, it is able to realistically model conditional waiting times, i.e. the probability to stay in a specific area depending on individuals' historical movements. Our results demonstrate that in standard mobility models the individuals tend to diffuse faster than observed in reality, whereas the predictions of the adaptive memory approach significantly agree with observations. We show that, as a consequence, the incidence and the geographical spread of a disease could be inadequately estimated when standard approaches are used, with crucial implications on resources deployment and policy-making during an epidemic outbreak. PMID:27581479

  17. Multinomial diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced fluctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete particles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N→∞, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  18. Multinomial diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-24

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced uctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete par- ticles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N ! 1, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  19. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  20. Minority carrier diffusion, defects, and localization in InGaAsN with 2% nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; JONES,ERIC D.

    2000-05-03

    Electron and hole transport in compensated, InGaAsN ({approx} 2% N) are examined through Hall mobility, photoconductivity, and solar cell photoresponse measurements. Short minority carrier diffusion lengths, photoconductive-response spectra, and doping dependent, thermally activated Hall mobilities reveal a broad distribution of localized states. At this stage of development, lateral carrier transport appears to be limited by large scale (>> mean free path) material inhomogeneities, not a random alloy-induced mobility edge.

  1. Helium diffusion in olivine based on first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Brodholt, John; Lu, Xiancai

    2015-05-01

    As a key trace element involved in mantle evolution, the transport properties of helium in the mantle are important for understanding the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth. However, the mobility of helium in the mantle is still unclear due to the scarcity of measured diffusion data from minerals under mantle conditions. In this study, we used first principles calculations based on density functional theory to calculate the absolute diffusion coefficients of the helium in olivine. Using the climbing images nudged elastic band method, we defined the diffusion pathways, the activation energies (Ea), and the prefactors. Our results demonstrate that the diffusion of helium has moderate anisotropy. The directionally dependent diffusion of helium in olivine can be written in Arrhenius form as follows.

  2. Simulations of Xe and U diffusion in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Vyas, Shyam; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Millett, Paul

    2012-09-10

    Diffusion of xenon (Xe) and uranium (U) in UO{sub 2} is controlled by vacancy mechanisms and under irradiation the formation of mobile vacancy clusters is important. Based on the vacancy and cluster diffusion mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we derive continuum thermodynamic and diffusion models for Xe and U in UO{sub 2}. In order to capture the effects of irradiation, vacancies (Va) are explicitly coupled to the Xe and U dynamics. Segregation of defects to grain boundaries in UO{sub 2} is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with models of the interaction between Xe atoms and vacancies with grain boundaries, which were derived from atomistic calculations. The diffusion and segregation models were implemented in the MOOSE-Bison-Marmot (MBM) finite element (FEM) framework and the Xe/U redistribution was simulated for a few simple microstructures.

  3. Diffusion of radionuclides in clay-based ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Gulin, A.N.; Shatkov, V.M.; Shashukov, E.A.; Kuznetsov, B.S.

    1988-09-01

    The diffusion coefficients of sodium-22, strontium-90, and cesium-134 in clay-containing ceramics of three types are determined by the method of integral residual activity. It is found that at the investigated temperatures the diffusion coefficients of the radionuclides decrease in the order sodium-22, cesium-134, strontium-90. Migration of cesium-134 in comparison with sodium-22 is characterized by substantially lower values of the preexponential factor and diffusion activation energy. It is shown that in the case of ceramic made up of 89% by mass cambrian clay and 11% by mass perlite, increase in relative moisture content of the samples from0.05 to 0.3% leads to substantial (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) growth of the diffusion coefficients of the radionuclides. Further increase in the relative moisture content has practically no effect on their diffusive mobility.

