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Sample records for diffusive cavity growth

  1. Derivation of anisotropic diffusion coefficients in a large annular cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Eiichi Suetomi; Hiroshi Sekimoto )

    1993-06-01

    A small reactor for a spacecraft or a small liquid-metal reactor for urban siting, decentralized electrical units, or seawater desalination is designed for a large leakage of neutrons from the reactor core. In these reactors, a movable annular reflector is used for reactivity control. Therefore, a large annular cavity exists between the core and the shielding materials. In this paper, anisotropic diffusion coefficients for a large annular cavity are derived by equating the neutron currents obtained by the diffusion equation and by the transport equation. These diffusion coefficients depend only on the geometrical configuration of the cavity. A numerical comparison of diffusion calculations using these diffusion coefficients and transport calculations shows good agreement.

  2. Environmentally-enhanced cavity growth in nickel and nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.M.; Delph, T.J.; Gao, M.; Wei, R.P.; Dwyer, D.J.

    1996-08-01

    Environmental factors have a strong effect on the elevated-temperature failure behavior of nickel-based alloys. It has been proposed that this effect is due to the reactions of oxygen with carbon in the interior of creep cavities. Such reactions can lead to quite high internal gas pressures, sufficient to result in substantial increases in the cavity growth rates. This hypothesis is investigated by carrying out detailed calculations for a simple system which take into account the coupled effects of oxygen diffusion into the cavity and concurrent cavity growth. The results show that creep cavity growth may or may not be affected by internal, gas-producing reactions, depending upon the nature of the carbon-containing particle, the ratio of the grain boundary oxygen diffusivity to the self-diffusivity of nickel, and upon other factors as well.

  3. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  4. Island nucleation and growth with anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Jacques G.; Semaan, Mikhael

    2016-06-01

    While most studies of submonolayer island nucleation and growth have been based on the assumption of ordinary monomer diffusion corresponding to diffusion exponent μ =1 , in some cases either subdiffusive (μ <1 ) or superdiffusive (μ >1 ) behavior may occur. Here we present general expressions for the exponents describing the flux dependence of the island and monomer densities as a function of the critical island size i , substrate dimension d , island fractal dimension df, and diffusion exponent μ , where 0 ≤μ ≤2 . Our results are compared with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for the case of irreversible island growth (i =1 ) with 0 ≤μ ≤2 and d =2 as well as simulation results for d =1 , 3, and 4, and excellent agreement is found.

  5. Enhancement in Quality Factor of SRF Niobium Cavities by Material Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-06-01

    An increase in the quality factor of superconducting radiofrequency cavities is achieved by minimizing the surface resistance during processing steps. The surface resistance is the sum of temperature independent residual resistance and temperature/material dependent Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) resistance. High temperature heat treatment usually reduces the impurities concentration from the bulk niobium, lowering the residual resistance. The BCS part can be reduced by selectively doping non-magnetic impurities. The increase in quality factor, termed as Q-rise, was observed in cavities when titanium or nitrogen thermally diffused in the inner cavity surface.

  6. A simplified model for thermal-wave cavity self-consistent measurement of thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Gu, Caikang; Neill, Stuart; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Fairbridge, Craig; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-12-01

    A simplified theoretical model was developed for the thermal-wave cavity (TWC) technique in this study. This model takes thermal radiation into account and can be employed for absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivity of gas and liquid samples without any knowledge of geometrical and thermal parameters of the components of the TWC. Using this model and cavity-length scans, thermal diffusivities of air and distilled water were accurately and precisely measured as (2.191 ± 0.004) × 10-5 and (1.427 ± 0.009) × 10-7 m2 s-1, respectively, in very good agreement with accepted literature values.

  7. Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal-wave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.

    2001-06-01

    A simple methodology for the direct measurement of the thermal wavelength using a thermal-wave cavity, and its application to the evaluation of the thermal diffusivity of liquids is described. The simplicity and robustness of this technique lie in its relative measurement features for both the thermal-wave phase and cavity length, thus eliminating the need for taking into account difficult-to-quantify and time-consuming instrumental phase shifts. Two liquid samples were used: distilled water and ethylene glycol. Excellent agreement was found with reported results in the literature. The accuracy of the thermal diffusivity measurements using the new methodology originates in the use of only difference measurements in the thermal-wave phase and cavity length. Measurement precision is directly related to the corresponding precision on the measurement of the thermal wavelength.

  8. Fluctuations and discreteness in diffusion limited growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devita, Jason P.

    This thesis explores the effects of fluctuations and discreteness on the growth of physical systems where diffusion plays an important role. It focuses on three related problems, all dependent on diffusion in a fundamental way, but each with its own unique challenges. With diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), the relationship between noisy and noise-free Laplacian growth is probed by averaging the results of noisy growth. By doing so in a channel geometry, we are able to compare to known solutions of the noise-free problem. We see that while the two are comparable, there are discrepancies which are not well understood. In molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), we create efficient computational algorithms, by replacing random walkers (diffusing atoms) with approximately equivalent processes. In one case, the atoms are replaced by a continuum field. Solving for the dynamics of the field yields---in an average sense---the dynamics of the atoms. In the other case, the atoms are treated as individual random-walking particles, but the details of the dynamics are changed to an (approximately) equivalent set of dynamics. This approach involves allowing adatoms to take long hops. We see approximately an order of magnitude speed up for simulating island dynamics, mound growth, and Ostwald ripening. Some ideas from the study of MBE are carried over to the study of front propagation in reaction-diffusion systems. Many of the analytic results about front propagation are derived from continuum models. It is unclear, however, that these results accurately describe the properties of a discrete system. It is reasonable to think that discrete systems will converge to the continuum results when sufficiently many particles are included. However, computational evidence of this is difficult to obtain, since the interesting properties tend to depend on a power law of the logarithm of the number of particles. Thus, the number of particles included in simulations must be exceedingly large. By

  9. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection.

  10. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection. PMID:22734771

  11. Characterization of Tack Strength Based on Cavity-Growth Criterion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Yamagata, Yuichiro; Inaba, Kazuaki; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Tomioka, Shiori; Sugizaki, Toshio

    2016-04-12

    The adhesive force generated by a small short-term pressure, called tack, is measured by a probe tack test on pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs); the maximum force is evaluated by cavity growth at the interface between the PSA layer and the probe surface. As the PSA layer becomes thinner, it is more difficult to measure the tack with a cylindrical probe because of the uneven contact resulting from misalignment. A spherical probe is preferable to obtain reproducible contact on the PSA layer, but the contact area should be taken into account if the contact pressure affects the tack performance. Tack was measured on PSAs with various thicknesses in different contact areas to clarify their effect. The results showed that a larger contact area on a thinner PSA generated higher adhesive stress with larger strain. It was found that the maximum adhesive stress was not affected by the contact pressure, but it was strongly correlated to the contact radius divided by the PSA thickness. In addition, a video microscope observation showed that, in all of the experimental cases, the adhesive stress always reached the maximum when cavities were generated at the interface between the PSA and probe surface. Therefore, the criterion of cavity growth was introduced for the evaluation of the maximum adhesive stress. As a result, the experimental results, even at different release rates, were in good agreement with the estimation by considering the effect of confining a thin layer. Furthermore, the theoretical estimation indicated the ultimate value, which was not dependent upon the PSA thickness or contact area. It was defined as a material property, referred to as the "ultimate tack strength" of PSAs. PMID:26991212

  12. Volume Diffusion Growth Kinetics and Step Geometry in Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    1998-01-01

    The role of step geometry in two-dimensional stationary volume diff4sion process used in crystal growth kinetics models is investigated. Three different interface shapes: a) a planar interface, b) an equidistant hemispherical bumps train tAx interface, and c) a train of right angled steps, are used in this comparative study. The ratio of the super-saturation to the diffusive flux at the step position is used as a control parameter. The value of this parameter can vary as much as 50% for different geometries. An approximate analytical formula is derived for the right angled steps geometry. In addition to the kinetic models, this formula can be utilized in macrostep growth models. Finally, numerical modeling of the diffusive and convective transport for equidistant steps is conducted. In particular, the role of fluid flow resulting from the advancement of steps and its contribution to the transport of species to the steps is investigated.

  13. A simplified model for thermal-wave cavity self-consistent measurement of thermal diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jun Zhou, Jianqin; Gu, Caikang; Neill, Stuart; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Fairbridge, Craig; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-12-15

    A simplified theoretical model was developed for the thermal-wave cavity (TWC) technique in this study. This model takes thermal radiation into account and can be employed for absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivity of gas and liquid samples without any knowledge of geometrical and thermal parameters of the components of the TWC. Using this model and cavity-length scans, thermal diffusivities of air and distilled water were accurately and precisely measured as (2.191 ± 0.004) × 10{sup −5} and (1.427 ± 0.009) × 10{sup −7} m{sup 2} s{sup −1}, respectively, in very good agreement with accepted literature values.

  14. Convective diffusion in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, J. K.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Xidis, A. L.; Howard, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    A protein crystal modeled as a flat plate suspended in the parent solution, with the normal to the largest face perpendicular to gravity and the protein concentration in the solution adjacent to the plate taken to be the equilibrium solubility, is studied. The Navier-Stokes equation and the equation for convective diffusion in the boundary layer next to the plate are solved to calculate the flow velocity and the protein mass flux. The local rate of growth of the plate is shown to vary significantly with depth due to the convection. For an aqueous solution of lysozyme at a concentration of 40 mg/ml, the boundary layer at the top of a 1-mm-high crystal has a thickness of 80 microns at 1 g, and 2570 microns at 10 to the -6th g.

  15. On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

    2010-03-09

    An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

  16. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  17. Enhanced modulation rate in platinum-diffused resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. B.; Yeh, D. H.; Hsieh, L. Z.; Zeng, S. H.

    2005-11-01

    This study is focused on the modulation response of resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes (RCLEDs). Platinum (Pt) atoms are diffused into the 660 nm RCLED epitaxial layers to increase the concentration of recombination centers and to improve the modulation speed. The RCLED has an AlInGaP multi-quantum-well active layer which was embedded into AlGaAs-distributed Bragg reflectors to form a one-wavelength (1-λ) optical resonator. Afterwards, the deep-level Pt impurity was diffused into the RCLED and an improved average rise time, from 18.07 to 12.21 ns, was obtained. The corresponding modulation frequency can be increased from 19.54 to 30.21 MHz.

  18. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  19. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  20. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  1. Motion of an atom in a weakly driven fiber-Bragg-grating cavity: Force, friction, and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K.

    2010-06-15

    We study the translational motion of an atom in the vicinity of a weakly driven nanofiber with two fiber-Bragg-grating mirrors. We calculate numerically and analytically the force, the friction coefficients, and the momentum diffusion. We find that the spatial dependences of the force, the friction coefficients, and the momentum diffusion are very complicated due to the evanescent-wave nature of the atom-field coupling as well as the effect of the van der Waals potential. We show that the time development of the mean number of photons in the cavity closely follows the translational motion of the atom through the nodes and antinodes of the fiber-guided cavity standing-wave field even though the cavity finesse is moderate, the cavity is long, and the probe field is weak.

  2. Scheme for a compact cold-atom clock based on diffuse laser cooling in a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Xiao, Ling; Cheng, Huadong; Liu, Liang

    2015-12-01

    We present a scheme for a compact rubidium cold-atom clock which performs diffuse light cooling, microwave interrogation, and detection of the clock signal in a cylindrical microwave cavity. The diffuse light is produced by laser light reflection at the inner surface of the microwave cavity. The pattern of the injected laser beams is specially designed to accumulate the majority of the cold atoms in the center of the microwave cavity. Microwave interrogation of the cold atoms in the cavity leads to Ramsey fringes, which have a linewidth of 24.5 Hz with a contrast of 95.6 % when the free evolution time is 20 ms. Recently, a frequency stability of 7.3 ×10-13τ-1 /2 has been achieved. The scheme of this physical package can largely reduce the cold-atom clock complexity and increase clock performance.

  3. Formation and growth of nanocavities and cavities induced by He+ implantation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, My Anh; Ruault, Marie-Odile; Fortuna, Franck

    2012-03-01

    Nanocavities and cavities are known to be efficient gettering sites for metallic impurities in silicon. Here, we report results from implanted lang100rang silicon at room temperature with 50 keV helium ions at a dose of 3×1016 cm‑2. Due to its low solubility, He segregates in gas-vacancy complexes and forms nanobubbles. Then, during an N2 ambient annealing at 800 °C using either rapid thermal annealing (RTA) or conventional furnace annealing, nanobubbles grow and He is released from the nanobubbles by gas exodiffusion, leading to (nano)cavities' formation. (Nano)cavities and residual defects were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fraction of retained helium was shown to decrease with annealing time according to the first-order gas release model. Two nucleation-growth mechanisms involved in the growth of these (nano)cavities have been studied. A remarkable result shows evidence about the balance-time dependence of the two mechanisms involved in the growth process of (nano)cavities. At the very beginning (30 s) of the annealing, the main mechanism is the migration-coalescence including nanobubbles and vacancy-helium complexes leading to the cavities' formation. Then, the Ostwald ripening mechanism, related to the helium exodiffusion, between the nanocavities and cavities appeared.

  4. Development of Nb{sub 3}Sn Cavity Vapor Diffusion Deposition System

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Macha, Kurt M.; Clemens, William A.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-02-01

    Nb{sub 3}Sn is a BCS superconductors with the superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium, so theoretically it surpasses the limitations of niobium in RF fields. The feasibility of technology has been demonstrated at 1.5 GHz with Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor deposition technique at Wuppertal University. The benefit at these frequencies is more pronounced at 4.2 K, where Nb{sub 3}Sn coated cavities show RF resistances an order of magnitude lower than that of niobium. At Jefferson Lab we started the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor diffusion deposition system within an R\\&D development program towards compact light sources. Here we present the current progress of the system development.

  5. Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.; Garcia, J. A.

    2000-07-01

    A liquid-ambient-compatible thermal wave resonant cavity (TWRC) has been constructed for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol, ethylene glycol, and olive oil were determined at room temperature (25 °C), with four-significant-figure precision as follows: (0.1445±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (distilled water); (0.0922±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (glycerol); (0.0918±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (ethylene glycol); and (0.0881±0.0004)×10-2 cm2/s (olive oil). The liquid-state TWRC sensor was found to be highly sensitive to various mixtures of methanol and salt in distilled water with sensitivity limits 0.5% (v/v) and 0.03% (w/v), respectively. The use of the TWRC to measure gas evolution from liquids and its potential for environmental applications has also been demonstrated.

  6. [Determining the volume of solution necessary for intraoperative disinfection lavage of the abdominal cavity in diffuse suppurative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Nifant'ev, O E; Popov, A E; Voevodina, T V; Okolelova, E V

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of lavage of the abdominal cavity in diffuse purulent peritonitis by means of a developed device "Geyser" are shown. Changes in the bacterial contamination, toxicity and metabolite contents in the lavage solution and peritoneum depended on a volume of the fluid used. PMID:2338787

  7. Onset of Double-Diffusive Convection in a Rectangular Cavity and Its Generation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Jiro; Yasumizu, Yuto; Ohashi, Shunsuke

    2013-08-01

    Two-dimensional double diffusive convection in a binary fluid mixture filled in a container with a rectangular cross section is investigated by linear stability analyses, numerical simulations and numerical calculations of steady solutions in the present paper. We mainly consider an ethanol--water mixture as the binary fluid, in which heat and ethanol diffuse in different time scales affecting the fluid motion through buoyancy force and the Soret effect. The bottom of the cavity is kept at a higher temperature than the top, and the side boundary walls are assumed to be perfectly insulating. The impermeability condition of mass is applied on all the boundaries. We obtain the critical condition for the onset of double diffusive convection, and examine the flow field at the criticality. It is found that the most unstable mode of disturbance is oscillatory at the criticality for negative values of the separation number, though it is a steady mode of disturbance for positive or null values of the separation number. We discuss the driving mechanism of the steady and oscillatory convections by evaluating torques exerted on the fluid due to the buoyancy force, the pressure and the viscosity separately in each. We find in numerical simulations that the convection, even if it is oscillatory initially, always attains a steady state in due course in the case of a container with a square cross section. The bifurcation diagram of the steady convection is obtained numerically and the relation between the steady convection and the oscillatory mode of disturbance arising due to the linear instability is briefly discussed.

  8. Dynamics of diffusive bubble growth in magmas: Isothermal case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prousevitch, A. A.; Sahagian, D. L.; Anderson, A. T.

    1993-12-01

    We have conducted a parametric study and developed a new cell model describing diffusion-induced growth of closely spaced bubbles in magmatic sytems. The model accounts for (1) the effects of advection of melt resulting from bubble growth, and its affect on the local concentration profile; (2) dynamic resistence of the viscous melt during diffusive growth; (3) diffusion of volatiles in response to evolving concentration gradients; (4) mass balance between dissolved volatiles and gas inside the bubble; (5) changes in the equilibrium saturation concentration at the bubble-melt interface; (6) total pressure within the bubble consisting of ambient, surface tension, and dynamic pressures. The results of this study reveal that bubble growth depends strongly on ambient pressure, volatile oversaturation in the melt, and diffusivity coefficients, but only weakly on bubble separation and inital bubble radius. Increased volatile oversaturation increases growth rate to the point at which it actually reduces time for complete bubble growth. This counterintuitive result is due to significant advective volatile flux toward the bubble interface during growth. Viscosity controls growth dynamics only for cases of high viscosity (greater than 10(exp 4) Pa s). The documentation of the evolution of gas fraction in the melt and bubble wall thickness as a function of time makes it possible to estimate bubble disruption thresholds which bear on volcanic eruption mechanisms. Model results can be applied to the larger-scale problem of magmatic degassing in terms of bubble coalescence, flotation and the development of foams in magma chambers and vent systems, and ultimately to the dynamics of eruption mechanisms.

  9. Abnormal Stability in Growth of Diffusion-Limited Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Shonosuke

    2009-01-01

    An abnormal and unsteady growth of an isotropic cluster in diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) is observed in stability analyses. Macroscopic fluctuation due to the delay of transition from a dendritic tip to a tip-splitting growth induces the anisotropy of DLA. An asymptotic deformation factor \\varepsilon∞ = 0.0888 is obtained from large DLA clusters. A symmetric oval model proposed from the dual-stability growth of DLA gives an asymptotic fractal dimension of 1.7112 using \\varepsilon∞. The correspondence of this model to the box dimension is excellent.

  10. Commissioning results of Nb3Sn cavity vapor diffusion deposition system at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Clemens, William A.; Macha, Kurt M.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R.

    2015-09-01

    Nb3Sn as a BCS superconductor with a superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium offers potential benefit for SRF cavities via a lower-than-niobium surface resistance at the same temperature and frequency. A Nb3Sn vapor diffusion deposition system designed for coating of 1.5 and 1.3 GHz single-cell cavities was built and commissioned at JLab. As the part of the commissioning, RF performance at 2.0 K of a single-cell 1.5 GHz CEBAF-shaped cavity was measured before and after coating in the system. Before Nb3Sn coating the cavity had a Q0 of about 1010 and was limited by the high field Q-slope at Eacc ≅ 27 MV/m. Coated cavity exhibited the superconducting transition at about 17.9 K. The low-field quality factor was about 5∙109 at 4.3 K and 7∙109 at 2.0 K decreasing with field to about 1∙109 at Eacc ≅ 8 MV/m at both temperatures. The highest field was limited by the available RF power.

  11. An extended fractal growth regime in the diffusion limited aggregation including edge diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Batabyal, R.; Das, G. P.; Dev, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated on-lattice diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) involving edge diffusion and compared the results with the standard DLA model. For both cases, we observe the existence of a crossover from the fractal to the compact regime as a function of sticking coefficient. However, our modified DLA model including edge diffusion shows an extended fractal growth regime like an earlier theoretical result using realistic growth models and physical parameters [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 1829]. While the results of Zhang et al. showed the existence of the extended fractal growth regime only on triangular but not on square lattices, we find its existence on the square lattice. There is experimental evidence of this growth regime on a square lattice. The standard DLA model cannot characterize fractal morphology as the fractal dimension (Hausdorff dimension, DH) is insensitive to morphology. It also predicts DH = DP (the perimeter dimension). For the usual fractal structures, observed in growth experiments on surfaces, the perimeter dimension can differ significantly (DH ≠ DP) depending on the morphology. Our modified DLA model shows minor sensitivity to this difference.

