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Sample records for diffusive cavity growth

  1. Superhydrophobicity: cavity growth and wetting transition.

    PubMed

    Wåhlander, Martin; Hansson-Mille, Petra M; Swerin, Agne

    2015-06-15

    We show by using AFM colloidal probe microscopy (combinations of hydrophobic/superhydrophobic as probe/surface) that superhydrophobicity displays a set of specific events when compared with hydrophobicity. Both attraction (due to capillary and wetting forces) and repulsion (most likely due to repelling air/vapor layers or micro-/nanobubbles) occur upon approach and when surfaces are pulled apart both shorter range (50-100 nm or more) and longer range (several micrometers) attractive forces are displayed. The interaction is explained by forces generated through the formation of air and water vapor cavities, in the shorter-range (>50 nm) case maintaining a constant volume of the cavity, in agreement with calculation of capillary forces, and in the longer-range (>1 μm) case through access of air to the cavity, in agreement with thermodynamics of cavity growth. An added sodium dodecyl sulphate surfactant gave a partially reversible wetting transition and reduced the longer-range interaction to shorter-range, suggesting a transfer from the Cassie-Baxter to the Wenzel wetting regime. The findings would be of interest in development of practical applications, such as for anti-soiling, anti-icing, protection of electrical components and for extreme water-repellency in paper and textiles. PMID:25771290

  2. Effective optical path length for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as gas absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gao, Q.; Zhang, Y. G.; Zhang, Z. G.; Wu, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Tandem diffuse cubic cavities designed by connecting two single diffuse cubic-shaped cavities, A and B, with an aperture (port fraction fap) in the middle of the connecting baffle was developed as a gas absorption cell. The effective optical path length (EOPL) was evaluated by comparing the oxygen absorption signal in the cavity and in air based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Experimental results manifested an enhancement of EOPL for the tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of fap and can be expressed as the sum of EOPL of two single cubic cavities at fap < 0.01, which coincided well with theoretical analysis. The simulating EOPL was smaller than experimental results at fap > 0.01, which indicated that back scattering light from cavity B to cavity A cannot be ignored at this condition.

  3. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  4. Diffusion, precipitation, and cavity-wall reactions of ion-implanted gold in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The diffusion of Au in Si and its binding to cavities and precipitates of the equilibrium Au-Si phase were investigated in the temperature range 1023-1123 K using ion implantation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The diffusivity-solubility product for interstitial Au was found to be about an order of magnitude greater than the extrapolation of previous, less direct determinations at higher temperatures. Chemisorption on cavity walls was shown to be more stable than Au-Si precipitation by 0.1-0.2 eV in the investigated temperature range, indicating that cavities are effective gettering centers for Au impurities.

  5. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

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  6. Enhancement in Quality Factor of SRF Niobium Cavities by Material Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-06-01

    An increase in the quality factor of superconducting radiofrequency cavities is achieved by minimizing the surface resistance during processing steps. The surface resistance is the sum of temperature independent residual resistance and temperature/material dependent Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) resistance. High temperature heat treatment usually reduces the impurities concentration from the bulk niobium, lowering the residual resistance. The BCS part can be reduced by selectively doping non-magnetic impurities. The increase in quality factor, termed as Q-rise, was observed in cavities when titanium or nitrogen thermally diffused in the inner cavity surface.

  7. A simplified model for thermal-wave cavity self-consistent measurement of thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Gu, Caikang; Neill, Stuart; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Fairbridge, Craig; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-12-01

    A simplified theoretical model was developed for the thermal-wave cavity (TWC) technique in this study. This model takes thermal radiation into account and can be employed for absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivity of gas and liquid samples without any knowledge of geometrical and thermal parameters of the components of the TWC. Using this model and cavity-length scans, thermal diffusivities of air and distilled water were accurately and precisely measured as (2.191 ± 0.004) × 10-5 and (1.427 ± 0.009) × 10-7 m2 s-1, respectively, in very good agreement with accepted literature values.

  8. A mass transfer study of the diffusion controlled dissolution of cubical cavities under natural convection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nirdosh, I.; Sedahmed, G.H.

    1996-09-01

    The role of mass transfer in the rate of diffusion controlled dissolution of cubical cavities was studied using an electrochemical technique involving the measurement of the limiting current of the anodic dissolution of copper cavities in H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Cavity side length and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration were varied to provide (Sc.Gr) range of 8.7 {times} 10{sup 9}--3.9 {times} 10{sup 11}. Under these conditions the mass transfer coefficients of cavity dissolution were correlated to other parameters by the equation Sh = 2.742 (Sc.Gr){sup 0.22}. The equation can be used in practice to predict the rate of diffusion controlled processes which might take place inside the cavity such as electropolishing and electrochemical machining. By comparing the experimental rate of mass transfer with the value calculated by adding the rates of mass transfer at different surfaces of the cavity a remarkable agreement was found denoting little convective interaction under the experimental conditions studied.

  9. Characterization of Tack Strength Based on Cavity-Growth Criterion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Yamagata, Yuichiro; Inaba, Kazuaki; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Tomioka, Shiori; Sugizaki, Toshio

    2016-04-12

    The adhesive force generated by a small short-term pressure, called tack, is measured by a probe tack test on pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs); the maximum force is evaluated by cavity growth at the interface between the PSA layer and the probe surface. As the PSA layer becomes thinner, it is more difficult to measure the tack with a cylindrical probe because of the uneven contact resulting from misalignment. A spherical probe is preferable to obtain reproducible contact on the PSA layer, but the contact area should be taken into account if the contact pressure affects the tack performance. Tack was measured on PSAs with various thicknesses in different contact areas to clarify their effect. The results showed that a larger contact area on a thinner PSA generated higher adhesive stress with larger strain. It was found that the maximum adhesive stress was not affected by the contact pressure, but it was strongly correlated to the contact radius divided by the PSA thickness. In addition, a video microscope observation showed that, in all of the experimental cases, the adhesive stress always reached the maximum when cavities were generated at the interface between the PSA and probe surface. Therefore, the criterion of cavity growth was introduced for the evaluation of the maximum adhesive stress. As a result, the experimental results, even at different release rates, were in good agreement with the estimation by considering the effect of confining a thin layer. Furthermore, the theoretical estimation indicated the ultimate value, which was not dependent upon the PSA thickness or contact area. It was defined as a material property, referred to as the "ultimate tack strength" of PSAs. PMID:26991212

  10. Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal-wave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.

    2001-06-01

    A simple methodology for the direct measurement of the thermal wavelength using a thermal-wave cavity, and its application to the evaluation of the thermal diffusivity of liquids is described. The simplicity and robustness of this technique lie in its relative measurement features for both the thermal-wave phase and cavity length, thus eliminating the need for taking into account difficult-to-quantify and time-consuming instrumental phase shifts. Two liquid samples were used: distilled water and ethylene glycol. Excellent agreement was found with reported results in the literature. The accuracy of the thermal diffusivity measurements using the new methodology originates in the use of only difference measurements in the thermal-wave phase and cavity length. Measurement precision is directly related to the corresponding precision on the measurement of the thermal wavelength.

  11. Volume Diffusion Growth Kinetics and Step Geometry in Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    1998-01-01

    The role of step geometry in two-dimensional stationary volume diff4sion process used in crystal growth kinetics models is investigated. Three different interface shapes: a) a planar interface, b) an equidistant hemispherical bumps train tAx interface, and c) a train of right angled steps, are used in this comparative study. The ratio of the super-saturation to the diffusive flux at the step position is used as a control parameter. The value of this parameter can vary as much as 50% for different geometries. An approximate analytical formula is derived for the right angled steps geometry. In addition to the kinetic models, this formula can be utilized in macrostep growth models. Finally, numerical modeling of the diffusive and convective transport for equidistant steps is conducted. In particular, the role of fluid flow resulting from the advancement of steps and its contribution to the transport of species to the steps is investigated.

  12. Groove instabilities in surface growth with diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Jacques G.; Lam, Pui-Man; Family, Fereydoon

    1993-05-01

    The existence of a grooved phase in linear and nonlinear models of surface growth with horizontal diffusion is studied in d=2 and 3 dimensions. We show that the presence of a macroscopic groove, i.e., an instability towards the creation of large slopes and the existence of a diverging persistence length in the steady state, does not require higher-order nonlinearities but is a consequence of the fact that the roughness exponent α>=1 for these models. This implies anomalous behavior for the scaling of the height-difference correlation function G(x)=<||h(x)-h(0)||2> which is explicitly calculated for the linear diffusion equation with noise in d=2 and 3 dimensions. The results of numerical simulations of continuum equations and discrete models are also presented and compared with relevant models.

  13. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection. PMID:22734771

  14. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection.

  15. Convective diffusion in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, J. K.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Xidis, A. L.; Howard, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    A protein crystal modeled as a flat plate suspended in the parent solution, with the normal to the largest face perpendicular to gravity and the protein concentration in the solution adjacent to the plate taken to be the equilibrium solubility, is studied. The Navier-Stokes equation and the equation for convective diffusion in the boundary layer next to the plate are solved to calculate the flow velocity and the protein mass flux. The local rate of growth of the plate is shown to vary significantly with depth due to the convection. For an aqueous solution of lysozyme at a concentration of 40 mg/ml, the boundary layer at the top of a 1-mm-high crystal has a thickness of 80 microns at 1 g, and 2570 microns at 10 to the -6th g.

  16. A simplified model for thermal-wave cavity self-consistent measurement of thermal diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jun Zhou, Jianqin; Gu, Caikang; Neill, Stuart; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Fairbridge, Craig; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-12-15

    A simplified theoretical model was developed for the thermal-wave cavity (TWC) technique in this study. This model takes thermal radiation into account and can be employed for absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivity of gas and liquid samples without any knowledge of geometrical and thermal parameters of the components of the TWC. Using this model and cavity-length scans, thermal diffusivities of air and distilled water were accurately and precisely measured as (2.191 ± 0.004) × 10{sup −5} and (1.427 ± 0.009) × 10{sup −7} m{sup 2} s{sup −1}, respectively, in very good agreement with accepted literature values.

  17. Constrained cavity growth models of longitudinal creep deformation of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J. J.; Nix, W. D.

    1986-02-01

    Two models of constrained cavity growth are developed to describe the long-term longitudinal creep behavior of nickel based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. For both models the rupture time is taken as the time for a transverse grain boundary to cavitate fully. A diffusive cavity growth law is assumed to govern cavitation. The applicability of the respective models is determined by the particular grain morphology achieved by thermal-mechanical processing. The first model assumes that longitudinal grain boundaries are unable to slide; hence displacements due to cavitation must be matched by displacements due to dislocation creep in adjoining grains. This model predicts a low stress exponent at the transition from single crystal to cavitation creep behavior, and higher stress exponents at stresses below this transition. Good agreement is found between the model predictions and creep data for MA 754 at 1000 and 1093 °C. A second model considers a grain morphology wherein longitudinal grain boundaries are able to slide by means of deformation of pockets of fine grains. Cavitation of transverse grain boundaries is thus controlled by grain boundary sliding. This model predicts a stress exponent of 1 at low stresses, and serves as an upper bound for the creep rate when a duplex grain morphology is present. Model predictions are in good agreement with creep data for a heat of MA 754 with a duplex grain morphology.

  18. Commissioning results of Nb3Sn cavity vapor diffusion deposition system at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Clemens, William A.; Macha, Kurt M.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R.

    2015-09-01

    Nb3Sn as a BCS superconductor with a superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium offers potential benefit for SRF cavities via a lower-than-niobium surface resistance at the same temperature and frequency. A Nb3Sn vapor diffusion deposition system designed for coating of 1.5 and 1.3 GHz single-cell cavities was built and commissioned at JLab. As the part of the commissioning, RF performance at 2.0 K of a single-cell 1.5 GHz CEBAF-shaped cavity was measured before and after coating in the system. Before Nb3Sn coating the cavity had a Q0 of about 10E10 and was limited by the high field Q-slope at Eacc about 27 MV/m. Coated cavity exhibited the superconducting transition at about 17.9 K. The low-field quality factor was about 5 10E9 at 4.3 K and 7 10E9 at 2.0 K decreasing with field to about 1 10E9 at Eacc about 8 MV/m at both temperatures. The highest field was limited by the available RF power.

  19. On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

    2010-03-09

    An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

  20. Persistent currents in diffusive metallic cavities: Large values and anomalous scaling with disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappe, G.; Sánchez, M. J.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of disorder on confined metallic cavities with an Aharonov-Bohm flux line is addressed. We find that, even deep in the diffusive regime, large values of persistent currents may arise for a wide variety of geometries. We present numerical results supporting an anomalous scaling law of the average typical current with the strength of disorder w, ~w-γ with γ<2. This is contrasted with previously reported results obtained for cylindrical samples where a scaling ~w-2 has been found. Possible links to, up to date, unexplained experimental data are finally discussed.

  1. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  2. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  3. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  4. Scheme for a compact cold-atom clock based on diffuse laser cooling in a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Xiao, Ling; Cheng, Huadong; Liu, Liang

    2015-12-01

    We present a scheme for a compact rubidium cold-atom clock which performs diffuse light cooling, microwave interrogation, and detection of the clock signal in a cylindrical microwave cavity. The diffuse light is produced by laser light reflection at the inner surface of the microwave cavity. The pattern of the injected laser beams is specially designed to accumulate the majority of the cold atoms in the center of the microwave cavity. Microwave interrogation of the cold atoms in the cavity leads to Ramsey fringes, which have a linewidth of 24.5 Hz with a contrast of 95.6 % when the free evolution time is 20 ms. Recently, a frequency stability of 7.3 ×10-13τ-1 /2 has been achieved. The scheme of this physical package can largely reduce the cold-atom clock complexity and increase clock performance.

  5. Formation and growth of nanocavities and cavities induced by He+ implantation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, My Anh; Ruault, Marie-Odile; Fortuna, Franck

    2012-03-01

    Nanocavities and cavities are known to be efficient gettering sites for metallic impurities in silicon. Here, we report results from implanted lang100rang silicon at room temperature with 50 keV helium ions at a dose of 3×1016 cm-2. Due to its low solubility, He segregates in gas-vacancy complexes and forms nanobubbles. Then, during an N2 ambient annealing at 800 °C using either rapid thermal annealing (RTA) or conventional furnace annealing, nanobubbles grow and He is released from the nanobubbles by gas exodiffusion, leading to (nano)cavities' formation. (Nano)cavities and residual defects were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fraction of retained helium was shown to decrease with annealing time according to the first-order gas release model. Two nucleation-growth mechanisms involved in the growth of these (nano)cavities have been studied. A remarkable result shows evidence about the balance-time dependence of the two mechanisms involved in the growth process of (nano)cavities. At the very beginning (30 s) of the annealing, the main mechanism is the migration-coalescence including nanobubbles and vacancy-helium complexes leading to the cavities' formation. Then, the Ostwald ripening mechanism, related to the helium exodiffusion, between the nanocavities and cavities appeared.

  6. Development of Nb{sub 3}Sn Cavity Vapor Diffusion Deposition System

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Macha, Kurt M.; Clemens, William A.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-02-01

    Nb{sub 3}Sn is a BCS superconductors with the superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium, so theoretically it surpasses the limitations of niobium in RF fields. The feasibility of technology has been demonstrated at 1.5 GHz with Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor deposition technique at Wuppertal University. The benefit at these frequencies is more pronounced at 4.2 K, where Nb{sub 3}Sn coated cavities show RF resistances an order of magnitude lower than that of niobium. At Jefferson Lab we started the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor diffusion deposition system within an R\\&D development program towards compact light sources. Here we present the current progress of the system development.

  7. Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.; Garcia, J. A.

    2000-07-01

    A liquid-ambient-compatible thermal wave resonant cavity (TWRC) has been constructed for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol, ethylene glycol, and olive oil were determined at room temperature (25 °C), with four-significant-figure precision as follows: (0.1445±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (distilled water); (0.0922±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (glycerol); (0.0918±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (ethylene glycol); and (0.0881±0.0004)×10-2 cm2/s (olive oil). The liquid-state TWRC sensor was found to be highly sensitive to various mixtures of methanol and salt in distilled water with sensitivity limits 0.5% (v/v) and 0.03% (w/v), respectively. The use of the TWRC to measure gas evolution from liquids and its potential for environmental applications has also been demonstrated.

  8. [Determining the volume of solution necessary for intraoperative disinfection lavage of the abdominal cavity in diffuse suppurative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Nifant'ev, O E; Popov, A E; Voevodina, T V; Okolelova, E V

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of lavage of the abdominal cavity in diffuse purulent peritonitis by means of a developed device "Geyser" are shown. Changes in the bacterial contamination, toxicity and metabolite contents in the lavage solution and peritoneum depended on a volume of the fluid used. PMID:2338787

  9. Diffusion-controlled growth and degree of disequilibrium of garnet porphyroblasts: is diffusion-controlled growth of porphyroblasts common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Rate-limiting processes and the degree of disequilibrium during metamorphic mineral growth are key controls on the rate of dehydration and hydration in the Earth's crust. This paper examines diffusion-controlled growth and the degree of disequilibrium of garnet porphyroblasts in the Tsukuba metamorphic rocks of central Japan. The analyzed porphyroblasts have irregular and branching morphologies with clear diffusional haloes, indicating that they grew in a diffusion-controlled regime. Mathematical analysis shows that the dominant wavelength of the interface of a garnet porphyroblast is dependent on the extent of supersaturation (Δ ζ), which is an index for the degree of disequilibrium. Using the calculated upper and lower limits of the dominant wavelength, the value of Δ ζ is estimated to be 0.05 × 10-1-0.16, which corresponds to a Gibbs free energy (Δ G r ) overstep of 0.9-27 kJ per mole of garnet (12 oxygen atoms) and a temperature overstep (Δ T) of 1.7-50 °C. Using the average value of the dominant wavelength, the following results are obtained: Δ ζ = 0.15 × 10-1, Δ G r = 2.7 kJ per mole of garnet, and Δ T = 5 °C. These values bring into question the importance of diffusion-controlled growth of garnet porphyroblasts, as highly irregular and branching garnet porphyroblasts are rare in most metamorphic belts. After significant overstepping for the nucleation of garnet, the garnet porphyroblasts grow at a high degree of disequilibrium. However, a high degree of disequilibrium under diffusion-controlled growth would be characterized by diffusional instability. The results indicate that garnet porphyroblasts that lack an irregular and branching morphology may grow at a high degree of disequilibrium under interface-controlled growth, provided they are set in a medium where the diffusion and supply of constituent elements are sufficient, such as a sufficient volume of metamorphic fluid.

  10. Diffusion-controlled growth and degree of disequilibrium of garnet porphyroblasts: is diffusion-controlled growth of porphyroblasts common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Rate-limiting processes and the degree of disequilibrium during metamorphic mineral growth are key controls on the rate of dehydration and hydration in the Earth's crust. This paper examines diffusion-controlled growth and the degree of disequilibrium of garnet porphyroblasts in the Tsukuba metamorphic rocks of central Japan. The analyzed porphyroblasts have irregular and branching morphologies with clear diffusional haloes, indicating that they grew in a diffusion-controlled regime. Mathematical analysis shows that the dominant wavelength of the interface of a garnet porphyroblast is dependent on the extent of supersaturation (? ?), which is an index for the degree of disequilibrium. Using the calculated upper and lower limits of the dominant wavelength, the value of ? ? is estimated to be 0.05 10-1-0.16, which corresponds to a Gibbs free energy (? G r ) overstep of 0.9-27 kJ per mole of garnet (12 oxygen atoms) and a temperature overstep (? T) of 1.7-50 C. Using the average value of the dominant wavelength, the following results are obtained: ? ? = 0.15 10-1, ? G r = 2.7 kJ per mole of garnet, and ? T = 5 C. These values bring into question the importance of diffusion-controlled growth of garnet porphyroblasts, as highly irregular and branching garnet porphyroblasts are rare in most metamorphic belts. After significant overstepping for the nucleation of garnet, the garnet porphyroblasts grow at a high degree of disequilibrium. However, a high degree of disequilibrium under diffusion-controlled growth would be characterized by diffusional instability. The results indicate that garnet porphyroblasts that lack an irregular and branching morphology may grow at a high degree of disequilibrium under interface-controlled growth, provided they are set in a medium where the diffusion and supply of constituent elements are sufficient, such as a sufficient volume of metamorphic fluid.

  11. An extended fractal growth regime in the diffusion limited aggregation including edge diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Batabyal, R.; Das, G. P.; Dev, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated on-lattice diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) involving edge diffusion and compared the results with the standard DLA model. For both cases, we observe the existence of a crossover from the fractal to the compact regime as a function of sticking coefficient. However, our modified DLA model including edge diffusion shows an extended fractal growth regime like an earlier theoretical result using realistic growth models and physical parameters [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 1829]. While the results of Zhang et al. showed the existence of the extended fractal growth regime only on triangular but not on square lattices, we find its existence on the square lattice. There is experimental evidence of this growth regime on a square lattice. The standard DLA model cannot characterize fractal morphology as the fractal dimension (Hausdorff dimension, DH) is insensitive to morphology. It also predicts DH = DP (the perimeter dimension). For the usual fractal structures, observed in growth experiments on surfaces, the perimeter dimension can differ significantly (DH ≠ DP) depending on the morphology. Our modified DLA model shows minor sensitivity to this difference.

  12. Insights in to hetero diffusion and growth: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, H.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Greeley, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    We report the results of first principles calculations performed to study heteroatom diffusion on the terraces and step edges of fcc(001) surfaces on a series of 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals. For each adsorbate-substrate pair, we report the most stable adsorption sites and the corresponding adsorption energies. The corresponding terrace diffusion barriers are also reported, and periodic trends in the barrier heights are related to differences in adsorbate adsorption energies, cohesive energies of both adsorbate and substrate, and the differences in bond length/strength. Diffusion barriers and mechanisms at the step edges are also reported. Finally, insights into the possibility of 2D vs. 3D growth for each studied system are discussed via the calculated Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers.

  13. Growth of Silicon Nanosheets Under Diffusion-Limited Aggregation Environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejun; Kim, Sung Wook; Kim, Ilsoo; Seo, Dongjea; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth of cubic-structured (silicon) Si nanosheets (SiNSs) was investigated. Freestanding, single-crystalline SiNSs with a thickness of 5-20 nm were grown on various Si substrates under an atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. Systematic investigation indicated that a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) environment that leads to dendritic growth in <110> directions at the initial stage is essential for 2D growth. The kinetic aspects under DLA environments that ascribe to the dendritic and 2D growth were discussed. Under the more dilute conditions made by addition of Ar to the flow of H2, the SiNSs grew epitaxially on the substrates with periodic arrangement at a specific angle depending on the orientation of the substrate. It reveals that SiNSs always grew two dimensionally with exposing (111) surfaces. That is thermodynamically favorable. PMID:26518028

  14. Growth of Silicon Nanosheets Under Diffusion-Limited Aggregation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejun; Kim, Sung Wook; Kim, Ilsoo; Seo, Dongjea; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2015-10-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth of cubic-structured (silicon) Si nanosheets (SiNSs) was investigated. Freestanding, single-crystalline SiNSs with a thickness of 5-20 nm were grown on various Si substrates under an atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. Systematic investigation indicated that a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) environment that leads to dendritic growth in <110> directions at the initial stage is essential for 2D growth. The kinetic aspects under DLA environments that ascribe to the dendritic and 2D growth were discussed. Under the more dilute conditions made by addition of Ar to the flow of H2, the SiNSs grew epitaxially on the substrates with periodic arrangement at a specific angle depending on the orientation of the substrate. It reveals that SiNSs always grew two dimensionally with exposing (111) surfaces. That is thermodynamically favorable.

  15. Nanomechanical characterization of cavity growth and rupture in hydrogen-implanted single-crystal BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Young-Bae; Nardi, Patrick; Li, Xiaodong; Atwater, Harry A.

    2005-04-01

    A thermodynamic model of cavity nucleation and growth in ion-implanted single-crystal BaTiO{sub 3} layer is proposed, and cavity formation is related to the measured mechanical properties to better understand hydrogen implantation-induced layer transfer processes for ferroelectric thin films. The critical radius for cavity nucleation was determined experimentally from blistering experiments performed under isochronal anneal conditions and was calculated using continuum mechanical models for deformation and fracture, together with thermodynamic models. Based on thermodynamic modeling, we suggest that cavities grow toward the cracking criteria at a critical blister size whereupon gas is emitted from ruptured cavities. The main driving force for layer splitting is the reduction of the overall elastic energy stored in the implanted region during the cavity nucleation and growth as the gaseous H{sub 2} entrapped within the cavities is released. Nanoindentation measurements reveal locally the mechanical property changes within the vicinity of a single cavity. Using the measured mechanical properties at the single-cavity level, we developed three-dimensional strain and stress profiles using finite element method.

  16. Nanomechanical characterization of cavity growth and rupture in hydrogen-implanted single-crystal BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Bae; Nardi, Patrick; Li, Xiaodong; Atwater, Harry A.

    2005-04-01

    A thermodynamic model of cavity nucleation and growth in ion-implanted single-crystal BaTiO3 layer is proposed, and cavity formation is related to the measured mechanical properties to better understand hydrogen implantation-induced layer transfer processes for ferroelectric thin films. The critical radius for cavity nucleation was determined experimentally from blistering experiments performed under isochronal anneal conditions and was calculated using continuum mechanical models for deformation and fracture, together with thermodynamic models. Based on thermodynamic modeling, we suggest that cavities grow toward the cracking criteria at a critical blister size whereupon gas is emitted from ruptured cavities. The main driving force for layer splitting is the reduction of the overall elastic energy stored in the implanted region during the cavity nucleation and growth as the gaseous H2 entrapped within the cavities is released. Nanoindentation measurements reveal locally the mechanical property changes within the vicinity of a single cavity. Using the measured mechanical properties at the single-cavity level, we developed three-dimensional strain and stress profiles using finite element method.

  17. The Growth of Ice Crystals by Molecular Diffusion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youk, Hyun; List, Roland; Ola, Theophilus

    2006-06-01

    The mass transfer of water molecules by diffusion onto ice particles is best described by their Sherwood number (Sh), a dimensionless quantity, which combines molecular and convective effects and depends on the airflow as represented by the Reynolds number (Re). While Sh (Re > 0) has been previously measured in experiments for typical crystal shapes, the limiting case of pure molecular diffusion (Sh0) for zero flow with Re = 0 is not known well and needs independent determination.The direct numerical solution of the controlling Laplace equation links diffusion with electric fields through the electrostatic analogy. It will be solved for the electrostatic potential V around a crystal-shaped conductor of capacitance C. The results will then be converted by similarity theory. This led to the first numerical determination of Sh0 for hexagonal plates, hexagonal columns, stellar crystals, capped columns, and broad-branched crystals. The new data represent another necessary step in the formulation of an experiment-based theory of the growth of freely falling ice crystals in the atmosphere.A discrete version of Gauss's flux law is developed to compute the flux generated by a crystal-shaped conductor in a finite Cartesian grid box, using a Gauss Seidel iterative scheme. This method is general and can be applied to compute Sh0 for any rectilinear shapes to any degree of accuracy. The dimensionless mass transfer by molecular diffusion, Sh0, is identical to the diffusion of heat characterized by the Nusselt number Nu0.


  18. Evidence of preferential diffusion of impurities along grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1997-02-01

    In order to overcome dissipation due to impurity segregation at grain boundaries, niobium cavities are submitted to a purification annealing (1300{degree}C{plus_minus}200{degree}C under vacuum) during which titanium is evaporated onto the Nb surface. The resulting titanium layer acts as a solid state getter reacting with light impurities (H, C, N, O), thereby removing these impurities from the bulk of the niobium. Preferential titanium diffusion along grain boundaries have been studied using proton-induced x-ray emission. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Influence of radiation on double conjugate diffusion in a porous cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Khan, T. M. Yunus; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Nik-Ghazali, N.; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna

    2016-05-01

    The current work highlights the effect of radiation on the conjugate heat and mass transfer in a square porous cavity having a solid wall. The solid wall is placed at the center of cavity. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature Tw and concentration Cw whereas the right surface is maintained at Tc and Cc such that Tw>Tc and Cw>Cc. The top and bottom surfaces are adiabatic. The governing equations are solved with the help of finite element method by making use of triangular elements. The results are discussed with respect to two different heights of solid wall inside the porous medium along with the radiation parameter.

  20. Effect of variable heating on double diffusive flow in a square porous cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Salman Ahmed N., J.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of heat and mass transfer due to variable heating at the left vertical surface of a square cavity filled with porous medium is carried out. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature and concentration as compared to right surface which has low temperature and concentration. Finite element method is used to convert the partial differential equations into simpler algebraic form of equations. The governing equations are solved in iterative manner to obtain the solution parameters.Results are presented in terms of isothermal lines, iso-concentration lines and streamlines for variable wall temperature at left surface.

  1. Growth of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L.; Choquette, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    We present growth and characterization of visible and near-infrared vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include growth rate and composition control using an {ital in}{ital situ} normal-incidence reflectometer, comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire composition range, and optimization of ultra-high material uniformity. We also demonstrate our recent achievements of all-AlGaAs VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous- wave demonstration of 700-nm red VCSELs and high-efficiency and low- threshold voltage 850-nm VCSELs.

  2. Diffusion-controlled growth rate of stepped interfaces.

    PubMed

    Saidi, P; Hoyt, J J

    2015-07-01

    For many materials, the structure of crystalline surfaces or solid-solid interphase boundaries is characterized by an array of mobile steps separated by immobile terraces. Despite the prevalence of step-terraced interfaces a theoretical description of the growth rate has not been completely solved. In this work the boundary element method (BEM) has been utilized to numerically compute the concentration profile in a fluid phase in contact with an infinite array of equally spaced surface steps and, under the assumption that step motion is controlled by diffusion through the fluid phase, the growth rate is computed. It is also assumed that a boundary layer exists between the growing surface and a point in the liquid where complete convective mixing occurs. The BEM results are presented for varying step spacing, supersaturation, and boundary layer width. BEM calculations were also used to study the phenomenon of step bunching during crystal growth, and it is found that, in the absence of elastic strain energy, a sufficiently large perturbation in the position of a step from its regular spacing will lead to a step bunching instability. Finally, an approximate analytic solution using a matched asymptotic expansion technique is presented for the case of a stagnant liquid or equivalently a solid-solid stepped interface. PMID:26274183

  3. Diffusion-controlled growth rate of stepped interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, P.; Hoyt, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    For many materials, the structure of crystalline surfaces or solid-solid interphase boundaries is characterized by an array of mobile steps separated by immobile terraces. Despite the prevalence of step-terraced interfaces a theoretical description of the growth rate has not been completely solved. In this work the boundary element method (BEM) has been utilized to numerically compute the concentration profile in a fluid phase in contact with an infinite array of equally spaced surface steps and, under the assumption that step motion is controlled by diffusion through the fluid phase, the growth rate is computed. It is also assumed that a boundary layer exists between the growing surface and a point in the liquid where complete convective mixing occurs. The BEM results are presented for varying step spacing, supersaturation, and boundary layer width. BEM calculations were also used to study the phenomenon of step bunching during crystal growth, and it is found that, in the absence of elastic strain energy, a sufficiently large perturbation in the position of a step from its regular spacing will lead to a step bunching instability. Finally, an approximate analytic solution using a matched asymptotic expansion technique is presented for the case of a stagnant liquid or equivalently a solid-solid stepped interface.

  4. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Ice crystal growth in a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.

    1980-01-01

    Ice crystals were grown in a supersaturated environment produced by a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber, which employed two horizontal plates separated by a distance of 2.5 cm. Air was circulated between and along the 1.2 m length of the plates past ice crystals which nucleated and grew from a fiber suspended vertically between the two plates. A zoom stereo microscope with a magnification which ranged from 3X to 80X and both 35 mm still photographs and 16 mm time lapse cine films taken through the microscope were used to study the variation of the shape and linear growth rate of ice crystals as a function of the ambient temperature, the ambient supersaturation, and the forced ventilation velocity. The ambient growth conditions were varied over the range of temperature 0 to -40 C, over the range of supersaturation 4% to 50% with respect to ice, and over the range of forced ventilation velocities 0 cm/s to 20 cm/s.

  6. Diffusion in a generalized thermoelastic solid in an infinite body with a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J. N.; Kumari, N.; Sharma, K. K.

    2013-09-01

    A dynamic problem of an infinite isotropic cylinder of radius r subjected to boundary conditions of the radial stress, temperature, or concentration of the diffusing substance is studied by using the equations of state of a elastothermodiffusive solid with one relaxation time and the Laplace transform technique. The distributions of the displacement, temperature, and concentration are displayed graphically and analytically.

  7. Reptation-induced coalescence of tunnels and cavities in Escherichia Coli XylE transporter conformers accounts for facilitated diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Philip; Naftalin, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    Structural changes and xylose docking to eight conformers of Escherichia Coli XylE, a xylose transporter similar to mammalian passive glucose transporters GLUTs, have been examined. Xylose docks to inward and outward facing conformers at a high affinity central site (K(i) 4-20 µM), previously identified by crystallography and additionally consistently docks to lower affinity sites in the external and internal vestibules (K(i) 12-50 µM). All these sites lie within intramolecular tunnels and cavities. Several local regions in the central transmembrane zone have large positional divergences of both skeleton carbon Cα positions and side chains. One such in TM 10 is the destabilizing sequence G388-P389-V390-C391 with an average RMSD (4.5 ± 0.4 Å). Interchange between conformer poses results in coalescence of tunnels with adjacent cavities, thereby producing a transitory channel spanning the entire transporter. A fully open channel exists in one inward-facing apo-conformer, (PDB 4ja4c) as demonstrated by several different tunnel-finding algorithms. The conformer interchanges produce a gated network within a branched central channel that permits staged ligand diffusion across the transporter during the open gate periods. Simulation of this model demonstrates that small-scale conformational changes required for sequentially opening gate with frequencies in the ns-μs time domain accommodate diffusive ligand flow between adjacent sites with association-dissociation rates in the μs-ms domain without imposing delays. This current model helps to unify the apparently opposing concepts of alternate access and multisite models of ligand transport. PMID:25163893

  8. Diffusion-controlled spherulite growth in obsidian inferred from H2O concentration profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Jim; Watkins, Jim; Manga, Michael; Huber, Christian; Martin, Michael C.

    2007-11-02

    Spherulites are spherical clusters of radiating crystals that occur naturally in rhyolitic obsidian. The growth of spherulites requires diffusion and uptake of crystal forming components from the host rhyolite melt or glass, and rejection of non-crystal forming components from the crystallizing region. Water concentration profiles measured by synchrotron-source Fourier transform spectroscopy reveal that water is expelled into the surrounding matrix during spherulite growth, and that it diffuses outward ahead of the advancing crystalline front. We compare these profiles to models of water diffusion in rhyolite to estimate timescales for spherulite growth. Using a diffusion-controlled growth law, we find that spherulites can grow on the order of days to months at temperatures above the glass transition. The diffusion-controlled growth law also accounts for spherulite size distribution, spherulite growth below the glass transition, and why spherulitic glasses are not completely devitrified.

  9. Crystal growth mechanisms in miarolitic cavities in the Lake George ring complex and vicinity, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Crystal Peak area of the Pikes Peak batholith, near Lake George in central Colorado, is world-renowned for its crystals of amazonite (the blue-green variety of microcline) and smoky quartz. Such crystals, collected from individual miarolitic pegmatites, have a remakably small variation in crystal size within each pegmatite, and the shapes of plots of their crystal size distributions (CSDs) are invariably lognormal or close to lognormal in all cases. These observations are explained by a crystal growth mechanism that was governed initially by surface-controlled kinetics, during which crystals tended to grow larger in proportion to their size, thereby establishing lognormal CSDs. Surface-controlled growth was followed by longer periods of supply controlled growth, during which growth rate was predominantly size-independent, consequently preserving the lognormal shapes of the CSDs and the small size variation. The change from surface- to supply controlled growth kinetics may have resulted from an increasing demand for nutrients that exceeded diffusion limitations of the system. The proposed model for crystal growth in this locality appears to be common in the geologic record, and can be used with other information, such as isotopic data, to deduce physico-chemical conditions during crystal formation.

  10. Strain rate dependence of the growth rate of grain boundary cavities during the high cycle high temperature fatigue of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Pedersen, J.S.

    1999-07-01

    High temperature fully reversed fatigue tests of high purity copper were made as a function of stress amplitude. A mean cavity volume V{sub p} and corresponding number density of cavities N{sub p} were determined from the total cavity volume fraction V{sub v} obtained from precision density measurements (PDM) and the total cavity surface area S{sub v} calculated from small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. Under the range of stress amplitudes tested, the plastic strain rate d{epsilon}{sub p}/dt was found to cover three orders of magnitude. The results of these tests of the influence of stress amplitude on cavity growth were combined with previous results in which the frequency of cycling was varied. It was found that the cavity growth rate correlates well with the measured plastic strain and stress amplitude through the relation dV{sub p}/dt {proportional{underscore}to} (d{epsilon}{sub p}/dt){sup 0.45} {proportional{underscore}to} {Delta}{sigma}{sup 2}.

  11. Transverse emittance growth due to rf noise in the high-luminosity LHC crab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudrenghien, P.; Mastoridis, T.

    2015-10-01

    The high-luminosity LHC (HiLumi LHC) upgrade with planned operation from 2025 onward has a goal of achieving a tenfold increase in the number of recorded collisions thanks to a doubling of the intensity per bunch (2.2e11 protons) and a reduction of β* to 15 cm. Such an increase would significantly expedite new discoveries and exploration. To avoid detrimental effects from long-range beam-beam interactions, the half crossing angle must be increased to 295 microrad. Without bunch crabbing, this large crossing angle and small transverse beam size would result in a luminosity reduction factor of 0.3 (Piwinski angle). Therefore, crab cavities are an important component of the LHC upgrade, and will contribute strongly to achieving an increase in the number of recorded collisions. The proposed crab cavities are electromagnetic devices with a resonance in the radio frequency (rf) region of the spectrum (400.789 MHz). They cause a kick perpendicular to the direction of motion (transverse kick) to restore an effective head-on collision between the particle beams, thereby restoring the geometric factor to 0.8 [K. Oide and K. Yokoya, Phys. Rev. A 40, 315 (1989).]. Noise injected through the rf/low level rf (llrf) system could cause significant transverse emittance growth and limit luminosity lifetime. In this work, a theoretical relationship between the phase and amplitude rf noise spectrum and the transverse emittance growth rate is derived, for a hadron machine assuming zero synchrotron radiation damping and broadband rf noise, excluding infinitely narrow spectral lines. This derivation is for a single beam. Both amplitude and phase noise are investigated. The potential improvement in the presence of the transverse damper is also investigated.

  12. O(minus 2) grain boundary diffusion and grain growth in pure dense MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapadia, C. M.; Leipold, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Grain growth behavior in fully dense compacts of MgO of very high purity was studied, and the results compared with other similar behaving materials. The activation energy for the intrinsic self-diffusion of Mg(2minus) is discussed along with the grain boundary diffusion of O(2minus). Grain boundary diffusion of O(2minus) is proposed as the controlling mechanism for grain growth.

  13. Rapid growth of congenital diffuse brain tumor considered to be teratoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Kondo, Akihide; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2008-07-01

    Prenatal ultrasonography of a 17-year-old pregnant female detected ventriculomegaly of the fetus at 31 weeks of gestation. Her medical and family histories were unremarkable. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging taken at 33 weeks of gestation showed a tumorous lesion with ventriculomegaly. A male baby was delivered by cesarean section at 36 weeks of gestation. The Apgar scores were 9 and 9 at 1 and 5 minutes after the delivery, respectively. The head circumference at birth was 41.5 cm with bulging anterior fontanel, but no other congenital anomaly. He showed relatively good activity with satisfactory feeding. Computed tomography performed on postnatal day 5 revealed a massive brain tumor of mixed density, with multiple lobulation and cystic and calcified components. The tumor had rapidly grown with diffuse appearance. The patient underwent endoscopic biopsy with installation of an Ommaya reservoir to control the hydrocephalus on postnatal day 6. The tumor appeared hypervascular and bled profusely on resection maneuver, so the endoscopic procedure for histological verification was abandoned. Cerebrospinal fluid taken intraoperatively revealed marked elevation of the alpha-fetoprotein level and mild increase of the human chorionic gonadotropin level, strongly suggestive of teratoma. Neuroimaging performed on postnatal day 11 indicated significant additional tumor growth which occupied nearly the whole cranial cavity. His activity began to deteriorate on postnatal day 13 and he died of respiratory distress on the 15th day of life. PMID:18654054

  14. Increased diffuse radiation fraction does not significantly accelerate plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, Alon; Krakauer, Nir

    2010-05-01

    A recent modelling study (Mercado et al., 2009) claims that increased numbers of scattering aerosols are responsible for a substantial fraction of the terrestrial carbon sink in recent decades because higher diffuse light fraction enhances plant net primary production (NPP). Here we show that observations of atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle and tree ring data indicate that the relation between diffuse light and NPP is actually quite weak on annual timescales. The inconsistency of these data with the modelling results may arise because the relationships used to quantify the enhancement of NPP were calibrated with eddy covariance measurements of hourly carbon uptake. The effect of diffuse-light fraction on carbon uptake could depend on timescale, since this effect varies rapidly as sun angle and cloudiness change, and since plants can respond dynamically over various timescales to change in incoming radiation. Volcanic eruptions, such as the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991, provide the best available tests for the effect of an annual-scale increase in the diffuse light fraction. Following the Pinatubo Eruption, in 1992 and 1993, a sharp decrease in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate was observed. This could have resulted from enhanced plant carbon uptake. Mercado et al. (2009) argue that largely as a result of the (volcanic aerosol driven) increase in diffuse light fraction, NPP was elevated in 1992, particularly between 25° N-45° N where annual NPP was modelled to be ~0.8 PgC (~10%) above average. In a previous study (Angert et al., 2004) a biogeochemical model (CASA) linked to an atmospheric tracer model (MATCH), was used to show that a diffuse-radiation driven increase in NPP in the extratropics will enhance carbon uptake mostly in summer, leading to a lower CO2 seasonal minimum. Here we use a 'toy model' to show that this conclusion is general and model-independent. The model shows that an enhanced sink of 0.8 PgC, similar to that modelled by Mercado et al. (2009), will result in a measurable decrease (~0.6ppm) in the seasonal CO2 minimum. This holds regardless of whether the sink is the result of 1) An increase in NPP, or 2) The combined effect of a temperature-driven decrease in heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and no change in NPP. This is since both NPP and Rh peak in summer. By contrast, observations from the NOAA global CO2 monitoring network show the opposite change in the seasonal minimum in 1992 and 1993 (~0.2ppm increase) both at Mauna Loa, and in the Marine Boundary Layer mean (>20° N), which is hard to reconcile with increased NPP in northern summer. Another indicator of annual NPP is tree wood increment. Previous work (Krakauer et al., 2003) showed that the average response in tree ring series after past Pinatubo-size volcanic eruptions implied lower NPP north of 45° N, presumably as a result of shorter growing season and lower total irradiance induced by scattering aerosols, and no significant change in NPP at lower latitudes. Here we show that In 1992, after the Pinatubo eruption, ring width in the 25° N-45° N band was 99.3±2.9% of average (n=351 sites), similar to the average of 100.4±2.2% over past eruptions (n=15 eruptions) (Uncertainty is given as 2 SE.). These results are also inconsistent with substantial NPP enhancement, although a limitation of the tree-ring approach is that available measurements do not uniformly sample the latitude band. The combined evidence of tree rings and the CO2 seasonal cycle shows that the enhancement of NPP by scattering aerosols on annual timescales is weak. This result suggests that reducing aerosols through stricter pollution controls may strengthen the land carbon sink, while geo-engineering schemes which aim to mitigate global warming by spreading scattering aerosols in the stratosphere may weaken it.

  15. Diffusion in immobilized-cell agar layers: influence of bacterial growth on the diffusivity of potassium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mignot, L; Junter, G A

    1990-05-01

    The diffusivity of potassium chloride in composite agar slab/microporous membrane structures loaded with various amounts of Escherichia coli whole cells was determined using both time-lag and steady-state methods. The diffusion coefficient of KCl decreased linearly with the logarithm of the immobilized-cell content. The effect exerted by bacterial growth inside the immobilization matrices on KCl diffusivity was then investigated. The diffusion coefficient of KCl obtained by time-lag analysis decreased during incubation of the immobilized-cell structures, whereas less consistent results arose from the steady-state method. An apparent doubling time for immobilized E. coli, increasing with the initial cell content of the gel, was obtained from the calibration relationship between KCl diffusivity and the number of organisms in agar. PMID:1366531

  16. Sucrose Release into the Endosperm Cavity of Wheat Grains Apparently Occurs by Facilitated Diffusion across the Nucellar Cell Membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, N.; Fisher, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    Nutrients required for the growth of the embryo and endosperm of developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grains are released into the endosperm cavity from the maternal tissues across the nucellar cell plasma membranes. We followed the uptake and efflux of sugars into and out of the nucellus by slicing grains longitudinally through the endosperm cavity to expose the nucellar surface to experimental solutions. Sucrose uptake and efflux are passive processes. Neither was sensitive to metabolic inhibitors, pH, or potassium concentration. p-Chloromercuribenzene sulfonate, however, strongly inhibited both uptake and efflux, although not equally. Except for p-chloromercuribenzene sensitivity, these characteristics of efflux and the insensitivity of Suc movement to turgor pressure are similar to those of sucrose release from maize pedicels, but they contrast with legume seed coats. Although the evidence is incomplete, movement appears to be carrier mediated rather than channel mediated. In vitro rates of sucrose efflux were similar to or somewhat less than in vivo rates, suggesting that transport across the nucellar cell membranes could be a factor in the control of assimilate import into the grain. PMID:12228614

  17. Diffusion rate for the emittance growth due to periodic crossings of nonlinear coupled resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J. . Dept. of Physics); Gluckstern, R.L.; Ohnuma, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Assuming that many betatron oscillations occur between crossings so that the betatron phase is uncorrelated from one crossing to the next, we estimate the diffusion rate for the emittance growth due to periodic crossing of coupled nonlinear resonances. It was shown that the diffusion rate is more or less independent of the frequency, but it is inversely proportional to the modulation amplitude.

