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Sample records for diffusion limited aggregation

  1. Inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Robin Blumberg; Nittmann, Johann; Stanley, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model can be used to simulate viscous fingering in a medium with inhomogeneous permeability and homogeneous porosity. The medium consists of a pipe-pore square-lattice network in which all pores have equal volume and the pipes have negligible volume. It is shown that fluctuations in a DLA-based growth process may be tuned by noise reduction, and that fluctuations in the velocity of the moving interface are multiplicative in form.

  2. Attracted diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, S H Ebrahimnazhad; Saberi, A A

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) with a seed placed on an attractive plane as a simple model in connection with the electrical double layers. We compute the fractal dimension of the aggregated patterns as a function of the attraction strength α. For the patterns grown in both two and three dimensions, the fractal dimension shows a significant dependence on the attraction strength for small values of α and approaches that of the ordinary two-dimensional (2D) DLA in the limit of large α. For the nonattracting case with α = 1, our results in three dimensions reproduce the patterns of 3D ordinary DLA, while in two dimensions our model leads to the formation of a compact cluster with dimension 2. For intermediate α, the 3D clusters have a quasi-2D structure with a fractal dimension very close to that of the ordinary 2D DLA. This allows one to control the morphology of a growing cluster by tuning a single external parameter α. PMID:23005417

  3. Attracted diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbari, S. H. Ebrahimnazhad; Saberi, A. A.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) with a seed placed on an attractive plane as a simple model in connection with the electrical double layers. We compute the fractal dimension of the aggregated patterns as a function of the attraction strength α. For the patterns grown in both two and three dimensions, the fractal dimension shows a significant dependence on the attraction strength for small values of α and approaches that of the ordinary two-dimensional (2D) DLA in the limit of large α. For the nonattracting case with α=1, our results in three dimensions reproduce the patterns of 3D ordinary DLA, while in two dimensions our model leads to the formation of a compact cluster with dimension 2. For intermediate α, the 3D clusters have a quasi-2D structure with a fractal dimension very close to that of the ordinary 2D DLA. This allows one to control the morphology of a growing cluster by tuning a single external parameter α.

  4. Anisotropic diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Popescu, M N; Hentschel, H G E; Family, F

    2004-06-01

    Using stochastic conformal mappings, we study the effects of anisotropic perturbations on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions. The harmonic measure of the growth probability for DLA can be conformally mapped onto a constant measure on a unit circle. Here we map m preferred directions for growth to a distribution on the unit circle, which is a periodic function with m peaks in [-pi,pi) such that the angular width sigma of the peak defines the "strength" of anisotropy kappa= sigma(-1) along any of the m chosen directions. The two parameters (m,kappa) map out a parameter space of perturbations that allows a continuous transition from DLA (for small enough kappa ) to m needlelike fingers as kappa--> infinity. We show that at fixed m the effective fractal dimension of the clusters D(m,kappa) obtained from mass-radius scaling decreases with increasing kappa from D(DLA) approximately 1.71 to a value bounded from below by D(min) = 3 / 2. Scaling arguments suggest a specific form for the dependence of the fractal dimension D(m,kappa) on kappa for large kappa which compares favorably with numerical results. PMID:15244564

  5. Diffusion Limited Aggregation: Algorithm optimization revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, F. L.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2011-08-01

    The Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA) model developed by Witten and Sander in 1978 is useful in modeling a large class of growth phenomena with local dependence. Besides its simplicity this aggregation model has a complex behavior that can be observed at the patterns generated. We propose on this work a brief review of some important proprieties of this model and present an algorithm to simulate a DLA aggregates that simpler and efficient compared to others found in the literature.

  6. Diffusion-limited aggregation on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Crowdy, D.; Bazant, M. Z.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we use stereographic projections to simulate diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on surfaces of constant Gaussian curvature, including the sphere (K>0) and the pseudo-sphere (K<0), which approximate "bumps" and "saddles" in smooth surfaces, respectively. Although the curvature affects the global morphology of the aggregates, the fractal dimension (in the curved metric) is remarkably insensitive to curvature, as long as the particle size is much smaller than the radius of curvature. We conjecture that all aggregates grown by conformally invariant transport on curved surfaces have the same fractal dimension as DLA in the plane. Our simulations suggest, however, that the multifractal dimensions increase from hyperbolic (K<0) to elliptic (K>0) geometry, which we attribute to curvature-dependent screening of tip branching.

  7. Thermodynamically reversible generalization of diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, R M; Margolus, N H

    1999-07-01

    We introduce a lattice gas model of cluster growth via the diffusive aggregation of particles in a closed system obeying a local, deterministic, microscopically reversible dynamics. This model roughly corresponds to placing the irreversible diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) in contact with a heat bath. Particles release latent heat when aggregating, while singly connected cluster members can absorb heat and evaporate. The heat bath is initially empty, hence we observe the flow of entropy from the aggregating gas of particles into the heat bath, which is being populated by diffusing heat tokens. Before the population of the heat bath stabilizes, the cluster morphology (quantified by the fractal dimension) is similar to a standard DLA cluster. The cluster then gradually anneals, becoming more tenuous, until reaching configurational equilibrium when the cluster morphology resembles a quenched branched random polymer. As the microscopic dynamics is invertible, we can reverse the evolution, observe the inverse flow of heat and entropy, and recover the initial condition. This simple system provides an explicit example of how macroscopic dissipation and self-organization can result from an underlying microscopically reversible dynamics. We present a detailed description of the dynamics for the model, discuss the macroscopic limit, and give predictions for the equilibrium particle densities obtained in the mean field limit. Empirical results for the growth are then presented, including the observed equilibrium particle densities, the temperature of the system, the fractal dimension of the growth clusters, scaling behavior, finite size effects, and the approach to equilibrium. We pay particular attention to the temporal behavior of the growth process and show that the relaxation to the maximum entropy state is initially a rapid nonequilibrium process, then subsequently it is a quasistatic process with a well defined temperature. PMID:11969759

  8. Diffusion-Limited Aggregation with Polygon Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Wang, Yan-Ting; Ou-Yang, Zhong-Can

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) assumes that particles perform pure random walk at a finite temperature and aggregate when they come close enough and stick together. Although it is well known that DLA in two dimensions results in a ramified fractal structure, how the particle shape influences the formed morphology is still unclear. In this work, we perform the off-lattice two-dimensional DLA simulations with different particle shapes of triangle, quadrangle, pentagon, hexagon, and octagon, respectively, and compare with the results for circular particles. Our results indicate that different particle shapes only change the local structure, but have no effects on the global structure of the formed fractal cluster. The local compactness decreases as the number of polygon edges increases.

  9. Diffusion limited aggregation. The role of surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, Juan M.; Otálora, Fermín

    1991-11-01

    We present a growth model in which the hitting particles are able to diffuse to more stable growth sites in the perimeter of a cluster growing by diffusion limited aggregation. By tuning the diffusion path Ls, the morphological output - from disordered fractal to perfect single crystals - can be controlled. Instabilities appear when the mean length of the crystal faces Lf are greater than 2 Ls.

  10. Scaling in the Diffusion Limited Aggregation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, Anton

    2012-01-01

    We present a self-consistent picture of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growth based on the assumption that the probability density P(r,N) for the next particle to be attached within the distance r to the center of the cluster is expressible in the scale-invariant form P[r/Rdep(N)]. It follows from this assumption that there is no multiscaling issue in DLA and there is only a single fractal dimension D for all length scales. We check our assumption self-consistently by calculating the particle-density distribution with a measured P(r/Rdep) function on an ensemble with 1000 clusters of 5×107 particles each. We also show that a nontrivial multiscaling function D(x) can be obtained only when small clusters (N<10000) are used to calculate D(x). Hence, multiscaling is a finite-size effect and is not intrinsic to DLA.

  11. Linear relationship statistics in diffusion limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi, Abbas Ali

    2009-11-01

    We show that various surface parameters in two-dimensional diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) grow linearly with the number of particles. We find the ratio of the average length of the perimeter and the accessible perimeter of a DLA cluster together with its external perimeters to the cluster size, and define a microscopic schematic procedure for attachment of an incident new particle to the cluster. We measure the fractal dimension of the red sites (i.e., the sites such that cutting each of them splits the cluster) as equal to that of the DLA cluster. It is also shown that the average number of dead sites and the average number of red sites have linear relationships with the cluster size.

  12. Scaling in the diffusion limited aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Menshutin, Anton

    2012-01-01

    We present a self-consistent picture of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growth based on the assumption that the probability density P(r,N) for the next particle to be attached within the distance r to the center of the cluster is expressible in the scale-invariant form P[r/R{dep}(N)]. It follows from this assumption that there is no multiscaling issue in DLA and there is only a single fractal dimension D for all length scales. We check our assumption self-consistently by calculating the particle-density distribution with a measured P(r/R{dep}) function on an ensemble with 1000 clusters of 5×10{7} particles each. We also show that a nontrivial multiscaling function D(x) can be obtained only when small clusters (N<10 000) are used to calculate D(x). Hence, multiscaling is a finite-size effect and is not intrinsic to DLA. PMID:22304265

  13. Beyond diffusion-limited aggregation kinetics in microparticle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Erb, Randall M; Krebs, Melissa D; Alsberg, Eben; Samanta, Bappaditya; Rotello, Vincent M; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2009-11-01

    Aggregation in nondiffusion limited colloidal particle suspensions follows a temporal power-law dependence that is consistent with classical diffusion limited cluster aggregation models; however, the dynamic scaling exponents observed in these systems are not adequately described by diffusion limited cluster aggregation models, which expect these scaling exponents to be constant over all experimental conditions. We show here that the dynamic scaling exponents for 10 microm particles increase with the particle concentration and the particle-particle free energy of interaction. We provide a semiquantitative explanation for the scaling behavior in terms of the long-ranged particle-particle interaction potential. PMID:20364980

  14. Diffusion-limited aggregates grown on nonuniform substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornette, V.; Centres, P. M.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Nieto, F.

    2013-12-01

    In the present paper, patterns of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) grown on nonuniform substrates are investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We consider a nonuniform substrate as the largest percolation cluster of dropped particles with different structures and forms that occupy more than a single site on the lattice. The aggregates are grown on such clusters, in the range the concentration, p, from the percolation threshold, pc up to the jamming coverage, pj. At the percolation threshold, the aggregates are asymmetrical and the branches are relatively few. However, for larger values of p, the patterns change gradually to a pure DLA. Tiny qualitative differences in this behavior are observed for different k sizes. Correspondingly, the fractal dimension of the aggregates increases as p raises in the same range pc≤p≤pj. This behavior is analyzed and discussed in the framework of the existing theoretical approaches.

  15. Optimizing off-lattice Diffusion-Limited Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijpers, Kasper R.; de Martín, Lilian; van Ommen, J. Ruud

    2014-03-01

    We present a technique to improve the time scaling of Diffusion-Limited Aggregation simulations. The proposed method reduces the number of calculations by making an extensive use of the RAM memory to store information about the particles’ positions and distances. We have simulated clusters up to 5ṡ106 particles in 2D and up to 1ṡ106 particles in 3D and compared the calculation times with previous algorithms proposed in the literature. Our method scales t∝Np1.08, outperforming the current optimization techniques.

  16. Abnormal Stability in Growth of Diffusion-Limited Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Shonosuke

    2009-01-01

    An abnormal and unsteady growth of an isotropic cluster in diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) is observed in stability analyses. Macroscopic fluctuation due to the delay of transition from a dendritic tip to a tip-splitting growth induces the anisotropy of DLA. An asymptotic deformation factor \\varepsilon∞ = 0.0888 is obtained from large DLA clusters. A symmetric oval model proposed from the dual-stability growth of DLA gives an asymptotic fractal dimension of 1.7112 using \\varepsilon∞. The correspondence of this model to the box dimension is excellent.

  17. Growth of Silicon Nanosheets Under Diffusion-Limited Aggregation Environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejun; Kim, Sung Wook; Kim, Ilsoo; Seo, Dongjea; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth of cubic-structured (silicon) Si nanosheets (SiNSs) was investigated. Freestanding, single-crystalline SiNSs with a thickness of 5-20 nm were grown on various Si substrates under an atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. Systematic investigation indicated that a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) environment that leads to dendritic growth in <110> directions at the initial stage is essential for 2D growth. The kinetic aspects under DLA environments that ascribe to the dendritic and 2D growth were discussed. Under the more dilute conditions made by addition of Ar to the flow of H2, the SiNSs grew epitaxially on the substrates with periodic arrangement at a specific angle depending on the orientation of the substrate. It reveals that SiNSs always grew two dimensionally with exposing (111) surfaces. That is thermodynamically favorable. PMID:26518028

  18. Modeling realistic breast lesions using diffusion limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Elangovan, Premkumar; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Diaz, Oliver; Wells, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Synthesizing the appearance of malignant masses and inserting these into digital mammograms can be used as part of a wider framework for investigating the radiological detection task in X-ray mammography. However, the randomness associated with cell division within cancerous masses and the associated complex morphology challenges the realism of the modeling process. In this paper, Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA), a type of fractal growth process is proposed and utilized for modeling breast lesions. Masses of different sizes, shapes and densities were grown by controlling DLA growth parameters either prior to growth, or dynamically updating these during growth. A validation study was conducted by presenting 30 real and 30 simulated masses in a random order to a team of radiologists. The results from the validation study suggest that the observers found it difficult to differentiate between the real and simulated lesions.

  19. Growth of Silicon Nanosheets Under Diffusion-Limited Aggregation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejun; Kim, Sung Wook; Kim, Ilsoo; Seo, Dongjea; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2015-10-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth of cubic-structured (silicon) Si nanosheets (SiNSs) was investigated. Freestanding, single-crystalline SiNSs with a thickness of 5-20 nm were grown on various Si substrates under an atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. Systematic investigation indicated that a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) environment that leads to dendritic growth in <110> directions at the initial stage is essential for 2D growth. The kinetic aspects under DLA environments that ascribe to the dendritic and 2D growth were discussed. Under the more dilute conditions made by addition of Ar to the flow of H2, the SiNSs grew epitaxially on the substrates with periodic arrangement at a specific angle depending on the orientation of the substrate. It reveals that SiNSs always grew two dimensionally with exposing (111) surfaces. That is thermodynamically favorable.

  20. Influence of particle size on diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Z J; Zou, X W; Zhang, W B; Jin, Z Z

    1999-11-01

    The influence of particle size on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) has been investigated by computer simulations. For DLA clusters consisting of two kinds of particles with different sizes, when large particles are in the minority, the patterns of clusters appear asymmetrical and nonuniform, and their fractal dimensions D(f) increase compared with one-component DLA. With increasing size of large particles, D(f) increases. This increase can be attributed to two reasons: one is that large particles become new growth centers; the other is the big masses of large particles. As the concentration ratio x(n) of large particles increases, D(f) will reach a maximum value D(f(m)) and then decrease. When x(n) exceeds a certain value, the morphology and D(f) of the two-component DLA clusters are similar to those of one-component DLA clusters. PMID:11970534

  1. Anisotropic diffusion limited aggregation in three dimensions: universality and nonuniversality.

    PubMed

    Goold, Nicholas R; Somfai, Ellák; Ball, Robin C

    2005-09-01

    We explore the macroscopic consequences of lattice anisotropy for diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) in three dimensions. Simple cubic and bcc lattice growths are shown to approach universal asymptotic states in a coherent fashion, and the approach is accelerated by the use of noise reduction. These states are strikingly anisotropic dendrites with a rich hierarchy of structure. For growth on an fcc lattice, our data suggest at least two stable fixed points of anisotropy, one matching the bcc case. Hexagonal growths, favoring six planar and two polar directions, appear to approach a line of asymptotic states with continuously tunable polar anisotropy. The more planar of these growths visually resembles real snowflake morphologies. Our simulations use a new and dimension-independent implementation of the DLA model. The algorithm maintains a hierarchy of sphere coverings of the growth, supporting efficient random walks onto the growth by spherical moves. Anisotropy was introduced by restricting growth to certain preferred directions. PMID:16241431

  2. Anisotropic diffusion limited aggregation in three dimensions: Universality and nonuniversality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goold, Nicholas R.; Somfai, Ellák; Ball, Robin C.

    2005-09-01

    We explore the macroscopic consequences of lattice anisotropy for diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) in three dimensions. Simple cubic and bcc lattice growths are shown to approach universal asymptotic states in a coherent fashion, and the approach is accelerated by the use of noise reduction. These states are strikingly anisotropic dendrites with a rich hierarchy of structure. For growth on an fcc lattice, our data suggest at least two stable fixed points of anisotropy, one matching the bcc case. Hexagonal growths, favoring six planar and two polar directions, appear to approach a line of asymptotic states with continuously tunable polar anisotropy. The more planar of these growths visually resembles real snowflake morphologies. Our simulations use a new and dimension-independent implementation of the DLA model. The algorithm maintains a hierarchy of sphere coverings of the growth, supporting efficient random walks onto the growth by spherical moves. Anisotropy was introduced by restricting growth to certain preferred directions.

  3. Scaling laws in the diffusion limited aggregation of persistent random walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Isadora R.; Alves, Sidiney G.; Ferreira, Silvio C.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the diffusion limited aggregation of particles executing persistent random walks. The scaling properties of both random walks and large aggregates are presented. The aggregates exhibit a crossover between ballistic and diffusion limited aggregation models. A non-trivial scaling relation ξ∼ℓ1.25 between the characteristic size ξ, in which the cluster undergoes a morphological transition, and the persistence length ℓ, between ballistic and diffusive regimes of the random walk, is observed.

  4. Diffusion-limited aggregation with power-law pinning.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, H G E; Popescu, M N; Family, F

    2004-01-01

    Using stochastic conformal mapping techniques we study the patterns emerging from Laplacian growth with a power-law decaying threshold for growth R(-gamma)(N) (where R(N) is the radius of the N-particle cluster). For gamma>1 the growth pattern is in the same universality class as diffusion limited aggregation (DLA), while for gamma<1 the resulting patterns have a lower fractal dimension D(gamma) than a DLA cluster due to the enhancement of growth at the hot tips of the developing pattern. Our results indicate that a pinning transition occurs at gamma=1/2, significantly smaller than might be expected from the lower bound alpha(min) approximately 0.67 of multifractal spectrum of DLA. This limiting case shows that the most singular tips in the pruned cluster now correspond to those expected for a purely one-dimensional line. Using multifractal analysis, analytic expressions are established for D(gamma) both close to the breakdown of DLA universality class, i.e., gamma less, similar 1, and close to the pinning transition, i.e., gamma greater, similar 1/2. PMID:14995617

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of interfacial interactions between small nanoparticles during diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Dongmei; Yang, Xiaonan; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Haixing; Tang, Huan; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the limitations of experimental methods at the atomic level, research on the aggregation of small nanoparticles (D < 5 nm) in aqueous solutions is quite rare. The aggregation of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is very different than that of normal sized nanoparticles. The interfacial interactions play a dominant role in the aggregation of small nanoparticles. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations, which can explore the microscopic behavior of nanoparticles during the diffusion-limited aggregation at an atomic level, were employed to reveal the aggregation mechanism of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. First, the aggregation processes and aggregate structure were depicted. Second, the particle-particle interaction and surface diffusion of nanoparticles during aggregation were investigated. Third, the water-mediated interactions during aggregation were ascertained. The results indicate that the aggregation of nanoparticle in aqueous solutions is affected by particle size. The strong particle-particle interaction and high surface diffusion result in the formation of particle-particle bonds of 2 nm TiO2 nanoparticles, and the water-mediated interaction plays an important role in the aggregation process of 3 and 4 nm TiO2 nanoparticles.

  6. An extended fractal growth regime in the diffusion limited aggregation including edge diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Batabyal, R.; Das, G. P.; Dev, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated on-lattice diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) involving edge diffusion and compared the results with the standard DLA model. For both cases, we observe the existence of a crossover from the fractal to the compact regime as a function of sticking coefficient. However, our modified DLA model including edge diffusion shows an extended fractal growth regime like an earlier theoretical result using realistic growth models and physical parameters [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 1829]. While the results of Zhang et al. showed the existence of the extended fractal growth regime only on triangular but not on square lattices, we find its existence on the square lattice. There is experimental evidence of this growth regime on a square lattice. The standard DLA model cannot characterize fractal morphology as the fractal dimension (Hausdorff dimension, DH) is insensitive to morphology. It also predicts DH = DP (the perimeter dimension). For the usual fractal structures, observed in growth experiments on surfaces, the perimeter dimension can differ significantly (DH ≠ DP) depending on the morphology. Our modified DLA model shows minor sensitivity to this difference.

  7. Multifractal analysis of the branch structure of diffusion-limited aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, W. G.; Heffernan, D. M.

    2012-02-01

    We examine the branch structure of radial diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) clusters for evidence of multifractality. The lacunarity of DLA clusters is measured and the generalized dimensions D(q) of their mass distribution is estimated using the sandbox method. We find that the global n-fold symmetry of the aggregates can induce anomalous scaling behavior into these measurements. However, negating the effects of this symmetry, standard scaling is recovered.

  8. Multifractal analysis of the branch structure of diffusion-limited aggregates.

    PubMed

    Hanan, W G; Heffernan, D M

    2012-02-01

    We examine the branch structure of radial diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) clusters for evidence of multifractality. The lacunarity of DLA clusters is measured and the generalized dimensions D(q) of their mass distribution is estimated using the sandbox method. We find that the global n-fold symmetry of the aggregates can induce anomalous scaling behavior into these measurements. However, negating the effects of this symmetry, standard scaling is recovered. PMID:22463212

  9. Electrochemical Growth of Ag Junctions and Diffusion Limited Aggregate (DLA) Fractal Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Zak; Tuppan, Sam; Kim, Woo-Joong; Seattle University Team

    2015-03-01

    We attempt construction of a single atom connection between two copper wires. By applying a DC voltage across the wires when immersed in a silver nitrate solution, we deposit silver until a junction is formed. The deposited silver forms a fractal structure that can be simulated with a diffusion limited aggregation model.

  10. Predictive model for diffusion-limited aggregation kinetics of nanocolloids under high concentration.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco

    2012-01-12

    Smoluchowski's equation for the rate of aggregation of colloidal particles under diffusion-limited conditions has set the basis for the interpretation of kinetics of aggregation phenomena. Nevertheless, its use is limited to sufficiently dilute conditions. In this work we propose a correction to Smoluchowski's equation by using a result derived by Richards ( J. Phys. Chem. 1986 , 85 , 3520 ) within the framework of trapping theory. This corrected aggregation kernel, which accounts for concentration dependence effects, has been implemented in a population-balance equations scheme and used to model the aggregation kinetics of colloidal particles undergoing diffusion-limited aggregation under concentrated conditions (up to a particle volume fraction of 30%). The predictions of population balance calculations have been validated by means of Brownian dynamic simulations. It was found that the corrected kernel can very well reproduce the results from Brownian dynamic simulations for all concentration values investigated, and is also able to accurately predict the time required by a suspension to reach the gel point. On the other hand, classical Smoluchowski's theory substantially underpredicts the rate of aggregation as well as the onset of gelation, with deviations becoming progressively more severe as the particle volume fraction increases. PMID:22148884

  11. Stationary growth and unique invariant harmonic measure of cylindrical diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Riccardo; Taloni, Alessandro; Caglioti, Emanuele; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-08-10

    We prove that the harmonic measure is stationary, unique, and invariant on the interface of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growing on a cylinder surface. We provide a detailed theoretical analysis puzzling together multiscaling, multifractality, and conformal invariance, supported by extensive numerical simulations of clusters built using conformal mappings and on a lattice. The growth properties of the active and frozen zones are clearly elucidated. We show that the unique scaling exponent characterizing the stationary growth is the DLA fractal dimension. PMID:23006279

  12. Stationary Growth and Unique Invariant Harmonic Measure of Cylindrical Diffusion Limited Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Riccardo; Taloni, Alessandro; Caglioti, Emanuele; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-08-01

    We prove that the harmonic measure is stationary, unique, and invariant on the interface of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growing on a cylinder surface. We provide a detailed theoretical analysis puzzling together multiscaling, multifractality, and conformal invariance, supported by extensive numerical simulations of clusters built using conformal mappings and on a lattice. The growth properties of the active and frozen zones are clearly elucidated. We show that the unique scaling exponent characterizing the stationary growth is the DLA fractal dimension.

  13. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Neto, P.; Stošić, T.; Stošić, B.; Lessa, R.; Milošević, M. V.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model—surface tension, particle flow and particle source—representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals.

  14. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Neto, P; Stošić, T; Stošić, B; Lessa, R; Milošević, M V

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model--surface tension, particle flow and particle source--representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals. PMID:25122308

  15. Probing surface characteristics of diffusion-limited-aggregation clusters with particles of variable size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, A. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a technique for probing the harmonic measure of a diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) cluster surface with variable-size particles and generate 1000 clusters with 50×106 particles using an original off-lattice killing-free algorithm. Taking, in sequence, the limit of the vanishing size of the probing particles and then sending the growing cluster size to infinity, we achieve unprecedented accuracy in determining the fractal dimension D=1.7100(2) crucial to the characterization of the geometric properties of DLA clusters.