  12. Bubble growth by rectified diffusion at high gas supersaturation levels.

    PubMed

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Wilson, Preston S; Hamilton, Mark F

    2008-10-01

    For high gas supersaturation levels in liquids, on the order of 300% as predicted in capillaries of marine mammals following a series of dives [D. S. Houser, R. Howard, and S. Ridgway, J. Theor. Biol. 213, 183-195 (2001)], standard mathematical models of both static and rectified diffusion are found to underestimate the rate of bubble growth by 10%-20%. The discrepancy is demonstrated by comparing predictions based on existing mathematical models with direct numerical solutions of the differential equations for gas diffusion in the liquid and thermal conditions in the bubble. Underestimation of bubble growth by existing mathematical models is due to the underlying assumption that the gas concentration in the liquid is given by its value for a bubble of constant equilibrium radius. This assumption is violated when high supersaturation causes the bubble to grow too fast in relation to the time scale associated with diffusion. Rapid bubble growth results in an increased gas concentration gradient at the bubble wall and therefore a growth rate in excess of predictions based on constant equilibrium bubble radius. PMID:19062834

  13. Transport Phenomena in Liquid Phase Diffusion Growth of Silicon Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Neil Alexander

    Silicon Germanium, SiGe, is an important emerging semiconductor material. In order to optimize growth techniques for SiGe production, such as Liquid Phase Diffusion, LPD, or Melt Replenishment Czochralski, a good understanding of the transport phenomena in the melt is required. In the context of the Liquid Phase Diffusion growth technique, the transport phenomena of silicon in a silicon-germanium melt has been explored. Experiments isolating the dissolution and transport of silicon into a germanium melt have been conducted under a variety of flow conditions. Preliminary modeling of these experiments has also been conducted and agreement with experiments has been shown. In addition, full LPD experiments have also been conducted under varying flow conditions. Altered flow conditions were achieved through the application of a variety of magnetic fields. Through the experimental and modeling work better understanding of the transport mechanisms at work in a silicon-germanium melt has been achieved.

  14. Fractal aggregation growth and the surrounding diffusion field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Satoru; Saito, Yukio; Uwaha, Makio

    2005-10-01

    Silver metal trees grow and form a forest at the edge of a Cu plate in the AgNO3 water solution in a two-dimensional ( d=2) cell. The local structure of the forest is similar to that of the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), but the whole pattern approaches a uniform structure. Its growth dynamics is characterized by the fractal dimension Df of DLA. Time-dependence of the tip height is found to satisfy the scaling relation with the solute concentration c, and the asymptotic growth velocity V is consistent with the power law V˜c expected from the theory. The thickness ξc of the diffusion boundary layer is measured by the Michelson interferometry, and the scaling relation is also confirmed.

  15. Growth of Silicon Nanosheets Under Diffusion-Limited Aggregation Environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejun; Kim, Sung Wook; Kim, Ilsoo; Seo, Dongjea; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth of cubic-structured (silicon) Si nanosheets (SiNSs) was investigated. Freestanding, single-crystalline SiNSs with a thickness of 5-20 nm were grown on various Si substrates under an atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. Systematic investigation indicated that a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) environment that leads to dendritic growth in <110> directions at the initial stage is essential for 2D growth. The kinetic aspects under DLA environments that ascribe to the dendritic and 2D growth were discussed. Under the more dilute conditions made by addition of Ar to the flow of H2, the SiNSs grew epitaxially on the substrates with periodic arrangement at a specific angle depending on the orientation of the substrate. It reveals that SiNSs always grew two dimensionally with exposing (111) surfaces. That is thermodynamically favorable. PMID:26518028

  16. Growth of Silicon Nanosheets Under Diffusion-Limited Aggregation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejun; Kim, Sung Wook; Kim, Ilsoo; Seo, Dongjea; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2015-10-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth of cubic-structured (silicon) Si nanosheets (SiNSs) was investigated. Freestanding, single-crystalline SiNSs with a thickness of 5-20 nm were grown on various Si substrates under an atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. Systematic investigation indicated that a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) environment that leads to dendritic growth in <110> directions at the initial stage is essential for 2D growth. The kinetic aspects under DLA environments that ascribe to the dendritic and 2D growth were discussed. Under the more dilute conditions made by addition of Ar to the flow of H2, the SiNSs grew epitaxially on the substrates with periodic arrangement at a specific angle depending on the orientation of the substrate. It reveals that SiNSs always grew two dimensionally with exposing (111) surfaces. That is thermodynamically favorable.

  17. Evidence of nonuniform phase-diffusion in a bad-cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppens, S.J.M.; Exter, M.P. van; Duin, M. van; Woerdman, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    The quantum-limited linewidth of a short HeNe 3.39-{micro}m laser was measured and seen to increase with increasing nonuniformity of the intracavity intensity distribution. Experiments were done inside as well as outside the bad-cavity regime; in this regime the polarization of the gain medium can not be adiabatically eliminated but acts as a memory. Good quantitative agreement with theory is obtained inside as well as outside the bad-cavity regime. The effect of nonuniformity is well described by the longitudinal Petermann K-factor. The bad-cavity and nonuniformity effects can be separated from each other as predicted by theory.

  18. Local diffusion induced roughening in cobalt phthalocyanine thin film growth.

    PubMed

    Gedda, Murali; Subbarao, Nimmakayala V V; Goswami, Dipak K

    2014-07-29

    We have studied the kinetic roughening in the growth of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) thin films grown on SiO2/Si(001) surfaces as a function of the deposition time and the growth temperature using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have observed that the growth exhibits the formation of irregular islands, which grow laterally as well as vertically with coverage of CoPc molecules, resulting rough film formation. Our analysis further disclosed that such formation is due to an instability in the growth induced by local diffusion of the molecules following an anomalous scaling behavior. The instability relates the (ln(t))(1/2), with t as deposition time, dependence of the local surface slope as described in nonequilibrium film growth. The roughening has been characterized by calculating different scaling exponents α, β, and 1/z determined from the height fluctuations obtained from AFM images. We obtained an average roughness exponent α = 0.78 ± 0.04. The interface width (W) increases following a power law as W ∼ t(β), with growth exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.05 and lateral correlation length (ξ) grows as ξ ∼ t(1/z) with dynamic exponent 1/z = 0.23 ± 0.06. The exponents revealed that the growth belongs to a different class of universality. PMID:24992503

  19. Directional entropy based model for diffusivity-driven tumor growth.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcelo E; Neto, Luiz M G

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present and investigate a multiscale model to simulate 3D growth of glioblastomas (GBMs) that incorporates features of the tumor microenvironment and derives macroscopic growth laws from microscopic tissue structure information. We propose a normalized version of the Shannon entropy as an alternative measure of the directional anisotropy for an estimation of the diffusivity tensor in cases where the latter is unknown. In our formulation, the tumor aggressiveness and morphological behavior is tissue-type dependent, i.e. alterations in white and gray matter regions (which can e.g. be induced by normal aging in healthy individuals or neurodegenerative diseases) affect both tumor growth rates and their morphology. The feasibility of this new conceptual approach is supported by previous observations that the fractal dimension, which correlates with the Shannon entropy we calculate, is a quantitative parameter that characterizes the variability of brain tissue, thus, justifying the further evaluation of this new conceptual approach. PMID:27105991

  20. Diffusion-controlled grain growth in two-phase solids

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Chen, L.Q.

    1997-08-01

    Microstructural evolution and the kinetics of grain growth in volume-conserved two-phase solids were investigated using two-dimensional (2-D) computer simulations based on a diffuse-interface field model. In this model, a two-phase microstructure is described by non-conserved field variables which represent crystallographic orientations of grains in each phase and by a conserved composition field variable which distinguishes the compositional difference between the two phases. The temporal and spatial evolution of these field variables were obtained through a numerical solution to the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations. The effect of the ratios of grain boundary energies to interfacial energy on the microstructure features was systematically studied. It was found that grain growth in a volume-conserved two-phase solid is controlled by long-range diffusion and follows the power growth law, R{sup m} {minus} R{sup m}{sub o} = kt with m = 3 in the scaling regime for all cases studied, including the microstructures containing only quadrijunctions. The effects of volume fractions and initial microstructures are discussed.

  1. Influence of radiation on double conjugate diffusion in a porous cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Khan, T. M. Yunus; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Nik-Ghazali, N.; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna

    2016-05-01

    The current work highlights the effect of radiation on the conjugate heat and mass transfer in a square porous cavity having a solid wall. The solid wall is placed at the center of cavity. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature Tw and concentration Cw whereas the right surface is maintained at Tc and Cc such that Tw>Tc and Cw>Cc. The top and bottom surfaces are adiabatic. The governing equations are solved with the help of finite element method by making use of triangular elements. The results are discussed with respect to two different heights of solid wall inside the porous medium along with the radiation parameter.

  2. Diffusion mass transport in liquid phase epitaxial growth of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, S.; Qin, Z.; Kimura, M.

    1996-12-01

    A numerical simulation model for the mass transport occurring during the liquid phase epitaxial growth of AlGaAs is presented. The mass transport equations in the liquid and solid phases, and the relationships between concentrations and temperature obtained from the phase diagram constitute the governing equations. These equations together with appropriate interface and boundary conditions were solved numerically by the Finite Element Method. Numerical results show the importance of diffusion into the solid phase, affecting the composition of grown layers. Simulation results agree with experiments.

  3. Effect of variable heating on double diffusive flow in a square porous cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Salman Ahmed N., J.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of heat and mass transfer due to variable heating at the left vertical surface of a square cavity filled with porous medium is carried out. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature and concentration as compared to right surface which has low temperature and concentration. Finite element method is used to convert the partial differential equations into simpler algebraic form of equations. The governing equations are solved in iterative manner to obtain the solution parameters.Results are presented in terms of isothermal lines, iso-concentration lines and streamlines for variable wall temperature at left surface.

  4. Diffusion of innovations dynamics, biological growth and catenary function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseo, Renato

    2016-12-01

    The catenary function has a well-known role in determining the shape of chains and cables supported at their ends under the force of gravity. This enables design using a specific static equilibrium over space. Its reflected version, the catenary arch, allows the construction of bridges and arches exploiting the dual equilibrium property under uniform compression. In this paper, we emphasize a further connection with well-known aggregate biological growth models over time and the related diffusion of innovation key paradigms (e.g., logistic and Bass distributions over time) that determine self-sustaining evolutionary growth dynamics in naturalistic and socio-economic contexts. Moreover, we prove that the 'local entropy function', related to a logistic distribution, is a catenary and vice versa. This special invariance may be explained, at a deeper level, through the Verlinde's conjecture on the origin of gravity as an effect of the entropic force.

  5. Growth of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L.; Choquette, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    We present growth and characterization of visible and near-infrared vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include growth rate and composition control using an {ital in}{ital situ} normal-incidence reflectometer, comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire composition range, and optimization of ultra-high material uniformity. We also demonstrate our recent achievements of all-AlGaAs VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous- wave demonstration of 700-nm red VCSELs and high-efficiency and low- threshold voltage 850-nm VCSELs.

  6. Diffusion-controlled growth rate of stepped interfaces.

    PubMed

    Saidi, P; Hoyt, J J

    2015-07-01

    For many materials, the structure of crystalline surfaces or solid-solid interphase boundaries is characterized by an array of mobile steps separated by immobile terraces. Despite the prevalence of step-terraced interfaces a theoretical description of the growth rate has not been completely solved. In this work the boundary element method (BEM) has been utilized to numerically compute the concentration profile in a fluid phase in contact with an infinite array of equally spaced surface steps and, under the assumption that step motion is controlled by diffusion through the fluid phase, the growth rate is computed. It is also assumed that a boundary layer exists between the growing surface and a point in the liquid where complete convective mixing occurs. The BEM results are presented for varying step spacing, supersaturation, and boundary layer width. BEM calculations were also used to study the phenomenon of step bunching during crystal growth, and it is found that, in the absence of elastic strain energy, a sufficiently large perturbation in the position of a step from its regular spacing will lead to a step bunching instability. Finally, an approximate analytic solution using a matched asymptotic expansion technique is presented for the case of a stagnant liquid or equivalently a solid-solid stepped interface. PMID:26274183

  7. MOVPE growth of visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorn, M.; Knigge, A.; Zeimer, U.; Klein, A.; Kissel, H.; Weyers, M.; Tränkle, G.

    2003-02-01

    This paper summarises the development of the epitaxial growth process for visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The production of these devices which are of particular interest, e.g. for data communications via plastic optical fibres or for consumer electronics, is a real challenge for MOVPE due to the unfavourable material properties in the AlInGaP/AlGaAs material system necessary for this wavelength range. The following stages of the growth process have been investigated with the intention to reach maximum output power and high temperature stability: distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) doping, interface grading, number of p:DBR pairs, oxide confinement layer, cavity design, number of quantum wells, and wavelength alignment. After optimisation devices with record high output powers of more than 4 mW at 650 nm and 10 mW at 670 nm could be fabricated. Single mode VCSELs show laser emission up to 65°C at 650 nm and 87°C at 670 nm. Laser operation for more than 1000 h demonstrates the potential of these devices for industrial applications.

  8. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  9. Diffusion in a generalized thermoelastic solid in an infinite body with a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J. N.; Kumari, N.; Sharma, K. K.

    2013-09-01

    A dynamic problem of an infinite isotropic cylinder of radius r subjected to boundary conditions of the radial stress, temperature, or concentration of the diffusing substance is studied by using the equations of state of a elastothermodiffusive solid with one relaxation time and the Laplace transform technique. The distributions of the displacement, temperature, and concentration are displayed graphically and analytically.

  10. Analysis of entropy generation for double diffusive MHD convection in a square cavity with isothermal hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sourav; Saha, Sumon

    2016-07-01

    Entropy optimization is a major concern for designing modern thermal management system. In the present work, entropy analysis in a square cavity with an isothermal hollow cylinder at the center is carried out for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) double diffusive convection. Galerkin weighted residuals method of finite element formulation is adopted for the numerical solution. Entropies due to fluid flow, heat, and mass transfer are computed for wide range of Hartmann (0 ≤ Ha ≤ 50) and Lewis numbers (1 ≤ Le ≤ 15), and buoyancy ratios (-5 ≤ N ≤ 5) at constant Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers. It is found that the influence of buoyancy ratio is prominent on entropy generation, which also depends on both Lewis and Hartmann numbers. The ratio N = -1 shows minimum entropy generation for any combination of Lewis and Hartman numbers. Visualization of isentropic contours and the variation of total entropy with the governing parameters provide remarkable evidences of entropy optimization.

  11. Ice crystal growth in a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.

    1980-01-01

    Ice crystals were grown in a supersaturated environment produced by a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber, which employed two horizontal plates separated by a distance of 2.5 cm. Air was circulated between and along the 1.2 m length of the plates past ice crystals which nucleated and grew from a fiber suspended vertically between the two plates. A zoom stereo microscope with a magnification which ranged from 3X to 80X and both 35 mm still photographs and 16 mm time lapse cine films taken through the microscope were used to study the variation of the shape and linear growth rate of ice crystals as a function of the ambient temperature, the ambient supersaturation, and the forced ventilation velocity. The ambient growth conditions were varied over the range of temperature 0 to -40 C, over the range of supersaturation 4% to 50% with respect to ice, and over the range of forced ventilation velocities 0 cm/s to 20 cm/s.

  12. Reptation-induced coalescence of tunnels and cavities in Escherichia Coli XylE transporter conformers accounts for facilitated diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Philip; Naftalin, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    Structural changes and xylose docking to eight conformers of Escherichia Coli XylE, a xylose transporter similar to mammalian passive glucose transporters GLUTs, have been examined. Xylose docks to inward and outward facing conformers at a high affinity central site (K(i) 4-20 µM), previously identified by crystallography and additionally consistently docks to lower affinity sites in the external and internal vestibules (K(i) 12-50 µM). All these sites lie within intramolecular tunnels and cavities. Several local regions in the central transmembrane zone have large positional divergences of both skeleton carbon Cα positions and side chains. One such in TM 10 is the destabilizing sequence G388-P389-V390-C391 with an average RMSD (4.5 ± 0.4 Å). Interchange between conformer poses results in coalescence of tunnels with adjacent cavities, thereby producing a transitory channel spanning the entire transporter. A fully open channel exists in one inward-facing apo-conformer, (PDB 4ja4c) as demonstrated by several different tunnel-finding algorithms. The conformer interchanges produce a gated network within a branched central channel that permits staged ligand diffusion across the transporter during the open gate periods. Simulation of this model demonstrates that small-scale conformational changes required for sequentially opening gate with frequencies in the ns-μs time domain accommodate diffusive ligand flow between adjacent sites with association-dissociation rates in the μs-ms domain without imposing delays. This current model helps to unify the apparently opposing concepts of alternate access and multisite models of ligand transport. PMID:25163893

  13. Diffusion-controlled spherulite growth in obsidian inferred from H2O concentration profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Jim; Watkins, Jim; Manga, Michael; Huber, Christian; Martin, Michael C.

    2007-11-02

    Spherulites are spherical clusters of radiating crystals that occur naturally in rhyolitic obsidian. The growth of spherulites requires diffusion and uptake of crystal forming components from the host rhyolite melt or glass, and rejection of non-crystal forming components from the crystallizing region. Water concentration profiles measured by synchrotron-source Fourier transform spectroscopy reveal that water is expelled into the surrounding matrix during spherulite growth, and that it diffuses outward ahead of the advancing crystalline front. We compare these profiles to models of water diffusion in rhyolite to estimate timescales for spherulite growth. Using a diffusion-controlled growth law, we find that spherulites can grow on the order of days to months at temperatures above the glass transition. The diffusion-controlled growth law also accounts for spherulite size distribution, spherulite growth below the glass transition, and why spherulitic glasses are not completely devitrified.

  14. A generalized diffusion model for growth of nanoparticles synthesized by colloidal methods.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tianlong; Brush, Lucien N; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2014-04-01

    A nanoparticle growth model is developed to predict and guide the syntheses of monodisperse colloidal nanoparticles in the liquid phase. The model, without any a priori assumptions, is based on the Fick's law of diffusion, conservation of mass and the Gibbs-Thomson equation for crystal growth. In the limiting case, this model reduces to the same expression as the currently accepted model that requires the assumption of a diffusion layer around each nanoparticle. The present growth model bridges the two limiting cases of the previous model i.e. complete diffusion controlled and adsorption controlled growth of nanoparticles. Specifically, the results show that a monodispersion of nanoparticles can be obtained both with fast monomer diffusion and with surface reaction under conditions of small diffusivity to surface reaction constant ratio that results is growth 'focusing'. This comprehensive description of nanoparticle growth provides new insights and establishes the required conditions for fabricating monodisperse nanoparticles critical for a wide range of applications. PMID:24491334

  15. Pressure Rate of Strain, Pressure Diffusion and Velocity Pressure Gradient Tensor Measurements in a Cavity Shear Layer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Katz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Pressure related turbulence statistics of a 2D open cavity shear layer flow was investigated experimentally in a water tunnel at a Reynolds number of 40,000. Time-resolved PIV sampled at 4500 fps and a field of view of 25 × 25 mm was used to simultaneously measure the instantaneous velocity, material acceleration and pressure distributions. The pressure was obtained by spatially integrating the measured material acceleration. Results based on 150,000 measurement samples enable direct estimates of components of the pressure-rate-of-strain, pressure diffusion and velocity-pressure-gradient tensors. The pressure and streamwise velocity correlation changes its sign from negative values far upstream from the downstream corner to positive values near the corner due to the strong adverse pressure gradient imposed by the corner. Moreover, once its sign changes, the pressure-velocity correlation preserves its positive value for the streamwise correlations, and negative value for the spanwise correlations, even after the shear layer propagates beyond the adverse pressure gradient region along both the vertical and horizontal corner walls. The pressure diffusion term is of the same order as the production rate. In the shear layer, the streamwise pressure-rate-of-strain term, R11, is mostly negative while the perpendicular term, R22, is positive but with a smaller magnitude, implying turbulent energy redistribution from streamwise to lateral directions. Sponsored by ONR and NSF.