  18. Diffusion rate for the emittance growth due to periodic crossings of nonlinear coupled resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Gluckstern, R.L.; Ohnuma, S.

    1992-06-01

    Assuming that many betatron oscillations occur between crossings so that the betatron phase is uncorrelated from one crossing to the next, we estimate the diffusion rate for the emittance growth due to periodic crossing of coupled nonlinear resonances. It was shown that the diffusion rate is more or less independent of the frequency, but it is inversely proportional to the modulation amplitude.

  19. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  20. Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jonathan; Staiger, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We draw on macroeconomic models of diffusion and productivity to explain empirical patterns of survival gains in heart attacks. Using Medicare data for 2.8 million patients during 1986–2004, we find that hospitals rapidly adopting cost-effective innovations such as beta blockers, aspirin, and reperfusion, had substantially better outcomes for their patients. Holding technology adoption constant, the marginal returns to spending were relatively modest. Hospitals increasing the pace of technology diffusion (“tigers”) experienced triple the survival gains compared to those with diminished rates (“tortoises”). In sum, small differences in the propensity to adopt effective technology lead to wide productivity differences across hospitals. PMID:26989267

  1. Gaugement of the inner space of the apomyoglobin's heme binding site by a single free diffusing proton. I. Proton in the cavity.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, E; Tsfadia, Y; Nachliel, E; Gutman, M

    1993-01-01

    Time resolved fluorimetry was employed to monitor the geminate recombination between proton and excited pyranine anion locked, together with less than 30 water molecules, inside the heme binding site of Apomyoglobin (sperm whale). The results were analyzed by a numerical reconstruction of the differential rate equation for time-dependent diffusion controlled reaction with radiating boundaries using N. Agmon's procedure (Huppert, Pines, and Agmon, 1990, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B., 7:1541-1550). The analysis of the curve provided the effective dielectric constant of the proton permeable space in the cavity and the diffusion coefficient of the proton. The electrostatic potential within the cavity was investigated by the equations given by Gilson et al. (1985, J. Mol. Biol., 183:503-516). According to this analysis the dielectric constant of the protein surrounding the site is epsilon prot < or = 6.5. The diffusion coefficient of the proton in the heme binding site of Apomyoglobin-pyranine complex is D = 4 x 10(-5) cm2/s. This value is approximately 50% of the diffusion coefficient of proton in water. The lower value indicates enhanced ordering of water in the cavity, a finding which is corroborated by a large negative enthropy of binding delta S0 = -46.6 cal.mole-1 deg-1. The capacity of a small cavity in a protein to retain a proton had been investigated through the mathematical reconstruction of the dynamics. It has been demonstrated that Coulombic attraction, as large as delta psi of energy coupling membrane, is insufficient to delay a free proton for a time frame comparable to the turnover time of protogenic sites. PMID:8384501

  2. Supersaturation state effect in diffusion induced Ge nanowires growth at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvani, S. J.; Favre, L.; Celegato, F.; Boarino, L.; Berbezier, Isabelle; Pinto, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report on supersaturation state effect in diffusion-induced vapor-liquid-solid growth of Ge nanowires at high temperature. Our experimental investigation establishes that at T ≥ 550 ° C the growth is hindered while the growth limitation is not resulted from a high value of the desorption rate. We demonstrate that the suppressed growth is a result of the droplets large chemical potential that inhibit the supersaturation state. This results either in a strong growth limitation due to a significant droplets enlargement or to a growth cessation.

  3. An early report of growth of an Aspergillus species on the wall of a lung cavity.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, L

    1989-01-01

    A report by Bristowe in 1854 of a vegetable fungus growing in a lung cavity and identified as an Aspergillus was almost certainly one of the earliest reports of A fumigatus colonisation. Images PMID:2648644

  4. Influence of stochastic domain growth on pattern nucleation for diffusive systems with internal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Thomas E.; Baker, Ruth E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Maini, Philip K.

    2011-10-01

    Numerous mathematical models exploring the emergence of complexity within developmental biology incorporate diffusion as the dominant mechanism of transport. However, self-organizing paradigms can exhibit the biologically undesirable property of extensive sensitivity, as illustrated by the behavior of the French-flag model in response to intrinsic noise and Turing’s model when subjected to fluctuations in initial conditions. Domain growth is known to be a stabilizing factor for the latter, though the interaction of intrinsic noise and domain growth is underexplored, even in the simplest of biophysical settings. Previously, we developed analytical Fourier methods and a description of domain growth that allowed us to characterize the effects of deterministic domain growth on stochastically diffusing systems. In this paper we extend our analysis to encompass stochastically growing domains. This form of growth can be used only to link the meso- and macroscopic domains as the “box-splitting” form of growth on the microscopic scale has an ill-defined thermodynamic limit. The extension is achieved by allowing the simulated particles to undergo random walks on a discretized domain, while stochastically controlling the length of each discretized compartment. Due to the dependence of diffusion on the domain discretization, we find that the description of diffusion cannot be uniquely derived. We apply these analytical methods to two justified descriptions, where it is shown that, under certain conditions, diffusion is able to support a consistent inhomogeneous state that is far removed from the deterministic equilibrium, without additional kinetics. Finally, a logistically growing domain is considered. Not only does this show that we can deal with nonmonotonic descriptions of stochastic growth, but it is also seen that diffusion on a stationary domain produces different effects to diffusion on a domain that is stationary “on average.”

  5. Multiple cluster growth of ultra-thin films with anisotropic edge diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-mu; Wu, Zi-qin

    2001-01-01

    The multiple cluster growth of ultra-thin films on a hexagonal substrate with fractal, dendritic and compact morphology has been studied by computer simulation. The influence of the different diffusion processes along island edges on the island shape has been investigated. The results show that the anisotropic corner diffusion induces the dendritic growth and the anisotropic step diffusion can promote the anisotropic growth and cause the ramified islands to grow in three directions. In the case of compact growth, the island shape is mainly determined by the anisotropic corner crossing process. The non-uniform distribution of the multiple cluster formation can be described quantitatively by multifractal. With patterns changing from fractal to compact islands, the width and height of the bell-like or hook-like multifractal spectra increase, while the top f(α) decreases.

  6. A creep cavity growth model for creep-fatigue life prediction of a unidirectional W/Cu composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Verrilli, Michael J.; Halford, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    A microstructural model was developed to predict creep-fatigue life in a (0)(sub 4), 9 volume percent tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite at the temperature of 833 K. The mechanism of failure of the composite is assumed to be governed by the growth of quasi-equilibrium cavities in the copper matrix of the composite, based on the microscopically observed failure mechanisms. The methodology uses a cavity growth model developed for prediction of creep fracture. Instantaneous values of strain rate and stress in the copper matrix during fatigue cycles were calculated and incorporated in the model to predict cyclic life. The stress in the copper matrix was determined by use of a simple two-bar model for the fiber and matrix during cyclic loading. The model successfully predicted the composite creep-fatigue life under tension-tension cyclic loading through the use of this instantaneous matrix stress level. Inclusion of additional mechanisms such as cavity nucleation, grain boundary sliding, and the effect of fibers on matrix-stress level would result in more generalized predictions of creep-fatigue life.

  7. Forward calculation of zoned garnet growth with limited diffusion transport in the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, M.

    2006-09-01

    A forward model is proposed to reproduce the formation of garnet under conditions of sluggish diffusion transport in the matrix. Starting from a matrix consisting of chlorite and quartz, the amount of garnet growth and the chemical composition was calculated at each P T increment in the system MnO FeO MgO Al2O3 SiO2 H2O. Sluggish diffusion transport was introduced considering the local equilibrium between garnet surface and the matrix within a given diffusion distance (equilibration volume). Varying the diffusion distance, calculations were performed along the prograde P T path of the Sambagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. The final size of the garnet grains was largely proportional to the diffusion distance. In contrast to the model without diffusion limitations, a shorter diffusion distance resulted in a rise of the Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratio in garnet before Mn approached zero. These results indicate that the chemical composition trend in zoned garnet from the Sambagawa belt is consistent with growth under sluggish material transport. The calculated amount of garnet growth increases dramatically with temperature. The amount of newly grown natural garnet in the Sambagawa metamorphic rocks was plotted against temperatures, where chemical compositions of garnet were calibrated against temperatures with the Gibbs’ method. This trend was also consistent with the modelled garnet behaviour.

  8. Reaction-diffusion controlled growth of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduin, Willem; Mahadevan, L.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how the emergence of complex forms and shapes in biominerals came about is both of fundamental and practical interest. Although biomineralization processes and organization strategies to give higher order architectures have been studied extensively, synthetic approaches to mimic these self-assembled structures are highly complex and have been difficult to emulate, let alone replicate. The emergence of solution patterns has been found in reaction-diffusion systems such as Turing patterns and the BZ reaction. Intrigued by this spontaneous formation of complexity we explored if similar processes can lead to patterns in the solid state. We here identify a reaction-diffusion system in which the shape of the solidified products is a direct readout of the environmental conditions. Based on insights in the underlying mechanism, we developed a toolbox of engineering strategies to deterministically sculpt patterns and shapes, and combine different morphologies to create a landscape of hierarchical multi scale-complex tectonic architectures with unprecedented levels of complexity. These findings may hold profound implications for understanding, mimicking and ultimately expanding upon nature's morphogenesis strategies, allowing the synthesis of advanced highly complex microscale materials and devices. WLN acknowledges the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for financial support

  9. Diffusion behavior of copper atoms under Cu(II) reduction in Cucurbit[8]uril cavity at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakovets, Vladimir V.; Nadolinnii, Vladimir A.; Kovalenko, Ekaterina A.; Plyusnin, Pavel E.; Dolgovesova, Irina P.; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper we describe copper clusters and nanoparticles formation by the reduction of copper (II) ions inside cavities of macrocycle molecules using supramolecular compound [Cu(Cyclen)(H{sub 2}O)@CB[8

  10. Multiple wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays using surface-controlled MOCVD growth rate enhancement and reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, G.G.; Hains, C.P.; Luong, S.; Cheng, J.; Hou, H.Q.; Vawter, G.A.

    1997-04-01

    Multiple-wavelength VCSEL and photodetector arrays are useful for wavelength-multiplexed fiberoptic networks, and for optical crosstalk isolation in parallel, free-space interconnects. Multiple wavelength VCSEL arrays have been obtained by varying the growth rate using thermal gradients caused by a backside-patterned substrate, by growth enhancement on a patterned substrate, and by varying the cavity length through anodic oxidation and selective etching of the wafer. We show here for the first time both the enhancement and the reduction of the growth rate of the entire VCSEL structure on a topographically patterned substrate, and demonstrate the controlled variation of the lasing wavelengths of a VCSEL array over an extended spectral range.

  11. Diffusion growth of titanium carbide film on NiTi substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lesokhin, S.; Levin, L.

    1996-10-01

    The formation of titanium carbide during hot filament assisted carburizing of NiTi alloy was investigated. Phase content and morphology of the diffusion zone were examined by X-ray diffraction, X-ray microanalysis, SEM, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The growth of stable and adherent TiC film was observed. A non-planarity of interphase boundary was noticed. The applicability of the chemical diffusion approach to the analysis of the experimentally observed interface instability is discussed. A criterion, taking into account the influence of growth stresses on the stability of the flat interface, is developed by means of linear perturbation analysis.

  12. Controlled growth of long-wavelength SiGe/Si multiple quantum well resonant-cavity photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carline, Roger T.; Hope, D. A. O.; Stanaway, Mark B.; Robbins, David J.

    1997-04-01

    Recently, resonantly enhanced photoresponse in the > 7 micrometers range has been demonstrated for long wavelength SiGe/Si multi-quantum well infrared photodetectors using reflection from a thick buried SiO2 layer. The SiGe/Si detector structures were grown epitaxially on bond-and-etch- back silicon-on-insulator substrates, with the separation of the reflecting oxide and detector surface determining the wavelength of resonant detection. Difficulties were, however, encountered in producing the desired cavity width. In this paper we show the origin to be a thickness-dependent error in the pyrometer measurement of wafer temperature caused by interference in the cavity of radiation to which the pyrometer is sensitive. Judicious choice of substrate oxide thickness is shown to reduce the effect. In-situ real- time monitoring of epitaxial growth rate and thickness using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is demonstrated to be a more flexible solution. Thickness dependent oscillations in the SE spectra allow accurate position of the MQW and end- pointing of the cavity width to give optimum resonant enhancement effect. Use of surface sensitive regions of the SE spectra also allow monitoring of the repeatability of the individual MQW periods. Detectors grown using SE exhibit superior peak responsivities within 0.1 micrometers of the design wavelength.

  13. Spectral and angular dependence of mid-infrared diffuse scattering from explosives residues for standoff detection using external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of scattered mid-infrared light from surfaces coated with explosives residues (TNT, RDX, and tetryl) detected at a 2 meter standoff distance. An external cavity quantum cascade laser provided tunable illumination between 7 and 8 µm. Important differences were identified in the spectral features between specular reflection and diffuse scattering which will impact most practical testing scenarios and complicate material identification. We discuss some of the factors influencing the dependence of observed spectra on the experimental geometry.

  14. An Investigation into Zinc Diffusion and Tin Whisker Growth for Electroplated Tin Deposits on Brass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Mark A.; Wilcox, Geoffrey D.; Higginson, Rebecca L.; Heath, Richard J.; Liu, Changqing

    2014-04-01

    It is widely documented that whisker growth is more rapid for tin deposits on brass compared with deposits produced on other substrate materials, such as copper. As a result, studies investigating the effect of process variables on tin whisker formation are often conducted on brass substrates to take advantage of the increased whisker growth rates. Although it has been understood since the 1960s that the increased whisker growth results from zinc diffusion, to date there has not been any detailed analysis of the zinc/zinc oxide distribution at the surface of the tin deposit. Using a commercial bright tin electroplating bath, the formation of zinc oxide at the surface of tin deposits on brass has been investigated. Analyses show that zinc oxide is present on the surface of the deposit within 1 day of electroplating. During storage at room temperature, a network of zinc oxide is formed at the surface grain boundaries, the extent of which increases with time. The critical role that zinc surface diffusion plays in whisker growth for tin deposits on brass has been demonstrated by electrochemical oxidation of the tin shortly after electroplating. This develops a tin oxide film that is thicker than the native air-formed oxide and subsequently serves as a diffusion barrier to zinc surface diffusion, thereby mitigating whisker growth.

  15. Application of diffusion growth chambers for the cultivation of marine sponge-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Georg; Whitfield, Susanna; Taylor, Michael W; Thoms, Carsten; Schupp, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Marine sponges contain dense and diverse microbial communities, which are renowned as a source of bioactive metabolites. The biological activities of sponge-microbe natural products span a broad spectrum, from antibacterial and antifungal to antitumor and antiviral applications. However, the potential of sponge-derived compounds has not been fully realized, due largely to the acknowledged "supply issue." Most bacteria from environmental samples have resisted cultivation on artificial growth media, and cultivation of sponge-associated bacteria has been a major focus in the search for novel marine natural products. One approach to isolate so-called "uncultivable" microorganisms from different environments is the diffusion growth chamber method. Here, we describe the first application of diffusion growth chambers for the isolation of cultivable and previously uncultivated bacteria from sponges. The study was conducted by implanting diffusion growth chambers in the tissue of Rhabdastrella globostellata reef sponges. In total, 255 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained, with phylogenetic analyses revealing their affiliations with the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Fifteen sequences represented previously uncultivated bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria (Alpha and Gamma classes). Our results indicate that the diffusion growth chamber approach can be successfully applied in a natural, living marine environment such as sponges. PMID:24838766

  16. Double-Diffusive Convection During Growth of Halides and Selenides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Su, Ching-Hua; Duval, Walter M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal halides and selenides have unique properties which make them excellent materials for chemical, biological and radiological sensors. Recently it has been shown that selenohalides are even better materials than halides or selenides for gamma-ray detection. These materials also meet the strong needs of a wide band imaging technology to cover ultra-violet (UV), midwave infrared wavelength (MWIR) to very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region for hyperspectral imager components such as etalon filters and acousto-optic tunable filters (AO). In fact AOTF based imagers based on these materials have some superiority than imagers based on liquid crystals, FTIR, Fabry-Perot, grating, etalon, electro-optic modulation, piezoelectric and several other concepts. For example, broadband spectral and imagers have problems of processing large amount of information during real-time observation. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) imagers are being developed to fill the need of reducing processing time of data, low cost operation and key to achieving the goal of covering long-wave infrared (LWIR). At the present time spectral imaging systems are based on the use of diffraction gratings are typically used in a pushbroom or whiskbroom mode. They are mostly used in systems and acquire large amounts of hyperspectral data that is processed off-line later. In contrast, acousto-optic tunable filter spectral imagers require very little image processing, providing new strategies for object recognition and tracking. They are ideally suited for tactical situations requiring immediate real-time image processing. But the performance of these imagers depends on the quality and homogeneity of acousto-optic materials. In addition for many systems requirements are so demanding that crystals up to sizes of 10 cm length are desired. We have studied several selenides and halide crystals for laser and AO imagers for MWIR and LWIR wavelength regions. We have grown and fabricated crystals of several materials such as mercurous chloride, mercurous bromide, mercurous iodide, lead chloride lead bromide, lead iodide, thallium arsenic selenide, gallium selenide, zince sulfide zinc selenide and several crystals into devices. We have used both Bridgman and physical vapor transport (PVT) crystal growth methods. In the past have examined PVT growth numerically for conditions where the boundary of the enclosure is subjected to a nonlinear thermal profile. Since past few months we have been working on binary and ternary materials such as selenoiodides, doped zinc sulfides and mercurous chloro bromide and mercurous bromoiodides. In the doped and ternary materials thermal and solutal convection play extremely important role during the growth. Very commonly striations and banding is observed. Our experiments have indicated that even in highly purified source materials, homogeneity in 1-g environment is very difficult. Some of our previous numerical studies have indicated that gravity level less than 10-4 (?-g) helps in controlling the thermosolutal convection. We will discuss the ground based growth results of HgClxBr(1-x) and ZnSe growth results for the mm thick to large cm size crystals. These results will be compared with our microgravity experiments performed with this class of materials. For both HgCl-HgBr and ZnS-ZnSe the lattice parameters of the mixtures obey Vagard's law in the studied composition range. The study demonstrates that properties are very anisotropic with crystal orientation, and performance achievement requires extremely careful fabrication to utilize highest figure of merit. In addition, some parameters such as crystal growth fabrication, processing time, resolution, field of view and efficiency will be described based on novel solid solution materials. It was predicted that very similar to the pure compounds solid solutions also have very large anisotropy, and very precise oriented and homogeneous bulk and thin film crystals is required to achieve maximum performance of laser or imagers. Some of the parameters controlling the homogeneity such as thermos-solutal convection driven forces can be controlled in microgravity environments to utilize the benefits of these unique materials.

  17. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  18. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  19. Numerical study of liquid phase diffusion growth of SiGe subjected to accelerated crucible rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhon, M.; Lent, B.; Dost, S.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) on liquid phase diffusion (LPD) growth of SixGe1-x crystal has been investigated numerically. Transient, axisymmetric simulations have been carried out for triangular and trapezoidal ACRT cycles. Natural convection driven flow in the early growth hours is found to be modified by the ACRT induced Ekman flow. Results also reveal that a substantial mixing in the solution can be induced by the application of ACRT in the later hours of growth which is otherwise a diffusion dominated growth period for LPD growth technique. A comparison is drawn to the cases of stationary crucible and crucible rotating at a constant speed examined previously for this growth system by Sekhon and Dost (J. Cryst. Growth 430 (2015) 63). It is found that a superior interface flattening effect and radial compositional uniformity along the growth interface can be accomplished by employing ACRT at 12 rpm than that which could be achieved by using steady crucible rotation at 25 rpm, owing to the higher time averaged growth velocity achieved in the former case. Furthermore, minor differences are also predicted in the results obtained for trapezoidal and triangular ACRT cycles.

  20. Diffusion and growth mechanism of Nb3Sn superconductor grown by bronze technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurila, T.; Vuorinen, V.; Kumar, A. K.; Paul, A.

    2010-06-01

    The rather surprising position of the Kirkendall pores in Nb3Sn superconductor grown by bronze technique is clarified. It is shown that Sn is the fastest diffusing species, which seems to be unusual considering the crystal structure of Nb3Sn. Further, we explain the dramatic change in the growth rate and the activation energy for growth of the product phase, when the Sn composition in the Cu(Sn) bronze alloy is changed from 7 to 8 at. %.

  1. Non-linear resonance of fluids in a crystal growth cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Francis C.

    1996-01-01

    In the microgravity environment, the effect of gravity on fluid motion is much reduced. Hence, secondary effects such as vibrations, jitters, surface tension, capillary effects, and electromagnetic forces become the dominant mechanism of fluid convection. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate fluid behavior in microgravity with the ultimate goal of developing processes with minimal influence from convection. Industrial applications such as crystal growth from solidification of melt and protein growth for pharmatheutical application are just a few examples of the vast potential benefit that can be reaped from material processing in space. However, a space laboratory is not immune from all undesirable disturbances and it is imperative that such disturbances be well understood, quantifiable, and controlled. Non-uniform and transient accelerations such as vibrations, jitters, and impulsive accelerations exist as a result of crew activities, space vehicle maneuvering, and the operations of on-board equipment. Measurements conducted on-board a U.S. Spacelab showed the existence of vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 100 Hz with a dominant mode of 17 Hz and harmonics of 54 Hz. The observed vibration is not limited to any coordinate plane but exists in all directions. Similar situation exists on-board the Russian MIR space station. Due to the large structure of its design, the future International Space Station will have its own characteristic vibration spectrum. It is well known that vibration can exert substantial influence on heat and mass transfer processes, thus hindering any attempts to achieve a diffusion-limited process. Experiments on vibration convection for a liquid-filled enclosure under one-g environment showed the existence of different flow regimes as vibration frequency and intensity changes. Results showed the existence of a resonant frequency, near which the enhancement is the strongest, and the existence of a high frequency asymptote. Numerical simulations of vibration convection have been conducted by Yurkov, Fu and Shieh, and by Wang. These analyses considered a two-dimensional air-filled cell under weightlessness condition and showed results similar to those of the experiments. It is not yet known whether resonance convection can be triggered by jitter alone or whether it requires the interaction of jitter with other convective forces in low gravity. An order of magnitude analysis, however, can be used to show the dependence of the resonance frequency on the fluid Prandtl number. Even though the onset of resonance convection may depend on other factors, results indicates that fluids with low Prandtl numbers are more susceptible to resonance than those with high Prandtl numbers. The current study is aimed at gaining additional insights to this problem using germanium as working fluid. Germanium was chosen for this analysis because of its common usage in solidification process and its relatively low Prandtl number (Pr = 0.02).

  2. Large interface diffusion in endotaxial growth of MnP films on GaP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nateghi, N. Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A.

    2014-10-07

    The metal organic vapor deposition of MnP films on GaP (100) substrates is shown to have a substantial endotaxial component. A study of the growth time evolution of the endotaxial depths of MnP grains reveals a diffusion-controlled growth with a relatively large diffusion coefficient of Mn in GaP. The value (2.2 ± 1.5) × 10⁻¹⁵ (cm²/s) obtained at 650 °C is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the reported Mn diffusion in bulk GaP. GaP surface mounds provide further indirect evidence that this large diffusion coefficient is concurrent with the out-diffusion of Ga atoms at the growing MnP/GaP interface. No trace of dislocations could be observed at or near this interface, which strongly suggests that Mn diffusion occurs through vacant sites generated by the difference between the crystallographic structures of MnP and GaP.

  3. Experimental techniques for determination of the role of diffusion and convection in crystal growth from solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zefiro, L.

    1980-01-01

    Various studies of the concentration of the solution around a growing crystal using interferometric techniques are reviewed. A holographic interferometric technique used in laboratory experiments shows that a simple description of the solution based on the assumption of a purely diffusive mechanism appears inadequate since the convection, effective even in reduced columns, always affects the growth.

  4. An Innovative Method for Preparing Semiconductor Change Used in Crystal Growth and Shear Cell Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anrold, William A.; Matthiesen, David; Benett, Robert J.; Jayne, Douglas T.

    1997-01-01

    An innovative technique for machining semiconductors has been developed. This technique was used to prepare semiconductor charges for crystal growth and shear cell diffusion experiments. The technique allows brittle semiconductor materials to be quickly and accurately machined. Lightly doping the semiconductor material increases the conductivity enough to allow the material to be shaped by an electrical discharge machine (EDM).

  5. Solute Layers and Double-Diffusive Interfaces during the Solidification of NH{sub 4}Cl-H{sub 2}O in Rectangular Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z. X.; Lu, J.; Bai, B. F.

    2010-03-01

    Flow and temperature fields during the solidification of hypereutectic and hypoeutectic NH{sub 4}Cl-H{sub 2}O solution in rectangular cavities were measured by a particle image velocimetry(PIV) and a weak perturbation thermocouple network, respectively. Double-diffusive convections caused by the coupling effects of temperature and solute gradients were studied by the experiment. During the solidification of hypereutectic solution, the rejected water near the solidification interface will lead to dilute solute layers and double-diffusive interfaces. As the continued rejection of water, the layer and interface will evolve into instability and a multi-layer and multi-interface structure will be formed. To the hypoeutectic solution, the rejection of NH{sub 4}Cl near the solidification interface will form a dense solute layer. When the thickness of the dense solute layer is large enough, the coupling effects of stabilizing solute gradient and unstable temperature gradient will lead to new solute layers. The solute layers and double-diffusive interfaces will evolve stably and have no breakup of the double-diffusive interfaces during the solidification of hypoeutectic solution.

  6. Metastatic appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma to well-differentiated diffuse mesothelioma of the peritoneal cavity: a mimicker of florid mesothelial hyperplasia in association with neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tien Anh N; Holloway, Robert W; Finkler, Neil J

    2008-10-01

    Atypical/florid mesothelial hyperplasia associated with another neoplastic process is not an infrequent phenomenon and has been reported in a variety of tumors. In those instances, the mesothelial proliferation might create a misdiagnosis of metastatic carcinoma but seldom raises the possibility of a well-differentiated mesothelioma seeded by metastatic neoplastic cells. Herein, we report the case of a 40-year-old woman originally diagnosed with exuberant atypical mesothelial hyperplasia after an diagnostic laparoscopy. The subsequent operation, however, demonstrated a mucinous neoplasm of the appendix with involvement of the peritoneal cavity in the form of peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis as well as metastases to the uterine serosa and adnexal surfaces. Microscopic analysis revealed an appendiceal adenocarcinoma with signet-ring-cell features that has metastasized to a diffuse well-differentiated mesothelioma of the peritoneal cavity. In many areas, the atypical mesothelial proliferation is indistinguishable from florid mesothelial hyperplasia. The true nature of the mesothelial proliferation was only confirmed after extensive additional sampling, which showed unequivocal stromal invasion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a metastatic appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma to a well-differentiated diffuse mesothelioma of the peritoneal cavity. Although commonly associated with atypical/ florid mesothelial hyperplasia, a carcinoma can rarely metastasize to a well-differentiated mesothelioma, which can pose significant diagnostic difficulties because it can mimic a reactive process. This unusual case report expands the spectrum of mesothelial proliferation in conjunction with a malignant neoplasm and serves to remind pathologists that such a concomitant occurrence exists. PMID:18753969

  7. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer. PMID:26419420

  8. Efficacy and safety of selenium nanoparticles administered intraperitoneally for the prevention of growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Kang; Tan, Yanping; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-07-01

    Peritoneal implantation of cancer cells, particularly postoperative seeding metastasis, frequently occurs in patients with primary tumors in the stomach, colon, liver, and ovary. Peritoneal carcinomatosis is associated with poor prognosis. In this work, we evaluated the prophylactic effect of intraperitoneal administration of selenium (Se), an essential trace element and a putative chemopreventive agent, on peritoneal implantation of cancer cells. Elemental Se nanoparticles were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice, into which highly malignant H22 hepatocarcinoma cells had previously been inoculated. Se concentrations in the cancer cells and tissues, as well as the efficacy of proliferation inhibition and safety, were evaluated. Se was mainly concentrated in cancer cells compared to Se retention in normal tissues, showing at least an order of magnitude difference between the drug target cells (the H22 cells) and the well-recognized toxicity target of Se (the liver). Such a favorable selective distribution resulted in strong proliferation suppression without perceived host toxicity. The mechanism of action of the Se nanoparticle-triggered cytotoxicity was associated with Se-mediated production of reactive oxygen species, which impaired the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Our results suggest that intraperitoneal administration of Se is a safe and effective means of preventing growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity for the above-mentioned high-risk populations. PMID:24727439

  9. Submonolayer epitaxial growth with long-range (Lévy) diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Jacques G.; Family, Fereydoon; Hughes, David C.

    1998-12-01

    The effects of long-range (Lévy) diffusion in submonolayer epitaxial growth are studied via kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and rate equations. Such long-range diffusion may be relevant in the case of liquid-phase epitaxy and electrochemical deposition. Results for the scaling of the submonolayer island density and size distribution are presented as a function of the Lévy distribution exponent β and the ratio D/F of the diffusion rate to the deposition rate. Both one- and two-dimensional Lévy flights (corresponding to infinitely fast hops) and one- and two-dimensional Lévy walks (corresponding to finite hopping velocity) are examined. Good agreement is found between theoretical predictions and simulations for the dependence of the island-density scaling exponent χ on the Lévy exponent β in both one and two dimensions.

  10. Atomic self-diffusion behaviors relevant to 2D homoepitaxy growth on stepped Pd(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fusheng; Hu, Wangyu; Chen, Yifeng; Deng, Huiqiu; Chen, Han; Yang, Xiyuan; Luo, Wenhua

    2014-06-01

    Using molecular dynamics, nudged elastic band and modified analytic embedded atom methods, the diffusion behaviors of Pd adatom on stepped Pd(001) surface have been investigated. Lower than 975 K, Pd adatom just hops along the perfect [110]-direction step. The diffusion dynamics equation is derived from the Arrhenius law between 875 and 975 K, and the corresponding migration energy and prefactor are 0.76 eV and 5.2 × 10- 2 cm2/s respectively, which shows that they adhere to the step in case of adatom moving to the step. The adatom diffuses across the perfect step with an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier of 0.09 eV by exchange mechanism. Our calculations show the kink at step can markedly decrease the static energy barrier across the step with a negative Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier, and it contributes to form layer-by-layer growth model in the epitaxial experiment. Our calculations show that the kink can also markedly improve the adatom's mass transport of interlayer, contributing to the formation of the compact film. Lastly, a quantitative result at 300 K shows that the kink affects tremendously the diffusion mobility of adatom near it, which indicates that the kink plays a key role in the formation of the compact and uniform film on Pd(001) surface in an epitaxial growth experiment.

  11. Nucleation and growth by diffusion under Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2014-02-14

    The critical radius of a nucleus grown by diffusion in a solution is studied thermodynamically as well as kinetically. The thermodynamic growth equation called Zeldovich equation of classical nucleation theory and the kinetic diffusional growth equation combined with the Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition lead to the same critical radius. However, it should be pointed out that the diffusional equation may lead to a kinetic critical radius that is different from the thermodynamic critical radius, thus indicating the possibility of kinetically controlling the critical radius of a nucleus.

  12. Rotational diffusion of receptors for epidermal growth factor measured by time-resolved phosphorescence depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidovetzki, Raphael; Johnson, David A.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    1991-06-01

    The cell surface receptor for epidermal growth factor (EGFR) is one of the most studied integral membrane proteins. The receptor is widely distributed in cells and tissues of mammalian and avian tissues and plays an important role in growth control. Binding of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGFR initiates a complex biological response, which includes self-phosphorylation of the receptor due to an intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, phosphorylation of other membrane proteins, increased intake of metabolites, and increased proliferation. Complete amino acid sequence of EGFR revealed a high degree of homology with viral oncogenes and allowed tentative identification of an external hormone binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain that includes tyrosine kinase activity. EGF binding induces rapid aggregation of EGFR, a process which was also observed on other receptor systems. These and other observations led to a hypothesis that microaggregation of EGFR is a necessary prerequisite for the biological response of EGF. A direct approach to study the processes of oligomerization of cell membrane proteins is to measure their mobility under various conditions. The lateral mobility of the EGFR was studied on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and on A431 cells. However, an examination of the equations for the lateral and rotational diffusion in membranes shows that only rotational diffusion is strongly dependent on the size of the diffusing entity. A method of measuring protein rotational diffusion by time-resolved phosphorescence has proved to be very useful in the analysis of both in vivo and in vitro systems. The authors apply this method to study the mobility of EGFR on living A431 cells and membrane preparations.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae PstS production is phosphate responsive and enhanced during growth in the murine peritoneal cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Mills, J.; Robb, C. W.; Wilson, C. J.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2001-01-01

    Differential display-PCR (DDPCR) was used to identify a Streptococcus pneumoniae gene with enhanced transcription during growth in the murine peritoneal cavity. Northern dot blot analysis and comparative densitometry confirmed a 1.8-fold increase in expression of the encoded sequence following murine peritoneal culture (MPC) versus laboratory culture or control culture (CC). Sequencing and basic local alignment search tool analysis identified the DDPCR fragment as pstS, the phosphate-binding protein of a high-affinity phosphate uptake system. PCR amplification of the complete pstS gene followed by restriction analysis and sequencing suggests a high level of conservation between strains and serotypes. Quantitative immunodot blotting using antiserum to recombinant PstS (rPstS) demonstrated an approximately twofold increase in PstS production during MPC from that during CCs, a finding consistent with the low levels of phosphate observed in the peritoneum. Moreover, immunodot blot and Northern analysis demonstrated phosphate-dependent production of PstS in six of seven strains examined. These results identify pstS expression as responsive to the MPC environment and extracellular phosphate concentrations. Presently, it remains unclear if phosphate concentrations in vivo contribute to the regulation of pstS. Finally, polyclonal antiserum to rPstS did not inhibit growth of the pneumococcus in vitro, suggesting that antibodies do not block phosphate uptake; moreover, vaccination of mice with rPstS did not protect against intraperitoneal challenge as assessed by the 50% lethal dose.

  14. THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES OBSERVED WITH AIA/SDO: FRACTAL DIFFUSION, SUB-DIFFUSION, OR LOGISTIC GROWTH?

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2012-09-20

    We explore the spatio-temporal evolution of solar flares by fitting a radial expansion model r(t) that consists of an exponentially growing acceleration phase, followed by a deceleration phase that is parameterized by the generalized diffusion function r(t){proportional_to}{kappa}(t - t{sub 1}){sup {beta}/2}, which includes the logistic growth limit ({beta} = 0), sub-diffusion ({beta} = 0-1), classical diffusion ({beta} = 1), super-diffusion ({beta} = 1-2), and the linear expansion limit ({beta} = 2). We analyze all M- and X-class flares observed with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) during the first two years of the SDO mission, amounting to 155 events. We find that most flares operate in the sub-diffusive regime ({beta} = 0.53 {+-} 0.27), which we interpret in terms of anisotropic chain reactions of intermittent magnetic reconnection episodes in a low plasma-{beta} corona. We find a mean propagation speed of v = 15 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}, with maximum speeds of v{sub max} = 80 {+-} 85 km s{sup -1} per flare, which is substantially slower than the sonic speeds expected for thermal diffusion of flare plasmas. The diffusive characteristics established here (for the first time for solar flares) is consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model, which predicted diffusive transport merely based on cellular automaton simulations.

  15. Introducing Carbon Diffusion Barriers for Uniform, High-Quality Graphene Growth from Solid Sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon diffusion barriers are introduced as a general and simple method to prevent premature carbon dissolution and thereby to significantly improve graphene formation from the catalytic transformation of solid carbon sources. A thin Al2O3 barrier inserted into an amorphous-C/Ni bilayer stack is demonstrated to enable growth of uniform monolayer graphene at 600 °C with domain sizes exceeding 50 μm, and an average Raman D/G ratio of <0.07. A detailed growth rationale is established via in situ measurements, relevant to solid-state growth of a wide range of layered materials, as well as layer-by-layer control in these systems. PMID:24024736

  16. Accelerated kinetics and mechanism of growth of boride layers on titanium under isothermal and cyclic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Biplab

    2011-12-01

    The tendency of titanium (Ti) and its alloys to wear, gall and seize during high contact stresses between sliding surfaces severely limits their applications in bearings, gears etc. One way to mitigate these problems is to modify their surfaces by applying hard and wear resistant surface coatings. Boriding, which involves solid state diffusion of boron (B) into Ti, thereby forming hard surface layers consisting of TiB2 and TiB compounds has been shown to produce extremely high wear resistant surfaces in Ti and its alloys. The growth kinetics of these layers are, however, limited by the low diffusivities of B in the high melting TiB2 and TiB compounds. On the basis of the fact that HCP metals such as Ti show enhanced (anomalous) self-diffusion near the phase transition temperature, the first hypothesis of this work has been that the diffusivity enhancement should cause rapid ingress of B atoms, thereby accelerating the growth of the hard boride layers. Isothermal boriding experiments were performed close to phase transition temperature (890, 910, and 915°C) for time periods ranging from 3 to 24 hours. It was found that indeed a much deeper growth of TiB into the Ti substrate (˜75 mum) occurred at temperatures very close to the transition temperature (910°C), compared to that obtained at 1050°C. A diffusion model based on error-function solutions of Fick's second law was developed to quantitatively illustrate the combined effects of the normal B diffusion in the TiB phase and the anomalous B diffusion in Ti phase in accelerating TiB layer growth. Furthermore, isothermal boriding experiments close to transition temperature (900°C) for a period of 71 hours resulted in coating thickness well above 100 mum, while at 1050°C, the layer growth saturated after about 24 hours of treatment time. In the second part of this work, a novel approach named "cyclic-phase-changediffusion, (CPCD)," to create deeper TiB2 and TiB coating layers on CP-Ti by cyclic thermal processing, has been investigated. It was found that thermal cyclic B diffusion in Ti across the alpha(alpha)-beta(beta) phase transition temperature led to highly hardened surface layers enriched with TiB whiskers that grow to depths exceeding 120 mum. By solving the transient heat transport problem for cyclic changes in surface temperatures, it was found that there is a "heat-packet" that travels back and forth from the surface to the interior of the material. This heat-packet appears to transport B dissolved in beta-Ti into interior causing increased coating depths.

  17. Nucleation, growth and dissolution of extended defects in implanted Si: impact on dopant diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, A.; Giles, L. F.; Omri, M.; de Mauduit, B.; Ben Assayag, G.; Mathiot, D.

    1999-01-01

    Transient Enhanced Diffusion (TED) of boron in silicon is driven by the large supersaturations of self-interstitial silicon atoms left after implantation which also often lead to the nucleation and subsequent growth, upon annealing, of extended defects. In this paper we review selected experimental results and concepts concerning boron diffusion and/or defect behavior which have recently emerged with the ion implantation community and briefly indicate how they are, or will be, currently used to improve "predictive simulations" softwares aimed at predicting TED. In a first part, we focuss our attention on TED and on the formation of defects in the case of "direct" implantation of boron in silicon. In a second part, we review our current knowledge of the defects and of the diffusion behavior of boron when annealing preamorphised Si. In a last part, we try to compare these two cases and to find out what are the reasons for some similarities and many differences in defect types and thermal evolution depending on whether boron is implanted in crystalline or amorphous silicon. While rising many more questions, we propose a "thermodynamical" vision of the nucleation and growth of clusters and extended defects and stress the interactions between these defects and the free Si self-interstitial atoms which surround them and are the source for TED in all cases. A pragmatic approach to the simulation of TED for various experimental conditions is proposed.

  18. Modeling Lymphoma Growth in an Evolving Lymph Node Using a Diffuse Domain Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Cristini, Vittorio; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Lowengrub, John

    2012-11-01

    Tumor growth often poses as a multiphase free-boundary problem as tumor cells aggregate into distinct subdomains due to differentiated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In ``Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth - I Model and numerical method'' [Wise et al., J. Theor. Biol. 253, pp. 524-543 (2008)], we have developed a multiphase Cahn-Hilliard model to study morphological patterns of tumor growth in a homogeneous open environment, and the results resembled in-vitro experiments. In living tissues, however, tumors are often confined in a closed environment of an organ, where the tissue geometry can also evolve in response to the pressure of tumor growth. Here we adapt our previous Cahn-Hilliard tumor growth model to an evolving geometry using a recently developed diffuse domain approach. We use the model to study the growth of lymphoma in a lymph node that swells during the process. An angiogenesis model for tumor-induced vasculature is also adapted to investigate substrate distribution and drug delivery within the lymph node. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  19. Layer-growth kinetics on gaseous nitriding of pure iron: Evaluation of diffusion coefficients for nitrogen in iron nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1995-01-01

    Models were derived for monolayer and bilayer growth into a substrate in which diffusion of the solute governs the growth kinetics, as in gas-solid reactions, for example. In the models, the composition dependence of the solute diffusivity in the phases constituting the layers was accounted for by appropriate definition of an effective diffusion coefficient for a (sub)layer. This effective diffusion coefficient is the intrinsic diffusion coefficient weighted over the composition range of the (sub)layer. The models were applied for analyzing the growth kinetics of a γ'-Fe4N1-x monolayer on an α-Fe substrate and the growth kinetics of an ɛ-Fe2N1-z/γ'-Fe4N1-x bilayer on an α-Fe substrate, as observed by gaseous nitriding in an NH3/H2-gas mixture at 843 K. The kinetics of layer development and the evolution of the microstructure were investigated by means of thermogravimetry, layer-thickness measurements, light microscopy, and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The effective and self-diffusion coefficients were determined for each of the nitride layers. The composition dependence of the intrinsic (and effective) diffusion coefficients was established. Re-evaluating literature data for diffusion in γ'-Fe4N1-x on the basis of the present model, it followed that the previous and present data are consistent. The activation energy for diffusion of nitrogen in γ'-Fe4N1-x was determined from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. The self-diffusion coefficient for nitrogen in ɛ-Fe2N1-z was significantly larger than that for γ'-Fe4N1-x. This was explained qualitatively, considering the possible mechanisms for interstitial diffusion of nitrogen atoms in the close-packed iron lattices of the ɛ and γ' iron nitrides.

  20. Substrate and metabolite diffusion within model medium for soft cheese in relation to growth of Penicillium camembertii.

    PubMed

    Aldarf, Mazen; Fourcade, Florence; Amrane, Abdeltif; Prigent, Yves

    2006-08-01

    Penicillium camembertii was cultivated on a jellified peptone-lactate based medium to simulate the composition of Camembert cheese. Diffusional limitations due to substrate consumption were not involved in the linear growth recorded during culture, while nitrogen (peptone) limitation accounted for growth cessation. Examination of gradients confirmed that medium neutralization was the consequence of lactate consumption and ammonium production. The diffusion of the lactate assimilated from the core to the rind and that of the ammonium produced from the rind to the core was described by means of a diffusion/reaction model involving a partial linking of consumption or production to growth. The model matched experimental data throughout growth. PMID:16491357

  1. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  2. Fractal growth in uv-irradiated DNA: Evidence of nonuniversal diffusion limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Amita; Shukla, M. K.; Mishra, P. C.; Chandra, S.

    1995-04-01

    Branched structures and fractals occur widely in nature (trees, corals, sand dunes, etc.) showing its preference for nonintegral dimensionality characteristic of nonequilibrium growth phenomena [B. B. Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (Freeman, New York, 1982)]. Neural networks, blood platelets, some cancerous growth patterns, etc. are also known examples of fractals in physiological systems. Many theoretical models have been invoked to explain different fractal and ramified structures [T. Vicsek, Fractal Growth Phenomena (World Scientific, Singapore, 1989)]. The diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) of particles in a random walk that was computer simulated by Witten and Sander [T. A. Witten and L. M. Sander, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 1400 (1981)] is a more universal mechanism. Recently, a nonuniversal DLA has been theoretically proposed [P. Ossadnik, C. Lam, and L. M. Sander, Phys. Rev. E 49, 1788 (1994)] where particles in a random walk are not of the same size. This paper reports the significant observation that uv-photolyzed DNA in an alkaline solution aggregates, on drying, in a fractal-like structure. Furthermore, this observation provides experimental confirmation of nonuniversal diffusion limited aggregation [P. Ossadnik, C. Lam, and L. M. Sander, Phys. Rev. E 49, 1788 (1994)].