  4. Observation of single-file diffusion in a MOF.

    PubMed

    Jobic, H

    2016-06-29

    The translational and rotational dynamics of neopentane adsorbed in the one-dimensional channels of MIL-47(V) has been studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The rotational motion of neopentane is well-described by the rotational diffusion model, with a correlation time of 41 ps at 300 K. The translational motion of the molecule has been fitted by several models: isotropic diffusion, normal 1D and single-file diffusion. It is found that the observed line shapes can only be reproduced by the single-file diffusion model. The single-file mobility factor, F, is (8 ± 1) × 10(-14) m(2) s(-1/2) at 300 K. This is the first observation of this unusual diffusion behaviour in a MOF. PMID:26932296

  5. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  6. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  7. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  8. Electrophoretic mobilities of counterions and a polymer in cylindrical pores

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sunil P.; Muthukumar, M.

    2014-01-01

    We have simulated the transport properties of a uniformly charged flexible polymer chain and its counterions confined inside cylindrical nanopores under an external electric field. The hydrodynamic interaction is treated by describing the solvent molecules explicitly with the multiparticle collision dynamics method. The chain consisting of charged monomers and the counterions interact electrostatically with themselves and with the external electric field. We find rich behavior of the counterions around the polymer under confinement in the presence of the external electric field. The mobility of the counterions is heterogeneous depending on their location relative to the polymer. The adsorption isotherm of the counterions on the polymer depends nonlinearly on the electric field. As a result, the effective charge of the polymer exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the electric field. This in turn leads to a nascent nonlinearity in the chain stretching and electrophoretic mobility of the polymer in terms of their dependence on the electric field. The product of the electric field and the effective polymer charge is found to be the key variable to unify our simulation data for various polymer lengths. Chain extension and the electrophoretic mobility show sigmoidal dependence on the electric field, with crossovers from the linear response regime to the nonlinear regime and then to the saturation regime. The mobility of adsorbed counterions is nonmonotonic with the electric field. For weaker and moderate fields, the adsorbed counterions move with the polymer and at higher fields they move opposite to the polymer's direction. We find that the effective charge and the mobility of the polymer decrease with a decrease in the pore radius. PMID:25240366

  9. High- and Low-Mobility Stages in the Synaptic Vesicle Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kamin, Dirk; Lauterbach, Marcel A.; Westphal, Volker; Keller, Jan; Schönle, Andreas; Hell, Stefan W.; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic vesicles need to be mobile to reach their release sites during synaptic activity. We investigated vesicle mobility throughout the synaptic vesicle cycle using both conventional and subdiffraction-resolution stimulated emission depletion fluorescence microscopy. Vesicle tracking revealed that recently endocytosed synaptic vesicles are highly mobile for a substantial time period after endocytosis. They later undergo a maturation process and integrate into vesicle clusters where they exhibit little mobility. Despite the differences in mobility, both recently endocytosed and mature vesicles are exchanged between synapses. Electrical stimulation does not seem to affect the mobility of the two types of vesicles. After exocytosis, the vesicle material is mobile in the plasma membrane, although the movement appears to be somewhat limited. Increasing the proportion of fused vesicles (by stimulating exocytosis while simultaneously blocking endocytosis) leads to substantially higher mobility. We conclude that both high- and low-mobility states are characteristic of synaptic vesicle movement. PMID:20643088

  10. Stackable differential mobility analyzer for aerosol measurement

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Chen, Da-Ren

    2007-05-08

    A multi-stage differential mobility analyzer (MDMA) for aerosol measurements includes a first electrode or grid including at least one inlet or injection slit for receiving an aerosol including charged particles for analysis. A second electrode or grid is spaced apart from the first electrode. The second electrode has at least one sampling outlet disposed at a plurality different distances along its length. A volume between the first and the second electrode or grid between the inlet or injection slit and a distal one of the plurality of sampling outlets forms a classifying region, the first and second electrodes for charging to suitable potentials to create an electric field within the classifying region. At least one inlet or injection slit in the second electrode receives a sheath gas flow into an upstream end of the classifying region, wherein each sampling outlet functions as an independent DMA stage and classifies different size ranges of charged particles based on electric mobility simultaneously.