  16. Crystal growth mechanisms in miarolitic cavities in the Lake George ring complex and vicinity, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Crystal Peak area of the Pikes Peak batholith, near Lake George in central Colorado, is world-renowned for its crystals of amazonite (the blue-green variety of microcline) and smoky quartz. Such crystals, collected from individual miarolitic pegmatites, have a remakably small variation in crystal size within each pegmatite, and the shapes of plots of their crystal size distributions (CSDs) are invariably lognormal or close to lognormal in all cases. These observations are explained by a crystal growth mechanism that was governed initially by surface-controlled kinetics, during which crystals tended to grow larger in proportion to their size, thereby establishing lognormal CSDs. Surface-controlled growth was followed by longer periods of supply controlled growth, during which growth rate was predominantly size-independent, consequently preserving the lognormal shapes of the CSDs and the small size variation. The change from surface- to supply controlled growth kinetics may have resulted from an increasing demand for nutrients that exceeded diffusion limitations of the system. The proposed model for crystal growth in this locality appears to be common in the geologic record, and can be used with other information, such as isotopic data, to deduce physico-chemical conditions during crystal formation.

  17. Transverse emittance growth due to rf noise in the high-luminosity LHC crab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudrenghien, P.; Mastoridis, T.

    2015-10-01

    The high-luminosity LHC (HiLumi LHC) upgrade with planned operation from 2025 onward has a goal of achieving a tenfold increase in the number of recorded collisions thanks to a doubling of the intensity per bunch (2.2e11 protons) and a reduction of β* to 15 cm. Such an increase would significantly expedite new discoveries and exploration. To avoid detrimental effects from long-range beam-beam interactions, the half crossing angle must be increased to 295 microrad. Without bunch crabbing, this large crossing angle and small transverse beam size would result in a luminosity reduction factor of 0.3 (Piwinski angle). Therefore, crab cavities are an important component of the LHC upgrade, and will contribute strongly to achieving an increase in the number of recorded collisions. The proposed crab cavities are electromagnetic devices with a resonance in the radio frequency (rf) region of the spectrum (400.789 MHz). They cause a kick perpendicular to the direction of motion (transverse kick) to restore an effective head-on collision between the particle beams, thereby restoring the geometric factor to 0.8 [K. Oide and K. Yokoya, Phys. Rev. A 40, 315 (1989).]. Noise injected through the rf/low level rf (llrf) system could cause significant transverse emittance growth and limit luminosity lifetime. In this work, a theoretical relationship between the phase and amplitude rf noise spectrum and the transverse emittance growth rate is derived, for a hadron machine assuming zero synchrotron radiation damping and broadband rf noise, excluding infinitely narrow spectral lines. This derivation is for a single beam. Both amplitude and phase noise are investigated. The potential improvement in the presence of the transverse damper is also investigated.

  18. Surface diffusion and surface crystal growth of tris-naphthyl benzene glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shigang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Ye; Ediger, M. D.; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients of α,α,β-tris-naphthyl benzene (TNB) glasses have been measured using the method of surface grating decay. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow at temperatures above Tg + 15 K, where Tg is the glass transition temperature (347 K), and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion of TNB is vastly faster than bulk diffusion, by a factor of 107 at Tg. Comparing TNB with other molecular glasses, each evaluated at its own Tg, we find that surface diffusion has a greater system-to-system variation than bulk diffusion, slowing down with increasing molecular size and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Experimentally determined surface diffusion coefficients are in reasonable agreement with those from simulations and theoretical predictions. TNB and other molecular glasses show fast crystal growth on the free surface and the growth velocity is nearly proportional to the surface diffusion coefficient, indicating that the process is supported by surface mobility.

  19. O(minus 2) grain boundary diffusion and grain growth in pure dense MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapadia, C. M.; Leipold, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Grain growth behavior in fully dense compacts of MgO of very high purity was studied, and the results compared with other similar behaving materials. The activation energy for the intrinsic self-diffusion of Mg(2minus) is discussed along with the grain boundary diffusion of O(2minus). Grain boundary diffusion of O(2minus) is proposed as the controlling mechanism for grain growth.

  20. Increased diffuse radiation fraction does not significantly accelerate plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, Alon; Krakauer, Nir

    2010-05-01

    A recent modelling study (Mercado et al., 2009) claims that increased numbers of scattering aerosols are responsible for a substantial fraction of the terrestrial carbon sink in recent decades because higher diffuse light fraction enhances plant net primary production (NPP). Here we show that observations of atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle and tree ring data indicate that the relation between diffuse light and NPP is actually quite weak on annual timescales. The inconsistency of these data with the modelling results may arise because the relationships used to quantify the enhancement of NPP were calibrated with eddy covariance measurements of hourly carbon uptake. The effect of diffuse-light fraction on carbon uptake could depend on timescale, since this effect varies rapidly as sun angle and cloudiness change, and since plants can respond dynamically over various timescales to change in incoming radiation. Volcanic eruptions, such as the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991, provide the best available tests for the effect of an annual-scale increase in the diffuse light fraction. Following the Pinatubo Eruption, in 1992 and 1993, a sharp decrease in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate was observed. This could have resulted from enhanced plant carbon uptake. Mercado et al. (2009) argue that largely as a result of the (volcanic aerosol driven) increase in diffuse light fraction, NPP was elevated in 1992, particularly between 25° N-45° N where annual NPP was modelled to be ~0.8 PgC (~10%) above average. In a previous study (Angert et al., 2004) a biogeochemical model (CASA) linked to an atmospheric tracer model (MATCH), was used to show that a diffuse-radiation driven increase in NPP in the extratropics will enhance carbon uptake mostly in summer, leading to a lower CO2 seasonal minimum. Here we use a 'toy model' to show that this conclusion is general and model-independent. The model shows that an enhanced sink of 0.8 PgC, similar to that modelled by Mercado et al. (2009

  1. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  2. Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jonathan; Staiger, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We draw on macroeconomic models of diffusion and productivity to explain empirical patterns of survival gains in heart attacks. Using Medicare data for 2.8 million patients during 1986–2004, we find that hospitals rapidly adopting cost-effective innovations such as beta blockers, aspirin, and reperfusion, had substantially better outcomes for their patients. Holding technology adoption constant, the marginal returns to spending were relatively modest. Hospitals increasing the pace of technology diffusion (“tigers”) experienced triple the survival gains compared to those with diminished rates (“tortoises”). In sum, small differences in the propensity to adopt effective technology lead to wide productivity differences across hospitals. PMID:26989267

  3. Kidney Tumor Growth Prediction by Coupling Reaction-Diffusion and Biomechanical Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    It is desirable to predict the tumor growth rate so that appropriate treatment can be planned in the early stage. Previously, we proposed a finite element method (FEM)-based 3D kidney tumor growth prediction system using longitudinal images. A reaction-diffusion model was applied as the tumor growth model. In this paper, we not only improve the tumor growth model by coupling the reaction-diffusion model with a biomechanical model, but also take the surrounding tissues into account. Different diffusion and biomechanical properties are applied for different tissue types. FEM is employed to simulate the coupled tumor growth model. Model parameters are estimated by optimizing an objective function of overlap accuracy using a hybrid optimization parallel search package (HOPSPACK). The proposed method was tested with kidney CT images of eight tumors from five patients with seven time points. The experimental results showed the performance of the proposed method improved greatly compared to our previous work. PMID:23047857

  4. A creep cavity growth model for creep-fatigue life prediction of a unidirectional W/Cu composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Verrilli, Michael J.; Halford, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    A microstructural model was developed to predict creep-fatigue life in a (0)(sub 4), 9 volume percent tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite at the temperature of 833 K. The mechanism of failure of the composite is assumed to be governed by the growth of quasi-equilibrium cavities in the copper matrix of the composite, based on the microscopically observed failure mechanisms. The methodology uses a cavity growth model developed for prediction of creep fracture. Instantaneous values of strain rate and stress in the copper matrix during fatigue cycles were calculated and incorporated in the model to predict cyclic life. The stress in the copper matrix was determined by use of a simple two-bar model for the fiber and matrix during cyclic loading. The model successfully predicted the composite creep-fatigue life under tension-tension cyclic loading through the use of this instantaneous matrix stress level. Inclusion of additional mechanisms such as cavity nucleation, grain boundary sliding, and the effect of fibers on matrix-stress level would result in more generalized predictions of creep-fatigue life.

  5. Si diffusion path for pit-free graphene growth on SiC(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G. F.; Liu, Y.; Rhim, S. H.; Jia, J. F.; Xue, Q. K.; Weinert, M.; Li, L.

    2011-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations reveal that the interfacial 63 × 63 structure [a warped graphene layer with periodic inclusions of pentagon-hexagon-heptagon (H5,6,7) defects] facilitates a Si diffusion path vertically through the interface layer during epitaxial growth of graphene on SiC(0001). The calculated diffusion barrier is 4.7 eV, competitive with Si interstitial diffusion of ˜3.5 eV in SiC [M. Bockstedte , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.68.205201 68, 205201 (2003)]. Scanning tunneling microscopy study shows that, for growth in an Ar background, where Si desorption is suppressed and all diffusion channels contribute, graphene films with reduced pit density can be grown on nominally flat SiC substrates. On the other hand, for Si diffusion-limited growth in ultrahigh vacuum, the Si interstitial diffusion is the energetically favorable path where the step edges serve as the necessary outlet toward Si desorption. The much higher density of step edges on vicinal substrates also facilitates the growth of pit-free graphene.

  6. Diffusion behavior of copper atoms under Cu(II) reduction in Cucurbit[8]uril cavity at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakovets, Vladimir V.; Nadolinnii, Vladimir A.; Kovalenko, Ekaterina A.; Plyusnin, Pavel E.; Dolgovesova, Irina P.; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper we describe copper clusters and nanoparticles formation by the reduction of copper (II) ions inside cavities of macrocycle molecules using supramolecular compound [Cu(Cyclen)(H{sub 2}O)@CB[8

  7. Real-time visualization of diffusion-controlled nanowire growth in solution.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shengrong; Chen, Zuofeng; Ha, Yoon-Cheol; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2014-08-13

    This Letter shows that copper nanowires grow through the diffusion-controlled reduction of dihydroxycopper(I), Cu(OH)2(-). A combination of potentiostatic coulometry, UV-visible spectroscopy, and thermodynamic calculations was used to determine the species adding to growing Cu nanowires is Cu(OH)2(-). Cyclic voltammetry was then used to measure the diffusion coefficient of Cu(OH)2(-) in the reaction solution. Given the diameter of a Cu nanowire and the diffusion coefficient of Cu(OH)2(-), we calculated the dependence of the diffusion-limited growth rate on the concentration of copper ions to be 26 nm s(-1) mM(-1). Independent measurements of the nanowire growth rate with dark-field optical microscopy yielded 24 nm s(-1) mM(-1) for the growth rate dependence on the concentration of copper. Dependence of the nanowire growth rate on temperature yielded a low activation energy of 11.5 kJ mol(-1), consistent with diffusion-limited growth. PMID:25054865

  8. Diffusion-limited growth in bacterial colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1990-09-01

    Colonies of bacterial species called Bacillus subtilis have been found to grow two-dimensionally and self-similarly on agar plates through diffusion-limited processes in a nutrient concentration field. We obtained a fractal dimension of the colony patterns of D=1.73±0.02, very close to that of the two-dimensional DLA model, and confirmed the existence of the screening effect of protruding main branches against inner ones in a colony, the repulsion between two neighboring colonies and the tendency to grow toward nutrient. These effects are all characteristic of the pattern formation in a Laplacian field. This finding implies the importance of physical properties of the environment for the morphology of bacterial colonies in general.

  9. Simulation of UAl 4 growth in an UAl 3/Al diffusion couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniznik, L.; Alonso, P. R.; Gargano, P. H.; Rubiolo, G. H.

    2011-07-01

    In this work the growth of the UAl 4 phase in an UAl 3/Al diffusion couple is treated as a planar moving boundary problem due to diffusion of Al and U atoms in the direction perpendicular to the interface surface. The diffusion problem was carried out by the DICTRA simulation package which combines data evaluated by Thermo-Calc with a mobility database. A thermodynamic database of the U-Al system, suitable for the Thermo-Calc code, was composed using data from literature. The mobility database was assessed from reported experimental growth of the UAl 4 phase at different temperatures. The Al tracer diffusion coefficient in the UAl 4 phase, DAl∗(UAl) (m/s)=2.7×10-1exp(-209500 (J/mol)/RT), is obtained under the assumption that uranium mobility is negligible.

  10. Diffusive transport enhancement by isolated resonances and distribution tails growth in hadronic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, A.

    1990-12-06

    The escape rates and evolution of a distribution of particles are considered for a 2-D model of transverse motion of particles in hadronic storage rings, when nonlinear resonances and external diffusion are present. Dynamic enhancement of diffusion inside separatrices can develop under a certain geometry of resonance oscillations and relatively wide resonances, leading to the fast growth of distribution tails and escape rates. The phenomenon is absent in 1-D. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Spectral and angular dependence of mid-infrared diffuse scattering from explosives residues for standoff detection using external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of scattered mid-infrared light from surfaces coated with explosives residues (TNT, RDX, and tetryl) detected at a 2 m standoff distance. An external cavity quantum cascade laser provided tunable illumination between 7 and 8 μm. Important differences were identified in the spectral features between specular reflection and diffuse scattering which will impact most practical testing scenarios and complicate material identification. We discuss some of the factors influencing the dependence of observed spectra on the experimental geometry.

  12. Spectral and angular dependence of mid-infrared diffuse scattering from explosives residues for standoff detection using external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of scattered mid-infrared light from surfaces coated with explosives residues (TNT, RDX, and tetryl) detected at a 2 meter standoff distance. An external cavity quantum cascade laser provided tunable illumination between 7 and 8 µm. Important differences were identified in the spectral features between specular reflection and diffuse scattering which will impact most practical testing scenarios and complicate material identification. We discuss some of the factors influencing the dependence of observed spectra on the experimental geometry.

  13. Double-Diffusive Convection During Growth of Halides and Selenides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Su, Ching-Hua; Duval, Walter M. B.

    2015-01-01

    several materials such as mercurous chloride, mercurous bromide, mercurous iodide, lead chloride lead bromide, lead iodide, thallium arsenic selenide, gallium selenide, zince sulfide zinc selenide and several crystals into devices. We have used both Bridgman and physical vapor transport (PVT) crystal growth methods. In the past have examined PVT growth numerically for conditions where the boundary of the enclosure is subjected to a nonlinear thermal profile. Since past few months we have been working on binary and ternary materials such as selenoiodides, doped zinc sulfides and mercurous chloro bromide and mercurous bromoiodides. In the doped and ternary materials thermal and solutal convection play extremely important role during the growth. Very commonly striations and banding is observed. Our experiments have indicated that even in highly purified source materials, homogeneity in 1-g environment is very difficult. Some of our previous numerical studies have indicated that gravity level less than 10-4 (?-g) helps in controlling the thermosolutal convection. We will discuss the ground based growth results of HgClxBr(1-x) and ZnSe growth results for the mm thick to large cm size crystals. These results will be compared with our microgravity experiments performed with this class of materials. For both HgCl-HgBr and ZnS-ZnSe the lattice parameters of the mixtures obey Vagard's law in the studied composition range. The study demonstrates that properties are very anisotropic with crystal orientation, and performance achievement requires extremely careful fabrication to utilize highest figure of merit. In addition, some parameters such as crystal growth fabrication, processing time, resolution, field of view and efficiency will be described based on novel solid solution materials. It was predicted that very similar to the pure compounds solid solutions also have very large anisotropy, and very precise oriented and homogeneous bulk and thin film crystals is required to achieve

  14. An Investigation into Zinc Diffusion and Tin Whisker Growth for Electroplated Tin Deposits on Brass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Mark A.; Wilcox, Geoffrey D.; Higginson, Rebecca L.; Heath, Richard J.; Liu, Changqing

    2014-04-01

    It is widely documented that whisker growth is more rapid for tin deposits on brass compared with deposits produced on other substrate materials, such as copper. As a result, studies investigating the effect of process variables on tin whisker formation are often conducted on brass substrates to take advantage of the increased whisker growth rates. Although it has been understood since the 1960s that the increased whisker growth results from zinc diffusion, to date there has not been any detailed analysis of the zinc/zinc oxide distribution at the surface of the tin deposit. Using a commercial bright tin electroplating bath, the formation of zinc oxide at the surface of tin deposits on brass has been investigated. Analyses show that zinc oxide is present on the surface of the deposit within 1 day of electroplating. During storage at room temperature, a network of zinc oxide is formed at the surface grain boundaries, the extent of which increases with time. The critical role that zinc surface diffusion plays in whisker growth for tin deposits on brass has been demonstrated by electrochemical oxidation of the tin shortly after electroplating. This develops a tin oxide film that is thicker than the native air-formed oxide and subsequently serves as a diffusion barrier to zinc surface diffusion, thereby mitigating whisker growth.

  15. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  16. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  17. Numerical study of liquid phase diffusion growth of SiGe subjected to accelerated crucible rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhon, M.; Lent, B.; Dost, S.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) on liquid phase diffusion (LPD) growth of SixGe1-x crystal has been investigated numerically. Transient, axisymmetric simulations have been carried out for triangular and trapezoidal ACRT cycles. Natural convection driven flow in the early growth hours is found to be modified by the ACRT induced Ekman flow. Results also reveal that a substantial mixing in the solution can be induced by the application of ACRT in the later hours of growth which is otherwise a diffusion dominated growth period for LPD growth technique. A comparison is drawn to the cases of stationary crucible and crucible rotating at a constant speed examined previously for this growth system by Sekhon and Dost (J. Cryst. Growth 430 (2015) 63). It is found that a superior interface flattening effect and radial compositional uniformity along the growth interface can be accomplished by employing ACRT at 12 rpm than that which could be achieved by using steady crucible rotation at 25 rpm, owing to the higher time averaged growth velocity achieved in the former case. Furthermore, minor differences are also predicted in the results obtained for trapezoidal and triangular ACRT cycles.

  18. Stationary growth and unique invariant harmonic measure of cylindrical diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Riccardo; Taloni, Alessandro; Caglioti, Emanuele; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-08-10

    We prove that the harmonic measure is stationary, unique, and invariant on the interface of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growing on a cylinder surface. We provide a detailed theoretical analysis puzzling together multiscaling, multifractality, and conformal invariance, supported by extensive numerical simulations of clusters built using conformal mappings and on a lattice. The growth properties of the active and frozen zones are clearly elucidated. We show that the unique scaling exponent characterizing the stationary growth is the DLA fractal dimension. PMID:23006279

  19. Stationary Growth and Unique Invariant Harmonic Measure of Cylindrical Diffusion Limited Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Riccardo; Taloni, Alessandro; Caglioti, Emanuele; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-08-01

    We prove that the harmonic measure is stationary, unique, and invariant on the interface of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growing on a cylinder surface. We provide a detailed theoretical analysis puzzling together multiscaling, multifractality, and conformal invariance, supported by extensive numerical simulations of clusters built using conformal mappings and on a lattice. The growth properties of the active and frozen zones are clearly elucidated. We show that the unique scaling exponent characterizing the stationary growth is the DLA fractal dimension.

  20. Large interface diffusion in endotaxial growth of MnP films on GaP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nateghi, N. Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A.

    2014-10-07

    The metal organic vapor deposition of MnP films on GaP (100) substrates is shown to have a substantial endotaxial component. A study of the growth time evolution of the endotaxial depths of MnP grains reveals a diffusion-controlled growth with a relatively large diffusion coefficient of Mn in GaP. The value (2.2 ± 1.5) × 10⁻¹⁵ (cm²/s) obtained at 650 °C is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the reported Mn diffusion in bulk GaP. GaP surface mounds provide further indirect evidence that this large diffusion coefficient is concurrent with the out-diffusion of Ga atoms at the growing MnP/GaP interface. No trace of dislocations could be observed at or near this interface, which strongly suggests that Mn diffusion occurs through vacant sites generated by the difference between the crystallographic structures of MnP and GaP.

