Science.gov

Sample records for diffusion of innovation

  1. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  2. THE CONFIGURATIONAL THEORY OF INNOVATION DIFFUSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BHOLA, HARBANS SINGH

    A THEORY OF INNOVATION DIFFUSION FOCUSED UPON SOCIAL INTERRELATIONSHIPS IS PRESENTED. INTERACTION OF VARYING KINDS AND SIZES OF SOCIAL UNITS RELATES INDIVIDUALS TO OTHER INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, INSTITUTIONS, OR CULTURES. INNOVATION MAY BE INITIATED BY ANY OF THESE FOUR SOCIAL UNITS AND MAY BE DIRECTED TOWARD SUBSEQUENT ADOPTION BY ANY OF THE UNITS.…

  3. Influence of Luddism on innovation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Andrew; Mobilia, Mauro; Redner, S.; Rucklidge, Alastair M.; Ward, Jonathan A.

    2015-07-01

    We generalize the classical Bass model of innovation diffusion to include a new class of agents—Luddites—that oppose the spread of innovation. Our model also incorporates ignorants, susceptibles, and adopters. When an ignorant and a susceptible meet, the former is converted to a susceptible at a given rate, while a susceptible spontaneously adopts the innovation at a constant rate. In response to the rate of adoption, an ignorant may become a Luddite and permanently reject the innovation. Instead of reaching complete adoption, the final state generally consists of a population of Luddites, ignorants, and adopters. The evolution of this system is investigated analytically and by stochastic simulations. We determine the stationary distribution of adopters, the time needed to reach the final state, and the influence of the network topology on the innovation spread. Our model exhibits an important dichotomy: When the rate of adoption is low, an innovation spreads slowly but widely; in contrast, when the adoption rate is high, the innovation spreads rapidly but the extent of the adoption is severely limited by Luddites.

  4. Diffusion of Instructional Innovations: Five Important, Unexplored Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surry, Daniel W.; Brennan, J. Patrick, II

    Instructional Technology is a field of innovation. As instructional technologists realize that their innovations are not always readily adopted, theories of diffusion and adoption have been incorporated into instructional development models. This paper describes five unexplored areas of research related to the adoption and diffusion of…

  5. Diffusion of innovations and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Jane T

    2004-01-01

    As the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues its relentless spread in many parts of the world, DOI provides a useful framework for analyzing the difficulties in achieving behavior change necessary to reduce HIV rates. The DOI concepts most relevant to this question include communication channels, the innovation-decision process, homophily, the attributes of the innovation, adopter categories, and opinion leaders. The preventive measures needed to halt the transmission of HIV constitute a "preventive innovation." This article describes the attributes of this preventive innovation in terms of relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability. It reviews studies that incorporated DOI into HIV/AIDS behavior change interventions, both in Western countries and in the developing world. Finally, it discusses possible reasons that the use of DOI has been fairly limited to date in HIV/AIDS prevention interventions in developing countries. PMID:14960407

  6. Applying Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Intervention Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearing, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Few social science theories have a history of conceptual and empirical study as long as does the diffusion of innovations. The robustness of this theory derives from the many disciplines and fields of study in which diffusion has been studied, from the international richness of these studies, and from the variety of new ideas, practices, programs,…

  7. Diffusion of Innovations in Service Organizations: Systematic Review and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Robert, Glenn; Macfarlane, Fraser; Bate, Paul; Kyriakidou, Olivia

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes an extensive literature review addressing the question, How can we spread and sustain innovations in health service delivery and organization? It considers both content (defining and measuring the diffusion of innovation in organizations) and process (reviewing the literature in a systematic and reproducible way). This article discusses (1) a parsimonious and evidence-based model for considering the diffusion of innovations in health service organizations, (2) clear knowledge gaps where further research should be focused, and (3) a robust and transferable methodology for systematically reviewing health service policy and management. Both the model and the method should be tested more widely in a range of contexts. PMID:15595944

  8. Innovation Diffusion: Assessment of Strategies within the Diffusion Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enfield, Jacob; Myers, Rodney D.; Lara, Miguel; Frick, Theodore W.

    2012-01-01

    Educators increasingly view the high level of engagement and experiential learning offered by games as a means to promote learning. However, as with any designed learning experience, player experiences should provide an accurate representation of content to be learned. In this study, the authors investigated the DIFFUSION SIMULATION GAME (DSG) to…

  9. Diffusion of innovations in Axelrod’s model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilles, Paulo F. C.; Fontanari, José F.

    2015-11-01

    Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture contains two key factors required to model the process of diffusion of innovations, namely, social influence (i.e., individuals become more similar when they interact) and homophily (i.e., individuals interact preferentially with similar others). The strength of these social influences are controlled by two parameters: $F$, the number of features that characterizes the cultures and $q$, the common number of states each feature can assume. Here we assume that the innovation is a new state of a cultural feature of a single individual -- the innovator -- and study how the innovation spreads through the networks among the individuals. For infinite regular lattices in one (1D) and two dimensions (2D), we find that initially the successful innovation spreads linearly with the time $t$, but in the long-time limit it spreads diffusively ($\\sim t^{1/2}$) in 1D and sub-diffusively ($\\sim t/\\ln t$) in 2D. For finite lattices, the growth curves for the number of adopters are typically concave functions of $t$. For random graphs with a finite number of nodes $N$, we argue that the classical S-shaped growth curves result from a trade-off between the average connectivity $K$ of the graph and the per feature diversity $q$. A large $q$ is needed to reduce the pace of the initial spreading of the innovation and thus delimit the early-adopters stage, whereas a large $K$ is necessary to ensure the onset of the take-off stage at which the number of adopters grows superlinearly with $t$. In an infinite random graph we find that the number of adopters of a successful innovation scales with $t^\\gamma$ with $\\gamma =1$ for $K> 2$ and $1/2 < \\gamma < 1$ for $K=2$. We suggest that the exponent $\\gamma$ may be a useful index to characterize the process of diffusion of successful innovations in diverse scenarios.

  10. Applying Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Intervention Development.

    PubMed

    Dearing, James W

    2009-09-01

    Few social science theories have a history of conceptual and empirical study as long as does the diffusion of innovations. The robustness of this theory derives from the many disciplines and fields of study in which diffusion has been studied, from the international richness of these studies, and from the variety of new ideas, practices, programs, and technologies that have been the objects of diffusion research. Early theorizing from the beginning of the 20th century was gradually displaced by post hoc empirical research that described and explained diffusion processes. By the 1950s, diffusion researchers had begun to apply the collective knowledge learned about naturalistic diffusion in tests of process interventions to affect the spread of innovations. Now, this purposive objective has given form to a science of dissemination in which evidence-based practices are designed a priori not just to result in internal validity but to increase the likelihood that external validity and diffusion both are more likely to result. Here, I review diffusion theory and focus on seven concepts-intervention attributes, intervention clusters, demonstration projects, societal sectors, reinforcing contextual conditions, opinion leadership, and intervention adaptation-with potential for accelerating the spread of evidence-based practices, programs, and policies in the field of social work. PMID:20976022

  11. Applying Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Intervention Development

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Few social science theories have a history of conceptual and empirical study as long as does the diffusion of innovations. The robustness of this theory derives from the many disciplines and fields of study in which diffusion has been studied, from the international richness of these studies, and from the variety of new ideas, practices, programs, and technologies that have been the objects of diffusion research. Early theorizing from the beginning of the 20th century was gradually displaced by post hoc empirical research that described and explained diffusion processes. By the 1950s, diffusion researchers had begun to apply the collective knowledge learned about naturalistic diffusion in tests of process interventions to affect the spread of innovations. Now, this purposive objective has given form to a science of dissemination in which evidence-based practices are designed a priori not just to result in internal validity but to increase the likelihood that external validity and diffusion both are more likely to result. Here, I review diffusion theory and focus on seven concepts—intervention attributes, intervention clusters, demonstration projects, societal sectors, reinforcing contextual conditions, opinion leadership, and intervention adaptation—with potential for accelerating the spread of evidence-based practices, programs, and policies in the field of social work. PMID:20976022

  12. The Diffusion of Innovations in Intensive ESL Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoller, Fredricka L.

    1994-01-01

    Research is reported on the growing English Language Teaching (ELT) literature that sheds new light on components of the diffusion process in one ELT context: the U.S. intensive English program. Findings highlight a new set of perspectives on the role of perceived attributes of ELT innovations. (42 references) (Author/LB)

  13. Course Management Software Adoption: A Diffusion of Innovations Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmon, Carol; Fagan, Mary Helen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the adoption of course management software (CMS) among faculty in a nursing program in order to better understand the consequences that result from adoption decisions. Design/methodology/approach: A case study approach was taken using a component of diffusion of innovations theory as a framework for…

  14. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

  15. Diffusion of Innovations: Smartphones and Wireless Anatomy Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trelease, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    The author has previously reported on principles of diffusion of innovations, the processes by which new technologies become popularly adopted, specifically in relation to anatomy and education. In presentations on adopting handheld computers [personal digital assistants (PDAs)] and personal media players for health sciences education, particular…

  16. Measuring the diffusion of innovative health promotion programs.

    PubMed

    Steckler, A; Goodman, R M; McLeroy, K R; Davis, S; Koch, G

    1992-01-01

    Once a health promotion program has proven to be effective in one or two initial settings, attempts may be made to transfer the program to new settings. One way to conceptualize the transference of health promotion programs from one locale to another is by considering the programs to be innovations that are being diffused. In this way, diffusion of innovation theory can be applied to guide the process of program transference. This article reports on the development of six questionnaires to measure the extent to which health promotion programs are successfully disseminated: Organizational Climate, Awareness-Concern, Rogers's Adoption Variables, Level of Use, Level of Success, and Level of Institutionalization. The instruments are being successfully used in a study of the diffusion of health promotion/tobacco prevention curricula to junior high schools in North Carolina. The instruments, which measure the four steps of the diffusion process, have construct validity since they were developed within existing theories and are derived from the work of previous researchers. No previous research has attempted to use instruments like these to measure sequentially the stages of the diffusion process. PMID:10148679

  17. Innovation Diffusion Model in Higher Education: Case Study of E-Learning Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buc, Sanjana; Divjak, Blaženka

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion of innovation (DOI) is critical for any organization and especially nowadays for higher education institutions (HEIs) in the light of vast pressure of emerging educational technologies as well as of the demand of economy and society. DOI takes into account the initial and the implementation phase. The conceptual model of DOI in…

  18. The Diffusion of Innovations: A Review of Research and Theory with Implications for Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David W.

    A review of the general literature on diffusion, innovation, and social change is worthwhile as a basis for developing more effective methods for facilitating the adoption of computer-based technologies. Much of the research on diffusion has focused on (1) characteristics of the innovation which influence the diffusion process, (2) a description…

  19. Diffusing Supply Chain Innovations at Hewlett-Packard Company: Applications of Performance Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargille, Brian; Branvold, Dwight

    2000-01-01

    Explains how Hewlett-Packard creates supply chain management innovations and effectively diffuses new technologies. Outlines how performance technologists help accelerate the diffusion and adoption of innovations by modifying innovations, define the client adoption path, create resources to lead clients through adoption, and improve the diffusion…

  20. Innovation Attributes, Policy Intervention, and the Diffusion of Computer Applications Among Local Governments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, James L.; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    1978-01-01

    Argues that innovation attributes, together with policies associated with the diffusion on an innovation, account for significant differences in diffusion patterns. An empirical analysis of this thesis focuses on the diffusion of computer applications software in local government. Available from Elsevier Scientific Publishing Co., Box 211,…

  1. Innovative anisotropic phantoms for calibration of diffusion tensor imaging sequences.

    PubMed

    Kłodowski, Krzysztof; Krzyżak, Artur Tadeusz

    2016-05-01

    The paper describes a novel type of anisotropic phantoms designed for b-matrix spatial distribution diffusion tensor imaging (BSD-DTI). Cubic plate anisotropic phantom, cylinder capillary phantom and water reference phantom are described as a complete set necessary for calibration, validation and normalization of BSD-DTI. An innovative design of the phantoms basing on enclosing the anisotropic cores in glass balls filled with liquid made for the first time possible BSD calibration with usage of echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence. Susceptibility artifacts prone to occur in EPI sequences were visibly reduced in the central region of the phantoms. The phantoms were designed for usage in a clinical scanner's head coil, but can be scaled for other coil or scanner types. The phantoms can be also used for a pre-calibration of imaging of other types of phantoms having more specific applications. PMID:26707852

  2. Diffusion of innovations dynamics, biological growth and catenary function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseo, Renato

    2016-12-01

    The catenary function has a well-known role in determining the shape of chains and cables supported at their ends under the force of gravity. This enables design using a specific static equilibrium over space. Its reflected version, the catenary arch, allows the construction of bridges and arches exploiting the dual equilibrium property under uniform compression. In this paper, we emphasize a further connection with well-known aggregate biological growth models over time and the related diffusion of innovation key paradigms (e.g., logistic and Bass distributions over time) that determine self-sustaining evolutionary growth dynamics in naturalistic and socio-economic contexts. Moreover, we prove that the 'local entropy function', related to a logistic distribution, is a catenary and vice versa. This special invariance may be explained, at a deeper level, through the Verlinde's conjecture on the origin of gravity as an effect of the entropic force.

  3. An Application of the Diffusion of Innovations Theory to the Investigation of Blended Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grgurovic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates technology-enhanced blended learning in an English as a Second Language (ESL) program from the theoretical perspective of Diffusion of Innovations theory. The study first established that the use of a learning management system (LMS) in two ESL classes represented an educational innovation. Next, the innovation attributes…

  4. School Counselors' Adoption of Brief Counseling: The Diffusion of an Innovative Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littrell, John M.; Carlson, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Brief counseling has emerged as an innovation in the field of school counseling. This study examined the factors that promote and impede the adoption of such innovation. Everett Rogers' diffusion of innovation model provided the framework for the survey examining counselors' knowledge, application skills, and actual use of brief counseling. The…

  5. Diffusion of Innovation Theory: A Bridge for the Research-Practice Gap in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Christine E.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a diffusion of innovation theory-based framework for addressing the gap between research and practice in the counseling profession. The author describes the nature of the research-practice gap and presents an overview of diffusion of innovation theory. On the basis of the application of several major postulates of diffusion…

  6. Diffusing Innovations: Adoption of Serious Educational Games by K-12 Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallett, David; Annetta, Leonard; Lamb, Richard; Bowling, Brandy

    2014-01-01

    Innovation is a term that has become widely used in education; especially as it pertains to technology infusion. Applying the corporate theory of diffusing innovation to educational practice is an innovation in itself. This mixed-methods study examined 38 teachers in a science educational gaming professional development program that provided…

  7. The Role of the Organization Structure in the Diffusion of Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz-Royo, Carlos; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion and adoption of innovations is a topic of increasing interest in economics, market research, and sociology. In this paper we investigate, through an agent based model, the dynamics of adoption of innovative proposals in different kinds of structures. We show that community structure plays an important role on the innovation diffusion, so that proposals are more likely to be accepted in homogeneous organizations. In addition, we show that the learning process of innovative technologies enhances their diffusion, thus resulting in an important ingredient when heterogeneous networks are considered. We also show that social pressure blocks the adoption process whatever the structure of the organization. These results may help to understand how different factors influence the diffusion and acceptance of innovative proposals in different communities and organizations. PMID:25978360

  8. Diffusion of innovations: smartphones and wireless anatomy learning resources.

    PubMed

    Trelease, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    The author has previously reported on principles of diffusion of innovations, the processes by which new technologies become popularly adopted, specifically in relation to anatomy and education. In presentations on adopting handheld computers [personal digital assistants (PDAs)] and personal media players for health sciences education, particular attention has been directed to the anticipated integration of PDA functions into popular cellular telephones. However, limited distribution of early "smartphones" (e.g., Palm Treo and Blackberry) has provided few potential users for anatomical learning resources. In contrast, iPod media players have been self-adopted by millions of students, and "podcasting" has become a popular medium for distributing educational media content. The recently introduced Apple iPhone has combined smartphone and higher resolution media player capabilities. The author successfully tested the iPhone and the "work alike" iPod touch wireless media player with text-based "flashcard" resources, existing PDF educational documents, 3D clinical imaging data, lecture "podcasts," and clinical procedure video. These touch-interfaced, mobile computing devices represent just the first of a new generation providing practical, scalable wireless Web access with enhanced multimedia capabilities. With widespread student self-adoption of such new personal technology, educators can look forward to increasing portability of well-designed, multiplatform "learn anywhere" resources. PMID:19109851

  9. The Fierce Urgency of Now: Diffusion of Innovation as a Mechanism to Integrate Social Justice in Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratts, Manivong J.; Wood, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The authors present diffusion of innovation theory (Rogers, 2003) as a framework for integrating social justice into counselor education. An overview of diffusion theory is provided along with how the tenets of diffusion of innovation can be used to alleviate fears and anxieties that come with adopting an innovation such as social justice in…

  10. Innovation Diffusion: A Deterministic Model of Space-Time Integration with Physical Analog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Kingsley E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Extends a fundamental temporal diffusion model to integrate space and time dimensions of innovation diffusion. Compares analogous developments in the physical sciences and argues that the proposed model may help link the concepts of catalysts in physical science diffusion processes to the role of change agents in social science systems. (Author/JG)

  11. Application of Diffusion of Innovations Theory to the TIPs Evaluation Project Results and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Susan M.; Huang, Judy Y.; Mulvey, Kevin P.

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes the results from four major studies under the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs) evaluation project and uses the diffusion of innovations theory as a theoretical framework to understand substance abuse treatment providers awareness, attitudes, and practices regarding TIPs. (SLD)

  12. The Origins and Development of the Diffusion of Innovations Paradigm as an Example of Scientific Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Thomas W.; Rogers, Everett M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes some of the history of rural sociological research on the diffusion of agricultural innovations, and shows how research followed (and deviated from) the Kuhnian concept of paradigm development. Examines the Iowa Hybrid Seed Corn Study which contributed to the rise of sociological diffusion research. (103 references) (AEF)

  13. Understanding innovators' experiences of barriers and facilitators in implementation and diffusion of healthcare service innovations: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Healthcare service innovations are considered to play a pivotal role in improving organisational efficiency and responding effectively to healthcare needs. Nevertheless, healthcare organisations encounter major difficulties in sustaining and diffusing innovations, especially those which concern the organisation and delivery of healthcare services. The purpose of the present study was to explore how healthcare innovators of process-based initiatives perceived and made sense of factors that either facilitated or obstructed the innovation implementation and diffusion. Methods A qualitative study was designed. Fifteen primary and secondary healthcare organisations in the UK, which had received health service awards for successfully generating and implementing service innovations, were studied. In-depth, semi structured interviews were conducted with the organisational representatives who conceived and led the development process. The data were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Four main themes were identified in the analysis of the data: the role of evidence, the function of inter-organisational partnerships, the influence of human-based resources, and the impact of contextual factors. "Hard" evidence operated as a proof of effectiveness, a means of dissemination and a pre-requisite for the initiation of innovation. Inter-organisational partnerships and people-based resources, such as champions, were considered an integral part of the process of developing, establishing and diffusing the innovations. Finally, contextual influences, both intra-organisational and extra-organisational were seen as critical in either impeding or facilitating innovators' efforts. Conclusions A range of factors of different combinations and co-occurrence were pointed out by the innovators as they were reflecting on their experiences of implementing, stabilising and diffusing novel service initiatives. Even though the innovations studied were of various

  14. The impact of network characteristics on the diffusion of innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Renana

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the influence of network topology on the speed and reach of new product diffusion. While previous research has focused on comparing network types, this paper explores explicitly the relationship between topology and measurements of diffusion effectiveness. We study simultaneously the effect of three network metrics: the average degree, the relative degree of social hubs (i.e., the ratio of the average degree of highly-connected individuals to the average degree of the entire population), and the clustering coefficient. A novel network-generation procedure based on random graphs with a planted partition is used to generate 160 networks with a wide range of values for these topological metrics. Using an agent-based model, we simulate diffusion on these networks and check the dependence of the net present value (NPV) of the number of adopters over time on the network metrics. We find that the average degree and the relative degree of social hubs have a positive influence on diffusion. This result emphasizes the importance of high network connectivity and strong hubs. The clustering coefficient has a negative impact on diffusion, a finding that contributes to the ongoing controversy on the benefits and disadvantages of transitivity. These results hold for both monopolistic and duopolistic markets, and were also tested on a sample of 12 real networks.