  11. Cell mobility after endocytosis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirbhai, Massooma; Flores, Thomas; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Rotkin, Slava

    2013-03-01

    Directed cell movement plays a crucial role in cellular behaviors such as neuronal cell division, cell migration, and cell differentiation. There is evidence in preclinical in vivo studies that small fields have successfully been used to enhance regrowth of damages spinal cord axons but with a small success rate. Fortunately, the evolution of functional biomaterials and nanotechnology may provide promising solutions for enhancing the application of electric fields in guiding neuron migration and neurogenesis within the central nervous system. In this work, we studied how endocytosis and subsequent retention of carbon nanotubes affects the mobility of cells under the influence of an electric field, including the directed cell movement.

  12. Mobility of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, J. R.; Sonder, E.; Weeks, R. A.; Zuhr, R. A.

    1986-04-01

    Transport of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel due to an applied electric field at approximately 1000 °C has been measured by observing changes in elemental concentrations near the cathode and anode surfaces using ion backscattering techniques. The results indicate that magnesium ions are the mobile species at 1000 °C and that these ions combine with ambient oxygen at the cathode surface to form a MgO layer. Quantitative interpretation of the data leads to the conclusion that the ionic transference number of spinel becomes approximately 0.5 after treatment in an electric field.

  13. On the Use of Human Mobility Proxies for Modeling Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Tizzoni, Michele; Bajardi, Paolo; Decuyper, Adeline; Kon Kam King, Guillaume; Schneider, Christian M.; Blondel, Vincent; Smoreda, Zbigniew; González, Marta C.; Colizza, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    Human mobility is a key component of large-scale spatial-transmission models of infectious diseases. Correctly modeling and quantifying human mobility is critical for improving epidemic control, but may be hindered by data incompleteness or unavailability. Here we explore the opportunity of using proxies for individual mobility to describe commuting flows and predict the diffusion of an influenza-like-illness epidemic. We consider three European countries and the corresponding commuting networks at different resolution scales, obtained from (i) official census surveys, (ii) proxy mobility data extracted from mobile phone call records, and (iii) the radiation model calibrated with census data. Metapopulation models defined on these countries and integrating the different mobility layers are compared in terms of epidemic observables. We show that commuting networks from mobile phone data capture the empirical commuting patterns well, accounting for more than 87% of the total fluxes. The distributions of commuting fluxes per link from mobile phones and census sources are similar and highly correlated, however a systematic overestimation of commuting traffic in the mobile phone data is observed. This leads to epidemics that spread faster than on census commuting networks, once the mobile phone commuting network is considered in the epidemic model, however preserving to a high degree the order of infection of newly affected locations. Proxies' calibration affects the arrival times' agreement across different models, and the observed topological and traffic discrepancies among mobility sources alter the resulting epidemic invasion patterns. Results also suggest that proxies perform differently in approximating commuting patterns for disease spread at different resolution scales, with the radiation model showing higher accuracy than mobile phone data when the seed is central in the network, the opposite being observed for peripheral locations. Proxies should therefore be

  14. The role of molecular diffusion processes in tertiary CO/sub 2/ flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, A.T.; Pinczewski, W.V.

    1987-05-01

    This paper examines the role of molecular diffusion in the mobilization of waterflood residual oil. A numerical model that simulates the swelling of residual oil blobs by CO/sub 2/ diffusion through a blocking water phase is developed. The diffusion times calculated with the model are compared with those calculated in laboratory micromodel and coreflood experiments. The comparison shows that diffusion plays a major role in the mobilization and recovery of waterflood residual oil and that high unit or local displacement efficiencies are achieved when there is sufficient time for diffusion to swell the oil significantly. For the length scales normally associated with laboratory corefloods, diffusion is sufficiently rapid to reduce effectively the adverse effects of bypassing on overall recovery efficiency. This is not so for field floods, where bypassing of oil by injected CO/sub 2/ may be expected to occur on a much larger scale.

  15. The role of molecular diffusion processes in tertiary carbon dioxide flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, A.T.; Pinczewski, W.V.