  1. Non-linear resonance of fluids in a crystal growth cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Francis C.

    1996-01-01

    In the microgravity environment, the effect of gravity on fluid motion is much reduced. Hence, secondary effects such as vibrations, jitters, surface tension, capillary effects, and electromagnetic forces become the dominant mechanism of fluid convection. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate fluid behavior in microgravity with the ultimate goal of developing processes with minimal influence from convection. Industrial applications such as crystal growth from solidification of melt and protein growth for pharmatheutical application are just a few examples of the vast potential benefit that can be reaped from material processing in space. However, a space laboratory is not immune from all undesirable disturbances and it is imperative that such disturbances be well understood, quantifiable, and controlled. Non-uniform and transient accelerations such as vibrations, jitters, and impulsive accelerations exist as a result of crew activities, space vehicle maneuvering, and the operations of on-board equipment. Measurements conducted on-board a U.S. Spacelab showed the existence of vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 100 Hz with a dominant mode of 17 Hz and harmonics of 54 Hz. The observed vibration is not limited to any coordinate plane but exists in all directions. Similar situation exists on-board the Russian MIR space station. Due to the large structure of its design, the future International Space Station will have its own characteristic vibration spectrum. It is well known that vibration can exert substantial influence on heat and mass transfer processes, thus hindering any attempts to achieve a diffusion-limited process. Experiments on vibration convection for a liquid-filled enclosure under one-g environment showed the existence of different flow regimes as vibration frequency and intensity changes. Results showed the existence of a resonant frequency, near which the enhancement is the strongest, and the existence of a high frequency asymptote

  2. Solute Layers and Double-Diffusive Interfaces during the Solidification of NH{sub 4}Cl-H{sub 2}O in Rectangular Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z. X.; Lu, J.; Bai, B. F.

    2010-03-01

    Flow and temperature fields during the solidification of hypereutectic and hypoeutectic NH{sub 4}Cl-H{sub 2}O solution in rectangular cavities were measured by a particle image velocimetry(PIV) and a weak perturbation thermocouple network, respectively. Double-diffusive convections caused by the coupling effects of temperature and solute gradients were studied by the experiment. During the solidification of hypereutectic solution, the rejected water near the solidification interface will lead to dilute solute layers and double-diffusive interfaces. As the continued rejection of water, the layer and interface will evolve into instability and a multi-layer and multi-interface structure will be formed. To the hypoeutectic solution, the rejection of NH{sub 4}Cl near the solidification interface will form a dense solute layer. When the thickness of the dense solute layer is large enough, the coupling effects of stabilizing solute gradient and unstable temperature gradient will lead to new solute layers. The solute layers and double-diffusive interfaces will evolve stably and have no breakup of the double-diffusive interfaces during the solidification of hypoeutectic solution.

  3. Diffusion and growth of aluminum adatoms on magnesium clusters with hexahedral structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiongying; Hu, Wangyu; Yang, Jianyu; Chen, Chuanpin

    2015-02-01

    The surface diffusion and growth of Al atoms on Mg clusters with hexahedral structure was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The diffusion pathways and the corresponding energy barriers were determined via the nudged elastic band method. Two diffusion paths from a (0001) facet to a neighboring (1 1 bar 01) facet and between two adjacent (1 1 bar 01) facets were considered. The energy barriers on the (1 1 bar 01) facets and between the two (1 1 bar 01) facets were remarkably increased. As such, the adatom's mobility became limited at low temperatures. The growth of small Al-Mg nanoclusters was modeled via the one-by-one atom deposition technique to form an anomalous core-shell structure. The Mg atoms with lower surface energy and larger atomic radius occupied the core and the Al atoms with higher surface energy and smaller atomic radius occupied the shell.

  4. 3D choroid neovascularization growth prediction based on reaction-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuxia; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Haoyu

    2016-03-01

    Choroid neovascularization (CNV) is a kind of pathology from the choroid and CNV-related disease is one important cause of vision loss. It is desirable to predict the CNV growth rate so that appropriate treatment can be planned. In this paper, we seek to find a method to predict the growth of CNV based on 3D longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. A reaction-diffusion model is proposed for prediction. The method consists of four phases: pre-processing, meshing, CNV growth modeling and prediction. We not only apply the reaction-diffusion model to the disease region, but also take the surrounding tissues into consideration including outer retinal layer, inner retinal layer and choroid layer. The diffusion in these tissues is considered as isotropic. The finite-element-method (FEM) is used to solve the partial differential equations (PDE) in the diffusion model. The curve of CNV growth with treatment are fitted and then we can predict the CNV status in a future time point. The preliminary results demonstrated that our proposed method is accurate and the validity and feasibility of our model is obvious.

  5. Experimental techniques for determination of the role of diffusion and convection in crystal growth from solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zefiro, L.

    1980-01-01

    Various studies of the concentration of the solution around a growing crystal using interferometric techniques are reviewed. A holographic interferometric technique used in laboratory experiments shows that a simple description of the solution based on the assumption of a purely diffusive mechanism appears inadequate since the convection, effective even in reduced columns, always affects the growth.

  6. An Innovative Method for Preparing Semiconductor Change Used in Crystal Growth and Shear Cell Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anrold, William A.; Matthiesen, David; Benett, Robert J.; Jayne, Douglas T.

    1997-01-01

    An innovative technique for machining semiconductors has been developed. This technique was used to prepare semiconductor charges for crystal growth and shear cell diffusion experiments. The technique allows brittle semiconductor materials to be quickly and accurately machined. Lightly doping the semiconductor material increases the conductivity enough to allow the material to be shaped by an electrical discharge machine (EDM).

  7. Effect of surfactants on the rate of growth of an air bubble by rectified diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judy; Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2005-08-01

    The rectified diffusion growth of a single air bubble levitated in an acoustic field (frequency = 22.35 kHz) in water and in aqueous solutions containing surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) was investigated. As reported by Crum (J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 1980, 68, 203), the presence of surfactants at the bubble/liquid interface enhanced the growth rate of the bubble by rectified diffusion. It is suggested in this paper that in addition to the effect of surfactants on the surface tension and interfacial resistance to mass transfer, the effect of surface rheological properties may also contribute to the cause of the enhancement observed in the bubble growth rate. PMID:16852840

  8. Effect of diffusion from a lateral surface on the rate of GaN nanowire growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirev, N. V. Tchernycheva, M.; Cirlin, G. E.; Patriarche, G.; Harmand, J. C.; Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2012-06-15

    The kinetics of the growth of GaN crystalline nanowires on a Si (111) surface with no catalyst is studied experimentally and theoretically. Noncatalytic GaN nanowires were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with AlN inserts, which makes it possible to determine the rate of the vertical growth of nanowires. A model for the formation of GaN nanowires is developed, and an expression for their rate of growth is derived. It is shown that, in the general case, the dependence of the rate of growth on the nanowire diameter has a minimum. The diameter corresponding to the experimentally observed minimum of the rate of growth steadily increases with increasing diffusion flux from the lateral surface.

  9. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer. PMID:26419420

  10. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer. PMID:26419420

  11. Transition in the fractal properties from diffusion-limited aggregation to Laplacian growth via their generalization.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, H George E; Levermann, Anders; Procaccia, Itamar

    2002-07-01

    We study the fractal and multifractal properties (i.e., the generalized dimensions of the harmonic measure) of a two-parameter family of growth patterns that result from a growth model that interpolates between diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and Laplacian growth patterns in two dimensions. The two parameters are beta that determines the size of particles accreted to the interface, and C that measures the degree of coverage of the interface by each layer accreted to the growth pattern at every growth step. DLA and Laplacian growth are obtained at beta=0, C=0 and beta=2, C=1, respectively. The main purpose of this paper is to show that there exists a line in the beta-C phase diagram that separates fractal (D<2) from nonfractal (D=2) growth patterns. Moreover, Laplacian growth is argued to lie in the nonfractal part of the phase diagram. Some of our arguments are not rigorous, but together with the numerics they indicate this result rather strongly. We first consider the family of models obtained for beta=0, C>0, and derive for them a scaling relation D=2D(3). We then propose that this family has growth patterns for which D=2 for some C>C(cr), where C(cr) may be zero. Next we consider the whole beta-C phase diagram and define a line that separates two-dimensional growth patterns from fractal patterns with D<2. We explain that Laplacian growth lies in the region belonging to two-dimensional growth patterns, motivating the main conjecture of this paper, i.e., that Laplacian growth patterns are two dimensional. The meaning of this result is that the branches of Laplacian growth patterns have finite (and growing) area on scales much larger than any ultraviolet cutoff length. PMID:12241482

  12. Wavy membranes and the growth rate of a planar chemical garden: Enhanced diffusion and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yang; Batista, Bruno; Steinbock, Oliver; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2016-08-16

    To model ion transport across protocell membranes in Hadean hydrothermal vents, we consider both theoretically and experimentally the planar growth of a precipitate membrane formed at the interface between two parallel fluid streams in a 2D microfluidic reactor. The growth rate of the precipitate is found to be proportional to the square root of time, which is characteristic of diffusive transport. However, the dependence of the growth rate on the concentrations of hydroxide and metal ions is approximately linear and quadratic, respectively. We show that such a difference in ionic transport dynamics arises from the enhanced transport of metal ions across a thin gel layer present at the surface of the precipitate. The fluctuations in transverse velocity in this wavy porous gel layer allow an enhanced transport of the cation, so that the effective diffusivity is about one order of magnitude higher than that expected from molecular diffusion alone. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with our laboratory measurements of the growth of a manganese hydroxide membrane in a microfluidic channel, and this enhanced transport is thought to have been needed to account for the bioenergetics of the first single-celled organisms. PMID:27486248

  13. Efficacy and safety of selenium nanoparticles administered intraperitoneally for the prevention of growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Kang; Tan, Yanping; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-07-01

    Peritoneal implantation of cancer cells, particularly postoperative seeding metastasis, frequently occurs in patients with primary tumors in the stomach, colon, liver, and ovary. Peritoneal carcinomatosis is associated with poor prognosis. In this work, we evaluated the prophylactic effect of intraperitoneal administration of selenium (Se), an essential trace element and a putative chemopreventive agent, on peritoneal implantation of cancer cells. Elemental Se nanoparticles were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice, into which highly malignant H22 hepatocarcinoma cells had previously been inoculated. Se concentrations in the cancer cells and tissues, as well as the efficacy of proliferation inhibition and safety, were evaluated. Se was mainly concentrated in cancer cells compared to Se retention in normal tissues, showing at least an order of magnitude difference between the drug target cells (the H22 cells) and the well-recognized toxicity target of Se (the liver). Such a favorable selective distribution resulted in strong proliferation suppression without perceived host toxicity. The mechanism of action of the Se nanoparticle-triggered cytotoxicity was associated with Se-mediated production of reactive oxygen species, which impaired the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Our results suggest that intraperitoneal administration of Se is a safe and effective means of preventing growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity for the above-mentioned high-risk populations. PMID:24727439

  14. Numerical computation of the linear stability of the diffusion model for crystal growth simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Sorensen, D.C.; Meiron, D.I.; Wedeman, B.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a computational scheme for determining the linear stability of a diffusion model arising from the simulation of crystal growth. The process of a needle crystal solidifying into some undercooled liquid can be described by the dual diffusion equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here U{sub t} and U{sub a} denote the temperature of the liquid and solid respectively, and {alpha} represents the thermal diffusivity. At the solid-liquid interface, the motion of the interface denoted by r and the temperature field are related by the conservation relation where n is the unit outward pointing normal to the interface. A basic stationary solution to this free boundary problem can be obtained by writing the equations of motion in a moving frame and transforming the problem to parabolic coordinates. This is known as the Ivantsov parabola solution. Linear stability theory applied to this stationary solution gives rise to an eigenvalue problem of the form.

  15. Nucleation and growth by diffusion under Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2014-02-14

    The critical radius of a nucleus grown by diffusion in a solution is studied thermodynamically as well as kinetically. The thermodynamic growth equation called Zeldovich equation of classical nucleation theory and the kinetic diffusional growth equation combined with the Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition lead to the same critical radius. However, it should be pointed out that the diffusional equation may lead to a kinetic critical radius that is different from the thermodynamic critical radius, thus indicating the possibility of kinetically controlling the critical radius of a nucleus.

  16. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion-reaction based continuum model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-01-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion-reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm's shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here. PMID:27434099

  17. Growth, diffusion, and loss of subsurface ice on Mars : experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Troy Lee

    Innovative experiments and models are used to explore the behavior of subsurface ice on Mars. Through communication with the atmosphere, the porous regolith of Mars hosts significant quantities of ice which grow, evolve, and are lost in response to climate changes. As a controlling property of rate of ice response to a changing equilibrium state, the diffusive properties of several regolith simulants are measured in Mars-like environments. Ice loss through a variety of particle sizes, particle size distributions, packing densities, and salt contents are examined and reveal that many unconsolidated media exhibit diffusion coefficients in the range of 2-6 cm^2 s^-1, indicating a response time on the order of several thousand years for ice within the upper meter of the regolith. Only high salt contents or mechanically packed micron-sized dust are observed to exhibit substantially lower coefficients, suggesting that strong diffusive barriers may not form as readily as previously invoked. The growth of ice directly from vapor under diffusive control is reproduced for Mars-like environmental conditions in the absence of the liquid phase. As predicted, ice deposits preferentially at grain contact points and the ice table interface is sharp and strongly controlled by near-surface temperature perturbations. The quantity of ice deposited as a function of depth and time accords well with new numerical models of vapor diffusion and ice deposition, though constriction of the pore space reduces the diffusion coefficient faster than originally expected. A numerical model incorporating a fast solution to subsurface ice growth predicts near-surface ice contents for the last 300,000 years of Mars' history at high latitude locations, including specifically the Phoenix landing site. Several parameterizations of constriction developed from laboratory observations of ice growth are employed and compared. The thickness of the ice-free layer above the ice table has the strongest effect on

  18. THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES OBSERVED WITH AIA/SDO: FRACTAL DIFFUSION, SUB-DIFFUSION, OR LOGISTIC GROWTH?

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2012-09-20

    We explore the spatio-temporal evolution of solar flares by fitting a radial expansion model r(t) that consists of an exponentially growing acceleration phase, followed by a deceleration phase that is parameterized by the generalized diffusion function r(t){proportional_to}{kappa}(t - t{sub 1}){sup {beta}/2}, which includes the logistic growth limit ({beta} = 0), sub-diffusion ({beta} = 0-1), classical diffusion ({beta} = 1), super-diffusion ({beta} = 1-2), and the linear expansion limit ({beta} = 2). We analyze all M- and X-class flares observed with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) during the first two years of the SDO mission, amounting to 155 events. We find that most flares operate in the sub-diffusive regime ({beta} = 0.53 {+-} 0.27), which we interpret in terms of anisotropic chain reactions of intermittent magnetic reconnection episodes in a low plasma-{beta} corona. We find a mean propagation speed of v = 15 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}, with maximum speeds of v{sub max} = 80 {+-} 85 km s{sup -1} per flare, which is substantially slower than the sonic speeds expected for thermal diffusion of flare plasmas. The diffusive characteristics established here (for the first time for solar flares) is consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model, which predicted diffusive transport merely based on cellular automaton simulations.

  19. Disabling the mitotic spindle and tumor growth by targeting a cavity-induced allosteric site of survivin

    PubMed Central

    Berezov, A; Cai, Z; Freudenberg, JA; Zhang, H; Cheng, X; Thompson, T; Murali, R; Greene, MI; Wang, Q

    2012-01-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family and has an essential role in mitosis. Survivin is overexpressed in a large variety of human cancers and represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor and Her/neu-transformed human tumors in particular exhibit high levels of survivin. The survivin protein forms dimers through a conserved region that is critical for subcellular localization and biological functions of the protein. We identified small molecules that target a specific cavity adjacent to the survivin dimerization surfaces. S12, a lead compound identified in the screen, can bind to the survivin protein at the intended target site. Moreover, S12 alters spindle formation, causing mitotic arrest and cell death, and inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell death occurs in premetaphase stage following mitotic arrest and is not a consequence of general toxicity. Thus, the study validates a novel therapeutic target site in the survivin protein and provides a promising strategy to develop a new class of therapeutic small molecules for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:21892210

  20. Streptococcus pneumoniae PstS production is phosphate responsive and enhanced during growth in the murine peritoneal cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Mills, J.; Robb, C. W.; Wilson, C. J.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2001-01-01

    Differential display-PCR (DDPCR) was used to identify a Streptococcus pneumoniae gene with enhanced transcription during growth in the murine peritoneal cavity. Northern dot blot analysis and comparative densitometry confirmed a 1.8-fold increase in expression of the encoded sequence following murine peritoneal culture (MPC) versus laboratory culture or control culture (CC). Sequencing and basic local alignment search tool analysis identified the DDPCR fragment as pstS, the phosphate-binding protein of a high-affinity phosphate uptake system. PCR amplification of the complete pstS gene followed by restriction analysis and sequencing suggests a high level of conservation between strains and serotypes. Quantitative immunodot blotting using antiserum to recombinant PstS (rPstS) demonstrated an approximately twofold increase in PstS production during MPC from that during CCs, a finding consistent with the low levels of phosphate observed in the peritoneum. Moreover, immunodot blot and Northern analysis demonstrated phosphate-dependent production of PstS in six of seven strains examined. These results identify pstS expression as responsive to the MPC environment and extracellular phosphate concentrations. Presently, it remains unclear if phosphate concentrations in vivo contribute to the regulation of pstS. Finally, polyclonal antiserum to rPstS did not inhibit growth of the pneumococcus in vitro, suggesting that antibodies do not block phosphate uptake; moreover, vaccination of mice with rPstS did not protect against intraperitoneal challenge as assessed by the 50% lethal dose.

  1. Introducing Carbon Diffusion Barriers for Uniform, High-Quality Graphene Growth from Solid Sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon diffusion barriers are introduced as a general and simple method to prevent premature carbon dissolution and thereby to significantly improve graphene formation from the catalytic transformation of solid carbon sources. A thin Al2O3 barrier inserted into an amorphous-C/Ni bilayer stack is demonstrated to enable growth of uniform monolayer graphene at 600 °C with domain sizes exceeding 50 μm, and an average Raman D/G ratio of <0.07. A detailed growth rationale is established via in situ measurements, relevant to solid-state growth of a wide range of layered materials, as well as layer-by-layer control in these systems. PMID:24024736

  2. Layer-growth kinetics on gaseous nitriding of pure iron: Evaluation of diffusion coefficients for nitrogen in iron nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1995-01-01

    Models were derived for monolayer and bilayer growth into a substrate in which diffusion of the solute governs the growth kinetics, as in gas-solid reactions, for example. In the models, the composition dependence of the solute diffusivity in the phases constituting the layers was accounted for by appropriate definition of an effective diffusion coefficient for a (sub)layer. This effective diffusion coefficient is the intrinsic diffusion coefficient weighted over the composition range of the (sub)layer. The models were applied for analyzing the growth kinetics of a γ'-Fe4N1-x monolayer on an α-Fe substrate and the growth kinetics of an ɛ-Fe2N1-z/γ'-Fe4N1-x bilayer on an α-Fe substrate, as observed by gaseous nitriding in an NH3/H2-gas mixture at 843 K. The kinetics of layer development and the evolution of the microstructure were investigated by means of thermogravimetry, layer-thickness measurements, light microscopy, and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The effective and self-diffusion coefficients were determined for each of the nitride layers. The composition dependence of the intrinsic (and effective) diffusion coefficients was established. Re-evaluating literature data for diffusion in γ'-Fe4N1-x on the basis of the present model, it followed that the previous and present data are consistent. The activation energy for diffusion of nitrogen in γ'-Fe4N1-x was determined from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. The self-diffusion coefficient for nitrogen in ɛ-Fe2N1-z was significantly larger than that for γ'-Fe4N1-x. This was explained qualitatively, considering the possible mechanisms for interstitial diffusion of nitrogen atoms in the close-packed iron lattices of the ɛ and γ' iron nitrides.