  15. Use of Diffusion of Innovations Theory To Drive a Federal Agency's Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Susan M.; Hayashi, Susan W.

    2003-01-01

    Provides the conceptual framework for the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs) evaluation project, using the diffusion of innovations theory as the theoretical foundation to understand and assess the development of TIPs. Summarizes principles of diffusion theory, and discusses how the model was used to structure the TIPs studies. (SLD)

  16. Lessons Learnt from Literature on the Diffusion of Innovative Learning and Teaching Practices in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Faced with the challenges of the changes in: higher education, educational developers' roles and the use of innovation to stimulate change, this study aimed to synthesise literature dealing with the diffusion of innovative learning and teaching practices in higher education to determine what lessons could be learnt. The findings suggest that the…

  17. Competency-Based Faculty Development in Community-Engaged Scholarship: A Diffusion of Innovation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Catherine; Doherty, William J.; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Cook, Nancy; Dubrow, Gail; Mendenhall, Tai J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors utilized interviews, competency surveys, and document review to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-year, cohort-based faculty development pilot program, grounded in diffusion of innovations theory, and aimed at increasing competencies in community engagement and community-engaged scholarship. Five innovator participants designed the…

  18. The Exile of Hansen's Disease Patients to Moloka'i: A Diffusion of Innovations Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pitman Harris, Adrea; Matusitz, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    This article analyzes the exile of patients with Hansen's disease (leprosy) to Moloka'i (Hawaii) by applying the diffusion of innovations (DoI) theory. Developed by Rogers, DoI posits that an innovation (i.e., idea, movement, or trend) is initiated within a culture. Then, it is diffused via particular channels across diverse cultures. Instead of evolving independently, innovations diffuse from one culture to another through various forms of contact and communication. In the context of this analysis, the objective is to examine how the diffusion of certain ideas, namely, abolishing the stigma associated with leprosy, could have improved the lives of Hawaiians. An important premise of this article is that the Hawaiian government barely applied the tenets of DoI, which is the reason why many people lost their lives. So, this article seeks to explore what could have been done to improve their situation and what pitfalls should be avoided in the future. PMID:27105179

  19. Diffusion of Innovation: A Plea for Indigenous Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubdy, Rani

    2008-01-01

    Much of curriculum innovation in English language teaching in the context of former colonial countries has been derivative rather than generative, imitative rather than self-initiated or self-regulatory. This trend is in part the result of historical exigencies that made the importation of ELT approaches, methods, and techniques for classroom…

  20. Expanding Downward: Innovation, Diffusion, and State Policy Adoptions of Universal Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, F. Chris

    2015-01-01

    Framed within the theoretical framework of policy innovation and diffusion, this study explores both interstate (diffusion) and intrastate predictors of adoption of state universal preschool policies. Event history analysis methodology is applied to a state level dataset drawn from the Census, the NCES Common Core, the Book of the States, and…

  1. Diffusion Milieus as a Focus of Research on Innovation in the Public Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Irwin; Menzel, Donald C.

    1977-01-01

    Presents an approach to the diffusion of technological innovations in state and local governments that is organized around the concept of "diffusion milieus." Available from: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Box 211, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; single issues supplied upon request. (Author/JG)

  2. The informatics nurse specialist as change agent. Application of innovation-diffusion theory.

    PubMed

    Hilz, L M

    2000-01-01

    The informatics nurse specialist (INS) is often the primary change agent in facilitating the implementation of clinical information systems (CIS) in healthcare settings. The INS has a unique understanding of the nursing issues that can affect the change process, and thus is in a key position to facilitate positive implementation outcomes. Innovation-diffusion theory is particularly useful in its application to the change agent role of the INS. With this theoretical knowledge, the INS can design CIS training interventions according to the psychological phenomena of Rogers' Innovation-Decision Process. An understanding of the decision-making process and the distribution of different rates of innovation adoption within a given population enable the INS to anticipate and address influential factors that affect the implementation process. Thus, Innovation-Diffusion Theory may be used as a powerful cognitive tool for the INS in facilitating the diffusion process and nurses' adoption of the technology in practice. PMID:11105401

  3. Rethinking Policy Diffusion: The Interstate Spread of "Finance Innovations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, T. Austin; Tandberg, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently a number of studies have focused on states' adoptions of postsecondary-specific policies. Cutting across much of this research is the presence and influence of interstate diffusion of policy adoptions, a phenomenon for which support is scant. This paper seeks to address this through broadening the categorization of policies beyond…

  4. Innovation in industry and the diffusion of technology.

    PubMed

    Utterback, J M

    1974-02-15

    The varied definitions used in the sources that have been discussed make any aggregate analysis difficult. A simple three-stage analysis of flows to, from, and within the firm was used to facilitate comparisons. Even so, each of the generalizations is drawn from relatively small and unrepresentative samples. Case studies may continue to be a source of ideas and hypotheses for further research, but do not appear to offer a means for deeper understanding of the innovation process. The retrospective nature of nearly all of the sources discussed probably means that the process has been viewed as much more rational and well-ordered than it is in fact. This failing is partially overcome in firsthand accounts such as those of Suites and Bueche (63) and Frey and Goldman (64). Each of these accounts involves a successful innovation according to technical or commercial criteria, or both. However, many of the characteristics of innovations that have failed commercially (10) appear to be similar to those of successful cases. The few longitudinal studies, and studies comparing more and less successful cases, do support the main conclusions drawn above (10, 32, 38). More serious problems are raised by the distinctly nonrepresentative nature of the samples used. There are few cases (17, 33, 65) in which the contributions of more than one organization, or details of interactions over a significant period of time, are discussed. There is a wide variation in the importance of the innovations included, ranging from those affecting the economy as a whole to cases involving production in a single firm, albeit with significant commercial results (66). In addition to questions of comparability and sampling, a central problem for further research on innovation will be to devise an operational model to account for interfirm and interindustry differences. Polar definitions used in past studies, "high technology" and "mature industry," for example, are insufficient. One possibility is to use

  5. Designing for Diffusion: How Can We Increase Uptake of Cancer Communication Innovations?

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, James W.; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The best innovations in cancer communication do not necessarily achieve uptake by researchers, public health and clinical practitioners, and policy makers. This paper describes design activities that can be applied and combined for the purpose of spreading effective cancer communication innovations. Methods A previously developed Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model is used to organize and highlight the types of activities that can be deployed during the design phase of innovations. Scientific literature about the diffusion of innovations, knowledge utilization, marketing, public health, and our experiences in working to spread effective practices, programs, and policies are used for this purpose. Results Attempts to broaden the reach, quicken the uptake, and facilitate the use of cancer communication innovations can apply design activities to increase the likelihood of diffusion. Some simple design activities hold considerable promise for improving dissemination and subsequent diffusion. Conclusion Augmenting current dissemination practices with evidence-based concepts from diffusion science, marketing science, and knowledge utilization hold promise for improving results by eliciting greater market pull. Practice Implications Inventors and change agencies seeking to spread cancer communication innovations can experience more success by explicit consideration of design activities that reflect an expanded version of the Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model. PMID:21067884

  6. Potential for Integrating Diffusion of Innovation Principles into Life Cycle Assessment of Emerging Technologies.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Benjamin E; Miller, Shelie A

    2016-03-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) measures cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of a product. To assess impacts of an emerging technology, LCA should be coupled with additional methods that estimate how that technology might be deployed. The extent and manner that an emerging technology diffuses throughout a region shapes the magnitude and type of environmental impacts. Diffusion of innovation is an established field of research that analyzes the adoption of new innovations, and its principles can be used to construct scenario models that enhance LCA of emerging technologies. Integrating diffusion modeling techniques with an LCA of emerging technology can provide estimates for the extent of market penetration, the displacement of existing systems, and the rate of adoption. Two general perspectives of application are macro-level diffusion models that use a function of time to represent adoption, and microlevel diffusion models that simulate adoption through interactions of individuals. Incorporating diffusion of innovation concepts complement existing methods within LCA to inform proactive environmental management of emerging technologies. PMID:26820700

  7. Nurses' adoption of technology: application of Rogers' innovation-diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ting

    2004-11-01

    This qualitative study applied Everett Rogers' innovation-diffusion model to analyze nurses' perceptions toward using a computerized care plan system. Twelve nurses from three respiratory intensive care units in Taiwan voluntarily participated in a one-on-one, in-depth interview. Data were analyzed by constant comparative analysis. The content that emerged was compared with the model's five innovation characteristics (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability), as perceived by new users. Results indicate that Rogers' model can accurately describe nurses' behavior during the process of adopting workplace innovations. Related issues that emerged deserve further attention to help nurses make the best use of technology. PMID:15573331

  8. Using Diffusion of Innovations Theory to implement the confusion assessment method for the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Constance Mary; Stanton, Marietta; Manno, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Routine screening of mechanically ventilated patients for delirium is essential for prompt recognition and management; however, this represents a change in practice. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory can be useful as a strategy to facilitate adoption of a practice change. This case study describes the effectiveness of identifying barriers to a change in practice and developing strategies, specific to Rogers' innovation decision process, for implementing the Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit. PMID:22367153

  9. Diffusion of innovations theory and work-site AIDS programs.

    PubMed

    Backer, T E; Rogers, E M

    1998-01-01

    Four case studies of the adoption of work-site AIDS programs are investigated, two of which were modifications of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Business Responds to AIDS (BRTA) program. AIDS work-site programs were mainly initiated by the four study companies as a result of the efforts of a champion (defined as an individual who gains attention and resources for an issue in a system) or the occurrence of a tragic event, such as a company employee contracting AIDS. The BRTA program is an innovation that has not yet reached critical mass, which is the point after which further rates of adoption occur rapidly in a self-sustaining process. PMID:10947372

  10. The Paradox of the Diffusion of Innovations Research: Creating More Communication Bottlenecks Than Breaking Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melkote, Srinivas R.; Babbili, Anantha S.

    The paradox of the diffusion of innovations research is that in its efforts to find ways and means of breaking the communication constraint in Third World countries, it has generated many bottlenecks that cumulatively constitute the major constraint: lack of an efficient system for delivering adequate and reliable information, knowledge, and…

  11. Innovation-diffusion: a geographical study of the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ting, T Y

    1984-09-01

    This paper uses map analysis to study the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan between 1961-80. The innovation-diffusion perspective emphasizes that birth control, particularly contraception, is a recent innovation and is essentially new in human culture. The innovation-diffusion theory assumes that the decline of fertility began in a setting where there was no, or at most very limited, previous practice of birth control. The theory emphasizes the importance of the spread of information. It also assumes that innovation starts in metropolitan centers, diffuses to other urban places with some delay, and penetrates to rural areas still later. Innovation behavior also diffuses from 1 area to another which is culturally and linguistically similar. Although there was some urban to rural diffusion from the Taiwan family planning program, the government supported program provided services more evenly between urban and rural areas, thus somewhat limiting the diffusion effect from the program. For the diffusion of family practice in Taiwan, it is expected that the availability of of information about and means of family limitation practice may effect the rate of the increase of small m values -- an index of family limitation -- in an area. The case study of Pingtung county shows that the demand-side diffusion from urban to rural areas was important in the earlier decade of the transition of family plimitation practice, but distance from urban center was less important as practice became more uniform through diffusion. Ethnicity, whether or not the township was dominated by Hakka or Fukienese, also seems to have played an important role in determining the pace at which the local residents adopted family practice limitation. Hakka townships seem to have adopted family limitation practice more slowly than Fukienese townships about the same distance from the urban center. The map analysis of Pingtung county provides descriptive evidence to support the diffusion of

  12. Social Capital and the Diffusion of Innovations within Organizations: The Case of Computer Technology in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Kenneth A.; Zhao, Yong; Borman, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    Although the educational community has learned much about better educational practices, less is known about processes for implementing new practices. The standard model of diffusion suggests that people change perceptions about the value of an innovation through communication, and these perceptions then drive implementation. But implementation can…

  13. Market Aspects of Diffusion: A Spatial Perspective on the Diffusion of Innovations in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontius, Steven K.

    How market factors affected the diffusion of four agricultural inputs (fertilizer, herbicide, insecticide, and fungicide) among farmers on the Central Plain of Thailand is examined. Market factors investigated were the distribution policies of the propagators and the travel behavior of the potential adopters. Data were gathered through personal…

  14. Reliability and Validity Study of the Mobile Learning Adoption Scale Developed Based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Aydin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mobile learning adoption scale (MLAS) was developed on the basis of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory. The scale that was developed consists of four sections. These sections are as follows: Stages in the innovation-decision process, Types of m-learning decision, Innovativeness level and attributes of m-learning.…

  15. Reliability and Validity Study of the Mobile Learning Adoption Scale Developed Based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Aydin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mobile learning adoption scale (MLAS) was developed on the basis of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory. The scale that was developed consists of four sections. These sections are as follows: Stages in the innovation-decision process, Types of m-learning decision, Innovativeness level and attributes of m-learning. There…

  16. Diffusion and Adoption of Innovations in Fertilizer-Related Agricultural Production Technology in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Kerry J.

    This monograph reviews a wide range of research literature on the diffusion and adoption of innovations in agricultural production technology in the developing countries, with particular emphasis on the practice of using commercially purchased, inorganic fertilizer as a source of plant nutrients. It is intended that the report's documentation of…

  17. Facebook and the Diffusion of Innovation in New Zealand Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neo, Emily; Calvert, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    The decision by public libraries in New Zealand to implement Facebook has been uneven. Using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations theory, a survey of nine public libraries investigated the process of its adoption or non-adoption. The motivating factors for the adoption of Facebook were identified. The surveyed libraries all met the four prior…

  18. Professional Learning Communities and the Diffusion of Pedagogical Innovation in the Chinese Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Tanja Carmel

    2015-01-01

    Pedagogical innovations have been diffusing unevenly through the Chinese education system as a result of the implementation of the New Curriculum Reforms. Drawing on large-scale linked teacher and principal survey data from the Gansu Survey of Children and Families, this article investigates the extent to which interlocking teacher networks, which…

  19. A Diffusion of Innovations Approach to Gerontological Curriculum Enrichment: Institutionalizing and Sustaining Curricular Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Lorraine T.; Murty, Susan A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a gerontological enrichment model for institutionalizing and sustaining curricular change utilizing Rogers' (1995, 2003) diffusion of innovations approach to organizational change. The goal of the project, funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation, is to transform the social work curriculum at a major state university so…

  20. Instructional Technology in Appalachian Kentucky 1929-2011: Countering the Pervasive Narrative of Innovation Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettleton, Kimberely Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    The prevalent public narrative based on Roger's (2003) model of innovation diffusion categorizes teachers as laggards; rigidly entrenched in outdated practices and unwilling to change. As new instructional technologies failed to be adopted into classrooms, this public narrative served as a pervasive explanation, widely accepted as characteristic…

  1. Innovation-diffusion or adjustment: the case of Taiwanese fertility transition.

    PubMed

    Sun, T H; Ting, T Y

    1989-06-01

    This study uses KAP data sets to analyze the determinants of Taiwan's fertility decline between 1964 and 1980 and to evaluate whether innovation-diffusion or adjustment or both can be applied to explain the transition. Furthermore, this study examines the roles of innovation-diffusion and adjustment in the stages of the transition of Taiwan's fertility from high to low levels. The 5 cross-sectional KAP surveys, collected by the Taiwan Provincial Institute of Family Planning and used in this study, focus on the fertility behavior of married women living in Taiwan in 1965, 1969, 1970, 1973, and 1980. Analyses of both cross-sectional and pooled-time series data sets provide evidence to support the theory that demand-side diffusion of birth control behavior from urban centers to more rural areas plays an important role in Taiwan's fertility transition. Contradictory findings on the supply-side of diffusion suggest that family planning programs have no consistently direct effects on fertility behavior. The adjustment variables of wife's education, husband's occupation, and the index of consumer goods generally have important influences on changes in family size, suggesting that the adjustment model has significant impact on fertility transition in Taiwan. Duration of marriage, not surprisingly, is the most powerful explanatory variable. Overall, the innovation-diffusion model is more useful in explaining Taiwanese fertility transition in the 1960s, and the adjustment model plays a more important role throughout the late years. PMID:12159726

  2. Diffusion of Technological Innovation in a Foreign Languages Unit in Turkey: A Focus on Risk-Aversive Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timucin, Metin

    2009-01-01

    Taking advantage of Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory, which suggests that adoption of a specific innovation is critically influenced by the way the adopters receive it, this article aims at presenting the implementation process of such an innovation in the form of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) in an English as a Foreign…

  3. Advancing the practice of online psychotherapy: An application of Rogers' diffusion of innovations theory.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, Travis I; Demireva, Petya D; Grayson, Jessica L; McNamara, John R

    2009-03-01

    With the advancements of technology and its increasing use in all spheres of life, clinicians too are faced with the decision of whether to adopt or refrain from adopting certain innovations in their practice. This article discusses the process of adopting clinical innovations within a theoretical framework, namely diffusion of innovations theory (DIT; Rogers, 2003). DIT constructs are applied to the example of online therapy adoption into clinical practice. Nine adoption barriers are identified, including issues of dehumanizing the therapeutic environment, start-up cost and reimbursement, infrastructure and training, licensure and jurisdiction concerns, ethical guidelines, both client and clinician suitability factors, and professional reputation and acceptance within the field. The authors conclude with a theory-based discussion of activities that may help to accelerate the adoption of online therapy among professional psychologists. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122574

  4. Factors influencing pharmacists’ adoption of prescribing: qualitative application of the diffusion of innovations theory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2007, Alberta became the first Canadian jurisdiction to grant pharmacists a wide range of prescribing privileges. Our objective was to understand what factors influence pharmacists’ adoption of prescribing using a model for the Diffusion of Innovations in healthcare services. Methods Pharmacists participated in semi-structured telephone interviews to discuss their prescribing practices and explore the facilitators and barriers to implementation. Pharmacists working in community, hospital, PCN, or other settings were selected using a mix of random and purposive sampling. Two investigators independently analyzed each transcript using an Interpretive Description approach to identify themes. Analyses were informed by a model explaining the Diffusion of Innovations in health service organizations. Results Thirty-eight participants were interviewed. Prescribing behaviours varied from non-adoption through to product, disease, and patient focused use of prescribing. Pharmacists’ adoption of prescribing was dependent on the innovation itself, adopter, system readiness, and communication and influence. Adopting pharmacists viewed prescribing as a legitimization of previous practice and advantageous to instrumental daily tasks. The complexity of knowledge required for prescribing increased respectively in product, disease and patient focused prescribing scenarios. Individual adopters had higher levels of self-efficacy toward prescribing skills. At a system level, pharmacists who were in practice settings that were patient focused were more likely to adopt advanced prescribing practices, over those in product-focused settings. All pharmacists stated that physician relationships impacted their prescribing behaviours and individual pharmacists’ decisions to apply for independent prescribing privileges. Conclusions Diffusion of Innovations theory was helpful in understanding the multifaceted nature of pharmacists’ adoption of prescribing. The characteristics