  16. Self-assembly of high molecular weight polypeptide copolymers studied via diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Weil, Tanja

    2014-01-13

    The assembly of high molecular weight polypeptides into complex architectures exhibiting structural complexity ranging from the nano- to the mesoscale is of fundamental importance for various protein-related diseases but also hold great promise for various nano- and biotechnological applications. Here, the aggregation of partially unfolded high molecular weight polypeptides into multiscale fractal structures is investigated by means of diffusion limited aggregation and atomic force microscopy. The zeta potential, the hydrodynamic radius, and the obtained fractal morphologies were correlated with the conformation of the polypeptide backbones as obtained from circular dichroism measurements. The polypeptides are modified with polyethylene oxide side chains to stabilize the polypeptides and to normalize intermolecular interactions. The modification with the hydrophobic thioctic acid alters the folding of the polypeptide backbone, resulting in a change in solution aggregation and fractal morphology. We found that a more compact folding results in dense and highly branched structures, whereas a less compact folded polypeptide chain yields a more directional assembly. Our results provide first evidence for the role of compactness of polypeptide folding on aggregation. Furthermore, the mesoscale-structured biofilms were used to achieve a hierarchical protein assembly, which is demonstrated by deposition of Rhodamine-labeled HSA with the preassembled fractal structures. These results contribute important insights to the fundamental understanding of the aggregation of high molecular weight polypeptides in general and provide opportunities to study nanostructure-related effects on biological systems such as adhesion, proliferation, and the development of, for example, neuronal cells. PMID:24354281

  17. Random walks, diffusion limited aggregation in a wedge, and average conformal maps.

    PubMed

    Sander, Leonard M; Somfai, Ellák

    2005-06-01

    We investigate diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in a wedge geometry. Arneodo and collaborators have suggested that the ensemble average of DLA cluster density should be close to the noise-free selected Saffman-Taylor finger. We show that a different, but related, ensemble average, that of the conformal maps associated with random clusters, yields a nontrivial shape which is also not far from the Saffman-Taylor finger. However, we have previously demonstrated that the same average of DLA in a channel geometry is not the Saffman-Taylor finger. This casts doubt on the idea that the average of noisy diffusion-limited growth is governed by a simple transcription of noise-free results. PMID:16035911

  18. Analysis of patterns formed by two-component diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Postnikov, E B; Ryabov, A B; Loskutov, A

    2010-11-01

    We consider diffusion limited aggregation of particles of two different kinds. It is assumed that a particle of one kind may adhere only to another particle of the same kind. The particles aggregate on a linear substrate which consists of periodically or randomly placed particles of different kinds. We analyze the influence of initial patterns on the structure of growing clusters. It is shown that at small distances from the substrate, the cluster structures repeat initial patterns. However, starting from a critical distance the initial periodicity is abruptly lost, and the particle distribution tends to a random one. An approach describing the evolution of the number of branches is proposed. Our calculations show that the initial pattern can be detected only at the distance which is not larger than approximately one and a half of the characteristic pattern size. PMID:21230475

  19. Bias-free simulation of diffusion-limited aggregation on a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yen Lee

    We identify sources of systematic error in traditional simulations of the Witten-Sander model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on a square lattice. Based on semi-analytic solutions of the walk-to-line and walk-to-square first-passage problems, we develop an algorithm that reduces the simulation bias to below 10-12. We grow clusters of 108 particles on 65536 × 65536 lattices. We verify that lattice DLA clusters inevitably grow into anisotropic shapes, dictated by the anisotropy of the aggregation process. We verify that the fractal dimension evolves from the continuum DLA value, D = 1 . 71 , for small disk-shaped clusters, towards Kesten's bound of D = 3 / 2 for highly anisotropic clusters with long protruding arms.

  20. Is it really possible to grow isotropic on-lattice diffusion-limited aggregates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, S. G.; Ferreira, S. C., Jr.

    2006-03-01

    In a recent paper (Bogoyavlenskiy V A 2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 2533), an algorithm aiming to generate isotropic clusters of the on-lattice diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model was proposed. The procedure consists of aggregation probabilities proportional to the squared number of occupied sites (k2). In the present work, we analysed this algorithm using the noise reduced version of the DLA model and large-scale simulations. In the noiseless limit, instead of isotropic patterns, a 45° (30°) rotation in the anisotropy directions of the clusters grown on square (triangular) lattices was observed. A generalized algorithm, in which the aggregation probability is proportional to kν, was proposed. The exponent ν has a nonuniversal critical value νc, for which the patterns generated in the noiseless limit exhibit the original (axial) anisotropy for ν < νc and the rotated one (diagonal) for ν > νc. The values νc = 1.395 ± 0.005 and νc = 0.82 ± 0.01 were found for square and triangular lattices, respectively. Moreover, large-scale simulations show that there is a nontrivial relation between the noise reduction and anisotropy direction. The case ν = 2 (Bogoyavlenskiy's rule) is an example where the patterns exhibit the axial anisotropy for small and the diagonal one for large noise reduction.

  1. Morphological transition between diffusion-limited and ballistic aggregation growth patterns.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S C; Alves, S G; Brito, A Faissal; Moreira, J G

    2005-05-01

    In this work, the transition between diffusion-limited (DLA) and ballistic aggregation (BA) models was reconsidered using a model in which biased random walks simulate the particle trajectories. The bias is controlled by a parameter lambda, which assumes the value lambda=0 (1) for the ballistic (diffusion-limited) aggregation model. Patterns growing from a single seed were considered. In order to simulate large clusters, an efficient algorithm was developed. For lambda (not equal to) 0 , the patterns are fractal on small length scales, but homogeneous on large ones. We evaluated the mean density of particles (-)rho in the region defined by a circle of radius r centered at the initial seed. As a function of r, (-)rho reaches the asymptotic value rho(0)(lambda) following a power law (-)rho = rho(0) +Ar(-gamma) with a universal exponent gamma=0.46 (2) , independent of lambda . The asymptotic value has the behavior rho(0) approximately |1-lambda|(beta) , where beta=0.26 (1) . The characteristic crossover length that determines the transition from DLA- to BA-like scaling regimes is given by xi approximately |1-lambda|(-nu) , where nu=0.61 (1) , while the cluster mass at the crossover follows a power law M(xi) approximately |1-lambda(-alpha) , where alpha=0.97 (2) . We deduce the scaling relations beta=nugamma and beta=2nu-alpha between these exponents. PMID:16089530

  2. A new example of the diffusion-limited aggregation: Ni-Cu film patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockar, Hakan; Bayirli, Mehmet; Alper, Mursel

    2010-02-01

    The mechanism of the growth of the dendrites in the Ni-Cu films is studied by comparing them with the aggregates obtained by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations according to the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. The films were grown by electrodeposition. The structural analysis of the films carried out using the x-ray diffraction showed that the films have a face-centered cubic structure. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used for morphological observations and the film compositions were determined by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The observed SEM images are compared with the patterns obtained by MC simulations according to DLA model in which the sticking probability, P between the particles is used as a parameter. For all samples between the least and the densest aggregates in the films, the critical exponents of the density-density correlation functions, α were within the interval 0.160 ± 0.005-0.124 ± 0.006, and the fractal dimensions, Df, varies from 1.825 ± 0.006 to 1.809 ± 0.008 according to the method of two-point correlation function. These values are also verified by the mass-radius method. The pattern with α and Df within these intervals was obtained by MC simulations to DLA model while the sticking probability, P was within the interval from 0.35 to 0.40 obtained by varying P (1-0.001). The results showed that the DLA model in this binary system is a possible mechanism for the formation of the ramified pattern of Ni-Cu within the Ni-rich base part of the Ni-Cu films due to the diffusive characteristics of Cu.

  3. Diffusion-Limited Aggregation with Anisotropic Sticking Probability: A Tentative Model for River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1986-10-01

    Diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model with anisotropic sticking probability Ps is computer-simulated on two dimensional square lattice. The cluster grows from a seed particle at the origin in the positive y area with the absorption-type boundary along x-axis. The cluster is found to grow anisotropically as R//˜Nν// and R\\bot˜Nν\\bot, where R\\bot and R// are the radii of gyration of the cluster along x- and y-axes, respectively, and N is the particle number constituting the cluster. The two exponents are shown to become assymptotically ν//{=}2/3, ν\\bot{=}1/3 whenever the sticking anisotropy exists. It is also found that the present model is fairly consistent with Hack’s law of river networks, suggesting that it is a good candidate of a prototype model for the evolution of the river network.

  4. Dendritic carbon architectures formed by nanotube core-directed diffusion-limited aggregation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Kong, Xiaohui

    2010-08-28

    A regular array of fractal patterns with macroscopic dendritic carbon architecture was prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The dendritic carbon architectures have micrometre-sized stems and hyperbranches evolved by lateral growth, and they are formed by diffusion-limited aggregation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticle building blocks generated from catalytic pyrolysis of toluene, which is directed by carbon nanotube cores, and followed by subsequent restructuring from surface to bulk. Incorporation of such proposed processes in Monte Carlo simulations generates dendritic architectures similar to the morphologies observed from the experiments. The findings provide direct information to the time resolved evolution of the morphology and microstructure of the dendritic carbon architecture, which mimic the nature behavior as snowflake attaching on the tree branches. Those will be important to understand the growth of vapor grown carbon fibers and carbon filamentous structures, and further possibility to control branching out of vapor grown carbon fibers. PMID:20607160

  5. A diffusion-limited aggregation model for the evolution of drainage networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1993-01-01

    We propose a modified diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model for the evolution of fluvial drainage networks. Random walkers are introduced randomly on a grid, and each two-dimensional random walk proceeds until the walker finds a drainage network on which to accrete. This model for headward growth of drainage networks generates drainage patterns remarkably similar to actual drainages. The model also predicts statistical features which agree with actual networks, including the frequency-order (bifurcation) ratio (R(sub b) = 3.98) and the stream length-order (R(sub r) = 2.09). Using the definition of network fractal dimension D = log R(sub b)/log R(sub r), we find that our DLA model gives D = 1.87, near the observed range of D approximately equal to 1.80 - 1.85.

  6. Scaling exponent of the maximum growth probability in diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mogens H; Mathiesen, Joachim; Procaccia, Itamar

    2003-04-01

    An early (and influential) scaling relation in the multifractal theory of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) is the Turkevich-Scher conjecture that relates the exponent alpha(min) that characterizes the "hottest" region of the harmonic measure and the fractal dimension D of the cluster, i.e., D=1+alpha(min). Due to lack of accurate direct measurements of both D and alpha(min), this conjecture could never be put to a serious test. Using the method of iterated conformal maps, D was recently determined as D=1.713+/-0.003. In this paper, we determine alpha(min) accurately with the result alpha(min)=0.665+/-0.004. We thus conclude that the Turkevich-Scher conjecture is incorrect for DLA. PMID:12786408

  7. Phase transition in diffusion limited aggregation with patchy particles in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartha, Moses J.; Sayeed, Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    The influence of patchy interactions on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) has been investigated by computer simulations. In this model, the adsorption of the particle is irreversible, but the adsorption occurs only when the 'sticky patch' makes contact with the sticky patch of a previously adsorbed particle. As we vary the patch size, growth rate of the cluster decreases, and below a well-defined critical patch size, pc the steady state growth rate goes to zero. The system reaches an absorbing phase producing a non-equilibrium continuous phase transition. The order parameter close to the critical value of the patch size shows a power law behavior ρ (∞) ∼(p -pc) β, where β = 0.2840. We have found that the value of the critical exponent convincingly shows that this transition in patchy DLA belongs to the directed percolation universality class.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on dielectrophoresis induced diffusion limited aggregation of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Faisal Khair

    Wires formed by diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) induced by dielectrophoresis (DEP) of gold nanoparticles were investigated as an effective sample preparation method for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Thymine was used as a test molecule and its SERS was measured to investigate the effectiveness of this technique that reproducibly resulted in x10 9 enhancement. It is known that molecules adsorbed near or at the surface of certain nanostructures produce strongly increased Raman signals and such phenomena is attributed to the concentration of electromagnetic (EM) optical fields at "hotspots" that usually occur at nanoscale junctions or clefts in metal nanostructures. Similarly, the enhancement obtained is attributed to the localized surface Plasmon's of the gold nanoparticles and the formation of "hotspots" in DEP wires. There are other methods that reproducibly yield in excess of x108 enhancement in SERS using tunable lasers and very elaborate Raman spectroscopy. The results presented here are obtained using a fixed laser excitation source at 785 nm and a simple spectrometer (5 cm-1 resolution).

  9. Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation crystal pattern formation in a reactive microemulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) crystal pattern formation in microemulsion consisting of water, styrene, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTACl), potassium persulphate and an oscillating Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactant is reported. A variety of spatiotemporal patterns like concentric wave, spatial (stripe) and chaotic patterns appear. A colloidal phase composed of numerous nano-sized particles has been observed. The solid phase nucleation has been found to occur in the colloidal phase and has been found to grow in a symmetric crystal pattern with the progress of the reaction finally exhibiting DLA structures. We show that the formation of a nanostructured DLA crystal pattern is governed by spatial structures emerging in the BZ microemulsion system. Without any spatial structure in the microemulsion system only hydrogel of high viscosity is formed. A nano-sized branched crystal pattern was formed with a particle diameter in the range of 60-100 nm, as evident by transmission electron microscope, powder x-ray diffraction and particle size analyser studies.

  10. Mean-field diffusion-limited aggregation: a "density" model for viscous fingering phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskiy, V A

    2001-12-01

    We explore a universal "density" formalism to describe nonequilibrium growth processes, specifically, the immiscible viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw cells (usually referred to as the Saffman-Taylor problem). For that we develop an alternative approach to the viscous fingering phenomena, whose basic concepts have been recently published in a Rapid Communication [Phys. Rev. E 63, 045305(R) (2001)]. This approach uses the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) paradigm as a core: we introduce a mean-field DLA generalization in stochastic and deterministic formulations. The stochastic model, a quasicontinuum DLA, simulates Monte Carlo patterns, which demonstrate a striking resemblance to natural Hele-Shaw fingers and, for steady-state growth regimes, follow precisely the Saffman-Taylor analytical solutions in channel and sector configurations. The relevant deterministic theory, a complete set of differential equations for a time development of density fields, is derived from that stochastic model. As a principal conclusion, we prove an asymptotic equivalency of both the stochastic and deterministic mean-field DLA formulations to the classic Saffman-Taylor hydrodynamics in terms of an interface evolution. PMID:11736272

  11. Scaling structure of the growth-probability distribution in diffusion-limited aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Y.; Sato, S.; Matsushita, M.

    1987-08-01

    In nonequilibrium growth such as diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), the growth-site probability distribution characterizes these growth processes. By solving the Laplace equation numerically, we calculate the growth probability Pg(x) at the perimeter site x of clusters for the DLA and its generalized version called the η model, and obtain the generalized dimension D(q) and the f-α spectrum proposed by Halsey et al.

    [Phys. Rev. A 33, 1141 (1986)]
    . It is found that D(q) depends strongly on q and that the f-α spectrum is continuous. Our results suggest that these growth processes cannot be described by a simple scaling theory with a few scaling exponents. This is in clear contrast to the Botet-Jullien model
    [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 1943 (1985)]
    which yields equilibrium patterns whose D(q) is constant. It is also found that the information dimension D(1) which represents the properties of the unscreened surface is in good agreement with our recent theory.

  12. Transition in the fractal properties from diffusion-limited aggregation to Laplacian growth via their generalization.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, H George E; Levermann, Anders; Procaccia, Itamar

    2002-07-01

    We study the fractal and multifractal properties (i.e., the generalized dimensions of the harmonic measure) of a two-parameter family of growth patterns that result from a growth model that interpolates between diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and Laplacian growth patterns in two dimensions. The two parameters are beta that determines the size of particles accreted to the interface, and C that measures the degree of coverage of the interface by each layer accreted to the growth pattern at every growth step. DLA and Laplacian growth are obtained at beta=0, C=0 and beta=2, C=1, respectively. The main purpose of this paper is to show that there exists a line in the beta-C phase diagram that separates fractal (D<2) from nonfractal (D=2) growth patterns. Moreover, Laplacian growth is argued to lie in the nonfractal part of the phase diagram. Some of our arguments are not rigorous, but together with the numerics they indicate this result rather strongly. We first consider the family of models obtained for beta=0, C>0, and derive for them a scaling relation D=2D(3). We then propose that this family has growth patterns for which D=2 for some C>C(cr), where C(cr) may be zero. Next we consider the whole beta-C phase diagram and define a line that separates two-dimensional growth patterns from fractal patterns with D<2. We explain that Laplacian growth lies in the region belonging to two-dimensional growth patterns, motivating the main conjecture of this paper, i.e., that Laplacian growth patterns are two dimensional. The meaning of this result is that the branches of Laplacian growth patterns have finite (and growing) area on scales much larger than any ultraviolet cutoff length. PMID:12241482

  13. Diffusion limited aggregation of particles with different sizes: Fractal dimension change by anisotropic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, F. L.; Mattos, O. A.; Amorin, V. S.; Souza, A. B.

    2015-07-01

    Clusters formation models have been extensively studied in literature, and one of the main task of this research area is the analysis of the particle aggregation processes. Some work support that the main characteristics of this processes are strictly correlated to the cluster morphology, for example in DLA. It is expected that in the DLA clusters formation with particles containing different sizes the modification of the aggregation processes can be responsible for changes in the DLA morphology. The present article is going to analyze the formation of DLA clusters of particles with different sizes and show that the aggregates obtained by this approach generate an angle selection mechanism on dendritic growth that influences the shielding effect of the DLA edge and affect the fractal dimension of the clusters.

  14. Traveling front solutions to directed diffusion-limited aggregation, digital search trees, and the Lempel-Ziv data compression algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Satya N.

    2003-08-01

    We use the traveling front approach to derive exact asymptotic results for the statistics of the number of particles in a class of directed diffusion-limited aggregation models on a Cayley tree. We point out that some aspects of these models are closely connected to two different problems in computer science, namely, the digital search tree problem in data structures and the Lempel-Ziv algorithm for data compression. The statistics of the number of particles studied here is related to the statistics of height in digital search trees which, in turn, is related to the statistics of the length of the longest word formed by the Lempel-Ziv algorithm. Implications of our results to these computer science problems are pointed out.

  15. Scaling and multiscaling behavior of the perimeter of a diffusion-limited aggregation generated by the Hastings-Levitov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, F.; Saberi, A. A.; Rouhani, S.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the scaling behavior of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) simulated by the Hastings-Levitov method. We obtain the fractal dimension of the clusters by direct analysis of the geometrical patterns, in good agreement with one obtained from an analytical approach. We compute the two-point density correlation function and we show that, in the large-size limit, it agrees with the obtained fractal dimension. These support the statistical agreement between the patterns and DLA clusters. We also investigate the scaling properties of various length scales and their fluctuations, related to the boundary of the cluster. We find that all of the length scales do not have a simple scaling with the same correction to scaling exponent. The fractal dimension of the perimeter is obtained equal to that of the cluster. The growth exponent is computed from the evolution of the interface width equal to β = 0.557(2). We also show that the perimeter of the DLA cluster has an asymptotic multiscaling behavior.

  16. Scaling and multiscaling behavior of the perimeter of a diffusion-limited aggregation generated by the Hastings-Levitov method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, F; Saberi, A A; Rouhani, S

    2009-09-16

    In this paper, we analyze the scaling behavior of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) simulated by the Hastings-Levitov method. We obtain the fractal dimension of the clusters by direct analysis of the geometrical patterns, in good agreement with one obtained from an analytical approach. We compute the two-point density correlation function and we show that, in the large-size limit, it agrees with the obtained fractal dimension. These support the statistical agreement between the patterns and DLA clusters. We also investigate the scaling properties of various length scales and their fluctuations, related to the boundary of the cluster. We find that all of the length scales do not have a simple scaling with the same correction to scaling exponent. The fractal dimension of the perimeter is obtained equal to that of the cluster. The growth exponent is computed from the evolution of the interface width equal to β = 0.557(2). We also show that the perimeter of the DLA cluster has an asymptotic multiscaling behavior. PMID:21832341

  17. Test of multiscaling in a diffusion-limited-aggregation model using an off-lattice killing-free algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, Anton Yu.; Shchur, Lev N.

    2006-01-01

    We test the multiscaling issue of diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) clusters using a modified algorithm. This algorithm eliminates killing the particles at the death circle. Instead, we return them to the birth circle at a random relative angle taken from the evaluated distribution. In addition, we use a two-level hierarchical memory model that allows using large steps in conjunction with an off-lattice realization of the model. Our algorithm still seems to stay in the framework of the original DLA model. We present an accurate estimate of the fractal dimensions based on the data for a hundred clusters with 50 million particles each. We find that multiscaling cannot be ruled out. We also find that the fractal dimension is a weak self-averaging quantity. In addition, the fractal dimension, if calculated using the harmonic measure, is a nonmonotonic function of the cluster radius. We argue that the controversies in the data interpretation can be due to the weak self-averaging and the influence of intrinsic noise.

  18. Average shape of transport-limited aggregates.

    PubMed

    Davidovitch, Benny; Choi, Jaehyuk; Bazant, Martin Z

    2005-08-12

    We study the relation between stochastic and continuous transport-limited growth models. We derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for the average shape of stochastic aggregates, whose mean-field approximation is the corresponding continuous equation. Focusing on the advection-diffusion-limited aggregation (ADLA) model, we show that the average shape of the stochastic growth is similar, but not identical, to the corresponding continuous dynamics. Similar results should apply to DLA, thus explaining the known discrepancies between average DLA shapes and viscous fingers in a channel geometry. PMID:16196793

  19. Average Shape of Transport-Limited Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovitch, Benny; Choi, Jaehyuk; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2005-08-01

    We study the relation between stochastic and continuous transport-limited growth models. We derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for the average shape of stochastic aggregates, whose mean-field approximation is the corresponding continuous equation. Focusing on the advection-diffusion-limited aggregation (ADLA) model, we show that the average shape of the stochastic growth is similar, but not identical, to the corresponding continuous dynamics. Similar results should apply to DLA, thus explaining the known discrepancies between average DLA shapes and viscous fingers in a channel geometry.

  20. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  1. Fractal aggregation growth and the surrounding diffusion field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Satoru; Saito, Yukio; Uwaha, Makio

    2005-10-01

    Silver metal trees grow and form a forest at the edge of a Cu plate in the AgNO3 water solution in a two-dimensional ( d=2) cell. The local structure of the forest is similar to that of the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), but the whole pattern approaches a uniform structure. Its growth dynamics is characterized by the fractal dimension Df of DLA. Time-dependence of the tip height is found to satisfy the scaling relation with the solute concentration c, and the asymptotic growth velocity V is consistent with the power law V˜c expected from the theory. The thickness ξc of the diffusion boundary layer is measured by the Michelson interferometry, and the scaling relation is also confirmed.

  2. Diffusion Limited Aggregation on a Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamini, Itai; Yadin, Ariel

    2008-04-01

    We consider the DLA process on a cylinder G × {mathbb{N}} . It is shown that this process “grows arms”, provided that the base graph G has small enough mixing time. Specifically, if the mixing time of G is at most log^{(2-ɛ)}left\\vert G right\\vert , the time it takes the cluster to reach the m th layer of the cylinder is at most of order m \\cdot left\\vert G right\\vert/loglogleft\\vert G right\\vert . In particular we get examples of infinite Cayley graphs of degree 5, for which the DLA cluster on these graphs has arbitrarily small density. In addition, we provide an upper bound on the rate at which the “arms” grow. This bound is valid for a large class of base graphs G, including discrete tori of dimension at least 3. It is also shown that for any base graph G, the density of the DLA process on a G-cylinder is related to the rate at which the arms of the cluster grow. This implies that for any vertex transitive G, the density of DLA on a G-cylinder is bounded by 2/3.

  3. Flux-limited diffusion with relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1983-03-15

    A recently reported flux-limited diffusion theory is extended to include relativistic terms, correct to first order in the fluid velocity. We show that this diffusion theory is fully flux limited, and yields the correct result for the radiative flux in the classical diffusion limit, namely a Fick's law component plus a v/c convective term.

  4. Diffusion and deformations of single hydra cells in cellular aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Rieu, J P; Upadhyaya, A; Glazier, J A; Ouchi, N B; Sawada, Y

    2000-01-01

    Cell motion within cellular aggregates consists of both random and coherent components. We used confocal microscopy to study the center of mass displacements and deformations of single endodermal Hydra cells in two kinds of cellular aggregates, ectodermal and endodermal. We first carefully characterize the center of mass displacements using standard statistical analysis. In both aggregates, cells perform a persistent random walk, with the diffusion constant smaller in the more cohesive endodermal aggregate. We show that a simple parametric method is able to describe cell deformations and relate them to displacements. These deformations are random, with their amplitude and direction uncorrelated with the center of mass motion. Unlike for an isolated cell on a substrate, the random forces exerted by the surrounding cells predominate over the deformation of the cell itself, causing the displacements of a cell within an aggregate. PMID:11023896

  5. Diffusion, aggregation, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Eaton, John K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-01

    The effects of nanoparticle aggregation and diffusion are difficult to separate using most nanofluid thermal conductivity data, for which the temperature dependence is collected sequentially. The present work captures the instantaneous temperature-dependent thermal conductivity using cross-sectional infrared microscopy and tracks the effects of aggregation and diffusion over time. The resulting data are strongly influenced by spatial and temperature variations in particle size and concentration and are interpreted using a Monte Carlo simulation and rate equations for particle and heat transport. These experiments improve our understanding of nanofluid behavior in practical systems including microscale heat exchangers.