  3. Modeling Lymphoma Growth in an Evolving Lymph Node Using a Diffuse Domain Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Cristini, Vittorio; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Lowengrub, John

    2012-11-01

    Tumor growth often poses as a multiphase free-boundary problem as tumor cells aggregate into distinct subdomains due to differentiated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In ``Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth - I Model and numerical method'' [Wise et al., J. Theor. Biol. 253, pp. 524-543 (2008)], we have developed a multiphase Cahn-Hilliard model to study morphological patterns of tumor growth in a homogeneous open environment, and the results resembled in-vitro experiments. In living tissues, however, tumors are often confined in a closed environment of an organ, where the tissue geometry can also evolve in response to the pressure of tumor growth. Here we adapt our previous Cahn-Hilliard tumor growth model to an evolving geometry using a recently developed diffuse domain approach. We use the model to study the growth of lymphoma in a lymph node that swells during the process. An angiogenesis model for tumor-induced vasculature is also adapted to investigate substrate distribution and drug delivery within the lymph node. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  4. Modelling the Effect of Fruit Growth on Surface Conductance to Water Vapour Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    GIBERT, CAROLINE; LESCOURRET, FRANÇOISE; GÉNARD, MICHEL; VERCAMBRE, GILLES; PÉREZ PASTOR, ALEJANDRO

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims A model of fruit surface conductance to water vapour diffusion driven by fruit growth is proposed. It computes the total fruit conductance by integrating each of its components: stomata, cuticle and cracks. • Methods The stomatal conductance is computed from the stomatal density per fruit and the specific stomatal conductance. The cuticular component is equal to the proportion of cuticle per fruit multiplied by its specific conductance. Cracks are assumed to be generated when pulp expansion rate exceeds cuticle expansion rate. A constant percentage of cracks is assumed to heal each day. The proportion of cracks to total fruit surface area multiplied by the specific crack conductance accounts for the crack component. The model was applied to peach fruit (Prunus persica) and its parameters were estimated from field experiments with various crop load and irrigation regimes. • Key Results The predictions were in good agreement with the experimental measurements and for the different conditions (irrigation and crop load). Total fruit surface conductance decreased during early growth as stomatal density, and hence the contribution of the stomatal conductance, decreased from 80 to 20 % with fruit expansion. Cracks were generated for fruits exhibiting high growth rates during late growth and the crack component could account for up to 60 % of the total conductance during the rapid fruit growth. The cuticular contribution was slightly variable (around 20 %). Sensitivity analysis revealed that simulated conductance was highly affected by stomatal parameters during the early period of growth and by both crack and stomatal parameters during the late period. Large fruit growth rate leads to earlier and greater increase of conductance due to higher crack occurrence. Conversely, low fruit growth rate accounts for a delayed and lower increase of conductance. • Conclusions By predicting crack occurrence during fruit growth, this model could be helpful

  5. Substrate and metabolite diffusion within model medium for soft cheese in relation to growth of Penicillium camembertii.

    PubMed

    Aldarf, Mazen; Fourcade, Florence; Amrane, Abdeltif; Prigent, Yves

    2006-08-01

    Penicillium camembertii was cultivated on a jellified peptone-lactate based medium to simulate the composition of Camembert cheese. Diffusional limitations due to substrate consumption were not involved in the linear growth recorded during culture, while nitrogen (peptone) limitation accounted for growth cessation. Examination of gradients confirmed that medium neutralization was the consequence of lactate consumption and ammonium production. The diffusion of the lactate assimilated from the core to the rind and that of the ammonium produced from the rind to the core was described by means of a diffusion/reaction model involving a partial linking of consumption or production to growth. The model matched experimental data throughout growth. PMID:16491357

  6. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  7. Double-diffusive layers adjacent to cold chimney flows during transient mushy-layer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Xue, Qiwei; Wettlaufer, John

    2013-03-01

    We examine the cooling effect of chimney flows in the liquid region during transient upward growth of a mushy layer in solidifying aqueous ammonium chloride. Through drainage channels in a mushy layer, cold, relatively fresh fluid is carried into the warm, salt-stratified liquid region. Double-diffusive cells form due to the cooling effect of the chimney flows and evolve into a series of downwelling horizontal layers. Using shadowgraph methods and dyed fluids we demonstrate the vigorous flow circulations and compositional mixing within each layer. Vertical concentration and temperature profiles reveal the double-diffusive staircase structure across the layers. The downward velocity of the layers decreases as they approach to the mush-liquid interface, which is interpreted by a filling-box model representing the momentum and compositional transport of turbulent continuous plumes in a confined region. The present experiment provides insight to evaluate the solute fluxes from growing mushy layers.

  8. Diffusion dominated process for the crystal growth of a binary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen-Rui; Hirata, Akira; Nishizawa, Shin-ichi

    1996-11-01

    The pure diffusion process has been often used to study the crystal growth of a binary alloy in the microgravity environment. In the present paper, a geometric parameter, the ratio of the maximum deviation distance of curved solidification and melting interfaces from the plane to the radius of the crystal rod, was adopted as a small parameter, and the analytical solution was obtained based on the perturbation theory. The radial segregation of a diffusion dominated process was obtained for cases of arbitrary Peclet number in a region of finite extension with both a curved solidification interface and a curved melting interface. Two types of boundary conditions at the melting interface were analyzed. Some special cases such as infinite extension in the longitudinal direction and special range of Peclet number were reduced from the general solution and discussed in detail.

  9. Diffusion-driven growth of nanowires by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda-Fonseca, P.; Orrò, M.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Robin, E.; Den Hertog, M.; Genuist, Y.; André, R.; Tatarenko, S.; Cibert, J.

    2016-04-01

    With ZnTe as an example, we use two different methods to unravel the characteristics of the growth of nanowires (NWs) by gold-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature. In the first approach, CdTe insertions have been used as markers, and the nanowires have been characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy, including geometrical phase analysis and energy dispersive electron spectrometry; the second approach uses scanning electron microscopy and the statistics of the relationship between the length of the tapered nanowires and their base diameter. Axial and radial growth are quantified using a diffusion-limited model adapted to the growth conditions; analytical expressions describe well the relationship between the NW length and the total molecular flux (taking into account the orientation of the effusion cells), and the catalyst-nanowire contact area. A long incubation time is observed. This analysis allows us to assess the evolution of the diffusion lengths on the substrate and along the nanowire sidewalls, as a function of temperature and deviation from stoichiometric flux.

  10. Modeling tumor growth in a complex evolving confinement using a diffuse domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Lowengrub, John; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Cristini, Vittorio

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of tumor growth represents an essential step towards engineering effective treatment for cancer patients. At the macroscopic scale, various biophysical models describing tumors as continuum fluids have been constructed, particularly on a Cartesian grid, where efficient numerical schemes are available to analyze the model for general tumor behaviors in a relatively unconfined space. For practical problems, however, tumors are often found in a confined sub-domain, which can even be dilated and distorted by the growing tumor within. To study such tumors, we adopt a novel diffuse domain approach that enables us to adapt a model to an evolving sub-domain and formulate the modified problem on a Cartesian grid to utilize existing numerical schemes. To demonstrate this approach, we adapt a diffuse-interface model presented in Wise et al. [2008, Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth - I Model and numerical method, J. Theor. Biol. 253, 524-543] to simulate lymphoma growth in a lymph node structure. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  11. Modeling the Growth of Hyperthermophiles in Deep-sea Hydrothermal Diffuse Fluids and Sulfide Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ver Eecke, H. C.; Oslowski, D. M.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.; Lilley, M. D.; Holden, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008 and 2009, 534 hydrothermal fluid samples and 5 actively-venting black smoker chimneys were collected using Alvin for correlative microbiological and chemical analyses as part of the Endeavour Segment and Axial Volcano Geochemistry and Ecology Research (EAGER) program. Hyperthermophilic, autotrophic Fe(III) oxide reducers, methanogens, and sulfur-reducing heterotrophs were enriched for at 85 and 95°C using most-probable-number estimates from 28 diffuse fluid and 8 chimney samples. Heterotrophs were the most abundant of the three groups in both diffuse fluids and black-smoker chimneys. Iron reducers were more abundant than methanogens, and more abundant in sulfide-hosted vents than in basalt-hosted vents. Fluid chemistry suggests that there is net biogenic methanogenesis at the Marker 113/62 diffuse vent at Axial Volcano but nowhere else sampled. The growth of hyperthermophilic methanogens and heterotrophs was modeled in the lab using pure cultures. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii grew at 82°C in a 2-liter reactor with continuous gas flow at H2 concentrations between 20 and 225 µM with a H2 km of 100 µM. Correlating H2 end-member mixing curves from vent fluids and seawater with our laboratory modeling study suggests that H2 concentrations are limiting for Methanocaldococcus growth at most Mothra, Main Field, and High Rise vent sites at Endeavour but sufficient to support growth at some Axial Volcano vents. Therefore, hyperthermophilic methanogens may depend on H2 syntrophy at low H2 sites. Twenty-one pure hyperthermophilic heterotroph strains each grew on α-1,4 and β-1,4 linked sugars and polypeptides with concomitant H2 production. The H2 production rate (cell-1 doubling-1) for Pyrococcus furiosus at 95°C without sulfur was 29 fmol, 36 fmol, and 53 fmol for growth on α-1,4 sugars, β-1,4 sugars, and peptides, respectively. The CH4 production rate for M. jannaschii was 390 fmol cell-1 doubling-1; therefore, we estimate that it would take approximately

  12. Growth of a diffusion flame in the field of a vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    In the present study of the growth of a diffusion flame in the field of a vortex, the motion in the core is converted into a solid body rotation. The flame extension and distortion kinematics are presented, and the effect of the local flow field on local flame structure is analyzed in detail. The combustion field is found to consist of a totally reacted core region whose radius is time-dependent, and an external flame region which consists of a pair of spiral arms that extend at large radii toward their original positions on the horizontal axis. Two similarity rules are formulated which are independent of kinematic viscosity.

  13. Scaling structure of the growth-probability distribution in diffusion-limited aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Y.; Sato, S.; Matsushita, M.

    1987-08-01

    In nonequilibrium growth such as diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), the growth-site probability distribution characterizes these growth processes. By solving the Laplace equation numerically, we calculate the growth probability Pg(x) at the perimeter site x of clusters for the DLA and its generalized version called the η model, and obtain the generalized dimension D(q) and the f-α spectrum proposed by Halsey et al.

    [Phys. Rev. A 33, 1141 (1986)]
    . It is found that D(q) depends strongly on q and that the f-α spectrum is continuous. Our results suggest that these growth processes cannot be described by a simple scaling theory with a few scaling exponents. This is in clear contrast to the Botet-Jullien model
    [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 1943 (1985)]
    which yields equilibrium patterns whose D(q) is constant. It is also found that the information dimension D(1) which represents the properties of the unscreened surface is in good agreement with our recent theory.

  14. Effect of substrate growth temperatures on H diffusion in hydrogenated Si/Si homoepitaxial structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lin; Lee, J. K.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, M.; Thompson, Phillip E.; David Theodore, N.; Alford, T. L.; Mayer, J. W.; Chen, Peng; Lau, S. S.

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated <100> Si/Si homoepitaxial structures, which were grown by molecular beam epitaxy at various temperatures. The substrate growth temperature can significantly affect the H diffusion behavior, with higher growth temperatures resulting in deeper H diffusion. For the Si/Si structure grown at the highest temperature of 800 °C, H trapping occurs at the epitaxial Si/Si substrate interface, which results in the formation of (100) oriented microcracks at the interface. The mechanism of H trapping and the potential application of these findings for the development of a method of transferring ultrathin Si layers are discussed.

  15. Dual-wavelength vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser: strict growth control and scalable design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasik, Agata; Sokół, Adam Kamil; Broda, Artur; Sankowska, Iwona; Wójcik-Jedlińska, Anna; Wasiak, Michał; Kubacka-Traczyk, Justyna; Muszalski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the design and fabrication of a dual-wavelength vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Grown by molecular beam epitaxy, the laser structures have a relatively simple active region divided into two sections, between which there is no optical filter. Comparable threshold power was achieved for both wavelengths. The growth rate was controlled precisely by growing AlAs/GaAs superlattices with different period thicknesses and testing them with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry. The simultaneous emission of two wavelengths was detected in setup without a heat spreader, one of 991 nm and the other of 1038 nm. After diamond heat spreader was bonded, both wavelengths lased in continuous-wave mode with the combined output power of 1.79 W. The design scalability allowed us to obtain two further structures with layers thinned by about 3 % in the first and by about 6 % in the second, operating at 958/1011 and 928/977 nm, respectively.

  16. Bacterial Growth on Distant Naphthalene Diffusing through Water, Air, and Water-Saturated and Nonsaturated Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Harms, H.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of substrate diffusion on bacterial growth was investigated. Crystalline naphthalene was supplied as the substrate at various distances in the range of centimeters from naphthalene-degrading organisms separated from the substrate by agar-solidified mineral medium. Within 2 weeks, the cells grew to final numbers which were negatively correlated with the distance from the substrate. A mathematical model that combined (i) Monod growth kinetics extended by a term for culture maintenance and (ii) substrate diffusion could explain the observed growth curves. The model could also predict growth on naphthalene that was separated from the bacteria by air. In addition, the bacteria were grown on distant naphthalene that had to diffuse to the cells through water-saturated and unsaturated porous media. The growth of the bacteria could be used to calculate the effective diffusivity of naphthalene in the three-phase system. Diffusion of naphthalene in the pore space containing 80% air was roughly 1 order of magnitude faster than in medium containing only 20% air because of the high Henry's law coefficient of naphthalene. It is proposed that the effective diffusivities of the substrates and the spatial distribution of substrates and bacteria are the main determinants of final cell numbers and, consequently, final degradation rates. PMID:16535349

  17. A phase-field/Monte-Carlo model describing organic crystal growth from solution. Investigation of the diffusion-influenced growth of hydroquinone crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, J.; Yürüdü, C.; Ulrich, J.; Emmerich, H.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper work we present a phase-field/Monte-Carlo hybrid algorithm for the simulation of solutal growth of organic crystals. The algorithm is subsequently used for an investigation of diffusion effects on the growth mechanisms. This method combines a two-scale phase-field model of the liquid phase epitaxial growth and a Monte-Carlo algorithm of the 2D nucleation and thus is faster than previous purely Monte Carlo simulations of crystal growth. The inclusion of supersaturation and diffusion in the method allows the study of crystal growth under various growth conditions. Parameters used in the hybrid algorithm are bound to the energetic parameters of crystal faces, which can be estimated from a detailed study of the actual crystal structure based on a connected nets analysis, which allows the prediction of the shape and morphology of real crystals. The study of the diffusion effect is carried out based on an example of a hydroquinone crystal, which grows from the water solution at various supersaturations. The dependencies of the growth rate and the nucleation rate on the supersaturation indicate the change of the growth mechanism from spiral growth to 2D nucleation. The difference in the growth rate for various faces is in agreement with the crystal morphologies derived from the attachment energy method and observed experimentally. The main result of the simulation is the evaluation of engineering limits for choosing appropriate external process conditions.

  18. Concentration Dependence of Solution Shear Viscosity and Solute Mass Diffusivity in Crystal Growth from Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izmailov, Alexander F.; Myerson, Allan S.

    1995-01-01

    The physical properties of a supersaturated binary solution such as its density rho, shear viscosity eta, and solute mass diffusivity D are dependent on the solute concentration c: rho = rho(c), eta = eta(c), and D = D(c). The diffusion boundary layer equations related to crystal growth from solution are derived for the case of natural convection with a solution density, a shear viscosity, and a solute diffusivity that are all depen- dent on solute concentration. The solution of these equations has demonstrated the following. (1) At the vicinity of the saturation concentration c(sub s) the solution shear viscosity eta depends on rho as eta(sub s) = eta(rho(sub s))varies as square root of rho(c(sub s)). This theoretically derived result has been verified in experiments with several aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic salts. (2) The maximum solute mass transfer towards the growing crystal surface can be achieved for values of c where the ratio of d ln(D(c)/dc) to d ln(eta(c)/dc) is a maximum.

  19. Tumor growth prediction with reaction-diffusion and hyperelastic biomechanical model by physiological data fusion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-10-01

    The goal of tumor growth prediction is to model the tumor growth process, which can be achieved by physiological modeling and model personalization from clinical measurements. Although image-driven frameworks have been proposed with promising results, several issues such as infinitesimal strain assumptions, complicated personalization procedures, and the lack of functional information, may limit their prediction accuracy. In view of these issues, we propose a framework for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor growth prediction, which comprises a FEM-based tumor growth model with coupled reaction-diffusion equation and nonlinear biomechanics. Physiological data fusion of structural and functional images is used to improve the subject-specificity of model personalization, and a derivative-free global optimization algorithm is adopted to facilitate the complicated model and accommodate flexible choices of objective functions. With this flexibility, we propose an objective function accounting for both the tumor volume difference and the root-mean-squared error of intracellular volume fractions. Experiments were performed on synthetic and clinical data to verify the parameter estimation capability and the prediction performance. Comparisons of using different biomechanical models and objective functions were also performed. From the experimental results of eight patient data sets, the average recall, precision, Dice coefficient, and relative volume difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes were 84.5 ± 6.9%, 85.8 ± 8.2%, 84.6 ± 1.7%, and 14.2 ± 8.4%, respectively. PMID:25962846

  20. On the origin of size-dependent and size-independent crystal growth: Influence of advection and diffusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments were conducted using potassium alum and calcite crystals in aqueous solution under both non-stirred and stirred conditions to elucidate the mechanism for size-dependent (proportionate) and size-independent (constant) crystal growth. Growth by these two laws can be distinguished from each other because the relative size difference among crystals is maintained during proportionate growth, leading to a constant crystal size variance (??2) for a crystal size distribution (CSD) as the mean size increases. The absolute size difference among crystals is maintained during constant growth, resulting in a decrease in size variance. Results of these experiments show that for centimeter-sized alum crystals, proportionate growth occurs in stirred systems, whereas constant growth occurs in non-stirred systems. Accordingly, the mechanism for proportionate growth is hypothesized to be related to the supply of reactants to the crystal surface by advection, whereas constant growth is related to supply by diffusion. Paradoxically, micrometer-sized calcite crystals showed proportionate growth both in stirred and in non-stirred systems. Such growth presumably results from the effects of convection and Brownian motion, which promote an advective environment and hence proportionate growth for minute crystals in non-stirred systems, thereby indicating the importance of solution velocity relative to crystal size. Calcite crystals grown in gels, where fluid motion was minimized, showed evidence for constant, diffusion-controlled growth. Additional investigations of CSDs of naturally occurring crystals indicate that proportionate growth is by far the most common growth law, thereby suggesting that advection, rather than diffusion, is the dominant process for supplying reactants to crystal surfaces.

  1. Linking biofilm growth to fouling and aeration performance of fine-pore diffuser in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Baserba, Manel; Asvapathanagul, Pitiporn; McCarthy, Graham W; Gocke, Thomas E; Olson, Betty H; Park, Hee-Deung; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B; Wett, Bernhard; Smeraldi, Joshua D; Shaw, Andrew R; Rosso, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Aeration is commonly identified as the largest contributor to process energy needs in the treatment of wastewater and therefore garners significant focus in reducing energy use. Fine-pore diffusers are the most common aeration system in municipal wastewater treatment. These diffusers are subject to fouling and scaling, resulting in loss in transfer efficiency as biofilms form and change material properties producing larger bubbles, hindering mass transfer and contributing to increased plant energy costs. This research establishes a direct correlation and apparent mechanistic link between biofilm DNA concentration and reduced aeration efficiency caused by biofilm fouling. Although the connection between biofilm growth and fouling has been implicit in discussions of diffuser fouling for many years, this research provides measured quantitative connection between the extent of biofouling and reduced diffuser efficiency. This was clearly established by studying systematically the deterioration of aeration diffusers efficiency during a 1.5 year period, concurrently with the microbiological study of the biofilm fouling in order to understand the major factors contributing to diffuser fouling. The six different diffuser technologies analyzed in this paper included four different materials which were ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), polyurethane, silicone and ceramic. While all diffusers foul eventually, some novel materials exhibited fouling resistance. The material type played a major role in determining the biofilm characteristics (i.e., growth rate, composition, and microbial density) which directly affected the rate and intensity at what the diffusers were fouled, whereas diffuser geometry exerted little influence. Overall, a high correlation between the increase in biofilm DNA and the decrease in αF was evident (CV < 14.0 ± 2.0%). By linking bacterial growth with aeration efficiency, the research was able to show quantitatively the causal connection

  2. Diffusion-controlled growth of bimineralic merwinite - diopside reaction rims between wollastonite - monticellite interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, B.; Gardes, E.; Heinrich, W.; Abart, R.