  3. Modeling tumor growth in a complex evolving confinement using a diffuse domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Lowengrub, John; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Cristini, Vittorio

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of tumor growth represents an essential step towards engineering effective treatment for cancer patients. At the macroscopic scale, various biophysical models describing tumors as continuum fluids have been constructed, particularly on a Cartesian grid, where efficient numerical schemes are available to analyze the model for general tumor behaviors in a relatively unconfined space. For practical problems, however, tumors are often found in a confined sub-domain, which can even be dilated and distorted by the growing tumor within. To study such tumors, we adopt a novel diffuse domain approach that enables us to adapt a model to an evolving sub-domain and formulate the modified problem on a Cartesian grid to utilize existing numerical schemes. To demonstrate this approach, we adapt a diffuse-interface model presented in Wise et al. [2008, Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth - I Model and numerical method, J. Theor. Biol. 253, 524-543] to simulate lymphoma growth in a lymph node structure. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  4. Modeling the Growth of Hyperthermophiles in Deep-sea Hydrothermal Diffuse Fluids and Sulfide Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ver Eecke, H. C.; Oslowski, D. M.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.; Lilley, M. D.; Holden, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008 and 2009, 534 hydrothermal fluid samples and 5 actively-venting black smoker chimneys were collected using Alvin for correlative microbiological and chemical analyses as part of the Endeavour Segment and Axial Volcano Geochemistry and Ecology Research (EAGER) program. Hyperthermophilic, autotrophic Fe(III) oxide reducers, methanogens, and sulfur-reducing heterotrophs were enriched for at 85 and 95C using most-probable-number estimates from 28 diffuse fluid and 8 chimney samples. Heterotrophs were the most abundant of the three groups in both diffuse fluids and black-smoker chimneys. Iron reducers were more abundant than methanogens, and more abundant in sulfide-hosted vents than in basalt-hosted vents. Fluid chemistry suggests that there is net biogenic methanogenesis at the Marker 113/62 diffuse vent at Axial Volcano but nowhere else sampled. The growth of hyperthermophilic methanogens and heterotrophs was modeled in the lab using pure cultures. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii grew at 82C in a 2-liter reactor with continuous gas flow at H2 concentrations between 20 and 225 M with a H2 km of 100 M. Correlating H2 end-member mixing curves from vent fluids and seawater with our laboratory modeling study suggests that H2 concentrations are limiting for Methanocaldococcus growth at most Mothra, Main Field, and High Rise vent sites at Endeavour but sufficient to support growth at some Axial Volcano vents. Therefore, hyperthermophilic methanogens may depend on H2 syntrophy at low H2 sites. Twenty-one pure hyperthermophilic heterotroph strains each grew on ?-1,4 and ?-1,4 linked sugars and polypeptides with concomitant H2 production. The H2 production rate (cell-1 doubling-1) for Pyrococcus furiosus at 95C without sulfur was 29 fmol, 36 fmol, and 53 fmol for growth on ?-1,4 sugars, ?-1,4 sugars, and peptides, respectively. The CH4 production rate for M. jannaschii was 390 fmol cell-1 doubling-1; therefore, we estimate that it would take approximately 40 heterotroph cells to provide all of the H2 necessary to support the growth of a single methanogen. In contrast to methanogens, autotrophic Fe(III) oxide reducers consume far less H2 during growth and reach cell concentrations similar to methanogens in pure culture. Thermodynamic predictions suggest that they would grow at H2 concentrations lower than those needed by methanogens.

  5. Microbial Growth and Coexistence on Diffusion-limited Unsaturated Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Or, D.

    2009-04-01

    Microbial activity in unsaturated soils plays an important role in biochemical nutrient cycling, bioremediation, and dispersal of pathogenic microorganisms. Quantitative description of microbial activity in unsaturated soils is hindered by complexity of pore space and hydration dynamics. Microbes in unsaturated soils live in an environment dominated by presence of numerous solid- and gas-liquid interfaces, where nutrient distribution and flux pathways are dynamically shaped by liquid configuration. We propose a model for considering effects of nutrient diffusive fluxes under various hydrations and pore space conditions on microbial growth and coexistence of two competing bacterial species. Simulation results show that hydration limitation to nutrient diffusive fluxes enhance microbial coexistence and are in good agreement with available experimental results. Effective nutrient diffusion coefficients on rough surfaces is significantly affected by liquid configuration and by connectivity (expressed as percolation probability) of the surface roughness network. The aqueous network is dynamically controlled by matric potential where effective diffusion coefficient varied from 0.46 mm2/hr to 0 and percolation probability varied from 0.76 to 0.21 when matric potential varies from -0.01 to -5 kPa, respectively. For matric potential values of -2.0 kPa and lower, two competing microbial species coexisted indefinitely supported by limited nutrient flux and within fragmented liquid clusters with percolation probability 0.37. Coexistence was limited to 90 hrs at -1.2 kPa with increasing percolation probability to 0.52 (effective diffusion coefficient of 0.19 mm2/hr). No coexistence was observed at matric potential of -0.01 kPa, the stronger species rapidly expanded and dominated the entire domain. Pore scale and roughness microhydrology may play an important role in the large microbial diversity found in soil.

  6. Step barrier for interlayer diffusion in Fe/Fe(100) epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Jacques G.; Family, Fereydoon

    1995-11-01

    The interlayer diffusoin barrier for Fe/Fe(100) deposition is estimated by comparing the results of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations with experimental results in the first few monolayers of growth. We find that, in contrast to previous theoretical estimates for other systems, the step barrier for Fe/Fe(100) is small in comparison with the activation energy for diffusion on a flat terrace (0.454 eV). Our results resolve a long-standing controversy and provide quantiative support for the conjecture that the existence of mounds in this system is due to a finite positive step barrier.

  7. Microvessel density and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gratzinger, Dita; Zhao, Shuchun; Marinelli, Robert J; Kapp, Amy V; Tibshirani, Robert J; Hammer, Anne S; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Natkunam, Yasodha

    2007-04-01

    Angiogenesis is known to play a major role in neoplasia, including hematolymphoid neoplasia. We assessed the relationships among angiogenesis and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors in the context of clinically and biologically relevant subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue microarrays. We found that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma specimens showing higher local vascular endothelial growth factor expression showed correspondingly higher microvessel density, implying that lymphoma cells induce local tumor angiogenesis. In addition, local vascular endothelial growth factor expression was higher in those specimens showing higher expression of the receptors of the growth factor, suggesting an autocrine growth-promoting feedback loop. The germinal center-like and nongerminal center-like subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were biologically and prognostically distinct. Interestingly, only in the more clinically aggressive nongerminal center-like subtype were microvessel densities significantly higher in specimens showing higher vascular endothelial growth factor expression; the same was true for the finding of higher vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 expression in conjunction with higher vascular endothelial growth factor expression. These differences may have important implications for the responsiveness of the two diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtypes to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:17392174

  8. Microvessel Density and Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Its Receptors in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gratzinger, Dita; Zhao, Shuchun; Marinelli, Robert J.; Kapp, Amy V.; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Hammer, Anne S.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Natkunam, Yasodha

    2007-01-01

    Angiogenesis is known to play a major role in neoplasia, including hematolymphoid neoplasia. We assessed the relationships among angiogenesis and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors in the context of clinically and biologically relevant subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue microarrays. We found that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma specimens showing higher local vascular endothelial growth factor expression showed correspondingly higher microvessel density, implying that lymphoma cells induce local tumor angiogenesis. In addition, local vascular endothelial growth factor expression was higher in those specimens showing higher expression of the receptors of the growth factor, suggesting an autocrine growth-promoting feedback loop. The germinal center-like and nongerminal center-like subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were biologically and prognostically distinct. Interestingly, only in the more clinically aggressive nongerminal center-like subtype were microvessel densities significantly higher in specimens showing higher vascular endothelial growth factor expression; the same was true for the finding of higher vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 expression in conjunction with higher vascular endothelial growth factor expression. These differences may have important implications for the responsiveness of the two diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtypes to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:17392174

  9. Dual-wavelength vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser: strict growth control and scalable design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasik, Agata; Sokół, Adam Kamil; Broda, Artur; Sankowska, Iwona; Wójcik-Jedlińska, Anna; Wasiak, Michał; Kubacka-Traczyk, Justyna; Muszalski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the design and fabrication of a dual-wavelength vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Grown by molecular beam epitaxy, the laser structures have a relatively simple active region divided into two sections, between which there is no optical filter. Comparable threshold power was achieved for both wavelengths. The growth rate was controlled precisely by growing AlAs/GaAs superlattices with different period thicknesses and testing them with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry. The simultaneous emission of two wavelengths was detected in setup without a heat spreader, one of 991 nm and the other of 1038 nm. After diamond heat spreader was bonded, both wavelengths lased in continuous-wave mode with the combined output power of 1.79 W. The design scalability allowed us to obtain two further structures with layers thinned by about 3 % in the first and by about 6 % in the second, operating at 958/1011 and 928/977 nm, respectively.

  10. Coupler induced transverse kick and emittance growth in single cell elliptical cavities of 10 MeV superconducting electron linac injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechoudhury, Siddhartha; Pandey, Hemendra Kumar; Pratim Dutta, Dipta; Naik, Vaishali; Chakrabarti, Alok; Chao, Yu-Chiu; Laxdal, Robert E.

    2015-03-01

    A Capture Cryo Module (CCM) consisting of two single cell 1.3 GHz, β = 1, niobium cavities is being developed for the superconducting electron linac injector at VECC. Electron beam of 100 keV and 2 mA from a thermionic gun will be accelerated in the CCM and thereafter in an Injector Cryo Module (ICM) to 10 MeV. Single cell cavities in the CCM are independently phased and a coaxial TTF-III coupler is chosen for rf power coupling into each cavity. The presence of the coupler perturbs the field symmetry of the cavity introducing local transverse kicks to the incoming electron beam in the coupler region. Numerical analysis taking into account the changing velocity profile as well as the off-axis field seen by the electron as it moves through the cavities has been carried out for estimating the kick. The variation of the kick with longitudinal position of electrons in the beam bunch introduces transverse emittance growth. This has been calculated using the field seen by the electron. The analytical calculations are compared with results from particle tracking with simulated 3D fields. It is found that coupler induced kick does not appreciably change the emittance values at 10 MeV.

  11. A phase-field/Monte-Carlo model describing organic crystal growth from solution. Investigation of the diffusion-influenced growth of hydroquinone crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, J.; Yürüdü, C.; Ulrich, J.; Emmerich, H.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper work we present a phase-field/Monte-Carlo hybrid algorithm for the simulation of solutal growth of organic crystals. The algorithm is subsequently used for an investigation of diffusion effects on the growth mechanisms. This method combines a two-scale phase-field model of the liquid phase epitaxial growth and a Monte-Carlo algorithm of the 2D nucleation and thus is faster than previous purely Monte Carlo simulations of crystal growth. The inclusion of supersaturation and diffusion in the method allows the study of crystal growth under various growth conditions. Parameters used in the hybrid algorithm are bound to the energetic parameters of crystal faces, which can be estimated from a detailed study of the actual crystal structure based on a connected nets analysis, which allows the prediction of the shape and morphology of real crystals. The study of the diffusion effect is carried out based on an example of a hydroquinone crystal, which grows from the water solution at various supersaturations. The dependencies of the growth rate and the nucleation rate on the supersaturation indicate the change of the growth mechanism from spiral growth to 2D nucleation. The difference in the growth rate for various faces is in agreement with the crystal morphologies derived from the attachment energy method and observed experimentally. The main result of the simulation is the evaluation of engineering limits for choosing appropriate external process conditions.

  12. Concentration Dependence of Solution Shear Viscosity and Solute Mass Diffusivity in Crystal Growth from Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izmailov, Alexander F.; Myerson, Allan S.

    1995-01-01

    The physical properties of a supersaturated binary solution such as its density rho, shear viscosity eta, and solute mass diffusivity D are dependent on the solute concentration c: rho = rho(c), eta = eta(c), and D = D(c). The diffusion boundary layer equations related to crystal growth from solution are derived for the case of natural convection with a solution density, a shear viscosity, and a solute diffusivity that are all depen- dent on solute concentration. The solution of these equations has demonstrated the following. (1) At the vicinity of the saturation concentration c(sub s) the solution shear viscosity eta depends on rho as eta(sub s) = eta(rho(sub s))varies as square root of rho(c(sub s)). This theoretically derived result has been verified in experiments with several aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic salts. (2) The maximum solute mass transfer towards the growing crystal surface can be achieved for values of c where the ratio of d ln(D(c)/dc) to d ln(eta(c)/dc) is a maximum.

  13. On the origin of size-dependent and size-independent crystal growth: Influence of advection and diffusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments were conducted using potassium alum and calcite crystals in aqueous solution under both non-stirred and stirred conditions to elucidate the mechanism for size-dependent (proportionate) and size-independent (constant) crystal growth. Growth by these two laws can be distinguished from each other because the relative size difference among crystals is maintained during proportionate growth, leading to a constant crystal size variance (??2) for a crystal size distribution (CSD) as the mean size increases. The absolute size difference among crystals is maintained during constant growth, resulting in a decrease in size variance. Results of these experiments show that for centimeter-sized alum crystals, proportionate growth occurs in stirred systems, whereas constant growth occurs in non-stirred systems. Accordingly, the mechanism for proportionate growth is hypothesized to be related to the supply of reactants to the crystal surface by advection, whereas constant growth is related to supply by diffusion. Paradoxically, micrometer-sized calcite crystals showed proportionate growth both in stirred and in non-stirred systems. Such growth presumably results from the effects of convection and Brownian motion, which promote an advective environment and hence proportionate growth for minute crystals in non-stirred systems, thereby indicating the importance of solution velocity relative to crystal size. Calcite crystals grown in gels, where fluid motion was minimized, showed evidence for constant, diffusion-controlled growth. Additional investigations of CSDs of naturally occurring crystals indicate that proportionate growth is by far the most common growth law, thereby suggesting that advection, rather than diffusion, is the dominant process for supplying reactants to crystal surfaces.

  14. Tumor growth in complex, evolving microenvironmental geometries: A diffuse domain approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lowengrub, John S.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of tumor growth in complex, dynamic microenvironments with active, deformable membranes. Using a diffuse domain approach, the complex domain is captured implicitly using an auxiliary function and the governing equations are appropriately modified, extended and solved in a larger, regular domain. The diffuse domain method enables us to develop an efficient numerical implementation that does not depend on the space dimension or the microenvironmental geometry. We model homotypic cell-cell adhesion and heterotypic cell-basement membrane (BM) adhesion with the latter being implemented via a membrane energy that models cell-BM interactions. We incorporate simple models of elastic forces and the degradation of the BM and ECM by tumor-secreted matrix degrading enzymes. We investigate tumor progression and BM response as a function of cell-BM adhesion and the stiffness of the BM. We find tumor sizes tend to be positively correlated with cell-BM adhesion since increasing cell-BM adhesion results in thinner, more elongated tumors. Prior to invasion of the tumor into the stroma, we find a negative correlation between tumor size and BM stiffness as the elastic restoring forces tend to inhibit tumor growth. In order to model tumor invasion of the stroma, we find it necessary to downregulate cell-BM adhesiveness, which is consistent with experimental observations. A stiff BM promotes invasiveness because at early stages the opening in the BM created by MDE degradation from tumor cells tends to be narrower when the BM is stiffer. This requires invading cells to squeeze through the narrow opening and thus promotes fragmentation that then leads to enhanced growth and invasion. In three dimensions, the opening in the BM was found to increase in size even when the BM is stiff because of pressure induced by growing tumor clusters. A larger opening in the BM can increase the potential for further invasiveness by increasing the possibility that additional tumor cells could invade the stroma. PMID:25014472

  15. Quantifying the effect of turbulent magnetic diffusion on the growth rate of the magneto-rotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visl, M. S.; Brandenburg, A.; Mitra, D.; Kpyl, P. J.; Mantere, M. J.

    2014-07-01

    Context. In astrophysics, turbulent diffusion is often used in place of microphysical diffusion to avoid resolving the small scales. However, we expect this approach to break down when time and length scales of the turbulence become comparable with other relevant time and length scales in the system. Turbulent diffusion has previously been applied to the magneto-rotational instability (MRI), but no quantitative comparison of growth rates at different turbulent intensities has been performed. Aims: We investigate to what extent turbulent diffusion can be used to model the effects of small-scale turbulence on the kinematic growth rates of the MRI, and how this depends on angular velocity and magnetic field strength. Methods: We use direct numerical simulations in three-dimensional shearing boxes with periodic boundary conditions in the spanwise direction and additional random plane-wave volume forcing to drive a turbulent flow at a given length scale. We estimate the turbulent diffusivity using a mixing length formula and compare with results obtained with the test-field method. Results: It turns out that the concept of turbulent diffusion is remarkably accurate in describing the effect of turbulence on the growth rate of the MRI. No noticeable breakdown of turbulent diffusion has been found, even when time and length scales of the turbulence become comparable with those imposed by the MRI itself. On the other hand, quenching of turbulent magnetic diffusivity by the magnetic field is found to be absent. Conclusions: Turbulence reduces the growth rate of the MRI in the same way as microphysical magnetic diffusion does. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Diffusion-controlled growth of bimineralic merwinite - diopside reaction rims between wollastonite - monticellite interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, B.; Gardes, E.; Heinrich, W.; Abart, R.

    2009-04-01

    At temperatures of 800 °C to 900 °C and 1.2 GPa, monticellite and wollastonite react to form merwinite and diopside after the reaction: 2 monticellite (CaMgSiO4) + 2 wollastonite (CaSiO3) → merwinite (Ca3MgSi2O8) + diopside (CaMgSi2O6) We synthesized bimineralic merwinite - diopside reaction rims along the interfaces of cylindric crystals of monticellite and wollastonite. The samples were loaded in a platinum capsule and annealed at 800 °C to 900 °C and 1.2 GPa in a piston cylinder apparatus for 5 to 65 hours. Natural CaF2 was used as pressure medium and the charges were nominally dry. In all experiments, a single layer consisting of bimineralic aggregates of merwinite and diopside was produced in about equal molar amounts. Time series revealed that rim growth is parabolic, indicating that the reaction kinetics is controlled by component diffusion. SEM analysis of the microstructure showed that the original monticellite-wollastonite interface is located in the centre of the reaction rim. This implies that rim growth primarily occurred by transfer of the mobile component MgO from the rim-monticellite interface to the rim-wollastonite interface. The bulk reaction is thus divided into two half reactions occurring at the two reaction fronts. At the rim-monticellite interface the reaction is: 2 monticellite → 0.5 merwinite + 0.5 diopside + MgO, and at the rim-wollastonite interface, it is: 2 wollastonite + MgO → 0.5 merwinite + 0.5 diopside Using the model of Abart et al. (2009), the effective diffusion coefficients DMgO at 800 °C are estimated at 1.55×10-16± 2.18×10-17 m2/s, and at 900 °C at 2.46×10-16± 3.45×10-17 m2/s. This yields an activation energy of Ea= 45.6 ± 16.4 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor log D0 = -13.59 ± 1.26 for the Arrhenius relations to describe the temperature-dependent effective diffusivity of the MgO component in the bimineralic aggregate. IR-spectra revealed distinctive OH-contents in the nominally dry phases monticellite and wollastonite after the experiments, which had not been present in the reactants. Obviously, some hydrogen released by the natural, water-containing CaF2 pressure medium diffused into the capsule, thus producing traces of water inside. The presence of minute amounts of water may strongly enhance the kinetics of the reaction. In fact, if completely waterfree Al2O3-powder is used as pressure medium, no significant reaction occurred, and accordingly, reactants remain OH-free. An Al2O3-layer of 3 mm thickness between the capsule and the CaF2 surrounding delays the onset of rim growth for about one hour. However, once initiated, the reaction progress is the same in instantaneous and delayed reactions. References: Abart R., Petrishcheva E., Fischer F.D., Svoboda J. (2009), Thermodynamic model for diffusion controlled reaction rim growth in a binary system: application to the forsterite-enstatite-quartz system, American Journal of Science, Vol. 309, pp. 114-131

  17. Linking biofilm growth to fouling and aeration performance of fine-pore diffuser in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Baserba, Manel; Asvapathanagul, Pitiporn; McCarthy, Graham W; Gocke, Thomas E; Olson, Betty H; Park, Hee-Deung; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B; Wett, Bernhard; Smeraldi, Joshua D; Shaw, Andrew R; Rosso, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Aeration is commonly identified as the largest contributor to process energy needs in the treatment of wastewater and therefore garners significant focus in reducing energy use. Fine-pore diffusers are the most common aeration system in municipal wastewater treatment. These diffusers are subject to fouling and scaling, resulting in loss in transfer efficiency as biofilms form and change material properties producing larger bubbles, hindering mass transfer and contributing to increased plant energy costs. This research establishes a direct correlation and apparent mechanistic link between biofilm DNA concentration and reduced aeration efficiency caused by biofilm fouling. Although the connection between biofilm growth and fouling has been implicit in discussions of diffuser fouling for many years, this research provides measured quantitative connection between the extent of biofouling and reduced diffuser efficiency. This was clearly established by studying systematically the deterioration of aeration diffusers efficiency during a 1.5 year period, concurrently with the microbiological study of the biofilm fouling in order to understand the major factors contributing to diffuser fouling. The six different diffuser technologies analyzed in this paper included four different materials which were ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), polyurethane, silicone and ceramic. While all diffusers foul eventually, some novel materials exhibited fouling resistance. The material type played a major role in determining the biofilm characteristics (i.e., growth rate, composition, and microbial density) which directly affected the rate and intensity at what the diffusers were fouled, whereas diffuser geometry exerted little influence. Overall, a high correlation between the increase in biofilm DNA and the decrease in αF was evident (CV < 14.0 ± 2.0%). By linking bacterial growth with aeration efficiency, the research was able to show quantitatively the causal connection between bacterial fouling and energy wastage during aeration. PMID:26760484

  18. Numerical approximation of oscillating Turing patterns in a reaction-diffusion model for electrochemical material growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgura, Ivonne; Bozzini, Benedetto; Lacitignola, Deborah

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a reaction-diffusion system for electrochemical material growth processes is considered, including an external sinusoidal forcing term for the PDE equation describing the morphology of the electrodeposit surface profile. The numerical approximation by the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method based on Extended Central Difference Formulas (ECDF) of order p = 4 in space is applied to investigate the way the variation of the frequency of the superimposed voltage sinusoid affects Turing pattern scenarios corresponding to steady state solutions of the unforced model. The ADI-ECDF method, introduced in [20] for the approximation of Turing patterns in the unforced case, is shown to be efficient from the computational point of view also to track oscillating Turing patterns for long-time simulations. In particular, the proposed method allows to identify a critical frequency range where the ripple effect arises, that is spots & worms patterns, related to the buildup of roughness in the material growth process, are suppressed and spatially homogeneous steady state solutions are attained. Such results have been validated by comparison with original experimental results on the growth of silver chloride films.

  19. Imaging growth and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation are independent predictors for diffuse low-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Gozé, Catherine; Blonski, Marie; Le Maistre, Guillaume; Bauchet, Luc; Dezamis, Edouard; Page, Philippe; Varlet, Pascale; Capelle, Laurent; Devaux, Bertrand; Taillandier, Luc; Duffau, Hugues; Pallud, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background We explored whether spontaneous imaging tumor growth (estimated by the velocity of diametric expansion) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation (estimated by IDH1 immunoexpression) were independent predictors of long-term outcomes of diffuse low-grade gliomas in adults. Methods One hundred thirty-one adult patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial diffuse low-grade gliomas were retrospectively studied. Results Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations were present in 107 patients. The mean spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion was 5.40 ± 5.46 mm/y. During follow-up (mean, 70 ± 54.7 mo), 56 patients presented a malignant transformation and 23 died. The median malignant progression-free survival and the overall survival were significantly longer in cases of slow velocity of diametric expansion (149 and 198 mo, respectively) than in cases of fast velocity of diametric expansion (46 and 82 mo; P < .001 and P < .001, respectively) and in cases with IDH1 mutation (100 and 198 mo, respectively) than in cases without IDH1 mutation (72 mo and not reached; P = .028 and P = .001, respectively). In multivariate analyses, spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion and IDH1 mutation were independent prognostic factors for malignant progression-free survival (P < .001; hazard ratio, 4.23; 95% CI, 1.81–9.40 and P = .019; hazard ratio, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.19–4.66, respectively) and for overall survival (P < .001; hazard ratio, 26.3; 95% CI, 5.42–185.2 and P = .007; hazard ratio, 17.89; 95% CI, 2.15–200.1, respectively). Conclusions The spontaneous velocity of diametric expansion and IDH1 mutation status are 2 independent prognostic values that should be obtained at the beginning of the management of diffuse low-grade gliomas in adults. PMID:24847087

  20. The effects of plasma diffusion and viscosity on turbulent instability growth

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, Brian M. Vold, Erik L.; Molvig, Kim; Aldrich, Charles; Rauenzahn, Rick

    2014-09-15

    We perform two-dimensional simulations of strongly–driven compressible Rayleigh–Taylor and Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities with and without plasma transport phenomena, modeling plasma species diffusion, and plasma viscosity in order to determine their effects on the growth of the hydrodynamic instabilities. Simulations are performed in hydrodynamically similar boxes of varying sizes, ranging from 1 μm to 1 cm in order to determine the scale at which plasma effects become important. Our results suggest that these plasma effects become noticeable when the box size is approximately 100 μm, they become significant in the 10 μm box, and dominate when the box size is 1 μm. Results suggest that plasma transport may be important at scales and conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion, and that a plasma fluid model is capable of representing some of the kinetic transport effects.

  1. Diffusion of lactate and ammonium in relation to growth of Geotrichum candidum at the surface of solid media.

    PubMed

    Aldarf, M; Fourcade, F; Amrane, A; Prigent, Y

    2004-07-01

    Geotrichum candidum was cultivated at the surface of solid model media containing peptone to simulate the composition of Camembert cheese. The surface growth of G. candidum induced the diffusion of substrates from the core to the rind and the diffusion of produced metabolites from the rind to the core. In the range of pH measured during G. candidum growth, constant diffusion coefficients were found for lactate and ammonium, 0.4 and 0.8 cm(2) day(-1), respectively, determined in sterile culture medium. Growth kinetics are described using the Verlhust model and both lactate consumption and ammonium production are considered as partially linked to growth. The experimental diffusion gradients of lactate and ammonium recorded during G. candidum growth have been fitted. The diffusion/reaction model was found to match with experimental data until the end of growth, except with regard to ammonium concentration gradients in the presence of lactate in the medium. Indeed, G. candidum preferentially assimilated peptone over lactate as a carbon source, resulting in an almost cessation of ammonium release before the end of growth. On peptone, it was found that the proton transfer did not account for the ammonium concentration gradients. Indeed, amino acids, being positively charged, are involved in the proton transfer at the beginning of growth. This effect can be neglected in the presence of lactate within the medium, and the sum of both lactate consumption and ammonium release gradients corresponded well to the proton transfer gradients, confirming that both components are responsible for the pH increase observed during the ripening of soft Camembert cheese. PMID:15211490

  2. Diffusion model of the formation of growth microdefects: A new approach to defect formation in crystals (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanin, V. I.; Talanin, I. E.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical studies of defect formation in semiconductor silicon play an important role in the creation of breakthrough ideas for next-generation technologies. A brief comparative analysis of modern theoretical approaches to the description of interaction of point defects and formation of the initial defect structure of dislocation-free silicon single crystals has been carried out. Foundations of the diffusion model of the formation of structural imperfections during the silicon growth have been presented. It has been shown that the diffusion model is based on high-temperature precipitation of impurities. The model of high-temperature precipitation of impurities describes processes of nucleation, growth, and coalescence of impurities during cooling of a crystal from 1683 to 300 K. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion model of defect formation provides a unified approach to the formation of a defect structure beginning with the crystal growth to the production of devices. The possibilities of using the diffusion model of defect formation for other semiconductor crystals and metals have been discussed. It has been shown that the diffusion model of defect formation is a platform for multifunctional solution of many key problems in modern solid state physics. Fundamentals of practical application of the diffusion model for engineering of defects in crystals with modern information technologies have been considered. An algorithm has been proposed for the calculation and analysis of a defect structure of crystals.

  3. Cardiac looping may be driven by compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity. Observations on a physical simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Meriç; Männer, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of the straight embryonic heart tube into a helically wound loop is named cardiac looping. Such looping is regarded as an essential process in cardiac morphogenesis since it brings the building blocks of the developing heart into an approximation of their definitive topographical relationships. During the past two decades, a large number of genes have been identified which play important roles in cardiac looping. However, how genetic information is physically translated into the dynamic form changes of the looping heart is still poorly understood. The oldest hypothesis of cardiac looping mechanics attributes the form changes of the heart loop (ventral bending → simple helical coiling → complex helical coiling) to compressive loads resulting from growth differences between the heart and the pericardial cavity. In the present study, we have tested the physical plausibility of this hypothesis, which we call the growth-induced buckling hypothesis, for the first time. Using a physical simulation model, we show that growth-induced buckling of a straight elastic rod within the confined space of a hemispherical cavity can generate the same sequence of form changes as observed in the looping embryonic heart. Our simulation experiments have furthermore shown that, under bilaterally symmetric conditions, growth-induced buckling generates left- and right-handed helices (D-/L-loops) in a 1:1 ratio, while even subtle left- or rightward displacements of the caudal end of the elastic rod at the pre-buckling state are sufficient to direct the buckling process toward the generation of only D- or L-loops, respectively. Our data are discussed with respect to observations made in biological “models.” We conclude that compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity play important roles in cardiac looping. Asymmetric positioning of the venous heart pole may direct these forces toward a biased generation of D- or L-loops. PMID:24772086

  4. Influence of mass diffusion on the stability of thermophoretic growth of a solid from the vapor phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, J. L.; Garcia-Ybarra, P. L.; Rosner, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The stability of solid planar growth from a binary vapor phase with a condensing species dilute in a carrier gas is examined when the ratio of depositing to carrier species molecular mass is large and the main diffusive transport mechanism is thermal diffusion. It is shown that a deformation of the solid-gas interface induces a deformation of the gas phase isotherms that increases the thermal gradients and thereby the local mass deposition rate at the crests and reduces them at the valleys. The initial surface deformation is enhanced by the modified deposition rates in the absence of appreciable Fick/Brownian diffusion and interfacial energy effects.

  5. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error <8.8%, Dice >0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  6. Diffusion-driven precipitate growth and ripening of oxygen precipitates in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Will, J. Gröschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A.; Spiecker, E.

    2014-03-28

    X-ray Pendellösung fringes from three silicon single crystals measured at 900 °C are analyzed with respect to density and size of oxygen precipitates within a diffusion-driven growth model and compared with TEM investigations. It appears that boron doped (p+) material shows a higher precipitate density and a higher strain than moderately (p-) boron crystals. In-situ diffraction reveals a diffusion-driven precipitate growth followed by a second growth regime in both materials. An interpretation of the second growth regime in terms of Ostwald ripening yields surface energy values (around 70 erg/cm{sup 2}) similar to published data. Further, an increased nucleation rate by a factor of ∼13 is found in the p+ sample as compared to a p- sample at a nucleation temperature of 450 °C.

  7. Analysis of the influence of coupled diffusion on transport in protein crystal growth for different gravity levels.

    PubMed

    Castagnolo, D; Vergara, A; Paduano, L; Sartorio, R; Annunziata, O

    2002-10-01

    Diffusion has a central role in protein crystal growth both in microgravity conditions and on ground. Recently several reports have been focused on the importance to use the generalized Fick's equations in n-component systems where crystals grow. In these equations the total flux of each component is produced by the own concentration gradient (main flow) and by the concentration gradient of the other components (cross-flow) present in the system. However in literature the latter effect is often neglected, and the so-called pseudo-binary approximation is used. Lin et al. (1995) proposed a mathematical model to evaluate the concentration profile of the species present around a growing protein crystal. Although the model is reliable, it suffers of the pseudo-binary approximation (neglecting cross term diffusion coefficients and using binary diffusion coefficients), probably because of the lack of multicomponent diffusion data. The present model is based on the experimental set-up proposed by Lin et al. (1995). Nevertheless we have included the coupled diffusion effects, according to the correct description of the matter transport through the generalized Fick's equations. The crystal growth rate is calculated for different gravity levels. The model has been applied to the ternary lysozyme-NaCl-water and quaternary lysozyme-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-NaCl-water systems using recent diffusion data. PMID:12351876

  8. Diffusion-controlled garnet growth in siliceous dolomites of the Adamello contact aureole, N-Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T.; Fiebich, E.; Foster, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    Texture forming processes are controlled by many factors, such as material transport through polycrystalline materials, surface kinetics, fluid flow, and many others. In metamorphic rocks, texture forming processes typically involve local reactions linked to net mass transfer which allows constraining the actual reaction path in more detail. In this study, we present geochemical data combined with textural modeling to constrain the conditions and reaction mechanism during contact metamorphic garnet growth in siliceous dolomites in the southern Adamello Massif, Italy. The metamorphic garnet porphyroblasts are poikiloblastic and idiomorphic in shape with a typical grain size ranging between 0.6-1 cm in diameter sitting in a matrix of calcite+diopside+anorthite+wollastonite. Inclusions in the grossular-rich garnets are almost uniquely diopside. On the hand specimen, garnets are surrounded by visible rims of about 0.6 mm indicating a diffusion-limited reaction mechanism to be responsible for the garnet formation. In the course of this study samples have been characterized by polarization microscopy, element x-ray maps using EMPA, cathodulominescence images and stable isotope analyses of carbon and oxygen of matrix carbonates. In addition, pseudosections have been calculated using the software package PerpleX (Connolly, 2005) based on the bulk chemistry of collected samples. Results indicate that the visible margin consists of a small rim (< 1 mm) purely consisting of recrystallized calcite adjacent to the garnet edge. The major part of the observed halo, however, is characterized by the absence of anorthite and wollastonite. The observed texture of garnet porphyroblasts growing and simultaneously forming an anorthite and wollastonite free margin can successfully be reproduced using the SEG program (Foster, 1993), which assumes diffusive mass transport. Therefore the model constrains the diffusive fluxes of Ca, Mg, Al and Si by mass balance and the local Gibbs-Duhem equations on the reaction site. Assuming that the pore fluid is not saturated in CO2, which is justified for the assumption of fluid-infiltration during contact metamorphism, the model predicts the wollastonite halo to be about the same size as the anorthite halo. Interestingly, the model also predicts the small diopside-free calcite margin surrounding the garnet interface, which is also observed in the thin section of the natural sample. Taken together, we interpret the garnet growth to be the consequence of the breakdown of anorthite + wollastonite + calcite at water-rich (XCO2 < 0.2) conditions around 600 °C. Preliminary modeling results suggest that the effective relative diffusion coefficients for Si, Mg and Al are not equal producing the diopside-free calcite rim surrounding the garnet edge. Connolly, J.A.D., 2005, Computation of phase equilibria by linear programming: A tool for geodynamic modeling and its application to subduction zone decarbonation. EPSL, 236 : p. 524-541. Foster, C.T., 1993, SEG93: A program to model metamorphic textures: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 25, no. 6, p. A264.

  9. Do volcanic gases represent equilibrium volatile concentrations? Some insights from a model of diffusive fractionation during rapid bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of volcanic gas compositions are often presumed to be directly related to equilibrium compositions of fluids exsolved at depth in magmatic systems that rapidly escape into the atmosphere. In particular, changes in the ratios of volatile species concentrations in volcanic gases have been interpreted to reflect influx of new magma batches or changes in the degassing depth. However, other mechanisms can also yield changes in volcanic gas compositions. One such mechanism is diffusive fractionation during rapid bubble growth. Such fractionation can occur because radial growth rates of bubbles in magmas are estimated to be in the range of 10-6 to 10-3 m s-1 and diffusion coefficients of minor volatiles (e.g., Cl, F, S, CO2) are orders of magnitude slower, 10-12 to 10-9 m2 s-1. Thus a bubble that rapidly grows and subsequently loses its volatiles to the surface may contribute a fluid sample whose concentration is affected by the interplay between the kinetics of bubble growth and volatile diffusion in the melt. A finite difference code was developed to calculate the effects of rapid bubble growth on the concentration of minor elements in the bubble for a spherical growth geometry. The bubble is modeled with a fixed growth rate and a constant equilibrium fluid-melt partition coefficient, KD. Bubbles were modeled to grow to a radius of 50 μm, the size at which the dominant bubble growth mechanism appears to change from diffusion to coalescence. The critical variables that control the departure from equilibrium behavior are the K D and the ratio of the growth velocity, V, to the diffusivity, D. Modeling bubble growth in a magma chamber at 100 MPa demonstrates that when KD is in the range of 10 to 1000 at low V/D values (e.g., 103 m-1) the composition of the fluid is at, or near, equilibrium with the melt. However, as V/D increases the bubble composition deviates increasingly from equilibrium. For V/D ratios of 105 and equilibrium KD's of either 50 or 100 (similar to estimates for S), a bubble with a 50 μm radius will contain a fluid whose concentration was apparently determined by a KD of less than 10. These models also demonstrate that the combination of rapid bubble growth with slow diffusion can deplete the melt in the volatile species only within the immediate neighborhood, on the order of 100 μm. If bubbles are spaced further apart the melts may retain significant concentrations of dissolved volatiles, which could lead to secondary and tertiary nucleation events. These models for diffusive fractionation during rapid bubble growth suggest that changes in the ratios of minor elements in volcanic gases may be influenced by bubble growth rate changes. Volatiles with lower diffusivities and volatiles with very high or very low partition coefficients will be more influenced by this process. Diffusive fractionation may be responsible for the drop in the CO2/SO2 ratios sometimes observed prior to large eruptions of Stromboli volcano.

  10. A model for the diffusive growth of hydrate saturation anomalies in layered sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.

    2011-10-01

    Sediment particles affect the phase behavior of gas hydrates, both by increasing the surface energy where pore geometry forces hydrate crystals to attain high curvatures and through wetting interactions that cause aqueous films to coat particle surfaces. These effects produce only slight changes to the gas solubility through most of the hydrate stability zone, so the particle size has only a modest influence on the rate of hydrate accumulation when the sediments are homogeneous. In hydrate reservoirs, however, discontinuous changes in sediment properties are common and such stratigraphic boundaries often coincide with hydrate anomalies. These anomalies are a natural consequence of variations in subsurface sediment properties. By accounting for sediment-hydrate interactions, I show how compositional diffusion supplies the growth of hydrate spikes in coarse-grained sediments immediately adjacent to hydrate-free regions (HFRs) in more fine-grained sediments where the solubility is slightly elevated. Over timescales comparable with Milankovitch cycles, hydrate spikes are typically less than a meter in width and contain essentially all of the hydrate that would have otherwise occupied the much larger adjacent HFR if sediment heterogeneities were absent. Hydrate can form in the more fine-grained sediments only once the spike achieves a sufficiently high saturation level (often >90% of pore volume) that the solubility is continuous across the stratigraphic boundary. The wetting interactions that stabilize much of the residual liquid when hydrate forms an interconnected skeleton spanning many pore diameters can also partially unload sediment particle contacts, and lead to the growth of segregated hydrate nodules and lenses.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  12. Analysis of δ18O and δD values of environmental waters at high temporal and spatial resolution by continuous diffusion sampling cavity ring-down spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munksgaard, Niels; Bass, Adrian; Wurster, Chris; Bird, Michael

    2013-04-01

    A novel sampling device utilises diffusion through porous PTFE tubing to deliver water vapour continuously from a liquid water source for analysis of δ18O and δD values by Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry (CRDS). Comparison of isotopic data for a range of water samples analysed by Diffusion Sampling-CRDS (DS-CRDS) and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) shows significant linear correlations between the two methods allowing for accurate standardisation of DS-CRDS data. The internal precision for an integration period of 3 min (standard deviation = 0.1 ‰ and 0.3 ‰ for δ18O and δD values, respectively) is similar to analysis of water by injection/evaporation CRDS of discrete water samples. The isotopic effects of variable air and water temperature, water vapour concentration and water pumping rate were found to be either negligible or correctable by analysis of water standards. Separation of the analysed water vapour from non-volatile dissolved and particulate contaminants in the liquid sample minimises interferences associated with CRDS analyses of many aqueous samples. Coupling of the DS-CRDS instrument to an auto sampler enables rapid analysis (10 min) of discrete water samples. The DS-CRDS system was used in the first continuous shipboard measurement of δ18O and δD of water. Combined with continuous salinity recordings, a data set of nearly 6,000 isotope measurements was made at 30-s intervals during a 3-day voyage through the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon. Precise identification of river plumes within the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon was possible because unique δ18O/δD-salinity relationships of individual plumes were measured at high spatial and temporal resolution. Continuous shipboard measurement of δ18O/δD values by DS-CRDS provides additional discriminatory power for assessing water mass formation processes and histories at a small fraction of the cost of traditional isotope analysis of discrete samples. In a second application of DS-CRDS, continuous real-time analysis, at 30-s intervals, of precipitation at an Australian tropical location revealed extreme and rapidly changing δ18O and δD values related to variations in moisture source areas, transport paths and precipitation histories. The range of δ18O (-19.6 ‰ to +2.6 ‰) and δD (-140 ‰ to +13 ‰) values from almost 6,000 measurements of nine rain events over 15 days during an 8-month period at a single location was comparable with the range measured in 1532 monthly samples from all seven Australian Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation stations from 1962 to 2002. Extreme variations in δ18O (-8.7 ‰ to -19.6 ‰) and δD (-54 ‰ to -140 ‰) were recorded within a single 4-h period. Real-time stable isotope monitoring of environmental waters at high temporal and spatial resolution enables new and powerful tracer applications in climatology, hydrology, eco-physiology and palaeo-climatology.

  13. The novel DNA alkylating agent BO-1090 suppresses the growth of human oral cavity cancer in xenografted and orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Sanjiv, Kumar; Su, Tsann-Long; Suman, Sharda; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Wang, Hsuan-Yao; Hsiao, Michael; Lee, Te-Chang

    2012-03-15

    Oral cancer is the fourth-most common cause of death in males and overall the sixth-most common cause of cancer death in Taiwan. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy combined with other therapies are the most common treatments for oral cavity cancer. Although cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel are commonly used clinically, there is no drug specific for oral cavity cancer. Here, we demonstrated that derivatives of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, a class of newly synthesized alkylating agents, may be drugs more specific for oral cancer based on its potent in vitro cytotoxicity to oral cancer cells and on in vivo xenografts. Among them, BO-1090, bis(hydroxymethyl)-3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene derivative, targeted DNA for its cytotoxic effects as shown by inhibition of DNA synthesis (bromodeoxyuridine-based DNA synthesis assay), induction of DNA crosslinking (alkaline gel shift assay), and induction of DNA single-stranded breaks (Comet assay) and double-stranded breaks (γ-H2AX focus formation). Following DNA damage, BO-1090 induced G1/S-phase arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cell lines. The therapeutic potential of BO-1090 was tested in mice that received a xenograft of oral cavity cancer cell lines (SAS or Cal 27 cells). Intravenous injection of BO-1090 significantly suppressed tumor growth in comparison to control mice. BO-1090 also significantly reduced the tumor burden in orthotopic mouse models using SAS cells. There was no significant adverse effect of BO-1090 treatment with this dosage based on whole blood count, biochemical enzyme profiles in plasma and histopathology of various organs in mouse. Taken together, our current results demonstrate that B0-1090 may have potential as a treatment for oral cavity cancer. PMID:21500194

  14. Growth behavior of intermetallic compounds during reactive diffusion between aluminum alloy 1060 and magnesium at 573-673 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    A potential new research reactor fuel design proposes to use U-Mo fuel in a Mg matrix clad with Al. Interdiffusion between the Mg containing fuel core and Al cladding can result in the formation of intermetallic compounds that can be detrimental to fuel element performance. The kinetics of the reactive diffusion in the binary Al-Mg system was experimentally studied. Layers of the intermetallic compounds, β (Al3Mg2) and γ (Al12Mg17) phases, were formed between the Al alloy 1060 and Mg during annealing. The β layer was observed to grow faster than the γ phase. The thickness of each layer can be expressed by a power function of the annealing time with the exponent n close to 0.5 for the β phase and less than 0.5 for the γ phase. The results suggest that the growth of β phase is controlled by lattice diffusion and that of the γ phase by grain boundary and lattice diffusion. Metallographic examination showed the grain boundary diffusion in the form of columnar growth of γ phase during annealing. Based on the reactive diffusion equation developed in this work, in the absence of irradiation effects, it will take more than 110 h to consume a half thickness of 400 μm of the cladding.

  15. A model of diffusion-limited ice growth inside biological cells during freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, J. O. M.; Cravalho, E. G.; Toner, M.