  6. 47 CFR 20.6 - CMRS spectrum aggregation limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CMRS (see 47 CFR 20.9) shall have an attributable interest in a total of more than 55 MHz of licensed... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. 20.6 Section... COMMERCIAL MOBILE SERVICES § 20.6 CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. (a) Spectrum limitation. No licensee...

  7. 47 CFR 20.6 - CMRS spectrum aggregation limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CMRS (see 47 CFR 20.9) shall have an attributable interest in a total of more than 55 MHz of licensed... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. 20.6 Section... COMMERCIAL MOBILE SERVICES § 20.6 CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. (a) Spectrum limitation. No licensee...

  8. 47 CFR 20.6 - CMRS spectrum aggregation limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CMRS (see 47 CFR 20.9) shall have an attributable interest in a total of more than 55 MHz of licensed... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. 20.6 Section... COMMERCIAL MOBILE SERVICES § 20.6 CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. (a) Spectrum limitation. No licensee...

  9. 47 CFR 20.6 - CMRS spectrum aggregation limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CMRS (see 47 CFR 20.9) shall have an attributable interest in a total of more than 55 MHz of licensed... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. 20.6 Section... COMMERCIAL MOBILE SERVICES § 20.6 CMRS spectrum aggregation limit. (a) Spectrum limitation. No licensee...

  10. Hydration and diffusion dynamics shape microbial community composition and function in soil aggregates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Natural variations in soil hydration conditions (rainfall, evaporation, root water uptake) affect gas and nutrient diffusion and soil microbial community composition and function. The conditions in soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into the core often containing organic carbon (as aggregation agent). The constantly varying soil hydration conditions affect the spatial extent of anoxic conditions in aggregates and thus the sized and self-organization of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. We developed an artificial soil aggregate composed of 3-D angular pore network combined with individual based models of motile microbial cells that grow, move, intercept nutrients and are inhibited by presence or absence of oxygen. The hydration conditions in the model aggregate affect community size, spatial segregation, and growth rates. The opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon were essential to maintenance of aerobic and anaerobic communities within an aggregate (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). Cohabited soil aggregates promoted onset of anaerobic conditions by oxygen consumption by peripheral aerobes. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with experimental data. Results illustrate how aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities are activated by certain hydration conditions that enhance either nitrogen losses or decomposition of organic matter both contributing to GHG emissions.

  11. Fluctuations and discreteness in diffusion limited growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devita, Jason P.

    This thesis explores the effects of fluctuations and discreteness on the growth of physical systems where diffusion plays an important role. It focuses on three related problems, all dependent on diffusion in a fundamental way, but each with its own unique challenges. With diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), the relationship between noisy and noise-free Laplacian growth is probed by averaging the results of noisy growth. By doing so in a channel geometry, we are able to compare to known solutions of the noise-free problem. We see that while the two are comparable, there are discrepancies which are not well understood. In molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), we create efficient computational algorithms, by replacing random walkers (diffusing atoms) with approximately equivalent processes. In one case, the atoms are replaced by a continuum field. Solving for the dynamics of the field yields---in an average sense---the dynamics of the atoms. In the other case, the atoms are treated as individual random-walking particles, but the details of the dynamics are changed to an (approximately) equivalent set of dynamics. This approach involves allowing adatoms to take long hops. We see approximately an order of magnitude speed up for simulating island dynamics, mound growth, and Ostwald ripening. Some ideas from the study of MBE are carried over to the study of front propagation in reaction-diffusion systems. Many of the analytic results about front propagation are derived from continuum models. It is unclear, however, that these results accurately describe the properties of a discrete system. It is reasonable to think that discrete systems will converge to the continuum results when sufficiently many particles are included. However, computational evidence of this is difficult to obtain, since the interesting properties tend to depend on a power law of the logarithm of the number of particles. Thus, the number of particles included in simulations must be exceedingly large. By

  12. Field theory and diffusion creep predictions in polycrystalline aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, A.; Busso, E. P.; Forest, S.

    2015-07-01

    In polycrystals, stress-driven vacancy diffusion at high homologous temperatures leads to inelastic deformation. In this work, a novel continuum mechanics framework is proposed to describe the strain fields resulting from such a diffusion-driven process in a polycrystalline aggregate where grains and grain boundaries are explicitly considered. The choice of an anisotropic eigenstrain in the grain boundary region provides the driving force for the diffusive creep processes. The corresponding inelastic strain rate is shown to be related to the gradient of the vacancy flux. Dislocation driven deformation is then introduced as an additional mechanism, through standard crystal plasticity constitutive equations. The fully coupled diffusion-mechanical model is implemented into the finite element method and then used to describe the biaxial creep behaviour of FCC polycrystalline aggregates. The corresponding results revealed for the first time that such a coupled diffusion-stress approach, involving the gradient of the vacancy flux, can accurately predict the well-known macroscopic strain rate dependency on stress and grain size in the diffusion creep regime. They also predict strongly heterogeneous viscoplastic strain fields, especially close to grain boundaries triple junctions. Finally, a smooth transition from Herring and Coble to dislocation creep behaviour is predicted and compared to experimental results for copper.

  13. 77 FR 31767 - Aggregation, Position Limits for Futures and Swaps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... approach best resolves those issues while maintaining a bright-line aggregation test?'' \\67\\ See 76 FR... Contracts'').\\4\\ \\4\\ See Position Limits for Futures and Swaps, 76 FR 71626, Nov. 18, 2011. The regulations... numerical level of the non-spot month limits based upon a formula provided in part 151.\\12\\ \\9\\ See 76 FR...

  14. Hydration and diffusion processes shape microbial community organization and function in model soil aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2015-12-01

    The constantly changing soil hydration status affects gas and nutrient diffusion through soil pores and thus the functioning of soil microbial communities. The conditions within soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into their core, and the presence of organic carbon often acting as binding agent. We developed a model for microbial life in simulated soil aggregates comprising of 3-D angular pore network model (APNM) that mimics soil hydraulic and transport properties. Within these APNM, we introduced individual motile (flagellated) microbial cells with different physiological traits that grow, disperse, and respond to local nutrients and oxygen concentrations. The model quantifies the dynamics and spatial extent of anoxic regions that vary with hydration conditions, and their role in shaping microbial community size and activity and the spatial (self) segregation of anaerobes and aerobes. Internal carbon source and opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon within an aggregate were essential to emergence of stable coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic communities (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). The model illustrates a range of hydration conditions that promote or suppress denitrification or decomposition of organic matter and thus affect soil GHG emissions. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with limited experimental data. These limited tests support the dynamic modeling approach whereby microbial community size, composition, and spatial arrangement emerge from internal interactions within soil aggregates. The upscaling of the results to a population of aggregates of different sizes embedded in a soil profile is underway.

  15. Attachment limited versus diffusion limited nucleation of organic molecules: Hexaphenyl on sputter-modified mica.

    PubMed

    Tumbek, L; Winkler, A

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation and growth of organic molecules is usually discussed in the framework of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). In this letter we demonstrate for the rod-like organic molecules hexaphenyl (6P) on sputter-modified mica, that under specific experimental conditions the nucleation has to be described by attachment limited aggregation (ALA). The crucial parameter for the growth mode is the roughness of the substrate surface, as induced by ion sputtering. With decreasing surface roughness the diffusion probability of the molecules increases and the growth mode changes from DLA to ALA. This was derived from the deposition rate dependence of the island density. A critical size of i = 7 molecules was determined for the nucleation of 6P on a moderately sputtered mica surface. PMID:23470898

  16. Attachment limited versus diffusion limited nucleation of organic molecules: Hexaphenyl on sputter-modified mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumbek, L.; Winkler, A.

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation and growth of organic molecules is usually discussed in the framework of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). In this letter we demonstrate for the rod-like organic molecules hexaphenyl (6P) on sputter-modified mica, that under specific experimental conditions the nucleation has to be described by attachment limited aggregation (ALA). The crucial parameter for the growth mode is the roughness of the substrate surface, as induced by ion sputtering. With decreasing surface roughness the diffusion probability of the molecules increases and the growth mode changes from DLA to ALA. This was derived from the deposition rate dependence of the island density. A critical size of i = 7 molecules was determined for the nucleation of 6P on a moderately sputtered mica surface.

  17. Intramolecular diffusion controls aggregation of the PAPf39 peptide.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kinshuk R; French, Kinsley C; Tzul, Franco O; Makhatadze, George I; Lapidus, Lisa J

    2016-09-01

    The 39-residue fragment of human prostatic acidic phosphatase (PAP) is found in high concentrations in semen and easily form fibrils. Previous work has shown that fibrillization is accelerated with a deletion of the first 8, mostly charged residues and it was hypothesized that fibrillization depended on the dynamics of these peptides. To test this hypothesis we have measured the intramolecular diffusion of the full length and 8-residue deletion peptides at two different pHs and found a correlation with fibrillization lag time. These results can be explained by a simple kinetic model of the early stages of aggregation in which oligomerization is controlled by the rate of peptide reconfiguration. PMID:27393931

  18. 42 CFR 441.354 - Aggregate projected expenditure limit (APEL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... approval; however, CMS makes final calculations of the aggregate limit after base data have been verified... section, the term base year means— (1) Federal fiscal year (FFY) 1987 (that is, October 1, 1986 through... categories during FFY 1987, the base year means FFY 1989 (that is, October 1, 1988 through September 30,...

  19. Diffusion limitations in Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.F.M.; Van'tHoog, A.C.; Minderhoud, J.K.; Sie, S.T. . Lab.)

    1989-07-01

    The extent of diffusion limitations in the catalytic conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons by the Fischer-Tropsch reaction has been established for a number of iron- and cobalt-based catalysts. The studies were performed in a fixed-bed microreactor system at temperatures in the range 473-523 {Kappa}. Variation of catalyst particle size in the range 0.2.-2.6 mm shows that the conversion of synthesis gas decreases considerably when the average particle size is increased. The effects of variation of particle size and pore diameter have been quantified with the Thiele model for diffusion limitations. Evidence has accumulated that the limited mobility of reactant molecules in the liquid-filled pores of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is the main cause of retardation of the reaction rates. The experimentally determined reaction rates with various catalysts operated under different conditions show an excellent fit with the theoretical model.

  20. Localization of Protein Aggregation in Escherichia coli Is Governed by Diffusion and Nucleoid Macromolecular Crowding Effect

    PubMed Central

    Coquel, Anne-Sophie; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Primet, Mael; Demarez, Alice; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Julou, Thomas; Moisan, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli) where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian). Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids) are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of “soft” intracellular structuring (based on macromolecular

  1. Kinetic theory of diffusion-limited nucleation.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T; Bonvalet, M; Blavette, D

    2016-05-28

    We examine binary nucleation in the size and composition space {R,c} using the formalism of the multivariable theory [N. V. Alekseechkin, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124512 (2006)]. We show that the variable c drops out of consideration for very large curvature of the new phase Gibbs energy with composition. Consequently nuclei around the critical size have the critical composition, which is derived from the condition of criticality for the canonical variables and is found not to depend on surface tension. In this case, nucleation kinetics can be investigated in the size space only. Using macroscopic kinetics, we determine the general expression for the condensation rate when growth is limited by bulk diffusion, which accounts for both diffusion and capillarity and exhibits a different dependence with the critical size, as compared with the interface-limited regime. This new expression of the condensation rate for bulk diffusion-limited nucleation is the counterpart of the classical interface-limited result. We then extend our analysis to multicomponent solutions. PMID:27250310

  2. Kinetic theory of diffusion-limited nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, T.; Bonvalet, M.; Blavette, D.

    2016-05-01

    We examine binary nucleation in the size and composition space {R,c} using the formalism of the multivariable theory [N. V. Alekseechkin, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124512 (2006)]. We show that the variable c drops out of consideration for very large curvature of the new phase Gibbs energy with composition. Consequently nuclei around the critical size have the critical composition, which is derived from the condition of criticality for the canonical variables and is found not to depend on surface tension. In this case, nucleation kinetics can be investigated in the size space only. Using macroscopic kinetics, we determine the general expression for the condensation rate when growth is limited by bulk diffusion, which accounts for both diffusion and capillarity and exhibits a different dependence with the critical size, as compared with the interface-limited regime. This new expression of the condensation rate for bulk diffusion-limited nucleation is the counterpart of the classical interface-limited result. We then extend our analysis to multicomponent solutions.

  3. Diffusion limitations in Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.F.M.; Sie, S.T. Badhuisweg 3, 1031 CM Amsterdam )

    1988-01-01

    Indirect conversion of natural hydrocarbon resources such as natural gas into transportation fuels or chemicals usually involves the conversion to carbon monoxide and hydrogen (synthesis gas), followed by a catalytic conversion to the desired products via e.g. the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. In a fixed-bed mode of operation, the FT catalyst generally consists of particles of a few mm in size, for pressure-drop and heat-transfer considerations. To investigate whether diffusion limitations inside larger catalyst particles play a role during the synthesis reaction, the authors have made an extensive study using a number of iron- and cobalt-based catalysts, in which they have evaluated and quantified the effects of catalyst particle size and pore diameter on reaction rates. The effects due to variation of particle size and pore diameter have been quantified with the Thiele model for diffusion limitations.

  4. Diffusion-limited hyperbranched polymers with substitution effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; He, Xuehao; Chen, Yu

    2011-03-14

    Highly branched structure has the essential influence on macromolecular property and functionality in physics and chemistry. In this work, we proposed a diffusion-limited reaction model with the consideration of macromolecular unit relaxations and substitution effect of monomers to study the structure of hyperbranched polymers prepared by slow monomer addition to a core molecule. The exponential relationship (R(g) ∼ N(λ)) between the radius of gyration R(g) and the degree of polymerization N, was systematically analyzed at various branching degrees. It is shown that the effective exponent λ(eff) decreases at lower N and but increases toward that of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) clusters (λ(DLA) = 0.4) with the degree of polymerization increasing. The substitution effect of monomers in reaction strongly influences the evolution pathway of λ(eff). With the static light scattering technique, the fractal property of internal chains was further calculated. A general law about the radial distribution of the units of diffusion-limited hyperbranched polymers was found that, at smaller reactivity ratio k(12), the radial density of all monomer units D(A) declines from the center region to the peripheral layer revealing the dense core structure; however, at larger k(12), the density distribution shows a loose-dense-loose structure. These structural characteristics are helpful to deeply understand the property of hyperbranched polymers. PMID:21405187

  5. Shape and scale dependent diffusivity of colloidal nanoclusters and aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcanzare, M. M. T.; Ollila, S. T. T.; Thakore, V.; Laganapan, A. M.; Videcoq, A.; Cerbelaud, M.; Ferrando, R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    The diffusion of colloidal nanoparticles and nanomolecular aggregates, which plays an important role in various biophysical and physicochemical phenomena, is currently under intense study. Here, we examine the shape and size dependent diffusion of colloidal nano- particles, fused nanoclusters and nanoaggregates using a hybrid fluctuating lattice Boltzmann-Molecular Dynamics method. We use physically realistic parameters characteristic of an aqueous solution, with explicitly implemented microscopic no-slip and full-slip boundary conditions. Results from nanocolloids below 10 nm in radii demonstrate how the volume fraction of the hydrodynamic boundary layer influences diffusivities. Full-slip colloids are found to diffuse faster than no-slip particles. We also characterize the shape dependent anisotropy of the diffusion coefficients of nanoclusters through the Green-Kubo relation. Finally, we study the size dependence of the diffusion of nanoaggregates comprising N ≤ 108 monomers and demonstrate that the diffusion coefficient approaches the continuum scaling limit of N-1/3.

  6. Diffusion-limited deposition of dipolar particles.

    PubMed

    de los Santos, F; Tavares, J M; Tasinkevych, M; Telo da Gama, M M

    2004-06-01

    Deposits of dipolar particles are investigated by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We found that the effect of the interactions is described by an initial, nonuniversal, scaling regime characterized by orientationally ordered deposits. In the dipolar regime, the order and geometry of the clusters depend on the strength of the interactions and the magnetic properties are tunable by controlling the growth conditions. At later stages, the growth is dominated by thermal effects and the diffusion-limited universal regime obtains, at finite temperatures. At low temperatures the crossover size increases exponentially as T decreases and at T=0 only the dipolar regime is observed. PMID:15244567

  7. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation/dissolution: Solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2011-01-28

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid-liquid interface posses similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured , close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) clusters.

  8. Fireproof impact limiter aggregate packaging inside shipping containers

    DOEpatents

    Byington, Gerald A.; Oakes, Jr., Raymon Edgar; Feldman, Matthew Rookes

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a product and a process for making a fireproof, impact limiter, homogeneous aggregate material for casting inside a hazardous material shipping container, or a double-contained Type-B nuclear shipping container. The homogeneous aggregate material is prepared by mixing inorganic compounds with water, pouring the mixture into the void spaces between an inner storage containment vessel and an outer shipping container, vibrating the mixture inside the shipping container, with subsequent curing, baking, and cooling of the mixture to form a solidified material which encapsulates an inner storage containment vessel inside an outer shipping container. The solidified material forms a protective enclosure around an inner storage containment vessel which may store hazardous, toxic, or radioactive material. The solidified material forms a homogeneous fire-resistant material that does not readily transfer heat, and provides general shock and specific point-impact protection, providing protection to the interior storage containment vessel. The material is low cost, may contain neutron absorbing compounds, and is easily formed into a variety of shapes to fill the interior void spaces of shipping containers.

  9. Ion Specificity in Protein Aggregation Predicted from Diffusivity Measurements in Stable Protein Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Jonathan; San Miguel, Adriana; Bommarius, Andreas; Behrens, Sven

    2011-03-01

    The aggregation of therapeutic proteins in solution represents a major challenge in pharmaceutical development, as the mid- and long-term stability of these proteins is crucial for their efficacy and for compliance with FDA requirements. Monitoring slow aggregation experimentally is notoriously time-consuming, yet often unavoidable, since no theory with predictive power is currently available. In the present work, diffusion and aggregation kinetics of the globular model proteins lysozyme and BSA were studied in sodium-salt solutions of different composition and ionic strength using dynamic light scattering. We find a strong correlation between the concentration dependent protein diffusivity in stable solutions and the kinetics of protein aggregation in unstable solutions of similar composition but higher salt content. Our findings suggest a fast and convenient new way to assess a protein's specific tendency to aggregate in different types of electrolytes and buffer solutions.

  10. Tuning the thermal diffusivity of silver based nanofluids by controlling nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Agresti, Filippo; Barison, Simona; Battiston, Simone; Pagura, Cesare; Colla, Laura; Fedele, Laura; Fabrizio, Monica

    2013-09-13

    With the aim of preparing stable nanofluids for heat exchange applications and to study the effect of surfactant on the aggregation of nanoparticles and thermal diffusivity, stable silver colloids were synthesized in water by a green method, reducing AgNO₃ with fructose in the presence of poly-vinylpyrollidone (PVP) of various molecular weights. A silver nanopowder was precipitated from the colloids and re-dispersed at 4 vol% in deionized water. The Ag colloids were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, combined dynamic light scattering and ζ-potential measurements, and laser flash thermal diffusivity. The Ag nanopowders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. It was found that the molecular weight of PVP strongly affects the ζ-potential and the aggregation of nanoparticles, thereby affecting the thermal diffusivity of the obtained colloids. In particular, it was observed that on increasing the molecular weight of PVP the absolute value of the ζ-potential is reduced, leading to increased aggregation of nanoparticles. A clear relation was identified between thermal diffusivity and aggregation, showing higher thermal diffusivity for nanofluids having higher aggregation. A maximum improvement of thermal diffusivity by about 12% was found for nanofluids prepared with PVP having higher molecular weight. PMID:23942258

  11. Tuning the thermal diffusivity of silver based nanofluids by controlling nanoparticle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agresti, Filippo; Barison, Simona; Battiston, Simone; Pagura, Cesare; Colla, Laura; Fedele, Laura; Fabrizio, Monica

    2013-09-01

    With the aim of preparing stable nanofluids for heat exchange applications and to study the effect of surfactant on the aggregation of nanoparticles and thermal diffusivity, stable silver colloids were synthesized in water by a green method, reducing AgNO3 with fructose in the presence of poly-vinylpyrollidone (PVP) of various molecular weights. A silver nanopowder was precipitated from the colloids and re-dispersed at 4 vol% in deionized water. The Ag colloids were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, combined dynamic light scattering and ζ-potential measurements, and laser flash thermal diffusivity. The Ag nanopowders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. It was found that the molecular weight of PVP strongly affects the ζ-potential and the aggregation of nanoparticles, thereby affecting the thermal diffusivity of the obtained colloids. In particular, it was observed that on increasing the molecular weight of PVP the absolute value of the ζ-potential is reduced, leading to increased aggregation of nanoparticles. A clear relation was identified between thermal diffusivity and aggregation, showing higher thermal diffusivity for nanofluids having higher aggregation. A maximum improvement of thermal diffusivity by about 12% was found for nanofluids prepared with PVP having higher molecular weight.

  12. Grain boundary diffusion of oxygen, potassium and calcium in natural and hot-pressed feldspar aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farver, John R.; Yund, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Grain boundary diffusion rates of oxygen, potassium and calcium in fine-grained feldspar aggregates were determined experimentally. The starting materials were a natural albite rock from the Tanco pegmatite and aggregates hot-pressed from fragments of Amelia albite or Ab, Or and An composition glasses. The technique employed isotopic tracers (18O, 41K, 42Ca) either evaporated onto the surface or in an aqueous solution surrounding the sample, and depth profiling using an ion microprobe (SIMS). From the depth profiles, the product of the grain boundary diffusion coefficient (D') and effective boundary width (δ) was calculated using numerical solutions to the appropriate diffusion equation. The experimental reproducibility of D'δ is a factor of 3. A separate determination of D' independent of δ yields an effective grain boundary width of ˜3 nm, consistent with high resolution TEM observations of a physical grain boundary width <5 nm. Oxygen (as molecular water) grain boundary diffusion rates were determined in the Ab and Or aggregates at 450°-800°C and 100 MPa (hydrothermal), potassium rates in Or aggregates at 450°-700°C both at 0.1 MPa (in air) and at 100 MPa (hydrothermal), and calcium rates in An aggregates at 700°-1100°C and 0.1 MPa (in air). Oxygen grain boundary diffusion rates are similar in all three of the Ab aggregates and in the Or aggregate. Potassium and oxygen depth profiles measured in the same samples yield different D'δ values, confirming a diffusional transport mechanism. Potassium diffusion in the Or aggregate has a greater activation energy (216 vs 78 kJ/mol) than oxygen, and the Arrhenius relations cross at ˜625°C. Potassium D'δ values in Or aggregates are about a factor of five greater in hydrothermal experiments at 100 MPa than in experiments at 0.1 MPa in air. Calcium grain boundary diffusion rates in An aggregates are 4 to 5 orders of magnitude slower than potassium in Or and have a greater (291 kJ/mol) activation energy. This

  13. Some free boundary problems involving non-local diffusion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, José Antonio; Vázquez, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the study of evolution processes involving degenerate parabolic equations which may exhibit free boundaries. The equations we have selected follow two recent trends in diffusion theory: considering anomalous diffusion with long-range effects, which leads to fractional operators or other operators involving kernels with large tails; and the combination of diffusion and aggregation effects, leading to delicate long-term equilibria whose description is still incipient. PMID:26261360

  14. Public Good Diffusion Limits Microbial Mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rajita; Korolev, Kirill S.

    2015-04-01

    Standard game theory cannot describe microbial interactions mediated by diffusible molecules. Nevertheless, we show that one can still model microbial dynamics using game theory with parameters renormalized by diffusion. Contrary to expectations, greater sharing of metabolites reduces the strength of cooperation and leads to species extinction via a nonequilibrium phase transition. We report analytic results for the critical diffusivity and the length scale of species intermixing. Species producing slower public good is favored by selection when fitness saturates with nutrient concentration.

  15. A numerical study of soot aggregate formation in a laminar coflow diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Thomson, M.J.; Guo, H.; Liu, F.; Smallwood, G.J.