    2009-04-01

    At temperatures of 800 °C to 900 °C and 1.2 GPa, monticellite and wollastonite react to form merwinite and diopside after the reaction: 2 monticellite (CaMgSiO4) + 2 wollastonite (CaSiO3) → merwinite (Ca3MgSi2O8) + diopside (CaMgSi2O6) We synthesized bimineralic merwinite - diopside reaction rims along the interfaces of cylindric crystals of monticellite and wollastonite. The samples were loaded in a platinum capsule and annealed at 800 °C to 900 °C and 1.2 GPa in a piston cylinder apparatus for 5 to 65 hours. Natural CaF2 was used as pressure medium and the charges were nominally dry. In all experiments, a single layer consisting of bimineralic aggregates of merwinite and diopside was produced in about equal molar amounts. Time series revealed that rim growth is parabolic, indicating that the reaction kinetics is controlled by component diffusion. SEM analysis of the microstructure showed that the original monticellite-wollastonite interface is located in the centre of the reaction rim. This implies that rim growth primarily occurred by transfer of the mobile component MgO from the rim-monticellite interface to the rim-wollastonite interface. The bulk reaction is thus divided into two half reactions occurring at the two reaction fronts. At the rim-monticellite interface the reaction is: 2 monticellite → 0.5 merwinite + 0.5 diopside + MgO, and at the rim-wollastonite interface, it is: 2 wollastonite + MgO → 0.5 merwinite + 0.5 diopside Using the model of Abart et al. (2009), the effective diffusion coefficients DMgO at 800 °C are estimated at 1.55×10-16± 2.18×10-17 m2/s, and at 900 °C at 2.46×10-16± 3.45×10-17 m2/s. This yields an activation energy of Ea= 45.6 ± 16.4 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor log D0 = -13.59 ± 1.26 for the Arrhenius relations to describe the temperature-dependent effective diffusivity of the MgO component in the bimineralic aggregate. IR-spectra revealed distinctive OH-contents in the nominally dry phases

  3. Calculation of surface diffusivity and residence time by molecular dynamics with application to nanoscale selective-area growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, S.; Ochoa, E.; Chavez, J. J.; Zhou, X. W.; Zubia, D.

    2015-08-01

    The surface diffusivity and residence time were calculated by molecular dynamics simulations in order to solve the surface diffusion equations for selective-area growth. The calculations for CdTe/CdS material system were performed in substrates with Cd termination and S termination. The surface diffusivity and residence time were obtained at different temperatures (600 K, 800 K, 1000 K, 1200 K, and 1400 K). The thermal activation energies were extracted from Arrhenius equation for each substrate termination. Thereafter, values obtained by molecular dynamics were used in a surface diffusion model to calculate the surface concentration profile of adatoms. Alternating the surface termination has the potential to achieve nanoscale selective-area growth without the need of a dielectric film as a mask.

  4. In vitro growth characteristics of asbestos-induced diffused malignant mesotheliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Akley, N.; Mackay, A.; Craighead, J.

    1986-03-05

    After long latency periods, DMM develop in rat inoculated into the pleural or peritoneal cavity with either chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos. Histologically, the tumors resemble the human lesion being either fibrosarcomatous or epithelial (or mixtures of the two cell types). Tumor tissue from most, but not all, lesions grow in serum containing medium in vitro. These tumor cells consistently are tetroploid or aneuploid; occasionally marker chromosomes are found. After a series of passages chemically defined serum-free medium maintains the growth of cells from many tumors in vitro. Cells in culture usually grow in monolayers but nodular masses of proliferating tumor cells develop from the cell sheet and readily float free in the medium. These seemingly spherical balls of cells can be used to establish fresh cultures, allowing the initial monolayers to grow indefinitely. The fine structural features of the nodular tumor masses have now been studied in detail. They consist of vacuolated epithelial cells which are replete with vellumentous villi. Experimentally-induced DMM in animals have characteristics similar to their human counterparts; implantation of metastases may develop from foci similar to those observed to form in cultures.

  5. Sn diffusion during Ni germanide growth on Ge1-xSnx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeulemeester, J.; Schrauwen, A.; Nakatsuka, O.; Zaima, S.; Adachi, M.; Shimura, Y.; Comrie, C. M.; Fleischmann, C.; Detavernier, C.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the redistribution of Sn during Ni germanide formation on Ge1-xSnx/ and its influence on the thin film growth and properties. These results show that the reaction involves the formation of Ni5Ge3 and NiGe. Sn redistributes homogenously in both phases, in which the Sn/Ge ratio retains the ratio of the as-deposited Ge1-xSnx film. Sn continues to diffuse after full NiGe formation and segregates in two regions: (1) at the interface between the germanide and Ge1-xSnx and (2) at the surface, which has major implications for the thin film and contact properties.

  6. The effects of plasma diffusion and viscosity on turbulent instability growth

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, Brian M. Vold, Erik L.; Molvig, Kim; Aldrich, Charles; Rauenzahn, Rick

    2014-09-15

    We perform two-dimensional simulations of strongly–driven compressible Rayleigh–Taylor and Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities with and without plasma transport phenomena, modeling plasma species diffusion, and plasma viscosity in order to determine their effects on the growth of the hydrodynamic instabilities. Simulations are performed in hydrodynamically similar boxes of varying sizes, ranging from 1 μm to 1 cm in order to determine the scale at which plasma effects become important. Our results suggest that these plasma effects become noticeable when the box size is approximately 100 μm, they become significant in the 10 μm box, and dominate when the box size is 1 μm. Results suggest that plasma transport may be important at scales and conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion, and that a plasma fluid model is capable of representing some of the kinetic transport effects.

  7. Growth of BaFe 12O 19 thin films formed by reactive diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, V.; Bartholdson, Å.; Stukalov, O.; Smolenchuk, S.; Babushkin, O.; Gremenok, V.

    2003-05-01

    Thin films of BaFe 12O 19 have been grown on (00 l) oriented α-Fe 2O 3 single crystal substrates. The initial stages of the reaction between BaFe 2O 4 thin films and hematite single crystals have been investigated using AFM and SEM. The microstructure studies showed that (00 l) oriented BaFe 12O 19 microcrystallites formed during annealing at 900-1100°C. It was concluded that the surface diffusion had a dominating role in formation of thin BaFe 12O 19 films. Crystal growth was performed by stacking of layers with the thickness 2.3 nm, correlated with the c-parameter of the BaFe 12O 19 unit cell.

  8. Diffusion of lactate and ammonium in relation to growth of Geotrichum candidum at the surface of solid media.

    PubMed

    Aldarf, M; Fourcade, F; Amrane, A; Prigent, Y

    2004-07-01

    Geotrichum candidum was cultivated at the surface of solid model media containing peptone to simulate the composition of Camembert cheese. The surface growth of G. candidum induced the diffusion of substrates from the core to the rind and the diffusion of produced metabolites from the rind to the core. In the range of pH measured during G. candidum growth, constant diffusion coefficients were found for lactate and ammonium, 0.4 and 0.8 cm(2) day(-1), respectively, determined in sterile culture medium. Growth kinetics are described using the Verlhust model and both lactate consumption and ammonium production are considered as partially linked to growth. The experimental diffusion gradients of lactate and ammonium recorded during G. candidum growth have been fitted. The diffusion/reaction model was found to match with experimental data until the end of growth, except with regard to ammonium concentration gradients in the presence of lactate in the medium. Indeed, G. candidum preferentially assimilated peptone over lactate as a carbon source, resulting in an almost cessation of ammonium release before the end of growth. On peptone, it was found that the proton transfer did not account for the ammonium concentration gradients. Indeed, amino acids, being positively charged, are involved in the proton transfer at the beginning of growth. This effect can be neglected in the presence of lactate within the medium, and the sum of both lactate consumption and ammonium release gradients corresponded well to the proton transfer gradients, confirming that both components are responsible for the pH increase observed during the ripening of soft Camembert cheese. PMID:15211490

  9. Numerical model of protein crystal growth in a diffusive field such as the microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Susumu; Takahashi, Sachiko; Inaka, Koji; Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki

    2013-11-01

    It is said that the microgravity environment positively affects the quality of protein crystal growth. The formation of a protein depletion zone and an impurity depletion zone due to the suppression of convection flow were thought to be the major reasons. In microgravity, the incorporation of molecules into a crystal largely depends on diffusive transport, so the incorporated molecules will be allocated in an orderly manner and the impurity uptake will be suppressed, resulting in highly ordered crystals. Previously, these effects were numerically studied in a steady state using a simplified model and it was determined that the combination of the diffusion coefficient of the protein molecule (D) and the kinetic constant for the protein molecule (β) could be used as an index of the extent of these depletion zones. In this report, numerical analysis of these depletion zones around a growing crystal in a non-steady (i.e. transient) state is introduced, suggesting that this model may be used for the quantitative analysis of these depletion zones in the microgravity environment. PMID:24121357

  10. Diffusion model of the formation of growth microdefects: A new approach to defect formation in crystals (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanin, V. I.; Talanin, I. E.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical studies of defect formation in semiconductor silicon play an important role in the creation of breakthrough ideas for next-generation technologies. A brief comparative analysis of modern theoretical approaches to the description of interaction of point defects and formation of the initial defect structure of dislocation-free silicon single crystals has been carried out. Foundations of the diffusion model of the formation of structural imperfections during the silicon growth have been presented. It has been shown that the diffusion model is based on high-temperature precipitation of impurities. The model of high-temperature precipitation of impurities describes processes of nucleation, growth, and coalescence of impurities during cooling of a crystal from 1683 to 300 K. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion model of defect formation provides a unified approach to the formation of a defect structure beginning with the crystal growth to the production of devices. The possibilities of using the diffusion model of defect formation for other semiconductor crystals and metals have been discussed. It has been shown that the diffusion model of defect formation is a platform for multifunctional solution of many key problems in modern solid state physics. Fundamentals of practical application of the diffusion model for engineering of defects in crystals with modern information technologies have been considered. An algorithm has been proposed for the calculation and analysis of a defect structure of crystals.

  11. Influence of mass diffusion on the stability of thermophoretic growth of a solid from the vapor phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, J. L.; Garcia-Ybarra, P. L.; Rosner, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The stability of solid planar growth from a binary vapor phase with a condensing species dilute in a carrier gas is examined when the ratio of depositing to carrier species molecular mass is large and the main diffusive transport mechanism is thermal diffusion. It is shown that a deformation of the solid-gas interface induces a deformation of the gas phase isotherms that increases the thermal gradients and thereby the local mass deposition rate at the crests and reduces them at the valleys. The initial surface deformation is enhanced by the modified deposition rates in the absence of appreciable Fick/Brownian diffusion and interfacial energy effects.

  12. Cardiac looping may be driven by compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity. Observations on a physical simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Meriç; Männer, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of the straight embryonic heart tube into a helically wound loop is named cardiac looping. Such looping is regarded as an essential process in cardiac morphogenesis since it brings the building blocks of the developing heart into an approximation of their definitive topographical relationships. During the past two decades, a large number of genes have been identified which play important roles in cardiac looping. However, how genetic information is physically translated into the dynamic form changes of the looping heart is still poorly understood. The oldest hypothesis of cardiac looping mechanics attributes the form changes of the heart loop (ventral bending → simple helical coiling → complex helical coiling) to compressive loads resulting from growth differences between the heart and the pericardial cavity. In the present study, we have tested the physical plausibility of this hypothesis, which we call the growth-induced buckling hypothesis, for the first time. Using a physical simulation model, we show that growth-induced buckling of a straight elastic rod within the confined space of a hemispherical cavity can generate the same sequence of form changes as observed in the looping embryonic heart. Our simulation experiments have furthermore shown that, under bilaterally symmetric conditions, growth-induced buckling generates left- and right-handed helices (D-/L-loops) in a 1:1 ratio, while even subtle left- or rightward displacements of the caudal end of the elastic rod at the pre-buckling state are sufficient to direct the buckling process toward the generation of only D- or L-loops, respectively. Our data are discussed with respect to observations made in biological “models.” We conclude that compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity play important roles in cardiac looping. Asymmetric positioning of the venous heart pole may direct these forces toward a biased generation of D- or L-loops. PMID

  13. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error <8.8%, Dice >0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  14. Adhesion between cells, diffusion of growth factors, and elasticity of the AER produce the paddle shape of the chick limb

    PubMed Central

    Popławski, Nikodem J.; Swat, Maciej; Gens, J. Scott; Glazier, James A.

    2007-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology is how cells interact to organize into tissues? In this paper, we study the role of mesenchyme-ectoderm interaction in the growing chick limb bud using Glazier and Graner's cellular Potts model, a grid-based stochastic framework designed to simulate cell interactions and movement. We simulate cellular mechanisms including cell adhesion, growth, and division and diffusion of morphogens, to show that differential adhesion between the cells, diffusion of growth factors through the extracellular matrix, and the elastic properties of the apical ectodermal ridge together can produce the proper shape of the limb bud. PMID:18167520

  15. Random walk on lattices: Graph-theoretic approach to simulating long-range diffusion-attachment growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate

    2014-03-01

    Interest in thin-film fabrication for industrial applications have driven both theoretical and computational aspects of modeling its growth. One of the earliest attempts toward understanding the morphological structure of a film's surface is through a class of solid-on-solid limited-mobility growth models such as the Family, Wolf-Villain, or Das Sarma-Tamborenea models, which have produced fascinating surface roughening behaviors. These models, however, restrict the motion of an incidence atom to be within the neighborhood of its landing site, which renders them inept for simulating long-distance surface diffusion such as that observed in thin-film growth using a molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Naive extension of these models by repeatedly applying the local diffusion rules for each hop to simulate large diffusion length can be computationally very costly when certain statistical aspects are demanded. We present a graph-theoretic approach to simulating a long-range diffusion-attachment growth model. Using the Markovian assumption and given a local diffusion bias, we derive the transition probabilities for a random walker to traverse from one lattice site to the others after a large, possibly infinite, number of steps. Only computation with linear-time complexity is required for the surface morphology calculation without other probabilistic measures. The formalism is applied, as illustrations, to simulate surface growth on a two-dimensional flat substrate and around a screw dislocation under the modified Wolf-Villain diffusion rule. A rectangular spiral ridge is observed in the latter case with a smooth front feature similar to that obtained from simulations using the well-known multiple registration technique. An algorithm for computing the inverse of a class of substochastic matrices is derived as a corollary.

  16. Diffusion-driven precipitate growth and ripening of oxygen precipitates in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, J.; Gröschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Spiecker, E.; Magerl, A.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray Pendellösung fringes from three silicon single crystals measured at 900 °C are analyzed with respect to density and size of oxygen precipitates within a diffusion-driven growth model and compared with TEM investigations. It appears that boron doped (p+) material shows a higher precipitate density and a higher strain than moderately (p-) boron crystals. In-situ diffraction reveals a diffusion-driven precipitate growth followed by a second growth regime in both materials. An interpretation of the second growth regime in terms of Ostwald ripening yields surface energy values (around 70 erg/cm2) similar to published data. Further, an increased nucleation rate by a factor of ˜13 is found in the p+ sample as compared to a p- sample at a nucleation temperature of 450 °C.

  17. Analysis of the influence of coupled diffusion on transport in protein crystal growth for different gravity levels.

    PubMed

    Castagnolo, D; Vergara, A; Paduano, L; Sartorio, R; Annunziata, O

    2002-10-01

    Diffusion has a central role in protein crystal growth both in microgravity conditions and on ground. Recently several reports have been focused on the importance to use the generalized Fick's equations in n-component systems where crystals grow. In these equations the total flux of each component is produced by the own concentration gradient (main flow) and by the concentration gradient of the other components (cross-flow) present in the system. However in literature the latter effect is often neglected, and the so-called pseudo-binary approximation is used. Lin et al. (1995) proposed a mathematical model to evaluate the concentration profile of the species present around a growing protein crystal. Although the model is reliable, it suffers of the pseudo-binary approximation (neglecting cross term diffusion coefficients and using binary diffusion coefficients), probably because of the lack of multicomponent diffusion data. The present model is based on the experimental set-up proposed by Lin et al. (1995). Nevertheless we have included the coupled diffusion effects, according to the correct description of the matter transport through the generalized Fick's equations. The crystal growth rate is calculated for different gravity levels. The model has been applied to the ternary lysozyme-NaCl-water and quaternary lysozyme-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-NaCl-water systems using recent diffusion data. PMID:12351876

  18. Diffusion-controlled garnet growth in siliceous dolomites of the Adamello contact aureole, N-Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T.; Fiebich, E.; Foster, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    Texture forming processes are controlled by many factors, such as material transport through polycrystalline materials, surface kinetics, fluid flow, and many others. In metamorphic rocks, texture forming processes typically involve local reactions linked to net mass transfer which allows constraining the actual reaction path in more detail. In this study, we present geochemical data combined with textural modeling to constrain the conditions and reaction mechanism during contact metamorphic garnet growth in siliceous dolomites in the southern Adamello Massif, Italy. The metamorphic garnet porphyroblasts are poikiloblastic and idiomorphic in shape with a typical grain size ranging between 0.6-1 cm in diameter sitting in a matrix of calcite+diopside+anorthite+wollastonite. Inclusions in the grossular-rich garnets are almost uniquely diopside. On the hand specimen, garnets are surrounded by visible rims of about 0.6 mm indicating a diffusion-limited reaction mechanism to be responsible for the garnet formation. In the course of this study samples have been characterized by polarization microscopy, element x-ray maps using EMPA, cathodulominescence images and stable isotope analyses of carbon and oxygen of matrix carbonates. In addition, pseudosections have been calculated using the software package PerpleX (Connolly, 2005) based on the bulk chemistry of collected samples. Results indicate that the visible margin consists of a small rim (< 1 mm) purely consisting of recrystallized calcite adjacent to the garnet edge. The major part of the observed halo, however, is characterized by the absence of anorthite and wollastonite. The observed texture of garnet porphyroblasts growing and simultaneously forming an anorthite and wollastonite free margin can successfully be reproduced using the SEG program (Foster, 1993), which assumes diffusive mass transport. Therefore the model constrains the diffusive fluxes of Ca, Mg, Al and Si by mass balance and the local Gibbs

  19. A model for the diffusive growth of hydrate saturation anomalies in layered sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.

    2011-10-01

    Sediment particles affect the phase behavior of gas hydrates, both by increasing the surface energy where pore geometry forces hydrate crystals to attain high curvatures and through wetting interactions that cause aqueous films to coat particle surfaces. These effects produce only slight changes to the gas solubility through most of the hydrate stability zone, so the particle size has only a modest influence on the rate of hydrate accumulation when the sediments are homogeneous. In hydrate reservoirs, however, discontinuous changes in sediment properties are common and such stratigraphic boundaries often coincide with hydrate anomalies. These anomalies are a natural consequence of variations in subsurface sediment properties. By accounting for sediment-hydrate interactions, I show how compositional diffusion supplies the growth of hydrate spikes in coarse-grained sediments immediately adjacent to hydrate-free regions (HFRs) in more fine-grained sediments where the solubility is slightly elevated. Over timescales comparable with Milankovitch cycles, hydrate spikes are typically less than a meter in width and contain essentially all of the hydrate that would have otherwise occupied the much larger adjacent HFR if sediment heterogeneities were absent. Hydrate can form in the more fine-grained sediments only once the spike achieves a sufficiently high saturation level (often >90% of pore volume) that the solubility is continuous across the stratigraphic boundary. The wetting interactions that stabilize much of the residual liquid when hydrate forms an interconnected skeleton spanning many pore diameters can also partially unload sediment particle contacts, and lead to the growth of segregated hydrate nodules and lenses.