  5. A Model of the Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations for the Case of the Individual Decision Maker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Allan

    Information on the development and testing of a model of spatial diffusion and adoption of an agricultural innovation is presented. The data concern the practice of artificial insemination of cattle in southern Sweden. The model is intended to predict the time at which adoption occurred in terms of the time at which the innovation became available…

  6. Diffusion of complex health innovations--implementation of primary health care reforms in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat A; Kyratsis, Ioannis; Jelic, Gordan; Rados-Malicbegovic, Drazenka; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek

    2007-01-01

    Most transition countries in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia are engaged in health reform initiatives aimed at introducing primary health care (PHC) centred on family medicine to enhance performance of their health systems. But, in these countries the introduction of PHC reforms has been particularly challenging; while some have managed to introduce pilots, many have failed to these scale up. Using an innovation lens, we examine the introduction and diffusion of family-medicine-centred PHC reforms in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), which experienced bitter ethnic conflicts that destroyed much of the health systems infrastructure. The study was conducted in 2004-05 over a 18-month period and involved both qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry. In this study we report the findings of the qualitative research, which involved in-depth interviews in three stages with key informants that were purposively sampled. In our research, we applied a proprietary analytical framework which enables simultaneous and holistic analysis of the context, the innovation, the adopters and the interactions between them over time. While many transition countries have struggled with the introduction of family-medicine-centred PHC reforms, in spite of considerable resource constraints and a challenging post-war context, within a few years, BiH has managed to scale up multifaceted reforms to cover over 25% of the country. Our analysis reveals a complex setting and bidirectional interaction between the innovation, adopters and the context, which have collectively influenced the diffusion process. Family-medicine-centred PHC reform is a complex innovation-involving organizational, financial, clinical and relational changes-within a complex adaptive system. An important factor influencing the adoption of this complex innovation in BiH was the perceived benefits of the innovation: benefits which accrue to the users, family physicians, nurses and policy makers. In the case of Bi

  7. Innovation and the diffusion of new production technologies in Soviet industry

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Chapter one of the dissertation describes the institutions and mechanisms involved in the innovation process in Soviet industry and surveys empirical research on this process. A distinction is drawn between the decentralized and centralized procedures which the Soviets employ to diffuse new production technologies. This chapter also critiques some of the analyses of the innovation process put forward by Western analysts. Chapter two examines the system of financial incentives designed to induce enterprises to adopt new production technologies and the effects which the regulation of enterprise incomes has on the payoffs to new technology adoption. A formal model is developed in which a regulator periodically reviews the distribution of incomes of two enterprises comprising an industry and redistributes incomes between them to control this distribution. Chapter three examines the important role which authorities superior to the enterprises play in planning the diffusion of new technologies. An optimal planning problem is formulated in which an industrial planner, who is responsible for producing some output, must determine the diffusion path of a process innovation.

  8. Diffusion of Innovation Theory and Xbox Live: Examining Minority Gamers' Responses and Rate of Adoption to Changes in Xbox Live

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kishonna L.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the response of minority gamers as they adopt new innovations in Xbox Live. Using diffusion of innovation theory, specific attention is given to gamers' rate of adoption of the new Xbox Live environment, which was a recent update to the Xbox Live interface. By employing virtual ethnography, observations, and interviews reveal…

  9. Detailed Review of Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory and Educational Technology-Related Studies Based on Rogers' Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Ismail

    2006-01-01

    The process of adopting new innovations has been studied for over 30 years, and one of the most popular adoption models is described by Rogers in his book, "Diffusion of Innovations" (Sherry & Gibson, 2002). Much research from a broad variety of disciplines has used the model as a framework. Dooley (1999) and Stuart (2000) mentioned…

  10. Detailed Review of Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory and Educational Technology-Related Studies Based on Rogers' Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Ismail

    2006-01-01

    The process of adopting new innovations has been studied for over 30 years, and one of the most popular adoption models is described by Rogers in his book, "Diffusion of Innovations" (Sherry & Gibson, 2002). Much research from a broad variety of disciplines has used the model as a framework. Dooley (1999) and Stuart (2000) mentioned several of…

  11. Diffusion of solar innovations through television news programming

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, F.; Halacy, D.; O'Keefe, G.J.; Sendroy, C.G.

    1981-04-01

    The rationale, methodology, finished product, and evaluation of a series of short, topical films of various solar applications are presented. They were produced for use on prime-television news programming.

  12. Advice Networks and Local Diffusion of Technological Innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona, Juan Carlos; Pentland, Alex Sandy

    Classical writers such as John Stuart Mill and Karl Marx speculated that the standard of living could not rise indefinitely unless advances in technology increased the yield of the means of production. Neoclassical growth theory, based on capital accumulation, supports this intuition [1]. Digital tools increase personal productivity. Communication technologies enhance the coordination among individuals and increase the efficacy and efficiency of collective efforts. In both ways, technology contributes with wealth creation and the overall welfare of the community.

  13. The Social Fabric and Innovation Diffusion: Symbolic Adoption of Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Stephen G.; Korsching, Peter F.

    2004-01-01

    This study used a longitudinal, panel design to examine the effects of negative information acquisition, compliance with opinion leader endorsements, and social demographic characteristics on consumers' symbolic adoption of food irradiation. Data collection coincided with the first market test of irradiated food conducted by a commercial firm,…

  14. Rapid innovation diffusion in social networks

    PubMed Central

    Kreindler, Gabriel E.; Young, H. Peyton

    2014-01-01

    Social and technological innovations often spread through social networks as people respond to what their neighbors are doing. Previous research has identified specific network structures, such as local clustering, that promote rapid diffusion. Here we derive bounds that are independent of network structure and size, such that diffusion is fast whenever the payoff gain from the innovation is sufficiently high and the agents’ responses are sufficiently noisy. We also provide a simple method for computing an upper bound on the expected time it takes for the innovation to become established in any finite network. For example, if agents choose log-linear responses to what their neighbors are doing, it takes on average less than 80 revision periods for the innovation to diffuse widely in any network, provided that the error rate is at least 5% and the payoff gain (relative to the status quo) is at least 150%. Qualitatively similar results hold for other smoothed best-response functions and populations that experience heterogeneous payoff shocks. PMID:25024191

  15. Patient Perceptions of a Personal Health Record: A Test of the Diffusion of Innovation Model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) have emerged as an important tool with which patients can electronically communicate with their doctors and doctor’s offices. However, there is a lack of theoretical and empirical research on how patients perceive the PHR and the differences in perceptions between users and non-users of the PHR. Objective To apply a theoretical model, the diffusion of innovation model, to the study of PHRs and conduct an exploratory empirical study on the applicability of the model to the study of perceptions of PHRs. A secondary objective was to assess whether perceptions of PHRs predict the perceived value of the PHR for communicating with the doctor’s office. Methods We first developed a survey capturing perceptions of PHR use and other factors such as sociodemographic characteristics, access and use of technology, perceived innovativeness in the domain of information technology, and perceptions of privacy and security. We then conducted a cross-sectional survey (N = 1500). Patients were grouped into five groups of 300: PHR users (innovators, other users, and laggards), rejecters, and non-adopters. We applied univariate statistical analysis (Pearson chi-square and one-way ANOVA) to assess differences among groups and used multivariate statistical techniques (factor analysis and multiple regression analysis) to assess the presence of factors identified by the diffusion of innovation model and the predictors of our dependent variable (value of PHR for communicating with the doctor’s office). Results Of the 1500 surveys, 760 surveys were returned for an overall response rate of 51%. Computer use among non-adopters (75%) was lower than that among PHR users (99%) and rejecters (92%) (P < .001). Non-adopters also reported a lower score on personal innovativeness in information technology (mean = 2.8) compared to 3.6 and 3.1, respectively, for users and rejecters (P < .001). Four factors identified by the diffusion of innovation model

  16. Diffusion of Electric Vehicles and Novel Social Infrastructure from the Viewpoint of Systems Innovation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki

    This paper describes diffusion of electric vehicles and novel social infrastructure from the viewpoint of systems innovation theory considering both human society aspects and elemental technological aspects. Firstly, fundamentals of the systems innovation theory and the platform theory are mentioned. Secondly, discussion on mobility from the viewpoint of the human-society layer and discussion of electrical vehicles from the viewpoint of the elemental techniques are carried out. Thirdly, based on those, R & D, measures are argued such as establishment of the ubiquitous noncontact feeding and authentication payment system is important. Finally, it is also insisted that after the establishment of this system the super smart grid with temporal and spatial control including demand itself with the low social cost will be expected.

  17. Understanding the Diffusion and Adoption of Telecommunication Innovations: What We Know and What We Don't Know

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherning, Heidi; Damsgaard, Jan

    This paper provides a systematic account about what we know and what we don't know about the diffusion and adoption of telecommunication innovations. As our sample, we obtained research papers from IFIP 8.6 conferences, the International Conference on Information Systems, and the European Conference on Information Systems from the past 10 years concerning telecommunication innovation diffusion and adoption to examine what aspects of the diffusion and adoption process are accentuated or overlooked using a general view of the process. As our theoretical vehicle, we build a holistic framework that comprises the innovation, the unit of adoption, and their interaction as captured by demand pull and supply push forces. The framework also takes into account the environment that embeds the diffusion and adoption. We find that there are certain shortcomings in the existing research within the field that need to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of adoption and diffusion of telecommunication technologies.

  18. Best practices: implementation of a glucose screening program based on diffusion of innovation theory methods.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Ginger E; Morrato, Elaine H; Johnson, Mark C; Campagna, Elizabeth; Yingling, Michael D; Pham, Victor; Newcomer, John W

    2011-01-01

    There is public health interest in the identification and treatment of modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors among patients treated with antipsychotic medications. However, best-practice screening recommendations endorsed by multiple medical organizations have not translated into real-world clinical practice. Quality improvement strategies may help to address the gap between policy and implementation. This column describes the successful implementation of a best-practice glucose screening program in a large network of community mental health centers that was based on Six Sigma and diffusion of innovation theory. PMID:21209293

  19. Diffusion of Innovation in Long-Term Care (DOI-LTC) Measurement Battery

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Eleanor S.; Corazzini, Kirsten N.; Lekan, Deborah; Bailey, Donald C.; Sloane, Richard; Landerman, L. Richard; Champagne, Mary T.

    2013-01-01

    Poor understanding of factors influencing integration of new practices into long-term care (LTC) hinders timely implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). Using the Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) framework, a new instrument measuring staff perceptions of an EBP was developed as part of a DOI-LTC battery, and tested in a cross-sectional survey of North Carolina LTC nursing personnel. Valid questionnaires were received from 95 licensed nurses and 102 certified nursing assistants (CNAs). Internal consistency reliability for five of seven subscales was acceptable (Cronbach’s alpha = .77 to .95). Perception of innovation attributes was associated with intention to adopt the new practice (licensed nurses Spearman Rho = .41–.68, p < .0001; CNAs = .26–.54, p = .05 to < .0001). The DOI-LTC battery represents a promising new approach to studying implementation of EBPs in LTC. Future work should examine its responsiveness to interventions that facilitate implementation of EBPs in LTC. PMID:21702425

  20. Mechanisms of Innovation Diffusion under Information Abundance and Information Scarcity--On the Contribution of Social Networks in Group vs. Individual Extension Approaches in Semi-Arid Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darr, Dietrich; Pretzsch, Jurgen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of innovation diffusion under group-oriented and individual-oriented extension. Current theoretical notions of innovation diffusion in social networks shall be briefly reviewed, and the concepts of "search" and "innovation" vis-a-vis "transfer" and "imitation" mechanisms (Hansen,…

  1. Innovation Diffusion: Implications for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Shena R.

    2009-01-01

    Whether looking at the spread and adoption of an intervention across a community, across multiple units, or within a single unit, an understanding of diffusion theory can help evaluators uncover patterns and impacts that might otherwise be overlooked. The theory alerts evaluators to examine why uptake of an intervention appeared different in…

  2. Application of diffusion of innovations models in hospital knowledge management systems: lessons to be learned in complex organizations.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Daniel F; Burbridge, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    The authors identify a number of lessons to be learned regarding implementing a knowledge management system in hospitals. Building on the diffusion of innovations model, the authors address the development and implementation of a staffing productivity system designed to anticipate future hospital staffing needs. They describe the methodology behind the daily staff management system, efforts to market the system, and the implementation process and subsequent discontinuance of the system in a few early adopter hospitals. The authors address a number of principles of diffusion of innovations in the context of a complex adaptive system and provide insights into why some knowledge management systems fail. PMID:18450559

  3. Diffusion of Surgical Innovations, Patient Safety, and Minimally Invasive Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Kellogg; Messer, Karen; Palazzi, Kerrin; Stroup, Sean; Chang, David

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Surgical innovations disseminate in the absence of coordinated systems to ensure their safe integration into clinical practice, potentially exposing patients to increased risk for medical error. OBJECTIVE To investigate associations of patient safety with the diffusion of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) resulting from the development of the da Vinci robot. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cohort study of 401 325 patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample who underwent radical prostatectomy during MIRP diffusion between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs), which measure processes of care and surgical provider performance. We estimated the prevalence of MIRP among all prostatectomies and compared PSI incidence between MIRP and open radical prostatectomy in each year during the study. We also collected estimates of MIRP incidence attributed to the manufacturer of the da Vinci robot. RESULTS Patients who underwent MIRP were more likely to be white (P = .004), have fewer comorbidities (P = .02), and have undergone surgery in higher-income areas (P = .005). The incidence of MIRP was substantially lower than da Vinci manufacturer estimates. Rapid diffusion onset occurred in 2006, when MIRP accounted for 10.4% (95% CI, 10.2-10.7) of all radical prostatectomies in the United States. In 2005, MIRP was associated with an increased adjusted risk for any PSI (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7; P = .02) vs open radical prostatectomy. Stratification by hospital status demonstrated similar patterns: rapid diffusion onset among teaching hospitals occurred in 2006 (11.7%; 95% CI, 11.3-12.0), with an increased risk for PSI for MIRP in 2005 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-5.3; P = .004), and onset among nonteaching hospitals occurred in 2008 (27.1%; 95% CI, 26.6-27.7), with an increased but nonsignificant risk for PSI in 2007

  4. A recommendation to use the diffusion of innovations theory to understand school nurses' role in HPV vaccine uptake.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Brittany; Goodson, Patricia

    Vaccinations represent one of the greatest public health achievements of the past century, but their success largely depends on populations' uptake. Seven years after its approval in 2006 for females, the HPV vaccination rates remain relatively low. Previous literature provides information about research examining U.S. physicians, pediatricians, and other healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and professional practice toward the HPV vaccine. No research has yet investigated U.S. school nurses' role in educating the school community about the vaccine's benefits. Diffusion of Innovations theory is an appropriate perspective for examining school nurses as opinion leaders who can influence the uptake of the HPV vaccine for youth. This theory explains how innovations diffuse throughout a social system, and highlights the construct of opinion leadership. School nurses exhibit the characteristics of opinion leaders; therefore, Diffusion of Innovations can be a useful lens for assessing their role in efforts to promote HPV vaccination for youth. PMID:24366021

  5. Health Promotion Efforts as Predictors of Physical Activity in Schools: An Application of the Diffusion of Innovations Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M.; Centeio, Erin E.; Van Dongen, Daniel J.; Carson, Russell L.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implementing a comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) effectively addresses public health issues by providing opportunities for physical activity (PA). Grounded in the Diffusion of Innovations model, the purpose of this study was to identify how health promotion efforts facilitate opportunities for PA. Methods: Physical…

  6. Oxide diffusion in innovative SOFC cathode materials.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Thoréton, V; Pirovano, C; Capoen, E; Bogicevic, C; Nuns, N; Mamede, A-S; Dezanneau, G; Vannier, R N

    2014-01-01

    Oxide diffusion was studied in two innovative SOFC cathode materials, Ba(2)Co(9)O(14) and Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ derivatives. Although oxygen diffusion was confirmed in the promising material Ba(2)Co(9)O(14), it was not possible to derive accurate transport parameters because of an oxidation process at the sample surface which has still to be clarified. In contrast, oxygen diffusion in the well-known Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ thermoelectric material was improved when calcium was partly substituted with strontium, likely due to an increase of the volume of the rock salt layers in which the conduction process takes place. Although the diffusion coefficient remains low, interestingly, fast kinetics towards the oxygen molecule dissociation reaction were shown with surface exchange coefficients higher than those reported for the best cathode materials in the field. They increased with the strontium content; the Sr atoms potentially play a key role in the mechanism of oxygen molecule dissociation at the solid surface. PMID:25407246

  7. Bridging the Research-to-Practice Gap in Autism Intervention: An Application of Diffusion of Innovation Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingfelder, Hilary E.; Mandell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that efficacious interventions for autism are rarely adopted or successfully implemented in public mental health and education systems. We propose applying diffusion of innovation theory to further our understanding of why this is the case. We pose a practical set of questions that administrators face as they decide about…

  8. Exploring Learner Perception of E-Learning Effectiveness in the Workplace Learning Context Based on Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Tzu-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Jung

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study aims to examine adult learner's perception related to e-learning effectiveness. The model of diffusion of innovations (DOI) was used as the research framework and quantitative research methodology employing survey techniques was applied to collect the data. The targeted population identified in this study includes adult…

  9. Clinical Team Functioning and IT Innovation: A Study of the Diffusion of a Point-of-care Online Evidence System

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, A. Sophie; Westbrook, Johanna I.; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association between clinical team functioning and diffusion (awareness, use, and impact) of a 24-hour online evidence retrieval system. To examine the relationships between clinical team characteristics and the adoption of the online evidence system. Design: 18 clinical teams, consisting of 180 clinicians from three Australian hospitals, were identified and studied. Teams were categorized as small (≤ 15 members) or large (> 15). Measurements: Clinical team functioning was assessed using the Team Climate Inventory (TCI). Awareness, use, and impact of an online evidence retrieval system were measured using a self-administered questionnaire. The relationships between TCI scores and awareness, use, and impact were examined using t-tests and one-way ANOVAs. Chi square analyses were used to examine differences between small and large teams. Results were interpreted within a diffusion of innovations framework. Results: Clinical team functioning was not related to awareness or use of the online evidence retrieval system. However, clinical team functioning was significantly associated with the impact of online evidence in terms of reported experience of improved patient care following system use. Clinicians in small teams (≤ 15 members) had higher levels of system awareness compared to large (> 15) teams. Conclusions: Team functioning had the greatest impact on the fourth stage of innovation diffusion, the effective use of online evidence for clinical care. This supports Rogers’ diffusion of innovation theory, to the effect that different types of communication about an innovation are important at different stages in the diffusion process. Members of small teams were more aware of the system than members of large teams. Team functioning is amenable to improvement through interventions. The findings suggest that the role of team climate in the diffusion of information systems is a promising area for future research. PMID:12626379

  10. Diffusion of innovations theory applied to global tobacco control treaty ratification.

    PubMed

    Valente, Thomas W; Dyal, Stephanie R; Chu, Kar-Hai; Wipfli, Heather; Fujimoto, Kayo