    2009-03-15

    Soot aggregate formation in a two-dimensional laminar coflow ethylene/air diffusion flame is studied with a pyrene-based soot model, a detailed sectional aerosol dynamics model, and a detailed radiation model. The chemical kinetic mechanism describes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation up to pyrene, the dimerization of which is assumed to lead to soot nucleation. The growth and oxidation of soot particles are characterized by the HACA surface mechanism and pyrene-soot surface condensation. The mass range of the solid soot phase is divided into thirty-five discrete sections and two equations are solved in each section to model the formation of the fractal-like soot aggregates. The coagulation model is improved by implementing the aggregate coagulation efficiency. Several physical processes that may cause sub-unitary aggregate coagulation efficiency are discussed. Their effects on aggregate structure are numerically investigated. The average number of primary soot particles per soot aggregate n{sub p} is found to be a strong function of the aggregate coagulation efficiency. Compared to the available experimental data, n{sub p} is well reproduced with a constant 20% aggregate coagulation efficiency. The predicted axial velocity, OH mole fraction, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} mole fraction are validated against experimental data in the literature. Reasonable agreements are obtained. Finally, a sensitivity study of the effects of particle coalescence on soot volume fraction and soot aggregate nanostructure is conducted using a coalescence cutoff diameter method. (author)

  16. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  17. Asymptotic Diffusion-Limit Accuracy of Sn Angular Differencing Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Morel, J E; Chang, J H

    2009-11-05

    In a previous paper, Morel and Montry used a Galerkin-based diffusion analysis to define a particular weighted diamond angular discretization for S{sub n}n calculations in curvilinear geometries. The weighting factors were chosen to ensure that the Galerkin diffusion approximation was preserved, which eliminated the discrete-ordinates flux dip. It was also shown that the step and diamond angular differencing schemes, which both suffer from the flux dip, do not preserve the diffusion approximation in the Galerkin sense. In this paper we re-derive the Morel and Montry weighted diamond scheme using a formal asymptotic diffusion-limit analysis. The asymptotic analysis yields more information than the Galerkin analysis and demonstrates that the step and diamond schemes do in fact formally preserve the diffusion limit to leading order, while the Morel and Montry weighted diamond scheme preserves it to first order, which is required for full consistency in this limit. Nonetheless, the fact that the step and diamond differencing schemes preserve the diffusion limit to leading order suggests that the flux dip should disappear as the diffusion limit is approached for these schemes. Computational results are presented that confirm this conjecture. We further conjecture that preserving the Galerkin diffusion approximation is equivalent to preserving the asymptotic diffusion limit to first order.

  18. Two solvable systems of coagulation equations with limited aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoin, Jean

    2009-11-01

    We consider two simple models for the formation of polymers where at the initial time, each monomer has a certain number of potential links (called arms in the text) that are consumed when aggregations occur. Loosely speaking, this imposes restrictions on the number of aggregations. The dynamics of concentrations are governed by modifications of Smoluchowski's coagulation equations. Applying classical techniques based on generating functions, resolution of quasi-linear PDE's, and Lagrange inversion formula, we obtain explicit solutions to these non-linear systems of ODE's. We also discuss the asymptotic behavior of the solutions and point at some connexions with certain known solutions to Smoluchowski's coagulation equations with additive or multiplicative kernels.

  19. 12 CFR 723.17 - Are there any exceptions to the aggregate loan limit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are there any exceptions to the aggregate loan limit? 723.17 Section 723.17 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS MEMBER BUSINESS LOANS § 723.17 Are there any exceptions to the aggregate loan limit? There are three circumstances where a...

  20. Defining the Limits: Protein Aggregation and Toxicity In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William M.; Klaips, Courtney L.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2014-01-01

    The proper folding of proteins to their functional forms is essential to cellular homeostasis. Perhaps not surprisingly, cells have evolved multiple pathways, some overlapping and others complementary, to resolve misfolded proteins when they arise, ranging from refolding through the action of molecular chaperones to elimination through regulated proteolytic mechanisms. These protein quality control pathways are sufficient, under normal conditions, to maintain a functioning proteome, but in response to diverse environmental, genetic, and/or stochastic events, protein misfolding exceeds the corrective capacity of these pathways, leading to the accumulation of aggregates and ultimately toxicity. Particularly devastating examples of these effects include certain neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s Disease, which are associated with the expansion of polyglutamine tracks in proteins. In these cases, protein misfolding and aggregation are clear contributors to pathogenesis, but uncovering the precise mechanistic links between the two events remains an area of active research. Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other model systems have uncovered previously unanticipated complexity in aggregation pathways, the contributions of protein quality control processes to them, and the cellular perturbations that result from them. Together these studies suggest that aggregate interactions and localization, rather than their size, are the crucial considerations in understanding the molecular basis of toxicity. PMID:24766537

  1. 42 CFR 441.354 - Aggregate projected expenditure limit (APEL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... individuals age 65 or older furnished as an alternative to care in an SNF or ICF (NF effective October 1, 1990... × (1+Z), where P=The aggregate amount of the State's medical assistance under title XIX for SNF and ICF... adjusted) for SNF services, ICF-other services, and mental health facility services for the base...

  2. 42 CFR 441.354 - Aggregate projected expenditure limit (APEL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... individuals age 65 or older furnished as an alternative to care in an SNF or ICF (NF effective October 1, 1990... × (1+Z), where P=The aggregate amount of the State's medical assistance under title XIX for SNF and ICF... adjusted) for SNF services, ICF-other services, and mental health facility services for the base...

  3. 42 CFR 441.354 - Aggregate projected expenditure limit (APEL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individuals age 65 or older furnished as an alternative to care in an SNF or ICF (NF effective October 1, 1990... × (1+Z), where P=The aggregate amount of the State's medical assistance under title XIX for SNF and ICF... adjusted) for SNF services, ICF-other services, and mental health facility services for the base...

  4. 42 CFR 441.354 - Aggregate projected expenditure limit (APEL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individuals age 65 or older furnished as an alternative to care in an SNF or ICF (NF effective October 1, 1990... × (1+Z), where P=The aggregate amount of the State's medical assistance under title XIX for SNF and ICF... adjusted) for SNF services, ICF-other services, and mental health facility services for the base...

  5. Invisibility cloaking in the diffusive-light limit (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittny, Robert; Kadic, Muamer; Wegener, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Albert Einstein's theory of relativity imposes stringent limitations to making macroscopic objects invisible with respect to electromagnetic light waves propagating in vacuum. These limitations are not relevant though for propagation of light in diffusive media like fog or milk because the effective energy speed is significantly lower than in vacuum due to multiple scattering events. Here, by exploiting the close mathematical analogy between the electrostatic or near-field limit of optics on the one hand and light diffusion on the other hand, we design, fabricate, and characterize simple core-shell cloaking structures for diffusive light propagation in cylindrical and spherical geometry.

  6. The effects of nutrient chemotaxis on bacterial aggregation patterns with non-linear degenerate cross diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, J. Francisco; Málaga, Carlos; Plaza, Ramón G.

    2013-11-01

    This paper studies a reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis model for bacterial aggregation patterns on the surface of thin agar plates. It is based on the non-linear degenerate cross diffusion model proposed by Kawasaki et al. (1997) [5] and it includes a suitable nutrient chemotactic term compatible with such type of diffusion, as suggested by Ben-Jacob et al. (2000) [20]. An asymptotic estimation predicts the growth velocity of the colony envelope as a function of both the nutrient concentration and the chemotactic sensitivity. It is shown that the growth velocity is an increasing function of the chemotactic sensitivity. High resolution numerical simulations using Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), which include noise in the diffusion coefficient for the bacteria, are presented. The numerical results verify that the chemotactic term enhances the velocity of propagation of the colony envelope. In addition, the chemotaxis seems to stabilize the formation of branches in the soft-agar, low-nutrient regime.

  7. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  8. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation/dissolution: Solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhijie Xu; Paul Meakin

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid–liquid interface has similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured df = 1.68, close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice DLA clusters.

  9. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation∕dissolution: solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2011-01-28

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid-liquid interface has similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured d(f)=1.68, close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice DLA clusters. PMID:21280717

  10. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation/dissolution: Solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid-liquid interface has similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured d_f = 1.68, close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice DLA clusters.

  11. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-01

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma.

  12. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H; Kooij, E Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-21

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma. PMID:26203037

  13. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  14. Estimation of the diffusion-limited rate of microtubule assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Odde, D J

    1997-01-01

    Microtubule assembly is a complex process with individual microtubules alternating stochastically between extended periods of assembly and disassembly, a phenomenon known as dynamic instability. Since the discovery of dynamic instability, molecular models of assembly have generally assumed that tubulin incorporation into the microtubule lattice is primarily reaction-limited. Recently this assumption has been challenged and the importance of diffusion in microtubule assembly dynamics asserted on the basis of scaling arguments, with tubulin gradients predicted to extend over length scales exceeding a cell diameter, approximately 50 microns. To assess whether individual microtubules in vivo assemble at diffusion-limited rates and to predict the theoretical upper limit on the assembly rate, a steady-state mean-field model for the concentration of tubulin about a growing microtubule tip was developed. Using published parameter values for microtubule assembly in vivo (growth rate = 7 microns/min, diffusivity = 6 x 10(-12) m2/s, tubulin concentration = 10 microM), the model predicted that the tubulin concentration at the microtubule tip was approximately 89% of the concentration far from the tip, indicating that microtubule self-assembly is not diffusion-limited. Furthermore, the gradients extended less than approximately 50 nm (the equivalent of about two microtubule diameters) from the microtubule tip, a distance much less than a cell diameter. In addition, a general relation was developed to predict the diffusion-limited assembly rate from the diffusivity and bulk tubulin concentration. Using this relation, it was estimated that the maximum theoretical assembly rate is approximately 65 microns/min, above which tubulin can no longer diffuse rapidly enough to support faster growth. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199774

  15. A Computational Investigation of Sooting Limits of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecoustre, V. R.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Limiting conditions for soot particle inception in spherical diffusion flames were investigated numerically. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport and an optically thick radiation model. Seventeen normal and inverse flames were considered, covering a wide range of stoichiometric mixture fraction, adiabatic flame temperature, and residence time. These flames were previously observed to reach their sooting limits after 2 s of microgravity. Sooting-limit diffusion flames with residence times longer than 200 ms were found to have temperatures near 1190 K where C/O = 0.6, whereas flames with shorter residence times required increased temperatures. Acetylene was found to be a reasonable surrogate for soot precursor species in these flames, having peak mole fractions of about 0.01.

  16. 5 CFR 9901.313 - Aggregate compensation limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards Act of 1938, as amended (29 U.S.C. 201-219 and 5 CFR part 551); (iii) Severance pay under 5 U.S.C... physicians and dentists (in occupational series 0602 and 0680, respectively) payment to the employee may not... limitation described in or established by this section. (3) Except for physicians and dentists...

  17. 5 CFR 9901.313 - Aggregate compensation limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards Act of 1938, as amended (29 U.S.C. 201-219 and 5 CFR part 551); (iii) Severance pay under 5 U.S.C... physicians and dentists (in occupational series 0602 and 0680, respectively) payment to the employee may not... limitation described in or established by this section. (3) Except for physicians and dentists...

  18. Morphological diagram of diffusion driven aggregate growth in plane: Competition of anisotropy and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, A. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2011-09-01

    Two-dimensional structures grown with Witten and Sander algorithm are investigated. We analyze clusters grown off-lattice and clusters grown with antenna method with N=3,4,5,6,7 and 8 allowed growth directions. With the help of variable probe particles technique we measure fractal dimension of such clusters D(N) as a function of their size N. We propose that in the thermodynamic limit of infinite cluster size the aggregates grown with high degree of anisotropy ( N=3,4,5) tend to have fractal dimension D equal to 3/2, while off-lattice aggregates and aggregates with lower anisotropy ( N>6) have D≈1.710. Noise-reduction procedure results in the change of universality class for DLA. For high enough noise-reduction value clusters with N⩾6 have fractal dimension going to 3/2 when N→∞.

  19. Information diffusion, Facebook clusters, and the simplicial model of social aggregation: a computational simulation of simplicial diffusers for community health interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Kerk F; Sparks, Lisa; Struppa, Daniele C; Mannucci, Mirco A; Damiano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    By integrating the simplicial model of social aggregation with existing research on opinion leadership and diffusion networks, this article introduces the constructs of simplicial diffusers (mathematically defined as nodes embedded in simplexes; a simplex is a socially bonded cluster) and simplicial diffusing sets (mathematically defined as minimal covers of a simplicial complex; a simplicial complex is a social aggregation in which socially bonded clusters are embedded) to propose a strategic approach for information diffusion of cancer screenings as a health intervention on Facebook for community cancer prevention and control. This approach is novel in its incorporation of interpersonally bonded clusters, culturally distinct subgroups, and different united social entities that coexist within a larger community into a computational simulation to select sets of simplicial diffusers with the highest degree of information diffusion for health intervention dissemination. The unique contributions of the article also include seven propositions and five algorithmic steps for computationally modeling the simplicial model with Facebook data. PMID:26362453

  20. 42 CFR 447.512 - Drugs: Aggregate upper limits of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: Aggregate upper limits of payment. (a) (b) Other drugs. The agency payments for brand name drugs certified... of brand name drugs. (1) The upper limit for payment for multiple source drugs for which a specific... an electronic alternative means approved by the Secretary) that a specific brand is...

  1. 42 CFR 447.512 - Drugs: Aggregate upper limits of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Aggregate upper limits of payment. (a) Multiple source drugs. Except for brand name drugs that are certified... applies. (b) Other drugs. The agency payments for brand name drugs certified in accordance with paragraph... brand name drugs. (1) The upper limit for payment for multiple source drugs for which a specific...

  2. 42 CFR 447.512 - Drugs: Aggregate upper limits of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Aggregate upper limits of payment. (a) (b) Other drugs. The agency payments for brand name drugs certified... of brand name drugs. (1) The upper limit for payment for multiple source drugs for which a specific... an electronic alternative means approved by the Secretary) that a specific brand is...

  3. The aggregation and diffusion of asphaltenes studied by GPU-accelerated dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sibo; Xu, Junbo; Wen, Hao

    2014-12-01

    The heavy crude oil consists of thousands of compounds and much of them have large molecular weights and complex structures. Studying the aggregation and diffusion behavior of asphaltenes can facilitate the understanding of the heavy crude oil. In previous studies, the fused aromatic rings were treated as rigid bodies so that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) integrated with the quaternion method can be used to study asphaltene systems. In this work, DPD integrated with the quaternion method is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs). Compared with the serial program, tens of times speedup can be achieved when simulations performed on a single GPU. Using multiple GPUs can provide faster computation speed and more storage space for simulations of significant large systems. By using large systems, simulations of the asphaltene-toluene system at extremely dilute concentrations can be performed. The determined diffusion coefficients of asphaltenes are similar to that in experimental studies. At last, the aggregation behavior of asphaltenes in heptane was investigated, and the simulation results agreed with the modified Yen model. Monomers, nanoaggregates and clusters were observed from the simulations at different concentrations.

  4. 26 CFR 48.4216(e)-2 - Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price readjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... readjustments. 48.4216(e)-2 Section 48.4216(e)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 48.4216(e)-2 Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price... advertising, as provided in section 4216(e)(1) and § 48.4216(e)-1, plus the amount of the readjustments...

  5. 26 CFR 48.4216(e)-2 - Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price readjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... readjustments. 48.4216(e)-2 Section 48.4216(e)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 48.4216(e)-2 Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price... advertising, as provided in section 4216(e)(1) and § 48.4216(e)-1, plus the amount of the readjustments...

  6. 26 CFR 48.4216(e)-2 - Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price readjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... readjustments. 48.4216(e)-2 Section 48.4216(e)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 48.4216(e)-2 Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price... advertising, as provided in section 4216(e)(1) and § 48.4216(e)-1, plus the amount of the readjustments...

  7. 26 CFR 48.4216(e)-2 - Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price readjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... readjustments. 48.4216(e)-2 Section 48.4216(e)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 48.4216(e)-2 Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price... advertising, as provided in section 4216(e)(1) and § 48.4216(e)-1, plus the amount of the readjustments...

  8. 42 CFR 447.78 - Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing. 447.78 Section 447.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payments:...

  9. 42 CFR 447.78 - Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing. 447.78 Section 447.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payments:...

  10. 42 CFR 447.78 - Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing. 447.78 Section 447.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payments:...

  11. 42 CFR 447.78 - Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aggregate limits on alternative premiums and cost sharing. 447.78 Section 447.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payments:...

  12. Weak Glycolipid Binding of a Microdomain-Tracer Peptide Correlates with Aggregation and Slow Diffusion on Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Tim; Manna, Manoj; Ruhnow, Maria; Wisantoso, Yudi; Wang, Yaofeng; Matysik, Artur; Oglęcka, Kamila; Mu, Yuguang; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Wohland, Thorsten; Kraut, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Organized assembly or aggregation of sphingolipid-binding ligands, such as certain toxins and pathogens, has been suggested to increase binding affinity of the ligand to the cell membrane and cause membrane reorganization or distortion. Here we show that the diffusion behavior of the fluorescently tagged sphingolipid-interacting peptide probe SBD (Sphingolipid Binding Domain) is altered by modifications in the construction of the peptide sequence that both result in a reduction in binding to ganglioside-containing supported lipid membranes, and at the same time increase aggregation on the cell plasma membrane, but that do not change relative amounts of secondary structural features. We tested the effects of modifying the overall charge and construction of the SBD probe on its binding and diffusion behavior, by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR; Biacore) analysis on lipid surfaces, and by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) on live cells, respectively. SBD binds preferentially to membranes containing the highly sialylated gangliosides GT1b and GD1a. However, simple charge interactions of the peptide with the negative ganglioside do not appear to be a critical determinant of binding. Rather, an aggregation-suppressing amino acid composition and linker between the fluorophore and the peptide are required for optimum binding of the SBD to ganglioside-containing supported lipid bilayer surfaces, as well as for interaction with the membrane. Interestingly, the strength of interactions with ganglioside-containing artificial membranes is mirrored in the diffusion behavior by FCS on cell membranes, with stronger binders displaying similar characteristic diffusion profiles. Our findings indicate that for aggregation-prone peptides, aggregation occurs upon contact with the cell membrane, and rather than giving a stronger interaction with the membrane, aggregation is accompanied by weaker binding and complex diffusion profiles indicative of heterogeneous diffusion

  13. Influence of neighboring reactive particles on diffusion-limited reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Competition between reactive species is commonplace in typical chemical reactions. Specifically the primary reaction between a substrate and its target enzyme may be altered when interactions with secondary species in the system are substantial. We explore this competition phenomenon for diffusion-limited reactions in the presence of neighboring particles through numerical solution of the diffusion equation. As a general model for globular proteins and small molecules, we consider spherical representations of the reactants and neighboring particles; these neighbors vary in local density, size, distribution, and relative distance from the primary target reaction, as well as their surface reactivity. Modulations of these model variables permit inquiry into the influence of excluded volume and competition on the primary reaction due to the presence of neighboring particles. We find that the surface reactivity effect is long-ranged and a strong determinant of reaction kinetics, whereas the excluded volume effect is relatively short-ranged and less influential in comparison. As a consequence, the effect of the excluded volume is only modestly dependent on the neighbor distribution and is approximately additive; this additivity permits a linear approximation to the many-body effect on the reaction kinetics. In contrast, the surface reactivity effect is non-additive, and thus it may require higher-order approximations to describe the reaction kinetics. Our model study has broad implications in the general understanding of competition and local crowding on diffusion-limited chemical reactions.

  14. Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion for temperature-dependent linear spectra of light harvesting aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Möbius, Sebastian; Eisfeld, Alexander; Suess, Daniel; Strunz, Walter T.

    2015-01-21

    Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion (NMQSD) has turned out to be an efficient method to calculate excitonic properties of aggregates composed of organic chromophores, taking into account the coupling of electronic transitions to vibrational modes of the chromophores. NMQSD is an open quantum system approach that incorporates environmental degrees of freedom (the vibrations in our case) in a stochastic way. We show in this paper that for linear optical spectra (absorption, circular dichroism), no stochastics is needed, even for finite temperatures. Thus, the spectra can be obtained by propagating a single trajectory. To this end, we map a finite temperature environment to the zero temperature case using the so-called thermofield method. The resulting equations can then be solved efficiently by standard integrators.

  15. Diffusion Limited Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) in Microgravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, M. C.; Lauver, R. W.; Hegde, U. G.; Sikora, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Tests designed to quantify the gravitational effects on thermal mixing and reactant injection in a Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) reactor have recently been performed in the Zero Gravity Facility (ZGF) at NASA s Glenn Research Center. An artificial waste stream, comprising aqueous mixtures of methanol, was pressurized to approximately 250 atm and then heated to 450 C. After uniform temperatures in the reactor were verified, a controlled injection of air was initiated through a specially designed injector to simulate diffusion limited reactions typical in most continuous flow reactors. Results from a thermal mapping of the reaction zone in both 1-g and 0-g environments are compared. Additionally, results of a numerical model of the test configuration are presented to illustrate first order effects on reactant mixing and thermal transport in the absence of gravity.

  16. Diffusion-limited growth in bacterial colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1990-09-01

    Colonies of bacterial species called Bacillus subtilis have been found to grow two-dimensionally and self-similarly on agar plates through diffusion-limited processes in a nutrient concentration field. We obtained a fractal dimension of the colony patterns of D=1.73±0.02, very close to that of the two-dimensional DLA model, and confirmed the existence of the screening effect of protruding main branches against inner ones in a colony, the repulsion between two neighboring colonies and the tendency to grow toward nutrient. These effects are all characteristic of the pattern formation in a Laplacian field. This finding implies the importance of physical properties of the environment for the morphology of bacterial colonies in general.

  17. Approaching the strong coupling limit in single plasmonic nanorods interacting with J-aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Gülis; Johansson, Göran; Johansson, Peter; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Käll, Mikael; Shegai, Timur

    2013-01-01

    We studied scattering and extinction of individual silver nanorods coupled to the J-aggregate form of the cyanine dye TDBC as a function of plasmon – exciton detuning. The measured single particle spectra exhibited a strongly suppressed scattering and extinction rate at wavelengths corresponding to the J-aggregate absorption band, signaling strong interaction between the localized surface plasmon of the metal core and the exciton of the surrounding molecular shell. In the context of strong coupling theory, the observed “transparency dips” correspond to an average vacuum Rabi splitting of the order of 100 meV, which approaches the plasmon dephasing rate and, thereby, the strong coupling limit for the smallest investigated particles. These findings could pave the way towards ultra-strong light-matter interaction on the nanoscale and active plasmonic devices operating at room temperature. PMID:24166360

  18. Diffusion limitations of the lung - comparison of different measurement methods.

    PubMed

    Preisser, A M; Seeber, M; Harth, V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis leads to a decrease of oxygen diffusion, in particular during exercise. Bronchial obstruction also could decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (P(a)O(2)). In this study we investigated the validity of blood gas content, especially P(a)O(2) and P(a)O(2) affected by hyperventilation (P(a)O(2corr)) and alveolo-arterial oxygen gradient (P(A-a)O(2)) in comparison with the CO diffusion capacity (DLCO) in different lung diseases. A total of 250 subjects were studied (52.3 ± 12.5 year; F/M 40/210), among which there were 162 subjects with different lung disorders and 88 healthy controls. Pearson's correlation coefficients (r) of DLCO with P(a)O(2), P(a)O(2corr), and PA-aO(2) were analyzed in each group. The results show that the diagnostic power of P(A-a)O(2) against P(a)O(2corr) was equivalent, especially during exercise (r = -0.89 and -0.92, respectively). DLCO showed only weak correlations with P(a)O(2corr) and P(A-a)O(2) (r = 0.17 and -0.19, respectively). In conclusion, DLCO shows a better match with blood gas content during exercise than at rest during which it is routinely tested. Thus, the exercise test is advisable. The P(A-a)O(2) takes into account the level of ventilation, which makes it correlate better with DLCO rather than with blood gas content. The most significant problems in clinical evaluation of blood gas parameters during exercise are the insufficiently defined limits of normal-to-pathological range. PMID:25381558

  19. On the Geometry of Diffusion and the Limits of Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    As the future of Moore's law of transistor scaling appears uncertain, Electronics is trying to reinvent itself by broadening its focus to other areas including macroelectronics (electronics of large, possibly flexible and transparent displays), bioelectronics (e.g. nanobio sensors for geomomics, proteomics), and energy-harvesting (e.g. solar cells). In this talk, I focus on the recent progress in the field of bioelectronics, specifically on nanobiosensors for gene and protein identification. While capabilities of classical techniques based on optical detection of biomolecules is already impressive, the method is too expensive to preclude its routine use in clinical setting for personal medicine. As an cost-effective alternative, (optical) label-free electronic detection of biomolecules has long been a cherished dream for researchers involved in Genomics and Proteomics. Despite significant interest and almost monthly reports of groundbreaking experimental results in leading journals by researchers all over the world, the elements that dictate response of a biosensor has remained -- until recently -- poorly understood. In this talk, we discuss how the elementary use of fractal geometry of diffusion, percolative transport in random networks, electrolyte screening-limited response, etc. are finally allowing us to establish the performance potential of such sensors and how ``form' or geometry is fundamental in defining the sensitivity of biosensors.

  20. Exploring the Limits to Observational Diffuse Interstellar Band Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.

    2014-02-01

    The status of DIB research (Herbig 1995) has strongly advanced since the DIB conference in Boulder in 1994. In the same year we reported the discovery of two near IR diffuse bands coincident with C60 +, that was confirmed in subsequent years. Since then a number of DIB observational studies have been published such as DIB surveys, measurements of DIB families, correlations and environment dependences as well as DIBs in extra-galactic sources. Resolved substructures were measured and compared to predicted rotational contours of large molecules. Polarisation studies provided constraints on possible carrier molecules and upper limits. DIBs carriers have been linked with several classes of organic molecules observed in the interstellar medium, in particular to the UIR bands (assigned to PAHs), the Extended Red Emission (ERE) or the recently detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME, assigned to spinning dust). In particular fullerenes and PAHs have been proposed to explain some DIBs and specific molecules were searched for in DIB spectra. DIB carriers could be present in various dehydrogenation and ionization states. Experiments in the laboratory and in space contribute to our understanding of the photo-stability of possible DIB carriers. In summary, the status of DIB research in the last 20 years has strongly advanced. We review DIB observational results and their interpretation and introduce the relevant plenary discussion.