  20. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  1. Growth behavior of intermetallic compounds during reactive diffusion between aluminum alloy 1060 and magnesium at 573-673 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    A potential new research reactor fuel design proposes to use U-Mo fuel in a Mg matrix clad with Al. Interdiffusion between the Mg containing fuel core and Al cladding can result in the formation of intermetallic compounds that can be detrimental to fuel element performance. The kinetics of the reactive diffusion in the binary Al-Mg system was experimentally studied. Layers of the intermetallic compounds, β (Al3Mg2) and γ (Al12Mg17) phases, were formed between the Al alloy 1060 and Mg during annealing. The β layer was observed to grow faster than the γ phase. The thickness of each layer can be expressed by a power function of the annealing time with the exponent n close to 0.5 for the β phase and less than 0.5 for the γ phase. The results suggest that the growth of β phase is controlled by lattice diffusion and that of the γ phase by grain boundary and lattice diffusion. Metallographic examination showed the grain boundary diffusion in the form of columnar growth of γ phase during annealing. Based on the reactive diffusion equation developed in this work, in the absence of irradiation effects, it will take more than 110 h to consume a half thickness of 400 μm of the cladding.

  2. A diffusion-controlled kinetic model for growth of Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, S. R.; Madaah Hosseini, H. R.

    2007-11-01

    A kinetic model for growth of ZnO nanorods via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism based on the bulk diffusion of Zn atoms through the Au-Zn droplet is presented. The dependences of the growth rate on size are given quantitatively. A general expression for the growth rate of nanorods during VLS process is derived. The derived formula shows the dependences of growth rate on lateral size of nanorods, concentration and supersaturation of Zn atoms in the liquid droplet. Based on the presented kinetic model the smaller nanorods have faster growth rate. Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods are grown by chemical vapor transport and condensation (CVTC) process experimentally. Theoretical and experimental rate/radius curves are compared to each other. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Numerical and Physical Simulation of the Low-Velocity Air Flow in a Diffuser with a Circular Cavity in the Case of Suction of the Air from the Central Cylindrical Body Positioned in the Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Guvernyuk, S. V.; Zubin, M. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Ermakov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the results of solution of the steady-state Reynolds equations closed with the use of the shear-stress transfer model for the air fl ow in a divergent channel with suction of the air from the surface of the cylindrical central body positioned in the circular vortex cavity built in the lower wall of the channel with the corresponding experimental data has been performed.

  4. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Craig E.; Carter, Shirron L.; Czupryna, Julie; Wang, Le; Putt, Mary E.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®)-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm). To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67) identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm. PMID:26784170

  5. The Origins and Development of the Diffusion of Innovations Paradigm as an Example of Scientific Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Thomas W.; Rogers, Everett M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes some of the history of rural sociological research on the diffusion of agricultural innovations, and shows how research followed (and deviated from) the Kuhnian concept of paradigm development. Examines the Iowa Hybrid Seed Corn Study which contributed to the rise of sociological diffusion research. (103 references) (AEF)

  6. New explicit equations for the accurate calculation of the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. C.; Coen, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The traditional explicit growth equation has been widely used to calculate the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor. This paper reexamines the assumptions underlying the traditional equation and shows that large errors (10-30 percent in some cases) result if it is used carelessly. More accurate explicit equations are derived by approximating the saturation vapor-density difference as a quadratic rather than a linear function of the temperature difference between the particle and ambient air. These new equations, which reduce the error to less than a few percent, merit inclusion in a broad range of atmospheric models.

  7. Diffusion-Controlled Anisotropic Growth of Stable and Metastable Crystal Polymorphs in the Phase-Field Crystal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegze, G.; Gránásy, L.; Tóth, G. I.; Podmaniczky, F.; Jaatinen, A.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Pusztai, T.

    2009-07-01

    We use a simple density functional approach on a diffusional time scale, to address freezing to the body-centered cubic (bcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), and face-centered cubic (fcc) structures. We observe faceted equilibrium shapes and diffusion-controlled layerwise crystal growth consistent with two-dimensional nucleation. The predicted growth anisotropies are discussed in relation with results from experiment and atomistic simulations. We also demonstrate that varying the lattice constant of a simple cubic substrate, one can tune the epitaxially growing body-centered tetragonal structure between bcc and fcc, and observe a Mullins-Sekerka-Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld-type instability.

  8. Growth and testing of vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) for intracavity cooling of Yb:YLF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederberg, J. G.; Albrecht, A. R.; Ghasemkhani, M.; Melgaard, S. D.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    2014-05-01

    Optically-pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) have unique characteristics that make them attractive for use in intracavity optical cooling of rare earth doped crystals. We present the development of high power VECSELs at 1020 nm for cooling ytterbium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Yb:YLF). The VECSEL structures use AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors and InGaAs/GaAsP resonant periodic gain epitaxially grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. To achieve the necessary output power, we investigated thinning the substrate to improve the thermal characteristics. We demonstrated a VECSEL structure that was grown inverted, bonded to the heat sink, and the substrate removed by chemical etching. The inverted structure allows us to demonstrate 15 W output with 27% slope efficiency. Wavelength tuning of 30 nm around 1020 nm was achieved by inserting a birefringent quartz window into the cavity. The window also narrows the VECSEL emission, going from a FWHM of 5 nm to below 0.5 nm at a pump power of 40 W.

  9. Elimination of gold diffusion in the heterostructure core/shell growth of high performance Ge/Si nanowire HFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel T; Dayeh, Shadi A

    2010-01-01

    Radial heterostructure nanowires offer the possibility of surface, strain, band-edge and modulution-doped engineering for optimizing performance of nanowire transistors. Synthesis of such heterostructures is non-trivial and is typically accompanied with Au diffusion on the nanowire sidewalls that result in rough morphology and undesired whisker growth. Here, they report a novel growth procedure to synthesize Ge/Si core/multi-shell nanowires by engineering the growth interface between the Au seed and the nanowire sidewalls. Single crystal Ge/Si core/multi-shell nanowires are used to fabricate side-by-side FET transistors with and without Au diffusion. Elimination of Au diffusion in the synthesis of such structures led to {approx} 2X improvement in hole field-effect mobility, transconductances and currents. Initial prototype devices with a 10 nm PECVD nitride gate dielectric resulted in a record maximum on current of 430 {micro}A/V (I{sub DS}L{sub G}/{pi}DV{sub DS}), {approx} 2X higher than ever achieved before in a p-type FET.

  10. In situ flash X-ray observation of projectile penetration processes and crater cavity growth in porous gypsum target analogous to low-density asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Minami; Arakawa, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Fujita, Yukihiro; Kadono, Toshihiko

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies of impact craters formed on low-density asteroids led to the proposal of a new crater formation mechanism dominated by pore collapse and compaction. Thus, it is important to study the crater formation process associated with the projectile penetration on porous cohesive targets. Laboratory impact experiments were conducted for a porous gypsum target with porosity of 50%, and flash X-rays were used to visualize the interior of the target for in situ observation of crater formation and projectile penetration. Spherical projectiles made of three different materials, stainless steel, aluminum, and nylon were impacted at 1.9-2.4 km/s (low-velocity impact) and 5.6-6.4 km/s (high-velocity impact) by using a two-stage light-gas gun. Two imaging plates were used to take two X-ray images at a different delay time from the impact moment for one shot. Two types of crater cavity shape were found on the porous gypsum target, that is, penetration holes or hemispherical cavities, depending on the projectile size and density, and the impact velocity. The drag coefficient of a projectile was determined by measuring the penetration depth changing with time, and we found that it was closely related to the crater cavity shape: it was about 0.9 for a penetration hole, while it was 2.3-3.9 for a hemispherical cavity. This large value for a hemispherical cavity could have been caused by the deformation or the disruption of the projectile. The cratering efficiency, ρtVcr(t)/mp, was found to have a power law relationship to the scaling time for crater growth, πt = vit/rp, where vi is the impact velocity, rp is the projectile radius, and t is the time after the impact, and all data for stainless steel and aluminum projectiles merged completely and could be fitted by a power-law equation of ρtVcr(t)/mp=2.69×10-1πt1.10. Furthermore, the scaled crater volume, πV = Vcr_finalρt/mp, where Vcr_final is the final crater cavity volume, ρt is the target density, and mp is the

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Growth Plates around the Knees of Adolescent Soccer Players by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krajnc, Zmago; Rupreht, Mitja; Drobnič, Matej

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate growth plates around the knees in adolescent soccer players utilizing the diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). Methods. The knees and adjacent growth plates of eleven 14-year-old male soccer players were evaluated by MRI before (end of season's summer break) and after two months of intense soccer training. MRI evaluation was conducted in coronal plane by PD-FSE and DWI. All images were screened for any major pathological changes. Later, central growth plate surface area (CGPSA) was measured and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated in two most central coronal slices divided into four regions: distal femur medial (DFM), distal femur lateral (DFL), proximal tibia medial (PTM), and proximal tibia lateral (PTL). Results. No gross pathology was diagnosed on MRI. CGPSA was not significantly reduced: DFM 278 versus 272, DFL 265 versus 261, PTM 193 versus 192, and PTL 214 versus 210. ADC decrease was statistically significant only for PTM: DFM 1.27 versus 1.22, DFL 1.37 versus 1.34, PTM 1.13 versus 1.03 (p = 0.003), and PTL 1.28 versus 1.22. Conclusions. DWI measurements indicate increased cellularity in growth plates around knees in footballers most prominent in PTM after intense training. No detectable differences on a standard PD-FSE sequence were observed. PMID:26693482

  12. Dielectric effects of step-increased pressure on the mass- and diffusion-controlled linear chain and network macromolecules growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylyshyn, D. A.; Johari, G. P.

    1998-10-01

    The dielectric properties of four stoichiometric liquid mixtures of a diepoxide with two monoamines and two diamines have been studied in real time during the mixture's polymerization isothermally to a linear-chain polymer in two cases and a network polymer in the other two cases, at 1 and 200 bar. The pressure was applied: (a) at the beginning of polymerization, (b) after a small extent of polymerization when the viscosity was low, and (c) after a relatively large extent of polymerization when the viscosity was high. For a fixed polymerization period, pressure increased the dielectric relaxation time much more than any other quantity in all cases, without a change in the distribution of relaxation times. Contributions to the dielectric permittivity and loss from physical and chemical effects have been considered and related to the changes in the dielectric relaxation time, viscosity and polymerization-rate constant as the extent of polymerization increased with time. Pressure is expected to decrease the polymerization rate for all conditions, but the decrease is relatively insignificant at the early stage, when polymerization is mass-controlled. Here other effects override the effect of viscosity increase, and the polymerization rate instead increases. The decrease in the rate becomes significant and predominates only when polymerization becomes diffusion-controlled. Since theories of diffusion-controlled reactions do not consider the mutual slowing of the molecular diffusion and the rate of chemical reactions leading to a macromolecule's growth until its vitrification isothermally, a method for determining the onset of diffusion control was needed. It is shown that this onset can be determined from plotting the rate of polymerization against the dielectric relaxation time. Expressed in terms of the dielectric loss, these plots cross each other. The cross-over point indicates the onset of diffusion control. Thus, the effect of pressure on the dielectric behaviour

  13. Radial expansion rates and tumor growth kinetics predict malignant transformation in contrast-enhancing low-grade diffuse astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Leith; Pope, Whitney B; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Contrast-enhancing low-grade diffuse astrocytomas are an understudied, aggressive subtype at increased risk because of few radiographic indications of malignant transformation. In the current study, we tested whether tumor growth kinetics could identify tumors that undergo malignant transformation to higher grades. Methods Thirty patients with untreated diffuse astrocytomas (WHO II) that underwent tumor progression were enrolled. Contrast-enhancing and T2 hyperintense tumor regions were segmented and the radius of tumor at two time points leading to progression was estimated. Radial expansion rates were used to estimate proliferation and invasion rates using a biomathematical model. Results Radial expansion rates for both contrast-enhancing (p = 0.0040) and T2 hyperintense regions (p = 0.0016) were significantly higher in WHO II–IV tumors compared with nontransformers. Similarly, model estimates showed a significantly higher proliferation (p = 0.0324) and invasion rate (p = 0.0050) in WHO II–IV tumors compared with nontransformers. Conclusion Tumor growth kinetics can identify contrast-enhancing diffuse astrocytomas undergoing malignant transformation. PMID:26095141

  14. Selectivity in glycosaminoglycan binding dictates the distribution and diffusion of fibroblast growth factors in the pericellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The range of biological outcomes generated by many signalling proteins in development and homeostasis is increased by their interactions with glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulfate (HS). This interaction controls the localization and movement of these signalling proteins, but whether such control depends on the specificity of the interactions is not known. We used five fibroblast growth factors with an N-terminal HaloTag (Halo-FGFs) for fluorescent labelling, with well-characterized and distinct HS-binding properties, and measured their binding and diffusion in pericellular matrix of fixed rat mammary 27 fibroblasts. Halo-FGF1, Halo-FGF2 and Halo-FGF6 bound to HS, whereas Halo-FGF10 also interacted with chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate, and FGF20 did not bind detectably. The distribution of bound FGFs in the pericellular matrix was not homogeneous, and for FGF10 exhibited striking clusters. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that FGF2 and FGF6 diffused faster, whereas FGF1 diffused more slowly, and FGF10 was immobile. The results demonstrate that the specificity of the interactions of proteins with glycosaminoglycans controls their binding and diffusion. Moreover, cells regulate the spatial distribution of different protein-binding sites in glycosaminoglycans independently of each other, implying that the extracellular matrix has long-range structure. PMID:27009190

  15. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  16. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  17. Analysis of monotectic growth: infinite diffusion in the L 2 phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mitchell, W. F.; Murray, B. T.; Andrews, J. B.; Arikawa, Y.

    1997-08-01

    The Jackson-Hunt model of eutectic solidification is applied to monotectic solidification in which a liquid (L 1) transforms into rods of a different liquid (L 2) in a solid matrix. Limiting cases of no diffusion and infinite diffusion (complete mixing) in the L 2 phase are considered. An adaptive refinement and multigrid algorithm (MGGHAT) is used to obtain numerical solutions for the concentration field in the L 1 phase; this allows consideration of a general phase diagram. Density differences between the three phases, which cause fluid flow, are treated approximately. Specific calculations are carried out for aluminum-indium alloys. Infinite diffusion in the L 2 phase has only a small effect on the relationship between interface undercooling and rod spacing.

  18. Enhanced (hydrodynamic) transport induced by population growth in reaction–diffusion systems with application to population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Marcel Ovidiu; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Ross, John

    2004-01-01

    We consider a system made up of different physical, chemical, or biological species undergoing replication, transformation, and disappearance processes, as well as slow diffusive motion. We show that for systems with net growth the balance between kinetics and the diffusion process may lead to fast, enhanced hydrodynamic transport. Solitary waves in the system, if they exist, stabilize the enhanced transport, leading to constant transport speeds. We apply our theory to the problem of determining the original mutation position from the current geographic distribution of a given mutation. We show that our theory is in good agreement with a simulation study of the mutation problem presented in the literature. It is possible to evaluate migratory trajectories from measured data related to the current distribution of mutations in human populations. PMID:15231998

  19. Cavity magnomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  20. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  1. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (dh) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with dh and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  2. Growth of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films by diffusion through a metal film and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Molto Pallares, Roger; Hibino, Hiroki

    2012-09-01

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films were grown on both the top and bottom surfaces of a polycrystalline Co or Ni film by annealing a Co (Ni)/amorphous boron nitride/SiO2 structure in vacuum. This method of growing hexagonal boron nitride is much simpler than other methods, such as thermal chemical vapour deposition. B and N atoms diffuse through the metal film, although N is almost completely insoluble in both Co and Ni, and precipitation occurs at the topmost surface. The mass transport is considered to be caused by grain boundary diffusion.

  3. Discerning crystal growth from diffusion profiles in zoned olivine by in situ Mg–Fe isotopic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sio, Corliss Kin I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Chaussidon, Marc; Helz, Rosalind T.; Roskosz, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Mineral zoning is used in diffusion-based geospeedometry to determine magmatic timescales. Progress in this field has been hampered by the challenge to discern mineral zoning produced by diffusion from concentration gradients inherited from crystal growth. A zoned olivine phenocryst from Kilauea Iki lava lake (Hawaii) was selected for this study to evaluate the potential of Mg and Fe isotopes for distinguishing these two processes. Microdrilling of the phenocryst (∼300 μm drill holes) followed by MC-ICPMS analysis of the powders revealed negatively coupled Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations (δ26Mg from +0.1‰ to −0.2‰ and δ56Fe from −1.2‰ to −0.2‰ from core to rim), which can only be explained by Mg–Fe exchange between melt and olivine. The data can be explained with ratios of diffusivities of Mg and Fe isotopes in olivine scaling as D2/D1 = (m1/m2)β with βMg ∼0.16 and βFe ∼0.27. LA-MC-ICPMS and MC-SIMS Fe isotopic measurements are developed and are demonstrated to yield accurate δ56Fe measurements within precisions of ∼0.2‰ (1 SD) at spatial resolutions of ∼50 μm. δ56Fe and δ26Mg stay constant with Fo# in the rim (late-stage overgrowth), whereas in the core (original phenocryst) δ56Fe steeply trends toward lighter compositions and δ26Mg trends toward heavier compositions with higher Fo#. A plot of δ56Fe vs. Fo# immediately distinguishes growth-controlled from diffusion-controlled zoning in these two regions. The results are consistent with the idea that large isotopic fractionation accompanies chemical diffusion in crystals, whereas fractional crystallization induces little or no isotopic fractionation. The cooling timescale inferred from the chemical-isotope zoning profiles is consistent with the documented cooling history of the lava lake. In the absence of geologic context, in situ stable isotopic measurements may now be used to interpret the nature of mineral zoning. Stable isotope measurements by LA-MC-ICPMS and MC

  4. Curation-Based Network Marketing: Strategies for Network Growth and Electronic Word-of-Mouth Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Earnie Mitchell, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of years, a new aspect of online social networking has emerged, in which the strength of social network connections is based not on social ties but mutually shared interests. This dissertation studies these "curation-based" online social networks (CBN) and their suitability for the diffusion of electronic word-of-mouth…

  5. The Growth and Decline of Research on the Diffusion of the News, 1945-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Fleur, Melvin L.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how the tradition of studying the word-of-mouth diffusion of news was established in 1945 and came to mature during the 1960s after the Kennedy assassination. Notes that the pace of this research slowed substantially in the 1970s and has all but stopped in recent years. Outlines six broad generalizations resulting from studies conducted…

  6. Electrochemical Growth of Ag Junctions and Diffusion Limited Aggregate (DLA) Fractal Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Zak; Tuppan, Sam; Kim, Woo-Joong; Seattle University Team

    2015-03-01

    We attempt construction of a single atom connection between two copper wires. By applying a DC voltage across the wires when immersed in a silver nitrate solution, we deposit silver until a junction is formed. The deposited silver forms a fractal structure that can be simulated with a diffusion limited aggregation model.

  7. Cu diffusion as an alternative method for nanopatterned CuTCNQ film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitán, M. J.; Álvarez, J.; Navío, C.; Miranda, R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we show by means of ‘in situ’ x-ray diffraction studies that CuTCNQ formation from Cu(solid)–TCNQ(solid tetracyanoquinodimethane) goes through Cu diffusion at room temperature. The film quality depends on the TCNQ evaporation rate. At low evaporation rate we get a single phase-I CuTCNQ film very well crystallized and well oriented. The film has a CuTCNQ(0 2 0) orientation. The film is formed by CuTCNQ nanorods of a very homogeneous size. The film homogeneity has also been seen by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electronic properties of the film have been measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Thus, the Cu-diffusion method has arisen as a very simple, clean and efficient method to grow localized CuTCNQ nanorods on Cu, opening up new insights for technological applications.

  8. Numerical simulation of diffusion-controlled droplet growth Dynamical correlation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beenakker, C. W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Diffusion-controlled coarsening (Ostwald ripening) of precipitated solutions is studied by numerical simulation. An algorithm is devised which exploits the screening of solute concentration fields, thereby removing the restriction to small systems of previous work. Simulation of the coarsening of 5000 droplets at 10-percent volume fraction reveals long-ranged dynamical correlations which broaden the droplet size-distribution function and increase the coarsening-rate coefficient.