    2015-11-01

    This study applies diffusion of innovations theory to understand network influences on country ratification of an international health treaty, the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC). From 2003 to 2014 approximately 90% of United Nations member countries ratified the FCTC. We hypothesized that communication between tobacco control advocates on GLOBALink, a 7000-member online communication forum in existence from 1992 to 2012, would be associated with the timing of treaty ratification. We further hypothesized dynamic network influences such that external influence decreased over time, internal influence increased over time, and the role of opinion leader countries varied over time. In addition we develop two concepts: Susceptibility and influence that uncover the micro-level dynamics of network influence. Statistical analyses lend support to the influence of co-subscriptions on GLOBALink providing a conduit for inter-country influences on treaty ratification and some support for the dynamic hypotheses. Analyses of susceptibility and infection indicated particularly influential countries. These results have implications for the study of policy diffusion as well as dynamic models of behavior change. PMID:26460508

  11. Diffusing Innovations in Nursing Education: From PDAs to OERs.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Glynda; Budz, Bernice

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian educational and healthcare practice landscapes are ever-evolving technologically. In response to these changes, the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) has integrated various educational technologies using Rogers Diffusion of Innovation model as a guiding framework for this integration with considerable success. This poster describes BCIT's journey with diffusing innovations, discusses examples of these technological integrations in accordance with Roger's model, and outlines several implications for educational practice. PMID:27332442

  12. Storylines of research in diffusion of innovation: a meta-narrative approach to systematic review.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Robert, Glenn; Macfarlane, Fraser; Bate, Paul; Kyriakidou, Olympia; Peacock, Richard

    2005-07-01

    Producing literature reviews of complex evidence for policymaking questions is a challenging methodological area. There are several established and emerging approaches to such reviews, but unanswered questions remain, especially around how to begin to make sense of large data sets drawn from heterogeneous sources. Drawing on Kuhn's notion of scientific paradigms, we developed a new method-meta-narrative review-for sorting and interpreting the 1024 sources identified in our exploratory searches. We took as our initial unit of analysis the unfolding 'storyline' of a research tradition over time. We mapped these storylines by using both electronic and manual tracking to trace the influence of seminal theoretical and empirical work on subsequent research within a tradition. We then drew variously on the different storylines to build up a rich picture of our field of study. We identified 13 key meta-narratives from literatures as disparate as rural sociology, clinical epidemiology, marketing and organisational studies. Researchers in different traditions had conceptualised, explained and investigated diffusion of innovations differently and had used different criteria for judging the quality of empirical work. Moreover, they told very different over-arching stories of the progress of their research. Within each tradition, accounts of research depicted human characters emplotted in a story of (in the early stages) pioneering endeavour and (later) systematic puzzle-solving, variously embellished with scientific dramas, surprises and 'twists in the plot'. By first separating out, and then drawing together, these different meta-narratives, we produced a synthesis that embraced the many complexities and ambiguities of 'diffusion of innovations' in an organisational setting. We were able to make sense of seemingly contradictory data by systematically exposing and exploring tensions between research paradigms as set out in their over-arching storylines. In some traditions

  13. The Science And Art Of Delivery: Accelerating The Diffusion Of Health Care Innovation.

    PubMed

    Parston, Greg; McQueen, Julie; Patel, Hannah; Keown, Oliver P; Fontana, Gianluca; Al Kuwari, Hanan; Al Kuwari, Hannan; Darzi, Ara

    2015-12-01

    There is a widely acknowledged time lag in health care between an invention or innovation and its widespread use across a health system. Much is known about the factors that can aid the uptake of innovations within discrete organizations. Less is known about what needs to be done to enable innovations to transform large systems of health care. This article describes the results of in-depth case studies aimed at assessing the role of key agents and agencies that facilitate the rapid adoption of innovations. The case studies-from Argentina, England, Nepal, Singapore, Sweden, the United States, and Zambia-represent widely varying health systems and economies. The implications of the findings for policy makers are discussed in terms of key factors within a phased approach for creating a climate for change, engaging and enabling the whole organization, and implementing and sustaining change. Purposeful and directed change management is needed to drive system transformation. PMID:26643638

  14. Rewiring the network. What helps an innovation to diffuse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna; Szwabiński, Janusz; Weron, Rafał; Weron, Tomasz

    2014-03-01

    A fundamental question related to innovation diffusion is how the structure of the social network influences the process. Empirical evidence regarding real-world networks of influence is very limited. On the other hand, agent-based modeling literature reports different, and at times seemingly contradictory, results. In this paper we study innovation diffusion processes for a range of Watts-Strogatz networks in an attempt to shed more light on this problem. Using the so-called Sznajd model as the backbone of opinion dynamics, we find that the published results are in fact consistent and allow us to predict the role of network topology in various situations. In particular, the diffusion of innovation is easier on more regular graphs, i.e. with a higher clustering coefficient. Moreover, in the case of uncertainty—which is particularly high for innovations connected to public health programs or ecological campaigns—a more clustered network will help the diffusion. On the other hand, when social influence is less important (i.e. in the case of perfect information), a shorter path will help the innovation to spread in the society and—as a result—the diffusion will be easiest on a random graph.

  15. The Impact of Principal Training in Diffusion of Innovation Theory on Fidelity of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruzzelli, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Districts and schools are constantly trying to find ways to increase student achievement. Research has shown a significant correlation between principal leadership skills and increased student achievement. Research has also shown a correlation between fidelity of implementation of new innovations and positive outcomes. This purpose of this study…

  16. Innovation diffusion equations on correlated scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, M. L.; Brunner, J.; Modanese, G.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a heterogeneous network structure into the Bass diffusion model, in order to study the diffusion times of innovation or information in networks with a scale-free structure, typical of regions where diffusion is sensitive to geographic and logistic influences (like for instance Alpine regions). We consider both the diffusion peak times of the total population and of the link classes. In the familiar trickle-down processes the adoption curve of the hubs is found to anticipate the total adoption in a predictable way. In a major departure from the standard model, we model a trickle-up process by introducing heterogeneous publicity coefficients (which can also be negative for the hubs, thus turning them into stiflers) and a stochastic term which represents the erratic generation of innovation at the periphery of the network. The results confirm the robustness of the Bass model and expand considerably its range of applicability.

  17. Diffusion of Technology Innovation in the Preservice Social Studies Experience: Results of a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolick, Cheryl Mason; Berson, Michael J.; Friedman, Adam M.; Porfeli, Erik J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents and discusses in detail the results from a longitudinal study of social studies teacher educators about the diffusion of technology in social studies teacher education. Data were obtained from the third distribution of a national survey that explores the beliefs, practices, and efficacy of social studies teacher education…

  18. The Diffusion of IT in the Historical Context of Innovations from Developed Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The well-known s-shaped diffusion of technology curve generally works well in developed countries. But how does it perform in the very different context of developing countries? Across a wide range of new technologies imported from the developed countries it works poorly. In most cases the penetration rate fails to reach 25% of the population. The…

  19. Diffusion of Innovation: A Case Study of Course Management System Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Phillip, Ed.D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the processes of evaluation, selection, adoption and diffusion of a course management system (CMS). This study incorporated a cross-case analysis using a multiple case study approach, which included two institutions, each having six participants. The participants were placed into three categories: faculty,…

  20. Diffusion of Impact Innovations to University Professors. A Final Report to the Exxon Education Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Everett M.; And Others

    Using four IMPACT innovations as examples (EXPER SIM, Guided Design, TIPS, and Student-to-Student Counseling), this study attempts to define the nature of technological and social changes in university teaching. Data were gathered in three phases: (1) a questionnaire was mailed to individuals who requested information; (2) the adopters of…

  1. [When the scientific career favors the scholarly diffusion of innovation: doctor Max Fourestier].

    PubMed

    Laffage-Cosnier, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    In 1992, the hospital of Nanterre assumed Max Fourestier's surname, as this great doctor was in office there between 1948 and 1973. Max Fourestier's biography and career emphasize that he embarked on three specific professional fields : specialty medicine, social medicine and school medicine. At the time, Max Fourestier was developing his universal endoscope in his department in Nanterre, achieving an extensive experience of massive BCG vaccination in a tuberculosis clinic in Montreuil, called "social hygiene" and, finally, carrying out a lot of school innovations to achieve an equal division of time between school work and sport practices. He also implemented snow classes in public schools in 1953 or napping classes,forest classes and snow classes in infant schools in 1959. In short, this presentation reveals that the inherent process of Max Fourestier's school innovation reputation lies in the scientific will of its creator, which allows him to convey his teaching ideas at the international level. Finally, in addition to the inventory of the physician's various innovations, the major challenge of this presentation is to reveal the intertwining and strong connections of Max Fourestier's medical and school commitments. In 1992, the hospital of Nanterre assumed Max Fourestier's surname, as this great doctor was in office there between 1948 and 1973. Max Fourestier's biography and career emphasize that he embarked on three specific professional fields: specialty medicine, social medicine and school medicine. At the time, Max Fourestier was developing his universal endoscope in his department in Nanterre, achieving an extensive experience of massive BCG vaccination in a tuberculosis clinic in Montreuil, called "social hygiene" and,finally, carrying out a lot of school innovations to achieve an equal division of time between school work and sport practices. He also implemented snow classes in public schools in 1953 or napping classes, forest classes and snow classes in

  2. The Challenge for Change in Rural Chile; A Study on Diffusion and Adoption of Agricultural Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menanteau-Horta, Dario

    Purposes of the study were (1) to present some of the problems of the organizational structure of Chilean agriculture, and (2) to explore some of the factors related to diffusion and adoption of agricultural practices as aspects of social and technological change and development. Two central factors considered in the research problem were (1)…

  3. Evaluation of an innovative sensor for measuring global and diffuse irradiance, and sunshine duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneer, Tariq; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wood, John

    2002-03-01

    Delta-T Device Limited of Cambridge, UK have developed an integrated device which enables simultaneous measurement of horizontal global and diffuse irradiance as well as sunshine status at any given instance in time. To evaluate the performance of this new device, horizontal global and diffuse irradiance data were simultaneously collected from Delta-T device and Napier University's CIE First Class daylight monitoring station. To enable a cross check a Kipp & Zonen CM11 global irradiance sensor has also been installed in Currie, south-west Edinburgh. Sunshine duration data have been recorded at the Royal Botanical Garden, Edinburgh using their Campbell-Stokes recorder. Hourly data sets were analysed and plotted within the Microsoft Excel environment. Using the common statistical measures, Root Mean Square Difference (RMSD) and Mean Bias Difference (MBD) the accuracy of measurements of Delta-T sensor's horizontal global and diffuse irradiance, and sunshine duration were investigated. The results show a good performance on the part of Delta-T device for the measurement of global and diffuse irradiance. The sunshine measurements were found to have a lack of consistency and accuracy. It is argued herein that the distance between the respective sensors and the poor accuracy of Campbell-Stokes recorder may be contributing factors to this phenomenon.

  4. Introduction of shared electronic records: multi-site case study using diffusion of innovation theory

    PubMed Central

    Stramer, Katja; Bratan, Tanja; Byrne, Emma; Mohammad, Yara; Russell, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the introduction of a centrally stored, shared electronic patient record (the summary care record (SCR)) in England and draw wider lessons about the implementation of large scale information technology projects in health care. Design Multi-site, mixed method case study applying utilisation focused evaluation. Setting Four early adopter sites for the SCR in England—three in urban areas of relative socioeconomic deprivation and the fourth in a relatively affluent rural area. Data sources and analysis Data included 250 staff interviews, 1500 hours of ethnographic observation, interviews and focus groups with 170 patients and carers, 2500 pages of correspondence and documentary evidence, and incorporation of relevant surveys and statistics produced by others. These were analysed by using a thematic approach drawing on (and extending) a theoretical model of complex change developed in a previous systematic review. Main findings The mixed fortunes of the SCR programme in its first year were largely explained by eight interacting influences. The first was the SCR’s material properties (especially technical immaturity and lack of interoperability) and attributes (especially the extent to which potential adopters believed the benefits outweighed the risks). The second was adopters’ concerns (especially about workload and the ethicality of sharing “confidential” information on an implied consent model). The third influence was interpersonal influence (for example, opinion leaders, champions, facilitators), and the fourth was organisational antecedents for innovation (for example past experience with information technology projects, leadership and management capacity, effective data capture systems, slack resources). The fifth was organisational readiness for the SCR (for example, innovation-system fit, tension for change, power balances between supporters and opponents, baseline data quality). The sixth was the implementation process (including

  5. Agent-based Modeling to Simulate the Diffusion of Water-Efficient Innovations and the Emergence of Urban Water Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanta, L.; Giacomoni, M.; Shafiee, M. E.; Berglund, E.

    2014-12-01

    The sustainability of water resources is threatened by urbanization, as increasing demands deplete water availability, and changes to the landscape alter runoff and the flow regime of receiving water bodies. Utility managers typically manage urban water resources through the use of centralized solutions, such as large reservoirs, which may be limited in their ability balance the needs of urbanization and ecological systems. Decentralized technologies, on the other hand, may improve the health of the water resources system and deliver urban water services. For example, low impact development technologies, such as rainwater harvesting, and water-efficient technologies, such as low-flow faucets and toilets, may be adopted by households to retain rainwater and reduce demands, offsetting the need for new centralized infrastructure. Decentralized technologies may create new complexities in infrastructure and water management, as decentralization depends on community behavior and participation beyond traditional water resources planning. Messages about water shortages and water quality from peers and the water utility managers can influence the adoption of new technologies. As a result, feedbacks between consumers and water resources emerge, creating a complex system. This research develops a framework to simulate the diffusion of water-efficient innovations and the sustainability of urban water resources, by coupling models of households in a community, hydrologic models of a water resources system, and a cellular automata model of land use change. Agent-based models are developed to simulate the land use and water demand decisions of individual households, and behavioral rules are encoded to simulate communication with other agents and adoption of decentralized technologies, using a model of the diffusion of innovation. The framework is applied for an illustrative case study to simulate water resources sustainability over a long-term planning horizon.

  6. Innovation or rebranding, acute care surgery diffusion will continue

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Courtney E.; Pringle, Patricia L.; Santry, Heena P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of adoption of acute care surgery (ACS) as a strategy for emergency general surgery (EGS) care are unknown. Methods We conducted a qualitative study comprising face-to-face interviews with senior surgeons responsible for ACS at 18 teaching hospitals chosen to ensure diversity of opinions and practice environment (three practice types [community, public/charity, university] in each of six geographic regions [Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, New England, Northeast, South, West]). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). We applied the methods of investigator triangulation using an inductive approach to develop a final taxonomy of codes organized by themes related to respondents’ views on the future of ACS as a strategy for EGS. We applied our findings to a conceptual model on diffusion of innovation. Results We found a paradox between ACS viewed as a healthcare delivery innovation versus a rebranding of comprehensive general surgery. Optimism for the future of ACS due to increased desirability for trauma/critical care careers and improved outcomes for EGS was tempered by fear over lack of continuity, poor institutional resources and uncertainty regarding financial viability. Our analysis suggests that the implementation of ACS, whether a true healthcare delivery innovation or an innovative rebranding, fits into the Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation Theory. Conclusions Despite concerns over resource allocation and the definition of the specialty, from the perspective of senior surgeons deeply entrenched in executing this care-delivery model, ACS represents the new face of general surgery that will likely continue to diffuse from these early adopters. PMID:25891673

  7. Using Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Explain the Degree of Faculty Adoption of Web-Based Instruction in a Thai University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intharaksa, Usa

    2009-01-01

    Scope and method of study: Using the framework of Rogers's (1995) Diffusion of Innovation Theory, the purpose of the study is to examine the use of web-based instruction and faculty perceptions of web-based instruction in a Thai university. In this study, interviews with seven participants were used as the primary method to collect data.…

  8. Innovation diffusion on time-varying activity driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1960s, the theory of innovation diffusion has contributed to the advancement of several research fields, such as marketing management and consumer behavior. The 1969 seminal paper by Bass [F.M. Bass, Manag. Sci. 15, 215 (1969)] introduced a model of product growth for consumer durables, which has been extensively used to predict innovation diffusion across a range of applications. Here, we propose a novel approach to study innovation diffusion, where interactions among individuals are mediated by the dynamics of a time-varying network. Our approach is based on the Bass' model, and overcomes key limitations of previous studies, which assumed timescale separation between the individual dynamics and the evolution of the connectivity patterns. Thus, we do not hypothesize homogeneous mixing among individuals or the existence of a fixed interaction network. We formulate our approach in the framework of activity driven networks to enable the analysis of the concurrent evolution of the interaction and individual dynamics. Numerical simulations offer a systematic analysis of the model behavior and highlight the role of individual activity on market penetration when targeted advertisement campaigns are designed, or a competition between two different products takes place.

  9. Using the Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Explain the Degree of English Teachers' Adoption of Interactive Whiteboards in the Modern Systems School in Jordan: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jwaifell, Mustafa; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explain the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by English female teachers in Modern Systems School in Jordan. Viewed from the lens of Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory, the study examined and reported teachers' use of IWB and its features that have impact on their decisions to adopt it in Modern Systems School . The…

  10. How Do Low-Income Urban African Americans and Latinos Feel about Telemedicine? A Diffusion of Innovation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    George, Sheba; Hamilton, Alison; Baker, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Telemedicine is promoted as a means to increase access to specialty medical care among the urban underserved, yet little is known about its acceptability among these populations. We used components of a diffusion of innovation conceptual framework to analyze preexperience perceptions about telemedicine to assess its appeal among urban underserved African Americans and Latinos. Methods. Ten focus groups were conducted with African American (n = 43) and Latino participants (n = 44) in both English and Spanish and analyzed for key themes. Results. Both groups perceived increased and immediate access to multiple medical opinions and reduced wait time as relative advantages of telemedicine. However, African Americans expressed more concerns than Latinos about confidentiality, privacy, and the physical absence of the specialist. This difference may reflect lower levels of trust in new health care innovations among African Americans resulting from a legacy of past abuses in the US medical system as compared to immigrant Latinos who do not have this particular historical backdrop. Conclusions. These findings have implications for important issues such as adoption of telemedicine, patient satisfaction, doctor-patient interactions, and the development and tailoring of strategies targeted to each of these populations for the introduction, marketing, and implementation of telemedicine. PMID:22997511

  11. An agent based multi-optional model for the diffusion of innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laciana, Carlos E.; Oteiza-Aguirre, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    We propose a model for the diffusion of several products competing in a common market based on the generalization of the Ising model of statistical mechanics (Potts model). Using an agent based implementation we analyze two problems: (i) a three options case, i.e. to adopt a product A, a product B, or non-adoption and (ii) a four option case, i.e. the adoption of product A, product B, both, or none. In the first case we analyze a launching strategy for one of the two products, which delays its launching with the objective of competing with improvements. Market shares reached by each product are then estimated at market saturation. Finally, simulations are carried out with varying degrees of social network topology, uncertainty, and population homogeneity.