  1. 12 CFR 723.16 - What is the aggregate member business loan limit for a credit union?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limit for a credit union? 723.16 Section 723.16 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... limit for a credit union? (a) General. The aggregate limit on a credit union's net member business loan balances is the lesser of 1.75 times the credit union's net worth or 12.25% of the credit union's......

  2. 12 CFR 723.16 - What is the aggregate member business loan limit for a credit union?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... limit for a credit union? 723.16 Section 723.16 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... limit for a credit union? (a) General. The aggregate limit on a credit union's net member business loan balances is the lesser of 1.75 times the credit union's net worth or 12.25% of the credit union's......

  3. 12 CFR 723.16 - What is the aggregate member business loan limit for a credit union?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... limit for a credit union? 723.16 Section 723.16 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... limit for a credit union? (a) General. The aggregate limit on a credit union's net member business loan balances is the lesser of 1.75 times the credit union's net worth or 12.25% of the credit union's......

  4. 12 CFR 723.16 - What is the aggregate member business loan limit for a credit union?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limit for a credit union? 723.16 Section 723.16 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... limit for a credit union? (a) General. The aggregate limit on a credit union's net member business loan balances is the lesser of 1.75 times the credit union's net worth or 12.25% of the credit union's......

  5. 12 CFR 723.16 - What is the aggregate member business loan limit for a credit union?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limit for a credit union? 723.16 Section 723.16 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... limit for a credit union? (a) General. The aggregate limit on a credit union's net member business loan balances is the lesser of 1.75 times the credit union's net worth or 12.25% of the credit union's......

  6. Limitations in Determining Multifractal Spectra from Pore-Solid Soil Aggregate Images

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, A N; Martin, M A; Smucker, A J.M.; Rivers, M L

    2011-11-16

    Multifractal methods have the potential to be useful tools for characterizing spatial distributions of soil pores from microtomographic images of undisturbed soil cores and soil aggregates. The objective of this study was to examine the limitations of multifractal analyses in binary (void and solid) soil images and to explore conditions under which multifractal spectra can be obtained. Multifractal characteristics of binary soil images are bounded within certain limiting values corresponding to nonfractal scaling. In this study, we first addressed the theoretical limitations of multifractal analysis of binary images and examined the nonfractal scaling boundaries in multifractal calculations by the method of moments. Then we developed boundary conditions for multifractal calculations by the direct method. Results revealed that fractal scaling is potentially possible only across a relatively narrow range of cell sizes restricted by the nonfractal scaling boundaries. Moreover, the range of cell sizes where fractal scaling is potentially possible varies with pore size. That is, in multifractal calculations it changes continuously with changes in the q value. For the soil aggregates examined in this study, this range varied from two to eight pixels for low q values to 128 pixels for high q values. The varying range makes calculations of true multifractal spectra for binary soil image data impossible. These results are consistent with a general theoretical notion that binary soil images are not multifractal in a strict mathematical sense. We suggest, however, that application of multifractal formalism can generate 'pseudo-multifractal spectra' that might still be useful for summarizing pore distribution information and for comparing pore data among different agricultural management regimes and soil type.

  7. A Mathematical Model of Diffusion-Limited Gas Bubble Dynamics in Tissue with Varying Diffusion Region Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A three-region mathematical model of gas bubble dynamics has been shown suitable for describing diffusion-limited dynamics of more than one bubble in a given volume of extravascular tissue. The model is based on the dynamics of gas exchange between a bubble and a well-stirred tissue region through an intervening unperfused diffusion region previously assumed to have constant thickness and uniform gas diffusivity. As a result, the gas content of the diffusion region remains constant as the volume of the region increases with bubble growth, causing dissolved gas in the region to violate Henry's law. Earlier work also neglected the relationship between the varying diffusion region volume and the fixed total tissue volume, because only cases in which the diffusion region volume is a small fraction of the overall tissue volume were considered. We herein extend the three-region model to correct these theoretical inconsistencies by allowing both the thickness and gas content of the diffusion region to vary during bubble evolution. A postulated difference in gas diffusivity between an infinitesimally thin layer at the bubble surface and the remainder of the diffusion region leads to variation in diffusion region gas content and thickness during bubble growth and resolution. This variable thickness, differential diffusivity (VTDD) model can yield bubble lifetimes considerably longer than those yielded by earlier three-region models for given model and decompression parameters, and meets a need for theoretically consistent but relatively simple bubble dynamics models for use in studies of decompression sickness (DCS) in human subjects, Keywords: decompression sickness, gas diffusion in tissue, diffusivity

  8. Nonlinear diffusion equations as asymptotic limits of Cahn-Hilliard systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Pierluigi; Fukao, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    An asymptotic limit of a class of Cahn-Hilliard systems is investigated to obtain a general nonlinear diffusion equation. The target diffusion equation may reproduce a number of well-known model equations: Stefan problem, porous media equation, Hele-Shaw profile, nonlinear diffusion of singular logarithmic type, nonlinear diffusion of Penrose-Fife type, fast diffusion equation and so on. Namely, by setting the suitable potential of the Cahn-Hilliard systems, all these problems can be obtained as limits of the Cahn-Hilliard related problems. Convergence results and error estimates are proved.

  9. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  10. Water Vapor Diffusion through Soil as Affected by Temperature and Aggregate Size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water vapor diffusion through the soil is an important part in the total water flux in the unsaturated zone of arid or semiarid regions and has several significant agricultural and engineering applications because soil moisture contents near the surface are relatively low. Water vapor diffusing thro...

  11. Numerical analysis of the influence of scale effects and microstructure on hydrogen diffusion in polycrystalline aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Legrand, Esaie; Bouhattate, Jamaa; Feaugas, Xavier; Touzain, S.; Garmestani, Hamid; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-04-01

    Predicting resistance to environmental degradation, especially hydrogen embrittlement (HE) has become a major concern for life assessment and risk analysis of structural materials. The microstructure of the materials plays a significant role in HE. Despite the large documentation about the subject, the contribution of hydrogen diffusion on this process stays unclear. In this work, we analyze the effects of the microstructure on hydrogen diffusion, especially the influence of grain boundaries considered as high diffusivity paths and possible sites of damage occurrence. Electrochemical permeation was simulated using finite elements method (FEM). Scale effects between the RVE (Representative Volume Element) and the size of the membrane are discussed. Domains of applicability for standard homogenization methods, especially Hashin Shtrikman model are studied using results from microstructural based FEM. Domains of invariance of diffusion behavior and concentration profiles for grain shapes and the size of the membrane are also analyzed. Thus, the difficulty to extract diffusion properties by permeation test for heterogeneous microstructures is highlighted and discussed.

  12. Diffusion limited soil vapor extraction: Geologic and bed thickness controls

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, G.D.; Benson, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can remove volatile contaminants from the subsurface environment. In a heterogeneous geologic setting, SVE cleanup will progress rapidly through advective mass transfer in permeable sediments and primarily through slow diffusion in lower permeability soil. The contrast in rates of cleanup between high and low permeability soils is further increased by the associated soil moisture retention contrasts (i.e., capillarity) in the same soils. Low permeability soil generally has a higher soil suction capacity and moisture content than high permeability soil. This results in further diminishment of cleanup rate in fine-grained sediments in a heterogeneous environment. This paper investigates how contrasts in soil type and bed thickness affect the rate of SVE diffusive cleanup. The numerical model VENT3D is used to simulate three heterogeneous geologic settings with differing soil contrasts. Within each geologic setting, four simulations are performed with varying bed thicknesses in each, effectively changing the diffusive half-length of the fine-grained soils while maintaining the total bulk percentages of fine-to coarse-grained material. Under these conditions, the bulk flow parameters measured during SVE field testing would be constant for each of the four simulations within a single geologic domain while the cleanup times would not.

  13. Diffusion limited soil vapor extraction: Geologic and bed thickness controls

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, G.D. ); Benson, D.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can remove volatile contaminants from the subsurface environment. In a heterogeneous geologic setting, SVE cleanup will progress rapidly through advective mass transfer in permeable sediments and primarily through slow diffusion in lower permeability soil. The contrast in rates of cleanup between high and low permeability soils is further increased by the associated soil moisture retention contrasts (i.e., capillarity) in the same soils. Low permeability soil generally has a higher soil suction capacity and moisture content than high permeability soil. This results in further diminishment of cleanup rate in fine-grained sediments in a heterogeneous environment. This paper investigates how contrasts in soil type and bed thickness affect the rate of SVE diffusive cleanup. The numerical model VENT3D is used to simulate three heterogeneous geologic settings with differing soil contrasts. Within each geologic setting, four simulations are performed with varying bed thicknesses in each, effectively changing the diffusive half-length of the fine-grained soils while maintaining the total bulk percentages of fine-to coarse-grained material. Under these conditions, the bulk flow parameters measured during SVE field testing would be constant for each of the four simulations within a single geologic domain while the cleanup times would not.

  14. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-07

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO{sub 2} show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of

  15. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Diffusion-limited retention of porous particles at density interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kindler, Kolja; Khalili, Arzhang; Stocker, Roman

    2010-01-01

    Downward carbon flux in the ocean is largely governed by particle settling. Most marine particles settle at low Reynolds numbers and are highly porous, yet the fluid dynamics of this regime have remained unexplored. We present results of an experimental investigation of porous particles settling through a density interface at Reynolds numbers between 0.1 and 1. We tracked 100 to 500 μm hydrogel spheres with 95.5% porosity and negligible permeability. We found that a small negative initial excess density relative to the lower (denser) fluid layer, a common scenario in the ocean, results in long retention times of particles at the interface. We hypothesized that the retention time was determined by the diffusive exchange of the stratifying agent between interstitial and ambient fluid, which increases excess density of particles that have stalled at the interface, enabling their settling to resume. This hypothesis was confirmed by observations, which revealed a quadratic dependence of retention time on particle size, consistent with diffusive exchange. These results demonstrate that porosity can control retention times and therefore accumulation of particles at density interfaces, a mechanism that could underpin the formation of particle layers frequently observed at pycnoclines in the ocean. We estimate retention times of 3 min to 3.3 d for the characteristic size range of marine particles. This enhancement in retention time can affect carbon transformation through increased microbial colonization and utilization of particles and release of dissolved organics. The observed size dependence of the retention time could further contribute to improve quantifications of vertical carbon flux. PMID:21135242

  17. A Diffusion Limit for a Test Particle in a Random Distribution of Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, G.; Nota, A.; Pulvirenti, M.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a point particle moving in a random distribution of obstacles described by a potential barrier. We show that, in a weak-coupling regime, under a diffusion limit suggested by the potential itself, the probability distribution of the particle converges to the solution of the heat equation. The diffusion coefficient is given by the Green-Kubo formula associated to the generator of the diffusion process dictated by the linear Landau equation.

  18. Deterministic aggregation kinetics of superparamagnetic colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Colin P.; Klop, Kira E.; Lavergne, François A.; Morrow, Sarah M.; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Dullens, Roel P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the irreversible aggregation kinetics of superparamagnetic colloidal particles in two dimensions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field at low packing fractions. Optical microscopy and image analysis techniques are used to follow the aggregation process and in particular study the packing fraction and field dependence of the mean cluster size. We compare these to the theoretically predicted scalings for diffusion limited and deterministic aggregation. It is shown that the aggregation kinetics for our experimental system is consistent with a deterministic mechanism, which thus shows that the contribution of diffusion is negligible.

  19. Fluctuation Limit for Interacting Diffusions with Partial Annihilations Through Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-Qing; Fan, Wai-Tong Louis

    2016-06-01

    We study fluctuations of the empirical processes of a non-equilibrium interacting particle system consisting of two species over a domain that is recently introduced in Chen and Fan (Ann Probab, to appear) and establish its functional central limit theorem. This fluctuation limit is a distribution-valued Gaussian Markov process which can be represented as a mild solution of a stochastic partial differential equation. The drift of our fluctuation limit involves a new partial differential equation with nonlinear coupled term on the interface that characterized the hydrodynamic limit of the system. The covariance structure of the Gaussian part consists two parts, one involving the spatial motion of the particles inside the domain and other involving a boundary integral term that captures the boundary interactions between two species. The key is to show that the Boltzmann-Gibbs principle holds for our non-equilibrium system. Our proof relies on generalizing the usual correlation functions to the join correlations at two different times.

  20. Fluctuation Limit for Interacting Diffusions with Partial Annihilations Through Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-Qing; Fan, Wai-Tong Louis

    2016-08-01

    We study fluctuations of the empirical processes of a non-equilibrium interacting particle system consisting of two species over a domain that is recently introduced in Chen and Fan (Ann Probab, to appear) and establish its functional central limit theorem. This fluctuation limit is a distribution-valued Gaussian Markov process which can be represented as a mild solution of a stochastic partial differential equation. The drift of our fluctuation limit involves a new partial differential equation with nonlinear coupled term on the interface that characterized the hydrodynamic limit of the system. The covariance structure of the Gaussian part consists two parts, one involving the spatial motion of the particles inside the domain and other involving a boundary integral term that captures the boundary interactions between two species. The key is to show that the Boltzmann-Gibbs principle holds for our non-equilibrium system. Our proof relies on generalizing the usual correlation functions to the join correlations at two different times.

  1. A multigrid Newton-Krylov method for flux-limited radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Knoll, D.A.; Olson, G.L.

    1998-09-01

    The authors focus on the integration of radiation diffusion including flux-limited diffusion coefficients. The nonlinear integration is accomplished with a Newton-Krylov method preconditioned with a multigrid Picard linearization of the governing equations. They investigate the efficiency of the linear and nonlinear iterative techniques.

  2. Ca-Mg inter-diffusion in synthetic polycrystalline dolomite-calcite aggregate at elevated temperatures and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wuu-Liang; Liu, Teh-Ching; Shen, Pouyan; Hsu, Allen

    2009-03-01

    This study measures the reaction rate of dolomite and aragonite (calcite) into Mg-calcite at 800, 850, and 900°C and 1.6 GPa. The dry synthetic dolomite-aragonite aggregate transformed very rapidly into dolomite-calcite polycrystalline aggregate while Mg-calcites formed at a relatively slow rate, becoming progressively richer in Mg with run time. We modeled the reaction progress semi-empirically by the first-order rate law. The temperature dependence of the overall transport rate of MgCO3 into calcite can be described by the kinetic parameters ( E = 231.7 kJ/mol and A o = 22.69 h-1). Extrapolation using the Arrhenius equation to the conditions during exhumation of UHPM rocks indicates that the reaction of dolomite with aragonite into Mg-saturated calcite can be completed as the P-T path enters the Mg-calcite stability field in a geologically short time period (<1 Ky). On the other hand, the extrapolation of the rate to prograde metamorphic conditions reveals that the Mg-calcite formed from dolomitic marble in the absence of metamorphic fluid may not reach Mg-saturation until temperatures corresponding to high-grade metamorphism (e.g., >340°C and >10 My). SEM-EDS analysis of individual calcite grains shows compositional gradients of Mg in the calcite grains. The Mg-Ca inter-diffusion coefficient at 850°C is around 1.68 × 10-14 m2/sec if diffusion is the major control of the reaction. The calculated closure temperatures for Ca-Mg inter-diffusion as a function of cooling rate and grain size reveal that Ca/Mg resetting in calcite in a dry polycrystalline carbonate aggregate (with grain size around 1 mm) may not occur at temperatures below 480°C at a geological cooling rate around 10°C/My, unless other processes, such as short-circuit interdiffusion along grain boundaries and dislocations, are involved.

  3. Spatial patterns of African ungulate aggregation reveal complex but limited risk effects from reintroduced carnivores.

    PubMed

    Moll, Remington J; Killion, Alexander K; Montgomery, Robert A; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W

    2016-05-01

    The "landscape of fear" model, recently advanced in research on the non-lethal effects of carnivores on ungulates, predicts that prey will exhibit detectable antipredator behavior not only during risky times (i.e., predators in close proximity) but also in risky places (i.e., habitat where predators kill prey or tend to occur). Aggregation is an important antipredator response in numerous ungulate species, making it a useful metric to evaluate the strength and scope of the landscape of fear in a multi-carnivore, multi-ungulate system. We conducted ungulate surveys over a 2-year period in South Africa to test the influence of three broad-scale sources of variation in the landscape on spatial patterns in aggregation: (1) habitat structure, (2) where carnivores tended to occur (i.e., population-level utilization distributions), and (3) where carnivores tended to kill ungulate prey (i.e., probabilistic kill site maps). We analyzed spatial variation in aggregation for six ungulate species exposed to predation from recently reintroduced lion (Panthera leo) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). Although we did detect larger aggregations of ungulates in "risky places," these effects existed primarily for smaller-bodied (<150 kg) ungulates and were relatively moderate (change of 4 individuals across all habitats). In comparison, ungulate aggregations tended to increase at a slightly lower rate in habitat that was more open. The lion, an ambush (stalking) carnivore, had stronger influence on ungulate aggregation than the hyena, an active (coursing) carnivore. In addition, places where lions tended to kill prey had a greater effect on ungulate aggregation than places where lions tended to occur, but an opposing pattern existed for hyena. Our study reveals heterogeneity in the landscape of fear and suggests broad-scale risk effects following carnivore reintroduction only moderately influence ungulate aggregation size and vary considerably by predator hunting mode, type of

  4. Turnover of subsoil organic carbon controlled by substrate limitation and aggregation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Patrick; Don, Axel; Helfrich, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Subsoils (>30 cm depth) store more than 50% of the total soil organic carbon (SOC) and subsoil SOC is characterised by high mean residence times compared to topsoil SOC. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the turnover of SOC in the subsoil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature, substrate limitation and aggregation disturbance on subsoil SOC turnover. We assumed that temperature limits SOC turnover in subsoil, but the temperature response of SOC is obscured by an increasing stabilization of organic material with soil depth. In a laboratory incubation experiment the production of CO2 from undisturbed and disturbed soil samples and disturbed soil samples with added 13C labelled roots were investigated at two different temperatures (10 and 20° C). Soil samples were taken from 2-12 cm (depth 1), 30-60 cm (depth2) and 130-160 cm (depth 3) in a deciduous forest from a podzolic Cambisol and were placed in microcosms with an inner diameter of 14.2 cm and a height of 20 cm for depth 1 and 40 cm for depth 2 and 3. The microcosms were incubated for 30 days at 60% of water holding capacity. The incubation experiment showed an average increase of 80-150% in CO2 production for disturbed and undisturbed samples in depth 1 and depth 2 with increasing temperature. However, this was not observed in depth 3. This temperature influence was not found in the disturbed samples with added substrate. Instead, the increase in CO2 production of the labelled samples from depth 2 and 3 had a lag time of 5 to 8 days compared to samples from depth 1. Reasons for this delayed reaction on substrate might be dormant microorganisms in the subsoil at the beginning of the incubation experiment or spatial separation of microorganisms and the labelled substrate. Disturbance of the samples from depth 1 and 2 initially increase the CO2 production, but this effect was minor after day 15. Contrary to expectation, the CO2 production in depth 3 was greater

  5. Multi-scale finite element analysis of chloride diffusion in concrete incorporating paste/aggregate ITZs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Guo, XiaoMing; Mi, ChangWen

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a concurrent multi-scale finite element (FE) model coupling equations of the degree of freedoms of meso-scale model of ITZs and macroscopic model of bulk pastes. The multi-scale model is subsequently implemented and integrated into ABAQUS resulting in easy application to complex concrete structures. A few benchmark numerical examples are performed to test both the accuracy and efficiency of the developed model in analyzing chloride diffusion in concrete. These examples clearly demonstrate that high diffusivity of ITZs, primarily because of its porous microstructure, tends to accelerate chloride penetration along concentration gradient. The proposed model provides new guidelines for the durability analysis of concrete structures under adverse operating conditions.

  6. Experimental limit on the cosmic diffuse ultrahigh energy neutrino flux.

    PubMed

    Gorham, P W; Hebert, C L; Liewer, K M; Naudet, C J; Saltzberg, D; Williams, D

    2004-07-23

    We report results from 120 h of live time with the Goldstone lunar ultrahigh energy neutrino experiment (GLUE). The experiment searches for < or = 10 ns microwave pulses from the lunar regolith, appearing in coincidence at two large radio telescopes separated by 22 km and linked by optical fiber. Such pulses would arise from subsurface electromagnetic cascades induced by interactions of > or = 100 EeV (1 EeV = 10(18) eV neutrinos in the lunar regolith. No candidates are yet seen, and the implied limits constrain several current models for ultrahigh energy neutrino fluxes. PMID:15323748

  7. Experimental Limit on the Cosmic Diffuse Ultrahigh Energy Neutrino Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, P. W.; Hebert, C. L.; Liewer, K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Saltzberg, D.; Williams, D.

    2004-07-01

    We report results from 120h of live time with the Goldstone lunar ultrahigh energy neutrino experiment (GLUE). The experiment searches for ≤10 ns microwave pulses from the lunar regolith, appearing in coincidence at two large radio telescopes separated by 22km and linked by optical fiber. Such pulses would arise from subsurface electromagnetic cascades induced by interactions of ≥100 EeV (1 EeV=1018 eV neutrinos in the lunar regolith. No candidates are yet seen, and the implied limits constrain several current models for ultrahigh energy neutrino fluxes.

  8. Detailed numerical investigation of the Bohm limit in cosmic ray diffusion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A. E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com

    2014-04-10

    A standard model in cosmic ray diffusion theory is the so-called Bohm limit in which the particle mean free path is assumed to be equal to the Larmor radius. This type of diffusion is often employed to model the propagation and acceleration of energetic particles. However, recent analytical and numerical work has shown that standard Bohm diffusion is not realistic. In the present paper, we perform test-particle simulations to explore particle diffusion in the strong turbulence limit in which the wave field is much stronger than the mean magnetic field. We show that there is indeed a lower limit of the particle mean free path along the mean field. In this limit, the mean free path is directly proportional to the unperturbed Larmor radius like in the traditional Bohm limit, but it is reduced by the factor δB/B {sub 0} where B {sub 0} is the mean field and δB the turbulent field. Although we focus on parallel diffusion, we also explore diffusion across the mean field in the strong turbulence limit.

  9. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  10. A study of the microstructural and diffusion properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels containing surfactant supramolecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Annamaria; Auriemma, Finizia; Ricciardi, Rosa; Mangiapia, Gaetano; Trifuoggi, Marco; Franco, Lorenzo; Rosa, Claudio De; Heenan, Richard K; Paduano, Luigi; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2006-11-23

    Surfactant-containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) cryogels have been prepared by drying and reswelling hydrogel patches, previously obtained by the freeze/thaw procedure, in decyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TAB) aqueous solutions. The microstructural and diffusive properties of the resulting material have been characterized by a combined experimental strategy. Gravimetric measurements show that the cryogel maximum swelling is not affected by the surfactant. The surfactant concentration within the cryogel, measured by ion chromatography, is the same as that in the rehydrating surfactant solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-probe and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements show that surfactant self-aggregation in the gel is similar to that in water, occurring at the same critical concentration and resulting in the formation of micellar aggregates whose structure is not affected by the cryogel polymeric scaffold. However, both the micelle intradiffusion coefficients, measured by PGSE-NMR, and the spin-probe correlation times, measured by EPR, indicate that dynamic processes in the hydrogel are much slower than in bulk water. A quantitative analysis of these results suggests that the cryogel polymer-poor domains, in which surfactant molecules are solubilized, have an average dimension of approximately 0.1 microm. Interestingly the experimental data also show that the polymer-poor phase contains more polymer than expected, suggesting that the spinodal decomposition, which occurs during the freezing step of cryogel preparation, is not complete or prevented by ice formation. PMID:17107141

  11. Innovation-diffusion: a geographical study of the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ting, T Y

    1984-09-01

    This paper uses map analysis to study the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan between 1961-80. The innovation-diffusion perspective emphasizes that birth control, particularly contraception, is a recent innovation and is essentially new in human culture. The innovation-diffusion theory assumes that the decline of fertility began in a setting where there was no, or at most very limited, previous practice of birth control. The theory emphasizes the importance of the spread of information. It also assumes that innovation starts in metropolitan centers, diffuses to other urban places with some delay, and penetrates to rural areas still later. Innovation behavior also diffuses from 1 area to another which is culturally and linguistically similar. Although there was some urban to rural diffusion from the Taiwan family planning program, the government supported program provided services more evenly between urban and rural areas, thus somewhat limiting the diffusion effect from the program. For the diffusion of family practice in Taiwan, it is expected that the availability of of information about and means of family limitation practice may effect the rate of the increase of small m values -- an index of family limitation -- in an area. The case study of Pingtung county shows that the demand-side diffusion from urban to rural areas was important in the earlier decade of the transition of family plimitation practice, but distance from urban center was less important as practice became more uniform through diffusion. Ethnicity, whether or not the township was dominated by Hakka or Fukienese, also seems to have played an important role in determining the pace at which the local residents adopted family practice limitation. Hakka townships seem to have adopted family limitation practice more slowly than Fukienese townships about the same distance from the urban center. The map analysis of Pingtung county provides descriptive evidence to support the diffusion of

  12. 27 CFR 53.101 - Limitation on aggregate of exclusions and price readjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... exclusions and price readjustments. 53.101 Section 53.101 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... aggregate of exclusions and price readjustments. (a) In general. The sum of the amount excluded from taxable price in respect of charges for local advertising, as provided in section 4216(e)(1) of the Code...