    1984-04-01

    The role of molecular diffusion in the mobilization of waterflood residual oil is examined. A simple numerical model which simulates the swelling of residual oil blobs by carbon dioxide diffusion through a blocking water phase is developed. The diffusion times calculated using the model are compared with the corresponding times in laboratory micromodel and core flood experiments. The comparison shows that diffusion plays a major role in the mobilization and recovery of waterflood residual oil and that high unit or local displacement efficiencies are achieved when there is sufficient time for diffusion to significantly swell the oil. For the length scales normally associated with laboratory core floods diffusion is shown to be sufficiently rapid to effectively reduce the adverse effects of bypassing on overall recovery efficiency. This is not so for field floods where bypassing of oil by injected carbon dioxide may be expected to occur on a much larger scale.

  16. Effect of manganese doping of BaSrTiO{sub 3} on diffusion and domain wall pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Nadaud, Kevin Borderon, Caroline Renoud, Raphaël; Gundel, Hartmut W.

    2015-02-28

    In the present paper, the influence of manganese doping on the dielectric properties of BaSrTiO{sub 3} thin films is presented. The real and imaginary parts of the material's permittivity have been measured in a large frequency range (100 Hz–1 MHz) and as a function of the electric field. The tunability and the figure of merit of the material have been obtained from the measurement of the permittivity under an applied DC bias electric field. For the undoped material, the dielectric losses become important for a large DC bias which leads to breakdown. At a suitable dopant rate, this effect disappears. In order to better understand the origin of the related phenomena, we measure the permittivity as a function of the AC excitation amplitude and we decompose the obtained permittivity with the hyperbolic law. This enables to extract the different contributions of the bulk (low frequency diffusion and high frequency lattice relaxation) and of the domain wall motions (vibration and pinning/unpinning) to the material's dielectric permittivity and to understand the effect of manganese doping on each contribution. Knowledge of the related mechanisms allows us to establish the optimum dopant rate (mainly conditioned by the lattice contribution) and to reduce the domain wall motion, which finally is beneficial for the desired properties of the ferroelectric thin film. A particular attention is paid to low frequency diffusion, an especially harmful effect when a DC biasing is mandatory (tunable electronic component in mobile telecommunication devices for example)

  17. CO Diffusion into Amorphous H2O Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauck, Trish; Karssemeijer, Leendertjan; Shulenberger, Katherine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I.; Cuppen, Herma M.

    2015-03-01

    The mobility of atoms, molecules, and radicals in icy grain mantles regulates ice restructuring, desorption, and chemistry in astrophysical environments. Interstellar ices are dominated by H2O, and diffusion on external and internal (pore) surfaces of H2O-rich ices is therefore a key process to constrain. This study aims to quantify the diffusion kinetics and barrier of the abundant ice constituent CO into H2O-dominated ices at low temperatures (15-23 K), by measuring the mixing rate of initially layered H2O(:CO2)/CO ices. The mixed fraction of CO as a function of time is determined by monitoring the shape of the infrared CO stretching band. Mixing is observed at all investigated temperatures on minute timescales and can be ascribed to CO diffusion in H2O ice pores. The diffusion coefficient and final mixed fraction depend on ice temperature, porosity, thickness, and composition. The experiments are analyzed by applying Fick’s diffusion equation under the assumption that mixing is due to CO diffusion into an immobile H2O ice. The extracted energy barrier for CO diffusion into amorphous H2O ice is ˜160 K. This is effectively a surface diffusion barrier. The derived barrier is low compared to current surface diffusion barriers in use in astrochemical models. Its adoption may significantly change the expected timescales for different ice processes in interstellar environments.

  18. Surface diffusion in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Kanji; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, Giddings pointed out in 'Dynamics of Chromatography' that surface diffusion should become an important research topic in the kinetics of chromatographic phenomena. However, few studies on surface diffusion in adsorbents used in chromatography were published since then. Most scientists use ordinary rate equations to study mass transfer kinetics in chromatography. They take no account of surface diffusion and overlook the significant contributions of this mass transfer process to chromatographic behavior and to column efficiency at high mobile phase flow rate. Only recently did the significance of surface diffusion in separation processes begin to be recognized in connection with the development of new techniques of fast flow, high efficiency chromatography. In this review, we revisit the reports on experimental data on surface diffusion and introduce a surface-restricted molecular diffusion model, derived as a first approximation for the mechanism of surface diffusion, on the basis of the absolute rate theory. We also explain how this model accounts for many intrinsic characteristics of surface diffusion that cannot properly be explained by the conventional models of surface diffusion.