    1994-05-01

    A theoretical model for predicting the kinetics of ice crystallization inside cells during cryopreservation was developed, and applied to mouse oocytes, by coupling separate models of (1) water transport across the cell membrane, (2) ice nucleation, and (3) crystal growth. The instantaneous cell volume and cytosol composition during continuous cooling in the presence of glycerol were predicted using the water transport model. Classical nucleation theory was used to predict ice nucleation rates, and a nonisothermal diffusion-limited crystal-growth model was used to compute the resulting crystallization kinetics. The model requires knowledge of the nucleation rate parameters Ω and κ, as well as the viscosity η of a water-NaCl-glycerol solution as a function of both the composition and temperature of the solution. These dependences were estimated from data available in the literature. Cell-specific biophysical parameters were obtained from previous studies on mouse oocytes. A sensitivity analysis showed that the model was most sensitive to the values of κ and η. The coupled model was used to study the effect of cooling rate and initial glycerol concentration on intracellular crystal growth. The extent of crystallization, as well as the crystal size distribution, were predicted as functions of time. For rapid cooling at low to intermediate glycerol concentrations, the cells crystallized completely, while at high concentrations of glycerol, partial or total vitrification was observed. As expected, the cooling rate necessary for vitrification dropped with increasing glycerol concentration; when cells initially contained ˜7.5 M glycerol, vitrification was achieved independent of cooling rate. For slow cooling protocols, water transport significantly affected the results. At glycerol concentrations greater than ˜3 M, the final intracellular ice content decreased with increasing glycerol concentration at a fixed cooling rate. In this regime, the cooling rate at which a critical amount of ice was formed increased as more glycerol was used. When less than ˜3 M glycerol was initially present in the cell, an increase in glycerol concentration was predicted to cause an increase in the final intracellular ice content at a given cooling rate. In this regime, the critical cooling rate decreased with increasing glycerol concentration. These predictions clarify previous empirical observations of slow freezing phenomena.

  16. A diffusion-controlled kinetic model for growth of Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, S. R.; Madaah Hosseini, H. R.

    2007-11-01

    A kinetic model for growth of ZnO nanorods via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism based on the bulk diffusion of Zn atoms through the Au-Zn droplet is presented. The dependences of the growth rate on size are given quantitatively. A general expression for the growth rate of nanorods during VLS process is derived. The derived formula shows the dependences of growth rate on lateral size of nanorods, concentration and supersaturation of Zn atoms in the liquid droplet. Based on the presented kinetic model the smaller nanorods have faster growth rate. Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods are grown by chemical vapor transport and condensation (CVTC) process experimentally. Theoretical and experimental rate/radius curves are compared to each other. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Craig E.; Carter, Shirron L.; Czupryna, Julie; Wang, Le; Putt, Mary E.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®)-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm). To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67) identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm. PMID:26784170

  18. Role of subsurface diffusion and Ostwald ripening in catalyst formation for single-walled carbon nanotube forest growth.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shunsuke; Nishino, Hidekazu; Futaba, Don N; Yasuda, Satoshi; Yamada, Takeo; Maigne, Alan; Matsuo, Yutaka; Nakamura, Eiichi; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    Here we show that essentially any Fe compounds spanning Fe salts, nanoparticles, and buckyferrocene could serve as catalysts for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) forest growth when supported on AlO(x) and annealed in hydrogen. This observation was explained by subsurface diffusion of Fe atoms into the AlO(x) support induced by hydrogen annealing where most of the deposited Fe left the surface and the remaining Fe atoms reconfigured into small nanoparticles suitable for SWNT growth. Interestingly, the average diameters of the SWNTs grown from all iron compounds studied were nearly identical (2.8-3.1 nm). We interpret that the offsetting effects of Ostwald ripening and subsurface diffusion resulted in the ability to grow SWNT forests with similar average diameters regardless of the initial Fe catalyst. PMID:22233092

  19. Diffusion-Controlled Anisotropic Growth of Stable and Metastable Crystal Polymorphs in the Phase-Field Crystal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegze, G.; Gránásy, L.; Tóth, G. I.; Podmaniczky, F.; Jaatinen, A.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Pusztai, T.

    2009-07-01

    We use a simple density functional approach on a diffusional time scale, to address freezing to the body-centered cubic (bcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), and face-centered cubic (fcc) structures. We observe faceted equilibrium shapes and diffusion-controlled layerwise crystal growth consistent with two-dimensional nucleation. The predicted growth anisotropies are discussed in relation with results from experiment and atomistic simulations. We also demonstrate that varying the lattice constant of a simple cubic substrate, one can tune the epitaxially growing body-centered tetragonal structure between bcc and fcc, and observe a Mullins-Sekerka-Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld-type instability.

  20. Elimination of gold diffusion in the heterostructure core/shell growth of high performance Ge/Si nanowire HFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel T; Dayeh, Shadi A

    2010-01-01

    Radial heterostructure nanowires offer the possibility of surface, strain, band-edge and modulution-doped engineering for optimizing performance of nanowire transistors. Synthesis of such heterostructures is non-trivial and is typically accompanied with Au diffusion on the nanowire sidewalls that result in rough morphology and undesired whisker growth. Here, they report a novel growth procedure to synthesize Ge/Si core/multi-shell nanowires by engineering the growth interface between the Au seed and the nanowire sidewalls. Single crystal Ge/Si core/multi-shell nanowires are used to fabricate side-by-side FET transistors with and without Au diffusion. Elimination of Au diffusion in the synthesis of such structures led to {approx} 2X improvement in hole field-effect mobility, transconductances and currents. Initial prototype devices with a 10 nm PECVD nitride gate dielectric resulted in a record maximum on current of 430 {micro}A/V (I{sub DS}L{sub G}/{pi}DV{sub DS}), {approx} 2X higher than ever achieved before in a p-type FET.

  1. In situ flash X-ray observation of projectile penetration processes and crater cavity growth in porous gypsum target analogous to low-density asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Minami; Arakawa, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Fujita, Yukihiro; Kadono, Toshihiko

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies of impact craters formed on low-density asteroids led to the proposal of a new crater formation mechanism dominated by pore collapse and compaction. Thus, it is important to study the crater formation process associated with the projectile penetration on porous cohesive targets. Laboratory impact experiments were conducted for a porous gypsum target with porosity of 50%, and flash X-rays were used to visualize the interior of the target for in situ observation of crater formation and projectile penetration. Spherical projectiles made of three different materials, stainless steel, aluminum, and nylon were impacted at 1.9-2.4 km/s (low-velocity impact) and 5.6-6.4 km/s (high-velocity impact) by using a two-stage light-gas gun. Two imaging plates were used to take two X-ray images at a different delay time from the impact moment for one shot. Two types of crater cavity shape were found on the porous gypsum target, that is, penetration holes or hemispherical cavities, depending on the projectile size and density, and the impact velocity. The drag coefficient of a projectile was determined by measuring the penetration depth changing with time, and we found that it was closely related to the crater cavity shape: it was about 0.9 for a penetration hole, while it was 2.3-3.9 for a hemispherical cavity. This large value for a hemispherical cavity could have been caused by the deformation or the disruption of the projectile. The cratering efficiency, ρtVcr(t)/mp, was found to have a power law relationship to the scaling time for crater growth, πt = vit/rp, where vi is the impact velocity, rp is the projectile radius, and t is the time after the impact, and all data for stainless steel and aluminum projectiles merged completely and could be fitted by a power-law equation of ρtVcr(t)/mp=2.69×10-1πt1.10. Furthermore, the scaled crater volume, πV = Vcr_finalρt/mp, where Vcr_final is the final crater cavity volume, ρt is the target density, and mp is the projectile mass, was successfully fitted by a power law equation when another scaling parameter was used for the crater formation in strength regime, πY=Yt/ρtvi2, where Yt is the target material strength, as follows: πV=1.69×10-1πY-0.51. As a result, the crater formed on porous gypsum was revealed to be more than one order of magnitude smaller than that formed on basalt. Based on our experimental results, which visualize how crater cavities on porous cohesive materials grow with projectile penetration, we are able to discuss compression and excavation processes during crater formation quantitatively. This observation enables us to investigate and revise numerical models and crater scaling laws for high-velocity impacts into porous cohesive materials.

  2. The theory of reactive diffusion for the description of oxide phase growth in a coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, Anna G.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the behavior of a coated material in oxidizing medium is studied under the conditions of heat flux action. It is assumed that the coated material is heated quickly due to high thermal conductivity of metals. This allows neglecting the temperature distribution along the thickness of the coated material. However, the sub problem on the diffusion accompanied by the formation of various oxides is analyzed in two-dimensional formulation. Oxygen can diffuse into the coating by two ways: along the grain boundaries and through volume diffusion. As a result, the distributions of oxide concentrations, local sizes of oxides for different time moments were obtained for various sets of parameters.

  3. Quantitative Evaluation of Growth Plates around the Knees of Adolescent Soccer Players by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krajnc, Zmago; Rupreht, Mitja; Drobnič, Matej

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate growth plates around the knees in adolescent soccer players utilizing the diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). Methods. The knees and adjacent growth plates of eleven 14-year-old male soccer players were evaluated by MRI before (end of season's summer break) and after two months of intense soccer training. MRI evaluation was conducted in coronal plane by PD-FSE and DWI. All images were screened for any major pathological changes. Later, central growth plate surface area (CGPSA) was measured and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated in two most central coronal slices divided into four regions: distal femur medial (DFM), distal femur lateral (DFL), proximal tibia medial (PTM), and proximal tibia lateral (PTL). Results. No gross pathology was diagnosed on MRI. CGPSA was not significantly reduced: DFM 278 versus 272, DFL 265 versus 261, PTM 193 versus 192, and PTL 214 versus 210. ADC decrease was statistically significant only for PTM: DFM 1.27 versus 1.22, DFL 1.37 versus 1.34, PTM 1.13 versus 1.03 (p = 0.003), and PTL 1.28 versus 1.22. Conclusions. DWI measurements indicate increased cellularity in growth plates around knees in footballers most prominent in PTM after intense training. No detectable differences on a standard PD-FSE sequence were observed. PMID:26693482

  4. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  5. Selectivity in glycosaminoglycan binding dictates the distribution and diffusion of fibroblast growth factors in the pericellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The range of biological outcomes generated by many signalling proteins in development and homeostasis is increased by their interactions with glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulfate (HS). This interaction controls the localization and movement of these signalling proteins, but whether such control depends on the specificity of the interactions is not known. We used five fibroblast growth factors with an N-terminal HaloTag (Halo-FGFs) for fluorescent labelling, with well-characterized and distinct HS-binding properties, and measured their binding and diffusion in pericellular matrix of fixed rat mammary 27 fibroblasts. Halo-FGF1, Halo-FGF2 and Halo-FGF6 bound to HS, whereas Halo-FGF10 also interacted with chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate, and FGF20 did not bind detectably. The distribution of bound FGFs in the pericellular matrix was not homogeneous, and for FGF10 exhibited striking clusters. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that FGF2 and FGF6 diffused faster, whereas FGF1 diffused more slowly, and FGF10 was immobile. The results demonstrate that the specificity of the interactions of proteins with glycosaminoglycans controls their binding and diffusion. Moreover, cells regulate the spatial distribution of different protein-binding sites in glycosaminoglycans independently of each other, implying that the extracellular matrix has long-range structure. PMID:27009190

  6. Selectivity in glycosaminoglycan binding dictates the distribution and diffusion of fibroblast growth factors in the pericellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changye; Marcello, Marco; Li, Yong; Mason, David; Lévy, Raphaël; Fernig, David G

    2016-03-01

    The range of biological outcomes generated by many signalling proteins in development and homeostasis is increased by their interactions with glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulfate (HS). This interaction controls the localization and movement of these signalling proteins, but whether such control depends on the specificity of the interactions is not known. We used five fibroblast growth factors with an N-terminal HaloTag (Halo-FGFs) for fluorescent labelling, with well-characterized and distinct HS-binding properties, and measured their binding and diffusion in pericellular matrix of fixed rat mammary 27 fibroblasts. Halo-FGF1, Halo-FGF2 and Halo-FGF6 bound to HS, whereas Halo-FGF10 also interacted with chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate, and FGF20 did not bind detectably. The distribution of bound FGFs in the pericellular matrix was not homogeneous, and for FGF10 exhibited striking clusters. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that FGF2 and FGF6 diffused faster, whereas FGF1 diffused more slowly, and FGF10 was immobile. The results demonstrate that the specificity of the interactions of proteins with glycosaminoglycans controls their binding and diffusion. Moreover, cells regulate the spatial distribution of different protein-binding sites in glycosaminoglycans independently of each other, implying that the extracellular matrix has long-range structure. PMID:27009190

  7. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  8. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  9. Cavity magnomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  10. Discerning crystal growth from diffusion profiles in zoned olivine by in situ Mg–Fe isotopic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sio, Corliss Kin I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Chaussidon, Marc; Helz, Rosalind T.; Roskosz, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Mineral zoning is used in diffusion-based geospeedometry to determine magmatic timescales. Progress in this field has been hampered by the challenge to discern mineral zoning produced by diffusion from concentration gradients inherited from crystal growth. A zoned olivine phenocryst from Kilauea Iki lava lake (Hawaii) was selected for this study to evaluate the potential of Mg and Fe isotopes for distinguishing these two processes. Microdrilling of the phenocryst (∼300 μm drill holes) followed by MC-ICPMS analysis of the powders revealed negatively coupled Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations (δ26Mg from +0.1‰ to −0.2‰ and δ56Fe from −1.2‰ to −0.2‰ from core to rim), which can only be explained by Mg–Fe exchange between melt and olivine. The data can be explained with ratios of diffusivities of Mg and Fe isotopes in olivine scaling as D2/D1 = (m1/m2)β with βMg ∼0.16 and βFe ∼0.27. LA-MC-ICPMS and MC-SIMS Fe isotopic measurements are developed and are demonstrated to yield accurate δ56Fe measurements within precisions of ∼0.2‰ (1 SD) at spatial resolutions of ∼50 μm. δ56Fe and δ26Mg stay constant with Fo# in the rim (late-stage overgrowth), whereas in the core (original phenocryst) δ56Fe steeply trends toward lighter compositions and δ26Mg trends toward heavier compositions with higher Fo#. A plot of δ56Fe vs. Fo# immediately distinguishes growth-controlled from diffusion-controlled zoning in these two regions. The results are consistent with the idea that large isotopic fractionation accompanies chemical diffusion in crystals, whereas fractional crystallization induces little or no isotopic fractionation. The cooling timescale inferred from the chemical-isotope zoning profiles is consistent with the documented cooling history of the lava lake. In the absence of geologic context, in situ stable isotopic measurements may now be used to interpret the nature of mineral zoning. Stable isotope measurements by LA-MC-ICPMS and MC-SIMS can be used as standard petrologic tools to identify samples for diffusion-based geospeedometry.

  11. Curation-Based Network Marketing: Strategies for Network Growth and Electronic Word-of-Mouth Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Earnie Mitchell, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of years, a new aspect of online social networking has emerged, in which the strength of social network connections is based not on social ties but mutually shared interests. This dissertation studies these "curation-based" online social networks (CBN) and their suitability for the diffusion of electronic word-of-mouth…

  12. The Growth and Decline of Research on the Diffusion of the News, 1945-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Fleur, Melvin L.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how the tradition of studying the word-of-mouth diffusion of news was established in 1945 and came to mature during the 1960s after the Kennedy assassination. Notes that the pace of this research slowed substantially in the 1970s and has all but stopped in recent years. Outlines six broad generalizations resulting from studies conducted…

  13. Curation-Based Network Marketing: Strategies for Network Growth and Electronic Word-of-Mouth Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Earnie Mitchell, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of years, a new aspect of online social networking has emerged, in which the strength of social network connections is based not on social ties but mutually shared interests. This dissertation studies these "curation-based" online social networks (CBN) and their suitability for the diffusion of electronic word-of-mouth

  14. Electrochemical Growth of Ag Junctions and Diffusion Limited Aggregate (DLA) Fractal Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Zak; Tuppan, Sam; Kim, Woo-Joong; Seattle University Team

    2015-03-01

    We attempt construction of a single atom connection between two copper wires. By applying a DC voltage across the wires when immersed in a silver nitrate solution, we deposit silver until a junction is formed. The deposited silver forms a fractal structure that can be simulated with a diffusion limited aggregation model.

  15. Laser scattering in a hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus for protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casay, G. A.; Wilson, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    One type of hardware used to grow protein crystals in the microgravity environment aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle is a hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus (HDVDA). In order to optimize crystal growth conditions, dynamic control of the HDVDA is desirable. A critical component in the dynamically controlled system is a detector for protein nucleation. We have constructed a laser scattering detector for the HDVDA capable of detecting the nucleation stage. The detector was successfully tested for several scatterers differing in size using dynamic light scattering techniques. In addition, the ability to detect protein nucleation using the HDVDA was demonstrated for lysozyme.

  16. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R.; Stoica, T.

    2011-03-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  17. Cu diffusion as an alternative method for nanopatterned CuTCNQ film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitán, M. J.; Álvarez, J.; Navío, C.; Miranda, R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we show by means of ‘in situ’ x-ray diffraction studies that CuTCNQ formation from Cu(solid)–TCNQ(solid tetracyanoquinodimethane) goes through Cu diffusion at room temperature. The film quality depends on the TCNQ evaporation rate. At low evaporation rate we get a single phase-I CuTCNQ film very well crystallized and well oriented. The film has a CuTCNQ(0 2 0) orientation. The film is formed by CuTCNQ nanorods of a very homogeneous size. The film homogeneity has also been seen by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electronic properties of the film have been measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Thus, the Cu-diffusion method has arisen as a very simple, clean and efficient method to grow localized CuTCNQ nanorods on Cu, opening up new insights for technological applications.

  18. Cu diffusion as an alternative method for nanopatterned CuTCNQ film growth.

    PubMed

    Capitán, M J; Álvarez, J; Navío, C; Miranda, R

    2016-05-11

    In this paper we show by means of 'in situ' x-ray diffraction studies that CuTCNQ formation from Cu(solid)-TCNQ(solid tetracyanoquinodimethane) goes through Cu diffusion at room temperature. The film quality depends on the TCNQ evaporation rate. At low evaporation rate we get a single phase-I CuTCNQ film very well crystallized and well oriented. The film has a CuTCNQ(0 2 0) orientation. The film is formed by CuTCNQ nanorods of a very homogeneous size. The film homogeneity has also been seen by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electronic properties of the film have been measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Thus, the Cu-diffusion method has arisen as a very simple, clean and efficient method to grow localized CuTCNQ nanorods on Cu, opening up new insights for technological applications. PMID:27049286

  19. Study of coupled double diffusive convection-radiation in a tilted cavity via a hybrid multi-relaxation time-lattice Boltzmann-finite difference and discrete ordinate methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufekkir, Fayçal; Moussaoui, Mohammed Amine; Mezrhab, Ahmed; Naji, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    The coupled double diffusive natural convection and radiation in a tilted and differentially heated square cavity containing a non-gray air-CO2 (or air-H2O) mixtures was numerically investigated. The horizontal walls are insulated and impermeable and the vertical walls are maintained at different temperatures and concentrations. The hybrid lattice Boltzmann method with the multiple-relaxation time model is used to compute the hydrodynamics and the finite difference method to determine temperatures and concentrations. The discrete ordinates method combined to the spectral line-based weighted sum of gray gases model is used to compute the radiative term and its spectral aspect. The effects of the inclination angle on the flow, thermal and concentration fields are analyzed for both aiding and opposing cases. It was found that radiation gas modifies the structure of the velocity and thermal fields by generating inclined stratifications and promoting the instabilities in opposing flows.

  20. On a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection system modelling the growth of phytoplankton with cell quota structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Sze-Bi; Mei, Linfeng; Wang, Feng-Bin

    2015-11-01

    Phytoplankton species in a water column compete for mineral nutrients and light, and the existing models usually neglect differences in the nutrient content and the amount of light absorbed of individuals. In this current paper, we examine a size-structured and nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection system which describes the dynamics of a single phytoplankton species in a water column where the species depends simply on light for its growth. Our model is under the assumption that the amount of light absorbed by individuals is proportional to cell size, which varies for populations that reproduce by simple division into two equally-sized daughters. We first establish the existence of a critical death rate and our analysis indicates that the phytoplankton survives if and only if its death rate is less than the critical death rate. The critical death rate depends on a general reproductive rate, the characteristics of the water column (e.g., turbulent diffusion rate, sinking, depth), cell growth, cell division, and cell size.

  1. Disrupting NOTCH Slows Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Growth, Enhances Radiation Sensitivity, and Shows Combinatorial Efficacy With Bromodomain Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Isabella C; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Brandt, William D; Kambhampati, Madhuri; Nazarian, Javad; Chang, Howard T; Warren, Katherine E; Eberhart, Charles G; Raabe, Eric H

    2015-08-01

    NOTCH regulates stem cells during normal development and stemlike cells in cancer, but the roles of NOTCH in the lethal pediatric brain tumor diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remain unknown. Because DIPGs express stem cell factors such as SOX2 and MYCN, we hypothesized that NOTCH activity would be critical for DIPG growth. We determined that primary DIPGs expressed high levels of NOTCH receptors, ligands, and downstream effectors. Treatment of the DIPG cell lines JHH-DIPG1 and SF7761 with the γ-secretase inhibitor MRK003 suppressed the level of the NOTCH effectors HES1, HES4, and HES5; inhibited DIPG growth by 75%; and caused a 3-fold induction of apoptosis. Short hairpin RNAs targeting the canonical NOTCH pathway caused similar effects. Pretreatment of DIPG cells with MRK003 suppressed clonogenic growth by more than 90% and enhanced the efficacy of radiation therapy. The high level of MYCN in DIPG led us to test sequential therapy with the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 and MRK003, and we found that JQ1 and MRK003 inhibited DIPG growth and induced apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that dual targeting of NOTCH and MYCN in DIPG may be an effective therapeutic strategy in DIPG and that adding a γ-secretase inhibitor during radiation therapy may be efficacious initially or during reirradiation. PMID:26115193

  2. A Cahn-Hilliard model of vascularized tumor growth in a complex evolving confinement using a diffuse domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Cristini, Vittorio; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Lowengrub, John

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of tumor growth is essential for developing effective strategies to treat cancers. Various studies have suggested that spatial heterogeneity during tumors growth is a key factor associated with subsequent tumor invasion and the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Spatial heterogeneity may arise due to morphological instability of the tumors and the complex tissue structure surrounding the tumors. In previous works, we have used a Cahn-Hilliard tumor growth model to study the morphological instability for tumors in non-resisting tissues. However, most tumors are surrounded by complex tissue structures and confined in the capsules of some organs or between certain basement membranes. The capsules and basement membranes may be distorted by interacting with the evolving tumors, affecting the morphological instability. Here we adopt a novel diffuse domain approach to adapt our previous Cahn-Hilliard model for tumor growth in such complex evolving environments. As an example, we apply the model to simulate the evolution of lymphoma in a lymph node, incorporating also the tumor-induced angiogenesis.

  3. Roles of aromatic side chains and template effects of the hydrophobic cavity of a self-assembled peptide nanoarchitecture for anisotropic growth of gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kishioka, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Akitsugu; Yamada, Naoki; Kataoka, Shunsuke; Imai, Takahito; Kasuno, Megumi

    2015-11-15

    Gold nanocrystals are promising as catalysts and for use in sensing/imaging systems, photonic/plasmonic devices, electronics, drug delivery systems, and for photothermal therapy due to their unique physical, chemical, and biocompatible properties. The use of various organic templates allows control of the size, shape, structure, surface modification and topology of gold nanocrystals; in particular, currently the synthesis of gold nanorods requires a cytotoxic surfactant to control morphology. To control the shape of gold nanocrystals, we previously demonstrated the de novo design and synthesis of a β-sheet-forming nonapeptide (RU006: Ac-AIAKAXKIA-NH2, X=L-2-naphthylalanine, Nal) and the fabrication of gold nanocrystals by mixing RU006 and HAuCl4 in water. The reaction afforded ultrathin gold nanoribbons 50-100 nm wide, several nanometers high, and microns long. To understand the mechanism underlying gold nanoribbon formation by the RU006 system, we here report (i) the effects of replacement of the Nal aromatic side chain in the RU006 sequence with other aromatic moieties, (ii) the electrochemical properties of aromatic side chains in the de novo designed template peptides to estimate the redox potential and number of electrons participating in the gold crystallization process, and (iii) the stoichiometry of the RU006 system for gold nanoribbon synthesis. Interestingly, RU006 bearing a naphthalene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.50 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) and an analog [Ant(6)]-RU006 bearing a bulky anthracene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.05 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) allowed the growth of anisotropic (ribbon-like) and isotropic (round) gold nanocrystals, respectively. This trend in morphology of gold nanocrystals was attributed to spatially-arranged hydrophobic cavities sufficiently large to accommodate the gold precursor and to allow directed crystal growth driven by cross-linking reactions among the naphthalene rings. Support for this mechanism was obtained by decreasing the mole fraction of [Ant(6)]-RU006 against the total concentration of [Ant(6)]-RU006 and [Phe(6)]-RU006: absorption spectra similar to that for RU006 were obtained. Differences in the redox properties of the anthracene and naphthalene moieties scarcely affected morphology. We propose that construction of an appropriate hydrophobic cavity is important for templating gold nanocrystal architectures by peptide self-assembly. This mechanism would be applicable for developing simple, low toxicity, mild synthetic methods for constructing metallic nanomaterials for therapeutic use. PMID:26521037

  4. Zn Diffusion and α-Fe(Zn) Layer Growth During Annealing of Zn-Coated B Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Vit; Lan, Yongjun; Beentjes, Peter; Norman, David; Hensen, Guido; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-01-01

    Direct hot press forming of Zn-coated 22MnB5 steels is impeded by micro-cracks that occur in the substrate due to the presence of Zn during the forming process. A study was therefore undertaken to quantify concentration of Zn across the α-Fe(Zn) coating and on grain boundaries in the α-Fe(Zn) layer and the underlying γ-Fe(Zn) substrate after isothermal annealing of Zn-coated 22MnB5 at 1173 K (900 °C) and to link the Zn distribution to the amount and type of micro-cracks observed in deformed samples. Finite difference model was developed to describe Zn diffusion and the growth of the α-Fe(Zn) layer. The penetration of Zn into the γ-Fe(Zn) substrate after 600 seconds annealing at 1173 K (900 °C) through bulk diffusion is estimated to be 3 μm, and the diffusion depth of Zn on the γ-Fe(Zn) grain boundaries is estimated to be 6 μm, which is significantly shorter than the maximum length (15 to 50 μm) of the micro-cracks formed in the severely stressed conditions, indicating that the Zn diffusion into the γ-Fe(Zn) from the α-Fe(Zn) during annealing is not correlated to the depth of micro-cracks. On the other hand, the maximum amount of Zn present in α-Fe(Zn) layer decreases with annealing time as the layer grows and Zn oxidizes, and the amount of Zn-enriched areas inside the α-Fe(Zn) layer is reduced leading to reduced length of cracking. Solid-Metal-Induced Embrittlement mechanism is proposed to explain the benefit of extended annealing on reduced depth of micro-crack penetration into the γ-Fe(Zn) substrate.

  5. Viscous cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Anne; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    We study experimentally the impact of solid spheres in a viscous liquid at moderate Reynolds numbers (Re ˜ 5-100). We first determine the drag force by following the slowdown dynamics of projectiles. We then focus on the shape of the free surface: such impacts generate cavities, whose original shape is described and modeled.

  6. Quantifying the rate of biofilm growth of S. meliloti strains in microfluidics via the diffusion coefficient of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorian, Matthew; Seitaridou, Effrosyni

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the rate of biofilm growth is essential for studying genes and preventing unwanted biofilms. In this study, the diffusion coefficient (D) of polystyrene microspheres was used to quantify biofilm growth rates of Sinorhizobia meliloti, a nitrogen fixing bacteria that forms a symbiotic relationship with alfalfa plants. Five strains were studied, two wild types (8530 expR+ and 1021) and three mutants in the exopolysaccharide (EPS I, EPS II) synthesis (8530 exoY , 9034 expG , and 9030-2 expA 1); 1021 and 9030-2 expA 1 are known to be unable to form biofilms. Each strain was inserted into a microfluidic channel with the microspheres. As the cultures grew, the spheres' D values were obtained every 24 hours for 4 days using fluorescence microscopy. Although the D values for 9030-2 expA 1 were inconclusive, 8530 expR+ , 8530 exoY , and 9034 expG showed significant decreases in D between 3 days of growth (| z | > 2 . 25 , p < 0 . 025). The data also indicated that 8530 expR+ and 8530 exoY grew at similar rates. There was no significant change in D for 1021 (χ2(2) = 5 . 76 , p > 0 . 05), which shows the lack of a structured biofilm community. Thus, D can be used as an indicator of the presence of a biofilm and its development.

  7. An image-driven parameter estimation problem for a reaction-diffusion glioma growth model with mass effects

    PubMed Central

    Hogea, Cosmina; Davatzikos, Christos; Biros, George

    2010-01-01

    We present a framework for modeling gliomas growth and their mechanical impact on the surrounding brain tissue (the so-called, mass-effect). We employ an Eulerian continuum approach that results in a strongly coupled system of nonlinear Partial Differential Equations (PDEs): a reaction-diffusion model for the tumor growth and a piecewise linearly elastic material for the background tissue. To estimate unknown model parameters and enable patient-specific simulations we formulate and solve a PDE-constrained optimization problem. Our two main goals are the following: (1) to improve the deformable registration from images of brain tumor patients to a common stereotactic space, thereby assisting in the construction of statistical anatomical atlases; and (2) to develop predictive capabilities for glioma growth, after the model parameters are estimated for a given patient. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt in the literature to introduce an adjoint-based, PDE-constrained optimization formulation in the context of image-driven modeling spatio-temporal tumor evolution. In this paper, we present the formulation, and the solution method and we conduct 1D numerical experiments for preliminary evaluation of the overall formulation/methodology. PMID:18026731

  8. Observation of charge-resonance band of naphthalene dimer cation confined in cavities of faujasite zeolites. Near-IR diffuse reflectance laser photolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shuichi

    1996-11-01

    The naphthalene dimer cation was formed on 266 nm nanosecond laser excitation of naphthalene adsorbed in faujasite zeolites at high loading levels and the charge-resonance band of the dimer cation was measured for the first time by use of diffuse reflectance laser photolysis with a near-infrared detection technique. The dimer cations were found to form exclusively inside the cage networks, not at the external surface of the zeolite and are expected to take a twisted form, conformation in which two naphthalene moieties are partially overlapped, enforced by the cage walls.

  9. A reaction-diffusion-advection model of harmful algae growth with toxin degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Bin; Hsu, Sze-Bi; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of a reaction-diffusion-advection system modeling the dynamics of a single nutrient, harmful algae and algal toxin in a flowing water habitat with a hydraulic storage zone. We introduce the basic reproduction ratio R0 for algae and show that R0 serves as a threshold value for persistence and extinction of the algae. More precisely, we prove that the washout steady state is globally attractive if R0 < 1, while there exists a positive steady state and the algae is uniformly persistent if R0 > 1. With an additional assumption, we obtain the uniqueness and global attractivity of the positive steady state in the case where R0 > 1.

  10. Multiple lineage colony growth from human marrow in plasma clot diffusion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Pojda, Z.; Szczylik, C.; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W.

    1987-10-01

    Marrow cells from ten healthy adult donors were cultured in plasma clot diffusion chambers implanted intraperitoneally into mice. Host animals were conditioned by two injections of phenylhydrazine and 600 cGy of x-rays. Cultures (5 X 10(4) cells/chamber) were continued for between 2 and 40 days and the chambers were retransplanted into new host animals every 5 days. Following termination of cultures, plasma clots were stained with benzidine-hematoxylin and analyzed microscopically. Erythroid, neutrophil, monocyte, eosinophil, megakaryocyte, mixed, undifferentiated, and fibroblastoid colonies were grown with neutrophil, erythroid, monocyte, and eosinophil colonies being the most frequent. A total of between 25 and 60 colonies was observed per chamber at any time point.

  11. Surface Diffusion Directed Growth of Anisotropic Graphene Domains on Different Copper Lattices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da Hee; Kang, Cheong; Nam, Ji Eun; Jeong, Heekyung; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic graphene domains are of significant interest since the electronic properties of pristine graphene strongly depend on its size, shape, and edge structures. In this work, considering that the growth of graphene domains is governable by the dynamics of the graphene-substrate interface during growth, we investigated the shape and defects of graphene domains grown on copper lattices with different indices by chemical vapor deposition of methane at either low pressure or atmospheric pressure. Computational modeling identified that the crystallographic orientation of copper strongly influences the shape of the graphene at low pressure, yet does not play a critical role at atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the defects that have been previously observed in the center of four-lobed graphene domains grown under low pressure conditions were demonstrated for the first time to be caused by a lattice mismatch between graphene and the copper substrate. PMID:26883174

  12. Surface Diffusion Directed Growth of Anisotropic Graphene Domains on Different Copper Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da Hee; Kang, Cheong; Nam, Ji Eun; Jeong, Heekyung; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic graphene domains are of significant interest since the electronic properties of pristine graphene strongly depend on its size, shape, and edge structures. In this work, considering that the growth of graphene domains is governable by the dynamics of the graphene-substrate interface during growth, we investigated the shape and defects of graphene domains grown on copper lattices with different indices by chemical vapor deposition of methane at either low pressure or atmospheric pressure. Computational modeling identified that the crystallographic orientation of copper strongly influences the shape of the graphene at low pressure, yet does not play a critical role at atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the defects that have been previously observed in the center of four-lobed graphene domains grown under low pressure conditions were demonstrated for the first time to be caused by a lattice mismatch between graphene and the copper substrate. PMID:26883174

  13. Surface Diffusion Directed Growth of Anisotropic Graphene Domains on Different Copper Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Da Hee; Kang, Cheong; Nam, Ji Eun; Jeong, Heekyung; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-02-01

    Anisotropic graphene domains are of significant interest since the electronic properties of pristine graphene strongly depend on its size, shape, and edge structures. In this work, considering that the growth of graphene domains is governable by the dynamics of the graphene-substrate interface during growth, we investigated the shape and defects of graphene domains grown on copper lattices with different indices by chemical vapor deposition of methane at either low pressure or atmospheric pressure. Computational modeling identified that the crystallographic orientation of copper strongly influences the shape of the graphene at low pressure, yet does not play a critical role at atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the defects that have been previously observed in the center of four-lobed graphene domains grown under low pressure conditions were demonstrated for the first time to be caused by a lattice mismatch between graphene and the copper substrate.

  14. 850-nm Zn-diffusion vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with with oxide-relief structure for high-speed and energy-efficient optical interconnects from very-short to medium (2km) reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Wei; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jason (Jyehong); Yang, Ying-Jay

    2015-03-01

    High-speed and "green" ~850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have lately attracted lots of attention due to their suitability for applications in optical interconnects (OIs). To further enhance the speed and its maximum allowable linking distance of VCSELs are two major trends to meet the requirement of OI in next generation data centers. Recently, by use of the advanced 850 nm VCSEL technique, data rate as high as 64 Gbit/sec over 57m and 20 Gbit/sec over 2km MMF transmission have been demonstrated, respectively. Here, we will review our recent work about 850 nm Zn-diffusion VCSELs with oxide-relief apertures to further enhance the above-mentioned performances. By using Zn-diffusion, we can not only reduce the device resistance but also manipulate the number of optical modes to benefit transmission. Combing such device, which has excellent single-mode (SMSR >30 dB) and high-power (~7mW) performance, with advanced modulation format (OFDM), record-high bit-rate-distance-product through MMF (2.3 km×28 Gbit/sec) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by selective etching away the oxide aperture inside Zn-diffusion VCSEL, significant enhancement of device speed, D-factor, and reliability can be observed. With such unique VCSEL structure, >40 Gbit/sec energy-efficient transmission over 100m MMF under extremely low-driving current density (<10kA/cm2) has been successfully demonstrated.

  15. Follicular lymphoma transforming into anaplastic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of oral cavity: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Megha; Puri, Abhiney; Nangia, Rajat; Sachdeva, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with the ability to transform into a more aggressive disease, frequently to B cell-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a subtype of NHL, which is characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphocytes. It accounts for 30% of all NHL and its occurrence in the mandible is very rare. It is often seen in young adults, but in the present case, a 50-year-old male patient presented with painless swelling in left lower jaw since 25 days following extraction of left lower molar teeth. There was a history of fever and submandibular lymph nodes were enlarged. On incisional biopsy, features of NHL-like lesion were observed and confirmed by immunohistochemistry using CD20, bcl-2, CD10, CD3, CD5, Ki67 markers to be FL (3A) lymphoma transforming into DLBCL. This is a very uncommon presentation. PMID:26980969

  16. Neonatal Neurobehavior and Diffusion MRI Changes in Brain Reorganization Due to Intrauterine Growth Restriction in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Eixarch, Elisenda; Batalle, Dafnis; Illa, Miriam; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Figueras, Francesc; Gratacos, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) affects 5–10% of all newborns and is associated with a high risk of abnormal neurodevelopment. The timing and patterns of brain reorganization underlying IUGR are poorly documented. We developed a rabbit model of IUGR allowing neonatal neurobehavioral assessment and high resolution brain diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the study was to describe the pattern and functional correlates of fetal brain reorganization induced by IUGR. Methodology/Principal Findings IUGR was induced in 10 New Zealand fetal rabbits by ligation of 40–50% of uteroplacental vessels in one horn at 25 days of gestation. Ten contralateral horn fetuses were used as controls. Cesarean section was performed at 30 days (term 31 days). At postnatal day +1, neonates were assessed by validated neurobehavioral tests including evaluation of tone, spontaneous locomotion, reflex motor activity, motor responses to olfactory stimuli, and coordination of suck and swallow. Subsequently, brains were collected and fixed and MRI was performed using a high resolution acquisition scheme. Global and regional (manual delineation and voxel based analysis) diffusion tensor imaging parameters were analyzed. IUGR was associated with significantly poorer neurobehavioral performance in most domains. Voxel based analysis revealed fractional anisotropy (FA) differences in multiple brain regions of gray and white matter, including frontal, insular, occipital and temporal cortex, hippocampus, putamen, thalamus, claustrum, medial septal nucleus, anterior commissure, internal capsule, fimbria of hippocampus, medial lemniscus and olfactory tract. Regional FA changes were correlated with poorer outcome in neurobehavioral tests. Conclusions IUGR is associated with a complex pattern of brain reorganization already at birth, which may open opportunities for early intervention. Diffusion MRI can offer suitable imaging biomarkers to characterize and monitor brain reorganization due to fetal diseases. PMID:22347486

  17. Effect of grossular on garnet-biotite, Fe Mg exchange reactions: evidence from garnet with mixed growth and diffusion zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, J.

    1996-07-01

    Garnets that exhibit mixed growth and diffusion zoning are used to evaluate the effect of grossular content on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions. These garnets from the uppermost amphibolite-facies to granulite-facies gneiss of the Wissahickon Group, southeastern Pennsylvania, show variation in grossular content (0.035< X Ca<0.14) but nearly constant Mg? ( X Mg/( X Mg+ X Fe) and X Mn through the interior indicating re-equilibration of garnet and matrix minerals with respect to iron, magnesium, and manganese. Mg? is not correlated with calcium content, evidence that the effect of calcium on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions is small or is offset by other interactions in almandine-rich garnets. In either case, the data presented here indicate that correction for calcium content of garnets in the application of garnet-biotite geothermometry to high-grade metapelites is unnecessary and may lead to an overestimate of peak temperature.

  18. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  19. Suppression of CD300A inhibits the growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Yulian; Zeng, Xinli; Fang, Jianchen; Morse, Herbert C.; Zhou, Jeff X.

    2015-01-01

    CD300A is a type I transmembrane receptor protein which has shown inhibitory effects on B-cell receptor-mediated signals. In an analysis of public dataset, we found that CD300A mRNA levels were inversely correlated with the overall survival time of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To decipher the role of CD300A in DLBCL, we knocked down the expression levels of CD300A in DLBCL cells and found that decreasing levels of CD300A significantly inhibited cell proliferation of OCI-Ly01, Farage, and SUDHL-4 cells, but not of VAL, OCI-Ly10, or SUDHL-8 cells. Mechanistically, reduced expression of CD300A resulted in a marked attenuation of AKT phosphorylation, a key molecular event in tumorigenesis, in OCI-Ly01, Farage, and SUDHL-4 cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K displayed a similar inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Furthermore, using a xenograft animal model, we found that decreasing levels of CD300A in OCI-Ly01 and Farage cells significantly inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggested an oncogenic role of CD300A in DLBCL which could serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for this malignant disease. PMID:26435477

  20. Diffusion limited aggregation of particles with different sizes: Fractal dimension change by anisotropic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, F. L.; Mattos, O. A.; Amorin, V. S.; Souza, A. B.

    2015-07-01

    Clusters formation models have been extensively studied in literature, and one of the main task of this research area is the analysis of the particle aggregation processes. Some work support that the main characteristics of this processes are strictly correlated to the cluster morphology, for example in DLA. It is expected that in the DLA clusters formation with particles containing different sizes the modification of the aggregation processes can be responsible for changes in the DLA morphology. The present article is going to analyze the formation of DLA clusters of particles with different sizes and show that the aggregates obtained by this approach generate an angle selection mechanism on dendritic growth that influences the shielding effect of the DLA edge and affect the fractal dimension of the clusters.

  1. Homodimerization Controls the Fibroblast Growth Factor 9 Subfamily's Receptor Binding and Heparan Sulfate-Dependent Diffusion in the Extracellular Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinina, J.; Byron, S; Makarenkova, H; Olsen, S; Eliseenkova, A; Larochelle, W; Dhanabal, M; Blais, S; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling can lead to human diseases, necessitating multiple layers of self-regulatory control mechanisms to keep its activity in check. Herein, we demonstrate that FGF9 and FGF20 ligands undergo a reversible homodimerization, occluding their key receptor binding sites. To test the role of dimerization in ligand autoinhibition, we introduced structure-based mutations into the dimer interfaces of FGF9 and FGF20. The mutations weakened the ability of the ligands to dimerize, effectively increasing the concentrations of monomeric ligands capable of binding and activating their cognate FGF receptor in vitro and in living cells. Interestingly, the monomeric ligands exhibit reduced heparin binding, resulting in their increased radii of heparan sulfate-dependent diffusion and biologic action, as evidenced by the wider dilation area of ex vivo lung cultures in response to implanted mutant FGF9-loaded beads. Hence, our data demonstrate that homodimerization autoregulates FGF9 and FGF20's receptor binding and concentration gradients in the extracellular matrix. Our study is the first to implicate ligand dimerization as an autoregulatory mechanism for growth factor bioactivity and sets the stage for engineering modified FGF9 subfamily ligands, with desired activity for use in both basic and translational research.

  2. From Impurity Doping to Metallic Growth in Diffusion Doping: Properties and Structure of Silver-Doped InAs Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Amit, Yorai; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Banin, Uri

    2015-11-24

    Tuning of the electronic properties of presynthesized colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) by doping plays a key role in the prospect of implementing them in printed electronics devices such as transistors and photodetectors. While such impurity doping reactions have already been introduced, the understanding of the doping process, the nature of interaction between the impurity and host atoms, and the conditions affecting the solubility limit of impurities in nanocrystals are still unclear. Here, we used a postsynthesis diffusion-based doping reaction to introduce Ag impurities into InAs NCs. Optical absorption spectroscopy and analytical inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to present a two-stage doping model consisting of a "doping region" and a "growth region", depending on the impurity to NC ratio in the reaction vessel. X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was employed to determine the impurity location and correlate between the structural and electronic properties for different sizes of InAs NCs and dopant concentrations. The resulting structural model describes a heterogeneous system where the impurities initially dope the NC, by substituting for In atoms near the surface of the NC, until the "solubility limit" is reached, after which the rapid growth and formation of metallic structures are identified. PMID:26390173

  3. Computer simulation of topological evolution in 2-d grain growth using a continuum diffuse-interface field model

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Geng, C.; Chen, L.Q.

    1997-03-01

    The local kinetics and topological phenomena during normal grain growth were studied in two dimensions by computer simulations employing a continuum diffuse-interface field model. The relationships between topological class and individual grain growth kinetics were examined, and compared with results obtained previously from analytical theories, experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations. It was shown that both the grain-size and grain-shape (side) distributions are time-invariant and the linear relationship between the mean radii of individual grains and topological class n was reproduced. The moments of the shape distribution were determined, and the differences among the data from soap froth. Potts model and the present simulation were discussed. In the limit when the grain size goes to zero, the average number of grain edges per grain is shown to be between 4 and 5, implying the direct vanishing of 4- and 5-sided grains, which seems to be consistent with recent experimental observations on thin films. Based on the simulation results, the conditions for the applicability of the familiar Mullins-Von Neumann law and the Hillert`s equation were discussed.