  13. Intraparticle diffusion limitations in the hydrogenation of monounsaturated edible oils and their fatty acid methyl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Jonker, G.H.; Veldsink, J.W.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    1998-12-01

    Intraparticle diffusion limitation in the hydrogenation and isomerization of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and edible oils (triacylglycerol, TAG) in porous nickel catalyst was investigated both under reactive and under inert conditions. Under reactive conditions, the diffusion coefficients were determined from the best fits of the model simulations applying the intrinsic reacting kinetics of monounsaturated FAME hydrogenation to experiments under diffusion limited conditions. Due to the absence of reaction (hydrogenation of double bonds), the obtained effective H{sub z} diffusion coefficient (D{sub e}) with the HPLC technique is volume averaged and thereby determined by the larger intercrystalline pores (<30% of the total pore volume) only. Moreover, D{sub e} measured under reaction conditions reflected the influence of the micropores, resulting in a 10-fold lower value.

  14. Diffusion-limited attachment of nanoparticles to flexible membrane-immobilized receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-04-01

    In biosystems, vesicles, virions, or metal particles of size ∼100 nm often diffuse in solution and interact with short (<10 nm) flexible receptors immobilized in a lipid membrane. The attachment kinetics of such nanoparticles can be limited by diffusion globally or locally. In the latter case, the calculation of the attachment rate is complicated by the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the distance between a particle and membrane. The analysis, taking this factor into account, shows that the attachment rate constant is proportional to the receptor length and nearly independent of the particle radius.

  15. Secular resonant dressed orbital diffusion - I. Method and WKB limit for tepid discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, Jean-Baptiste; Pichon, Christophe; Prunet, Simon

    2015-05-01

    The equation describing the secular diffusion of a self-gravitating collisionless system induced by an exterior perturbation is derived while assuming that the time-scale corresponding to secular evolution is much larger than that corresponding to the natural frequencies of the system. Its two-dimensional formulation for a tepid galactic disc is also derived using the epicyclic approximation. Its Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) limit is found while assuming that only tightly wound transient spirals are sustained by the disc. It yields a simple quadrature for the diffusion coefficients which provides a straightforward understanding of the loci of maximal diffusion within the disc.

  16. An asymptotic-preserving scheme for linear kinetic equation with fractional diffusion limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Yan, Bokai

    2016-05-01

    We present a new asymptotic-preserving scheme for the linear Boltzmann equation which, under appropriate scaling, leads to a fractional diffusion limit. Our scheme rests on novel micro-macro decomposition to the distribution function, which splits the original kinetic equation following a reshuffled Hilbert expansion. As opposed to classical diffusion limit, a major difficulty comes from the fat tail in the equilibrium which makes the truncation in velocity space depending on the small parameter. Our idea is, while solving the macro-micro part in a truncated velocity domain (truncation only depends on numerical accuracy), to incorporate an integrated tail over the velocity space that is beyond the truncation, and its major component can be precomputed once with any accuracy. Such an addition is essential to drive the solution to the correct asymptotic limit. Numerical experiments validate its efficiency in both kinetic and fractional diffusive regimes.

  17. Effects of C/O Ratio and Temperature on Sooting Limits of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecoustre, V. R.; Sunderland, P. B.; Chao, B. H.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Limiting conditions for soot particle inception in spherical diffusion flames were investigated numerically. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport and an optically thick radiation model. Seventeen normal and inverse flames were considered, covering a wide range of stoichiometric mixture fraction, adiabatic flame temperature, residence time and scalar dissipation rate. These flames were previously observed to reach their sooting limits after 2 s of microgravity. Sooting-limit diffusion flames with scalar dissipation rate lower than 2/s were found to have temperatures near 1400 K where C/O = 0.51, whereas flames with greater scalar dissipation rate required increased temperatures. This finding was valid across a broad range of fuel and oxidizer compositions and convection directions.

  18. Condensation versus diffusion. A spatial-scale-independent theory of aggregate structures in edible oils: applications to model systems and commercial shortenings studied via rheology and USAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Peyronel, Fernanda; Quinn, Bonnie; Singh, Pratham; Marangoni, Alejandro G.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how solid fats structures come about in edible oils and quantifying their structures is of fundamental importance in developing edible oils with pre-selected characteristics. We considered the great range of fractal dimensions, from 1.91 to 2.90, reported from rheological measurements. We point out that, if the structures arise via DLA/RLA or DLCA/RLCA, as has been established using ultra small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), we would expect fractal dimensions in the range ~1.7 to 2.1, and ~2.5 or ~3.0. We present new data for commercial fats and show that the fractal dimensions deduced lie outside these values. We have developed a model in which competition between two processes can lead to the range of fractal dimensions observed. The two processes are (i) the rate at which the solid fat particles are created as the temperature is decreased, and (ii) the rate at which these particles diffuse, thereby meeting and forming aggregates. We assumed that aggregation can take place essentially isotropically and we identified two characteristic times: a time characterizing the rate of creation of solid fats, {τ\\text{create}}(T)\\equiv 1/{{R}S}(T) , where {{R}S}(T) is the rate of solid condensation (cm3 s-1), and the diffusion time of solid fats, {τ\\text{diff}}≤ft(T,{{c}S}\\right)=< {{r}2}> /6{D}≤ft(T,{{c}S}\\right) , where {D}≤ft(T,{{c}S}\\right) is their diffusion coefficient and < {{r}2}> is the typical average distance that fats must move in order to aggregate. The intent of this model is to show that a simple process can lead to a wide range of fractal dimensions. We showed that in the limit of very fast solid creation, {τ\\text{create}}\\ll {τ\\text{diff}} the fractal dimension is predicted to be that of DLCA, ~1.7, relaxing to that of RLCA, 2.0-2.1, and that in the limit of very slow solid creation, {τ\\text{create}}\\gg {τ\\text{diff}} , the fractal dimension is predicted to be that obtained via DLA, ~2.5, relaxing to that of RLA, 3

  19. Aggregation Limits Surface Expression of Homomeric GluA3 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sarah K; Hou, Ying; Willibald, Marina; Semenov, Artur; Möykkynen, Tommi; Keinänen, Kari

    2016-04-15

    AMPA receptors are glutamate-gated cation channels assembled from GluA1-4 subunits and have properties that are strongly dependent on the subunit composition. The subunits have different propensities to form homomeric or various heteromeric receptors expressed on cell surface, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we examined the biochemical basis for the poor ability of GluA3 subunits to form homomeric receptors, linked previously to two amino acid residues, Tyr-454 and Arg-461, in its ligand binding domain (LBD). Surface expression of GluA3 was improved by co-assembly with GluA2 but not with stargazin, a trafficking chaperone and modulator of AMPA receptors. The secretion efficiency of GluA2 and GluA3 LBDs paralleled the transport difference between the respective full-length receptors and was similarly dependent on Tyr-454/Arg-461 but not on LBD stability. In comparison to GluA2, GluA3 homomeric receptors showed a strong and Tyr-454/Arg-461-dependent tendency to aggregate both in the macroscopic scale measured as lower solubility in nonionic detergent and in the microscopic scale evident as the preponderance of hydrodynamically large structures in density gradient centrifugation and native gel electrophoresis. We conclude that the impaired surface expression of homomeric GluA3 receptors is caused by nonproductive assembly and aggregation to which LBD residues Tyr-454 and Arg-461 strongly contribute. This aggregation inhibits the entry of newly synthesized GluA3 receptors to the secretory pathway. PMID:26912664

  20. Detangling the Effects of Environmental Filtering and Dispersal Limitation on Aggregated Distributions of Tree and Shrub Species: Life Stage Matters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He-Ming; Wang, Zhang-Hua; Ma, Zun-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive pattern of aggregated tree distributions in natural communities is commonly explained by the joint effect of two clustering processes: environmental filtering and dispersal limitation, yet little consensus remains on the relative importance of the two clustering processes on tree aggregations. Different life stages of examined species were thought to be one possible explanation of this disagreement, because the effect of environmental filtering and dispersal limitation are expected to increase and decrease with tree life stages, respectively. However, few studies have explicitly tested these expectations. In this study, we evaluated these expectations by three different methods (species-habitat association test based on Poisson Clustering model and spatial point pattern analyses based on Heterogeneous Poisson model and the jointly modeling approach) using 36 species in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot. Our results showed that the percentage of species with significant habitat association increased with life stages, and there were fewer species affected by dispersal limitation in later life stages compared with those in earlier stages. Percentage of variance explained by the environmental filtering and dispersal limitation also increases and decreases with life stages. These results provided a promising alternative explanation on the existing mixed results about the relative importance of the two clustering processes. These findings also highlighted the importance of plant life stages for fully understanding species distributions and species coexistence. PMID:27227538

  1. Detangling the Effects of Environmental Filtering and Dispersal Limitation on Aggregated Distributions of Tree and Shrub Species: Life Stage Matters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Song; Shen, Guo-Chun; Liu, He-Ming; Wang, Zhang-Hua; Ma, Zun-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive pattern of aggregated tree distributions in natural communities is commonly explained by the joint effect of two clustering processes: environmental filtering and dispersal limitation, yet little consensus remains on the relative importance of the two clustering processes on tree aggregations. Different life stages of examined species were thought to be one possible explanation of this disagreement, because the effect of environmental filtering and dispersal limitation are expected to increase and decrease with tree life stages, respectively. However, few studies have explicitly tested these expectations. In this study, we evaluated these expectations by three different methods (species-habitat association test based on Poisson Clustering model and spatial point pattern analyses based on Heterogeneous Poisson model and the jointly modeling approach) using 36 species in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot. Our results showed that the percentage of species with significant habitat association increased with life stages, and there were fewer species affected by dispersal limitation in later life stages compared with those in earlier stages. Percentage of variance explained by the environmental filtering and dispersal limitation also increases and decreases with life stages. These results provided a promising alternative explanation on the existing mixed results about the relative importance of the two clustering processes. These findings also highlighted the importance of plant life stages for fully understanding species distributions and species coexistence. PMID:27227538

  2. Limited diffusive fluxes of substrate facilitate coexistence of two competing bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Or, Dani; Smets, Barth F

    2008-04-01

    Soils are known to support a great bacterial diversity down to the millimeter scale, but the mechanisms by which such a large diversity is sustained are largely unknown. A feature of unsaturated soils is that water usually forms thin, poorly-connected films, which limit solute diffusive fluxes. It has been proposed, but never unambiguously experimentally tested, that a low substrate diffusive flux would impact bacterial diversity, by promoting the coexistence between slow-growing bacteria and their potentially faster-growing competitors. We used a simple experimental system, based on a Petri dish and a perforated Teflon membrane to control diffusive fluxes of substrate (benzoate) whilst permitting direct observation of bacterial colonies. The system was inoculated with prescribed strains of Pseudomonas, whose growth was quantified by microscopic monitoring of the fluorescent proteins they produced. We observed that substrate diffusion limitation reduced the growth rate of the otherwise fast-growing Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain. This strain out-competed Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 in liquid culture, but its competitive advantage was less marked on solid media, and even disappeared under conditions of low substrate diffusion. Low diffusive fluxes of substrate, characteristic of many unsaturated media (e.g. soils, food products), can thus promote bacterial coexistence in a competitive situation between two strains. This mechanism might therefore contribute to maintaining the noncompetitive diversity pattern observed in unsaturated soils. PMID:18312376

  3. Underdamped scaled Brownian motion: (non-)existence of the overdamped limit in anomalous diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Bodrova, Anna S.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Safdari, Hadiseh; Sokolov, Igor M.; Metzler, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    It is quite generally assumed that the overdamped Langevin equation provides a quantitative description of the dynamics of a classical Brownian particle in the long time limit. We establish and investigate a paradigm anomalous diffusion process governed by an underdamped Langevin equation with an explicit time dependence of the system temperature and thus the diffusion and damping coefficients. We show that for this underdamped scaled Brownian motion (UDSBM) the overdamped limit fails to describe the long time behaviour of the system and may practically even not exist at all for a certain range of the parameter values. Thus persistent inertial effects play a non-negligible role even at significantly long times. From this study a general questions on the applicability of the overdamped limit to describe the long time motion of an anomalously diffusing particle arises, with profound consequences for the relevance of overdamped anomalous diffusion models. We elucidate our results in view of analytical and simulations results for the anomalous diffusion of particles in free cooling granular gases. PMID:27462008

  4. Underdamped scaled Brownian motion: (non-)existence of the overdamped limit in anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Bodrova, Anna S; Chechkin, Aleksei V; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Safdari, Hadiseh; Sokolov, Igor M; Metzler, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    It is quite generally assumed that the overdamped Langevin equation provides a quantitative description of the dynamics of a classical Brownian particle in the long time limit. We establish and investigate a paradigm anomalous diffusion process governed by an underdamped Langevin equation with an explicit time dependence of the system temperature and thus the diffusion and damping coefficients. We show that for this underdamped scaled Brownian motion (UDSBM) the overdamped limit fails to describe the long time behaviour of the system and may practically even not exist at all for a certain range of the parameter values. Thus persistent inertial effects play a non-negligible role even at significantly long times. From this study a general questions on the applicability of the overdamped limit to describe the long time motion of an anomalously diffusing particle arises, with profound consequences for the relevance of overdamped anomalous diffusion models. We elucidate our results in view of analytical and simulations results for the anomalous diffusion of particles in free cooling granular gases. PMID:27462008

  5. Scaling Limits of a Tagged Particle in the Exclusion Process with Variable Diffusion Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Patrícia; Jara, Milton

    2008-09-01

    We prove a law of large numbers and a central limit theorem for a tagged particle in a symmetric simple exclusion process in ℤ with variable diffusion coefficient. The scaling limits are obtained from a similar result for the current through -1/2 for a zero-range process with bond disorder. For the CLT, we prove convergence to a fractional Brownian motion of Hurst exponent 1/4.

  6. The effect of receptor clustering on diffusion-limited forward rate constants.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B; Wiegel, F W

    1983-01-01

    The effect of receptor clustering on the diffusion-limited forward rate constant (k+) is studied theoretically by modeling cell surface receptors by hemispheres distributed on a plane. We give both exact results and bounds. The exact results are obtained using an electrostatic analogue and applying the method of the images. Accurate upper bounds on k+ are found from a variational principle. PMID:6309261

  7. Carrier diffusion limited MTF of a back-illuminated pv detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sudha; Gopal, Vishnu; Chhabra, K. C.

    Carrier diffusion limited MTF of a back-illuminated HgCdTe-PV detector array has been calculated by including the multiple reflections within a CdTe-HgCdTe structure. Results of these calculations show that there is only a marginal improvement in MTF. The gain in quantum efficiency can however become substantial if the unilluminated surface is made strongly reflecting.

  8. Microwave extinction characteristics of nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Cheng, J. X.; Liu, X. X.; Wang, H. X.; Zhao, F. T.; Wen, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    Structure of nanoparticle aggregates plays an important role in microwave extinction capacity. The diffusion-limited aggregation model (DLA) for fractal growth is utilized to explore the possible structures of nanoparticle aggregates by computer simulation. Based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, the microwave extinction performance by different nano-carborundum aggregates is numerically analyzed. The effects of the particle quantity, original diameter, fractal structure, as well as orientation on microwave extinction are investigated, and also the extinction characteristics of aggregates are compared with the spherical nanoparticle in the same volume. Numerical results give out that proper aggregation of nanoparticle is beneficial to microwave extinction capacity, and the microwave extinction cross section by aggregated granules is better than that of the spherical solid one in the same volume.

  9. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  10. Mathematical model of diffusion-limited evolution of multiple gas bubbles in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Models of gas bubble dynamics employed in probabilistic analyses of decompression sickness incidence in man must be theoretically consistent and simple, if they are to yield useful results without requiring excessive computations. They are generally formulated in terms of ordinary differential equations that describe diffusion-limited gas exchange between a gas bubble and the extravascular tissue surrounding it. In our previous model (Ann. Biomed. Eng. 30: 232-246, 2002), we showed that with appropriate representation of sink pressures to account for gas loss or gain due to heterogeneous blood perfusion in the unstirred diffusion region around the bubble, diffusion-limited bubble growth in a tissue of finite volume can be simulated without postulating a boundary layer across which gas flux is discontinuous. However, interactions between two or more bubbles caused by competition for available gas cannot be considered in this model, because the diffusion region has a fixed volume with zero gas flux at its outer boundary. The present work extends the previous model to accommodate interactions among multiple bubbles by allowing the diffusion region volume of each bubble to vary during bubble evolution. For given decompression and tissue volume, bubble growth is sustained only if the bubble number density is below a certain maximum.

  11. Limiting diffusion current at rotating disk electrode with dense particle layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weroński, P.; Nosek, M.; Batys, P.

    2013-09-01

    Exploiting the concept of diffusion permeability of multilayer gel membrane and porous multilayer we have derived a simple analytical equation for the limiting diffusion current at rotating disk electrode (RDE) covered by a thin layer with variable tortuosity and porosity, under the assumption of negligible convection in the porous film. The variation of limiting diffusion current with the porosity and tortuosity of the film can be described in terms of the equivalent thickness of stagnant solution layer, i.e., the average ratio of squared tortuosity to porosity. In case of monolayer of monodisperse spherical particles, the equivalent layer thickness is an algebraic function of the surface coverage. Thus, by means of cyclic voltammetry of RDE with a deposited particle monolayer we can determine the monolayer surface coverage. The effect of particle layer adsorbed on the surface of RDE increases non-linearly with surface coverage. We have tested our theoretical results experimentally by means of cyclic voltammetry measurements of limiting diffusion current at the glassy carbon RDE covered with a monolayer of 3 μm silica particles. The theoretical and experimental results are in a good agreement at the surface coverage higher than 0.7. This result suggests that convection in a monolayer of 3 μm monodisperse spherical particles is negligibly small, in the context of the coverage determination, in the range of very dense particle layers.

  12. Feedback localization of freely diffusing fluorescent particles near the optical shot-noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Andrew J.; McHale, Kevin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We report near-optimal tracking of freely diffusing fluorescent particles in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry via photon counting and real-time feedback. We present a quantitative statistical model of our feedback network and find excellent agreement with the experiment. We monitor the motion of a single fluorescent particle with a sensitivity of 15 nm/sqrt Hz while collecting fewer than 5000 fluorescence photons/s. Fluorescent microspheres (diffusion coefficient 1.3 μm2/s) are tracked with a root-mean-square tracking error of 170 nm, within a factor of 2 of the theoretical limit set by photon counting shot noise.

  13. Non-normalizable densities in strong anomalous diffusion: beyond the central limit theorem.

    PubMed

    Rebenshtok, Adi; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Barkai, Eli

    2014-03-21

    Strong anomalous diffusion, where ⟨|x(t)|(q)⟩ ∼ tqν(q) with a nonlinear spectrum ν(q) ≠ const, is wide spread and has been found in various nonlinear dynamical systems and experiments on active transport in living cells. Using a stochastic approach we show how this phenomenon is related to infinite covariant densities; i.e., the asymptotic states of these systems are described by non-normalizable distribution functions. Our work shows that the concept of infinite covariant densities plays an important role in the statistical description of open systems exhibiting multifractal anomalous diffusion, as it is complementary to the central limit theorem. PMID:24702341

  14. Oxygen diffusion limitation triggers ventilatory movements during spiracle closure when insects breathe discontinuously.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Sender, Roi; Gefen, Eran

    2014-07-01

    During discontinuous gas exchange cycles in insects, spiracular opening follows a typical prolonged period of spiracle closure. Gas exchange with the environment occurs mostly during the period of full spiracular opening. In this study we tested the hypothesis that recently reported ventilatory movements during the spiracle closure period serve to mix the tracheal system gaseous contents, and support diffusive exchanges with the tissues. Using heliox (21% O2, 79% He), we found that by increasing oxygen diffusivity in the gas phase, ventilatory movements of Schistocerca gregaria were significantly delayed compared with normoxic conditions. Exposure to hyperoxic conditions (40% O2, 60% N2) resulted in a similar delay in forced ventilation. Together, these results indicate that limits to oxygen diffusion to the tissues during spiracle closure trigger ventilatory movements, which in turn support tissue demands. These findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of respiratory gas exchange between insect tissues and the environment. PMID:24737753

  15. Limitations and Prospects for Diffusion-Weighted MRI of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Roger; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is the most effective component of the modern multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) scan for prostate pathology. DWI provides the strongest prediction of cancer volume, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) correlates moderately with Gleason grade. Notwithstanding the demonstrated cancer assessment value of DWI, the standard measurement and signal analysis methods are based on a model of water diffusion dynamics that is well known to be invalid in human tissue. This review describes the biophysical limitations of the DWI component of the current standard mpMRI protocol and the potential for significantly improved cancer assessment performance based on more sophisticated measurement and signal modeling techniques. PMID:27240408

  16. Limitations and Prospects for Diffusion-Weighted MRI of the Prostate.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Roger; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is the most effective component of the modern multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) scan for prostate pathology. DWI provides the strongest prediction of cancer volume, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) correlates moderately with Gleason grade. Notwithstanding the demonstrated cancer assessment value of DWI, the standard measurement and signal analysis methods are based on a model of water diffusion dynamics that is well known to be invalid in human tissue. This review describes the biophysical limitations of the DWI component of the current standard mpMRI protocol and the potential for significantly improved cancer assessment performance based on more sophisticated measurement and signal modeling techniques. PMID:27240408

  17. A Bayesian approach to distinguishing interdigitated tongue muscles from limited diffusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chuyang; Murano, Emi; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2015-10-01

    The tongue is a critical organ for a variety of functions, including swallowing, respiration, and speech. It contains intrinsic and extrinsic muscles that play an important role in changing its shape and position. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to reconstruct tongue muscle fiber tracts. However, previous studies have been unable to reconstruct the crossing fibers that occur where the tongue muscles interdigitate, which is a large percentage of the tongue volume. To resolve crossing fibers, multi-tensor models on DTI and more advanced imaging modalities, such as high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), have been proposed. However, because of the involuntary nature of swallowing, there is insufficient time to acquire a sufficient number of diffusion gradient directions to resolve crossing fibers while the in vivo tongue is in a fixed position. In this work, we address the challenge of distinguishing interdigitated tongue muscles from limited diffusion magnetic resonance imaging by using a multi-tensor model with a fixed tensor basis and incorporating prior directional knowledge. The prior directional knowledge provides information on likely fiber directions at each voxel, and is computed with anatomical knowledge of tongue muscles. The fiber directions are estimated within a maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework, and the resulting objective function is solved using a noise-aware weighted ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm. Experiments were performed on a digital crossing phantom and in vivo tongue diffusion data including three control subjects and four patients with glossectomies. On the digital phantom, effects of parameters, noise, and prior direction accuracy were studied, and parameter settings for real data were determined. The results on the in vivo data demonstrate that the proposed method is able to resolve interdigitated tongue muscles with limited gradient directions. The distributions of the

  18. Mathematical model of diffusion-limited gas bubble dynamics in unstirred tissue with finite volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Models of gas bubble dynamics for studying decompression sickness have been developed by considering the bubble to be immersed in an extravascular tissue with diffusion-limited gas exchange between the bubble and the surrounding unstirred tissue. In previous versions of this two-region model, the tissue volume must be theoretically infinite, which renders the model inapplicable to analysis of bubble growth in a finite-sized tissue. We herein present a new two-region model that is applicable to problems involving finite tissue volumes. By introducing radial deviations to gas tension in the diffusion region surrounding the bubble, the concentration gradient can be zero at a finite distance from the bubble, thus limiting the tissue volume that participates in bubble-tissue gas exchange. It is shown that these deviations account for the effects of heterogeneous perfusion on gas bubble dynamics, and are required for the tissue volume to be finite. The bubble growth results from a difference between the bubble gas pressure and an average gas tension in the surrounding diffusion region that explicitly depends on gas uptake and release by the bubble. For any given decompression, the diffusion region volume must stay above a certain minimum in order to sustain bubble growth.

  19. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  20. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as 'source tilting'. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  1. Self-similar fast-reaction limits for reaction-diffusion systems on unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, E. C. M.; Hilhorst, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a unified approach to characterising fast-reaction limits of systems of either two reaction-diffusion equations, or one reaction-diffusion equation and one ordinary differential equation, on unbounded domains, motivated by models of fast chemical reactions where either one or both reactant(s) is/are mobile. For appropriate initial data, solutions of four classes of problems each converge in the fast-reaction limit k → ∞ to a self-similar limit profile that has one of four forms, depending on how many components diffuse and whether the spatial domain is a half or whole line. For fixed k, long-time convergence to these same self-similar profiles is also established, thanks to a scaling argument of Kamin. Our results generalise earlier work of Hilhorst, van der Hout and Peletier to a much wider class of problems, and provide a quantitative description of the penetration of one substance into another in both the fast-reaction and long-time regimes.

  2. Diffusion-Limited Agglomeration and Defect Generation during Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, R.; Han, Y.; Karra, P.; Sherman, P.; Chandra, A.