  19. Ion Mobility Separation of Peptide Isotopomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszycki, Julia L.; Bowman, Andrew P.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-03-01

    Differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) operating at high electric fields fully resolves isotopic isomers for a peptide with labeled residues. The naturally present isotopes, alone and together with targeted labels, also cause spectral shifts that approximately add for multiple heavy atoms. Separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition. These findings may enable novel strategies in proteomic and metabolomic analyses using stable isotope labeling.

  20. SOFCo mobile planar solid oxide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Khandkar, A.C.; Privette, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents results from the first phase of a three phase, four-year program with the objective of designing and demonstrating a 10 kW mobile electric power generator operating on logistic fuel. Objectives of the first phase include: the development of a preliminary system design, an assessment of technologies critical to system performance, and the fabrication of three multi-stack test units.

  1. Ion Mobility Separation of Peptide Isotopomers.

    PubMed

    Kaszycki, Julia L; Bowman, Andrew P; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A

    2016-05-01

    Differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) operating at high electric fields fully resolves isotopic isomers for a peptide with labeled residues. The naturally present isotopes, alone and together with targeted labels, also cause spectral shifts that approximately add for multiple heavy atoms. Separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition. These findings may enable novel strategies in proteomic and metabolomic analyses using stable isotope labeling. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26944281

  2. Ion Mobility Separation of Peptide Isotopomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszycki, Julia L.; Bowman, Andrew P.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-05-01

    Differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) operating at high electric fields fully resolves isotopic isomers for a peptide with labeled residues. The naturally present isotopes, alone and together with targeted labels, also cause spectral shifts that approximately add for multiple heavy atoms. Separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition. These findings may enable novel strategies in proteomic and metabolomic analyses using stable isotope labeling.

  3. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  4. Mobile Marine Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, R. D.; Schaadt, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Calfiornia State University (Long Beach) purchased a motor home and converted it into a mobile marine science display unit, outfitting it with built-in display racks inside and an awning to provide shelter displays suited to outdoor use. School activities and programs using the mobile museum are described. (JN)

  5. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  6. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  7. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  8. Mobile Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele-Dyrli, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning--the use of mobile devices for educational purposes by students--is rapidly moving from an experimental initiative by a few innovative districts over the last five years to a broadly accepted concept in K12. The latest research and surveys, results of pilot programs, and analysis of trends in both public education and the broader…

  9. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…

  10. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  11. Extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.; Rouen, M. N.; Lutz, C. C.; Mcbarron, J. W., II

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) consisted of a highly mobile, anthropomorphic pressure vessel and a portable life support system. The EMU used for the first lunar landing is described along with the changes made in the EMU design during the program to incorporate the results of experience and to provide new capabilities. The performance of the EMU is discussed.

  12. Galactic Diffuse Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2007-10-25

    Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

  13. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  14. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  15. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  16. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  17. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  18. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile…

  19. Kinetic Structure of the Reconnection Diffusion Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    We present high-resolution multi-spacecraft observations of electromagnetic fields and particle distributions by Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission throughout a reconnection layer at the sub-solar magnetopause. We study which terms in the generalized Ohm's law balance the observed electric field throughout the region. We also study waves and particle distribution functions in order to identify kinetic boundaries created due to acceleration and trapping of electrons and ions as well as mixing of electron populations from different sides of the reconnecting layer. We discuss the interplay between particles, waves, and DC electric and magnetic fields, which clearly demonstrates kinetic and multi-scale nature of the reconnection diffusion region.