  12. Characterization and biological abatement of diffuse methane emissions and odour in an innovative wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Barcón, Tamara; Hernández, Jerónimo; Gómez-Cuervo, Santiago; Garrido, Juan M; Omil, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An innovative and patented process for medium-high strength sewage which comprises an anaerobic step followed by a hybrid anoxic-aerobic chamber and a final ultrafiltration stage was characterized in terms of methane fugitive emissions as well as odours. The operation at ambient temperature implies higher methane content in the liquid anaerobic effluent, which finally causes concentrations around 0.01-2.4% in the off-gas released in the anoxic-aerobic chamber (1.25% average). Mass balances indicate that these emissions account for up to 30-35% of the total methane generated in the anaerobic reactor. A conventional biofilter (BF) operated at an empty bed residence time of 4 min was used to treat these emissions for 70 d. In spite of the fluctuations in the methane inlet concentrations derived from the operation of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), it was possible to operate at pseudo-steady-state conditions, achieving average removal efficiencies of 76.5% and maximum elimination capacities of 30.1 g m(-3) h(-1). Odour removal was quantified as 99.1%. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes as well as metabolic activity assays demonstrated the suitability of the biomass developed in the WWTP as inoculum to start up the BF due to the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. PMID:25749282

  13. Diffusion of innovation: enhancing the dissemination of the Ponseti method in Latin America through virtual forums.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Asitha; Boardman, Allison; Cook, Thomas; Oprescu, Florin; Morcuende, Jose A

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study evaluated the use of low-bandwidth web-conferencing to enhance diffusion of a specific best practice, the Ponseti method to treat clubfoot, in three economically diverse countries in Latin America. A "Ponseti Virtual Forum" (PVF) was organized in Guatemala, Peru and Chile to examine the influences of economic level and telecommunication infrastructure on the effectiveness of tins approach. Across the three countries, a total of 14 different sites participated in the PVFs. Thirty-three Ponseti-trained practitioners were interviewed before and after each PVF, which included interactions with a Spanish-speaking Ponseti method expert. Semi-structured interviews, observations, and IP address data were triangulated and analyzed. The results demonstrated that 100% of the practitioners rated the sessions as very useful and that they would use this approach again. The largest obstacles to using PVFs were financial (7 out of 9 practitioners) in Guatemala; a lack of equipment and network access (6 out of 11) in Peru; and the organization and implementation of the conferences themselves (7 out of 9) in Chile. This study illustrates the usefulness of Ponseti Virtual Forums in Latin America. Health officials in Peru are currently developing a large-scale information session for traumatologists about the Ponseti method, while practitioners in Guatemala and Chile are organizing monthly scholarly meetings for physicians in remote areas. This initial feedback suggests that low-bandwidth web-conferencing can be an important vehicle for the dissemination of best practices, such as the Ponseti method, in developing countries. PMID:22096417

  14. Technical Report for DOE grant ER63467-1020269-0008388 ''International Innovation & Diffusion of Environmental Technologies: The Case of NOX''

    SciTech Connect

    David Popp

    2004-11-18

    This research traces the development of nitrogen dioxide (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution control devices for coal-fired power plants in the United States, Japan, and Germany. This is of particular interest because of the timing of regulation in each country. While the US was an early adopter of SO2 regulations, it did not adopt stringent NOX regulations until the 1990s. Both Japan and Germany adopted stringent NOX regulations earlier. As such, advanced control techniques such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) were first developed in Japan and Germany. In contrast, US firms were more active in the development of SO2 control devices. This study uses patent data from the three countries, as well as adoption data for individual plants, to trace the development of these technologies. Of particular interest is the role of technology transfer. While we know from previous research that firms respond to new regulations in their own country with new innovations, we do no t know the extent to which firms respond to regulations in foreign countries. Moreover, we know little about how innovations developed abroad enter the domestic knowledge base. For example, do firms make direct use of knowledge developed in foreign countries, or is domestic R&D necessary to adapt these innovations to local conditions. Understanding such trends is important, as it affects both the speed at which technology will diffuse, and the cost of technology transfer. To address these issues, this research compares the role that domestic and foreign knowledge play in the decisions of firms to adopt new environmental technologies. I begin by using patent and regulatory data from the U.S., Japan, and Germany to study the links between both domestic and foreign environmental policy and innovation. I show that innovative activity responds to domestic environmental policy pressures, but not to foreign pressures. Moreover, even countries that adopt regulations late, such as th e U.S. in the case

  15. Diffusion of Impact Innovations from 1973-76: Interpersonal Communication Networks Among University Professors. A Report to the Exxon Education Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwala-Rogers, Rekha; And Others

    This report presents the research findings from the second year of a continuing investigation to determine the diffusion patterns to university professors of four specific educational innovations developed by the IMPACT Program. Issues addressed include: (1) creation of a corps of secondary and tertiary receivers, (2) future adoption and…

  16. The Importance of Innovation: Diffusion Theory and Technological Progress in Writing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that all stakeholders should share a focus on "innovations," referring here simultaneously to technologies and their social, cultural, political, and historical contexts. Introduces a new perspective through which writing center professionals can approach collaborative relationships with other stakeholders in the move towards…

  17. Agency, Socio-Cultural Context, and the Role of the Technical Communicator during IT Adoption: A Case Study in Innovation Diffusion across Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggio, Grace Leinbach

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the diffusion of an innovative information technology system across multiple cultures between 2000 and 2006. Developed and implemented by technical communicators in the technical communication department of a global medical device company, the Advanced Single-Source Authoring and Publication System (ASAPS) brought…

  18. Organization-wide adoption of computerized provider order entry systems: a study based on diffusion of innovations theory

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems have been introduced to reduce medication errors, increase safety, improve work-flow efficiency, and increase medical service quality at the moment of prescription. Making the impact of CPOE systems more observable may facilitate their adoption by users. We set out to examine factors associated with the adoption of a CPOE system for inter-organizational and intra-organizational care. Methods The diffusion of innovation theory was used to understand physicians' and nurses' attitudes and thoughts about implementation and use of the CPOE system. Two online survey questionnaires were distributed to all physicians and nurses using a CPOE system in county-wide healthcare organizations. The number of complete questionnaires analyzed was 134 from 200 nurses (67.0%) and 176 from 741 physicians (23.8%). Data were analyzed using descriptive-analytical statistical methods. Results More nurses (56.7%) than physicians (31.3%) stated that the CPOE system introduction had worked well in their clinical setting (P < 0.001). Similarly, more physicians (73.9%) than nurses (50.7%) reported that they found the system not adapted to their specific professional practice (P = < 0.001). Also more physicians (25.0%) than nurses (13.4%) stated that they did want to return to the previous system (P = 0.041). We found that in particular the received relative advantages of the CPOE system were estimated to be significantly (P < 0.001) higher among nurses (39.6%) than physicians (16.5%). However, physicians' agreements with the compatibility of the CPOE and with its complexity were significantly higher than the nurses (P < 0.001). Conclusions Qualifications for CPOE adoption as defined by three attributes of diffusion of innovation theory were not satisfied in the study setting. CPOE systems are introduced as a response to the present limitations in paper-based systems. In consequence, user expectations are often high on their relative

  19. Dynamics of human innovative behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    How to promote the innovative activities is an important problem for modern society. In this paper, combining the evolutionary games with information spreading, we propose a lattice model to investigate dynamics of human innovative behaviors based on benefit-driven assumption. Simulations show several properties in agreement with peoples’ daily cognition on innovative behaviors, such as slow diffusion of innovative behaviors, gathering of innovative strategy on “innovative centers”, and quasi-localized dynamics. Furthermore, our model also emerges rich non-Poisson properties in the temporal-spatial patterns of the innovative status, including the scaling law in the interval time of innovation releases and the bimodal distributions on the spreading range of innovations, which would be universal in human innovative behaviors. Our model provides a basic framework on the study of the issues relevant to the evolution of human innovative behaviors and the promotion measurement of innovative activities.

  20. Case management for dementia in primary health care: a systematic mixed studies review based on the diffusion of innovation model

    PubMed Central

    Khanassov, Vladimir; Vedel, Isabelle; Pluye, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the implementation of case management (CM) interventions in primary health care (PHC) and to develop strategies to enhance its adoption by PHC practices. Methods This study was designed as a systematic mixed studies review (including quantitative and qualitative studies) with synthesis based on the diffusion of innovation model. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database (1995 to August 2012) to identify quantitative (randomized controlled and nonrandomized) and qualitative studies describing the conditions limiting and facilitating successful CM implementation in PHC. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed using the validated Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Results Twenty-three studies (eleven quantitative and 12 qualitative) were included. The characteristics of CM that negatively influence implementation are low CM intensity (eg, infrequent follow-up), large caseload (more than 60 patients per full-time case manager), and approach, ie, reactive rather than proactive. Case managers need specific skills to perform their role (eg, good communication skills) and their responsibilities in PHC need to be clearly delineated. Conclusion Our systematic review supports a better understanding of factors that can explain inconsistent evidence with regard to the outcomes of dementia CM in PHC. Lastly, strategies are proposed to enhance implementation of dementia CM in PHC. PMID:24959072

  1. School climate and teachers' beliefs and attitudes associated with implementation of the positive action program: a diffusion of innovations model.

    PubMed

    Beets, Michael W; Flay, Brian R; Vuchinich, Samuel; Acock, Alan C; Li, Kin-Kit; Allred, Carol

    2008-12-01

    Teacher- and school-level factors influence the fidelity of implementation of school-based prevention and social character and development (SACD) programs. Using a diffusion of innovations framework, the relationships among teacher beliefs and attitudes towards a prevention/SACD program and the influence of a school's administrative support and perceptions of school connectedness, characteristics of a school's climate, were specified in two cross-sectional mediation models of program implementation. Implementation was defined as the amount of the programs' curriculum delivered (e.g., lessons taught), and use of program-specific materials in the classroom (e.g., ICU boxes and notes) and in relation to school-wide activities (e.g., participation in assemblies). Teachers from 10 elementary schools completed year-end process evaluation reports for year 2 (N = 171) and 3 (N = 191) of a multi-year trial. Classroom and school-wide material usage were each favorably associated with the amount of the curriculum delivered, which were associated with teachers' attitudes toward the program which, in turn, were related to teachers' beliefs about SACD. These, in turn, were associated with teachers' perceptions of school climate. Perceptions of school climate were indirectly related to classroom material usage and both indirectly and directly related to the use of school-wide activities. Program developers need to consider the importance of a supportive environment on program implementation and attempt to incorporate models of successful school leadership and collaboration among teachers that foster a climate promoting cohesiveness, shared visions, and support. PMID:18780182

  2. Disruptive Innovations for Designing and Diffusing Evidence-based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Chorpita, Bruce F.

    2013-01-01

    The numbers of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) have been growing exponentially, both therapeutic and prevention programs. Yet, EBIs have not been broadly adopted in the United States. In order for our EBI science to significantly reduce disease burden, we need to critically re-examine our scientific conventions and norms. Innovation may be spurred by re-examining the biomedical model for validating EBIs and the compartmentalization of EBIs as disease-specific, institutionally-based, counseling programs. The model of Disruptive Innovations suggests that we re-engineer EBIs based on their most robust features in order to reach more people in less time and at lower cost. Four new research agendas will be required to support disruptive innovations in EBI science: synthesize common elements across EBIs; experiment with new delivery formats (e.g., consumer controlled, self-directed, brief, paraprofessional, coaching, and technology and media strategies); adopt market strategies to promote and diffuse EBI science, knowledge, and products; and adopt continuous quality improvement as a research paradigm for systematically improving EBIs, based on ongoing data and feedback. EBI science can have more impact if it can better leverage what we know from existing EBIs in order to inspire, engage, inform, and support families and children to adopt and sustain healthy daily routines and lifestyles. PMID:22545596

  3. Differential Effect of Information Channels in the Process of Innovation Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Nan; Burt, Ronald S.

    1975-01-01

    Distinguishes three types of communication channels -- the mass media, inter-personal channels, and the local media -- and, using data gathered in El Salvador, places each of the three types in a structural model involving antecedent demographic considerations and consequent variables measuring participation in the adoption process. (Author/JM)

  4. The governance of innovation diffusion - a socio-technical analysis of energy policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolden, C.

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a dynamic price mechanism to coordinate eletric power generation from micro Combined Heat and Power (micro-CHP) systems in a network of households. It is assumed that the households are prosumers, i.e. both producers and consumers of electricity. The control is done on household level in a completely distributed manner. Avoiding a centralized controller both eases computation complexity and preserves communication structure in the network. Local information is used to decide to turn on or off the micro-CHP, but through price signals between the prosumers the network as a whole operates in a cooperative way.

  5. Geographic Theories of Educational Development: Innovation Diffusion Within Informal Interpersonal Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Brian J. L.

    An examination of geographic theories of social change clarifies how and why Torsten Haagerstrand's ideas have revolutionized geographic thinking, particularly regarding educational change and development, and provides the background for analyzing his models in detail. Haagerstrand developed the first formal geoqraphic model of diffusion…

  6. Modeling Technology Innovation and Diffusion in Transition Economies: The Case of China

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Fisher-Vanden

    2005-10-20

    Our research program has involved data collection and analysis, modeling building, and the presentation of results. The data collection and analysis work was done in collaboration with our colleagues at the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) in China. Each summer, we hosted on average four researchers from NBS for 3 months to work with us on the data analysis component of the research. Each summer our NBS colleagues would bring an updated data set of firm-level economic, R&D, and energy data that allowed us to explore the impacts of technological change on firm-level energy consumption. This grant also funded a number of graduate and undergraduate students to work on different elements of the analysis.

  7. Contraceptive intention behavior in rural Bangladesh: factors in the diffusion of an innovation.

    PubMed

    Paul, B K

    1990-04-01

    To elucidate the determinants of contraceptive use or nonuse in rural Bangladesh, Fishbein's behavioral intention model was modified and applied to survey data collected in 1984 in the Ghatail upazila of the Tangail district. The proposed behavioral model consists of 5 independent variables: global attitude, global motivation to comply, motivation toward fertility regulation, method-specific attitude, and method-specific availability. Of the 193 respondents surveyed, 152 expressed an intention not to use oral contraceptives (OCs)--the most accessible method in the survey area--and were generally negative about any form of contraceptive use. As expected, the 41 women who did intend to use OCs had a positive global attitude toward contraception. Global motivation to comply scores were negative for women who had no plans to become OC users, largely because of a belief that the Islamic religion prohibits contraceptive use. Concern about religion was a greater obstacle to these women than the perceived reaction of their husband and friends to OC use. The aggregate score on motivation for fertility regulation was positive, suggesting that respondents still desire more children. The pill received a negative method-specific score due to perceptions that it is unreliable and causes side effects. The mean distance to a source of OCs (method availability) was 2.55 miles among women who intended not to use the pill and 2.34 miles among potential acceptors. Stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that global attitude and global motivation were the most significant predictors of intent to use OCs; the only other significant variable was method-specific attitude. The implications of these findings are that contraceptive availability is not sufficient to contraceptive use; creation of a favorable attitude toward contraception and support from Islamic religious leaders appear to the necessary prerequisites to more widespread fertility control. PMID:12283440

  8. Using Diffusion of Innovations to Explore Digital Gaming in Undergraduate Library Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Michael James

    2009-01-01

    Digital games and simulations are receiving considerable notice within the library and information science (LIS) community. This study adds to the depth of knowledge in this area by providing research on the likelihood a hypothetical digital game delivery method for library instruction achieves sufficient adoption to justify its development.…

  9. The Users of Cable TV Access Channels: A Study of the Diffusion and Adoption of a Communications Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparkes, Vernone M.

    A mail survey of 91 past and present users of the community programing (public access) channels in the Toronto, Canada, area revealed that personal contact is most important in the diffusion of knowledge about access opportunities. Friends and colleagues were the most often cited initial source of information; but contact by the cable company…

  10. Diffusion of e-health innovations in ‘post-conflict’ settings: a qualitative study on the personal experiences of health workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Technological innovations have the potential to strengthen human resources for health and improve access and quality of care in challenging ‘post-conflict’ contexts. However, analyses on the adoption of technology for health (that is, ‘e-health’) and whether and how e-health can strengthen a health workforce in these settings have been limited so far. This study explores the personal experiences of health workers using e-health innovations in selected post-conflict situations. Methods This study had a cross-sectional qualitative design. Telephone interviews were conducted with 12 health workers, from a variety of cadres and stages in their careers, from four post-conflict settings (Liberia, West Bank and Gaza, Sierra Leone and Somaliland) in 2012. Everett Roger’s diffusion of innovation-decision model (that is, knowledge, persuasion, decision, implementation, contemplation) guided the thematic analysis. Results All health workers interviewed held positive perceptions of e-health, related to their beliefs that e-health can help them to access information and communicate with other health workers. However, understanding of the scope of e-health was generally limited, and often based on innovations that health workers have been introduced through by their international partners. Health workers reported a range of engagement with e-health innovations, mostly for communication (for example, email) and educational purposes (for example, online learning platforms). Poor, unreliable and unaffordable Internet was a commonly mentioned barrier to e-health use. Scaling-up existing e-health partnerships and innovations were suggested starting points to increase e-health innovation dissemination. Conclusions Results from this study showed ICT based e-health innovations can relieve information and communication needs of health workers in post-conflict settings. However, more efforts and investments, preferably driven by healthcare workers within the post

  11. Task-shifting Using a Pain Management Protocol in an Emergency Care Service: Nurses' Perception through the Eye of the Rogers's Diffusion of Innovation Theory.

    PubMed

    Hadorn, Fabienne; Comte, Pascal; Foucault, Eliane; Morin, Diane; Hugli, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that over 70% of patients waiting in emergency departments (EDs) do not receive analgesics, despite the fact that more than 78% complain of pain. A clinical innovation in the form of a pain management protocol that includes task-shifting has been implemented in the ED of a university hospital in Switzerland in order to improve pain-related outcomes in patients. This innovation involves a change in clinical practice for physicians and nurses. The aim of this study is to explore nurses' perceptions on how well this innovation is adopted. This descriptive correlational study took place in the ED of a Swiss university hospital; the hospital provides healthcare for the city, the canton, and adjoining cantons. A convenience sample of 37 ED nurses participated. They were asked to complete a questionnaire comprising 56 statements based on Rogers's "Diffusion of Innovation" theory. Nurses' opinions (on a 1-10 Likert scale) indicate that the new protocol benefits the ED (mean [M] = 7.4, standard deviation [SD] = 1.21), is compatible with nursing roles (M = 8.0, SD = 1.9), is not too complicated to apply (M = 2.7, SD = 1.7), provides observable positive effects in patients (M = 7.0, SD = 1.28), and is relatively easy to introduce into daily practice (M = 6.5, SD = 1.0). Further studies are now needed to examine patients' experiences of this innovation. PMID:26602151

  12. Diffusion of innovations in social interaction systems. An agent-based model for the introduction of new drugs in markets.

    PubMed

    Pombo-Romero, Julio; Varela, Luis M; Ricoy, Carlos J

    2013-06-01

    The existence of imitative behavior among consumers is a well-known phenomenon in the field of Economics. This behavior is especially common in markets determined by a high degree of innovation, asymmetric information and/or price-inelastic demand, features that exist in the pharmaceutical market. This paper presents evidence of the existence of imitative behavior among primary care physicians in Galicia (Spain) when choosing treatments for their patients. From this and other evidence, we propose a dynamic model for determining the entry of new drugs into the market. To do this, we introduce the structure of the organization of primary health care centers and the presence of groups of doctors who are specially interrelated, as well as the existence of commercial pressure on doctors. For modeling purposes, physicians are treated as spins connected in an exponentially distributed complex network of the Watts-Strogatz type. The proposed model provides an explanation for the differences observed in the patterns of the introduction of technological innovations in different regions. The main cause of these differences is the different structure of relationships among consumers, where the existence of small groups that show a higher degree of coordination over the average is particularly influential. The evidence presented, together with the proposed model, might be useful for the design of optimal strategies for the introduction of new drugs, as well as for planning policies to manage pharmaceutical expenditure. PMID:22487887

  13. The Diffusion of New Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ready, Patricia M.

    The life cycle of "new math" is fertile ground for the study of the diffusion of an innovation. New math arrived in 1958 to save the day for America after the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first successful space flight in 1957. In a period of 16 years an entire diffusion cycle was completed throughout the entire educational system of the…

  14. Exploring links between innovation and diffusion: adoption of NOx control technologies at U.S. coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, D.