    2008-06-06

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of copper involves removal of surface asperities with abrasive particles and polishing processes. This leads to copper-containing nanoparticles extruded into the solution. We model the diffusion-limited agglomeration (DLA) of such nanoparticles which can rapidly grow to large sizes. These large particles are detrimental because they can participate in polishing, causing scratches and surface defects during CMP. The agglomeration is much slower in the reaction-limited agglomeration process. Under realistic conditions the defect generation probability can increase significantly over time scales of {approx}10 to 20 min from DLA, unless prevented by slurry rejuvenation or process modification measures.

  3. Flux-limited diffusion in a scattering medium. [such as accretion-disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Zylstra, Gregory J.

    1991-01-01

    A diffusion equation (FDT) is presented with a coefficient that reduces to the appropriate limiting form in the streaming and near thermodynamic limits for a moving fluid in which the dominant source of opacity is Thomson scattering. The present results are compared to those obtained with the corresponding equations for an absorptive medium. It is found that FDT for a scattering medium is accurate to better than less than about 17 percent over the range of optical depths of tau in the range of about 0 to 3.

  4. Model of alpha particle diffusion in the outer limiter shadow of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. |; Zweben, S.J.

    1996-05-01

    A new code, Monte Carlo Collisional Stochastic Orbit Retracing (MCCSOR), has been developed to model the alpha particle loss signal as measured by the outer midplane scintillator detector in TFTR. The shadowing effects due to the outer limiters and the detector itself have been included, along with a pitch angle scattering and stochastic ripple diffusion. Shadowing by the outer limiters has a strong effect on both the magnitude and pitch angle distribution of the calculated loss. There is at least qualitative agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data.

  5. Nano Vacancy Clusters and Trap Limited Diffusion of Si Interstitials in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Wei-Kan Chu

    2010-05-05

    consecutive steps. (a) First, high energy self ion irradiation is used to create a wide vacancy-rich region, and to form voids by post implantation annealing. (b) In an additional annealing step in oxygen ambient, Si interstitials are injected in by surface oxidation. (c) Analyzing trap-limited diffusion of Si interstitials, which is experimentally detectable by studying the diffusion of multiple boron superlattices grown in Si, and enables us to characterize the nano voids, e.g. their sizes and densities.

  6. Effect of Diffusion Limitations on Multianalyte Determination from Biased Biosensor Response

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas; Lančinskas, Algirdas; Žilinskas, Antanas

    2014-01-01

    The optimization-based quantitative determination of multianalyte concentrations from biased biosensor responses is investigated under internal and external diffusion-limited conditions. A computational model of a biocatalytic amperometric biosensor utilizing a mono-enzyme-catalyzed (nonspecific) competitive conversion of two substrates was used to generate pseudo-experimental responses to mixtures of compounds. The influence of possible perturbations of the biosensor signal, due to a white noise- and temperature-induced trend, on the precision of the concentration determination has been investigated for different configurations of the biosensor operation. The optimization method was found to be suitable and accurate enough for the quantitative determination of the concentrations of the compounds from a given biosensor transient response. The computational experiments showed a complex dependence of the precision of the concentration estimation on the relative thickness of the outer diffusion layer, as well as on whether the biosensor operates under diffusion- or kinetics-limited conditions. When the biosensor response is affected by the induced exponential trend, the duration of the biosensor action can be optimized for increasing the accuracy of the quantitative analysis. PMID:24608006

  7. Possible complication regarding phosphorus removal with a continuous flow biofilm system: diffusion limitation.

    PubMed

    Falkentoft, C M; Arnz, P; Henze, M; Mosbaek, H; Müller, E; Wilderer, P A; Harremoës, P

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion limitation of phosphate possibly constitutes a serious problem regarding the use of a biofilm reactor for enhanced biological phosphorus removal. A lab-scale reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated in a continuous alternating mode of operation. For a steady-state operation with excess amounts of carbon source (acetate) during the anaerobic phase, the same amount of phosphate was released during the anaerobic phase as was taken up during the anoxic phase. The measured phosphorus content of the biomass that detached during backwash after an anoxic phase was low, 2.4 +/- 0.4% (equal to 24 +/- 4 mg P/g TS). A simplified computer model indicated the reason to be phosphate diffusion limitation and the model revealed a delicate balance between the obtainable phosphorus contents of the biomass and operating parameters, such as backwash interval, biofilm thickness after backwash, and phase lengths. The aspect of diffusion is considered of crucial importance when evaluating the performance of a biofilter for phosphate removal. PMID:11400109

  8. Pushing the limits of in vivo diffusion MRI for the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Setsompop, K.; Kimmlingen, R.; Eberlein, E.; Witzel, T.; Cohen-Adad, J.; McNab, J.A.; Keil, B.; Tisdall, M.D.; Hoecht, P.; Dietz, P.; Cauley, S.F.; Tountcheva, V.; Matschl, V.; Lenz, V. H.; Heberlein, K.; Potthast, A.; Thein, H.; Van Horn, J.; Toga, A.; Schmitt, F.; Lehne, D.; Rosen, B.R.; Wedeen, V.; Wald, L.L.

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps more than any other “-omics” endeavor, the accuracy and level of detail obtained from mapping the major connection pathways in the living human brain with diffusion MRI depends on the capabilities of the imaging technology used. The current tools are remarkable; allowing the formation of an “image” of the water diffusion probability distribution in regions of complex crossing fibers at each of half a million voxels in the brain. Nonetheless our ability to map the connection pathways is limited by the image sensitivity and resolution, and also the contrast and resolution in encoding of the diffusion probability distribution. The goal of our Human Connectome Project (HCP) is to address these limiting factors by re-engineering the scanner from the ground up to optimize the high b-value, high angular resolution diffusion imaging needed for sensitive and accurate mapping of the brain’s structural connections. Our efforts were directed based on the relative contributions of each scanner component. The gradient subsection was a major focus since gradient amplitude is central to determining the diffusion contrast, the amount of T2 signal loss, and the blurring of the water PDF over the course of the diffusion time. By implementing a novel 4-port drive geometry and optimizing size and linearity for the brain, we demonstrate a whole-body sized scanner with Gmax = 300mT/m on each axis capable of the sustained duty cycle needed for diffusion imaging. The system is capable of slewing the gradient at a rate of 200 T/m/s as needed for the EPI image encoding. In order to enhance the efficiency of the diffusion sequence we implemented a FOV shifting approach to Simultaneous MultiSlice (SMS) EPI capable of unaliasing 3 slices excited simultaneously with a modest g-factor penalty allowing us to diffusion encode whole brain volumes with low TR and TE. Finally we combine the multi-slice approach with a compressive sampling reconstruction to sufficiently undersample q

  9. Pushing the limits of in vivo diffusion MRI for the Human Connectome Project.

    PubMed

    Setsompop, K; Kimmlingen, R; Eberlein, E; Witzel, T; Cohen-Adad, J; McNab, J A; Keil, B; Tisdall, M D; Hoecht, P; Dietz, P; Cauley, S F; Tountcheva, V; Matschl, V; Lenz, V H; Heberlein, K; Potthast, A; Thein, H; Van Horn, J; Toga, A; Schmitt, F; Lehne, D; Rosen, B R; Wedeen, V; Wald, L L

    2013-10-15

    Perhaps more than any other "-omics" endeavor, the accuracy and level of detail obtained from mapping the major connection pathways in the living human brain with diffusion MRI depend on the capabilities of the imaging technology used. The current tools are remarkable; allowing the formation of an "image" of the water diffusion probability distribution in regions of complex crossing fibers at each of half a million voxels in the brain. Nonetheless our ability to map the connection pathways is limited by the image sensitivity and resolution, and also the contrast and resolution in encoding of the diffusion probability distribution. The goal of our Human Connectome Project (HCP) is to address these limiting factors by re-engineering the scanner from the ground up to optimize the high b-value, high angular resolution diffusion imaging needed for sensitive and accurate mapping of the brain's structural connections. Our efforts were directed based on the relative contributions of each scanner component. The gradient subsection was a major focus since gradient amplitude is central to determining the diffusion contrast, the amount of T2 signal loss, and the blurring of the water PDF over the course of the diffusion time. By implementing a novel 4-port drive geometry and optimizing size and linearity for the brain, we demonstrate a whole-body sized scanner with G(max) = 300 mT/m on each axis capable of the sustained duty cycle needed for diffusion imaging. The system is capable of slewing the gradient at a rate of 200 T/m/s as needed for the EPI image encoding. In order to enhance the efficiency of the diffusion sequence we implemented a FOV shifting approach to Simultaneous MultiSlice (SMS) EPI capable of unaliasing 3 slices excited simultaneously with a modest g-factor penalty allowing us to diffusion encode whole brain volumes with low TR and TE. Finally we combine the multi-slice approach with a compressive sampling reconstruction to sufficiently undersample q-space to

  10. Diffuse reflectance optical topography: location of inclusions in 3D and detectability limits

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, N. A.; Baez, G. R.; García, H. A.; Waks Serra, M. V.; Di Rocco, H. O.; Iriarte, D. I.; Pomarico, J. A.; Grosenick, D.; Macdonald, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present contribution we investigate the images of CW diffusely reflected light for a point-like source, registered by a CCD camera imaging a turbid medium containing an absorbing lesion. We show that detection of μa variations (absorption anomalies) is achieved if images are normalized to background intensity. A theoretical analysis based on the diffusion approximation is presented to investigate the sensitivity and the limitations of our proposal and a novel procedure to find the location of the inclusions in 3D is given and tested. An analysis of the noise and its influence on the detection capabilities of our proposal is provided. Experimental results on phantoms are also given, supporting the proposed approach. PMID:24876999

  11. Quantum Mechanical Limitations to Spin Diffusion in the Unitary Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, Tilman; Haussmann, Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    We compute spin transport in the unitary Fermi gas using the strong-coupling Luttinger-Ward theory. In the quantum degenerate regime the spin diffusivity attains a minimum value of Ds≃1.3ℏ/m approaching the quantum limit of diffusion for a particle of mass m. Conversely, the spin drag rate reaches a maximum value of Γsd≃1.2kBTF/ℏ in terms of the Fermi temperature TF. The frequency-dependent spin conductivity σs(ω) exhibits a broad Drude peak, with spectral weight transferred to a universal high-frequency tail σs(ω→∞)=ℏ1/2C/3π(mω)3/2 proportional to the Tan contact density C. For the spin susceptibility χs(T) we find no downturn in the normal phase.

  12. Theoretical limit of spatial resolution in diffuse optical tomography using a perturbation model

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, A B; Vlasov, V V

    2014-03-28

    We have assessed the limit of spatial resolution of timedomain diffuse optical tomography (DOT) based on a perturbation reconstruction model. From the viewpoint of the structure reconstruction accuracy, three different approaches to solving the inverse DOT problem are compared. The first approach involves reconstruction of diffuse tomograms from straight lines, the second – from average curvilinear trajectories of photons and the third – from total banana-shaped distributions of photon trajectories. In order to obtain estimates of resolution, we have derived analytical expressions for the point spread function and modulation transfer function, as well as have performed a numerical experiment on reconstruction of rectangular scattering objects with circular absorbing inhomogeneities. It is shown that in passing from reconstruction from straight lines to reconstruction using distributions of photon trajectories we can improve resolution by almost an order of magnitude and exceed the accuracy of reconstruction of multi-step algorithms used in DOT. (optical tomography)

  13. Averaging and spectral properties for the 2D advection-diffusion equation in the semi-classical limit for vanishing diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukadinovic, J.; Dedits, E.; Poje, A. C.; Schäfer, T.

    2015-08-01

    We consider the two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation (ADE) on a bounded domain subject to Dirichlet or von Neumann boundary conditions involving a Liouville integrable Hamiltonian. Transformation to action-angle coordinates permits averaging in time and angle, resulting in an equation that allows for separation of variables. The Fourier transform in the angle coordinate transforms the equation into an effective diffusive equation and a countable family of non-self-adjoint Schrödinger equations. For the corresponding Liouville-Sturm problem, we apply complex-plane WKB methods to study the spectrum in the semi-classical limit for vanishing diffusivity. The spectral limit graph is found to consist of analytic curves (branches) related to Stokes graphs forming a tree-structure. Eigenvalues in the neighborhood of branches emanating from the imaginary axis are subject to various sublinear power laws with respect to diffusivity, leading to convection-enhanced rates of dissipation of the corresponding modes. The solution of the ADE converges in the limit of vanishing diffusivity to the solution of the effective diffusion equation on convective time scales that are sublinear with respect to the diffusive time scales.

  14. Scleroderma lung study (SLS): differences in the presentation and course of patients with limited versus diffuse systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Clements, P J; Roth, M D; Elashoff, R; Tashkin, D P; Goldin, J; Silver, R M; Sterz, M; Seibold, J R; Schraufnagel, D; Simms, R W; Bolster, M; Wise, R A; Steen, V; Mayes, M D; Connelly, K; Metersky, M; Furst, D E

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary fibrosis is a leading cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc). This report examines the differences at baseline and over 12 months between patients with limited versus diffuse cutaneous SSc who participated in the Scleroderma Lung Study. Methods SSc patients (64 limited; 94 diffuse) exhibiting dyspnoea on exertion, restrictive pulmonary function and evidence of alveolitis on bronchoalveolar lavage and/or high‐resolution computed tomography (HRCT) were randomised to receive cyclophosphamide (CYC) or placebo and serially evaluated over 12 months. Results Baseline measures of alveolitis, dyspnoea and pulmonary function were similar in limited and diffuse SSc. However, differences were noted with respect to HRCT‐scored fibrosis (worse in limited SSc), and to functional activity, quality of life, skin and musculoskeletal manifestations (worse in diffuse SSc) (p<0.05). When adjusted for the baseline level of fibrosis, both groups responded similarly to CYC with regard to lung function and dyspnoea (p<0.05). Cyclophosphamide was also associated with more improvement in skin score in the diffuse disease group more than in the limited disease group (p<0.05). Conclusions After adjusting for the severity of fibrosis at baseline, CYC slowed the decline of lung volumes and improved dyspnoea equally in the limited and the diffuse SSc groups. On the other hand, diffuse SSc patients responded better than limited patients with respect to improvements in skin thickening. PMID:17485423

  15. Exact Results for a Diffusion-Limited Pair Annihilation Process on a One-Dimensional Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Tomohiro

    2000-05-01

    The process of pair annihilation of particles diffusing on a ring ofone-dimensional lattice is studied analytically.A set of master equations for the distribution functions of particlesare solved exactly for the initial condition of uniform, randomdistribution of particles.An explicit expression for the time dependence of the densityof particles is derived from the distribution functions.In the limit of infinite lattice, the present result agreeswith the one obtained by [Balding, Clifford and Green:Phys. Lett. A 126 (1988) 481].

  16. 1,4-Addition of Lithium Diisopropylamide to Unsaturated Esters: Role of Rate-Limiting Deaggregation, Autocatalysis, Lithium Chloride Catalysis and Other Mixed Aggregation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yun; Hoepker, Alexander C.; Gupta, Lekha; Faggin, Marc F.; Collum, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in tetrahydrofuran at −78 °C undergoes 1,4-addition to an unsaturated ester via a rate-limiting deaggregation of LDA dimer followed by a post-rate-limiting reaction with the substrate. Muted autocatalysis is traced to a lithium enolate-mediated deaggregation of the LDA dimer and the intervention of LDA-lithium enolate mixed aggregates displaying higher reactivities than LDA. Striking accelerations are elicited by <1.0 mol % LiCl. Rate and mechanistic studies reveal that the uncatalyzed and catalyzed pathways funnel through a common monosolvated-monomer-based intermediate. Four distinct classes of mixed aggregation effects are discussed. PMID:20961095

  17. Development of the new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Veshchunov, M. S.

    2012-04-15

    The new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory, recently proposed by the author, is further developed on the base of a similar approach to Brownian coagulation. The traditional diffusion approach to calculation of the reaction rate is critically analyzed. In particular, it is shown that the traditional approach is applicable only in the special case of reactions with a large reaction radius and the mean inter-particle distances, and become inappropriate in calculating the reaction rate in the case of a relatively small reaction radius. In the latter case, most important for chemical reactions, particle collisions occur not in the diffusion regime but mainly in the kinetic regime characterized by homogeneous (random) spatial distribution of particles on the length scale of the mean inter-particle distance. The calculated reaction rate for a small reaction radius in three dimensions formally (and fortuitously) coincides with the expression derived in the traditional approach for reactions with a large reaction radius, but notably deviates at large times from the traditional result in the planar two-dimensional geometry. In application to reactions on discrete lattice sites, new relations for the reaction rate constants are derived for both three-dimensional and two-dimensional lattices.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann method for diffusion-limited partial dissolution of fluids.

    PubMed

    Aursjø, Olav; Pride, Steven R

    2015-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for two partially miscible fluids is developed. By partially miscible we mean that, although there is a definite interfacial region separating the two fluids with a surface tension force acting at all points of the transition region, each fluid can nonetheless accept molecules from the other fluid up to a set solubility limit. We allow each fluid to diffuse into the other with the solubility and diffusivity in each fluid being input parameters. The approach is to define two regions within the fluid: one interfacial region having finite width, across which most of the concentration change occurs, and in which a surface tension force and color separation step are allowed for and one miscible fluid region where the concentration of the binary fluids follows an advection-diffusion equation and the mixture as a whole obeys the Navier-Stokes incompressible flow equations. Numerical examples are presented in which the algorithm produces results that are quantitatively compared to exact analytical results as well as qualitatively examined for their reasonableness. The model has the ability to simulate how bubbles of one fluid flow through another while dissolving their contents as well as to simulate a range of practical invasion problems such as injecting supercritical CO(2) into a porous material saturated with water for sequestration purposes. PMID:26274306

  19. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

  20. Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The primary advantages of establishing such operating limits include (a) technically defensible screening criteria for landfill-destined solid wastes, (b) significant reductions in the required capacity of radioactive waste storage and disposal facilities, and (c) reductions in costs associated with storage and disposal of radioactive materials. The approach was based on analyses of potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (a) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to groundwater, (b) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (c) calculations of operating limits from the dose objective and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted.

  1. Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C.

    1994-05-24

    The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The approach was based on analyses of the potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (1) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to the groundwater, (2) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (3) calculations of operating limits from the dose limit and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted. The intended application of the results is to refine the radiological monitoring standards employed by the PGDP Health Physics personnel to determine what constitutes radioactive wastes, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

  2. On the limits of applicability of drift-diffusion based hot carrier degradation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jech, Markus; Sharma, Prateek; Tyaginov, Stanislav; Rudolf, Florian; Grasser, Tibor

    2016-04-01

    We study the limits of the applicability of a drift-diffusion (DD) based model for hot-carrier degradation (HCD). In this approach the rigorous but computationally expensive solution of the Boltzmann transport equation is replaced by an analytic expression for the carrier energy distribution function. On the one hand, we already showed that the simplified version of our HCD model is quite successful for LDMOS devices. On the other hand, hot carrier degradation models based on the drift-diffusion and energy transport schemes were shown to fail for planar MOSFETs with gate lengths of 0.5-2.0 µm. To investigate the limits of validity of the DD-based HCD model, we use planar nMOSFETs of an identical topology but with different gate lengths of 2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 µm. We show that, although the model is able to adequately represent the linear and saturation drain current changes in the 2.0 µm transistor, it starts to fail for gate lengths shorter than 1.5 µm and becomes completely inadequate for the 1.0 µm device.

  3. Prevalence of Escherichia coli strains with localized, diffuse, and aggregative adherence to HeLa cells in infants with diarrhea and matched controls.

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, T A; Blake, P A; Trabulsi, L R

    1989-01-01

    To determine the possible role of Escherichia coli strains with three different patterns of adherence to HeLa cells in causing diarrhea in infants in São Paulo, Brazil, we studied stool specimens from 100 infants up to 1 year of age with acute diarrheal illnesses and 100 age-matched control infants without recent diarrhea. E. coli with localized adherence to HeLa cells was much more common in patients (23%) than in controls (2%) (P less than 0.0001) and was detected more frequently than rotavirus (19%) was in patients, even though the study was conducted during the coldest months of the year. Most (80%) of the E. coli colonies with localized adherence were of traditional enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes. Little difference was found between patients and controls in the rate of isolation of E. coli with diffuse adherence (31 and 32%, respectively) or aggregative adherence (10 and 8%, respectively). A genetic probe used to detect a plasmid-mediated adhesin which confers expression of localized adherence proved to be 100% sensitive and 99.9% specific in detecting E. coli with localized adherence to HeLa cells. Although E. coli strains with localized adherence have now been shown to be enteric pathogens in several parts of the world, the role of strains showing diffuse adherence and aggregative adherence is still uncertain. PMID:2563383

  4. Occurrence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and an endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation in diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, J L; Kemp, A; Rogers, M; Mallet, A I; Toia, R F; Spur, B; Earl, J W; Chesterman, C N; Krilis, S A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified PAF in the blister fluid from a patient with bullous mastocytosis, a rare form of mast-cell disease. We have found a novel endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation which obscured the presence of the PAF in unprocessed blister fluid and in ethanol or lipid extracts. The PAF was characterized by the demonstration of chromatographic, mass spectral and biological properties identical to those of authentic PAF. Thus this is the first demonstration of PAF in biological fluid from a patient with mastocytosis. High levels of immunoreactive prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and histamine were also present in the blister fluid. The interaction between PAF and the inhibitor of platelet aggregation in patients with systemic mastocytosis may provide an explanation for some of the manifestations of the disease, in particular the episodic hypotension, cutaneous flushing and pallor. PMID:2805409

  5. Effects of chemical mechanical planarization slurry additives on the agglomeration of alumina nanoparticles II: aggregation rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Brahma, Neil; Talbot, Jan B

    2014-04-01

    The aggregation rate and mechanism of 150 nm alumina particles in 1mM KNO3 with various additives used in chemical mechanical planarization of copper were investigated. The pH of each suspension was ∼8 such that the aggregation rate was slow enough to be measured and analyzed over ∼120 min. In general, an initial exponential growth was observed for most suspensions indicating reaction-limited aggregation. After aggregate sizes increase to >500 nm, the rate followed a power law suggesting diffusion-limited aggregation. Stability ratios and fractal dimension numbers were also calculated to further elucidate the aggregation mechanism. PMID:24491325

  6. Aggregates and Superaggregates of Soot with Four Distinct Fractal Morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, C. M.; Kim, W.; Fry, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Soot formed in laminar diffusion flames of heavily sooting fuels evolves through four distinct growth stages which give rise to four distinct aggregate fractal morphologies. These results were inferred from large and small angle static light scattering from the flames, microphotography of the flames, and analysis of soot sampled from the flames. The growth stages occur approximately over four successive orders of magnitude in aggregate size. Comparison to computer simulations suggests that these four growth stages involve either diffusion limited cluster aggregation or percolation in either three or two dimensions.

  7. Kinetic effects of toluene blending on the extinction limit of n-decane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Sang Hee; Sun, Wenting; Ju, Yiguang

    2010-03-15

    The impact of toluene addition in n-decane on OH concentrations, maximum heat release rates, and extinction limits were studied experimentally and computationally by using counterflow diffusion flames with laser induced fluorescence imaging. Sensitivity analyses of kinetic path ways and species transport on flame extinction were also conducted. The results showed that the extinction strain rate of n-decane/toluene/nitrogen flames decreased significantly with an increase of toluene addition and depended linearly on the maximum OH concentration. It was revealed that the maximum OH concentration, which depends on the fuel H/C ratio, can be used as an index of the radical pool and chemical heat release rate, since it plays a significant role on the heat production via the reaction with other species, such as CO, H{sub 2}, and HCO. Experimental results further demonstrated that toluene addition in n-decane dramatically reduced the peak OH concentration via H abstraction reactions and accelerated flame extinction via kinetic coupling between toluene and n-decane mechanisms. Comparisons between experiments and simulations revealed that the current toluene mechanism significantly over-predicts the radical destruction rate, leading to under-prediction of extinction limits and OH concentrations, especially caused by the uncertainty of the H abstraction reaction from toluene, which rate coefficient has a difference by a factor of 5 in the tested toluene models. In addition, sensitivity analysis of diffusive transport showed that in addition to n-decane and toluene, the transport of OH and H also considerably affects the extinction limit. A reduced linear correlation between the extinction limits of n-decane/toluene blended fuels and the H/C ratio as well as the mean fuel molecular weight was obtained. The results suggest that an explicit prediction of the extinction limits of aromatic and alkane blended fuels can be established by using H/C ratio (or radical index) and the

  8. Universal diffusion-limited injection and the hook effect in organic thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan; Huseynova, Gunel; Xu, Yong; Long, Dang Xuan; Park, Won-Tae; Liu, Xuying; Minari, Takeo; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-07-01

    The general form of interfacial contact resistance was derived for organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) covering various injection mechanisms. Devices with a broad range of materials for contacts, semiconductors, and dielectrics were investigated and the charge injections in staggered OTFTs was found to universally follow the proposed form in the diffusion-limited case, which is signified by the mobility-dependent injection at the metal-semiconductor interfaces. Hence, real ohmic contact can hardly ever be achieved in OTFTs with low carrier concentrations and mobility, and the injection mechanisms include thermionic emission, diffusion, and surface recombination. The non-ohmic injection in OTFTs is manifested by the generally observed hook shape of the output conductance as a function of the drain field. The combined theoretical and experimental results show that interfacial contact resistance generally decreases with carrier mobility, and the injection current is probably determined by the surface recombination rate, which can be promoted by bulk-doping, contact modifications with charge injection layers and dopant layers, and dielectric engineering with high-k dielectric materials.