  4. Inhibition of COP9-signalosome (CSN) deneddylating activity and tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas by doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Pulvino, Mary; Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Li, Jing; Compitello, George; Rossi, Randy; Spence, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Vijaya; Jordan, Craig; Poligone, Brian; Casulo, Carla; Burack, Richard; Shapiro, Joel L.; Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Land, Hartmut; Zhao, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    In searching for small-molecule compounds that inhibit proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells and may, therefore, be exploited as potential therapeutic agents for this disease, we identified the commonly used and well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline as a strong candidate. Here, we demonstrate that doxycycline inhibits the growth of DLBCL cells both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models. In addition, we show that doxycycline accumulates in DLBCL cells to high concentrations and affects multiple signaling pathways that are crucial for lymphomagenesis. Our data reveal the deneddylating activity of COP-9 signalosome (CSN) as a novel target of doxycycline and suggest that doxycycline may exert its effects in DLBCL cells in part through a CSN5-HSP90 pathway. Consistently, knockdown of CSN5 exhibited similar effects as doxycycline treatment on DLBCL cell survival and HSP90 chaperone function. In addition to DLBCL cells, doxycycline inhibited growth of several other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells in vitro. Together, our results suggest that doxycycline may represent a promising therapeutic agent for DLBCL and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas subtypes. PMID:26142707

  5. Modeling growth and dissemination of lymphoma in a co-evolving lymph node: a diffuse-domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Cristini, Vittorio; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Lowengrub, John

    2013-03-01

    While partial differential equation models of tumor growth have successfully described various spatiotemporal phenomena observed for in-vitro tumor spheroid experiments, one challenge towards taking these models to further study in-vivo tumors is that instead of relatively static tissue culture with regular boundary conditions, in-vivo tumors are often confined in organ tissues that co-evolve with the tumor growth. Here we adopt a recently developed diffuse-domain method to account for the co-evolving domain boundaries, adapting our previous in-vitro tumor model for the development of lymphoma encapsulated in a lymph node, which may swell or shrink due to proliferation and dissemination of lymphoma cells and treatment by chemotherapy. We use the model to study the induced spatial heterogeneity, which may arise as an emerging phenomenon in experimental observations and model analysis. Spatial heterogeneity is believed to lead to tumor infiltration patterns and reduce the efficacy of chemotherapy, leaving residuals that cause cancer relapse after the treatment. Understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of in-vivo tumors can be an essential step towards more effective strategies of curing cancer. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  6. Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2/SiO2/Si Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhang, Yanwen; Namavar, Fereydoon; Wang, Chong M.; Zhu, Zihua; Weber, William J.

    2011-01-15

    Defect- and strain-enhanced cavity formation and Au precipitation at the interfaces of a nanocrystalline ZrO2/SiO2/Si multilayer structure resulting from 2 MeV Au+ irradiation at temperatures of 160 and 400 K have been studied. Under irradiation, loss of oxygen is observed, and the nanocrystalline grains in the ZrO2 layer increase in size. In addition, small cavities are observed at the ZrO2/SiO2 interface with the morphology of the cavities being dependent on the damage state of the underlying Si lattice. Elongated cavities are formed when crystallinity is still retained in the heavily-damaged Si substrate; however, the morphology of the cavities becomes spherical when the substrate is amorphized. With further irradiation, the cavities appear to become stabilized and begin to act as gettering sites for the Au. As the cavities become fully saturated with Au, the ZrO2/SiO2 interface then acts as a gettering site for the Au. Analysis of the results suggests that oxygen diffusion along the grain boundaries contributes to the growth of cavities and that oxygen within the cavities may affect the gettering of Au. Mechanisms of defect- and strain-enhanced cavity formation and Au precipitation at the interfaces will be discussed with focus on oxygen diffusion and vacancy accumulation, the role of the lattice strain on the morphology of the cavities, and the effect of the binding free energy of the cavities on the Au precipitation.

  7. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation. PMID:26276694

  8. Continuous analysis of δ¹⁸O and δD values of water by diffusion sampling cavity ring-down spectrometry: a novel sampling device for unattended field monitoring of precipitation, ground and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Wurster, Chris M; Bird, Michael I

    2011-12-30

    A novel sampling device suitable for continuous, unattended field monitoring of rapid isotopic changes in environmental waters is described. The device utilises diffusion through porous PTFE tubing to deliver water vapour continuously from a liquid water source for analysis of δ¹⁸O and δD values by Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry (CRDS). Separation of the analysed water vapour from non-volatile dissolved and particulate contaminants in the liquid sample minimises spectral interferences associated with CRDS analyses of many aqueous samples. Comparison of isotopic data for a range of water samples analysed by Diffusion Sampling-CRDS (DS-CRDS) and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) shows significant linear correlations between the two methods allowing for accurate standardisation of DS-CRDS data. The internal precision for an integration period of 3 min (standard deviation (SD) = 0.1‰ and 0.3‰ for δ¹⁸O and δD values, respectively) is similar to analysis of water by CRDS using an autosampler to inject and evaporate discrete water samples. The isotopic effects of variable air temperature, water vapour concentration, water pumping rate and dissolved organic content were found to be either negligible or correctable by analysis of water standards. The DS-CRDS system was used to analyse the O and H isotope composition in short-lived rain events. Other applications where finely time resolved water isotope data may be of benefit include recharge/discharge in groundwater/river systems and infiltration-related changes in cave drip water. PMID:22468325

  9. Toward CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during Ni/Fe-catalyzed carbon nanofiber growth: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chen; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Chen, De; Cheng, Hong-Ye; Zhu, Yi-An

    2011-04-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during the Ni/Fe-catalyzed growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Two bulk models with different Ni to Fe molar ratios (1:1 and 2:1) are constructed, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) simulations are conducted to evaluate their reliability. With the comparison between the calculated and experimental XRD patterns, these models are found to be well suited to reproduce the crystalline structures of Ni/Fe bulk alloys. The calculations indicate the binding of the C1 derivatives to the Ni/Fe closest-packed surfaces is strengthened compared to that on Ni(111), arising from the upshift of the weighted d-band centers of catalyst surfaces. Then, the transition states for the four successive dehydrogenation steps in CH4 dissociation are located using the dimer method. It is found that the energy barriers for the first three steps are rather close on the alloyed Ni/Fe and Ni surfaces, while the activation energy for CH dissociation is substantially lowered with the introduction of Fe. The dissolution of the generated C from the surface into the bulk of the Ni/Fe alloys is thermodynamically favorable, and the diffusion of C through catalyst particles is hindered by the Fe component. With the combination of density functional theory calculations and kinetic analysis, the C concentration in catalyst particles is predicted to increase with the Fe content. Meanwhile, other experimental conditions, such as the composition of carbon-containing gases, feedstock partial pressure, and reaction temperature, are also found to play a key role in determining the C concentration in bulk metal, and hence the microstructures of generated CNFs.

  10. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D.; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction.

  11. Unified Heat Kernel Regression for Diffusion, Kernel Smoothing and Wavelets on Manifolds and Its Application to Mandible Growth Modeling in CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Moo K.; Qiu, Anqi; Seo, Seongho; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel kernel regression framework for smoothing scalar surface data using the Laplace-Beltrami eigenfunctions. Starting with the heat kernel constructed from the eigenfunctions, we formulate a new bivariate kernel regression framework as a weighted eigenfunction expansion with the heat kernel as the weights. The new kernel regression is mathematically equivalent to isotropic heat diffusion, kernel smoothing and recently popular diffusion wavelets. Unlike many previous partial differential equation based approaches involving diffusion, our approach represents the solution of diffusion analytically, reducing numerical inaccuracy and slow convergence. The numerical implementation is validated on a unit sphere using spherical harmonics. As an illustration, we have applied the method in characterizing the localized growth pattern of mandible surfaces obtained in CT images from subjects between ages 0 and 20 years by regressing the length of displacement vectors with respect to the template surface. PMID:25791435

  12. Potential Role of Preoperative Conventional MRI Including Diffusion Measurements in Assessing Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Amplification Status in Patients with Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Young, R.J.; Gupta, A.; Shah, A.D.; Graber, J.J.; Schweitzer, A.D.; Prager, A.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Z.; Huse, J.; Omuro, A.M.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification is a common molecular event in glioblastomas. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential usefulness of morphologic and diffusion MR imaging signs in the prediction of epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification status in patients with glioblastoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS We analyzed pretreatment MR imaging scans from 147 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and correlated MR imaging features with tumor epidermal growth factor receptor amplification status. The following morphologic tumor MR imaging features were qualitatively assessed: 1) border sharpness, 2) cystic/necrotic change, 3) hemorrhage, 4) T2-isointense signal, 5) restricted water diffusion, 6) nodular enhancement, 7) subependymal enhancement, and 8) multifocal discontinuous enhancement. A total of 142 patients had DWI available for quantitative analysis. ADC maps were calculated, and the ADCmean, ADCmin, ADCmax, ADCROI, and ADCratio were measured. RESULTS Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification was present in 60 patients (40.8%) and absent in 87 patients (59.2%). Restricted water diffusion correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor amplification (P = .04), whereas the other 7 morphologic MR imaging signs did not (P > .12). Quantitative DWI analysis found that all ADC measurements correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor amplification, with the highest correlations found with ADCROI (P = .0003) and ADCmean (P = .0007). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest a role for diffusion MR imaging in the determination of epidermal growth factor receptor amplification status in glioblastoma. Additional work is necessary to confirm these results and isolate new imaging biomarkers capable of noninvasively characterizing the molecular status of these tumors. PMID:23811973

  13. CRAB Cavity in CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.

    2010-05-01

    Beam collisions with a crossing angle at the interaction point are often necessary in colliders to reduce the effects of parasitic collisions which induce emittance growth and decrease beam lifetime. The crossing angle reduces the geometrical overlap of the beams and hence the luminosity. Crab cavity offer a promising way to compensate the crossing angle and to realize effective head-on collisions. Moreover, the crab crossing mitigates the synchro-betatron resonances due to the crossing angle. A crab cavity experiment in SPS is proposed as a proof of principle before deciding on a full crab-cavity implementation in the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the effects of a single crab cavity on beam dynamics in the SPS and life time.

  14. Algal morphogenesis: modelling interspecific variation in Micrasterias with reaction--diffusion patterned catalysis of cell surface growth

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Semi-cell morphogenesis in unicellular desmid algae of the genus Micrasterias generates a stellar shape by repeated dichotomous branching of growing tips of the cell surface. The numerous species of the genus display variations of the branching pattern that differ markedly in number of branchings, lobe width and lobe length. We have modelled this morphogenesis, following previous work by D. M. Harrison and M. Kolar (1988), on the assumptions that patterning occurs by chemical reaction-diffusion activity within the plasma membrane, leading to morphological expression by patterned catalysis of the extension of the cell surface. The latter has been simulated in simplified form by two-dimensional computations. Our results indicate that for generation of repeated branchings and for the control of diverse species-specific shapes, the loss of patterning activity and of rapid growth in regions separating the active growing tips is an essential feature. We believe this conclusion to be much more general than the specific details of our model. We discuss the limitations of the model especially in terms of what extra features might be addressed in three-dimensional computation.

  15. A thin interface asymptotic for a phase-field model of epitaxial growth with different adatom diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, J.; Hubert, J.; Emmerich, H.

    2009-10-01

    Here we extend a phase-field model for epitaxial step-flow growth originally derived by Liu and Metiu to capture the case of different adatom diffusivities at neighboring terraces as well as an arbitrary Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Our extended model approach bridges the atomic to continuum scale in the sense that it takes into account atomic attachment kinetics in full detail and likewise allows to simulate long range transport processes above the surface efficiently. To verify the model we present a matched asymptotic analysis of the derived model equations, which shows that in a special limit the presented model can be related to the Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) model with different kinds of attachment coefficients at either side of a step edge. We demonstrate the capability of our approach by presenting numerical simulations with an Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier, which reproduce the well-known step meandering instability. Thereby we show how mathematical analysis helps to specify and validate a phase-field model and thus contributes to the further development of this modeling approach at the nano- to microscale.

  16. Nonvascular, Symplasmic Diffusion of Sucrose Cannot Satisfy the Carbon Demands of Growth in the Primary Root Tip of Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Bret-Harte, M. S.; Silk, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    Nonvascular, symplasmic transport of sucrose (Suc) was investigated theoretically in the primary root tip of maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 x Mo 17) seedlings. Symplasmic diffusion has been assumed to be the mechanism of transport of Suc to cells in the root apical meristem (R.T. Giaquinta, W. Lin, N.L. Sadler, V.R. Franceschi [1983] Plant Physiol 72: 362-367), which grow apical to the end of the phloem and must build all biomass with carbon supplied from the shoot or kernel. We derived an expression for the growth-sustaining Suc flux, which is the minimum longitudinal flux that would be required to meet the carbon demands of growth in the root apical meristem. We calculated this flux from data on root growth velocity, area, and biomass density, taking into account construction and maintenance respiration and the production of mucilage by the root cap. We then calculated the conductivity of the symplasmic pathway for diffusion, from anatomical data on cellular dimensions and the frequency and dimensions of plasmodesmata, and from two estimates of the diffusive conductance of a plasmodesma, derived from independent data. Then, the concentration gradients required to drive a growth-sustaining Suc flux by diffusion alone were calculated but were found not to be physiologically reasonable. We also calculated the hydraulic conductivity of the plasmodesmatal pathway and found that mass flow of Suc solution through plasmodesmata would also be insufficient, by itself, to satisfy the carbon demands of growth. However, much of the demand for water to cause cell expansion could be met by the water unloaded from the phloem while unloading Suc to satisfy the carbon demands of growth, and the hydraulic conductivity of plasmodesmata is high enough that much of that water could move symplasmically. Either our current understanding of plasmodesmatal ultrastructure and function is flawed, or alternative transport mechanisms must exist for Suc transport to the meristem. PMID:12232183

  17. Escape from cavity through narrow tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Barzykin, Alexander V.; Zitserman, Vladimir Yu.

    2009-06-01

    The paper deals with a diffusing particle that escapes from a cavity to the outer world through a narrow cylindrical tunnel. We derive expressions for the Laplace transforms of the particle survival probability, its lifetime probability density, and the mean lifetime. These results show how the quantities of interest depend on the geometric parameters (the cavity volume and the tunnel length and radius) and the particle diffusion coefficients in the cavity and in the tunnel. Earlier suggested expressions for the mean lifetime, which correspond to different escape scenarios, are contained in our result as special cases. In contrast to these expressions, our formula predicts correct asymptotic behavior of the mean lifetime in the absence of the cavity or tunnel. To test the accuracy of our approximate theory we compare the mean lifetime, the lifetime probability density, and the survival probability (the latter two are obtained by inverting their Laplace transforms numerically) with corresponding quantities found by solving numerically the three-dimensional diffusion equation, assuming that the cavity is a sphere and that the particle has the same diffusion coefficient in the cavity and in the tunnel. Comparison shows excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical results over a broad range of the geometric parameters of the problem.

  18. Pump cavities for compact pulsed Nd:YAG lasers: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Docchio, F.; Pallaro, L.; Svelto, O.

    1985-11-15

    Two elliptical cavities of different dimensions and eccentricity, one close-coupled diffusive cavity and one close-coupled reflecting cavity of our design, have been studied as a function of the type and geometry of the pumping cavity. A high efficiency is obtained with the two elliptical cavities, while a more uniform beam distribution is obtained with the two close-coupled cavities. The close-coupled reflective cavity gives comparable efficiency with respect to the diffusive type but a superior beam quality.

  19. Regulation of lipid composition in Acholeplasma laidlawii and Escherichia coli membranes: NMR studies of lipid lateral diffusion at different growth temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Göran; Orädd, Greger; Rilfors, Leif; Morein, Sven

    2002-09-24

    Lipid lateral diffusion coefficients have been directly determined by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy on macroscopically aligned, fully hydrated lamellar phases containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and total lipid extracts from Acholeplasma laidlawii and Escherichia coli. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient was of the Arrhenius type in the temperature interval studied. The sharp increase in the diffusion coefficient at the growth temperature of E. coli obtained by FRAP measurements, using a fluorescent probe molecule (Jin, A. J., Edidin, M., Nossal, R., and Gershfeld, N. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 13275-13278), was not observed. Thus, we conclude that the lipid structural properties (i.e., those affecting the lipid phase behavior), rather than the lipid dynamics, are involved in the adjustment of the membrane lipid composition. Further support for this conclusion is given by the finding that lipid extracts from A. laidlawii grown at different temperatures have about the same diffusion coefficients. Finally, the lipid lateral diffusion in bilayers of phospholipids was found to be much faster than that in bilayers of mainly glucolipids, which can be understood in terms of a free volume theory for the diffusion process. PMID:12234195

  20. Growth patterns and nuclear distribution in white muscle fibers from black sea bass, Centropristis striata: evidence for the influence of diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Priester, Carolina; Morton, Lindsay C.; Kinsey, Stephen T.; Watanabe, Wade O.; Dillaman, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY This study investigated the influence of fiber size on the distribution of nuclei and fiber growth patterns in white muscle of black sea bass, Centropristis striata, ranging in body mass from 0.45 to 4840 g. Nuclei were counted in 1 μm optical sections using confocal microscopy of DAPIand Acridine-Orange-stained muscle fibers. Mean fiber diameter increased from 36±0.87 μm in the 0.45 g fish to 280±5.47 μm in the 1885 g fish. Growth beyond 2000 g triggered the recruitment of smaller fibers, thus significantly reducing mean fiber diameter. Nuclei in the smaller fibers were exclusively subsarcolemmal (SS), whereas in larger fibers nuclei were more numerous and included intermyofibrillar (IM) nuclei. There was a significant effect of body mass on nuclear domain size (F=118.71, d.f.=3, P<0.0001), which increased to a maximum in fish of medium size (282–1885 g) and then decreased in large fish (>2000 g). Although an increase in the number of nuclei during fiber growth can help preserve the myonuclear domain, the appearance of IM nuclei during hypertrophic growth seems to be aimed at maintaining short effective diffusion distances for nuclear substrates and products. If only SS nuclei were present throughout growth, the diffusion distance would increase in proportion to the radius of the fibers. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in nuclear distribution and fiber growth patterns are mechanisms for avoiding diffusion limitation during animal growth. PMID:21430198

  1. Kinetics of growth of thin-films of Co2Si, Ni2Si, WSi2 and VSi2 during a reactive diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akintunde, S. O.; Selyshchev, P. A.

    A theoretical approach is developed which describes the growth kinetics of thin films of near noble metal silicide (especially of cobalt silicide (Co2Si) and nickel silicide (Ni2Si)) and refractory metal silicide (particularly of tungsten disilicide (WSi2) and vanadium disilicide (VSi2)) at the interfaces of metal-silicon system. In this approach, metal species are presented as A-atoms, silicon as B-atoms, and silicide as AB-compound. The AB-compound is formed as a result of chemical transformation between A- and B-atoms at the reaction interfaces A/AB and AB/B. The growth of AB-compound at the interfaces occurs in two stages. The first growth stage is reaction controlled stage which takes place at the interface with excess A or B-atoms and the second stage is diffusion limited stage which occurs at both interfaces. The critical thickness of AB-compound and the corresponding time is determined at the transition point between the two growth stages. The result that follows from this approach shows that the growth kinetics of any growing silicides depends on the number of kinds of dominant diffusing species in the silicide layer and also on their number densities at the reaction interface. This result shows a linear-parabolic growth kinetics for WSi2, VSi2, Co2Si, and Ni2Si and it is in good agreement with experiment.

  2. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  3. Effect of sputtered Cu film's diffusion barrier on the growth and field emission properties of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Chen, Ting; Feng, Tao; Chen, Yiwei; Que, Wenxiu; Lin, Lifeng; Sun, Zhuo

    2008-03-01

    Growth of carbon nanotube (CNT) films with good field emission properties on glass is very important for low cost field emission display (FED) applications. In addition to Ni, Co and Fe, Cu can be a good catalyst for CNT growth on glass, but due to diffusion into SiO2 it is difficult to control the CNTs density and uniformity. In this paper, four metal barrier layers (W, Ni, Cr, Ti) were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering on glass to reduce the Cu diffusion. As-grown CNT films showed various morphologies with the use of different barrier metals. CNTs with uniform distribution and better crystallinity can be synthesized only on Ti/Cu and W/Cu. Voltage current measurements indicate that better field emission properties of CNT films can be obtained on titanium and tungsten barriered Cu, while chromium and nickel are not suitable barrier candidates for copper in CNT-FED applications because of the reduced emission performance.

  4. Flow above natural and ventilated cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Merle, L.; Delannoy, Y.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents an experimental study of velocities and turbulent fluctuations, around two-dimensional vapor cavities in water. A Laser-Doppler Velocimeter was used above and in the wake of natural or ventilated cavities, attached to a ridge of the water tunnel. On the first half of the cavity, the boundary layer developing before the cavity, is convected above the interface and diffused. On the second half and in the wake, a large velocity defect and high level of fluctuations, created by the cavity itself, are observed. The effect of velocity and cavity length are investigated, whereas the suppression of mass transfer (ventilated cavity) only influence the results in the wake. The cavity deduced from an image processing technique show that the lowest measurement points are located in a two-phase flow medium, so that streamlines deduced from the velocities are not representative of the mass flow rate distribution. Further measurements are expected to give the mass flow rate towards the cavity.

  5. Effective diffusion of confined active Brownian swimmers.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Mario; Dagdug, Leornardo

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically find the effect of confinement and thermal fluctuations on the diffusivity of a spherical active swimmer moving inside a two-dimensional narrow cavity of general shape. The explicit formulas for the effective diffusion coefficient of a swimmer moving inside two particular cavities are presented. We also compare our analytical results with Brownian dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement. PMID:25615133

  6. Nitrogen doping study in ingot niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Makita, Junki

    2015-09-01

    Thermal diffusion of nitrogen in niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities at temperature ~800 C has resulted in the increase in quality factor with a low-field Q-rise extending to Bp > 90 mT. However, the maximum accelerating gradient of these doped cavities often deteriorates below the values achieved by standard treatments prior to doping. Here, we present the results of the measurements on ingot niobium cavities doped with nitrogen at 800 C. The rf measurements were carried out after the successive electropolishing to remove small amount of material from the inner surface layer. The result showed higher breakdown field with lower quality factor as material removal increases.

  7. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  8. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  9. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  10. Void Nucleation, Growth and Coalescence in Irradiated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Sturgeon, J B; Wolfer, W G

    2008-01-11

    A novel computational treatment of dense, stiff, coupled reaction rate equations is introduced to study the nucleation, growth, and possible coalescence of cavities during neutron irradiation of metals. Radiation damage is modeled by the creation of Frenkel pair defects and helium impurity atoms. A multi-dimensional cluster size distribution function allows independent evolution of the vacancy and helium content of cavities, distinguishing voids and bubbles. A model with sessile cavities and no cluster-cluster coalescence can result in a bimodal final cavity size distribution with coexistence of small, high-pressure bubbles and large, low-pressure voids. A model that includes unhindered cavity diffusion and coalescence ultimately removes the small helium bubbles from the system, leaving only large voids. The terminal void density is also reduced and the incubation period and terminal swelling rate can be greatly altered by cavity coalescence. Temperature-dependent trapping of voids/bubbles by precipitates and alterations in void surface diffusion from adsorbed impurities and internal gas pressure may give rise to intermediate swelling behavior through their effects on cavity mobility and coalescence.

  11. Photon storage cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1991-08-01

    A general analysis is presented of a photon storage cavity, coupled to free-electron laser (FEL) cavity. It is shown that if the coupling between the FEL cavity and the storage cavity is unidirectional (for example, a ring resonator storage cavity) then storage is possible, but that if the coupling is bi-directional then storage is not possible. Parameters are presented for an infra-red FEL storage cavity giving an order of magnitude increase in the instantaneous photon power within the storage cavity. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Up-Regulation of Intestinal Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor by Afa/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cane, Gaëlle; Moal, Vanessa Liévin-Le; Pagès, Gilles; Servin, Alain L.; Hofman, Paul; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis has been recently described as a novel component of inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been found increased in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis mucosa. To question whether a pro-inflammatory Escherichia coli could regulate the expression of VEGF in human intestinal epithelial cells, we examine the response of cultured human colonic T84 cells to infection by E. coli strain C1845 that belongs to the typical Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli family (Afa/Dr DAEC). Methodology VEGF mRNA expression was examined by Northern blotting and q-PCR. VEGF protein levels were assayed by ELISA and its bioactivity was analysed in endothelial cells. The bacterial factor involved in VEGF induction was identified using recombinant E. coli expressing Dr adhesin, purified Dr adhesin and lipopolysaccharide. The signaling pathway activated for the up-regulation of VEGF was identified using a blocking monoclonal anti-DAF antibody, Western blot analysis and specific pharmacological inhibitors. Principal Findings C1845 bacteria induce the production of VEGF protein which is bioactive. VEGF is induced by adhering C1845 in both a time- and bacteria concentration-dependent manner. This phenomenon is not cell line dependent since we reproduced this observation in intestinal LS174, Caco2/TC7 and INT407 cells. Up-regulation of VEGF production requires: (1) the interaction of the bacterial F1845 adhesin with the brush border-associated decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) acting as a bacterial receptor, and (2) the activation of a Src protein kinase upstream of the activation of the Erk and Akt signaling pathways. Conclusions Results demonstrate that a Afa/Dr DAEC strain induces an adhesin-dependent activation of DAF signaling that leads to the up-regulation of bioactive VEGF in cultured human intestinal cells. Thus, these results suggest a link between an entero-adherent, pro-inflammatory E. coli strain and angiogenesis which appeared recently as a novel component of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:18159242

  13. Induced- and alternating-current electro-osmotic control of the diffusion layer growth in a microchannel-membrane interface device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-11-01

    The passage of an electric current through an ionic permselective medium under an applied electric field is characterized by the formation of ionic concentration gradients, which result in regions of depleted and enriched ionic concentration at opposite ends of the medium. Induced-current electro-osmosis (ICEO) and alternating-current-electro-osmosis (ACEO) are shown to control the growth of the diffusion layer (DL) which, in turn, controls the diffusion limited ion transport through the microchannel-membrane system. We fabricated and tested devices made of a Nafion membrane connecting two opposite PDMS microchannels. An interdigitated electrode array was embedded within the microchannel with various distances from the microchannel-membrane interface. The induced ICEO (floating electrodes) / ACEO (active electrodes) vortices formed at the electrode array stir the fluid and thereby suppress the growth of the DL. The intensity of the ACEO vortices is controlled by either varying the voltage amplitude or the frequency, each having its own unique effect. Enhancement of the limiting current by on-demand control of the diffusion length is of importance in on-chip electro-dialysis, desalination and preconcentration of analytes.

  14. Unified heat kernel regression for diffusion, kernel smoothing and wavelets on manifolds and its application to mandible growth modeling in CT images.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Qiu, Anqi; Seo, Seongho; Vorperian, Houri K

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel kernel regression framework for smoothing scalar surface data using the Laplace-Beltrami eigenfunctions. Starting with the heat kernel constructed from the eigenfunctions, we formulate a new bivariate kernel regression framework as a weighted eigenfunction expansion with the heat kernel as the weights. The new kernel method is mathematically equivalent to isotropic heat diffusion, kernel smoothing and recently popular diffusion wavelets. The numerical implementation is validated on a unit sphere using spherical harmonics. As an illustration, the method is applied to characterize the localized growth pattern of mandible surfaces obtained in CT images between ages 0 and 20 by regressing the length of displacement vectors with respect to a surface template. PMID:25791435

  15. Kinetic characteristics of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic regularities of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity are investigated and the growth order and constants are determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is found that the stage in which the number of particles increases occurs in the range of mixed kinetics and their growth occurs in the diffusion range. The enhancing effect of additives HCO- 3 > C6H12O6 > F- and the retarding effect of Mg2+ are demonstrated. The HCO- 3 and Mg2+ additives, taken in high concentrations, affect the corresponding rate constants. It is revealed the crystallization in DPF is favorable for the growth of small crystallites, while the model solution of saliva is, vice versa, favorable for the growth of larger crystals.

  16. Simultaneous establishing of stationary growth rate and composition of supercritical droplets at isothermal binary condensation in the diffusion-controlled regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchma, Anatoly E.; Shchekin, Alexander K.; Kuni, Fedor M.

    2011-10-01

    General integral relations expressing the droplet radius and time of the droplet nonstationary growth as nonlinear functions of solution concentration in the droplet have been derived. These relations are valid for a supercritical droplet (i.e., sufficiently large droplet, for which the Laplace pressure effect on the concentration at saturation of vapors is negligible) isothermally growing via stationary diffusion in the mixture of two condensing vapors and an incondensable carrier gas. The initial composition in the droplet may be arbitrary and partial molecular volumes of components are not fixed. Explicit analytical relations have been found for droplet composition and the droplet size as functions of time at small deviations from the stationary concentration in the growing droplet. These relations show that the assumption of the steady droplet growth rate is not valid for non-small deviations from the stationary concentration. Some illustrations of the general nonlinear theory have been done in situation when solution in the droplet can be considered ideal.

  17. Investigation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline growth: Ga diffusion and surface morphology evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jun-feng; Liao, Cheng; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Hua-mu; Zhao, Kui

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ga diffusion in CIGS absorption layer after annealing treatment. • Phenomenon of surface reconstruction after annealing treatment. • Understand selenium effect on CIGS annealing process. • Explain the kinetic of Ga diffusion and MoSe{sub 2} formation. - Abstract: We report a study of selenization and annealing treatment of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) film. Morphologies and composition of surface and cross section were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra were used to investigate film structure. Depth profiles of element distributions were detected by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). A double-layer structure was formed in the film by selenizing metallic precursor at 450 °C. Further annealing at 600 °C in pure argon enhanced gallium diffusion from the bottom to the top of the film, while additional selenium in the annealing had a negative effect. A MoSe{sub 2} layer was detected between CIGS and Mo layers with annealing in additional Se. The annealing treatment also significantly modified the film surface morphology. A large amount of triangular and polygon shaped islands were observed by SEM. That might be due to different nucleation kinetics for different crystal facets.

  18. The Kinetic Theory of Growth of Zr-Sn Diffusion Layers on Zr55 Cu30 Al10 Ni5 Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Kan; Lin, Tie-Song; He, Peng; Sun, Jian-Fei

    2014-11-01

    The growth kinetics of the intermetallic compound layer between molten pure Sn and Zr55 Cu30 Al10 Ni5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) is mainly controlled by the diffusion mechanism at stage I at which the value of the time exponent is approximately 1/2, also there is unusual or unique stage II whose time exponent of the growth is suppressed to 1/3. It is deduced that phase transition such as nucleation, coalescence occurring in the vicinity of the interface of the diffusion layer within the BMG and the average size growing as one-third power of time, called the Lifshitz—Slezov law. A more elegant means of attack is based upon the Fokker—Planck approach, which permits us to calculate directly the probability of the distribution of steady-state thickness fluctuations. Physical implications of the analytical results also give the one-third power of time of distance scale. The transmission of Sn particles through a disorder system of the BMG, scattered by the local fluctuation levels, is the source of the time exponent from 1/2 to 1/3 as a macroscopic cumulative effect.

  19. Identification of Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins as novel regulators of pathogenic B-cell receptor signaling and tumor growth in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pore, D; Bodo, J; Danda, A; Yan, D; Phillips, J G; Lindner, D; Hill, B T; Smith, M R; Hsi, E D; Gupta, N

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a hematological cancer associated with an aggressive clinical course. The predominant subtypes of DLBCL display features of chronic or tonic B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. However, it is not known whether the spatial organization of the BCR contributes to the regulation of pro-survival signaling pathways and cell growth. Here, we show that primary DLBCL tumors and patient-derived DLBCL cell lines contain high levels of phosphorylated Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins. The surface BCRs in both activated B cell and germinal B cell subtype DLBCL cells co-segregate with phosphoERM suggesting that the cytoskeletal network may support localized BCR signaling and contribute to pathogenesis. Indeed, ablation of membrane-cytoskeletal linkages by dominant-negative mutants, pharmacological inhibition and knockdown of ERM proteins disrupted cell surface BCR organization, inhibited proximal and distal BCR signaling, and reduced the growth of DLBCL cell lines. In vivo administration of the ezrin inhibitor retarded the growth of DLBCL tumor xenografts, concomitant with reduction in intratumor phosphoERM levels, dampened pro-survival signaling and induction of apoptosis. Our results reveal a novel ERM-based spatial mechanism that is coopted by DLBCL cells to sustain tumor cell growth and survival. PMID:25801911

  20. Identification of Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins as novel regulators of pathogenic B cell receptor signaling and tumor growth in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Bodo, Juraj; Danda, Avinash; Yan, Di; Phillips, James G.; Lindner, Daniel; Hill, Brian T.; Smith, Mitchell R.; Hsi, Eric D.; Gupta, Neetu

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a hematological cancer associated with an aggressive clinical course. The predominant subtypes of DLBCL display features of chronic or tonic B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. However, it is not known if the spatial organization of the BCR contributes to regulation of pro-survival signaling pathways and cell growth. Here, we show that primary DLBCL tumors and patient-derived DLBCL cell lines contain high levels of phosphorylated Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins. The surface BCRs in both activated B cell and germinal B cell subtype DLBCL cells co-segregate with phosphoERM suggesting that the cytoskeletal network may support localized BCR signaling and contribute to pathogenesis. Indeed, ablation of membrane-cytoskeletal linkages by dominant negative mutants, pharmacological inhibition and knockdown of ERM proteins disrupted cell surface BCR organization, inhibited proximal and distal BCR signaling, and reduced the growth of DLBCL cell lines. In vivo administration of the ezrin inhibitor retarded the growth of DLBCL tumor xenografts, concomitant with reduction in intratumor phosphoERM levels, dampened pro-survival signaling and induction of apoptosis. Our results reveal a novel ERM-based spatial mechanism that is coopted by DLBCL cells to sustain tumor cell growth and survival. PMID:25801911

  1. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  2. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  3. mTOR and MEK1/2 inhibition differentially modulate tumor growth and the immune microenvironment in syngeneic models of oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Harrison; Shah, Sujay; Moore, Ellen; Caruso, Andria; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Van Waes, Carter; Allen, Clint

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mTOR and MEK1/2 inhibition on tumor growth and the tumor microenvironment in immunogenic and poorly immunogenic models of murine oral cancer. In vitro, rapamycin and PD901 inhibited signaling through expected downstream targets, but only PD901 reduced viability and altered function of MOC cells. Following transplantation of MOC cells into immune-competent mice, effects on both cancer and infiltrating immune cells were characterized following rapamycin and/or PD901 treatment for 21 days. In vivo, both rapamycin and PD901 inhibition reduced primary growth of established MOC tumors on treatment. Following withdrawal of PD901, rapid rebound of tumor growth limited survival, whereas durable tumor control was observed following rapamycin treatment in immunogenic MOC1 tumors despite more robust inhibition of oncogenic signaling by PD901. Characterization of the immune microenvironment revealed diminished infiltration and activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells and other immune cells following PD901 but not rapamycin in immunogenic tumors. Subsequent in vitro T-cell assays validated robust inhibition of T-cell expansion and activation following MEK inhibition compared to mTOR inhibition. CD8 cell depletion abrogated rapamycin-induced primary tumor growth inhibition in MOC1 mice. These data have critical implications in the design of combination targeted and immune therapies in oral cancer. PMID:26506415

  4. Effect of binding on escape from cavity through narrow tunnel.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2012-03-28

    When a diffusing particle escapes from a spherical cavity through a narrow, not too long tunnel, the escape kinetics is essentially single-exponential. The presence of reversible binding sites on the cavity wall leads to retention of the particle in the system and converts the single-exponential kinetics into bi-exponential. We develop a theory that describes these effects. The theory shows how the delay time and the average number of binding events depend on the geometric and kinetic parameters of the system. To study the effect of the cavity shape, we also analyze the kinetics when the particle escapes from a cylindrical cavity with reversible binding sites. PMID:22462838

  5. Effects of electron-phonon coupling and electron diffusion on ripples growth on ultrafast-laser-irradiated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Colombier, J. P.; Garrelie, F.; Faure, N.; Reynaud, S.; Bounhalli, M.; Audouard, E.; Stoian, R.; Pigeon, F.

    2012-01-15

    Metals exposed to ultrafast laser irradiation close to ablative regimes show often a submicron-scale (near 0.5 {mu}m) periodic organization of the surface as ripples. Using two classes of metallic materials (transition and noble), we have determined that the ripples amplitude is strongly correlated to the material transport properties, namely electron-phonon relaxation strength, electronic diffusion, and to the energy band characteristics of the electronic laser excitation. This particularly depends on the topology of the electronic structure, including d-band effects on electronic excitation. Comparing the effects of electron-phonon nonequilibrium lifetimes for the different metals under similar irradiation conditions, we indicate how the electron-phonon coupling strength affects the electronic thermal diffusion, the speed of phase transformation and impacts on the ripples contrast. The highest contrast is observed for ruthenium, where the electron-phonon coupling is the strongest, followed by tungsten, nickel, and copper, the latter with the least visible contrast. The dependence of surface patterns contrast with fluence is linked to the dependence of the relaxation characteristics with the electronic temperature.

  6. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  7. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  8. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  9. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  10. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  11. Cavity and dislocation instability due to electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Wang, W.; Suo, Z.

    1994-06-01

    ALECTRIC CURRENT drives atomic diffusion in aluminum lines. The phenomenon, known as electromigration, has been a persistent problem in integrated circuits, as the current density increases and the linewidth shrinks for every new generation of the technology. As atoms diffuse, cavities nucleate, enlarge and migrate. Evidence has accumulated that an aluminum line often fails when a rounded cavity collapses into a narrow slit across the width of the line. The fatal slits are often found to be transgranular, i.e. each slit cuts across a single grain. We investigate theoretically this instability phenomenon. Because the shape changes in a relatively short time below half the melting temperature of aluminum, atoms are assumed to diffuse only along the cavity surface, under the combined action of the electron wind and surface tension. When subjected to a small electric field, a circular cavity migrates as atoms diffuse from one portion of the cavity surface to another ; the cavity remains circular, so that capillarity does not drive diffusion. However, the cavity buckles above a critical electric field, elongating either along or normal to the electric field. The surface tension now drives the atomic diffusion to restore the circular shape. The instability sets in if the electric field prevails over the surface tension. The general problem is formulated in terms of nonlinear differential equations, and the pre-bifurcation, bifurcation and post-bifurcation solutions are discussed. In addition, we analyse an analogous phenomenon: a prismatic dislocation loop climbs due to core diffusion driven simultaneously by the electron wind and line tension. The climb relocates mass at relatively low temperatures and thereby degrades the aluminum lines.

  12. Modeling the cell-type dependence of diffusion-limited intracellular ice nucleation and growth during both vitrification and slow freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Geer; Zhang, Aili; Xu, Lisa X.; He, Xiaoming

    2009-06-01

    In this study, a set of models for predicting the diffusion-limited ice nucleation and growth inside biological cells were established. Both the heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation mechanisms were considered in the models. Molecular mobility including viscosity and mutual diffusion coefficient of aqueous cryoprotectant (i.e., glycerol here) solutions was estimated using models derived from the free volume theory for glass transition, which makes it possible to predict the two most important physical properties (i.e., viscosity and mutual diffusion coefficient) over wide ranges of temperature and concentration as encountered in cryopreservation. After being verified using experimental data, the models were used to predict the critical cooling rate (defined as the cooling rate required so that the crystallized volume is less than 0.1% of the cell volume) as a function of the initial glycerol concentration in a number of cell types with different sizes. For slowing freezing, it was found that the required critical cooling rate is cell-type dependent with influences from cell size and the ice nucleation and water transport parameters. In general, the critical cooling rate does not change significantly with the initial glycerol concentration used and tends to be higher for smaller cells. For vitrification, the required critical cooling rate does change significantly with the initial glycerol concentration used and tends to decrease with the decrease in cell size. However, the required critical cooling rate can be similar for cells with very different sizes. It was further found that the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for intracellular ice formation associated with different cells rather than the cell size per se significantly affect the critical cooling rates required for vitrification. For all cell types, it was found that homogeneous nucleation dominates at ultrafast cooling rates and/or high glycerol concentrations, whereas heterogeneous nucleation becomes important only during slow freezing with a low initial glycerol concentration (<1.5-2M), particularly for large cells such as mouse oocytes.

  13. Long-Term Functional Outcomes and Correlation with Regional Brain Connectivity by MRI Diffusion Tractography Metrics in a Near-Term Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Illa, Miriam; Eixarch, Elisenda; Batalle, Dafnis; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Figueras, Francesc; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) affects 5–10% of all newborns and is associated with increased risk of memory, attention and anxiety problems in late childhood and adolescence. The neurostructural correlates of long-term abnormal neurodevelopment associated with IUGR are unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the long-term functional and neurostructural correlates of abnormal neurodevelopment associated with IUGR in a near-term rabbit model (delivered at 30 days of gestation) and evaluate the development of quantitative imaging biomarkers of abnormal neurodevelopment based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters and connectivity. Methodology At +70 postnatal days, 10 cases and 11 controls were functionally evaluated with the Open Field Behavioral Test which evaluates anxiety and attention and the Object Recognition Task that evaluates short-term memory and attention. Subsequently, brains were collected, fixed and a high resolution MRI was performed. Differences in diffusion parameters were analyzed by means of voxel-based and connectivity analysis measuring the number of fibers reconstructed within anxiety, attention and short-term memory networks over the total fibers. Principal Findings The results of the neurobehavioral and cognitive assessment showed a significant higher degree of anxiety, attention and memory problems in cases compared to controls in most of the variables explored. Voxel-based analysis (VBA) revealed significant differences between groups in multiple brain regions mainly in grey matter structures, whereas connectivity analysis demonstrated lower ratios of fibers within the networks in cases, reaching the statistical significance only in the left hemisphere for both networks. Finally, VBA and connectivity results were also correlated with functional outcome. Conclusions The rabbit model used reproduced long-term functional impairments and their neurostructural correlates of abnormal neurodevelopment associated with IUGR. The description of the pattern of microstructural changes underlying functional defects may help to develop biomarkers based in diffusion MRI and connectivity analysis. PMID:24143189

  14. Crystal growth of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase, carboxypeptidase t, and thymidine phosphorylase on the international space station by the capillary counter-diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranova, I. P. Smirnova, E. A.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2011-09-15

    Crystals of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thymidine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli, carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris and its mutant forms, and crystals of complexes of these proteins with functional ligands and inhibitors were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the Japanese Experimental Module Kibo on the International Space Station. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction data sets suitable for the determination of high-resolution three-dimensional structures of these proteins were collected from the grown crystals on the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The conditions of crystal growth for the proteins and the data-collection statistics are reported. The crystals grown in microgravity diffracted to a higher resolution than crystals of the same proteins grown on Earth.

  15. Crystal growth of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase, carboxypeptidase t, and thymidine phosphorylase on the international space station by the capillary counter-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranova, I. P.; Smirnova, E. A.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2011-09-01

    Crystals of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thymidine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli, carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris and its mutant forms, and crystals of complexes of these proteins with functional ligands and inhibitors were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the Japanese Experimental Module Kibo on the International Space Station. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction data sets suitable for the determination of high-resolution three-dimensional structures of these proteins were collected from the grown crystals on the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The conditions of crystal growth for the proteins and the data-collection statistics are reported. The crystals grown in microgravity diffracted to a higher resolution than crystals of the same proteins grown on Earth.

  16. Effect of H and He irradiation on cavity formation and blistering in ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.

    2012-09-01

    Single- or poly-crystalline specimens of SiC, Si3N4, MgO, Al2O3 and MgAl2O4 were implanted with 0.4-1 MeV H+ or He+ ion beams at room temperature and 650 °C up to fluences of ˜1 × 1022/m2. This produced peak implanted gas and displacement damage levels as high as ˜50 at.% and 34 displacements per atom (dpa). The specimens were subsequently examined optically, and in cross-section using transmission electron microscopy. Subsurface blistering occurred for specimens irradiated to H or He fluences greater than about 3 × 1021/m2 (˜15 at.% peak implanted gas concentration), and surface exfoliation occurred for fluences above ˜1 × 1022/m2 (˜40 at.% implanted gas). Both helium and hydrogen had comparable effectiveness for inducing blistering and exfoliation on an atomic basis. The threshold blistering and exfoliation fluences for both ions were weakly dependent on temperature between 25 and 650 °C. Both H and He were found to be very effective in inducing matrix cavity formation, due to their low solubility in these ceramics. The implanted gas concentrations that resulted in visible cavity formation generally ranged from 1 to 5 at.%. Visible cavity formation was readily induced during room temperature irradiation despite the limited vacancy mobility in these ceramics at room temperature. Three general types of cavity morphologies were observed: isolated cavities, clusters of small cavities (typically associated with dislocation loops), and two-dimensional platelets. Cavity formation was observed to initiate at the periphery of dislocation loops in some cases. During elevated temperature irradiation, cavity formation was often observed to be preferentially associated with certain low-index habit planes, particularly if the habit plane was oriented nearly parallel to the irradiated surface: (0 0 0 1) and {1 1¯ 0 0} for Al2O3, (0 0 0 1) for α-SiC, {0 0 1} and {1 1 0} for MgO, and {1 1 0} and {1 1 1} for MgAl2O4. The bubble formation and blistering behavior of the ceramics was similar to that observed in other studies of metals irradiated at comparable homologous temperatures. Ionization-induced diffusion effects associated with dual-beam light ion irradiation appeared to exert only a weak effect on cavity and dislocation loop growth compared to the single ion irradiation conditions.