    2006-03-15

    While many studies have looked at innovation and adoption of technologies separately, the two processes are linked. Advances (and expected advances) in a single technology should affect both its adoption rate and the adoption of alternative technologies. Moreover, advances made abroad may affect adoption differently than improvements developed domestically. This paper combines plant-level data on US coal-fired electric power plants with patent data pertaining to NOx pollution control techniques to study these links. It is shown that technological advances, particularly those made abroad, are important for the adoption of newer post-combustion treatment technologies, but have little effect on the adoption of older combustion modification techniques. Moreover, it provides evidence that adaptive R&D by US firms is necessary before foreign innovations are adopted in the US. Expectations of future technological advances delay adoption. Nonetheless, as in other studies of environmental technologies, the effect of other explanatory variables is dominated by the effect of environmental regulations, demonstrating that the mere presence of environmental technologies is not enough to encourage its usage.

  15. Study Abroad as Innovation: Applying the Diffusion Model to International Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiering, Kerri; Erickson, Sheri

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses diffusion of innovation theory as a framework for studying why United States college students who attend study abroad information sessions fail to take advantage of such educational opportunities. Surveys were administered to two groups of undergraduate students--those who studied abroad and those who did not. Students ranked their…

  16. Measuring the Quality of Communication Linkages between Farmers and the Agricultural Agencies Responsible for the Diffusion of Innovations in the South West Province of Cameroon. A Summary Report of Research. Department Information Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Bridget Ayuk

    The quality of communication linkages between farmers and the agricultural agencies responsible for diffusion of innovations in the South West Province of Cameroon was examined in a study of all 25 researchers and 150 extension agents in the province and 385 farmers who were randomly selected from the province's 3,000 farmers. Data were collected…

  17. Exploring audience segmentation: investigating adopter categories to diffuse an innovation to prevent famine in rural Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; Findeis, Jill L

    2013-01-01

    Audience segmentation is a useful tool for designing effective campaigns. Further, the efficiency promised in diffusion science rests to some degree on the existence of adopter categories that can be identified and used to strategically disseminate prevention innovations. This study investigates the potential to identify adopter categories in potential recipients (n = 127) of an innovation to prevent food shortages in Mozambique. A 5-class model was found using latent class analysis, but it showed important differences from existing descriptions of adopter categories. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23020741

  18. Using the Innovation Adoption Diffusion Model to Target Educational Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    A telephone survey of 200 farm operators regarding adoption of innovations found 52% were early adopters or early majority adopters and 48% were late majority adopters or laggard. Importance of scientific research, learning about new concepts, and use of sources other than extension were factors distinguishing the categories. (SK)

  19. Diffusion of Distance Education in North Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Dabaj, Fahme

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to explore how distance education has diffused in north Cyprus. In this paper, Rogers' diffusion theory (1995) was used to analyze the acceptance and implementation of distance education in institutions of higher learning in north Cyprus. The four main elements of the diffusion paradigm--the innovation,…

  20. Communication of Innovations; A Cross-Cultural Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Everett M.; Shoemaker, F. Floyd

    How do innovations (defined as idea, products, and practices perceived as new by an individual) diffuse to members of a social system? The authors answer this and other questions about the character of innovators, the rate of adoption of ideas, and the decision-making process in 103 generalizations about diffusion of innovation. These propositions…

  1. Diffusing Innovation in an Urban Setting: An Evaluator's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brethower, Dale M.; Pasch, Marvin

    Described in this paper is a project utilizing the linkage concept in the implementation of a diffused team planning process in six elementary schools undergoing desegregation. Strategies employed in designing the project are reviewed. These reviews include a retrospective analysis of the first two years of the project, a review of the minutes of…

  2. VET and the Diffusion and Implementation of Innovation in the Mining, Solar Energy and Computer Games Sectors. NCVER Monograph Series 06/2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalitz, Robert; Toner, Phillip; Turpin, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Innovation is thought to improve productivity at the firm level and economic prosperity at the national level. This would seem to have implications for the skills and skills development of employees. However, little is known about the relationship between skills development and innovation. This report is the culmination of case studies exploring…

  3. An Examination of the Adoption of Preservation Metadata in Cultural Heritage Institutions: An Exploratory Study Using Diffusion of Innovations Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw

    2009-01-01

    Digital preservation is a significant challenge for cultural heritage institutions and other repositories of digital information resources. Recognizing the critical role of metadata in any successful digital preservation strategy, the Preservation Metadata Implementation Strategies (PREMIS) has been extremely influential on providing a "core" set…

  4. An Evaluation of the ELNP e-Learning Quality Assurance Program: Perspectives of Gap Analysis and Innovation Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ming-Puu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the appropriateness of a nationwide quality assurance framework for e-learning from participants' perspectives. Two types of quality evaluation programs were examined in this study, including the e-Learning Service Certification program (eLSC) and the e-Learning Courseware Certification program (eLCC). Gap…

  5. Diffusion of Innovations Approach to the Evaluation of Learning Management System Usage in an Open Distance Learning Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mkhize, Peter; Mtsweni, Samuel; Buthelezi, Portia

    2016-01-01

    Academic institutions such as the University of South Africa (Unisa) are using information and communication technology (ICT) in order to conduct their daily primary operations, which are teaching and learning. Unisa is the only distance learning university in South Africa and also in Africa. Unisa currently has the highest number of students on…

  6. The Diffusion of Innovations in Education: A Study of Secondary English Language Arts Teachers' Classroom Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Kelly Keener

    2013-01-01

    This study explored secondary English Language Arts teachers' experiences using digital technologies in their classrooms, as presented in two key journals in the English Education field: the "Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy" ("JAAL"), sponsored by the International Reading Association, and "English…

  7. The Impact of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry; Weidner, Laura; Wilson, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    With funding from MetLife Foundation, the League for Innovation in the Community College engaged in a yearlong study in 2009 of the nature of innovation in the community college. Using recipients of the League's Innovation of the Year Award at 19 community colleges during the period from 1999 through 2008 as a data set, the authors used document…

  8. Electronic Health Records: Applying Diffusion of Innovation Theory to the Relationship between Multifactor Authentication and EHR Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Daeron C.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are increasingly becoming accepted as future direction of medical record management systems. Programs such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have provided incentives to hospitals that adopt EHR systems. In spite of these incentives, the perception of EHR adoption is that is has not achieved the…

  9. A decision analytical framework for evaluating technical innovation and diffusion: The case of electronic ballasts for commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, H.G.; Weyant, J.P.; Johnson, B.; Kann, A.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present a decision analytical framework for studying the decision to purchase new energy-efficient magnetic ballasts for commercial buildings as a special case study for understanding the decision environment that could either encourage or retard the penetration of new carbon-saving technologies. The framework is particularly germane to situations where uncertainty in the investment outcome prevails as a dominant dimension of the problem. It allows the policy analyst to consider policies that operate through other considerations than through the price alone. A key effect is how a policy will either truncate a probability distribution to remove the worst outcomes or cause the probability distribution to narrow. Such considerations appear important when studying information programs, vendor warranty, and other factors that condition the investment decision.

  10. Innovation Diffusion: Learner Benefits and Instructor Insights with the DIFFUSION SIMULATION GAME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Kuo, Chia-Ling

    2012-01-01

    This research project investigated student reaction to playing the DIFFUSION SIMULATION GAME (DSG) and how an instructor, who is a novice in playing online games, implemented the DSG in an online higher education course. The goal of this research project was to determine whether playing the DSG helps students learn and apply course content. In…

  11. In Search of Alternative Communication Strategies for Rural Development in the Third World: A Critique of the Diffusion of Innovations Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melkote, Srinivas Rajagopal

    In their attempts to further the adoption of productivity increasing ideas and practices by third world peasants, diffusion researchers have paid insufficient attention to the factors acting as constraints to their efforts. An examination of one of these constraints, the lack of an equitable system for delivering knowledge and skills to rural…

  12. The discipline of innovation.

    PubMed

    Drucker, P F

    1998-01-01

    Some innovations spring from a flash of genius. But as Peter Drucker points out in this HBR Classic, most result from a conscious, purposeful search for opportunities. For managers seeking innovation, engaging in disciplined work is more important than having an entrepreneurial personality. Writing originally in the May-June 1985 issue, Drucker describes the major sources of opportunities for innovation. Within a company or industry, opportunities can be found in unexpected occurrences, incongruities of various kinds, process needs, or changes in an industry or market. Outside a company, opportunities arise from demographic changes, changes in perception, or new knowledge. These seven sources overlap, and the potential for innovation may well lie in more than one area at a time. Innovations based on new knowledge, of course, tend to have the greatest effect on the marketplace. But it often takes decades before the ideas are translated into actual products, processes, or services. The other sources of innovation are easier and simpler to handle, yet they still require managers to look beyond established practices. Drucker emphasizes that in seeking opportunities, innovators need to look for simple, focused solutions to real problems. The greatest praise an innovation can receive is for people to say, "This is obvious!" Grandiose ideas designed to revolutionize an industry rarely work. Innovation, like any other endeavor, takes talent, ingenuity, and knowledge. But Drucker cautions that if diligence, persistence, and commitment are lacking, companies are unlikely to succeed at the business of innovation. PMID:10187245

  13. The discipline of innovation.

    PubMed

    Drucker, P F

    1985-01-01

    As managers recognize the heightened importance of innovation to competitive success, they face an apparent paradox: the orderly and predictable decisions on which a business rests depend increasingly on the disorderly and unpredictable process of innovation. How can managers expect to plan for--or count on--a process that is itself so utterly dependent on creativity, inspiration, and old-fashioned luck? Drawing on his many years' experience studying innovative and entrepreneurial companies, the author argues that this paradox is apparent only, not real. Most of what happens in successful innovations is not the happy occurrence of a blinding flash of insight but, rather, the careful implementation of an unspectacular but systematic management discipline. At the heart of that discipline lies the knowledge of where to look for innovation opportunities and how to identify them. It is to this study of the sources of innovation that Mr. Drucker here addresses himself. PMID:10272260

  14. Innovative Decontamination Technology for Use in Gaseous Diffusion Plant Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.J.; Norton, C.J.; Fraikor, G.B.; Potter, G.L.; Chang, K.C.

    2006-07-01

    The results of bench scale tests demonstrated that TechXtract{sup R} RadPro{sup TM} technology (hereinafter referred to as RadPro{sup R}) can provide 100% coverage of complex mockup gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) equipment and can decontaminate uranium (U) deposits with 98% to 99.99% efficiency. Deployment tests demonstrated RadPro{sup R} can be applied as foam, mist/fog, or steam, and fully cover the internal surfaces of complex mockup equipment, including large piping. Decontamination tests demonstrated that two formulations of RadPro{sup R}, one with neutron attenuators and one without neutron attenuators, could remove up to 99.99% of uranyl fluoride deposits, one of the most difficult to remove deposits in GDP equipment. These results were supplemented by results from previous tests conducted in 1994 that showed RadPro{sup R} could remove >97% of U and Tc-99 contamination from actual GDP components. Operational use of RadPro{sup R} at other DOE and commercial facilities also support these data. (authors)

  15. The wheel of innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Herbig, P.; Golden, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    The wheel of innovation refers to the concept whereby those very same forces that create an innovative hot spot eventually provide the seeds for the hot spot`s decline. An innovative hot spot creates economic prosperity. An increasing demand for economic entitlements within the hot spot creates negative structure that is not conductive to later entrepreneurs or new ventures. This tends to put a damper on further innovative activity within the maturing hot spot. This rags-to-riches-to-rags evolution of innovation hot spots is termed the wheel of innovation. This paper examines the phenomenon from a historical perspective and provide insights on how a country and a region can continue to succeed without falling victim to the phenomenon. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 59: Japanese Technological Innovation. Implications for Large Commercial Aircraft and Knowledge Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kotler, Mindy L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper explores three factors-public policy, the Japanese (national) innovation system, and knowledge-that influence technological innovation in Japan. To establish a context for the paper, we examine Japanese culture and the U.S. and Japanese patent systems in the background section. A brief history of the Japanese aircraft industry as a source of knowledge and technology for other industries is presented. Japanese and U.S. alliances and linkages in three sectors-biotechnology, semiconductors, and large commercial aircraft (LCA)-and the importation, absorption, and diffusion of knowledge and technology are examined next. The paper closes with implications for diffusing knowledge and technology, U.S. public policy, and LCA.

  17. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  18. A Study of Educational Knowledge Diffusion and Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, W. C., Jr.; Fiorino, A. John

    Some six hundred educators were studied in depth to determine their experiences with innovation, the influences of recognized diffusion agents upon their adoption of innovations, the characteristics of selected target audiences in relation to the adoption of innovations to personal practice, and relationships between five distinguishable stages of…

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 62: The Influence of Knowledge Diffusion on Aeronautics Innovation: The Research, Development, and Production of Large Commercial Aircraft in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Golich, Vicki L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on how European public policies-individually and collectively - influence the diffusion of knowledge and technology. It begins with an overview of the roles played historically and currently by European governments in the research, development and production (RD&P) of large commercial aircraft (LCA). The analytical framework brings together literature from global political economy, comparative politics, business management, and science and technology policy studies. It distinguishes between the production of knowledge, on the one hand, and the dissemination of knowledge, on the other. France, Germany, and the United Kingdom serve as the analytical cases. The paper concludes with a call for additional research in this area, some tentative lessons learned, and a discussion of the consequences of national strategies and policies for the diffusion of knowledge and technology in an era of globalization.

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 62: The Influence of Knowledge Diffusion on Aeronautics Innovation: The Research, Development, and Production of Large Commercial Aircraft in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golich, Vicki L.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on how European public policies-individually and collectively - influence the diffusion of knowledge and technology. It begins with an overview of the roles played historically and currently by European governments in the Research, Development and Production (RD&P) of Large Commercial Aircraft (LCA). The analytical framework brings together literature from global political economy, comparative politics, business management, and science and technology policy studies. It distinguishes between the production of knowledge, on the one hand, and the dissemination of knowledge, on the other. France, Germany, and the United Kingdom serve as the analytical cases. The paper concludes with a call for additional research in this area, some tentative lessons learned, and a discussion of the consequences of national strategies and policies for the diffusion of knowledge and technology in an era of globalizaton.

  1. An Innovative Method for Preparing Semiconductor Change Used in Crystal Growth and Shear Cell Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anrold, William A.; Matthiesen, David; Benett, Robert J.; Jayne, Douglas T.

    1997-01-01

    An innovative technique for machining semiconductors has been developed. This technique was used to prepare semiconductor charges for crystal growth and shear cell diffusion experiments. The technique allows brittle semiconductor materials to be quickly and accurately machined. Lightly doping the semiconductor material increases the conductivity enough to allow the material to be shaped by an electrical discharge machine (EDM).

  2. Diffusion of innovative agricultural production systems for sustainable development of small islands: A methodological approach based on the science of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Guiseppe; Butera, Federico M.

    1992-09-01

    In order to develop small islands, not only must a vital agricultural system be maintained, but the range of opportunities for tourism must be increased with respect to both the seaside and the environmental features of the rural landscape. As an alternative to the traditional and economically declining ones, many innovative production processes can be identified, but their success depends on their interaction with the physical, biological, economic and social environment. In order to identify the main nodes and the most critical interactions, so as to increase the probability of success of a new productive process, a methodological approach based on the science of complexity is proposed for the cultivation of capers ( Capparis spinosa L.) on the island of Pantelleria. The methodology encompasses the identification of actors and factors involved. the quantitative evaluation of their interactions with the different stages of the productive process, and a quasiquantitative evaluation of the probability that the particular action will be performed successfully. The study of “traditional,” “modernized,” and “modernized-sustainable” processes, shows that the modernized-sustainable process offers mutually reinforcing opportunities in terms of an integrated development of high-quality agricultural products and the enhancement of environmental features, in conjunction with high-efficiency production techniques, in conjunction with high-efficiency production techniques, in a way that suits the development of Pantelleria. There is a high probability of failure, however, as a result of the large number of critical factors. Nevertheless, the present study indicates which activities will enhance the probability of successful innovation in the production process.

  3. Sustaining Research Innovations in Educational Technology through Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, David; Lee, Shu-Shing; Lim, Kenneth Y. T.

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of innovation is critical to societal progression. In the field of education, such diffusion takes on added significance because of the many stakeholders and accountabilities involved. This article presents the argument that efforts at diffusion which are designed from a top-down perspective are not sustainable over the long term…

  4. National Seminar on the Diffusion of New Instructional Materials and Practices. Perspectives on Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Everett M.; And Others

    The nature and timing of decisions regarding the diffusion of new instructional materials and practices are critical to the ultimate utility achieved by a curriculum project. This publication is a collection of five conference papers which deal with various aspects of diffusion of innovative materials and ideas. Everett M. Rogers discusses two…

  5. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  6. Diffusion of innovation I: Formulary acceptance rates of new drugs in teaching and non-teaching British Columbia hospitals--a hospital pharmacy perspective.

    PubMed

    D'Sa, M M; Hill, D S; Stratton, T P

    1994-12-01

    Lag times in the diffusion of new drugs in the hospital setting have both patient care and pharmaceutical industry implications. This two-part series uses diffusion theory to examine differences in the adoption rates of new drugs in British Columbia teaching and non-teaching hospitals. Formulary addition of a new drug by a hospital's Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee was considered the adoption indicator. Time for adoption was defined as the difference between a drug's Canadian market approval date and the date of formulary addition. Surveys were mailed in September 1990 to 41 hospital pharmacies (response rate = 88%), asking respondents to provide formulary inclusion dates of 29 drugs marketed between July 1987 and March 1990. A significant difference (Mann-Whitney U Test, p < 0.0358) in median adoption time was observed between the six teaching and 25 non-teaching study hospitals, with the former adopting a new drug in 7.5 months versus the latter adopting a new drug in 12.1 months. PMID:10139270

  7. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  8. The Communication of Innovations and the Case of Sustainable Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Mary Anne

    This paper begins by providing a thorough history and review of the diffusion of innovations research tradition. It then focuses on undesirable, indirect, and unanticipated consequences of innovations based on the dominant paradigm of development. In the case of high-input agriculture, the consequences have affected the quality of the environment…

  9. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  10. Modelling Diffusion of a Personalized Learning Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmeshu; Raman, Raghu; Nedungadi, Prema

    2012-01-01

    A new modelling approach for diffusion of personalized learning as an educational process innovation in social group comprising adopter-teachers is proposed. An empirical analysis regarding the perception of 261 adopter-teachers from 18 schools in India about a particular personalized learning framework has been made. Based on this analysis,…

  11. IT Funding's Race with Obsolescence, Innovation, Diffusion, and Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartkovich, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    General economic uncertainty and ongoing issues with information technology (IT) funding in higher education are impacting the general availability and allocation of funds to community colleges and, subsequently, to IT. However, financial support for IT is not always just about money: how much and to whom, from what source for what purpose. Other…

  12. Applying the Concepts of Innovation Strategies to Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yirong; Kotsis, Sandra V.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plastic surgery has a well-known history of innovative procedures and products. However, with the rise in competition, such as aesthetic procedures being performed by other medical specialties, there is a need for continued innovation in plastic surgery to create novel treatments to advance this specialty. Although many articles introduce innovative technologies and procedures, there is a paucity of publications to highlight the application of principles of innovation in plastic surgery. Methods: We review the literature regarding business strategies for innovation. Results: We evaluate concepts of innovation, process of innovation (idea generation, idea evaluation, idea conversion, idea diffusion and adoption), ethical issues, and the application to plastic surgery. Conclusions: Adopting a business model of innovation is helpful to promote a new paradigm of progress to propel plastic surgery to new avenues of creativity. PMID:23897344

  13. FINAL RESULTS OF THE CONDORS CONVECTIVE DIFFUSION FIELD EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Convective Diffusion Observed by Remote Sensors (CONDORS) field experiment conducted at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory used innovative techniques to obtain three dimensional mappings of plume concentration fields of oil fog detected by lidar and "chaff" detected by Doppl...