  9. Numerical simulation of transonic limit cycle oscillations using high-order low-diffusion schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoyuan; Zha, Ge-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    This paper simulates the NLR7301 airfoil limit cycle oscillation (LCO) caused by fluid-structure interaction (FSI) using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) coupled with Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) one-equation turbulence model. A low diffusion E-CUSP (LDE) scheme with 5th order weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme (WENO) is employed to calculate the inviscid fluxes. A fully conservative 4th order central differencing is used for the viscous terms. A fully coupled fluid-structural interaction model is employed. For the case computed in this paper, the predicted LCO frequency, amplitudes, averaged lift and moment, all agree excellently with the experiment performed by Schewe et al. The solutions appear to have bifurcation and are dependent on the initial fields or initial perturbation. The developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/computational structure dynamics (CSD) simulation is able to capture the LCO with very small amplitudes measured in the experiment. This is attributed to the high order low diffusion schemes, fully coupled FSI model, and the turbulence model used. This research appears to be the first time that a numerical simulation of LCO matches the experiment. The simulation confirms several observations of the experiment.

  10. Forecasting sales of new vehicle with limited data using Bass diffusion model and Grey theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu, Noratikah; Ismail, Zuhaimy

    2015-02-01

    New product forecasting is a process that determines a reasonable estimate of sales attainable under a given set of conditions. There are several new products forecasting method in practices and Bass Diffusion Model (BDM) is one of the most common new product diffusion model used in many industries to forecast new product and technology. Hence, this paper proposed a combining BDM with Grey theory to forecast sales of new vehicle in Malaysia that certainly have limited data to build a model on. The aims of this paper is to examine the accuracy of different new product forecasting models and thus identify which is the best among the basic BDM and combining BDM with Grey theory. The results show that combining BDM with Grey theory performs better than the basic BDM based on in-sample and out-sample mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). Results also reveals combining model forecast more effectively and accurately even with insufficient previous data on the new vehicle in Malaysia.

  11. Intermolecular electron transfer rate in diffusion limited region: Picosecond fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Periasamy, N.; Modi, S.; Dutt, G. Bhaskar; Doraiswamy, S.

    1992-12-01

    The temporal profiles of the quenched fluorescence decay of the free base meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (H 2TPP) and its Zn derivative (ZnTPP) with quenchers such as quinones and m-dinitrobenzene have been analysed by methods developed for short time regimes which are known to be diffusion influenced [N. Periasamy et al., J. Chem. Phys.88, 1638 (1988); 89, 4799 (1988); Chem. Phys. Lett.160, 457 (1989); N. Periasamy, Biophys. J.. 54, 961 (1988); R. Das and N. Periasamy, Chem. Phys. 136, 361 (1989); G.C. Joshi et al., J. Phys. Chem.94, 2908 (1990)]. These quenchers are known to participate in an electron transfer reaction leading to a charge separation. The intrinsic rate constant ( ka) derived from the analysis is examined as a function of the change in free energy in the electron transfer reaction. Such a comparison indicates that ka can be related to the electron transfer rate, ket. The electron transfer rates measured in acetonitrile (solvent reorganization energy, λ s = 1.35) and toluene (λ s = 0.1) do not indicate the existence of an inverted region as predicted by Marcus. The trend agrees with the findings of Rehm and Weller [ Isr. J. Chem.8, 259 (1970)], except that the rate constants are at least one order of magnitude larger than the diffusion limited values.

  12. Structural limitations of learning in a crowd: communication vulnerability and information diffusion in MOOCs.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Nabeel; Yasseri, Taha; Eynon, Rebecca; Hjorth, Isis

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) bring together a global crowd of thousands of learners for several weeks or months. In theory, the openness and scale of MOOCs can promote iterative dialogue that facilitates group cognition and knowledge construction. Using data from two successive instances of a popular business strategy MOOC, we filter observed communication patterns to arrive at the "significant" interaction networks between learners and use complex network analysis to explore the vulnerability and information diffusion potential of the discussion forums. We find that different discussion topics and pedagogical practices promote varying levels of 1) "significant" peer-to-peer engagement, 2) participant inclusiveness in dialogue, and ultimately, 3) modularity, which impacts information diffusion to prevent a truly "global" exchange of knowledge and learning. These results indicate the structural limitations of large-scale crowd-based learning and highlight the different ways that learners in MOOCs leverage, and learn within, social contexts. We conclude by exploring how these insights may inspire new developments in online education. PMID:25244925

  13. Structural limitations of learning in a crowd: communication vulnerability and information diffusion in MOOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillani, Nabeel; Yasseri, Taha; Eynon, Rebecca; Hjorth, Isis

    2014-09-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) bring together a global crowd of thousands of learners for several weeks or months. In theory, the openness and scale of MOOCs can promote iterative dialogue that facilitates group cognition and knowledge construction. Using data from two successive instances of a popular business strategy MOOC, we filter observed communication patterns to arrive at the ``significant'' interaction networks between learners and use complex network analysis to explore the vulnerability and information diffusion potential of the discussion forums. We find that different discussion topics and pedagogical practices promote varying levels of 1) ``significant'' peer-to-peer engagement, 2) participant inclusiveness in dialogue, and ultimately, 3) modularity, which impacts information diffusion to prevent a truly ``global'' exchange of knowledge and learning. These results indicate the structural limitations of large-scale crowd-based learning and highlight the different ways that learners in MOOCs leverage, and learn within, social contexts. We conclude by exploring how these insights may inspire new developments in online education.

  14. Universal diffusion-limited injection and the hook effect in organic thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Huseynova, Gunel; Xu, Yong; Long, Dang Xuan; Park, Won-Tae; Liu, Xuying; Minari, Takeo; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-01-01

    The general form of interfacial contact resistance was derived for organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) covering various injection mechanisms. Devices with a broad range of materials for contacts, semiconductors, and dielectrics were investigated and the charge injections in staggered OTFTs was found to universally follow the proposed form in the diffusion-limited case, which is signified by the mobility-dependent injection at the metal-semiconductor interfaces. Hence, real ohmic contact can hardly ever be achieved in OTFTs with low carrier concentrations and mobility, and the injection mechanisms include thermionic emission, diffusion, and surface recombination. The non-ohmic injection in OTFTs is manifested by the generally observed hook shape of the output conductance as a function of the drain field. The combined theoretical and experimental results show that interfacial contact resistance generally decreases with carrier mobility, and the injection current is probably determined by the surface recombination rate, which can be promoted by bulk-doping, contact modifications with charge injection layers and dopant layers, and dielectric engineering with high-k dielectric materials. PMID:27440253

  15. Diffusion Rate Limitations in Actin-Based Propulsion of Hard and Deformable Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B.; Purich, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism by which actin polymerization propels intracellular vesicles and invasive microorganisms remains an open question. Several recent quantitative studies have examined propulsion of biomimetic particles such as polystyrene microspheres, phospholipid vesicles, and oil droplets. In addition to allowing quantitative measurement of parameters such as the dependence of particle speed on its size, these systems have also revealed characteristic behaviors such a saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory deformation of soft particles. Such measurements and observations provide tests for proposed mechanisms of actin-based motility. In the actoclampin filament end-tracking motor model, particle-surface-bound filament end-tracking proteins are involved in load-insensitive processive insertion of actin subunits onto elongating filament plus-ends that are persistently tethered to the surface. In contrast, the tethered-ratchet model assumes working filaments are untethered and the free-ended filaments grow as thermal ratchets in a load-sensitive manner. This article presents a model for the diffusion and consumption of actin monomers during actin-based particle propulsion to predict the monomer concentration field around motile particles. The results suggest that the various behaviors of biomimetic particles, including dynamic saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory vesicle deformations, can be quantitatively and self-consistently explained by load-insensitive, diffusion-limited elongation of (+)-end-tethered actin filaments, consistent with predictions of the actoclampin filament-end tracking mechanism. PMID:16731556

  16. Diffusive transfer between two intensely interacting cells with limited surface kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, T. M.

    2012-01-01

    The diffusive transfer, or paracrine delivery, of chemical factors during the interaction of an emitting cell and a receiving cell is a ubiquitous cellular process that facilitates information exchange between the cells an/or to bystander cells. In the cellular immune response this exchange governs the magnitude and breadth of killing of cellular targets, inflammation or tolerance. Paracrine delivery is examined here by solving the the steady-state diffusion equation for the concentration field surrounding two intensely interacting, equi-sized cells on which surface kinetics limits the rates of factor emission and absorption. These chemical factors may be cytokines, such as Interlukins and Interferons, but the results are presented in a generic form so as to be applicable to any chemical factor and/or cell-type interaction. In addition to providing overall transfer rates and transfer efficiencies, the results also indicate that when the receiving cell is naïve, with few factor receptors on its surface, there may be a significant accumulation of factor in the synaptic region between the cells with a consequent release of factor to the medium where it can signal bystander cells. This factor accumulation may play a critical role in activating a naïve receiving cell. As the receiving cell activates and becomes more absorbent, the factor accumulation diminishes, as does potential bystander signaling. PMID:22485051

  17. Universal diffusion-limited injection and the hook effect in organic thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan; Huseynova, Gunel; Xu, Yong; Long, Dang Xuan; Park, Won-Tae; Liu, Xuying; Minari, Takeo; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-01-01

    The general form of interfacial contact resistance was derived for organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) covering various injection mechanisms. Devices with a broad range of materials for contacts, semiconductors, and dielectrics were investigated and the charge injections in staggered OTFTs was found to universally follow the proposed form in the diffusion-limited case, which is signified by the mobility-dependent injection at the metal-semiconductor interfaces. Hence, real ohmic contact can hardly ever be achieved in OTFTs with low carrier concentrations and mobility, and the injection mechanisms include thermionic emission, diffusion, and surface recombination. The non-ohmic injection in OTFTs is manifested by the generally observed hook shape of the output conductance as a function of the drain field. The combined theoretical and experimental results show that interfacial contact resistance generally decreases with carrier mobility, and the injection current is probably determined by the surface recombination rate, which can be promoted by bulk-doping, contact modifications with charge injection layers and dopant layers, and dielectric engineering with high-k dielectric materials. PMID:27440253

  18. Self-Similarity in Game-Locked Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiong, Wan-Ting; Wang, You-Gui

    2012-12-01

    A collective game is studied via agent-based modeling approach, where a group of adaptive learning players seek for their best positions on a vertical line. The movements of players are driven by benefits obtained from interactions. The game falls into an evolutionary stable state, at which aggregations of players on the line emerge. The pattern of these aggregates exhibits self-similarity at different scales with a fractal dimension of 0.58. The underlying mechanism of this aggregation is unique in that aggregates are resulted from mutual lock-in of players. This game-locked aggregation, in contrast with the diffusion limited aggregation, is applicable to a broader scope of aggregation processes.

  19. Normal-to-anomalous diffusion transition in disordered correlated potentials: From the central limit theorem to stable laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado-García, R.; Maldonado, Cesar

    2013-12-01

    We study the diffusion of an ensemble of overdamped particles sliding over a tilted random potential (produced by the interaction of a particle with a random polymer) with long-range correlations. We found that the diffusion properties of such a system are closely related to the correlation function of the corresponding potential. We model the substrate as a symbolic trajectory of a shift space which enables us to obtain a general formula for the diffusion coefficient when normal diffusion occurs. The total time that the particle takes to travel through n monomers can be seen as an ergodic sum to which we can apply the central limit theorem. The latter can be implemented if the correlations decay fast enough in order for the central limit theorem to be valid. On the other hand, we presume that when the central limit theorem breaks down the system give rise to anomalous diffusion. We give two examples exhibiting a transition from normal to anomalous diffusion due to this mechanism. We also give analytical expressions for the diffusion exponents in both cases by assuming convergence to a stable law. Finally we test our predictions by means of numerical simulations.

  20. Normal-to-anomalous diffusion transition in disordered correlated potentials: from the central limit theorem to stable laws.

    PubMed

    Salgado-García, R; Maldonado, Cesar

    2013-12-01

    We study the diffusion of an ensemble of overdamped particles sliding over a tilted random potential (produced by the interaction of a particle with a random polymer) with long-range correlations. We found that the diffusion properties of such a system are closely related to the correlation function of the corresponding potential. We model the substrate as a symbolic trajectory of a shift space which enables us to obtain a general formula for the diffusion coefficient when normal diffusion occurs. The total time that the particle takes to travel through n monomers can be seen as an ergodic sum to which we can apply the central limit theorem. The latter can be implemented if the correlations decay fast enough in order for the central limit theorem to be valid. On the other hand, we presume that when the central limit theorem breaks down the system give rise to anomalous diffusion. We give two examples exhibiting a transition from normal to anomalous diffusion due to this mechanism. We also give analytical expressions for the diffusion exponents in both cases by assuming convergence to a stable law. Finally we test our predictions by means of numerical simulations. PMID:24483421

  1. Effects of Inter- and Intra-aggregate Pore Space on the Soil-Gas Diffusivity Behavior in Unsaturated, Undisturbed Volcanic Ash Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resurreccion, A. C.; Kawamoto, K.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash soils (Andisols) have a unique dual porosity structure that results in good drainage and high soil- water retention. Despite of the complicated and highly developed soil structure, recent studies have reported a simple, highly linear relation between the soil-gas diffusion coefficient, Dp, and the soil-air content, ɛ, for several Japanese Andisols. In this study, we explain the linear Dp(ɛ) behavior from the effects of the inter- and intra-aggregate pore-size distributions. We couple the bimodal van Genuchten soil-water retention model with a general Dp(ɛ) model, ɛ^{X}, allowing the tortuosity- connectivity factor X to vary with pF (= log(-ψ; the soil-water matric potential in cm H2O)). Measured data suggest that the tortuosity-connectivity parameter X is at the minimum at pF 3 (where X ~ 2, following Buckingham, 1904), equal to the water retention point where a separation of inter- and intra-aggregate effects on Dp is observed. At pF < 3, the X values increased as pF decreased because of inactive/remote air-filled pore space entrapped by the inter-connected water films between inter-aggregate pore spaces. At pF > 3, X increased to a high value at very dry conditions due to remote air-filled space inside the intra-aggregate pores. By combining the complex dual porosity soil-water retention model with the power- law gas diffusivity model using a parabolic X(pF) function, the surprisingly simple linear behavior of Dp with ɛ was captured while the variation of Dp with pF followed a dual s-shaped curve similar to the water retention curve. A simple linear model to predict Dp(ɛ) is suggested, with slope C and threshold soil-air content, ɛth, calculated from the power-law model ɛ^{X} at pF 2 (near field capacity) and at pF 4.1 (near wilting point) using the same X value (= 2.3) at both pF in agreement with measured data. This linear Dp(ɛ) model performed better, especially at dry conditions, compared to the traditionally-used predictive models when

  2. Aggregation behavior of illite using light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Derrendinger, L.; Sposito, G.

    1995-12-01

    Stable environmental particles can be at the origin of facilitated transport of metals and organic compounds, especially contaminants. We investigated the destabilization (aggregation) kinetics of both a reference and a soil clay mineral: Imt-1 (Silver Hill) illite and Hanford soil illite, respectively. Dynamic and static light scattering was used to follow the aggregation kinetics and infer the structure of the resulting clusters. Kinetics curves showed exponential and power-law shapes, corresponding respectively to reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regimes. The fractal dimension of the clusters showed no observable change with the change of aggregation regime, its value always being between 2.10 and 2.25 ({plus_minus}0.12). The change in aggregation regime for Na-illite (or ccc) was measured to be 45 mol.m{sup -3}.

  3. Near-Limit Flamelet Phenomena in Buoyant Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Beneath a Solid Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; Tien, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    A unique near-limit low stretch multidimensional stable flamelet phenomena has been observed for the first time which extends the material flammability limit beyond the one-dimensional low stretch flammability limit to lower burning rates and higher relative heat losses than is possible with uniform flame coverage. During low stretch experiments burning the underside of very large radii (greater than or = 75 cm stretch rate less than or = 3/s) cylindrical cast PMMA samples, multidimensional flamelets were observed, in contrast with a one-dimensional flame that was found to blanket the surface for smaller radii samples ( higher stretch rate). Flamelets were observed by decreasing the stretch rate or by increasing the conductive heat loss from the flame. Flamelets are defined as flames that cover only part of the burning sample at any given time, but persist for many minutes. Flamelet phenomena is viewed as the flame's method of enhancing oxygen flow to the flame, through oxygen transport into the edges of the flamelet. Flamelets form as heat losses (surface radiation and solid-phase conduction) become large relative to the weakened heat release of the low stretch flame. While heat loss rates remain fairly constant, the limiting factor in the heat release of the flame is hypothesized to be the oxygen transport to the flame in this low stretch (low convective) environment. Flamelet extinction is frequently caused by encroachment of an adjacent flamelet. Large-scale whole-body flamelet oscillations at 1.2 - 1.95 Hz are noted prior to extinction of a flamelet. This oscillation is believed to be due a repeated process of excess fuel leakage through the dark channels between the flamelets, fuel premixing with slow incoming oxidizer, and subsequent rapid flame spread and retreat of the flamelet through the premixed layer. The oscillation frequency is driven by gas-phase diffusive time scales.

  4. Upper limit on the diffuse flux of UHE tau neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The Pierre Auger

    2007-12-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to Earth-skimming tau-neutrinos {nu}{sub {tau}} that interact in the Earth's crust. Tau leptons from {tau}{sub {tau}} charged-current interactions can emerge and decay in the atmosphere to produce a nearly horizontal shower with a significant electromagnetic component. The data collected between 1 January 2004 and 31 August 2007 is used to place an upper limit on the diffuse flux of {nu}{sub {tau}} at EeV energies. Assuming an E{sub {nu}}{sup -2} differential energy spectrum the limit set at 90 % C.L. is E{sub {nu}}{sup 2} dN{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}}/dE{sub {nu}} < 1.3 x 10{sup -7} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} in the energy range 2 x 10{sup 17} eV < E{sub {nu}} < 2 x 10{sup 19} eV.

  5. Anatomical accuracy of brain connections derived from diffusion MRI tractography is inherently limited.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cibu; Ye, Frank Q; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Modi, Pooja; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Leopold, David A; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2014-11-18

    Tractography based on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is widely used for mapping the structural connections of the human brain. Its accuracy is known to be limited by technical factors affecting in vivo data acquisition, such as noise, artifacts, and data undersampling resulting from scan time constraints. It generally is assumed that improvements in data quality and implementation of sophisticated tractography methods will lead to increasingly accurate maps of human anatomical connections. However, assessing the anatomical accuracy of DWI tractography is difficult because of the lack of independent knowledge of the true anatomical connections in humans. Here we investigate the future prospects of DWI-based connectional imaging by applying advanced tractography methods to an ex vivo DWI dataset of the macaque brain. The results of different tractography methods were compared with maps of known axonal projections from previous tracer studies in the macaque. Despite the exceptional quality of the DWI data, none of the methods demonstrated high anatomical accuracy. The methods that showed the highest sensitivity showed the lowest specificity, and vice versa. Additionally, anatomical accuracy was highly dependent upon parameters of the tractography algorithm, with different optimal values for mapping different pathways. These results suggest that there is an inherent limitation in determining long-range anatomical projections based on voxel-averaged estimates of local fiber orientation obtained from DWI data that is unlikely to be overcome by improvements in data acquisition and analysis alone. PMID:25368179

  6. Energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates from a time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lu; Liang, WanZhen; Zhao, Yi; Zhong, Xinxin

    2014-06-07

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusive method [X. Zhong and Y. Zhao, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014111 (2013)] is extended to investigate the energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates with incorporation of Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling. The pair initial condition generated by laser pulse is represented by a Gaussian wavepacket with a central momentum. The results reveal that the hot electron energy relaxation is very well described by two rate processes with the fast rate much larger than the slow one, consistent with experimental observations, and an efficient electron-hole separation is accomplished accompanying the fast energy relaxation. Furthermore, although the extra energy indeed helps the separation by overcoming the Coulomb interaction, the width of initial wavepacket is much sensitive to the separation efficiency and the narrower wavepacket generates the more separated charges. This behavior may be useful to understand the experimental controversy of the hot carrier effect on charge separation.

  7. Diffusion in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo; Ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion in disordered systems does not follow the classical laws which describe transport in ordered crystalline media, and this leads to many anomalous physical properties. Since the application of percolation theory, the main advances in the understanding of these processes have come from fractal theory. Scaling theories and numerical simulations are important tools to describe diffusion processes (random walks: the 'ant in the labyrinth') on percolation systems and fractals. Different types of disordered systems exhibiting anomalous diffusion are presented (the incipient infinite percolation cluster, diffusion-limited aggregation clusters, lattice animals, and random combs), and scaling theories as well as numerical simulations of greater sophistication are described. Also, diffusion in the presence of singular distributions of transition rates is discussed and related to anomalous diffusion on disordered structures.

  8. Implications of Aggregation and Mass Fractal Nature of Aggregates on the Properties of Organic Pigments and Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Nikhil; Beaucage, Gregory; Skillas, George; Jemian, Peter; Long, Gabrielle; Ilavsky, Jan; Clapp, Lisa; Schwartz, Russell

    2002-03-01

    Aggregation of organic pigments was studied by small and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The aggregation of organic pigments and the implications for optical properties has not been previously reported in the literature, although extensive literature of this type exists for inorganic pigments such as titanium oxide. The pigments were also inspected for primary particle-size by electron microscopy and aggregate size by light scattering. All the pigments exhibited mass-fractal behavior when mixed into various polymers. Some pigments exhibited mass-fractal behavior even in powder form. The scattering patterns reflected differences in mass fractal dimension and particle size. The mass fractal dimension and the size of the aggregates in the polymer depend on the chemical nature of the pigment, the size and strength of the primary particle, the surface characteristics of the pigment, the interaction between the pigment and the polymer and the type of polymer used. A relation between the aggregate size and optimal optical properties is proposed. Aggregates having size around 0.5 microns show best optical properties and hence the pigment aggregate growth needs to be controlled during processing. The processes of aggregation were examined for these pigments. Some of the pigments formed aggregates by a reaction limited aggregation process while others exhibited diffusion limited aggregation.

  9. Oxidation of nanoscale zero-valent iron under sufficient and limited dissolved oxygen: Influences on aggregation behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danlie; Hu, Xialin; Wang, Rui; Yin, Daqiang

    2015-03-01

    Oxidations of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) under aerobic (dissolved oxygen≈8mgL(-1)) and anaerobic (dissolved oxygen <3mgL(-1)) conditions were simulated, and their influences on aggregation behaviors of nZVI were investigated. The two oxidation products were noted as HO-nZVI (nZVI oxidized in highly oxygenated water) and LO-nZVI (nZVI oxidized in lowly oxygenated water) respectively. The metallic iron of the oxidized nZVI was almost exhausted (Fe(0)≈8±5%), thus magnetization mainly depended on magnetite content. Since sufficient dissolved oxygen led to the much less magnetite (∼15%) in HO-nZVI than that in LO-nZVI (>90%), HO-nZVI was far less magnetic (Ms=88kAm(-1)) than LO-nZVI (Ms=365kAm(-1)). Consequently, HO-nZVI formed small agglomerates (228±10nm), while LO-nZVI tended to form chain-like aggregations (>1μm) which precipitated rapidly. Based on the EDLVO theory, we suggested that dissolved oxygen level determined aggregation morphologies by controlling the degree of oxidation and the magnitude of magnetization. Then the chain-like alignment of LO-nZVI would promote further aggregation, but the agglomerate morphology of HO-nZVI would eliminate magnetic forces and inhibit the aggregation while HO-nZVI remained magnetic. Our results indicated the fine colloidal stability of HO-nZVI, which might lead to the great mobility in the environment. PMID:25441925

  10. Identifying the limitations of conventional biofiltration of diffuse methane emissions at long-term operation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cuervo, S; Hernández, J; Omil, F

    2016-08-01

    There is growing international concern about the increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, particularly CO2 and methane. The emissions of methane derived from human activities are associated with large flows and very low concentrations, such as those emitted from landfills and wastewater treatment plants, among others. The present work was focused on the biological methane degradation at diffuse concentrations (0.2% vv(-1)) in a conventional biofilter using a mixture of compost, perlite and bark chips as carrier. An extensive characterization of the process was carried out at long-term operation (250 days) in a fully monitored pilot plant, achieving stable conditions during the entire period. Operational parameters such as waterings, nitrogen addition and inlet loads and contact time influences were evaluated. Obtained results indicate that empty bed residence times within 4-8 min are crucial to maximize elimination rates. Waterings and the type of nitrogen supplied in the nutrient solution (ammonia or nitrate) have a strong impact on the biofilter performance. The better results compatible with a stable operation were achieved using nitrate, with elimination capacities up to 7.6 ± 1.1 g CH4 m(-3 )h(-1). The operation at low inlet concentrations (IC) implied that removal rates obtained were quite limited (ranging 3-8 g CH4 m(-3 )h(-1)); however, these results could be significantly increased (up to 20.6 g CH4 m(-3) h(-1)) at higher IC, which indicates that the mass transfer from the gas to the liquid layer surrounding the biofilm is a key limitation of the process. PMID:26708417