  17. Partial Cavity Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiharju, Simo; Lay, Keary; Yakushiji, Ryo; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2008-11-01

    The notion of using air to reduce a ship's frictional drag dates back to the 19^th century. Bubbles, air layers and air filled cavities have been proposed, but there has been little systematic research published. To address this, partial cavity drag reduction experiments were carried out at the W. B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel. The partial cavity was investigated at Reynolds numbers to 70 million and stable cavities with frictional drag reduction of more than 95% were attained. The model used was a 3 m wide and 12 m long flat plate with a plenum on the bottom. The design of the cavity was based on both linear gravity wave theory and two-dimensional inviscid numerical calculations. To create the partial cavity, air was injected at the base of an 18 cm backwards facing step 1.5 m from the nose of the plate. Frictional loads, free stream speed, air flow and cavity pressures were measured over a range of flow speeds and air fluxes. High speed video was used to investigate the unsteady three dimensional cavity closure. Cloud shedding, similar to sheet-cloud cavitation shedding with natural cavitation on hydrofoils, was observed at the closure.

  18. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  19. Raman cavity dump laser

    SciTech Connect

    Stultz, R.D.; Narhi, D.E.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes an improvement in a laser which includes a lasing medium within a resonant cavity. The improvement comprising: a Q-spoiler provided by a Raman medium which soils the Q of the resonant cavity by absorbing laser photons when the intensity of laser photons exceeds a threshold.

  20. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  1. Passivated niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  2. Metasurface external cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavitynot the sub-cavitiesdetermines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3 5.1 divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  3. Effects of growth temperature and oxidant feeding time on residual C- and N-related impurities and Si diffusion behavior in atomic-layer-deposited La2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Tae Joo; Sivasubramani, Prasanna; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-02-01

    The effects of oxidant (H2O) feeding time and growth temperature on the C- and N-related impurities and Si diffusion behavior in the atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) of La2O3 films were examined using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Longer H2O pulse time assisted in a complete ligand exchange reaction during ALD, which suppressed the accumulation in the film of residual C- and N-related byproducts/impurities with low bonding energy that originated from incompletely reacted ligands and carboxyl compound intermediate phases. In addition, this phenomenon slightly increased the growth rate of the La2O3 film even under the nominal growth-saturated ALD conditions because the concentration of residual C- and N-related byproducts/impurities, which disturb the formation of the active sites, was reduced. The band gap energy of the films increased slightly with H2O feeding time due to the reduction of C impurities. The residual C- and N-related byproducts/impurities and carboxyl compound intermediate phases in the La2O3 films were effectively reduced by increased growth temperature. However, increased growth temperature enhanced the Si out-diffusion from the substrate into the films and decreased the film growth rate because the surface functional groups for sequential film growth during ALD were reduced. The enhanced Si out-diffusion increased the band gap of the film and the valence band off-set with respect to the Si substrate.

  4. Homodimerization Controls the Fibroblast Growth Factor 9 Subfamily's Receptor Binding and Heparan Sulfate-Dependent Diffusion in the Extracellular Matrix▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Kalinina, Juliya; Byron, Sara A.; Makarenkova, Helen P.; Olsen, Shaun K.; Eliseenkova, Anna V.; Larochelle, William J.; Dhanabal, Mohanraj; Blais, Steven; Ornitz, David M.; Day, Loren A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Pollock, Pamela M.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling can lead to human diseases, necessitating multiple layers of self-regulatory control mechanisms to keep its activity in check. Herein, we demonstrate that FGF9 and FGF20 ligands undergo a reversible homodimerization, occluding their key receptor binding sites. To test the role of dimerization in ligand autoinhibition, we introduced structure-based mutations into the dimer interfaces of FGF9 and FGF20. The mutations weakened the ability of the ligands to dimerize, effectively increasing the concentrations of monomeric ligands capable of binding and activating their cognate FGF receptor in vitro and in living cells. Interestingly, the monomeric ligands exhibit reduced heparin binding, resulting in their increased radii of heparan sulfate-dependent diffusion and biologic action, as evidenced by the wider dilation area of ex vivo lung cultures in response to implanted mutant FGF9-loaded beads. Hence, our data demonstrate that homodimerization autoregulates FGF9 and FGF20's receptor binding and concentration gradients in the extracellular matrix. Our study is the first to implicate ligand dimerization as an autoregulatory mechanism for growth factor bioactivity and sets the stage for engineering modified FGF9 subfamily ligands, with desired activity for use in both basic and translational research. PMID:19564416

  5. Emittance control in rf cavities and solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraqi, Mohammad; Franchetti, Giuliano; Lombardi, Alessandra M.

    2009-02-01

    We study emittance growth for transport of uniform and Gaussian beams of particles in rf cavities and solenoids and show analytically its dependence on initial beam parameters. Analytical results are confirmed with simulation studies over a broad range of different initial beams.

  6. Carbon dioxide diffusion across stomata and mesophyll and photo-biochemical processes as affected by growth CO2 and phosphorus nutrition in cotton.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shardendu K; Badgujar, Girish; Reddy, Vangimalla R; Fleisher, David H; Bunce, James A

    2013-06-15

    Nutrients such as phosphorus may exert a major control over plant response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2), which is projected to double by the end of the 21st century. Elevated CO2 may overcome the diffusional limitations to photosynthesis posed by stomata and mesophyll and alter the photo-biochemical limitations resulting from phosphorus deficiency. To evaluate these ideas, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) was grown in controlled environment growth chambers with three levels of phosphate (Pi) supply (0.2, 0.05 and 0.01mM) and two levels of CO2 concentration (ambient 400 and elevated 800μmolmol(-1)) under optimum temperature and irrigation. Phosphate deficiency drastically inhibited photosynthetic characteristics and decreased cotton growth for both CO2 treatments. Under Pi stress, an apparent limitation to the photosynthetic potential was evident by CO2 diffusion through stomata and mesophyll, impairment of photosystem functioning and inhibition of biochemical process including the carboxylation efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxyganase and the rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration. The diffusional limitation posed by mesophyll was up to 58% greater than the limitation due to stomatal conductance (gs) under Pi stress. As expected, elevated CO2 reduced these diffusional limitations to photosynthesis across Pi levels; however, it failed to reduce the photo-biochemical limitations to photosynthesis in phosphorus deficient plants. Acclimation/down regulation of photosynthetic capacity was evident under elevated CO2 across Pi treatments. Despite a decrease in phosphorus, nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations in leaf tissue and reduced stomatal conductance at elevated CO2, the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf area when measured at the growth CO2 concentration tended to be higher for all except the lowest Pi treatment. Nevertheless, plant biomass increased at elevated CO2 across Pi nutrition with taller plants, increased leaf number and larger leaf area. PMID:23384758

  7. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  8. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been fabricated. The clad seamless tubes were produced using hot bonding or explosive bonding and subsequent flow forming. The thicknesses of Nb and Cu layers in the tube wall are about 1 and 3 mm respectively. The rf performance of the best NbCu clad cavities is similar to that of bulk Nb cavities. The highest accelerating gradient achieved was 40 MV /m . The advantages and disadvantages of hydroformed cavities are discussed in this paper.

  9. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been fabricated. The clad seamless tubes were produced using hot bonding or explosive bonding and subsequent flow forming. The thicknesses of Nb and Cu layers in the tube wall are about 1 and 3 mm respectively. The rf performance of the best NbCu clad cavities is similar to that of bulk Nb cavities. The highest accelerating gradient achieved was 40 MV/m. The advantages and disadvantages of hydroformed cavities are discussed in this paper.

  10. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been fabricated. The clad seamless tubes were produced using hot bonding or explosive bonding and subsequent flow forming. The thicknesses of Nb and Cu layers in the tube wall are about 1 and 3 mm respectively. The rf performance of the best NbCu clad cavities is similar to that of bulk Nb cavities. The highest accelerating gradient achieved was 40 MV/m. The advantages and disadvantages of hydroformed cavities are discussed in this paper.« less

  11. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  12. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  13. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, Junki; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  14. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Park; J. Yoo; K. Huang; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; J. F. Jue; B. Rabin; G. Moore; Y. H. Sohn

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45–345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the a-U phase was found between the UZr2 and U10Mo, while the Mo2Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the a-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si)3Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the a-U, Mo2Zr, and UZr2 phases.

  15. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K.; Keiser, D. D.; Jue, J. F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G.; Sohn, Y. H.

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45-345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr2 and U10Mo, while the Mo2Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si)3Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo2Zr, and UZr2 phases.

  16. Protein kinase CK2 is widely expressed in follicular, Burkitt and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and propels malignant B-cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Agostinelli, Claudio; Fuligni, Fabio; Benvenuti, Pietro; Mandato, Elisa; Casellato, Alessandro; Rugge, Massimo; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Pileri, Stefano A.

    2015-01-01

    Serine-threonine kinase CK2 is highly expressed and pivotal for survival and proliferation in multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma. Here, we investigated the expression of ? catalytic and ? regulatory CK2 subunits by immunohistochemistry in 57 follicular (FL), 18 Burkitt (BL), 52 diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and in normal reactive follicles. In silico evaluation of available Gene Expression Profile (GEP) data sets from patients and Western blot (WB) analysis in NHL cell-lines were also performed. Moreover, the novel, clinical-grade, ATP-competitive CK2-inhibitor CX-4945 (Silmitasertib) was assayed on lymphoma cells. CK2 was detected in 98.4% of cases with a trend towards a stronger CK2? immunostain in BL compared to FL and DLBCL. No significant differences were observed between Germinal Center B (GCB) and non-GCB DLBCL types. GEP data and WB confirmed elevated CK2 mRNA and protein levels as well as active phosphorylation of specific targets in NHL cells. CX-4945 caused a dose-dependent growth-arresting effect on GCB, non-GCB DLBCL and BL cell-lines and it efficiently shut off phosphorylation of NF-?B RelA and CDC37 on CK2 target sites. Thus, CK2 is highly expressed and could represent a suitable therapeutic target in BL, FL and DLBCL NHL. PMID:25788269

  17. Suppression of Cavity-Driven Flow Separation in a Simulated Mixed Compression Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    A test facility designed to simulate a bifurcated subsonic diffuser operating within a mixed compression inlet is described. The subsonic diffuser in this facility modeled a bypass cavity feature often used in mixed compression inlets for engine flow matching and normal shock control. A bypass cavity-driven flow separation was seen to occur in the subsonic diffuser without applied flow control. Flow control in the form of vortex generators and/or a partitioned bypass cavity cover plate were used to eliminate this flow separation, providing a 2% increase in area-averaged total pressure recovery, and a 70% reduction in circumferential distortion intensity.

  18. Wakefields in photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory R.; Bauer, Carl A.; Cary, John R.

    2009-07-01

    Simulations of charged particle beams in accelerator cavities show that a two-dimensional photonic crystal can be used to create a three-dimensional hybrid cavity with a single operating mode and no significant higher order modes, greatly reducing long-range wakefields. Optimizing the photonic crystal cavity to reduce radiation leakage in the desired mode (of a finite-sized structure) yields even lower wakefields. Wakefields in photonic crystal cavities are compared to those in metal pillbox cavities.

  19. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  20. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  1. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  2. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  3. The auroral plasma cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    A region of diminished plasma density has been found to occur at the source of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). The density within this auroral plasma cavity, determined from limited Hawkeye wave data, was less than 1/cu cm from 1.8 to 3 earth radii geocentric, at 70 deg + or - 3 deg invariant magnetic latitude. The altitude variation of the magnetic field produces a minimum in the ratio of plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency within the cavity which accounts for the observed spectrum of AKR.

  4. Enhanced fluorescence diffuse optical tomography with indocyanine green-encapsulating liposomes targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Xu, Yan; Hamby, Carl V; Backer, Marina V; Backer, Joseph M; Zhu, Quing

    2013-12-01

    To develop an indocyanine green (ICG) tracer with slower clearance kinetics, we explored ICG-encapsulating liposomes (Lip) in three different formulations: untargeted (Lip/ICG), targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (scVEGF-Lip/ICG) by the receptor-binding moiety single-chain VEGF (scVEGF), or decorated with inactivated scVEGF (inactive-Lip/ICG) that does not bind to VEGF receptors. Experiments were conducted with tumor-bearing mice that were placed in a scattering medium with tumors located at imaging depths of either 1.5 or 2.0 cm. Near-infrared fluorescence diffuse optical tomography that provides depth-resolved spatial distributions of fluorescence in tumor was used for the detection of postinjection fluorescent signals. All liposome-based tracers, as well as free ICG, were injected intravenously into mice in the amounts corresponding to 5 nmol of ICG/mouse, and the kinetics of increase and decrease of fluorescent signals in tumors were monitored. A signal from free ICG reached maximum at 15-min postinjection and then rapidly declined with t1/2 of ~20 min. The signals from untargeted Lip/ICG and inactive-Lip/ICG also reached maximum at 15-min postinjection, however, declined somewhat slower than free ICG with t1/2 of ~30 min. By contrast, a signal from targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG grew slower than that of all other tracers, reaching maximum at 30-min postinjection and declined much slower than that of other tracers with t1/2 of ~90 min, providing a more extended observation window. Higher scVEGF-Lip/ICG tumor accumulation was further confirmed by the analysis of fluorescence on cryosections of tumors that were harvested from animals at 400 min after injection with different tracers. PMID:24346856

  5. Enhanced fluorescence diffuse optical tomography with indocyanine green-encapsulating liposomes targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Xu, Yan; Hamby, Carl V.; Backer, Marina V.; Backer, Joseph M.; Zhu, Quing

    2013-12-01

    To develop an indocyanine green (ICG) tracer with slower clearance kinetics, we explored ICG-encapsulating liposomes (Lip) in three different formulations: untargeted (Lip/ICG), targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (scVEGF-Lip/ICG) by the receptor-binding moiety single-chain VEGF (scVEGF), or decorated with inactivated scVEGF (inactive-Lip/ICG) that does not bind to VEGF receptors. Experiments were conducted with tumor-bearing mice that were placed in a scattering medium with tumors located at imaging depths of either 1.5 or 2.0 cm. Near-infrared fluorescence diffuse optical tomography that provides depth-resolved spatial distributions of fluorescence in tumor was used for the detection of postinjection fluorescent signals. All liposome-based tracers, as well as free ICG, were injected intravenously into mice in the amounts corresponding to 5 nmol of ICG/mouse, and the kinetics of increase and decrease of fluorescent signals in tumors were monitored. A signal from free ICG reached maximum at 15-min postinjection and then rapidly declined with t of ˜20 min. The signals from untargeted Lip/ICG and inactive-Lip/ICG also reached maximum at 15-min postinjection, however, declined somewhat slower than free ICG with t of ˜30 min. By contrast, a signal from targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG grew slower than that of all other tracers, reaching maximum at 30-min postinjection and declined much slower than that of other tracers with t of ˜90 min, providing a more extended observation window. Higher scVEGF-Lip/ICG tumor accumulation was further confirmed by the analysis of fluorescence on cryosections of tumors that were harvested from animals at 400 min after injection with different tracers.

  6. Coupled Geomechanical Simulations of UCG Cavity Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y

    2009-07-13

    This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project to develop predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (both natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). In this paper we will focus upon the development of coupled geomechanical capabilities for simulating the evolution of the UCG cavity using discrete element methodologies. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) has unique advantages for facilitating the prediction of the mechanical response of fractured rock masses, such as cleated coal seams. In contrast with continuum approaches, the interfaces within the coal can be explicitly included and combinations of both elastic and plastic anisotropic response are simulated directly. Additionally, the DEM facilitates estimation of changes in hydraulic properties by providing estimates of changes in cleat aperture. Simulation of cavity evolution involves a range of coupled processes and the mechanical response of the host coal and adjoining rockmass plays a role in every stage of UCG operations. For example, cavity collapse during the burn has significant effect upon the rate of the burn itself. In the vicinity of the cavity, collapse and fracturing may result in enhanced hydraulic conductivity of the rock matrix in the coal and caprock above the burn chamber. Even far from the cavity, stresses due to subsidence may be sufficient to induce new fractures linking previously isolated aquifers. These mechanical processes are key in understanding the risk of unacceptable subsidence and the potential for groundwater contamination. These mechanical processes are inherently non-linear, involving significant inelastic response, especially in the region closest to the cavity. In addition, the response of the rock mass involves both continuum and discrete mechanical behavior. We have recently coupled the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) and NUFT (Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport) codes to investigate the interaction between combustion, water influx and mechanical response. The modifications to NUFT are described in detail in a companion paper. This paper considers the extension of the LDEC code and the application of the coupled tool to the simulation of cavity growth and collapse. The distinct element technology incorporated into LDEC is ideally suited to simulation of the progressive failure of the cleated coal mass by permitting the simulation of individual planes of weakness. We will present details of the coupling approach and then demonstrate the capability through simulation of several test cases.

  7. Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehei; R. Trautz; S. Finsterle; P. Cook; C. Ahlers

    2004-07-01

    Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.

  8. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat ?nan; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  9. Transport and reactions of gold in silicon containing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    We quantified the strength of Au binding on cavity walls and in precipitates of the Au-Si molten phase within Si over the temperature range 1023{endash}1123 K. Also determined was the diffusivity-solubility product of interstitial Au. These properties were obtained by using ion implantation and annealing to form multiple layers containing cavities or Au-Si precipitates and then measuring by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry the rate and extent of Au redistribution between layers during isothermal heating. Results were incorporated into a diffusion-reaction formalism describing the evolution of the coupled concentrations of interstitial Au, substitutional Au, Si interstitial atoms, and Si vacancies. Cavities were shown to be effective sinks for the gettering of Au from solution in Si. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  11. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  12. Hopf bifurcation in the driven cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.; Gustafson, Karl; Halasi, Kadosa

    1990-01-01

    The algorithm employed in the present incompressible two-dimensional calculations of an impulsively-started lid-driven cavity has its basis in the time-dependent stream-function equation. While a Crank-Nicholson differencing scheme is used for the diffusion terms, the Adams-Bashforth scheme is used for the convection terms. The periodic asymptotic solutions obtained for Reynolds numbers of 5000 and 10,000 are found to be precisely periodic; it is demonstrated that they have reached asymptotic states. The indicators of that achievement are discussed.

  13. Lithium diffusion at Si-C interfaces in silicon-graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; McNutt, N. W.; Nicholson, D. M.; Rios, O.; Keffer, D. J.

    2014-08-04

    Models of intercalated Li and its diffusion in Si-Graphene interfaces are investigated using density functional theory. Results suggest that the presence of interfaces alters the energetics of Li binding and diffusion significantly compared to bare Si or Graphene surfaces. Our results show that cavities along reconstructed Si surface provide diffusion paths for Li. Diffusion barriers calculated along these cavities are significantly lower than penetration barriers to bulk Si. Interaction with Si surface results in graphene defects, creating Li diffusion paths that are confined along the cavities but have still lower barrier than in bulk Si.

  14. Lithium diffusion at Si-C interfaces in Silicon-Graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; McNutt, Nichiolas William; Nicholson, Donald M.; Rios, Orlando; Keffer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Models of intercalated Li and its diffusion in Si-Graphene interfaces are investigated using Density Functional Theory. Results suggest that the presence of interfaces alters the energetics of Li binding and diffusion significantly compared to bare Si or Graphene surfaces. Our results show that cavities along reconstructed Si surface provide diffusion paths for Li. Diffusion barriers calculated along these cavities are significantly lower than penetration barriers to bulk Si. Interaction with Si surface results in graphene defects, creating Li diffusion paths that are confined along the cavities but have still lower barrier than in bulk Si.

  15. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  16. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-09-20

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth.

  17. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  18. External cavity laser biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chun; Lu, Meng; George, Sherine; Flood, Timothy A; Wagner, Clark; Zheng, Jie; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Eden, J Gary; Hergenrother, Paul J; Cunningham, Brian T

    2013-04-01

    Utilizing a tunable photonic crystal resonant reflector as a mirror of an external cavity laser cavity, we demonstrate a new type of label-free optical biosensor that achieves a high quality factor through the process of stimulated emission, while at the same time providing high sensitivity and large dynamic range. The photonic crystal is fabricated inexpensively from plastic materials, and its resonant wavelength is tuned by adsorption of biomolecules on its surface. Gain for the lasing process is provided by a semiconductor optical amplifier, resulting in a simple detection instrument that operates by normally incident noncontact illumination of the photonic crystal and direct back-reflection into the amplifier. We demonstrate single-mode, biomolecule-induced tuning of the continuous-wave laser wavelength. Because the approach incorporates external optical gain that is separate from the transducer, the device represents a significant advance over previous passive optical resonator biosensors and laser-based biosensors. PMID:23429747

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  20. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  1. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  2. Gyromultiplier with sectioned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Mishakin, S. V.

    2010-11-15

    A novel scheme of a self-exciting single-cavity terahertz gyromultiplier is proposed and theoretically investigated. Simulations predict a possibility to obtain a power of 75 W at the frequency of 1.3 THz from the 80 kV/0.7 A electron beam when operating at the fourth cyclotron harmonic at the relatively low magnetic field of 14 T.

  3. Single mode cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.W.; Levy, J.L.

    1984-01-17

    This external cavity laser utilizes an unstable resonator in conjuction with a high reflectivity stripe end mirror which is oriented substantially parallel to the plane of the maximum divergence of the laser diode output beam and whose axis is substantially parallel to the plane of the junction of the laser diode. This configuration operates with high efficiency to select only the fundamental mode of the laser diode with a minimal divergence in the output beam.

  4. A new cavity classification.

    PubMed

    Mount, G J; Hume, W R

    1998-06-01

    With the development of adhesive restorative materials and a far better understanding of the action of the fluoride ion it is suggested that the time has arrived for a reassessment of the traditional cavity classification as set out by G.V. Black over one hundred years ago. When preventive measures and remineralization fail and a carious lesion has progressed through the enamel into the dentine there is a need to remove the infected dentine, and possibly some of the affected dentine as well, to eliminate cavitation and avoid further accumulation of plaque. In most situations this will involve removal of enamel to achieve access to the infected dentine but, in the presence of fluoride, both enamel and dentine are capable of being remineralized and therefore conserved, at least to a degree. The principle of minimal extension must be encouraged to allow maximum preservation of natural tooth structure. A new cavity classification is proposed which is designed to make the most of the potential for healing which is inherent in both enamel and dentine. However, it must be accepted that a considerable proportion of restorative dentistry is carried out to replace failed restorations and, in this case, cavity design will be complicated by existing loss of tooth structure. PMID:9707777

  5. Rapid Optical Cavity PCR.

    PubMed

    Son, Jun Ho; Hong, SoonGweon; Haack, Amanda J; Gustafson, Lars; Song, Minsun; Hoxha, Ori; Lee, Luke P

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of deadly infectious diseases, such as Ebola and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, have motivated the research for accurate, rapid diagnostics that can be administered at the point of care. Nucleic acid biomarkers for these diseases can be amplified and quantified via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In order to solve the problems of conventional PCR-speed, uniform heating and cooling, and massive metal heating blocks-an innovative optofluidic cavity PCR method using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is accomplished. Using this device, 30 thermal cycles between 94 °C and 68 °C can be accomplished in 4 min for 1.3 μL (10 min for 10 μL). Simulation results show that temperature differences across the 750 μm thick cavity are less than 2 °C and 0.2 °C, respectively, at 94 °C and 68 °C. Nucleic acid concentrations as low as 10(-8) ng μL(-1) (2 DNA copies per μL) can be amplified with 40 PCR thermal cycles. This simple, ultrafast, precise, robust, and low-cost optofluidic cavity PCR is favorable for advanced molecular diagnostics and precision medicine. It is especially important for the development of lightweight, point-of-care devices for use in both developing and developed countries. PMID:26592501

  6. Plasmapause diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Bohm diffusion coefficient and observed electrostatic wave scattering are used as the bases of estimates of the smoothing effect that diffusion may have on steep plasmapause density gradients. The estimate for diffusion resulting from scattering by observed electrostatic waves is found to be much lower than that of the perpendicular Bohm diffusion coefficient for characteristic plasma temperatures and magnetic fields. This diffusion rate estimate may be too small, however, if the wave amplitudes are significantly higher for steep plasmapauses. The effects are therefore negligible for most considerations of macroscopic plasmapause dynamics, but may be significant in limiting drift wave instabilities and similar phenomena driven by the steepness of the plasmapause density gradient.

  7. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  8. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  9. Dispersion enhancement in atom-cavity and coupled cavity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, H.

    2013-03-01

    We present an entirely linear all-optical method of dispersion enhancement using coupled cavities that leads to a substantial increase in system transmission in comparison with atom-cavity systems. This is achieved by tuning the system to an anomalous dispersion condition by under-coupling at least one of the cavities to the other. The intracavity anomalous dispersion is then associated with a dip in reflection (and in turn with a peak in transmission) rather than with an absorption resonance as in the case of the atomic vapor. We find that in contrast with the atom-cavity system where mode reshaping always contributes to the mode pushing, in coupled cavity systems reshaping of the mode profile can either contribute to or oppose the mode pushing, and even reverse it under appropriate conditions leading to a reduced scale factor in transmission. We demonstrate a method for further optimizing the transmission of both atom-cavity and coupled-cavity systems, but show that this leads to a more rectangular mode profile and a reduction in the scale factor bandwidth. We also derive the cavity scale factor in reflection for both atom-cavity and coupled cavity systems and show that in reflection the reshaping of the mode profile can either contribute to or oppose the mode pushing, but cannot reverse it.

  10. Pb-Zn liquid metal diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B., Sr.; Winter, J. M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Lead-Zinc binary equilibrium system is currently being investigated. Ground based studies of this system were performed to examine the possibility of obtaining a couple which, after diffusion, could be examined continuously along the diffusion axis by quantitative metallography to determine the extent of diffusion. The specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscope to provide exact information on the chemical composition gradient. Two diffusion experiments were run simultaneously in the multipurpose furnace, each in its own isothermal cavity. Two flight samples, two flight backup samples, and two flight space samples were generated.

  11. Interaction of cavities with misfit dislocations in SiGe/Si heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Floro, J.A.; Lee, S.R.

    1996-09-01

    Consequences of the strong, short-range attractive interaction between cavities and misfit dislocations are examined in SiGe/Si heterostructures. When He is implanted at the SiGe/Si interface, either in situ during epitaxial growth or by post-growth treatment, cavities form and locate on the misfit dislocation cores. The misfit dislocations are no longer straight lines extending over several microns, but form a network with jogs and intersections at the cavities. The He-implanted cavity layer enhances thermal relaxation of the strained alloy and may increase the achievable degree of relaxation by lowering dislocation energies.

  12. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities. PMID:25424655

  13. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  14. Sporadic segmental Interstitial cell of cajal hyperplasia (microscopic GIST) with unusual diffuse longitudinal growth replacing the muscularis propria: differential diagnosis to hereditary GIST syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Agaimy, Abbas; Märkl, Bruno; Arnholdt, Hans; Hartmann, Arndt; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Chetty, Runjan

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) usually form a well-circumscribed mass. However, patients with germline mutations in c-KIT, PDGFRA and NF1 may present with diffuse interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) hyperplasia along the Auer-bach plexus without forming a discrete mass. To our knowledge, sporadic diffuse ICC hyperplasia replacing the gut wall has not been described previously. We describe herein two such cases. Case 1 was a 59-yr-old woman who presented with signs of ileus and a large mass submitted as Meckel diverticulum. The resection specimen showed a large GIST with diverticulum-like and solid areas. The diverticular component showed a diffuse proliferation of spindle cells extending for several centimetres from the solid tumor replacing the full thickness of the gut wall and lined by intact mucosa. Mutation analysis revealed a combined deletion/insertion in c-KIT exon 11 (V560delEins) in both the solid and the diffuse tumor component. Case 2 was a 66-yr-old man who underwent segmental sigmoid colon resection for adenocarcinoma in a villous adenoma. Random sections from grossly unremarkable colonic wall showed a diffuse proliferation of CD117+/CD34+ spindle cells completely replacing the muscularis propria for a length of 6 mm. Molecular analysis revealed a somatic point mutation/ deletion in exon 11 of c-KIT (Q575L; L576_W582del). Absence of multiple lesions and demonstration of a wild-type sequence for c-KIT in surrounding normal tissue ruled out the possibility of a germline mutation in both cases. This peculiar diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia results from somatic c-KIT mutations and must be distinguished from syndromic ICC hyperplasia associated with hereditary GIST syndromes. PMID:20606738

  15. Cavity-Loss Induced Plateau in Coupled Cavity QED Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuge, Tatsuro; Kamide, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2014-12-01

    Nonequilibrium steady states are investigated in a coupled cavity QED array system which is pumped by a thermal bath and dissipated through cavity loss. In the coherent (non-zero photon amplitude) phase, plateau regions appear, where the steady states become unchanged against the variation of the chemical potential of the thermal bath. The cavity loss plays a crucial role for the plateaus: the plateaus appear only if the cavity loss exists, and the photon leakage current, which is induced by the loss, is essential to the mechanism of the plateaus.

  16. Elemental diffusion during the droplet epitaxy growth of In(Ga)As/GaAs(001) quantum dots by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z. B.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y. B.; Liao, X. Z.; Lei, W.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.; Zou, J.; Ringer, S. P.

    2014-01-13

    Droplet epitaxy is an important method to produce epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Droplet epitaxy of III-V QDs comprises group III elemental droplet deposition and the droplet crystallization through the introduction of group V elements. Here, we report that, in the droplet epitaxy of InAs/GaAs(001) QDs using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, significant elemental diffusion from the substrate to In droplets occurs, resulting in the formation of In(Ga)As crystals, before As flux is provided. The supply of As flux suppresses the further elemental diffusion from the substrate and promotes surface migration, leading to large island formation with a low island density.

  17. Multicolor cavity metrology.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kiwamu; Arai, Koji; Barr, Bryan; Betzwieser, Joseph; Brooks, Aidan; Dahl, Katrin; Doravari, Suresh; Driggers, Jennifer C; Korth, W Zach; Miao, Haixing; Rollins, Jameson; Vass, Stephen; Yeaton-Massey, David; Adhikari, Rana X

    2012-10-01

    Long-baseline laser interferometers used for gravitational-wave detection have proven to be very complicated to control. In order to have sufficient sensitivity to astrophysical gravitational waves, a set of multiple coupled optical cavities comprising the interferometer must be brought into resonance with the laser field. A set of multi-input, multi-output servos then lock these cavities into place via feedback control. This procedure, known as lock acquisition, has proven to be a vexing problem and has reduced greatly the reliability and duty factor of the past generation of laser interferometers. In this article, we describe a technique for bringing the interferometer from an uncontrolled state into resonance by using harmonically related external fields to provide a deterministic hierarchical control. This technique reduces the effect of the external seismic disturbances by 4 orders of magnitude and promises to greatly enhance the stability and reliability of the current generation of gravitational-wave detectors. The possibility for using multicolor techniques to overcome current quantum and thermal noise limits is also discussed. PMID:23201656

  18. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  19. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  20. Landau cavities at MAX II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgsson, M.; Andersson, Å.; Eriksson, M.

    Passive Landau cavities have been built, installed and taken into regular operation in the MAX II ring. The purpose of the Landau damping system is twofold: to decrease the energy spread of the beam induced by coupled bunch oscillations and to increase the Touschek life-time. The cavities are of the pillbox type operated at 1500 MHz, the third harmonic of the main RF. This paper describes the design, tuning and operational results of the cavities.

  1. Loading a single photon into an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shengwang; Liu, Chang; Sun, Yuan; Zhao, Luwei; Zhang, Shanchao; Loy, M. M. T.

    2015-05-01

    Confining and manipulating single photons inside a reflective optical cavity is an essential task of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) for probing the quantum nature of light quanta. Such systems are also elementary building blocks for many protocols of quantum network, where remote cavity quantum nodes are coupled through flying photons. The connectivity and scalability of such a quantum network strongly depends on the efficiency of loading a single photon into cavity. In this work we demonstrate that a single photon with an optimal temporal waveform can be efficiently loaded into a cavity. Using heralded narrow-band single photons with exponential growth wave packet whose time constant matches the photon lifetime in the cavity, we demonstrate a loading efficiency of more than 87 percent from free space to a single-sided Fabry-Perot cavity. Our result and approach may enable promising applications in realizing large-scale CQED-based quantum networks. The work was supported by the Hong Kong RGC (Project No. 601411).

  2. Anomalous Diffusion Near Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Synchro-betatron resonances can lead to emittance growth and the loss of luminosity. We consider the detailed dynamics of a bunch near such a low order resonance driven by crossing angles at the collision points. We characterize the nature of diffusion and find that it is anomalous and sub-diffusive. This affects both the shape of the beam distribution and the time scales for growth. Predictions of a simplified anomalous diffusion model are compared with direct simulations. Transport of particles near resonances is still not a well understood phenomenon. Often, without justification, phase space motion is assumed to be a normal diffusion process although at least one case of anomalous diffusion in beam dynamics has been reported [1]. Here we will focus on the motion near synchro-betatron resonances which can be excited by several means, including beams crossing at an angle at the collision points as in the LHC. We will consider low order resonances which couple the horizontal and longitudinal planes, both for simplicity and to observe large effects over short time scales. While the tunes we consider are not practical for a collider, nonetheless the transport mechanisms we uncover are also likely to operate at higher order resonances.

  3. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  4. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  5. Effects of surface diffusion on high temperature selective emitters.

    PubMed

    Peykov, Daniel; Yeng, Yi Xiang; Celanovic, Ivan; Joannopoulos, John D; Schuh, Christopher A

    2015-04-20

    Using morphological and optical simulations of 1D tantalum photonic crystals at 1200K, surface diffusion was determined to gradually reduce the efficiency of selective emitters. This was attributed to shifting resonance peaks and declining emissivity caused by changes to the cavity dimensions and the aperture width. Decreasing the structure's curvature through larger periods and smaller cavity widths, as well as generating smoother transitions in curvature through the introduction of rounded cavities, was found to alleviate this degradation. An optimized structure, that shows both high efficiency selective emissivity and resistance to surface diffusion, was presented. PMID:25969039

  6. Convection-Enhanced Transport into Open Cavities : Effect of Cavity Aspect Ratio.

    PubMed

    Horner, Marc; Metcalfe, Guy; Ottino, J M

    2015-09-01

    Recirculating fluid regions occur in the human body both naturally and pathologically. Diffusion is commonly considered the predominant mechanism for mass transport into a recirculating flow region. While this may be true for steady flows, one must also consider the possibility of convective fluid exchange when the outer (free stream) flow is transient. In the case of an open cavity, convective exchange occurs via the formation of lobes at the downstream attachment point of the separating streamline. Previous studies revealed the effect of forcing amplitude and frequency on material transport rates into a square cavity (Horner in J Fluid Mech 452:199-229, 2002). This paper summarizes the effect of cavity aspect ratio on exchange rates. The transport process is characterized using both computational fluid dynamics modeling and dye-advection experiments. Lagrangian analysis of the computed flow field reveals the existence of turnstile lobe transport for this class of flows. Experiments show that material exchange rates do not vary linearly as a function of the cavity aspect ratio (A = W/H). Rather, optima are predicted for A ≈ 2 and A ≈ 2.73, with a minimum occurring at A ≈ 2.5. The minimum occurs at the point where the cavity flow structure bifurcates from a single recirculating flow cell into two corner eddies. These results have significant implications for mass transport environments where the geometry of the flow domain evolves with time, such as coronary stents and growing aneurysms. Indeed, device designers may be able to take advantage of the turnstile-lobe transport mechanism to tailor deposition rates near newly implanted medical devices. PMID:26577366

  7. Spatially-resolved spectral image of a microwave-induced plasma with Okamoto-cavity for nitridation of steel substrate.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeo; Arai, Yuuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    When a nitrogen microwave-induced plasma produced with an Okamoto-cavity was employed as a source for the nitridation of steel samples, the characteristics of the plasma were investigated by analyzing a spatially-resolved emission image of nitrogen excited species obtained with a two-dimensionally imaging spectrograph. Our previous study had reported on an excellent performance of the Okamoto-cavity microwave-induced plasma (MIP), enabling a nitrided layer having a several-micrometer-thickness to form on an iron substrate, even if the treatment is completed within 1 min, which is superior to a conventional plasma nitriding using low-pressure glow discharges requiring a prolonged treatment time. In this paper, the reason for this is discussed based on a spectrometric investigation. The emission images of band heads of nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecule ion extended toward the axial/radial directions of the plasma at larger microwave powers supplied to the MIP, thus elevating the number density of the excited species of nitrogen, which would activate any chemical reaction on the iron substrate. However, a drastic increase in the growth rate of the nitrided layer when increasing the microwave power from 600 to 700 W, which had been observed in our previous study, could not be explained only from such a variation in the excited species of nitrogen. This result is probably because the growth process is dominantly controlled by thermal diffusion of nitrogen atom after it enters into the iron substrate, where the substrate temperature is the most important parameter concerning the mobility in the iron lattice. Therefore, the Okamoto-cavity MIP could contribute to a thermal source through radiative heating as well as a source of nitrogen excited species, especially in the growth process of the nitrided layer. PMID:24521910

  8. A scanning cavity microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm2; we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  9. High reflected cubic cavity as long path absorption cell for infrared gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    One direct and efficient method to improve the sensitivity of infrared gas sensors is to increase the optical path length of gas cells according to Beer-Lambert Law. In this paper, cubic shaped cavities with high reflected inner coating as novel long path absorption cells for infrared gas sensing were developed. The effective optical path length (EOPL) for a single cubic cavity and tandem cubic cavities were investigated based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measuring oxygen P11 line at 763 nm. The law of EOPL of a diffuse cubic cavity in relation with the reflectivity of the coating, the port fraction and side length of the cavity was obtained. Experimental results manifested an increase of EOPL for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of port fraction of the connecting aperture f', and the EOPL equaled to the sum of that of two single cubic cavities at f'<0.01. The EOPL spectra at infrared wavelength range for different inner coatings including high diffuse coatings and high reflected metallic thin film coatings were deduced.

  10. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E.; Norby, Richard J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-01-01

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and therefore overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 to 1,057 PgC for the period of 1901–2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, which is large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earth system models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC/y/ppm. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2 limited than previously thought. PMID:25313079

  11. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E.; Norby, Richard J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-10-13

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earthmore » System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.« less

  12. Impact of Mesophyll Diffusion on Estimated Global Land CO2 Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Gu, L.; Dickinson, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earth System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.

  13. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  14. FORWARD MODELING CAVITY DENSITY: A MULTI-INSTRUMENT DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, D. J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2011-05-20

    The thermodynamic properties of coronal prominence cavities present a unique probe into the energy and mass budget of prominences. Using a three-dimensional morphological model, we forward model the polarization brightness and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) emission of a cavity and its surrounding streamer. Using a genetic algorithm, we find the best-fit density model by comparing the models to Mauna Loa Solar Observatory MK4 and Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer data. The effect of temperature variations on the derived density is also measured. We have measured the density inside a cavity down to 1.05 R{sub sun} with height-dependent error bars. Our forward modeling technique compensates for optically thin projection effects. This method provides a complementary technique to traditional line ratio diagnostics that is useful for diffuse off-limb coronal structures.

  15. Forward Modeling Cavity Density: A Multi-instrument Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2011-05-01

    The thermodynamic properties of coronal prominence cavities present a unique probe into the energy and mass budget of prominences. Using a three-dimensional morphological model, we forward model the polarization brightness and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) emission of a cavity and its surrounding streamer. Using a genetic algorithm, we find the best-fit density model by comparing the models to Mauna Loa Solar Observatory MK4 and Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer data. The effect of temperature variations on the derived density is also measured. We have measured the density inside a cavity down to 1.05 R sun with height-dependent error bars. Our forward modeling technique compensates for optically thin projection effects. This method provides a complementary technique to traditional line ratio diagnostics that is useful for diffuse off-limb coronal structures.

  16. Beam breakup instability experiments on long-pulse electron-beam transport through rf cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menge, Peter R.; Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Bosch, Robert A.; Ching, Chi H.; Spencer, Thomas A.; Walter, M. T.

    1992-04-01

    Experiments designed to investigate the beam breakup (BBU) instability have been performed using the long-pulse MELBA electron-beam generator (0.5 - 1.5 microsecond(s) , 0.7 - 0.8 MV, ldiode equals 1 - 15 kA, lextracted equals 0.1 - 0.5 kA). The experiment consists of 10 identical pillbox cavities each containing a small microwave loop antenna designed to detect the TM110 beam breakup mode. For our cavity design the TM110 resonant frequency occurs at approximately 2.5 GHz. The cavities are connected by small diameter tubes which attenuate the RF cavity-to-cavity crosstalk. The MELBA diode and subsequent cavity system are immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field (0.8 - 3 kG). Microwaves of 2.5 GHz (1 - 4 kW), whose pulselength exceeds the beam pulse, can be injected into the initial cavity in order to prime the BBU instability. BBU instability growth is measured through the growth of 2.5 GHz RF between the first (or second) and tenth cavities. The BBU growth is compared with predictions made by beam-cavity coupled-mode theory.

  17. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  18. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  19. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  1. Gigahertz Modulation of a Photonic Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aaron Karim Taylor

    Photonic crystal (PtC) cavities are an increasingly important way to create all optical methods to control optical data. Not only must the data be controlled, but interfacing it with high frequency electrical signals is particularly interesting especially if this occurs in the 1.55microm telecom band. We present an experiment that uses Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to modulate the frequency of the guided mode of an L3-cavity PtC created on a silicon slab. This work has the potential to interface optical and electrical signals via a mechanical strain wave operating at gigahertz frequencies. Defects are carefully designed into a triangular lattice PtC to realize a waveguide coupled optical cavity. The cavity can be experimentally accessed through grating couplers excited by polarized light at 10° incidence from normal. The optical components are fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator platform, with light confined to the silicon slab region. Through transmission experiments, the L3 cavity was found to have a narrow resonance characterized by a Lorentzian distribution. A quality factor of 165 centered at 6255cm --1 (1.599microm) was measured. Aluminum interdigitated transducers (IDTs) were fabricated through a lithography liftoff process. Their ability to create SAWs requires a piezoelectric medium. As silicon does not have this property, growth of a thin ZnO film was required. The transducers were measured using a network analyzer and were found to produce Rayleigh SAWs at a frequency of 179MHz and a wavelength of 24microm. The acoustic energy traveled 70microm to the target optical device. The L3 cavity has dimensions of around 4microm a side - less than 1/2 a SAW wavelength. Modulation of the L3 PtC resonant frequency was monitored through a repeat of the transmission experiment but with RF excitation of the IDTs at the SAW frequency. A broadening of the transmission spectrum was expected. Unfortunately no change in the fitting parameters could be measured. An HF etch was used to undercut the L3 PtC such that a silicon slab suspended in air could be realized. Simulations had been conducted showing an order of magnitude increase in the quality factor was possible. Broken wirebonds on the transducers created unintended etch channels rendering the SAW non-operational.

  2. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  3. LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

    2014-11-11

    An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

  4. Temporary Sealing of Cavities for Leak Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, J.

    1984-01-01

    Wax Seals cavity openings to permit helium leak test of cavity welds. Technique facilitates leak testing of cavities in components of larger systems not otherwise sealed off at time leak testing done.

  5. Laser Scanner for Tile-Cavity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, Stanley Y.; Wykes, Donald H.; Hagen, George R.; Lotgering, Gene E.; Gaynor, Michael B.; Westerlund, Paul G.; Baal, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    Irregular surfaces mapped and digitized for numerical-control machinery. Fast, accurate laser scanning system measures size and shape of cavity without making any physical contact with cavity and walls. Measurements processed into control signals for numerically controlled machining of tile or block to fit cavity. System generates map of grid points representing cavity and portion of outer surface surrounding cavity. Map data used to control milling machine, which cuts tile or block to fit in cavity.

  6. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  7. Enhanced diffusion welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Surfaces of unrecrystallized alloys are sanded and polished. This is followed by a two-step welding process by which the strength of the parent metal is retained at the weld joint. The first step forces the surfaces into intimate contact at a temperature where the metal still has good ductility. The second step causes diffusion, recrystallization, and grain growth across the original weld interface.

  8. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-15

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schroedinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  9. Preliminary Experience with ''In-Site'' Baking of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    P. Kneisel

    2000-01-01

    In a series of experiments several single cell and multi-cell niobium cavities made from reactor grade and high RRR niobium (frequencies were 700 MHz, 1300 MHz and 1497 MHz) have been baked--after initial testing--in-situ around 145 C for up to 90 hours prior to being recooled. Surprisingly, all cavities showed significant improvements in Q-values between 4.2 and 1.6K. The BCS surface resistance was lowered by nearly a factor of two. This cannot be explained by solely a reduction of dielectric losses caused by adsorbates at the surface or by a decrease of the mean free path due to possibly diffusion of oxygen into the surface layer. In several experiments also the high field behavior of the cavity improved after the in-situ baking procedure. The observed effect opens the possibility for the CEBAF upgrade cavities, which in turn will permit to run the cavities at higher gradients if field emission loading can be prevented. Utilizing this effect can possibly translate into sizeable cost savings since fewer modules are needed for the upgrade program.