  20. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  1. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous. PMID:21867316

  2. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  3. Diffusion on strained surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1997-03-01

    The change of diffusion kinetics when elastic fields are present is discussed for diffusion on (001) surfaces of simple cubic, fcc and bcc lattices. All particles interact pairwise with a Lennard-Jones potential. The simple cubic lattice was stabilized by an anisotropic prefactor. It is found that generically compressive strain enhances diffusion whereas tensile strain increases the activation barrier. An approximately linear dependence of the barrier in a wide range of misfits is found. In heteroepitaxy, diffusion on top of large clusters is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. The kinetics close to edges and centers of islands are remarkably different. In many cases changes of binding energies are small compared to those of saddle point energies. Thermodynamic arguments (minimization of free energy) are not appropriate to describe diffusion on strained surfaces in these cases.

  4. Electric emissions from electrical appliances.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, N; Cech, R; Schröttner, J

    2008-01-01

    Electric emissions from electric appliances are frequently considered negligible, and standards consider electric appliances to comply without testing. By investigating 122 household devices of 63 different categories, it could be shown that emitted electric field levels do not justify general disregard. Electric reference values can be exceeded up to 11-fold. By numerical dosimetry with homogeneous human models, induced intracorporal electric current densities were determined and factors calculated to elevate reference levels to accounting for reduced induction efficiency of inhomogeneous fields. These factors were found not high enough to allow generally concluding on compliance with basic restrictions without testing. Electric appliances usually simultaneously emit both electric and magnetic fields exposing almost the same body region. Since the sum of induced current densities is limited, one field component reduces the available margin for the other. Therefore, superposition of electric current densities induced by either field would merit consideration. PMID:18083998

  5. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  6. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  7. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  8. Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Bracht, H.

    2014-03-15

    Germanium is being actively considered by the semiconductor community as a mainstream material for nanoelectronic applications. Germanium has advantageous materials properties; however, its dopant-defect interactions are less understood as compared to the mainstream material, silicon. The understanding of self- and dopant diffusion is essential to form well defined doped regions. Although p-type dopants such as boron exhibit limited diffusion, n-type dopants such as phosphorous, arsenic, and antimony diffuse quickly via vacancy-mediated diffusion mechanisms. In the present review, we mainly focus on the impact of intrinsic defects on the diffusion mechanisms of donor atoms and point defect engineering strategies to restrain donor atom diffusion and to enhance their electrical activation.

  9. Electrical Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Described are two activities designed to help children investigate electrical charges, electric meters, and electromagnets. Included are background information, a list of materials, procedures, and follow-up questions. Sources of additional information are cited. (CW)

  10. Quasi-equilibrium hopping drift and field-stimulated diffusion in ultrathin layers of organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Korolev, N. A.; Nikitenko, V. R. Ivanov, D. V.

    2011-02-15

    Hopping transport (drift and diffusion) of charge carriers is studied by numerical Monte Carlo simulation at the quasi-equilibrium initial energy distribution of charge carriers in ultrathin disordered organic semiconductor and insulator films (thinner than 100 molecular layers). The effect of variations in the film thickness, the degree of energy disorder, and the applied field strength on the drift mobility and diffusion coefficient is analyzed. It is found that, as the film thickness is increased, the mobility substantially decreases and follows the power law. The diffusion coefficient significantly differs from that obtained previously in the limit of large thicknesses. This result must be taken into consideration in the analysis of experimental data.

  11. Lipid mobility in supported lipid bilayers by single molecule tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohram, Maryam; Shi, Xiaojun; Smith, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipid bilayers are the main component of cell membranes and their interaction with biomolecules in their immediate environment is critical for cellular functions. These interactions include the binding of polycationic polymers to lipid bilayers which affects many cell membrane events. As an alternative method of studying live cell membranes, we assemble a supported lipid bilayer and investigate its binding with polycationic polymers in vitro by fluorescently labeling the molecules of the supported lipid bilayer and tracking their mobility. In this work, we use single molecule tracking total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to study phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids with and without an adsorbed polycationic polymer, quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP). Individual molecular trajectories are obtained from the experiment, and a Brownian diffusion model is used to determine diffusion coefficients through mean square displacements. Our results indicate a smaller diffusion coefficient for the supported lipid bilayers in the presence of QPVP in comparison to its absence, revealing that their binding causes a decrease in lateral mobility.