  14. Diffusion of Photovoltaic Occupational Skills Training: Awareness and Adoption in the North Carolina Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Deborah Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Educational administrators in the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) play a key role in the decisions to adopt or reject educational innovations and as a result are the gatekeepers of technology innovations reaching students. In this study the innovation-decision process and other aspects of the diffusion of innovation model are used…

  15. The Epistemology of Innovator Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, W. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This satire reports an imaginary research study which found three motivations for educational innovation: money, happiness, and garlic. The article facetiously traces the careers of three innovators: the director of an institute, a government official, and a popular writer. (SJL)

  16. Developing Communities of Innovation by Identifying Innovation Champions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coakes, Elayne; Smith, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose that a form of communities of practice (CoP), a community of innovation (CoInv), is the best support for sustainable innovation. It aims to outline a method for identifying champions of innovation in organisation. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on extant research to argue that…

  17. Educational Policy Diffusion and Transfer: The Case of Armenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakhanyan, Susanna; van Veen, Klaas; Bergen, Theo

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the quality of the implementation of the West European Bologna reforms in higher education in a post-soviet country. This process of policy diffusion is analysed using concepts of policy diffusion/transfer and innovation literature, attempting to combine both streams of literature. Despite strong motivation to improve the…

  18. Towards a bioethics of innovation.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Wendy; Axler, Renata

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, it has become almost axiomatic that biomedical research and clinical practice should be 'innovative'-that is, that they should be always evolving and directed towards the production, translation and implementation of new technologies and practices. While this drive towards innovation in biomedicine might be beneficial, it also raises serious moral, legal, economic and sociopolitical questions that require further scrutiny. In this article, we argue that biomedical innovation needs to be accompanied by a dedicated 'bioethics of innovation' that attends systematically to the goals, process and outcomes of biomedical innovation as objects of critical inquiry. Using the example of personalised or precision medicine, we then suggest a preliminary framework for a bioethics of innovation, based on the research policy initiative of 'Responsible Innovation'. We invite and encourage critiques of this framework and hope that this will provoke a challenging and enriching new bioethical discourse. PMID:27015740

  19. Review of Recent Literature on Educational Diffusion Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    This report reviews the increasing numbers of case studies, technical guides, and theory-oriented reports that bear on the successful diffusion of new instructional programs and their local adoption. The author separates these reports and articles into four categories: (1) case studies of educational innovation diffusion, (2) theory-oriented…

  20. Income, Inequality, Market Potential, and Diffusion of Mobile Telephony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sungjoong

    2009-01-01

    The diffusion of many previous innovations eventually slowed down and reached an equilibrium level. Despite continued rapid growth, it is possible that the diffusion of mobile telephony will also begin to decelerate and reach a saturation level. Whether universal service can be achieved with the help of mobile telephony will therefore depend…

  1. A Temporal Model of Technology Diffusion into Small Firms in Wales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Brychan; Packham, Gary; Miller, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Discusses technology diffusion through formal and informal networks. Develops a model that includes channels and mechanisms involved in transferring technology into innovative small businesses. The model depicts influences that increase or slow the rate of diffusion. (SK)

  2. Evolution of error diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.

    1999-10-01

    As we approach the new millennium, error diffusion is approaching the 25th anniversary of its invention. Because of its exceptionally high image quality, it continues to be a popular choice among digital halftoning algorithms. Over the last 24 years, many attempts have been made to modify and improve the algorithm--to eliminate unwanted textures and to extend it to printing media and color. Some of these modifications have been very successful and are in use today. This paper will review the history of the algorithm and its modifications. Three watershed events in the development of error diffusion will be described, together with the lessons learned along the way.

  3. Evolution of error diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.

    1998-12-01

    As we approach the new millennium, error diffusion is approaching the 25th anniversary of its invention. Because of its exceptionally high image quality, it continues to be a popular choice among digital halftoning algorithms. Over the last 24 years, many attempts have been made to modify and improve the algorithm - to eliminate unwanted textures and to extend it to printing media and color. Some of these modifications have been very successful and are in use today. This paper will review the history of the algorithm and its modifications. Three watershed events in the development of error diffusion will be described, together with the lesions learned along the way.

  4. 75 FR 59685 - Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; the National Advisory Council on Innovation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship: National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship AGENCY: Office of Innovation and... Committee on Innovation and Entrepreneurship will hold a meeting via conference call on Tuesday, October...

  5. Thermodynamics of diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszak, Daniel

    Diffusion is the migration of molecules in the reference frame of a system's center of mass and it is a physical process that occurs in all chemical and biological systems. Diffusion generally involves intermolecular interactions that lead to clustering, adsorption, and phase transitions; as such, it is difficult to describe theoretically on a molecular level in systems containing both intermolecular repulsions and attractions. This work describes a simple thermodynamic approach that accounts for intermolecular attractions and repulsions (much like how the van der Waals equation does) to model and help provide an understanding of diffusion. The approach is an extension of the equilibrium Lattice Density Functional Theory of Aranovich and Donohue; it was developed with Mason and Lonsdale's guidelines on how to construct and test a transport theory. In the framework of lattice fluids, this new approach gives (a) correct equilibrium limits, (b) Fickian behavior for non-interacting systems, (c) correct departures from Fickian behavior in non-ideal systems, (d) the correct Maxwell-Stefan formulation, (e) symmetry behavior upon re-labeling species, (f) reasonable non-equilibrium phase behavior, (g) agreement with Molecular Dynamics simulations, (h) agreement with the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, (i) a vanishing diffusive flux at the critical point, and (j) other qualitatively-correct behaviors when applied to problems in porous membranes and in packed beds.

  6. The dynamics of social innovation

    PubMed Central

    Young, H. Peyton

    2011-01-01

    Social norms and institutions are mechanisms that facilitate coordination between individuals. A social innovation is a novel mechanism that increases the welfare of the individuals who adopt it compared with the status quo. We model the dynamics of social innovation as a coordination game played on a network. Individuals experiment with a novel strategy that would increase their payoffs provided that it is also adopted by their neighbors. The rate at which a social innovation spreads depends on three factors: the topology of the network and in particular the extent to which agents interact in small local clusters, the payoff gain of the innovation relative to the status quo, and the amount of noise in the best response process. The analysis shows that local clustering greatly enhances the speed with which social innovations spread. It also suggests that the welfare gains from innovation are more likely to occur in large jumps than in a series of small incremental improvements. PMID:22198762

  7. Adoption of Technological Innovations: A Case Study of the ASSESS Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sarah; Brown, Shane; Davis, Denny; LeBeau, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In engineering education, assessment instruments are often developed to evaluate programs and projects. Unfortunately, these innovations are not always adopted by intended audiences. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations (DI) Theory provides a framework to analyze characteristics of an innovation that will affect adoption. The Appraisal System for…

  8. Technology-Enhanced Blended Language Learning in an ESL Class: A Description of a Model and an Application of the Diffusion of Innovations Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grgurovic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    Blended learning, a combination of face-to-face and online instruction, is seen as one of the most important advancements of this century and a natural evolution of the learning agenda (Thorne, 2003). Blended learning studies that compared traditional and blended foreign language classes showed no significant differences in learner outcomes and…

  9. Assessing Risk of Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, GO

    2001-08-15

    Today's manufacturing systems and equipment must perform at levels thought impossible a decade ago. Companies must push operations, quality, and efficiencies to unprecedented levels while holding down costs. In this new economy, companies must be concerned with market shares, equity growth, market saturation, and profit. U.S. manufacturing is no exception and is a prime example of businesses forced to adapt to constant and rapid changes in customer needs and product mixes, giving rise to the term ''Agile Manufacturing''. The survival and ultimate success of the American Manufacturing economy may depend upon its ability to create, innovate, and quickly assess the impact that new innovations will have on its business practices. Given the need for flexibility, companies need proven methods to predict and measure the impact that new technologies and strategies will have on overall plant performance from an enterprise perspective. The Value-Derivative Model provides a methodology and approach to assess such impacts in terms of energy savings, production increases, quality impacts, emission reduction, and maintenance and operating costs as they relate to enabling and emerging technologies. This is realized by calculating a set of first order sensitivity parameters obtained from expanding a Taylor Series about the system's operating point. These sensitivity parameters are invariant economic and operational indicators that quantify the impact of any proposed technology in terms of material throughput, efficiency, energy usage, environmental effects, and costs. These parameters also provide a mechanism to define metrics and performance measures that can be qualified in terms of real economic impact. Value-Derivative Analysis can be applied across all manufacturing and production segments of our economy and has found specific use in steel and textiles. Where economic models give the cost of conducting a business, Value-Derivative Analysis provides the cost to conduct

  10. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  11. The Seductive Power of an Innovation: Enrolling Non-Conventional Actors in a Drip Irrigation Community in Morocco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benouniche, Maya; Errahj, Mostafa; Kuper, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the motivations of non-conventional innovation actors to engage in innovation processes, how their involvement changed the technology and their own social-professional status, and to analyze their role in the diffusion of the innovation. Design/methodology/approach: We studied the innovation process of…

  12. Elementary Classroom Teachers' Adoption of Physical Activity Promotion in the Context of a Statewide Policy: An Innovation Diffusion and Socio-Ecologic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Collin Andrew; Caputi, Peter; Perreault, Melanie; Doan, Rob; Doutis, Panayiotis; Weaver, Robert Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity promotion in the academic classroom (PAPAC) is an effective means for increasing children's school-based physical activity. In the context of a South Carolina policy requiring elementary schools to provide children with 90 min of physical activity beyond physical education every week, the purpose of this study was to test a…

  13. Adding Innovation Diffusion Theory to the Technology Acceptance Model: Supporting Employees' Intentions to Use E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Chia-Ning

    2011-01-01

    This study intends to investigate factors affecting business employees' behavioral intentions to use the e-learning system. Combining the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) with the technology acceptance model (TAM), the present study proposes an extended technology acceptance model. The proposed model was tested with data collected from 552…

  14. Chapter Innovators Guide, 2001: Models of Innovation Award Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National FFA Organization, Indianapolis, IN.

    This document presents the activities that received Future Farmers of America's (FFA's) Model of Innovation awards in 2001. The booklet begins with an overview of the FFA National Chapter Award program and a list of the 2001 Models of Innovation Winners. The next three sections profile award-winning activities in the following areas of the three…

  15. An Examination of the Acceptance, Adoption, and Diffusion of Smartphone Devices with Senior Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, James M.

    2013-01-01

    This research looked at the process of the diffusion of an innovation in the context of smartphones with American senior citizens. The subject of diffusion, or spread of a technology, is a rich and varied topic with more than 60 years of research. Much of this diffusion research does not go beyond the study of the original acceptance of a new…

  16. Percolation of interaction diffusing particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Robin Blumberg; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1990-01-01

    The connectivity properties of systems of diffusing interacting particles with the blind and myopic diffusion rules are studied. It is found that the blind rule case is equivalent to the lattice gas with J = 0 in all dimensions. The connectivity properties of blind rule diffusion are described by random site percolation due to the fact that the density on neighboring sites is uncorrelated.

  17. The discipline of innovation. 1985.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Peter F

    2002-08-01

    How much of innovation is inspiration, and how much is hard work? The answer lies somewhere in the middle, says management thinker Peter Drucker. In this HBR classic from 1985, he argues that innovation is real work that can and should be managed like any other corporate function. Success is more likely to result from the systematic pursuit of opportunities than from a flash of genius. Indeed, most innovative business ideas arise through the methodical analysis of seven areas of opportunity. Within a company or industry, opportunities can be found in unexpected occurrences, incongruities of various kinds, process needs, or changes in an industry or market. Outside a company, opportunities arise from demographic changes, changes in perception, or new knowledge. There is some overlap among the sources, and the potential for innovation may well lie in more than one area at a time. Innovations based on new knowledge tend to have the greatest effect on the marketplace, but it often takes decades before the ideas are translated into actual products, processes, or services. The other sources of innovation are easier and simpler to handle, yet they still require managers to look beyond established practices, Drucker explains. The author emphasizes that innovators need to look for simple, focused solutions to real problems. The greatest praise an innovation can receive is for people to say, "That's so obvious!" Grandiose ideas designed to revolutionize an industry rarely work. Innovation, like any other endeavor, takes talent, ingenuity, and knowledge. But Drucker cautions that if diligence, persistence, and commitment are lacking, companies are unlikely to succeed at the business of innovation. PMID:12195923

  18. Innovation, Innovation, Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation, Universities and Skills. The new title of the department offers much food for thought. The title is indeed an intriguing and important one. Bringing the idea of innovation right to the fore is, to use an overworked term, challenging. Pinning down what innovation means is not at all easy. There are three different lines of argument. The…

  19. Focus on Learning. Proceedings of the National Conference on Innovation, Diffusion, and Delivery in Education. (Newport Beach, California, March 6-8, 1978)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    League for Innovation in the Community Coll., Los Angeles, CA.

    This proceedings contains the full texts of five keynote speeches: "The Continuing Challenge of the Disadvantaged Student" by Nolen Ellison; "Fostering Creativity in the Teaching-Learning Process" by Norman Watson; "From Junior College to Community College and the Significance of the Change" by John Dunn; Robert Heinich's "From Learning Theory to…

  20. The diffusion of microfinance.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhijit; Chandrasekhar, Arun G; Duflo, Esther; Jackson, Matthew O

    2013-07-26

    To study the impact of the choice of injection points in the diffusion of a new product in a society, we developed a model of word-of-mouth diffusion and then applied it to data on social networks and participation in a newly available microfinance loan program in 43 Indian villages. Our model allows us to distinguish information passing among neighbors from direct influence of neighbors' participation decisions, as well as information passing by participants versus nonparticipants. The model estimates suggest that participants are seven times as likely to pass information compared to informed nonparticipants, but information passed by nonparticipants still accounts for roughly one-third of eventual participation. An informed household is not more likely to participate if its informed friends participate. We then propose two new measures of how effective a given household would be as an injection point. We show that the centrality of the injection points according to these measures constitutes a strong and significant predictor of eventual village-level participation. PMID:23888042

  1. Measuring the diffusion of linguistic change

    PubMed Central

    Nerbonne, John

    2010-01-01

    We examine situations in which linguistic changes have probably been propagated via normal contact as opposed to via conquest, recent settlement and large-scale migration. We proceed then from two simplifying assumptions: first, that all linguistic variation is the result of either diffusion or independent innovation, and, second, that we may operationalize social contact as geographical distance. It is clear that both of these assumptions are imperfect, but they allow us to examine diffusion via the distribution of linguistic variation as a function of geographical distance. Several studies in quantitative linguistics have examined this relation, starting with Séguy (Séguy 1971 Rev. Linguist. Romane 35, 335–357), and virtually all report a sublinear growth in aggregate linguistic variation as a function of geographical distance. The literature from dialectology and historical linguistics has mostly traced the diffusion of individual features, however, so that it is sensible to ask what sort of dynamic in the diffusion of individual features is compatible with Séguy's curve. We examine some simulations of diffusion in an effort to shed light on this question. PMID:21041207

  2. Diffusion of Web Supported Instruction in Higher Education--The Case of Tel-Aviv University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soffer, Tal; Nachmias, Rafi; Ram, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a study that focused on long-term web-supported learning diffusion among lecturers at Tel Aviv University (TAU), from an organizational point of view. The theoretical models we used to examine this process are Rogers' model for "Diffusion of Innovation" (1995) and Bass's "Diffusion Model" (1969). The study was conducted…

  3. Diffusion of Zonal Variables Using Node-Centered Diffusion Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T B

    2007-08-06

    Tom Kaiser [1] has done some preliminary work to use the node-centered diffusion solver (originally developed by T. Palmer [2]) in Kull for diffusion of zonal variables such as electron temperature. To avoid numerical diffusion, Tom used a scheme developed by Shestakov et al. [3] and found their scheme could, in the vicinity of steep gradients, decouple nearest-neighbor zonal sub-meshes leading to 'alternating-zone' (red-black mode) errors. Tom extended their scheme to couple the sub-meshes with appropriate chosen artificial diffusion and thereby solved the 'alternating-zone' problem. Because the choice of the artificial diffusion coefficient could be very delicate, it is desirable to use a scheme that does not require the artificial diffusion but still able to avoid both numerical diffusion and the 'alternating-zone' problem. In this document we present such a scheme.

  4. Challenges of the Innovation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayrapetyan, Ruben

    2010-04-01

    In order to be successful in the modern world a professional needs to be creative, open to innovation, and able to take responsibilities. Innovation and creativity are not skills a person is born with, they have to be taught. However, the course syllabus has almost no room for teaching anything except of standard course topics and even more standard applications. Course project may be a solution to this problem. But being a strong tool for teaching an innovation, such a project is a challenge for both students and instructors. In this talk I will discuss some outputs (both positive and negative) of the innovation project ``Trip to Mars'' given in my ``Differential Equations'' class.

  5. A source of innovation.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, D G

    1992-12-01

    In 1992, the USAID Population Assistance Program turned 25 years old. The program is noteworthy for being the largest of all national government programs with a current annual budget of $300 million, having wide support from the US congress and public, developing a wide variety of experts in many areas of family planning (FP), and developing and relying upon a strong infrastructure of private sector agencies. The agency has been instrumental in injecting competition into government service, using market methods, providing for choice among service providers, and investing and not just spending money. The important lessons learned over the years are identified. 1) Products, services, and information can be generated through the private sector, which was supported by USAID. The International Planned Parenthood Federation was one of the 1st to receive grants. 2) The commitment of the private sector to FP is shown in its achievement of goals, not on rules and budgets. The willingness of staff to work for low pay levels exemplifies the depth of commitment. 3) The private sector sometimes can be and often has been a source of innovation and experiment. Examples of this creativity are evident in the development of Norplant by the Population Council and RAPID computerized illustration of the impact of future population growth by the Futures Group. 4) Healthy competition and expansion of government resources can be generated through the contribution of expertise and specialization in the private sector. Grants have been distributed to private groups for delivery of FP services, management skills, training, survey research, operations research, contraceptive development an clinical testing, communication, and evaluation. 5) Use of the private sector, particularly the commercial sector, in providing services has meant a shared cost for services and less cost for taxpayers. 6) USAID has funded projects for FP services through place of employment or union, which has proven to be

  6. Relationship of Self-Efficacy to Stages of Concern in the Adoption of Innovation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcu, Amber Diane

    2013-01-01

    In this research, it was proposed that self-efficacy is the missing underlying psychological factor in innovation diffusion models of higher education. This is based upon research conducted in the fields of innovation-diffusion in higher education, technology adoption, self-efficacy, health and behavioral change. It was theorized that if…

  7. Identification of Empirical Dimensions of the Diffusion Process: Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Ralph J.; Hull, William L.