  10. Nonlocal intracranial cavity extraction.

    PubMed

    Manjón, José V; Eskildsen, Simon F; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E; Collins, D Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  11. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  12. Hopf bifurcation in the driven cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.; Gustafson, Karl; Halasi, Kadosa

    1989-01-01

    Incompressible two dimensional calculations are reported for the impulsively started lid driven cavity with aspect ratio two. The algorithm is based on the time dependent streamfunction equation, with a Crank-Nicolson differencing scheme for the diffusion terms, and with an Adams-Bashforth scheme for the convection terms. A multigrid method is used to solve the linear implicit equations at each time step. Periodic asymptotic solutions have been found for Re = 10000 and for Re = 5000. The Re = 5000 results are validated by grid refinement calculations. The solutions are shown to be precisely periodic, and care is taken to demonstrate that asymptotic states were reached. A discussion is included about the indicators that are used to show that an asymptotic state was reached, and to show that the asymptotic state is indeed periodic.

  13. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  14. Absolute stability of dynamic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanov, N. N.

    2015-07-01

    The field structure in a cavity composed of an oscillating plane mirror and an immobile spherical mirror has been analyzed within the paraxial approximation. Relations between the radius of curvature of the spherical mirror and the distance between the mirrors at which the initially paraxial beam remains paraxial after multiple propagations through the cavity have been determined. It is shown that the stability is absolute, in contrast to the case of a static cavity (with immobile mirrors); i.e., deviations from the axial direction decrease exponentially with time.

  15. Novel Crab Cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Sah, R.; Rimmer, B.; Wang, H.

    2011-03-01

    A 20-50 MV integrated transverse voltage is required for the Electron-Ion Collider. The most promising of the crab cavity designs that have been proposed in the last five years are the TEM type crab cavities because of the higher transverse impedance. The TEM design approach is extended here to a hybrid crab cavity that includes the input power coupler as an integral part of the design. A prototype was built with Phase I monies and tested at JLAB. The results reported on, and a system for achieving 20-50 MV is proposed.

  16. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  17. Microwave cavity search for paraphotons

    SciTech Connect

    Povey, Rhys; Hartnett, John; Tobar, Michael

    2010-06-15

    In this proceeding we report the first results of a microwave cavity search for hidden sector photons. Using a pair of isolated resonant cavities we look for 'light shining through a wall' from photon--hidden sector photon oscillations. Our prototype experiment consists of two cylindrical, copper cavities stacked axially inside a single vacuum chamber. At a hidden sector photon mass of 39.58 mueV we place an upper limit on the kinetic mixing parameter chi at 7.8x10{sup -6}. Whilst this result is inside already established limits our experiment has great scope for improvement.

  18. Devil's staircase in an optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Dhayalan, Yuvaraj; Buks, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEOs) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. While the phase of SEOs randomly diffuses in time when the laser power injected into the cavity is kept constant, phase locking may occur when the laser power is periodically modulated in time. We investigate the dependence of phase locking on the amplitude and frequency of the laser-power modulation. We find that phase locking can be induced with a relatively low modulation amplitude provided that the ratio between the modulation frequency and the frequency of SEOs is tuned close to a rational number of relatively low hierarchy in the Farey tree. To account for the experimental results, a one-dimensional map, which allows evaluating the time evolution of the phase of SEOs, is theoretically derived. By calculating the winding number of the one-dimensional map, the regions of phase locking can be mapped in the plane of modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. Comparison between the theoretical predictions and the experimental findings yields a partial agreement.

  19. A Comprehensive study of Cavities on the Sun: Structure, Formation, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Nishu; Zhang, Jie; Pesnell, William D.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal cavities are large-scale structures in the Sun's corona that are closely related with the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the photosphere as well as associated with the energetic solar activity such as prominence eruptions and coronal mass ejections. They are observed as circular or elliptical-shaped relatively low-density dark regions above the solar limb in EUV, X-ray, and white-light coronal images. We used SDO/AIA limb synoptic maps, constructed from annuli above the solar limb, to systematically identify cavities. We observed 429 coronal prominence cavities between May 20, 2010 and Feb 1, 2015. We examined correlations between height, width, and length of the cavities. Based on the fitting of the shape of the cross section, we classified cavities in three types: prolate (38%), oblate (27%) and circular (35%). We found that the cavities of all shapes are common in shorter length while circular and oblate cavities are more common in the longer length. In general, we found that the overall 3-D topology of long stable cavities can be characterized as a long tube with an elliptical cross-section. Next, we investigated the pattern of cavity location and found that cavity systematically drifts towards the pole. We found that cavities form a belt by making a plot using SDO/HMI surface magnetogram similar to classical buttery diagram of sunspots, we call that the cavity belt. Our analysis showed that the cavity belts migrated towards higher latitude with time and the cavity belts disappeared after the polar magnetic field reversal. This result shows that cavity evolution provides new insight into the solar cycle. Moreover, we studied the underlying magnetic field of a circumpolar crown cavity (Mar 21, 2013- Oct 25, 2013) that was observed for several Carrington Rotations. Our results showed that the underlying polarity inversion line of cavities is formed between the trailing part of decayed active regions and the unipolar magnetic field in the pole. The long life of cavities was due to continuous and sustained adding of trailing flux from multiple active regions as their remnants diffused toward the pole.

  20. Growth of tantalum nitride film as a Cu diffusion barrier by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition from bis((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)(methyl)amido)methyl(tert-butylimido)tantalum complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Hyo Yeon; Lee, Sang Chan; Kim, Da Hye; Park, Bo Keun; Park, Jin-Seong; Jeon, Dong Ju; Chung, Taek-Mo; Kim, Chang Gyoun

    2016-01-01

    A new bis((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)(methyl)amido)methyl(tert-butylimido)tantalum complex was synthesized for plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of tantalum nitride (TaN) film. Using the synthesized Ta compound, PEALD of TaN was conducted at growth temperatures of 150-250 °C in combination with NH3 plasma. The TaN PEALD showed a saturated growth rate of 0.062 nm/cycle and a high film density of 9.1-10.3 g/cm3 at 200-250 °C. Auger depth profiling revealed that the deposited TaN film contained low carbon and oxygen impurity levels of approximately 3-4%. N-rich amorphous TaN films were grown at all growth temperatures and showed highly resistive characteristic. The Cu barrier performance of the TaN film was evaluated by annealing of Cu/TaN (0-6 nm)/Si stacks at 400-800 °C, and excellent Cu diffusion barrier properties were observed even with ultrathin 2 nm-thick TaN film.

  1. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities.

    PubMed

    Liberal, I; Mahmoud, A M; Engheta, N

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  2. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  3. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  4. Stress-diffusion interaction during oxidation at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuelin; Feng, Xue; Hwang, Keh-Chih

    2014-10-01

    Superalloy or other thermal protective materials are often oxidized seriously at high temperature. For most materials diffusion is the controlling step of oxidation. During oxidation, stress would be induced by growth strain and it can affect the diffusion process through chemical potential and diffusivity. Governing equation for diffusion is derived considering chemo-mechanical potential and diffusivity affected by stress. Oxidation kinetics is obtained to interpret the stress-diffusion coupling effects. The stress and its gradient influences on oxidation are also discussed.

  5. Theory of Bloch cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, O. A.; Lederer, F.; Staliunas, K.

    2010-10-01

    We present a detailed study of light dynamics in passive nonlinear resonators with shallow intracavity periodic modulation of the refractive index in both longitudinal and transverse directions of the resonator. Specifically, we concentrate on the nonlinear envelopes of dissipative Bloch modes, localized in the transverse plane of the resonator, the so-called Bloch cavity solitons, predicted recently in K. Staliunas [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.101.153903 101, 153903 (2008)]. Bloch cavity solitons, being dissipative structures, are attractors, therefore they can be excited from a wide range of initial conditions (the attractor basin) depending on the systems parameters. A unique property of Bloch cavity solitons is that they are envelopes of waves with tailored diffraction. Using the round-trip model for forward- and backward-propagating waves we reveal different types of Bloch cavity solitons supported by both focusing (at normal diffraction) and defocusing (at anomalous diffraction) nonlinearities. We show also the coexistence of solitons bifurcating from different Bloch wave dispersion branches. In order to analyze the properties of Bloch cavity solitons and to obtain an analytical access we develop a modified mean-field model and prove its validity. In particular, we demonstrate substantial narrowing of Bloch cavity solitons near the zero-diffraction regime.

  6. Theory of Bloch cavity solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, O. A.; Lederer, F.; Staliunas, K.

    2010-10-15

    We present a detailed study of light dynamics in passive nonlinear resonators with shallow intracavity periodic modulation of the refractive index in both longitudinal and transverse directions of the resonator. Specifically, we concentrate on the nonlinear envelopes of dissipative Bloch modes, localized in the transverse plane of the resonator, the so-called Bloch cavity solitons, predicted recently in K. Staliunas et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 153903 (2008)]. Bloch cavity solitons, being dissipative structures, are attractors, therefore they can be excited from a wide range of initial conditions (the attractor basin) depending on the system's parameters. A unique property of Bloch cavity solitons is that they are envelopes of waves with tailored diffraction. Using the round-trip model for forward- and backward-propagating waves we reveal different types of Bloch cavity solitons supported by both focusing (at normal diffraction) and defocusing (at anomalous diffraction) nonlinearities. We show also the coexistence of solitons bifurcating from different Bloch wave dispersion branches. In order to analyze the properties of Bloch cavity solitons and to obtain an analytical access we develop a modified mean-field model and prove its validity. In particular, we demonstrate substantial narrowing of Bloch cavity solitons near the zero-diffraction regime.

  7. Numerical and experimental study on flame structure characteristics in a supersonic combustor with dual-cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Zhenguo; Sun, Mingbo; Wang, Hongbo; Li, Li

    2015-12-01

    Combined numerical and experimental approaches have been implemented to investigate the quasi-steady flame characteristics of supersonic combustion in tandem and parallel dual-cavity. In simulation, a hybrid Large Eddy Simulation (LES)/assumed sub-grid Probability Density Function (PDF) closure model was carried out. Comparison of calculation and experiment as well as comparison of the two configurations are qualitatively and quantitatively performed regarding the flame structure and other flowfield features. Simulation shows a good level of agreement with experimental observation and measurement in terms of instantaneous and time-averaged results. Given the same fuel equivalence ratio, the parallel dual-cavity with the two opposite injections gathers the major combustion around the cavities, thus leading to the concentrated heat release, the greatly extended recirculation zones and the converging-diverging core flow path. Only intermittent stray flame packets can be found in the downstream region. Flame in the combustor with tandem dual-cavity appears to be stabilized by the upstream cavity shear layer and grows gradually to the second cavity, peaking its most intensity in the middle section between the two cavities. For both dual-cavity configurations, the strongest reaction takes place in near chemistry stoichiometric region around the flame edge, and is mainly confined in the supersonic region supported by the inner subsonic combustion. The coexistence of three parts plays a vital role in flame stabilization in the parallel and tandem dual-cavity: a reacting reservoir transferring hot products and activated radicals within the cavity recirculation zone, the hydrogen-rich premixed flame in the jet mixing region, and the downstream diffusion flames supported by the upstream premixed combustion region. In addition, for the parallel dual-cavity under the given condition, significant reaction are present near jet exit upstream the cavity leading edge.

  8. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  9. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  10. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion

  11. Polishing Difficult-To-Reach Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1990-01-01

    Springy abrasive tool used to finish surfaces of narrow cavities made by electrical-discharge machining. Robot arm moves vibrator around perimeters of cavities, polishing walls of cavities as it does so. Tool needed because such cavities inaccessible or at least difficult to reach with most surface-finishing tools.

  12. Design criteria for FIR waveguide laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A.; Mcavoy, N.

    1977-01-01

    The geometrical design parameters of coherently pumped far infrared waveguide laser cavities are analyzed with respect to minimization of pump power losses. The advantages of highly degenerate cavities and off axis displacement of the injection hole are outlined. Relations between the cavity parameters are given which simplify the design of cavities with high pumping efficiency.

  13. The Growth of Steroidobacter agariperforans sp. nov., a Novel Agar-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Soil, is Enhanced by the Diffusible Metabolites Produced by Bacteria Belonging to Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Masao; Hosoda, Akifumi; Ogura, Kenjiro; Ikenaga, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium was isolated from soil collected in a vegetable cropping field. The growth of this isolate was enhanced by supplying culture supernatants of bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the novel bacterium, strain KA5–BT, belonged to the genus Steroidobacter in Gammaproteobacteria, but differed from its closest relative, Steroidobacter denitrificans FST, at the species level with 96.5% similarity. Strain KA5–BT was strictly aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore forming, and had a straight to slightly curved rod shape. Cytochrome oxidase and catalase activities were positive. The strain grew on media containing culture supernatants in a temperature range of 15–37°C and between pH 4.5 and 9.0, with optimal growth occurring at 30°C and pH 6.0–8.0. No growth occurred at 10 or 42°C or at NaCl concentrations more than 3% (w/v). The main cellular fatty acids were iso–C15:0, C16:1ω7c, and iso–C17:1ω9c. The main quinone was ubiquinone-8 and DNA G+C content was 62.9 mol%. In contrast, strain FST was motile, did not grow on the agar plate, and its dominant cellular fatty acids were C15:0 and C17:1ω8c. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain KA5–BT (JCM 18477T = KCTC 32107T) represents a novel species in genus Steroidobacter, for which the name Steroidobacter agariperforans sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:24621511

  14. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  15. Si/SiO2 resonant cavity photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, D. C.; Schow, C. L.; Qi, Jieming; Campbell, J. C.; Bean, J. C.; Peticolas, L. J.

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown earlier that GeSi/Si resonant-cavity photodiodes can achieve high speed without sacrificing quantum efficiency. In this letter, we report a Si-based resonant-cavity photodiode that utilizes a Si/SiO2 Bragg reflector. This structure is more compatible with standard Si processing technology than the GeSi/Si resonant-cavity photodiodes. The absorbing region is a 1-μm-thick polysilicon layer that has been annealed to enhance secondary grain growth and the bottom mirror consists of three quarter-wavelength pairs of Si and SiO2. After annealing the dark current was 9 μA at 1 V, the peak quantum efficiency was 44%, and the bandwidth was ≳1.4 GHz.

  16. Precipitation and cavity formation in austenitic stainless steels during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels subjected to displacement damage at high temperature is strongly influenced by the interactions between helium atoms and second phase particles. Cavity nucleation occurs by the trapping of helium at partially coherent particle-matrix interfaces. The recent precipitate point defect collector theory describes the more rapid growth of precipitate-attached cavities compared to matrix cavities where the precipitate-matrix interface collects point defects to augment the normal point deflect flux to the cavitry. Data are presented which support these ideas. It is shown that during nickel ion irradiation of a titanium-modified stainless steel at 675/sup 0/C the rate of injection of helium has a strong effect on the total swelling and also on the nature and distribution of precipitate phases.

  17. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  18. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Renard, Bertrand; Olivier, Gilles; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  19. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Bousson, Sebastien; Duthil, Patxi; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  20. Cavity optomechanics and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Mishkatul

    2009-05-01

    Cavity optomechanics is an emerging field at the intersection of quantum optics, atomic physics, nanoscience and gravitational wave interferometry. It involves cavities (with one or more mechanical degrees of freedom) driven by laser radiation. The ensuing optical control of macroscopic mechanical motion may have implications for precision sensing, coherent control of atoms and molecules, and quantum information processing. Due to recent innovations optomechanical physics has been realized in a variety of experimental systems spanning many orders of magnitude in mass and time-scales. In this talk, I will first introduce the basic paradigm of a laser-driven two mirror cavity used for cooling a vibrational mode. A three-mirror configuration recently implemented using a partially transmissive dielectric membrane in a high finesse cavity will then be discussed, and shown to be superior to the two-mirror design in a number of ways. One implication of the three-mirror configuration is the possibility of scaling optomechanical techniques to multiple oscillators. This topic will be explored by analysing the case of two membranes in a cavity where it will be shown that the collective(center-of-mass and breathing) modes of vibration can be cooled independently, analogous to a chain of trapped ions. Finally, future directions for possible applications to the control of atoms and molecules will be indicated briefly.

  1. Measurements of planing forces and cavity shapes on cylindrical afterbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellum, Aren; Belden, Jesse; Beal, David; Huyer, Stephen; Henoch, Charles; Hrubes, Dana

    2015-11-01

    Supercavitation is a drag reduction technique by which an underwater body is enclosed over a significant portion of its length in a bubble of gas. Hydrodynamic forces act on the body only through contact with the nose and a planing section at the rear. Models of the planing forces typically assume that the body is placed into a cavity which is unchanged by the presence of the body, and the present study was designed to test the validity of this assumption. Measurements were taken of the planing forces for five afterbody lengths over a range of angles concurrently with photographs showing the size and shape of the cavity produced. These observations reveal that the cavity form and growth rate are significantly affected by both the length and angle of attack of the body; the length of the cavity shrinks at the same angle of attack as the body length is reduced past a critical threshold, suggesting a hydrodynamic interaction between the afterbody trailing edge and the cavity. Additionally, the planing forces demonstrate a non-monotonic dependence on attack angle that is not readily explained by existing models, specifically a ``lift crisis'' for short bodies in which the planing lift goes to zero over a range from -1 to -3 degrees.

  2. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rothe, S.; Savonen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A.

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary 107Ag21+ ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z 94Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  3. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D. Pohjalainen, I.; Savonen, M.; Voss, A.; Rothe, S.; Sonnenschein, V.

    2015-12-15

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary {sup 107}Ag{sup 21+} ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z {sup 94}Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  4. Phoxonic crystals and cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; El-Jallal, Said; Pennec, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Phoxonic crystals are dual phononic/photonic crystals exhibiting simultaneously band gaps for both types of excitations. Therefore, they have the ability to confine phonons and photons in the same cavity and in turn allow the enhancement of their interaction. In this paper, we review some of our theoretical works on cavity optomechanical interactions in different types of phoxonic crystals, including two-dimensional, slab, and nanobeam structures. Two mechanisms are behind the phonon-photon interaction, namely the photoelastic and the moving interface effects. Coupling rates of a few MHz are obtained with high-frequency phonons of a few GHz. Finally, we give some preliminary results about the optomechanical interaction when a metallic nanoparticle is introduced into the cavity, giving rise to coupled photon-plasmon modes or, in the case of very small particles, to an enhancement of the electric field at the position of the particle. xml:lang="fr"

  5. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  6. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  7. Grating based plasmonic band gap cavities.

    PubMed

    Senlik, S Seckin; Kocabas, Askin; Aydinli, Atilla

    2009-08-31

    We report on a comparative study of grating based plasmonic band gap cavities. Numerically, we calculate the quality factors of the cavities based on three types of grating surfaces; uniform, biharmonic and Moir surfaces. We show that for biharmonic band gap cavities, the radiation loss can be suppressed by removing the additional grating component in the cavity region. Due to the gradual change of the surface profile in the cavity region, Moir type surfaces support cavity modes with higher quality factors. Experimentally, we demonstrate the existence of plasmonic cavities based on uniform gratings. Effective index perturbation and cavity geometries are obtained by additional dielectric loading. Quality factor of 85 is obtained from the measured band structure of the cavity. PMID:19724552

  8. Experimental cavity pressure distributions at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to define pressure distributions for rectangular cavities over a range of free-stream Mach numbers and cavity dimensions. These pressure distributions together with schlieren photographs are used to define the critical values of cavity length-to-depth ratio that separate open type cavity flows from closed type cavity flows. For closed type cavity flow, the shear layer expands over the cavity leading edge and impinges on the cavity floor, whereas for open type cavity flow, the shear layer bridges the cavity. The tests were conducted by using a flat-plate model permitting the cavity length to be remotely varied from 0.5 to 12 in. Cavity depths and widths were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 in. The flat-plate boundary layer approaching the cavity was turbulent and had a thickness of approximately 0.2 in. at the cavity front face for the range of test Mach numbers from 1.5 to 2.86. Presented are a discussion of the results and a complete tabulation of the experimental data.

  9. Leaky cavities with unwanted noise

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, A. A.; Vasylyev, D. Yu.; Vogel, W.; Khanbekyan, M.; Welsch, D.-G.

    2006-09-15

    A phenomenological approach is developed that allows one to completely describe the effects of unwanted noise, such as the noise associated with absorption and scattering, in high-Q cavities. This noise is modeled by a block of beam splitters and an additional input-output port. The replacement schemes enable us to formulate appropriate quantum Langevin equations and input-output relations. It is demonstrated that unwanted noise renders it possible to combine a cavity input mode and the intracavity mode in a nonmonochromatic output mode. Possible applications to unbalanced and cascaded homodyning of the intracavity mode are discussed and the advantages of the latter method are shown.

  10. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  11. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  12. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  13. Progress on a Be Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Palmer, R.; Stratakis, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-12-24

    Previous RF experiments with normal-conducting cavities have demonstrated that there is a significant degradation in maximum gradient when the cavity is subjected to a strong axial magnetic field. We have developed a model suggesting that a cavity with beryllium walls may perform better than copper cavities. In this paper we outline the issues that led us to propose fabricating a Be-wall cavity. We also discuss a concept for fabricating such a cavity and mention some of the manufacturing issues we expect to face.

  14. Testing quantum mechanics and quantum gravity with cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitali, David

    Cavity optomechanical setups represents a promising platform for testing quantum mechanics and its validity at a macroscopic scale. Here we present two different examples. We first show the result of an experiment which, by a high sensitive measurement of the free evolution of the nanomechanical resonator probed by an optical field, has improved by many orders of magnitude the bounds on commutator deformation parameters which characterize a wide class of approaches to quantum gravity. In the second case we propose an experiment able to discriminate unambiguously collapse models, postulating the existence of intrinsic noise which modifies quantum mechanics and is responsible for the emergence of macroscopic classicality, from standard environmental sources of decoherence. In particular, we show that the stationary state of a trapped nanosphere is particularly sensitive, under specific experimental conditions, to the interplay between the cavity size, the trapping frequency and the momentum diffusion induced by the collapse models, allowing to detect them even in the presence of standard environmental noises.

  15. Cavity-QED enhancement of fluorescence yields in microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    Measurements of the integrated fluorescence yield of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in levitated microdroplets (4 to 16 {mu}m diameter) display a size dependence which is attributed to a decreased probability per excitation cycle of photochemical bleaching as a result of cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates. The average number of fluorescence photons detected per molecule in 4 {mu}m droplets (where emission rate enhancement has been previously demonstrated) is shown to be approximately a factor of 2 larger than the yield measured for larger droplets where emission rate enhancement does not occur. Within some simple approximations, these results suggest that essentially no emission rate inhibition occurs in this system. A mechanism based on spectral diffusion is postulated for the apparent absence of cavity-inhibited emission and is illustrated by Monte Carlo calculations using time-dependent lineshape functions.

  16. Diffuse interstellar bands in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, O.; Henning, Thomas; Pfau, Werner; Stognienko, R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code for radiation transport calculations is used to compare the profiles of the lambda lambda 5780 and 6613 Angstrom diffuse interstellar bands in the transmitted and the reflected light of a star embedded within an optically thin dust cloud. In addition, the behavior of polarization across the bands were calculated. The wavelength dependent complex indices of refraction across the bands were derived from the embedded cavity model. In view of the existence of different families of diffuse interstellar bands the question of other parameters of influence is addressed in short.

  17. Cavity flow control using a rod in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpotdar, Shekhar

    For a variety of aerodynamic conditions and geometric configurations fluid structure interactions give rise to a reverberant field. This phenomenon, referred to as resonant acoustics, has practical importance due to its undesirable effects such as noise, structural loading, and unsteady flow field. Several flow control technologies exist but they lose efficacy at off-design conditions. With the focus on expanding their operating envelope, the present work investigates the physics of the flow control using a combination of detailed experimental measurements and theoretical analysis. The model resonant acoustic flow problem that we chose for our study is cavity tones, i.e., the high intensity acoustic tones produced by high speed air moving over rectangular cavity. The flow control actuator is a rod in cross flow, i.e., a thin horizontal rod placed upstream of the cavity. In the present work, a detailed experimental study has been undertaken to characterize the acoustics, mean velocity field as well as the pressure perturbation field both inside and outside of the cavity. Control cases with contrasting suppression results are chosen to illustrate important aspects of the mean flow field. To investigate whether the cylinder, through its wake, changes the stability characteristics of the shear layer that develops over the cavity, stability analysis of the shear layer is undertaken. First, stability of artificial velocity profiles that are prototypical of the experimentally measured velocity profiles is investigated; in order to determine what parameters of the velocity profiles influence the stability of the shear layer the most. Next stability of experimentally measured velocity profiles is evaluated to calculate integrated growth rates along the length of the cavity. Mean velocity data is also used to elucidate the shear layer lift off mechanism of the rod. Both integrated growth range and shear layer lift off data are compared with the acoustic suppression results. Based on the trends it appears that shear layer lift off, which interferes with the acoustic interaction between the shear layer and the trailing edge of the cavity, is the dominant mechanism by which the rod controls flow over the cavity.

  18. Modification of Ohnaka back diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkeli, A.

    2016-03-01

    The first and simplest analytical model for a binary alloy came from Gulliver-Scheil, considering a constant partition coefficient at the interface during solidification without back diffusion in solid. Later, Brody-Flemings proposed an approximate analytical model, taking into account one dimensional diffusion of solute in solid during solidification in plate-like dendrite arms for parabolic growth. However, this model does not work well at high back diffusion values. Ohnaka modified this back diffusion parameter. The Ohnaka model works well at the low and high back diffusion values but it underestimates between them. In this paper, Voller-Ohnaka back diffusion model is modified further to predict concentration profiles more accurately than all others analytical models for the parabolic growth rate.

  19. Water vapor permeabilities through polymers: diffusivities from experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seethamraju, Sindhu; Chandrashekarapura Ramamurthy, Praveen; Madras, Giridhar

    2014-09-01

    This study experimentally determines water vapor permeabilities, which are subsequently correlated with the diffusivities obtained from simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for determining the diffusion of water vapor in various polymeric systems such as polyethylene, polypropylene, poly (vinyl alcohol), poly (vinyl acetate), poly (vinyl butyral), poly (vinylidene chloride), poly (vinyl chloride) and poly (methyl methacrylate). Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) based methodology has been used to determine the water vapor transmission rates. These values were then used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for water vapor through these polymers. A comparative analysis is provided for diffusivities calculated from CRDS and MD based results by correlating the free volumes.

  20. Fast anomalous diffusion of small hydrophobic species in water.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Barbara; Stubbs, John; Marx, Dominik

    2002-11-18

    Using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics a structural diffusion mechanism for the simplest hydrophobic species in water, an H atom, is proposed. The hydrophobic solvation cavity is a highly dynamical aggregate that actually drives, by its own hydrogen-bond fluctuations, the diffusion of the enclosed solute. This makes possible an anomalously fast diffusion that falls only short of that of "Grotthuss structural diffusion" of H+ in water. Here, the picture of a static, i.e., "iceberglike," clathrate cage is a misleading concept. The uncovered scenario is similar to the "dynamical hole mechanism" found in a very different context, that is, large molecules moving in hot polymeric melts. PMID:12443432

  1. Diffusive acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholer, Manfred

    This paper reviews the properties of diffuse energetic ions observed at the quasi-parallel bow shock and at quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks. The first-order Fermi or diffusive acceleration mechanism can consistently explain the many detailed observational facts. In this model, it is assumed that particles are scattered approximately elastically in the solar wind frame, and gain energy by repeated scattering between the converging upstream and downstream flows or between the upstream flow and the shock. An essential feature at both the bow shock and at interplanetary shocks are self-excited low-frequency waves representing the scattering irregularities. The seed particles for the acceleration process at the bow shock are most probably solar wind ions. However, how and with what efficiency a certain fraction of the thermal solar wind population is injected into the acceleration process is at present only poorly understood. Whether the seed particles for the acceleration at interplanetary shocks are solar wind ions or more energetic ions is an open question.

  2. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  3. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  4. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  5. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  6. Monte Carlo Modeling of a Cavity Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, L. A.; Borg, L. E.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical tool, but is limited by sensitivity and precision, which are crucial for samples that contain low concentrations of the elements of interest. One way to increase this sensitivity and precision is with more efficient ion sources. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which yields some of the most sensitive and precise isotope ratio data, uses Re or Ta ribbon filaments as ion sources. These generally ionize material with <1% efficiency (percent of ions counted). The cavity ion source (CIS) has recently been explored as an alternative to filaments. In contrast to flat filaments, the CIS is a hollowed Re or W rod. The CIS ionizes refractory elements with much higher efficiency than TIMS filaments. For example, filaments ionize U with ~0.1% efficiency, whereas CIS studies have reported efficiencies up to 39%. The filament and the CIS use the same mechanism to ionize material (i.e., thermal ionization), but the CIS forces the sample to interact with the ionizing surface many times by confining the evaporated sample to a cavity. The CIS is heated by electron bombardment, evaporating the sample just as it would on a filament. However, before being lost to the environment, the sample diffuses to the cavity's opening. While diffusing, the sample collides with the walls of the hot cavity hundreds or thousands of times. Each collision is an opportunity to ionize the evaporated sample atoms. Typical probabilities for ionization (per collision) for actinides are <1%, but having thousands of collisions greatly raises the final ionization efficiency. However, each ionized atom has the potential to recombine (i.e., gain an electron and become neutral) with additional collisions in the CIS. The probability of recombination is much higher than the probability of ionization for a single collision. Therefore, a critical design feature of a CIS is to ensure that ions are extracted after they form. The subject of this study is how to design a CIS to maximize ionization and minimize recombination. This work models a CIS using SIMION 7.0 to determine how the ionization efficiency (and thus ionization and recombination rate) depends on the cavity's length, radius and extraction potential. The model assumes a Re cavity held at a steady-state temperature of 2750 K, with a circular extraction electrode. The study predicts that ionization efficiency is not strongly dependent on cavity dimensions or extraction potential (as long as it is >1kV), but wider cavities and higher extraction potentials increase the cavity's efficiency, while longer cavities do not. The most efficient CIS modeled had a length of ~3cm and an inner radius ~5mm. As such, a CIS can be fitted to a commercially available mass spectrometer with relative ease. Once operational, an instrument fitted with a CIS could dramatically change the field of mass spectrometry by facilitating analysis of pictogram quantities of elements using high precision Faraday cup detectors in place of secondary electron multipliers.

  7. Cavity Alighment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Frisch, J.; Hacker, K.E.; Jones, R.M.; McCormick, D.; O'Connell, C.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.; Baboi, N.; Wendt, M.; /DESY

    2005-07-06

    Each nine cell superconducting (SC) accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY [1] has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power [2]. They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and tested a time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present a preliminary experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  8. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared

    PubMed Central

    Shubina, T. V.; Pozina, G.; Jmerik, V. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Hemmingsson, C.; Andrianov, A. V.; Kazanov, D. R.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large ’ripened’ crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies. PMID:26656267

  9. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Pozina, G.; Jmerik, V. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Hemmingsson, C.; Andrianov, A. V.; Kazanov, D. R.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large ’ripened’ crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies.

  10. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared.

    PubMed

    Shubina, T V; Pozina, G; Jmerik, V N; Davydov, V Yu; Hemmingsson, C; Andrianov, A V; Kazanov, D R; Ivanov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large 'ripened' crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies. PMID:26656267

  11. Efficiently loading a single photon into a single-sided Fabry-Perot cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Sun, Yuan; Zhao, Luwei; Zhang, Shanchao; Loy, M M T; Du, Shengwang

    2014-09-26

    We demonstrate that a single photon with an optimal temporal waveform can be efficiently loaded into a cavity. Using heralded narrow-band single photons with exponential growth wave packet shaped by an electro-optical amplitude modulator, whose time constant matches the photon lifetime in the cavity, we demonstrate a loading efficiency of (87±2)% from free space to a single-sided Fabry-Perot cavity. We further demonstrate directly loading heralded single Stokes photons into the cavity with an efficiency of (60±5)% without the electro-optical amplitude modulator and verify the time reversal between the frequency-entangled paired photons. Our result and approach may enable promising applications in realizing large-scale quantum networks based on cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:25302886

  12. Measuring Thermal Diffusivity of Molten Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R.; Holland, L.; Taylor, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity of molten and solid mercury cadmium telluride measured with aid of new apparatus. Knowledge gained from such measurements help efforts to grow high-quality single crystals of this semiconductor for use in infrared detectors: Without knowledge of thermal diffusivity, difficult to control growth rate of solid from molten material.

  13. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes the lips, the inside ... oropharynx. The oropharynx is the part of the throat just behind the mouth. It begins where the ...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  15. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  16. Optical modeling of certical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presently the subject of intense research due to their potential as compact, efficient, astigmatic laser sources for a number of important applications. Of special interest are the selectively-oxidized VCSELs that have recently set records for threshold current and wall-plug efficiency. The onset of higher-order modes at powers of a few milliWatts, however, presently limits the wide utilization of these devices and indicates the need for improvements in design. Unfortunately, their complexity precludes optimization based solely upon empirical methods, and points instead to the need for better numerical models. Modeling the optical field in a vertical-cavity laser, however, is especially difficult due to both the high Q of the optical cavity and the distributed reflectivity of the mirrors. Our approach to this dilemma has been the development of modeling techniques on two complexity scales. We first derived an effective- index model that is numerically efficient and thus can be included together with carrier transport and thermal models to make up a self-consistent modeling package. In addition to its use in the overall VCSEL model, this simplified optical model has been extremely valuable in elucidating the basic principles of waveguiding in VCSELs that in turn have led to new ideas in device design. More specifically, the derived expression for the effective index shows clearly that index guiding in a VCSEL depends only on variations in optical cavity length, and thus can be engineered without the need to alter the material index of refraction. Also, we have designed index- guided and antiguided devices whose cavity lengths are modified in certain regions by etching of the cavity material prior to growth of the second mirror. Fabrication of these new device designs is presently in progress.

  17. Electrostatic modeling of cavities inside linear actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, T. A.; Jansen, J. W.; van Duivenbode, J.; Lomonova, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the modeling of two-dimensional electric fields inside linear actuators where cavities in the cooling environment are present. A semi-analytical model based on Fourier series is extended for cavities and incorporates the curvature of corners. The model shows good agreement with finite element analysis. The effect of position and sizes of the cavity are investigated as well as the curvature of the corners of the cavity.

  18. Understanding cavity resonances with intracavity dispersion properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Jiteng; Wu Haibin; Mumba, M.; Gea-Banacloche, J.; Xiao Min

    2011-02-15

    We experimentally study the strongly coupled three-level atom-cavity system at both cavity and coupling frequency detuning cases. Side peak splitting and anti-crossing-like phenomena are observed under different experimental conditions. Intracavity dispersion properties are used to explain qualitatively the complicated cavity resonance structures in the composite system of inhomogeneously broadened three-level atoms inside an optical ring cavity with relatively strong driving intensities.

  19. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  3. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  4. Photonic crystal cavities and integrated optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lin; Li, ZhiYuan

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to our recent works on photonic crystal (PhC) cavities and related integrated optical structures and devices. Theoretical background and numerical methods for simulation of PhC cavities are first presented. Based on the theoretical basis, two relevant quantities, the cavity mode volume and the quality factor are discussed. Then the methods of fabrication and characterization of silicon PhC slab cavities are introduced. Several types of PhC cavities are presented, such as the usual L3 missing-hole cavity, the new concept waveguide-like parallel-hetero cavity, and the low-index nanobeam cavity. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of cavity are discussed. This will help the readers to decide which type of PhC cavities to use in particular applications. Furthermore, several integrated optical devices based on PhC cavities, such as optical filters, channel-drop filters, optical switches, and optical logic gates are described in both the working principle and operation characteristics. These devices designed and realized in our group demonstrate the wide range of applications of PhC cavities and offer possible solutions to some integrated optical problems.

  5. Many-atom-cavity QED system with homogeneous atom-cavity coupling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongmin; Vrijsen, Geert; Teper, Igor; Hosten, Onur; Kasevich, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a many-atom-cavity system with a high-finesse dual-wavelength standing wave cavity in which all participating rubidium atoms are nearly identically coupled to a 780-nm cavity mode. This homogeneous coupling is enforced by a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by the field of a 1560-nm cavity mode. PMID:24978793

  6. Many-atom-cavity QED system with homogeneous atom-cavity coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongmin; Vrijsen, Geert; Teper, Igor; Hosten, Onur; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a many-atom-cavity system with a high-finesse dual-wavelength standing wave cavity in which all participating rubidium atoms are nearly identically coupled to a 780-nm cavity mode. This homogeneous coupling is enforced by a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by the field of a 1560-nm cavity mode.

  7. Potassium ions in the cavity of a KcsA channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Qiao, Baofu; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The high rate of ion flux and selectivity of potassium channels has been attributed to the conformation and dynamics of the ions in the filter which connects the channel cavity and the extracellular environment. The cavity serves as the reservoir for potassium ions diffusing from the intracellular medium. The cavity is believed to decrease the dielectric barrier for the ions to enter the filter. We study here the equilibrium and dynamic properties of potassium ions entering the water-filled cavity of a KcsA channel model. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that are supplemented by electrostatic calculations reveal the important role of water molecules and the partially charged protein helices at the bottom of the cavity in overcoming the energy barrier and stabilizing the potassium ion in the cavity. We further show that the average time for a potassium ion to enter the cavity is much shorter than the conduction rate of a potassium passing through the filter, and this time duration is insensitive over a wide range of the membrane potential. The conclusions drawn from the study of the channel model are applicable in generalized contexts, including the entry of ions in artificial ion channels and other confined geometries.

  8. 3-D Modeling of Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe Growth Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical calculation for a non-dilute alloy solidification was performed using the FIDAP finite element code. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. Estimates of convection contributions for various gravity conditions was performed parametrically. For gravity levels higher then 1 0 -7 of earth's gravity it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by factor of 50% for precise orientation of the ampoule in the microgravity environment. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D modeling are compared with previous 2-D finding. A video film featuring melt convection will be presented.

  9. Optimisation of laser linewidth and cavity alignment in off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyutich, Vasili L.; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2015-07-01

    Laser linewidth affects baseline mode structured variations and hence measurement absorption sensitivity in off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a continuous-wave tunable laser and a stable optical cavity formed by two high reflectivity mirrors. Cavity transmittances have been calculated for various laser linewidths and different optical beam re-entrant conditions for the cavity when overlapping of the optical beams occurs on the cavity mirrors after a finite number of beam round trips within the cavity. It is shown that in order to achieve maximum absorption sensitivity both a specific laser linewidth and specific arrangement of the optical cavity have to be selected and defined using the proposed approach.

  10. Non-reacting flow visualization of supersonic combustor based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Liang, Jianhan; Zhao, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Nano-particle planer laser scattering and particle image velocimetry technology are employed to observe the flow field of scramjet combustors based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder. Density field and velocity distribution inside combustors are obtained. Mainstream fluid enters into cavity nearby side wall in experimental observation because side wall shock waves interact with bottom wall boundary layer. Cavity fluid is entrained into mainstream in the middle of combustor meanwhile. Flow past cavity displays obvious three dimensional characteristics in both combustors. But cavity-strut combustor displays asymmetrical flow field because of strut configuration. Mass exchange between mainstream and cavity fluid is evaluated by statistic mass flow rate into cavity. Mass flow rate near side wall is raised to 6.62 times of the value in the middle of cavity combustor while it is 5.1 times in cavity-strut combustor. Further study is needed to injection strategies and realistic flow characteristics on condition of combustion.

  11. Calculations of HOMs and coupled bunch instabilities due to the RHIC rf cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.

    1994-09-01

    The cavities for the two RHIC rf systems have been defined, a 26.7 MHz cavity developed by the RHIC rf group and the well documented CERN SPS 200 MHz cavity tuned to 196.1 MHz for operation in RHIC. Calculations of the shunt impedances and Q`s of the higher order modes (HOMs) are summarized along with beadpull measurements of R/Q of selected modes. Estimates of coupled bunch instability growth rates are calculated with both analytical techniques and using the code ZAP and used to make projections of mode damping requirements.

  12. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  13. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  14. Dissipative structures in optomechanical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquín; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Patera, Giuseppe; Roldán, Eugenio; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the increasing interest in the properties of multimode optomechanical devices, here we study a system in which a driven longitudinal mode of a large-area optical cavity is dispersively coupled to a deformable mechanical element. Two different models naturally appear in such scenario, for which we predict the formation of periodic patterns, localized structures (cavity solitons), and domain walls, among other complex nonlinear phenomena. Further, we propose a realistic design based on intracavity membranes where our models can be studied experimentally. Apart from its relevance to the field of nonlinear optics, the results put forward here are a necessary step towards understanding the quantum properties of optomechanical systems in the multimode regime of both the optical and the mechanical degrees of freedom.

  15. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  16. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Calaga, R.; Assmann, R.; Barranco, J.; Tomas, R.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Morita, A.

    2009-10-14

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit, also degrade the collimation cleaning efficiency, and so on. In this paper, we explore the principal feasibility of LHC crab cavities from a beam dynamics point of view. The implications of the crab cavities for the LHC optics, analytical and numerical luminosity studies, dynamic aperture, aperture and beta beating, emittance growth, beam-beam tune shift, long-range collisions, and synchrobetatron resonances, crab dispersion, and collimation efficiency will be discussed.

  17. Hydrogen atom in ellipsoidal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shuai; Liu, Qiang; Meng, Hui-Yan; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectra of a hydrogen atom confined in an ellipsoidal cavity with nucleus located at any position of the symmetric axis has been calculated using linear variational method. B-splines have been used as basis functions, which can easily construct the trial wave functions with appropriate boundary and cusp conditions. The energy levels as functions of the eccentric rate and the nuclear position are analyzed.

  18. Red and orange resonant-cavity LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Ralph; Karnutsch, Christian; Kugler, Siegmar; Thaler, Simone; Streubel, Klaus P.

    2001-05-01

    Usually resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes (RCLEDs) are used as emitters for plastic optical fiber communication. However, there are some arguments that may lead to the introduction of RCLEDs in a much wider range of applications. A typical high-brightness AlGaInP LED consists of a Bragg mirror, the active region and some layers for current spreading and light extraction. The thickness of these layers can add up to several ten microns which causes long epitaxial growth times. The total thickness of a RCLED can be significantly lower. Furthermore, since no lattice mismatched layers such as GaP are involved, the total incorporated strain is low which simplifies wafer handling and device processing. For this reason we studied RCLEDs with a dominant wavelength around 632 nm (superred) and 605 nm (orange). The processes for epitaxial growth and chip fabrication were optimized for homogeneity on 4 inch wafers and suitability for low-cost mass production, respectively. Possible applications for our RCLEDs are optical scanners, indicators, signal lights and other applications which benefit from the enhanced directionality of RCLEDs.

  19. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  20. Controlled directional scattering cavity for tubular absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1982-01-01

    A specular cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity is provided with a series of V groove-like indentations (or pyramidal-type indentations) which redirect energy entering between the receiver and cavity structure onto the receiver. The aperture opening of each V groove is less than half the cavity opening and in most preferred embodiments, much less than half. This enables the optical receiver to be emplaced a distance g from the cavity wherein 0.414r

  1. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  2. Acoustic cavity technology for high performance injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of damping more than one mode of rocket engine combustion instability by means of differently tuned acoustic cavities sharing a common entrance was shown. Analytical procedures and acoustic modeling techniques for predicting the stability behavior of acoustic cavity designs in hot firings were developed. Full scale testing of various common entrance, dual cavity configurations, and subscale testing for the purpose of obtaining motion pictures of the cavity entrance region, to aid in determining the mechanism of cavity damping were the two major aspects of the program.

  3. Cavity lining in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesEmbase, Medline, Cochrane Central, Biomed Central and Open Grey databases and bibliographies of identified studies.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials investigating humans with primary caries lesions receiving operative treatment involving caries removal and restoration, with minimum two treatment groups comparing different cavity treatments before restoration (no lining versus lining) were included.Data extraction and synthesisData were extracted independently by two reviewers and study quality assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Random effect meta-analysis was carried out.ResultsThree studies involving a total of 89 patients were included. All the studies involved primary teeth and were conducted in Brazil. Follow-up periods ranged from 26-53 months. All the studies were considered to be at high risk of bias. Restoring the cavity without lining did not significantly affect the risk of failure. The quality of the evidence was low.ConclusionsCurrent evidence does not support strong recommendations to use or not to use liners after caries removal and before restoring cavities. Our findings are restricted to primary teeth after selective excavation, with only one liner (calcium hydroxide) being used for comparison. PMID:27012571

  4. 3D Multimode Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ravi; McKay, David C.; Schuster, David I.

    2015-03-01

    Scalable quantum computing architectures require many long-lived and highly coherent, yet easily addressable quantum states. Photonic qubits in 3D superconducting microwave cavities are a promising approach because they are highly insensitive to decoherence and single photon lifetimes exceeding 10 ms have been demonstrated. However, the plurality of current 3D cavity devices are engineered to address single photon modes. In this talk, we introduce our implementation of a multimode 3D cavity that can store greater than 20 distinct, long-lived photon modes. To perform single- and two-qubit gates between photons, each of the modes are coupled to a single flux-tunable superconducting transmon qubit. We will discuss our preliminary results towards a controlled phase gate between any pair of photons modes. This multimode circuit QED architecture may also be used as a many-body bosonic system for quantum simulation, to study multimode quantum optics, and for quantum memories as part of a larger quantum network.