  12. Natural Human Mobility Patterns and Spatial Spread of Infectious Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belik, Vitaly; Geisel, Theo; Brockmann, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    We investigate a model for spatial epidemics explicitly taking into account bidirectional movements between base and destination locations on individual mobility networks. We provide a systematic analysis of generic dynamical features of the model on regular and complex metapopulation network topologies and show that significant dynamical differences exist to ordinary reaction-diffusion and effective force of infection models. On a lattice we calculate an expression for the velocity of the propagating epidemic front and find that, in contrast to the diffusive systems, our model predicts a saturation of the velocity with an increasing traveling rate. Furthermore, we show that a fully stochastic system exhibits a novel threshold for the attack ratio of an outbreak that is absent in diffusion and force of infection models. These insights not only capture natural features of human mobility relevant for the geographical epidemic spread, they may serve as a starting point for modeling important dynamical processes in human and animal epidemiology, population ecology, biology, and evolution.

  13. 30 CFR 36.32 - Electrical components and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electrical components and systems. 36.32... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.32 Electrical components and systems. (a) Electrical components on mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment shall be certified or approved...

  14. 30 CFR 36.32 - Electrical components and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electrical components and systems. 36.32... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.32 Electrical components and systems. (a) Electrical components on mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment shall be certified or approved...

  15. 30 CFR 36.32 - Electrical components and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electrical components and systems. 36.32... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.32 Electrical components and systems. (a) Electrical components on mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment shall be certified or approved...

  16. 30 CFR 36.32 - Electrical components and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical components and systems. 36.32... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.32 Electrical components and systems. (a) Electrical components on mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment shall be certified or approved...

  17. 30 CFR 36.32 - Electrical components and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electrical components and systems. 36.32... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.32 Electrical components and systems. (a) Electrical components on mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment shall be certified or approved...

  18. Electrical Systems. FOS: Fundamentals of Service. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual, which is part of a series on agricultural and industrial machinery, deals with electrical systems. Special attention is paid to electricity as it is commonly used on mobile machines. The following topics are covered in the individual chapters: electricity and how it works (current, voltage, and resistance; types of circuits;…

  19. Nonlinear diffusion waves in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and the large-scale instabilities arising upon an electrical explosion of conductors in a superstrong (2-3 MG) magnetic field were investigated experimentally on the MIG high-current generator (up to 2.5 peak current, 100 ns current rise time). It was observed that in the nonlinear stage of the process, the wavelength of thermal instabilities (striations) increased with a rate of 1.5-3 km/s.

  20. Electrical detection of spin transport in Si two-dimensional electron gas systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Te; Fischer, Inga Anita; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Murata, Koichi; Nie, Tianxiao; Oehme, Michael; Schulze, Jörg; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Spin transport in a semiconductor-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system has been attractive in spintronics for more than ten years. The inherent advantages of high-mobility channel and enhanced spin-orbital interaction promise a long spin diffusion length and efficient spin manipulation, which are essential for the application of spintronics devices. However, the difficulty of making high-quality ferromagnetic (FM) contacts to the buried 2DEG channel in the heterostructure systems limits the potential developments in functional devices. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate electrical detection of spin transport in a high-mobility 2DEG system using FM Mn-germanosilicide (Mn(Si0.7Ge0.3)x) end contacts, which is the first report of spin injection and detection in a 2DEG confined in a Si/SiGe modulation doped quantum well structure (MODQW). The extracted spin diffusion length and lifetime are l sf = 4.5 μm and [Formula: see text] at 1.9 K respectively. Our results provide a promising approach for spin injection into 2DEG system in the Si-based MODQW, which may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as spin-based transistor, logic, and memory devices. PMID:27479155