    The objective of the research study was to determine if dimensions of the innovation diffusion process could be identified empirically. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 educational practitioners in various roles in Kansas and Ohio. The data resulting from the 82 percent response are divided into two categories. One category…

  8. KEY ITEMS OF INNOVATION MANAGEMENT IN THE PRIMARY HEALTHCARE CENTRES CASE STUDY: FINLAND.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Alireza; Zolfagharzadeh, Mohammad Mahdi; Naaranoja, Marja

    2015-09-01

    Trends such as aging populations, excess costs, rising public expectations, and progress in medical science and technologies point out the necessity of adaptation and development of innovation in the healthcare systems particularly in developed countries. The main objective of this article is to review diffusion of innovation in the healthcare sector. Different types of innovation, diffusion characteristics, and adoption mechanisms are the subjects that are discussed in the selected case study, Finland. Finally, the key items of innovation management in the Finnish health system are introduced. The results can be implemented in other countries as well. PMID:26615647

  9. Studies of Innovation and of Communication to the Public. Studies in the Utilization of Behavioral Science, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Elihu; And Others

    The papers presented in this volume report studies on the process of innovation and studies on the process and problems of communicating scientific information to the public. Papers include: "The Social Itinerary of Technical Change: Two Studies on the Diffusion of Innovation" by Elihu Katz; "The Communication of Ideals on Innovation in…

  10. New Perspectives on the Implementation of Educational Technology Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Donald P.

    Most professionals in the field of educational technology have served as change agents; it is no accident that one domain in the current definition of the field specifies a sociological theory base linked to practice that includes diffusion, adoption, implementation and institutionalization of innovations. This paper emphasizes the implementation…

  11. Innovation Adoption: A Review of Theories and Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Many theoretical frameworks seek to describe the dynamic process of the implementation of innovations. Little is known, however, about factors related to decisions to adopt innovations and how the likelihood of adoption of innovations can be increased. Using a narrative synthesis approach, this paper compared constructs theorized to be related to adoption of innovations proposed in existing theoretical frameworks in order to identify characteristics likely to increase adoption of innovations. The overall goal was to identify elements across adoption frameworks that are potentially modifiable and, thus, might be employed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices. The review identified 20 theoretical frameworks that could be grouped into two broad categories: theories that mainly address the adoption process (N = 10) and theories that address adoption within the context of implementation, diffusion, dissemination, and/or sustainability (N = 10). Constructs of leadership, operational size and structure, innovation fit with norms and values, and attitudes/motivation toward innovations each are mentioned in at least half of the theories, though there were no consistent definitions of measures for these constructs. A lack of precise definitions and measurement of constructs suggests further work is needed to increase our understanding of adoption of innovations. PMID:23549911

  12. Innovation adoption: a review of theories and constructs.

    PubMed

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Horwitz, Sarah M

    2014-07-01

    Many theoretical frameworks seek to describe the dynamic process of the implementation of innovations. Little is known, however, about factors related to decisions to adopt innovations and how the likelihood of adoption of innovations can be increased. Using a narrative synthesis approach, this paper compared constructs theorized to be related to adoption of innovations proposed in existing theoretical frameworks in order to identify characteristics likely to increase adoption of innovations. The overall goal was to identify elements across adoption frameworks that are potentially modifiable and, thus, might be employed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices. The review identified 20 theoretical frameworks that could be grouped into two broad categories: theories that mainly address the adoption process (N = 10) and theories that address adoption within the context of implementation, diffusion, dissemination, and/or sustainability (N = 10). Constructs of leadership, operational size and structure, innovation fit with norms and values, and attitudes/motivation toward innovations each are mentioned in at least half of the theories, though there were no consistent definitions of measures for these constructs. A lack of precise definitions and measurement of constructs suggests further work is needed to increase our understanding of adoption of innovations. PMID:23549911

  13. A simple flow analysis of diffuser-getter-diffuser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Howard, D. W.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition. (authors)

  14. FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Dave W. Howard, D

    2007-07-24

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.

  15. Innovative bi-fluid atomizer inner flow characterization and outer spray diffusion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzo, D.; Mazin, C.

    2012-11-01

    We developed an atomizer nozzle equipping a medical device used for airborne disinfection of medical rooms. The diffusion technology of the equipment is based on the spraying of fine liquid droplets of disinfectant into the volume to be treated. The liquid phase is expulsed thanks to an air assist atomizer we designed, which originality comes from the geometry we give to the throat of the micro-venturi, inner part of the atomizer nozzle. The micro-venturi throat is deviated of angle of 4° and will permit a homogeneous diffusion. We computed three dimensional numerical calculations of the inner compressible turbulent air flow through the atomizer we designed and compared the results obtained with the ones computed for a symmetrical atomizer. The modeling was done with the CFD codes STARCCM+ and Fluent, choosing the k-omega turbulent model. The modeling has been validated especially by one dimensional analytical calculations and experimental measurements of the mean axial velocity and mass flow rate circulating through the atomizer. Three dimensional numerical calculations show the vertical deviation of the flow at throat level and swirl effect generated by the deviated inner throat of the micro-venturi. These calculations allowed understanding the nature of the spray observed in experimental conditions, and the advantages to use a deviated micro-venturi throat. Indeed, micro bacteriological tests showed that the quality and the effectiveness of the diffusion are enhanced in comparison to equipments with a symmetrical micro-venturi.

  16. Innovating the practice of medical speciality training.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, Joanne P I

    2016-02-01

    Educational innovations are being introduced into medical speciality training. But how do people who participate in medical speciality training (residents, consultants, programme directors) deal with these innovations? And what effects do educational innovations have according to these people?By addressing these questions, this thesis contributes to the knowledge about the challenging process of innovating medical speciality training. PMID:26754312

  17. Diffusion limited aggregation. The role of surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, Juan M.; Otálora, Fermín

    1991-11-01

    We present a growth model in which the hitting particles are able to diffuse to more stable growth sites in the perimeter of a cluster growing by diffusion limited aggregation. By tuning the diffusion path Ls, the morphological output - from disordered fractal to perfect single crystals - can be controlled. Instabilities appear when the mean length of the crystal faces Lf are greater than 2 Ls.

  18. Factors affecting the diffusion of online end user literature searching.

    PubMed Central

    Ash, J S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify factors that affect diffusion of usage of online end user literature searching. Fifteen factors clustered into three attribute sets (innovation attributes, organizational attributes, and marketing attributes) were measured to study their effect on the diffusion of online searching within institutions. METHODS: A random sample of sixty-seven academic health sciences centers was selected and then 1,335 library and informatics staff members at those institutions were surveyed by mail with electronic mail follow-up. Multiple regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: The survey yielded a 41% response rate with electronic mail follow-up being particularly effective. Two dependent variables, internal diffusion (spread of diffusion) and infusion (depth of diffusion), were measured. There was little correlation between them, indicating they measured different things. Fifteen independent variables clustered into three attribute sets were measured. The innovation attributes set was significant for both internal diffusion and infusion. Significant individual variables were visibility for internal diffusion and image enhancement effects (negative relation) as well as visibility for infusion (depth of diffusion). Organizational attributes were also significant predictors for both dependent variables. No individual variables were significant for internal diffusion. Communication, management support (negative relation), rewards, and existence of champions were significant for infusion. Marketing attributes were not significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Successful diffusion of online end user literature searching is dependent on the visibility of the systems, communication among, rewards to, and peers of possible users who promote use (champions). Personal image enhancement effects have a negative relation to infusion, possibly because the use of intermediaries is still seen as the more luxurious way to have searches done

  19. Thermal diffusivity of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Winfree, William P.; Crews, B. Scott

    1990-01-01

    A laser pulse technique to measure the thermal diffusivity of diamond films deposited on a silicon substrate is developed. The effective thermal diffusivity of diamond film on silicon was measured by observing the phase and amplitude of the cyclic thermal waves generated by the laser pulses. An analytical model is developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face-parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The model is used to reduce the effective thermal diffusivity of the diamond/silicon sample to a value for the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the diamond film. Phase and amplitude measurements give similar results. The thermal conductivity of the films is found to be better than that of type 1a natural diamond.

  20. Innovators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  1. Determinants of the Use of Technological Innovation in Distance Learning: A Study with Business School Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo Leal, Edvalda; Luiz Albertin, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This study's overall purpose is to identify the factors determining the use of technological innovation in Distance Learning (DL), as perceived by instructors of Business Education programs. The theoretical basis for the study is the Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT). The study's sample is made up of 436 instructors; we used a quantitative…

  2. Dimensions of Innovation: Some Historical Perspectives on Vocational Education and Training and Innovation in Australia. A Discussion Paper. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickersgill, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The development of a uniquely Australian system of innovation and its relation to the vocational education and training (VET) system is considered in this discussion paper. It asserts that the Australian system of innovation fits the pattern of incremental innovation and diffusion of technical knowledge. It focuses on arrangements prior to the…

  3. Four Decades of Innovation: Impact of the League for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Los Santos, Gerardo E.; O'Banion, Terry

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the League for Innovation in the Community College which will be celebrating throughout 2008 its 40th anniversary as one of the oldest and most significant organizations in the community college world. Created in 1968, when community colleges were being established at the rate of one per week, the League became a beacon for…

  4. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  5. Management of Innovation: The Role of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapero, Albert

    Management of the innovation process is described, and resources on which innovation management must operate are identified. The relationship of information to subsystems in the innovation process is examined using empirical results from sociology, communication, and psychology. Analysis develops from a one-man information model, through a…

  6. A Case of Problematic Diffusion: The Use of Sex Determination Techniques in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luthra, Rashmi

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of model shifts in diffusion research focuses on the growth in the use of sex determination techniques in India and their consequences relating to gender and power. Topics addressed include development, underdevelopment, and modernization; the adoption of innovations; and meanings of innovations within particular social systems.…

  7. Perceived Characteristics of an Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Robert E.

    This study investigated the characteristics of an innovative cooperative high school-college program as perceived by principals of adopting and nonadopting schools. The data from survey questionnaires with 24 Likert-type items were reduced to six factors: observability, status, simplicity, cost, trialability, and relative…

  8. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  9. Innovation Management Perceptions of Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakir, Asli Agiroglu

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine the perceptions of principals about innovation management and to investigate whether there is a significant difference in this perception according to various parameters. In the study, descriptive research model is used and universe is consisted from principals who participated in "Acquiring Formation Course…

  10. ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSION FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes general theoretical frameworks for the ordering of diffusion field data in terms of meteorological measurements. The three methods described are surface-layer (Monin-Obukhov) similarity, convective scaling, and statistical theory using wind fluctuations. Earl...

  11. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    As shown in last quarter's report on the configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules, the hindered diffusion data for both TPP and coal macromolecules were significantly different from the theoretical correlations. In order to evaluate the factors which could lead to this difference an error analysis was conducted, and the detailed results reported herein. Generally, we did not find any errors which could account for the deviation from the theory, and thus we conclude that this deviation is real and can be ascribed to some factor not considered by the hindered diffusion theory, i.e., attractive or repulsive forces. 2 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Chapter Innovators Guide, 2000: Models of Innovation Award Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National FFA Organization, Indianapolis, IN.

    This guide presents the Future Farmers of America (FFA) 2000 Model of Innovation award winners' projects. Chapters demonstrated abilities to identify goals and objectives, create a workable plan of action, attain and evaluate results, and identify items learned and ways to improve. Chapter 1 discusses the FFA National Chapter Award program that…

  13. Diffusion of monochromatic classical waves.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Sijmen; Bauer, Gerrit E W

    2006-01-01

    We study the diffusion of monochromatic classical waves in a disordered acoustic medium by scattering theory. In order to avoid artifacts associated with mathematical point scatterers, we model the randomness by small but finite insertions. We derive expressions for the configuration-averaged energy flux, energy density, and intensity for one-, two-, and three-dimensional (3D) systems with an embedded monochromatic source using the ladder approximation to the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We study the transition from ballistic to diffusive wave propagation and obtain results for the frequency dependence of the medium properties such as mean free path and diffusion coefficient as a function of the scattering parameters. We discover characteristic differences of the diffusion in 2D as compared to the conventional 3D case, such as an explicit dependence of the energy flux on the mean free path and quite different expressions for the effective transport velocity. PMID:16486306

  14. Developing a Questionnaire to Measure Perceived Attributes of eHealth Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To design a valid and reliable questionnaire to assess perceived attributes of technology-based health education innovations. Methods: College students in 12 personal health courses reviewed a prototype eHealth intervention using a 30-item instrument based upon diffusion theory's perceived attributes of an innovation. Results:…

  15. Visualization of Diffusion within Nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Holzinger, Angelika; Knittel, Peter; Poltorak, Lukasz; Gamero-Quijano, Alonso; Rickard, William D A; Walcarius, Alain; Herzog, Grégoire; Kranz, Christine; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2016-07-01

    The direct experimental characterization of diffusion processes at nanoscale remains a challenge that could help elucidate processes in biology, medicine and technology. In this report, two experimental approaches were employed to visualize ion diffusion profiles at the orifices of nanopores (radius (ra) of 86 ± 6 nm) in array format: (1) electrochemically assisted formation of silica deposits based on surfactant ion transfer across nanointerfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (nanoITIES); (2) combined atomic force - scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) imaging of topography and redox species diffusion through the nanopores. The nature of the diffusion zones formed around the pores is directly related to the interpore distance within the array. Nanopore arrays with different ratios of pore center-to-center separation (rc) to pore radius (ra) were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of silicon nitride (SiN) membranes, with 100 pores in a hexagonal arrangement. The ion diffusion profiles determined by the two visualization methods indicated the formation of overlapped or independent diffusion profiles at nanopore arrays with rc/ra ratios of 21 ± 2 and 91 ± 7, respectively. In particular, the silica deposition method resulted in formation of a single deposit encompassing the complete array with closer nanopore arrangement, whereas individual silica deposits were formed around each nanopore within the more widely spaced array. The methods reveal direct experimental evidence of diffusion zones at nanopore arrays and provide practical illustration that the pore-pore separation within such arrays has a significant impact on diffusional transport as the pore size is reduced to the nanoscale. These approaches to nanoscale diffusion zone visualization open up possibilities for better understanding of molecular transport processes within miniaturized systems. PMID:27264360

  16. Fast Measurements Of Thermal Diffusivities Of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marnell; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature rises of samples compared with reference sample. Apparatus quickly measures thermal diffusivities of ceramics at high temperatures. Produces data on relative thermal diffusivities of as many as six ceramic specimens per hour. Thermal-diffusivity tester makes it easy to determine thermal diffusivities of ceramics. Pronounced effects of processing parameters on thermal properties of ceramics evaluated quickly.

  17. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov–Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects. PMID:26178745

  18. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov-Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects. PMID:26178745

  19. Pursuing Knowledge and Innovation through Collective Actions. The Case of Young Farmers in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutsou, Stavriani; Partalidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines new coalitions for knowledge diffusion and innovations of young farmers. Understanding their patterns and the factors influencing their cooperative and innovating norms is crucial in improving these young farmers' positioning in the agricultural knowledge and information system. Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on…

  20. Living Labs: Arbiters of Mid- and Ground-Level Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almirall, Esteve; Wareham, Jonathan

    We perform a comparative case analysis of four working Living Labs to identify their common functions. Theoretically, we ground our analysis in terms of how they function, their processes of exploration and exploitation, where they work in the innovation strata, how new socially negotiated meanings are negotiated and diffused. Our research highlights four novel insights: first, Living Labs function at the low and mid level innovation strata; second, Living Labs are technologically agnostic; third, Living Labs use context based experience to surface new, socially constructed meanings for products and services; and finally, Living Labs are equally focused on exploration and exploitation.

  1. Knowledge Diffusion in the Context of Development in Rural Areas. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Brawley, Emilia E.

    This paper analyzes principles of knowledge diffusion and provides a framework for applying new ideas or innovations, particularly in relation to rural community development. As new knowledge is created or old knowledge is found to have new applications, the art of spreading knowledge and managing innovation has become more crucial in both urban…

  2. Creativity: the fuel of innovation.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, M J

    1999-01-01

    Market-leveled changes occurring in the health care industry require new and creative models of organization, management, and service delivery. One of today's primary management challenges is the development of organizational cultures that value innovation, change, and creativity. The adoption of an ethic of innovativeness allows the organization to stretch the limits of individual and collective knowledge, skill, and ability to meet complex consumer needs. Creativity within organizations is influenced by management practices in conjunction with creativity-relevant work group skills. A common wisdom exists that professional nurses are creative in finding solutions for complex patient care needs. The expansion of this creativity within organizational systems will allow for the evolution of professional nursing practice, improvement in care delivery, and organizational performance. PMID:10205475

  3. Using diffusion theory in health promotion: the case of tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ferrence, R

    1996-01-01

    Diffusion theory can profitably be applied to a range of health problems and interventions. This paper uses the case of tobacco to illustrate this process. The diffusion of innovations model refers to the spread of new ideas, techniques and behaviours or products throughout populations. Those who adopt at different phases of the process tend to differ in predictable ways, such as age, sex, residence, socioeconomic status and level of access to communications, each of which can be employed to affect the overall rate of adoption. A series of perspectives are employed to examine aspects of the diffusion process for tobacco use. Examples from the tobacco areas are used to illustrate ways in which the diffusion model can be applied in the field. Applications of the model for prevention are presented and discussed. PMID:9002339

  4. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules. PMID:26180576

  5. Beyond Economy: Impact of National Cultural Values on Nationwide Broadband Internet Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Sung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how the non-conventional factors of national cultural values and government involvement affect the diffusion of broadband Internet technologies in various nations around the world. An innovative element of the study was the examination of the influence patterns at different stages of diffusion, which was measured by the number…

  6. Diffusion of irreversible energy technologies under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Cacallo, J.D.; Sutherland, R.J.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents a model of technology diffusion is consistent with characteristics of participants in most energy markets. Whereas the models used most widely for empirical research are based on the assumption that the extended delays in adoption of cost-saving innovations are the result of either lack of knowledge about the new processes or heterogeneity across potential adopters, the model presented in this paper is based on the strategic behavior by firms. The strategic interdependence of the firms` decisions is rooted in spillover effects associated with an inability to exclude others from the learning-by-doing acquired when a firm implements a new technology. The model makes extensive use of recent developments in investment theory as it relates irreversible investments under uncertainty.

  7. Diffusion of childbearing within cohabitation.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Agnese; Aassve, Arnstein; Lappegård, Trude

    2015-04-01

    The article analyzes the diffusion of childbearing within cohabitation in Norway, using municipality data over a 24-year period (1988-2011). Research has found substantial spatial heterogeneity in this phenomenon but also substantial spatial correlation, and the prevalence of childbearing within cohabitation has increased significantly over time. We consider several theoretical perspectives and implement a spatial panel model that allows accounting for autocorrelation not only on the dependent variable but also on key explanatory variables, and hence identifies the key determinants of diffusion of childbearing within cohabitation across space and over time. We find only partial support for the second demographic transition as a theory able to explain the diffusion of childbearing within cohabitation. Our results show that at least in the first phase of the diffusion (1988-1997), economic difficulties as measured by increased unemployment among men contributed to the diffusion of childbearing within cohabitation. However, the most important driver for childbearing within cohabitation is expansion in education for women. PMID:25808022

  8. 75 FR 51438 - Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; The National Advisory Council on Innovation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; The National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Meeting of the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY:...

  9. 75 FR 71670 - Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; the National Advisory Council on Innovation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Meeting of the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY:...

  10. Technology Diffusion and Innovations in Music Education in a Notebook Computer Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Sara L.

    Valley City State University (North Dakota) was the second university in the nation to adopt a notebook computer environment, supplying every faculty, staff member, administrator, and student with a laptop computer and 24-hour access to the World Wide Web. This paper outlines the innovations made in the music department to accommodate the infusion…