  5. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  6. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan; El-Jallal, Said

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  7. Recent nuclear cavity pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B. ); Stubbs, T. ); Nilson, R.; Peterson, E. )

    1989-09-01

    An underground nuclear test is typically conducted in an emplacement hole hundreds of metres deep that has been back-filled with sand gravel and concrete plugs. These plugs, which vary in thickness and strength, serve not only to prevent radioactive material from reaching the surface but also, ideally, to constrain it to a region near the explosion cavity. When we determine the appropriate depth of burial (DOB) for a device, we have to make it shallow enough to be economical but deep enough to reasonably ensure containment given the expected yield of the device and the particular geology of the hole. To do this, we have developed sophisticated computer models that consider each site's geologic structure and physical properties to predict explosion effects such as ground motion, confining stresses around the cavity, and cavity pressure. However, to be able to assess the performance and relative accuracy of these computational models, we must develop a data base of the measured values for each of these effects that can be compared with predictions. This report discusses pressure measurements and devices at the Cornucopia, Mission Ghost and Rhyolite Events.

  8. Organized Oscillations of Initially-Turbulent Flow Past a Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2002-09-17

    Flow past an open cavity is known to give rise to self-sustained oscillations in a wide variety of configurations, including slotted-wall, wind and water tunnels, slotted flumes, bellows-type pipe geometries, high-head gates and gate slots, aircraft components and internal piping systems. These cavity-type oscillations are the origin of coherent and broadband sources of noise and, if the structure is sufficiently flexible, flow-induced vibration as well. Moreover, depending upon the state of the cavity oscillation, substantial alterations of the mean drag may be induced. In the following, the state of knowledge of flow past cavities, based primarily on laminar inflow conditions, is described within a framework based on the flow physics. Then, the major unresolved issues for this class of flows will be delineated. Self-excited cavity oscillations have generic features, which are assessed in detail in the reviews of Rockwell and Naudascher, Rockwell, Howe and Rockwell. These features, which are illustrated in the schematic of Figure 1, are: (i) interaction of a vorticity concentration(s) with the downstream corner, (ii) upstream influence from this corner interaction to the sensitive region of the shear layer formed from the upstream corner of the cavity; (iii) conversion of the upstream influence arriving at this location to a fluctuation in the separating shear layer; and (iv) amplification of this fluctuation in the shear layer as it develops in the streamwise direction. In view of the fact that inflow shear-layer in the present investigation is fully turbulent, item (iv) is of particular interest. It is generally recognized, at least for laminar conditions at separation from the leading-corner of the cavity, that the disturbance growth in the shear layer can be described using concepts of linearized, inviscid stability theory, as shown by Rockwell, Sarohia, and Knisely and Rockwell. As demonstrated by Knisely and Rockwell, on the basis of experiments interpreted with the aid of linearized theory, not only the fundamental component of the shear layer instability may be present, but a number of additional, primarily lower frequency components can exist as well. In fact, the magnitude of these components can be of the same order as the fundamental component. These issues have not been addressed for the case of a fully-turbulent in-flow and its separation from the leading corner of the cavity.

  9. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Smith, J. D.A.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; Delayen, J.; Calaga, R.

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  10. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  11. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3+ density and the control offered by the precise epitaxy. The growth and fabrication methods are discussed. Spectral measurements at cryogenic and room temperatures show negligible background losses and resonant Er3+ absorption strong enough to produce cavity-polaritons that persist to above 361 K. Cooperative relaxation and upconversion limit the optical performance in the telecommunications bands by transferring the excitations to quenching sites or by further exciting the ions up to visible transitions. Future prospects and alternative applications for Er2O3 and other epitaxial rare-earth oxides are also considered.

  12. Selective Advantage of Diffusing Faster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Benzi, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    We study a stochastic spatial model of biological competition in which two species have the same birth and death rates, but different diffusion constants. In the absence of this difference, the model can be considered as an off-lattice version of the voter model and presents similar coarsening properties. We show that even a relative difference in diffusivity on the order of a few percent may lead to a strong bias in the coarsening process favoring the more agile species. We theoretically quantify this selective advantage and present analytical formulas for the average growth of the fastest species and its fixation probability.

  13. Influence of Er:YAG laser ablation on cavity surface and cavity shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Krejsa, Otakar; Hamal, Karel; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1996-04-01

    The cavity surface and shape after Er:YAG laser ablation at different energies, number of pulses and at a different repetition rate were observed. Longitudinal sections of extracted human incisors and transverse sections of ivory tusk were cut and polished to flat and glazed surfaces. The samples thickness was from 3 to 5 mm. The Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running (long pulse) mode. The laser radiation was focused onto the tooth surface by CaF2 lens (f equals 55 mm). During the experiment, the teeth were steady and the radiation was delivered by a special mechanical arm fixed in a special holder; fine water mist was also used (water-mJ/min, a pressure of two atm, air-pressure three atm). The shapes of the prepared cavities were studied either by using a varying laser energies (from 70 mJ to 500 mJ) for a constant number of pulses, or a varying number of pulses (from one to thirty) for constant laser energy. The repetition rate was changed from 1 to 2 Hz. For evaluating the surfaces, shapes, and profiles, scanning electron microscopy and photographs from a light microscope were used. The results were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. It is seen that there is no linear relation between the radiation pulse energy and the size of the prepared holes. With increasing the incident energy the cavity depth growth is limited. There exists some saturation not only in the enamel and dentin but especially in the homogeneous ivory.

  14. Scaled experiments of explosions in cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, J.; Cranch, G. A.; Lunsford, R.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Weaver, J.; Dunlop, W.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-05-01

    Consequences of an explosion inside an air-filled cavity under the earth's surface are partly duplicated in a laboratory experiment on spatial scales 1000 smaller. The experiment measures shock pressures coupled into a block of material by an explosion inside a gas-filled cavity therein. The explosion is generated by suddenly heating a thin foil that is located near the cavity center with a short laser pulse, which turns the foil into expanding plasma, most of whose energy drives a blast wave in the cavity gas. Variables in the experiment are the cavity radius and explosion energy. Measurements and GEODYN code simulations show that shock pressures measured in the block exhibit a weak dependence on scaled cavity radius up to ˜25 m/kt1/3, above which they decrease rapidly. Possible mechanisms giving rise to this behavior are described. The applicability of this work to validating codes used to simulate full-scale cavity explosions is discussed.

  15. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  16. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  17. Cavity QED with optically transported atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, J.A.; Fortier, K.M.; Chang, M.S.; Hamley, C.D.; Chapman, M.S.

    2004-05-01

    Ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms are delivered into a high-finesse optical microcavity using a translating optical lattice trap and detected via the cavity field. The atoms are loaded into an optical lattice from a magneto-optic trap and transported 1.5 cm into the cavity. Our cavity satisfies the strong-coupling requirements for a single intracavity atom, thus permitting real-time observation of single atoms transported into the cavity. This transport scheme enables us to vary the number of intracavity atoms from 1 to >100 corresponding to a maximum atomic cooperativity parameter of 5400, the highest value ever achieved in an atom-cavity system. When many atoms are loaded into the cavity, optical bistability is directly measured in real-time cavity transmission.

  18. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Lingwood, C.; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  19. Generalized magneto-thermoviscoelasticity in a perfectly conducting thermodiffusive medium with a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkour, Ashraf M.; Alzahrani, Ebraheem O.; Abouelregal, Ahmed E.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the effects of viscosity and diffusion on thermoelastic interactions in an infinite medium with a spherical cavity are studied. The formulation is applied to the generalized thermoelasticity based on the theory of generalized thermoelastic diffusion with one relaxation time. The surface of the spherical cavity is taken to be traction free and subjected to both heating and external constant magnetic field. The solution is obtained in the Laplace transform domain by using a direct approach. The solution of the problem in the physical domain obtained numerically using a method based on Fourier expansion techniques. The temperature, displacement, stress, concentration as well as the chemical potential are obtained and represented graphically. Comparisons are made within the theory in the presence and absence of viscosity and diffusion.

  20. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high mechanical frequency of these systems allows for the possibility of using a dilution refrigerator to simultaneously achieve low thermal occupancy and long mechanical coherence time by passively cooling the device to the millikelvin regime. This thesis describes efforts to realize the measurement of OMC cavities inside a dilution refrigerator, including the development of fridge-compatible optical coupling schemes and the characterization of the heating dynamics of the mechanical resonator at sub-kelvin temperatures. We will begin by summarizing the theoretical framework used to describe cavity optomechanical systems, as well as a handful of the quantum applications envisioned for such devices. Then, we will present background on the design of the nanobeam OMC cavities used for this work, along with details of the design and characterization of tapered fiber couplers for optical coupling inside the fridge. Finally, we will present measurements of the devices at fridge base temperatures of Tf = 10 mK, using both heterodyne spectroscopy and time-resolved sideband photon counting, as well as detailed analysis of the prospects for future quantum applications based on the observed optically-induced heating.

  1. Low-lying bifurcations in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Armen, M. A.; Mabuchi, H.

    2006-06-15

    The interplay of quantum fluctuations with nonlinear dynamics is a central topic in the study of open quantum systems, connected to fundamental issues (such as decoherence and the quantum-classical transition) and practical applications (such as coherent information processing and the development of mesoscopic sensors and amplifiers). With this context in mind, we here present a computational study of some elementary bifurcations that occur in a driven and damped cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) model at low intracavity photon number. In particular, we utilize the single-atom cavity QED master equation and associated stochastic Schroedinger equations to characterize the equilibrium distribution and dynamical behavior of the quantized intracavity optical field in parameter regimes near points in the semiclassical (mean-field, Maxwell-Bloch) bifurcation set. Our numerical results show that the semiclassical limit sets are qualitatively preserved in the quantum stationary states, although quantum fluctuations apparently induce phase diffusion within periodic orbits and stochastic transitions between attractors. We restrict our attention to an experimentally realistic parameter regime.

  2. Dynamics of an oscillating turbulent jet in a confined cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righolt, B. W.; Kenjereš, S.; Kalter, R.; Tummers, M. J.; Kleijn, C. R.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate how the self-sustained oscillation of a confined jet in a thin cavity can be quantitatively described by a zero-dimensional model of the delay differential equation type with two a priori predicted model constants. This model describes the three phases in self-sustained oscillations: (i) pressure driven growth of the oscillation, (ii) amplitude limitation by geometry, and (iii) delayed destruction of the recirculation zone. The two parameters of the model are the growth rate of the jet angle by a pressure imbalance and the delay time for the destruction of this pressure imbalance. We present closed relations for both model constants as a function of the jet Reynolds number Re, the inlet velocity vin, the cavity width W, and the cavity width over inlet diameter W/d and we demonstrate that these model constants do not depend on other geometric ratios. The model and the obtained model constants have been successfully validated against three dimensional large eddy simulations, and planar particle image velocimetry measurements, for 1600 < Re ≤ 7100 and 20 ≤ W/d < 50. The presented model inherently contains the transition to a non-oscillating mode for decreasing Reynolds numbers or increasing W/d-ratios and allows for the quantitative prediction of the corresponding critical Reynolds number and critical W/d.

  3. Analysis of diffusion of noncondensable gas in liquid around gaseous bubble nucleus in pressure reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mukasa, Shinobu; Mizukami, Koichi; Wada, Kazuhiro

    1999-07-01

    To know the boiling inception condition is one of the fundamental problems in boiling heat transfer research and is often concerned with evaluation of safety and reliability of apparatuses cooled by means of boiling. The boiling liquid is not necessarily free from noncondensable gas. For example, liquid sodium in a fast nuclear reactor contains inert gas. The purpose of this study is to develop a well established method for evaluating the effect of noncondensable gas on the condition of boiling inception induced by pressure reduction. In their previous study, the authors adopted one-directional diffusion equation to describe the diffusion of noncondensable gas in the liquid around a bubble nucleus growing due to pressure reduction. However the equation is an approximation obtained by ignoring the advection due to the movement of the liquid accompanied by the growth of the bubble nucleus. In the present study is derived a pseudo-spherical diffusion equation which includes the advection effect. The equation is applied for the investigation of the growth of gaseous bubble nucleus and the boiling inception caused by pressure reduction. Calculations are made for such combinations of liquid and noncondensable gas as liquid sodium and argon, water and oxygen, and water and nitrogen. The growing process of gaseous bubble nucleus and the boiling inception condition are analyzed and compared with those with the previous method. The modified curvatures at boiling does not differ greatly between two analyses, whereas the growth processes are quite different from those with the previous method. The effect of temperature, pressure reduction rate, cavity size and solubility of noncondensable gas are examined.

  4. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  5. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  6. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  7. Observation and characterization of cavity Rydberg polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningyuan, Jia; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Ryou, Albert; Schine, Nathan; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the emergence of a robust quasiparticle, the cavity Rydberg polariton, when an optical cavity photon hybridizes with a collective Rydberg excitation of a laser-cooled atomic ensemble. Free-space Rydberg polaritons have recently drawn intense interest as tools for quantum information processing and few-body quantum science. Here, we explore the properties of their cavity counterparts in the single-particle sector, observing an enhanced lifetime and slowed dynamics characteristic of cavity dark polaritons. We measure the range of cavity frequencies over which the polaritons persist, corresponding to the spectral width available for polariton quantum dynamics, and the speed limit for quantum information processing. Further, we observe a cavity-induced suppression of inhomogeneous broadening channels and demonstrate the formation of Rydberg polaritons in a multimode cavity. In conjunction with recent demonstrations of Rydberg-induced cavity nonlinearities, our results point the way towards using cavity Rydberg polaritons as a platform for creating high-fidelity photonic quantum materials and, more broadly, indicate that cavity dark polaritons offer enhanced stability and control uniquely suited to optical quantum information processing applications beyond the Rydberg paradigm.

  8. Temperature Structure of a Coronal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    we analyze the temperature structure of a coronal cavity observed in Aug. 2007. coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and x-rays. when these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs. It is important to establish the temperature structure of cavities in order to understand the thermodynamics of cavities in relation to their three-dimensional magnetic structure. To analyze the temperature we compare temperature ratios of a series of iron lines observed by the Hinode/EUv Imaging spectrometer (EIS). We also use those lines to constrain a forward model of the emission from the cavity and streamer. The model assumes a coronal streamer with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel lenth. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. The general cavity morphology and the cavity and streamer density have already been modeled using data from STEREO's SECCHI/EUVI and Hinode/EIS (Gibson et al 2010 and Schmit & Gibson 2011).

  9. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  10. Cavity quantum electro-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei

    2010-06-15

    The quantum dynamics of the coupling between a cavity optical field and a resonator microwave field via the electro-optic effect is studied. This coupling has the same form as the optomechanical coupling via radiation pressure, so all previously considered optomechanical effects can in principle be observed in electro-optic systems as well. In particular, I point out the possibilities of laser cooling of the microwave mode, entanglement between the optical mode and the microwave mode via electro-optic parametric amplification, and back-action-evading optical measurements of a microwave quadrature.

  11. Outbursts from cavities in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S.

    2014-07-01

    In 2005 the impact module of the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft collided with Comet 9P/Tempel 1. Based on analysis of the images made during the first 13 minutes after the collision of the DI impact module with the comet, Ipatov and A'Hearn [1] studied time variations of ejection of material after this impact. Observed brightness of the cloud of ejected material was mainly due to particles with diameters d<3 micron, and so we discussed ejection of such particles. It was shown that, besides the normal ejection of material from the crater, at time t_{e} after the DI collision between 8 s and 60 s there was a considerable additional ejection (a triggered outburst) of small (micron size) particles. It increased the mean velocities of observed small ejected particles (compared with the normal ejection). It is difficult to explain the time variations in the brightness of the DI cloud at distance 1cavity with dust and gas under pressure. Though the model of a layered target can play some role in an explanation of the variation in brightness of the DI cloud, it cannot explain all details of such variation (for example, at t_{e} sim 10 s there was simultaneously a jump in the direction from the place of ejection to the brightest pixel in an image of the DI cloud by 50 degrees, an increase in the rate of ejection of small particles, and an increase in the brightness of the brightest pixel; at t_{e} ≈ 60 s there was a sharp decrease in the rate of ejection of small particles, and at t_{e} ≈ 60 s the direction from the place of ejection to the brightest pixel returned to the direction at 1 < t_{e} <12 s; the mean ejection velocities of observed particles were almost the same at t_{e} about 10-20 s, etc.). In [1] it was concluded that particles could not increase their velocities by more than a few meters per second during those few minutes when they moved from R=1 to 10 km. The largest cavity excavated after the collision could be relatively deep because a considerable excess ejection lasted during about 50 s. According to Schultz et al. [2], the diameter d_{tc} of the DI transient crater was about 200 m, but some authors support smaller values of d_{tc}. I estimated [3] the depth of the DI crater at t_{e}=8 s to be about 6 m for d_{tc}=200 m and 4 m for d_{tc}=100 m. The cavity could be located not exactly below the center of the crater (i.e., at a little smaller depth of the crater), but the gas and dust could begin to eject via cracks. The distance between the pre-impact surface of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 and the upper border of the largest excavated cavity of about 4-6 m, and sizes of particles inside the cavities of a few microns are in good agreement with the results obtained by Kossacki and Szutowicz [4]. These authors concluded that the rapid sublimation of the CO ice in a cavity could lead to a rise of gas pressure above the tensile strength of the nucleus. In their models of the explosion of Comet 17P/Holmes, the pressure of CO vapor can rise to the threshold value of 10 kPa only when the nucleus is composed of very fine grains, a few microns in radius. The porous structure of comets provides enough space for sublimation. The projection of the velocity of the leading edge of the DI cloud (onto the plane perpendicular to the line of sight) was about 100-200 m/s and is typical for outburst particles ejected from comets (references to the papers devoted to natural outbursts can be found in [5]). The similarity of velocities of particles ejected at triggered and natural outbursts shows that these outbursts could be caused by similar internal processes in comets. It is possible that cavities with dust and gas under pressure can be located a few meters below the surfaces of comets. After some time, gas under pressure can make its way from a cavity to the surface of a comet, and the gas formed later can follow this path at a relatively low pressure. Therefore, probably, the more time a comet has spent close to the Sun, the greater are the distances from the surface of the comet to the upper borders of cavities containing dust and gas under considerable pressure.

  12. Mass renormalization in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Matloob, Reza

    2011-01-15

    We show that the presence of a background medium and a boundary surface or surfaces in cavity QED produces no change in the energy shift of a free charged particle due to its coupling to the fluctuating electromagnetic field of the vacuum. This clarifies that the electromagnetic and the observed mass of the charged particle are not affected by the modification of the field of the vacuum. The calculations are nonrelativistic and restricted to the dipole approximation but are otherwise based on the general requirements of causality.

  13. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  14. Optical Devices Based on Limit Cycles and Amplification in Semiconductor Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    At strong pump powers, a semiconductor optical cavity passes through a Hopf bifurcation and undergoes self-oscillation. We simulate this device using semiclassical Langevin equations and assess the effect of quantum fluctuations on the dynamics. Below threshold, the cavity acts as a phase-insensitive linear amplifier, with noise approximately 5 ×larger than the Caves bound. Above threshold, the limit cycle acts as an analog memory, and the phase diffusion is approximately 10 ×larger than the bound set by the standard quantum limit. We also simulate entrainment of this oscillator and propose an optical Ising machine and classical controlled not (cnot) gate based on the effect.

  15. Differential ultrafast all-optical switching of the resonances of a micropillar cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Thyrrestrup, Henri Yüce, Emre; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L.; Claudon, Julien; Gérard, Jean-Michel

    2014-09-15

    We perform frequency- and time-resolved all-optical switching of a GaAs-AlAs micropillar cavity using an ultrafast pump-probe setup. The switching is achieved by two-photon excitation of free carriers. We track the cavity resonances in time with a high frequency resolution. The pillar modes exhibit simultaneous frequency shifts, albeit with markedly different maximum switching amplitudes and relaxation dynamics. These differences stem from the non-uniformity of the free carrier density in the micropillar, and are well understood by taking into account the spatial distribution of injected free carriers, their spatial diffusion and surface recombination at micropillar sidewalls.

  16. Environmental enhancement of creep crack growth in Inconel 718 by oxygen and water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio, P.; Gao, M.; Wei, R.P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics)

    1994-05-15

    Inconel 718 alloy is widely used in high temperature applications. Because of its sensitivity to environmentally enhanced crack growth at high temperatures, its use has been limited to modest temperatures (i.e., below 973 K). To improve its performance and to better predict its service life, it is important to develop a better understanding of the processes of crack growth at high temperatures in this alloy. It has been shown that the creep crack growth rates (CCGR) in air are at least two orders of magnitude faster than those in vacuum or inert environments. CCGR were also found to depend strongly on temperature. Fractographic studies showed that crack growth was intergranular in air and in vacuum with brittle appearing grain boundary separation in air and extensive cavity formation in vacuum. The increased CCGR in air has been attributed to the enhancement by oxygen; principally through enhanced cavity nucleation and growth by high-pressure carbon monoxide/dioxide formed by the reactions of oxygen that diffused into the material with the grain boundary carbides. The appropriateness of this mechanism, however, may be questioned by the absence of cavitation on the crack surfaces produced in air. As such the mechanism for crack growth needs to be re-examined. Because of the presence of moisture in air, the possible influence of hydrogen needs to be considered as well. In this study, preliminary experiments were conducted to examine the process of environmentally enhanced creep crack growth in Inconel 718 alloy in terms of possible mechanisms and rate controlling processes. Creep crack growth experiments were carried out in air, oxygen (from 2.67 to 100 kPa), moist argon (water vapor) and pure argon at temperatures from 873 to 973 K.

  17. Primary Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma involving the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Faleh Ali A; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Motabi, Ibraheem Hm; Alrashed, Abdullah; Anil, Sukumaran

    2015-10-01

    Lymphomas of the oral cavity are rare and typically present as intraosseous lesions that are most commonly diffuse large B-cell type. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma histologically characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphoid cells with a nuclear size equal to or exceeding normal histiocytic nuclei. A case of DLBCL of the mandible in an 18 years old male patient is presented. This report discusses this rare malignancy, including clinical presentation, histopathologic features, immunologic profile, treatment and prognosis. Though lymphoma of mandible is rare, it must be considered in differential diagnosis of swellings arising in the region. PMID:26581467

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Modelling of diamond deposition microwave cavity generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassouni, K.; Silva, F.; Gicquel, A.

    2010-04-01

    Some aspects of the numerical modelling of diamond deposition plasmas generated using microwave cavity systems are discussed. The paper mainly focuses on those models that allow (i) designing microwave cavities in order to optimize the power deposition in the discharge and (ii) estimating the detailed plasma composition in the vicinity of the substrate surface. The development of hydrogen plasma models that may be used for the self-consistent simulation of microwave cavity discharge is first discussed. The use of these models for determining the plasma configuration, composition and temperature is illustrated. Examples showing how to use these models in order to optimize the cavity structure and to obtain stable process operations are also given. A transport model for the highly reactive H2/CH4 moderate pressure discharges is then presented. This model makes possible the determination of the time variation of plasma composition and temperature on a one-dimensional domain located on the plasma axis. The use of this model to analyse the transport phenomena and the chemical process in diamond deposition plasmas is illustrated. The model is also utilized to analyse pulsed mode discharges and the benefit they can bring as far as diamond growth rate and quality enhancement are concerned. We, in particular, show how the model can be employed to optimize the pulse waveform in order to improve the deposition process. Illustrations on how the model can give estimates of the species density at the growing substrate surface over a wide domain of deposition conditions are also given. This brings us to discuss the implication of the model prediction in terms of diamond growth rate and quality.

  19. Tunable-cavity QED with phase qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Jed D.; da Silva, Fabio; Allman, Michael Shane; Lecocq, Florent; Cicak, Katarina; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a tunable-cavity QED architecture with an rf SQUID phase qubit inductively coupled to a single-mode, resonant cavity with a tunable frequency that allows for both tunneling and dispersive measurements. Dispersive measurement is well characterized by a three-level model, strongly dependent on qubit anharmonicity, qubit-cavity coupling and detuning. The tunable cavity frequency provides dynamic control over the coupling strength and qubit-cavity detuning helping to minimize Purcell losses and cavity-induced dephasing during qubit operation. The maximum decay time T1 = 1 . 5 μs is limited by dielectric losses from a design geometry similar to planar transmon qubits. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  20. Cavity-Dumped Communication Laser Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Cavity-dumped lasers have significant advantages over more conventional Q-switched lasers for high-rate operation with pulse position modulation communications, including the ability to emit laser pulses at 1- to 10-megahertz rates, with pulse widths of 0.5 to 5 nanoseconds. A major advantage of cavity dumping is the potential to vary the cavity output percentage from pulse to pulse, maintaining the remainder of the energy in reserve for the next pulse. This article presents the results of a simplified cavity-dumped laser model, establishing the requirements for cavity efficiency and projecting the ultimate laser efficiency attainable in normal operation. In addition, a method of reducing or eliminating laser dead time is suggested that could significantly enhance communication capacity. The design of a laboratory demonstration laser is presented with estimates of required cavity efficiency and demonstration potential.

  1. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  2. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  3. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  4. Cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasulu Raju, S.; Umapathy, M.; Uma, G.

    2015-11-01

    Energy harvesting employing piezoelectric materials in mechanical structures such as cantilever beams, plates, diaphragms, etc, has been an emerging area of research in recent years. The research in this area is also focused on structural tailoring to improve the harvested power from the energy harvesters. Towards this aim, this paper presents a method for improving the harvested power from a cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester by introducing multiple rectangular cavities. A generalized model for a piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple rectangular cavities at a single section and two sections is developed. A method is suggested to optimize the thickness of the cavities and the number of cavities required to generate a higher output voltage for a given cantilever beam structure. The performance of the optimized energy harvesters is evaluated analytically and through experimentation. The simulation and experimental results show that the performance of the energy harvester can be increased with multiple cavities compared to the harvester with a single cavity.

  5. An Experimental Investigation of Supersonic Cavity Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Ning; Alvi, Farrukh. S.; Shih, Chiang; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu; Alkislar, Mehmet. B.

    2003-11-01

    A series of experiments were conducted on supersonic, Mach = 2, cavity flow over variable length / depth ratios, L/D=1 ˜5. Large-scale structures in the cavity shear layer were clearly captured by particle image velocimetry method. The convective velocities of the structures were measured around 60% of the freestream velocity. Supersonic microjets at the leading edge of the cavity were implemented to control the flow-induced resonance in the cavities. The size and strength of the large-scale structure were also significant altered by the microjets. More than 9 dB reduction in Prms and more than 20 dB reduction in cavity tones were obtained with an extremely low mass flux, the cavity blowing ratio Bc < 0.2%.

  6. Some Nuclear Calculations of U-235-D2O Gaseous-Core Cavity Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.; Hyland, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    The results of a multigroup, diffusion theory study of spherical gaseous-core cavity reactors are presented in this report. The reactor cavity of gaseous U235 is enclosed by a region of hydrogen gas and is separated from an external D2O moderator-reflector by a zirconium structural shell. Some cylindrical reactors are also investigated. A parametric study of spherical reactors indicates that, for the range of variables studied, critical mass increases as: (1) Fuel region is compressed within the reactor cavity, (2) moderator thickness is decreased, (3) structural shell thickness is increased, and (4) moderator temperature is increased. A buckling analogy is used to estimate the critical mass of fully reflected cylindrical reactors from spherical results without fuel compression. For a reactor cavity of a 120-centimeter radius uniformly filled with fuel, no structural shell, a moderator temperature of 70 F, and a moderator thickness of 100 centimeters, the critical mass of a spherical reactor is 3.1 kilograms while that of a cylinder with a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.0 (L/D = 1) is approximately 3.8 kilograms and, with L/D = 2, 5.9 kilograms. For the range of variables considered for U235-D2O gaseous-core cavity reactors, the systems are characterized by 95 to 99 percent thermal absorptions, with the flux reaching a maximum in the moderator about 10 to 15 centimeters from the reactor cavity.

  7. SPINNING MOTIONS IN CORONAL CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Stenborg, G. E-mail: guillermo.stenborg.ctr.ar@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-08-20

    In movies made from Fe XII 19.5 nm images, coronal cavities that graze or are detached from the solar limb appear as continually spinning structures, with sky-plane projected flow speeds in the range 5-10 km s{sup -1}. These whirling motions often persist in the same sense for up to several days and provide strong evidence that the cavities and the immediately surrounding streamer material have the form of helical flux ropes viewed along their axes. A pronounced bias toward spin in the equatorward direction is observed during 2008. We attribute this bias to the poleward concentration of the photospheric magnetic flux near sunspot minimum, which leads to asymmetric heating along large-scale coronal loops and tends to drive a flow from higher to lower latitudes; this flow is converted into an equatorward spinning motion when the loops pinch off to form a flux rope. As sunspot activity increases and the polar fields weaken, we expect the preferred direction of the spin to reverse.

  8. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-03-01

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  9. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    ScienceCinema

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2014-05-21

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  10. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W.; Chiu, Shiu-Chu; Parks, Paul; Rawls, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  11. Universal quantum cloning in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Milman, P.; Ollivier, H.; Raimond, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    We propose an implementation of an universal quantum cloning machine [UQCM, V. Buzek and M. Hillery, Phys. Rev. A 54, 1844 (1996)] in a cavity quantum electrodynamics experiment. This UQCM acts on the electronic states of atoms that interact with the electromagnetic field of a high-Q cavity. We discuss here the specific case of the 1{yields}2 cloning process using either a one- or a two-cavity configuration.

  12. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  13. Optical microfiber-based photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Yi-zhi; Andrews, Steve; Li, Zhi-yuan; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Using a focused ion beam milling technique, we fabricate broad stop band (∼10% wide) photonic crystal (PhC) cavities in adiabatically-tapered silica fibers. Abrupt structural design of PhC mirrors efficiently reduces radiation loss, increasing the cavity finesse to ∼7.5. Further experiments and simulations verify that the remaining loss is mainly due to Ga ion implantation. Such a microfiber PhC cavity probably has potentials in many light-matter interaction applications.

  14. Outbursts and cavities in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, Sergei

    Based on analysis of the images made during the first 13 minutes after the collision of the impact module of the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft with Comet 9P/Tempel 1, Ipatov & A'Hearn [1] studied time variations of ejection of material after this impact. They showed that, besides the normal ejection, at time t_{e} after the DI collision between 8 s and 60 s there was a considerable additional ejection (a triggered outburst) of small (micron size) particles. It increased the mean velocities of observed small ejected particles (compared with the normal ejection). The outburst could be caused by excavation of a large cavity with dust and gas under pressure. The largest cavity excavated after the collision could be relatively deep because a considerable excess ejection lasted during about 50 s. Schultz et al. [2] concluded that the diameter d_{tc} of the DI transient crater was about 200 m. Some authors support smaller values of d_{tc}. The depth of the DI crater at t_{e}=8 s was estimated in [3] to be about 6 m for d_{tc}=200 m and 4 m for d_{tc}=100 m. The distance between the pre-impact surface of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 and the upper border of the largest excavated cavity equal to about 4-6 m, and sizes of particles inside the cavities of a few microns are in good agreement with the results obtained by Kossacki & Szutowicz [4]. In their models of the explosion of Comet 17P/Holmes, the initial sublimation front of the CO ice was located at a depth of 4 m, 10 m, or 20 m, and calculations were finished when the CO pressure exceeded the threshold value 10 kPa. It was shown that the pressure of CO vapor can rise to this value only when the nucleus is composed of very fine grains, a few microns in radius. The porous structure of comets provides enough space for sublimation. The projection of the velocity of the leading edge of the DI cloud (onto the plane perpendicular to the line of sight) was about 100-200 m/s and is typical for outburst particles ejected from comets (references to the papers devoted to natural outbursts can be found in [5]). Similarity of velocities of particles ejected at triggered and natural outbursts shows that these outbursts could be caused by similar internal processes in comets. It is possible that cavities with dust and gas under pressure can be located a few meters below many places of surfaces of comets. [1] Ipatov S.I. & A'Hearn M.F., MNRAS, 2011, 414, 76-107. [2] Schultz P.H., Hermalyn B., & Veverka J., Icarus, 2013, 222, 502-515. [3] Ipatov S.I., MNRAS, 2012, 423, 3474-3477. [4] Kossacki K.J. & Szutowicz S., Icarus, 2011, 212, 847-857. [5] Ipatov S.I. in: P.G. Melark (ed.), Comets: Characteristics, Composition and Orbits, 2012, 101-112, (http://arxiv.org/abs/1103.0330).

  15. Comparing the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model

    PubMed Central

    Öztaş, Nurhan; Sümer, Zeynep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model. Study Design: Twenty-one human molars were divided into 3 groups. Cavities were then cut into the teeth (4 per tooth, 28 cavities per group). After sterilization, the teeth were left in broth cultures of 106 colony-forming units (CFU) ml-1 of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) at 36°C for 48 h. The appropriate treatment followed (group A, control; group B, 2% chlorhexidine solution; and group C, 80s of treatment with ozone, and the cavities were then filled with composite resin. After 72h, the restorations were removed, dentin chips were collected with an excavator, and the total number of microorganisms was determined. Results: Both of the treatments significantly reduced the number of S. mutans present compared with the control group and there was a significant difference between the all groups in terms of the amount of the microorganisms grown (p < 0.05). Group B was beter than group C; and group C was better than group A. Moreover, it was found that the amount of the growth in the group of chlorhexidine was significantly less than that of the ozone group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution was the antibacterial treatment most efficacious on S. mutans; however, ozone application could be an anlternative cavity disinfection method because of ozone’s cavity disinfection activity. Key words:Antibacterial activity, chlorhexidine, ozone, streptococcus mutans, tooth cavity. PMID:24455068

  16. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  17. Secure Quantum Dialogue via Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a secure quantum dialogue protocol via cavity QED is suggested by using the evolution law of atom in cavity QED. The present protocol employs both the two-step transmission and the unitary operation encoding. Two security checks are adopted to ensure its transmission security against the active attacks from an outside eavesdropper. The present protocol avoids the information leakage problem by using the entanglement swapping between any two Bell states via cavity QED together with the shared secret Bell state. Compared with the previous information leakage resistant quantum dialogue protocol via cavity QED, the present protocol takes advantage in quantum measurement.

  18. A compound cavity optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Yufei; Xu Zuyanxu; Zhou Yi; Deng Daoqun; Zhu Xiangan; Wu Lingan

    1996-12-31

    The authors report a new type of optical parametric oscillator (OPO) cavity, i.e., a compound cavity OPO, and present its time dynamics based on a mathematical model. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results show that this type of cavity is superior in that its threshold is lower than that of a simple narrow-band cavity with dispersive elements, and its external efficiency is increased while its narrow linewidth remains nearly the same across the tunable range of the nonlinear crystals used.

  19. Large Scale Shape Optimization for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Li-Ling; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2011-12-06

    We present a shape optimization method for designing accelerator cavities with large scale computations. The objective is to find the best accelerator cavity shape with the desired spectral response, such as with the specified frequencies of resonant modes, field profiles, and external Q values. The forward problem is the large scale Maxwell equation in the frequency domain. The design parameters are the CAD parameters defining the cavity shape. We develop scalable algorithms with a discrete adjoint approach and use the quasi-Newton method to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. Two realistic accelerator cavity design examples are presented.

  20. Evaluation of acoustic cavities for combustion stabilization.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, C. L.; Wong, T. L.; Ford, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The stabilizing influence of acoustic cavities (quarterwave acoustic resonators) on acoustic modes of combustion instability has been studied. The ability to analytically predict cavity damping was improved. Relatively good agreement between predicted damping and measured stability was demonstrated. Full-scale motor firings were made to evaluate the influence of several parameters on stability. Results from these firings showed that stability was changed, but not dramatically, by changes in the engine operating conditions. Variations in the film-coolant flowrate do not significantly affect cavity stabilization. The ability to stabilize an engine with unconventional cavity configurations was demonstrated.

  1. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Graham, Alexandra; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; McPhedran, Ross; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2009-06-01

    We present a principle for the temperature stabilization of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities based on optofluidics. We introduce an analytic method enabling a specific mode of a cavity to be made wavelength insensitive to changes in ambient temperature. Using this analysis, we experimentally demonstrate a PhC cavity with a quality factor of Q ≈15 000 that exhibits a temperature-independent resonance. Temperature-stable cavities constitute a major building block in the development of a large suite of applications from high-sensitivity sensor systems for chemical and biomedical applications to microlasers, optical filters, and switches.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  3. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  4. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  5. Diffusion tensor MRI phantom exhibits anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Allen Q; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L; Zhou, Feng-Lei; Yin, Ziying; Parker, Geoff J M; Magin, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports diffusion weighted MRI measurements of cyclohexane in a novel diffusion tensor MRI phantom composed of hollow coaxial electrospun fibers (average diameter 10.2 ?m). Recent studies of the phantom demonstrated its potential as a calibration standard at low b values (less than 1000 s/mm<;sup>2<;/sup>) for mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy. In this paper, we extend the characterization of cyclohexane diffusion in this heterogeneous, anisotropic material to high b values (up to 5000 s/mm<;sup>2<;/sup>), where the apparent diffusive motion of the cyclohexane exhibits anomalous behavior (i.e., the molecular mean squared displacement increases with time raised to the fractional power 2?/?). Diffusion tensor MRI was performed at 9.4 T using an Agilent imaging scanner and the data fit to a fractional order Mittag-Leffler (generalized exponential) decay model. Diffusion along the fibers was found to be Gaussian (2?/?=l), while diffusion across the fibers was sub-diffusive (2?/?<;l). Fiber tract reconstruction of the data was consistent with scanning electron micrograph images of the material. These studies suggest that this phantom material may be used to calibrate MR systems in both the normal (Gaussian) and anomalous diffusion regimes. PMID:25570066

  6. Analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments investigating cavity interactions following postulated vessel meltthrough

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments examining aspects of ex-vessel material interactions in a PWR reactor cavity following postulated core meltdown and localized breaching of the reactor vessel has been carried out. While previous analyses of the tests examined thresholds for the onset of sweepout of fluid from the cavity, the present analysis considers the progression of specific hydrodynamic phenomena involved in the dispersal process: crater formation due to gas jet impingement, radial wave motion and growth, entrainment and transport of liquid droplets, liquid layer formation due to droplet recombination, fluidization of liquid remaining in the cavity, removal of fluidized liquid droplets from the cavity, and the ultimate removal of the remaining liquid layer within the tunnel passageway. Phenomenological models which may be used to predict the phenomena are presented.

  7. CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, S.; Casassus, S.; Van der Plas, G.; Christiaens, V.; Ménard, F.; Roman, P.; Cieza, L.; Hales, A. S.; Pinte, C.

    2015-01-10

    Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 AU from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J = 2-1 line of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the {sup 12}CO emission is optically thick, while {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is ∼1.5-2 M {sub Jup}. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best-fit model shows that the cavity radius is much smaller in CO than it is in millimeter continuum and scattered light observations, with a gas cavity that does not extend beyond 105 AU (at 3σ). The gap wall at its outer edge is diffuse and smooth in the gas distribution, while in dust continuum it is manifestly sharper. The inclination angle, as estimated from the high velocity channel maps, is 28 ± 0.5 deg, higher than in previous estimates, assuming a fix central star mass of 2.2 M {sub ☉}.

  8. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows an individual cell from the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  9. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  10. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering. PMID:25242838

  11. Mini-cavity-dumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lasers for use in high precision satellite ranging systems consist typically of an oscillator followed by several amplifier stages. While the shortest optical pulses are achieved by using a mode locked oscillator, such an oscillator is incompatible with the compact design needed in future, highly mobile systems. The laser oscillator achieves pulse lengths approaching those obtainable by mode locking, but in a much more compact and stable design. The oscillator uses two LiNbO3 Pockels cells inside the resonator. One Q-switches the oscillator, and the other is used in a pulse slicing scheme to cavity dump a portion of the circulating optical energy. The length of the optical output pulse measured at 425 + or - 50 picoseconds.

  12. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmidt, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D. K.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  13. Fast tuning of superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, M.; Wilson, C. M.; Persson, F.; Johansson, G.; Shumeiko, V.; Bauch, T.; Duty, T.; Delsing, P.

    2008-11-07

    Photons are fundamental excitations of electromagnetic fields and can be captured in cavities. For a given cavity with a certain size, the fundamental mode has a fixed frequency f which gives the photons a specific 'color'. The cavity also has a typical lifetime {tau}, which results in a finite linewidth {delta}f. If the size of the cavity is changed fast compared to {tau}, and so that the frequency change {delta}f>>{delta}f, then it is possible to change the 'color' of the captured photons. Here we demonstrate superconducting microwave cavities, with tunable effective lengths. The tuning is obtained by varying a Josephson inductance at one end of the cavity. We show data on four different samples and demonstrate tuning by several hundred linewidths in a time {delta}t<<{tau}. Working in the few photon limit, we show that photons stored in the cavity at one frequency will leak out from the cavity with the new frequency after the detuning. The characteristics of the measured devices make them suitable for different applications such as dynamic coupling of qubits and parametric amplification.

  14. High-current SRF cavity design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, D.; Grimm, T. L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-07-01

    For high current applications, it is desirable for the cavity shape to have a low longitudinal loss factor and to have a high beam-breakup threshold current. This paper briefly describes three different cavities designed for this purpose: a six-cell elliptical cavity for particles traveling at the speed of light, a two-cell elliptical cavity for subluminal particle speeds, and a single cell cavity which uses the TM012 mode for acceleration. SUPERFISH simulations predict the peak fields in both of the elliptical cavities will not exceed the TeSLA values by more than 10% but both will have 28.7% larger apertures. The elliptical designs assume the bunch frequency equals the accelerating mode frequency. The beam pipe radius is chosen so that the cutoff frequency is less than twice that of the accelerating mode. Hence all of the monopole and dipole higher-order modes (HOMs) that can be driven by the beam have low loaded Q values. This simplifies the problem of HOM damping. The TM012 cavity is predicted to have much higher peak fields than a π-mode elliptical cavity, but offers potential advantages from its simplified shape; it is essentially a circular waveguide with curved end plates. This basic shape results in easier fabrication and simplified tuning.

  15. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Kneisel, Peter; Cameiro, Tadeu

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  16. Hydrogen masers with cavity frequency switching servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Harry E.; Owings, H. B.; Koppang, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of the free-running hydrogen maser is limited by pulling of the unperturbed hydrogen transition frequency due to instability of the cavity resonance frequency. While automatic spin-exchange tuning is in principle the more basic and accurate method, the required beam intensity switching and the long servo time constant result in reduced stability for measuring intervals up to 10(exp 6) seconds. More importantly, the spin-exchange tuning method requires a second stable frequency source as a reference, ideally a second hydrogen maser, to get the best results. The cavity frequency switching servo, on the other hand, has very little effect on the maser short term stability, and is fast enough to correct for cavity drift while maintaining the cavity at the spin-exchange tuned offset required to minimize instability due to beam intensity fluctuations. Not only does the cavity frequency switching servo not require a second stable frequency source, but the frequency reference is the atomic hydrogen radiated beam signal, so that no extra RF connections need be made to the cavity, and externally generated signals that would perturb the hydrogen atom need not be transmitted through the cavity. The operation of the cavity frequency switching stabilization method is discussed and the transient response of the servo and certain other aspects of the technique that have potential for achieving improved basic accuracy are illustrated.

  17. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  18. Developing of superconducting niobium cavities for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobol, I. L.; Yurevich, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of a study of structure and mechanical properties of welding joints, superconducting characteristics of the material after joining of welded components of superconducting radio frequency cavities are presented. The paper also describes the results of testing of the RF 1.3 GHz single-cell niobium cavity manufactured in the PTI NAS Belarus.

  19. Effective emissivity of a blackbody cavity formed by two coaxial tubes.

    PubMed

    Mei, Guohui; Zhang, Jiu; Zhao, Shumao; Xie, Zhi

    2014-04-10

    A blackbody cavity is developed for continuously measuring the temperature of molten steel, which consists of a cylindrical outer tube with a flat bottom, a coaxial inner tube, and an aperture diaphragm. The ray-tracing approach based on the Monte Carlo method was applied to calculate the effective emissivity for the isothermal cavity with the diffuse walls. And the dependences of the effective emissivity on the inner tube relative length were calculated for various inner tube radii, outer tube lengths, and wall emissivities. Results indicate that the effective emissivity usually has a maximum corresponding to the inner tube relative length, which can be explained by the impact of the inner tube relative length on the probability of the rays absorbed after two reflections. Thus, these results are helpful to the optimal design of the blackbody cavity. PMID:24787424

  20. Communication: Escape kinetics of self-propelled Janus particles from a cavity: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar

    2014-08-01

    We numerically investigate the escape kinetics of elliptic Janus particles from narrow two-dimensional cavities with reflecting walls. The self-propulsion velocity of the Janus particle is directed along either their major (prolate) or minor (oblate) axis. We show that the mean exit time is very sensitive to the cavity geometry, particle shape, and self-propulsion strength. The mean exit time is found to be a minimum when the self-propulsion length is equal to the cavity size. We also find the optimum mean escape time as a function of the self-propulsion velocity, translational diffusion, and particle shape. Thus, effective transport control mechanisms for Janus particles in a channel can be implemented.