  9. A Reactive-Transport Model Describing Methanogen Growth and Methane Production in Diffuse Flow Vents at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is an important mode of metabolism in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Diffuse vent fluids often show a depletion in hydrogen with a corresponding increase in methane relative to pure-mixing of end member fluid and seawater, and genomic surveys show an enrichment in genetic sequences associated with known methanogens. However, because we cannot directly sample the subseafloor habitat where these organisms are living, constraining the size and activity of these populations remains a challenge and limits our ability to quantify the role they play in vent biogeochemistry. Reactive-transport modeling may provide a useful tool for approaching this problem. Here we present a reactive-transport model describing methane production along the flow-path of hydrothermal fluid from its high temperature end-member to diffuse venting at the seafloor. The model is set up to reflect conditions at several diffuse vents in the Axial Seamount. The model describes the growth of the two dominant thermophilic methanogens, Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus, observed at Axial seamount. Monod and Arrhenius constants for Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii were obtained for the model using chemostat and bottle experiments at varying temperatures. The model is used to investigate the influence of different mixing regimes on the subseafloor populations of these methanogens. By varying the model flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations, and fitting to observed hydrogen and methane concentrations in the venting fluid, the subseafloor biomass, fluid residence time, and methane production rate can be constrained.

  10. Combined heat transfer in floating zone growth of large silicon crystals with radiation on diffuse and specular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Maruyama, Shigenao; Togawa, Shinji

    1998-01-01

    Numerical analyses are conducted to investigate the combined heat transfer in floating zone growth of large Si crystals with needle-eye technique. The radiation element method, REM2, is employed to determine the radiative heat exchange, in which the view factors associated with the components in the float zone furnace and both the diffuse and specular reflection components are incorporated. The boundary element method and the finite difference method are adopted to calculate the electromagnetic field and the heat conduction, respectively. The effect of surface radiative characteristics of Si melt and crystal, i.e., diffuse and/or specular, is discussed in detail. It is found that the consideration of specular surfaces increases the Joulean heat and the radiative heat flux. The temperature fields are obtained for the cases of diffuse and specular, and the difference between the two different cases is obvious in the crystal and molten zone areas. The molten zone is enlarged when the specular surface is accounted for. The interface shape is examined and found to be in good agreement with the experiment.

  11. On the creep constrained diffusive cavitation of grain boundary facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    CREEP rupture in a polycrystalline metal at a high temperature, by cavity growth on a number of grain boundary facets, is studied numerically. An axisymmetric model problem is analysed, in which a cavitating facet is represented as disk-shaped, and the model dimensions are taken to represent spacings between neighbouring cavitating facets. For the grains both power law creep and elastic deformations are taken into account, and the description of cavity growth is based on an approximate expression that incorporates the coupled influence of grain boundary diffusion and power law creep. The cases considered include creep-constrained cavity growth at low stresses, where the voids link up to form grain boundary cracks at relatively small overall strains, as well as the power law creep dominated behaviour at higher stress levels, where rupture occurs at large overall strains. The numerical results are compared with results based on various simplified analyses.

  12. Crystal growth of TTF-TCNQ by solute diffusion in earth-orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.; Gerward, L.; Thorup, N.

    1993-04-01

    TTF-TCNQ single crystals have been grown under microgravity conditions from solutions of TTF and TCNQ in acetonitrile in experiments performed on the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility. Their habit is very different from that obtained previously. The crystals are rectangular plates with the crystallographic b axis perpendicular to the plate. That is contrary to ground-based crystal growth experiments, in which the b axis is the preferred direction of growth.

  13. [Mechanism of inhibiting the cell growth in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by valproic acid combined with temsirolimus].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Li-Hua; Wang, Li; Cheng, Shu; Zhao, Wei-Li

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the mechanism of inhibiting the cell growth in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) combined with mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus (TEM). MTT assay and Wright's stain were used to assess cell growth inhibition and to detect the cell morphological changes respectively. The cell apoptosis, cell cycle and cell autophagy were determined by flow cytometry. Ultrastructure changes were confirmed by electron microscopy. Protein changes were detected by Western blot. The results showed that both VPA and TEM alone inhibited cell proliferation and the effect was more obvious in the combination group. VPA combined with TEM induced cell arrest in G0/G1 phase and upregulated the expression of autophagy-related protein LC3, without cell apoptosis. Moreover, typical autophagosomes were observed, further confirming the presence of autophagy. Western blot showed the changes of proteins involved in autophagy signaling pathway. VPA decreased HDAC1 and HDAC3 expression and increased histone acetylation, suggesting that VPA also affected lymphoma cell proliferation through epigenetic modification. It is concluded that the combined treatment of VPA and TEM induces cell cycle arrest and cell autophagy, which provides a new clue for their clinical application in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:24370026

  14. Disrupting NOTCH Slows Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Growth, Enhances Radiation Sensitivity, and Shows Combinatorial Efficacy With Bromodomain Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Isabella C; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Brandt, William D; Kambhampati, Madhuri; Nazarian, Javad; Chang, Howard T; Warren, Katherine E; Eberhart, Charles G; Raabe, Eric H

    2015-08-01

    NOTCH regulates stem cells during normal development and stemlike cells in cancer, but the roles of NOTCH in the lethal pediatric brain tumor diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remain unknown. Because DIPGs express stem cell factors such as SOX2 and MYCN, we hypothesized that NOTCH activity would be critical for DIPG growth. We determined that primary DIPGs expressed high levels of NOTCH receptors, ligands, and downstream effectors. Treatment of the DIPG cell lines JHH-DIPG1 and SF7761 with the γ-secretase inhibitor MRK003 suppressed the level of the NOTCH effectors HES1, HES4, and HES5; inhibited DIPG growth by 75%; and caused a 3-fold induction of apoptosis. Short hairpin RNAs targeting the canonical NOTCH pathway caused similar effects. Pretreatment of DIPG cells with MRK003 suppressed clonogenic growth by more than 90% and enhanced the efficacy of radiation therapy. The high level of MYCN in DIPG led us to test sequential therapy with the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 and MRK003, and we found that JQ1 and MRK003 inhibited DIPG growth and induced apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that dual targeting of NOTCH and MYCN in DIPG may be an effective therapeutic strategy in DIPG and that adding a γ-secretase inhibitor during radiation therapy may be efficacious initially or during reirradiation. PMID:26115193

  15. Disrupting NOTCH Slows Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Growth, Enhances Radiation Sensitivity, and Shows Combinatorial Efficacy with Bromodomain Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Isabella C.; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Brandt, William D.; Kambhampati, Madhuri; Nazarian, Javad; Chang, Howard T.; Warren, Katherine E.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Raabe, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    NOTCH regulates stem cells during normal development and stem-like cells in cancer but the roles of NOTCH in the lethal pediatric brain tumor diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remain unknown. Because DIPGs express stem cell factors such as SOX2 and MYCN, we hypothesized that NOTCH activity would be critical for DIPG growth. We determined that primary DIPGs expressed high levels of NOTCH receptors, ligands, and downstream effectors. Treatment of the DIPG cell lines JHH-DIPG1 and SF7761 with the γ-secretase inhibitor MRK003 suppressed the level of the NOTCH effectors HES1, HES4, HES5, inhibited DIPG growth by 75%, and caused a 3-fold induction of apoptosis. Short hairpin RNAs targeting the canonical NOTCH pathway caused similar effects. Pre-treatment of DIPG cells with MRK003 suppressed clonogenic growth by more than 90% and enhanced the efficacy of radiation therapy. The high level of MYCN in DIPG led us to test sequential therapy with the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 and MRK003, and we found that JQ1 and MRK003 inhibited DIPG growth and induced apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that dual targeting of NOTCH and MYCN in DIPG may be an effective therapeutic strategy in DIPG and that adding a γ-secretase inhibitor during radiation therapy may be efficacious initially or during re-irradiation. PMID:26115193

  16. Zn Diffusion and α-Fe(Zn) Layer Growth During Annealing of Zn-Coated B Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Vit; Lan, Yongjun; Beentjes, Peter; Norman, David; Hensen, Guido; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-01-01

    Direct hot press forming of Zn-coated 22MnB5 steels is impeded by micro-cracks that occur in the substrate due to the presence of Zn during the forming process. A study was therefore undertaken to quantify concentration of Zn across the α-Fe(Zn) coating and on grain boundaries in the α-Fe(Zn) layer and the underlying γ-Fe(Zn) substrate after isothermal annealing of Zn-coated 22MnB5 at 1173 K (900 °C) and to link the Zn distribution to the amount and type of micro-cracks observed in deformed samples. Finite difference model was developed to describe Zn diffusion and the growth of the α-Fe(Zn) layer. The penetration of Zn into the γ-Fe(Zn) substrate after 600 seconds annealing at 1173 K (900 °C) through bulk diffusion is estimated to be 3 μm, and the diffusion depth of Zn on the γ-Fe(Zn) grain boundaries is estimated to be 6 μm, which is significantly shorter than the maximum length (15 to 50 μm) of the micro-cracks formed in the severely stressed conditions, indicating that the Zn diffusion into the γ-Fe(Zn) from the α-Fe(Zn) during annealing is not correlated to the depth of micro-cracks. On the other hand, the maximum amount of Zn present in α-Fe(Zn) layer decreases with annealing time as the layer grows and Zn oxidizes, and the amount of Zn-enriched areas inside the α-Fe(Zn) layer is reduced leading to reduced length of cracking. Solid-Metal-Induced Embrittlement mechanism is proposed to explain the benefit of extended annealing on reduced depth of micro-crack penetration into the γ-Fe(Zn) substrate.

  17. Roles of aromatic side chains and template effects of the hydrophobic cavity of a self-assembled peptide nanoarchitecture for anisotropic growth of gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kishioka, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Akitsugu; Yamada, Naoki; Kataoka, Shunsuke; Imai, Takahito; Kasuno, Megumi

    2015-11-15

    Gold nanocrystals are promising as catalysts and for use in sensing/imaging systems, photonic/plasmonic devices, electronics, drug delivery systems, and for photothermal therapy due to their unique physical, chemical, and biocompatible properties. The use of various organic templates allows control of the size, shape, structure, surface modification and topology of gold nanocrystals; in particular, currently the synthesis of gold nanorods requires a cytotoxic surfactant to control morphology. To control the shape of gold nanocrystals, we previously demonstrated the de novo design and synthesis of a β-sheet-forming nonapeptide (RU006: Ac-AIAKAXKIA-NH2, X=L-2-naphthylalanine, Nal) and the fabrication of gold nanocrystals by mixing RU006 and HAuCl4 in water. The reaction afforded ultrathin gold nanoribbons 50-100 nm wide, several nanometers high, and microns long. To understand the mechanism underlying gold nanoribbon formation by the RU006 system, we here report (i) the effects of replacement of the Nal aromatic side chain in the RU006 sequence with other aromatic moieties, (ii) the electrochemical properties of aromatic side chains in the de novo designed template peptides to estimate the redox potential and number of electrons participating in the gold crystallization process, and (iii) the stoichiometry of the RU006 system for gold nanoribbon synthesis. Interestingly, RU006 bearing a naphthalene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.50 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) and an analog [Ant(6)]-RU006 bearing a bulky anthracene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.05 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) allowed the growth of anisotropic (ribbon-like) and isotropic (round) gold nanocrystals, respectively. This trend in morphology of gold nanocrystals was attributed to spatially-arranged hydrophobic cavities sufficiently large to accommodate the gold precursor and to allow directed crystal growth driven by cross-linking reactions among the naphthalene rings. Support for this mechanism was obtained by

  18. Morphological transition between diffusion-limited and ballistic aggregation growth patterns.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S C; Alves, S G; Brito, A Faissal; Moreira, J G

    2005-05-01

    In this work, the transition between diffusion-limited (DLA) and ballistic aggregation (BA) models was reconsidered using a model in which biased random walks simulate the particle trajectories. The bias is controlled by a parameter lambda, which assumes the value lambda=0 (1) for the ballistic (diffusion-limited) aggregation model. Patterns growing from a single seed were considered. In order to simulate large clusters, an efficient algorithm was developed. For lambda (not equal to) 0 , the patterns are fractal on small length scales, but homogeneous on large ones. We evaluated the mean density of particles (-)rho in the region defined by a circle of radius r centered at the initial seed. As a function of r, (-)rho reaches the asymptotic value rho(0)(lambda) following a power law (-)rho = rho(0) +Ar(-gamma) with a universal exponent gamma=0.46 (2) , independent of lambda . The asymptotic value has the behavior rho(0) approximately |1-lambda|(beta) , where beta=0.26 (1) . The characteristic crossover length that determines the transition from DLA- to BA-like scaling regimes is given by xi approximately |1-lambda|(-nu) , where nu=0.61 (1) , while the cluster mass at the crossover follows a power law M(xi) approximately |1-lambda(-alpha) , where alpha=0.97 (2) . We deduce the scaling relations beta=nugamma and beta=2nu-alpha between these exponents. PMID:16089530

  19. 850-nm Zn-diffusion vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with with oxide-relief structure for high-speed and energy-efficient optical interconnects from very-short to medium (2km) reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Wei; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jason (Jyehong); Yang, Ying-Jay

    2015-03-01

    High-speed and "green" ~850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have lately attracted lots of attention due to their suitability for applications in optical interconnects (OIs). To further enhance the speed and its maximum allowable linking distance of VCSELs are two major trends to meet the requirement of OI in next generation data centers. Recently, by use of the advanced 850 nm VCSEL technique, data rate as high as 64 Gbit/sec over 57m and 20 Gbit/sec over 2km MMF transmission have been demonstrated, respectively. Here, we will review our recent work about 850 nm Zn-diffusion VCSELs with oxide-relief apertures to further enhance the above-mentioned performances. By using Zn-diffusion, we can not only reduce the device resistance but also manipulate the number of optical modes to benefit transmission. Combing such device, which has excellent single-mode (SMSR >30 dB) and high-power (~7mW) performance, with advanced modulation format (OFDM), record-high bit-rate-distance-product through MMF (2.3 km×28 Gbit/sec) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by selective etching away the oxide aperture inside Zn-diffusion VCSEL, significant enhancement of device speed, D-factor, and reliability can be observed. With such unique VCSEL structure, >40 Gbit/sec energy-efficient transmission over 100m MMF under extremely low-driving current density (<10kA/cm2) has been successfully demonstrated.

  20. Follicular lymphoma transforming into anaplastic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of oral cavity: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Megha; Puri, Abhiney; Nangia, Rajat; Sachdeva, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with the ability to transform into a more aggressive disease, frequently to B cell-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a subtype of NHL, which is characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphocytes. It accounts for 30% of all NHL and its occurrence in the mandible is very rare. It is often seen in young adults, but in the present case, a 50-year-old male patient presented with painless swelling in left lower jaw since 25 days following extraction of left lower molar teeth. There was a history of fever and submandibular lymph nodes were enlarged. On incisional biopsy, features of NHL-like lesion were observed and confirmed by immunohistochemistry using CD20, bcl-2, CD10, CD3, CD5, Ki67 markers to be FL (3A) lymphoma transforming into DLBCL. This is a very uncommon presentation. PMID:26980969

  1. Scaling exponent of the maximum growth probability in diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mogens H; Mathiesen, Joachim; Procaccia, Itamar

    2003-04-01

    An early (and influential) scaling relation in the multifractal theory of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) is the Turkevich-Scher conjecture that relates the exponent alpha(min) that characterizes the "hottest" region of the harmonic measure and the fractal dimension D of the cluster, i.e., D=1+alpha(min). Due to lack of accurate direct measurements of both D and alpha(min), this conjecture could never be put to a serious test. Using the method of iterated conformal maps, D was recently determined as D=1.713+/-0.003. In this paper, we determine alpha(min) accurately with the result alpha(min)=0.665+/-0.004. We thus conclude that the Turkevich-Scher conjecture is incorrect for DLA. PMID:12786408

  2. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  3. Surface Diffusion Directed Growth of Anisotropic Graphene Domains on Different Copper Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da Hee; Kang, Cheong; Nam, Ji Eun; Jeong, Heekyung; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic graphene domains are of significant interest since the electronic properties of pristine graphene strongly depend on its size, shape, and edge structures. In this work, considering that the growth of graphene domains is governable by the dynamics of the graphene-substrate interface during growth, we investigated the shape and defects of graphene domains grown on copper lattices with different indices by chemical vapor deposition of methane at either low pressure or atmospheric pressure. Computational modeling identified that the crystallographic orientation of copper strongly influences the shape of the graphene at low pressure, yet does not play a critical role at atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the defects that have been previously observed in the center of four-lobed graphene domains grown under low pressure conditions were demonstrated for the first time to be caused by a lattice mismatch between graphene and the copper substrate. PMID:26883174

  4. Effect of grossular on garnet-biotite, Fe Mg exchange reactions: evidence from garnet with mixed growth and diffusion zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, J.

    1996-07-01

    Garnets that exhibit mixed growth and diffusion zoning are used to evaluate the effect of grossular content on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions. These garnets from the uppermost amphibolite-facies to granulite-facies gneiss of the Wissahickon Group, southeastern Pennsylvania, show variation in grossular content (0.035< X Ca<0.14) but nearly constant Mg? ( X Mg/( X Mg+ X Fe) and X Mn through the interior indicating re-equilibration of garnet and matrix minerals with respect to iron, magnesium, and manganese. Mg? is not correlated with calcium content, evidence that the effect of calcium on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions is small or is offset by other interactions in almandine-rich garnets. In either case, the data presented here indicate that correction for calcium content of garnets in the application of garnet-biotite geothermometry to high-grade metapelites is unnecessary and may lead to an overestimate of peak temperature.

  5. Interface proliferation and the growth of labyrinths in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Muraki, David J.; Petrich, Dean M.

    1996-04-01

    In the bistable regime of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of reaction-diffusion systems, spatially homogeneous patterns may be nonlinearly unstable to the formation of compact "localized states." The formation of space-filling patterns from instabilities of such structures is studied in the context of a nonlocal contour dynamics model for the evolution of boundaries between high and low concentrations of the activator. An earlier heuristic derivation [D. M. Petrich and R. E. Goldstein,

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1120 (1994)
    ] is made more systematic by an asymptotic analysis appropriate to the limits of fast inhibition, sharp activator interfaces, and small asymmetry in the bistable minima. The resulting contour dynamics is temporally local, with the normal component of the velocity involving a local contribution linear in the interface curvature and a nonlocal component having the form of a screened Biot-Savart interaction. The amplitude of the nonlocal interaction is set by the activator-inhibitor coupling and controls the "lateral inhibition" responsible for the destabilization of localized structures such as spots and stripes, and the repulsion of nearby interfaces in the later stages of those instabilities. The phenomenology of pattern formation exhibited by the contour dynamics is consistent with that seen by Lee, McCormick, Ouyang, and Swinney
    [Science 261, 192 (1993)]
    in experiments on the iodide-ferrocyanide-sulfite reaction in a gel reactor. Extensive numerical studies of the underlying partial differential equations are presented and compared in detail with the contour dynamics. The similarity of these phenomena (and their mathematical description) with those observed in amphiphilic monolayers, type I superconductors in the intermediate state, and magnetic fluids in Hele-Shaw geometry is emphasized.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    SciTech Connect

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    A new type of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The method uses the strong radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity to provide high-resolution NMR spectral information while simultaneously resolving distances on the micron scale. The toroid cavity imaging technique differs from conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in that NMR structural information is not lost during signal processing. The new technique could find a wide range of applications in the characterization of surface layers and in the production of advanced materials. Potential areas of application include in situ monitoring of growth sites during ceramic formation processes, analysis of the oxygen annealing step for wires coated with high-temperature superconducting films, and investigation of the reaction chemistry as a function of distance within the diffusion layer for electrochemical processes.

  7. Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2/SiO2/Si Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhang, Yanwen; Namavar, Fereydoon; Wang, Chong M.; Zhu, Zihua; Weber, William J.

    2011-01-15

    Defect- and strain-enhanced cavity formation and Au precipitation at the interfaces of a nanocrystalline ZrO2/SiO2/Si multilayer structure resulting from 2 MeV Au+ irradiation at temperatures of 160 and 400 K have been studied. Under irradiation, loss of oxygen is observed, and the nanocrystalline grains in the ZrO2 layer increase in size. In addition, small cavities are observed at the ZrO2/SiO2 interface with the morphology of the cavities being dependent on the damage state of the underlying Si lattice. Elongated cavities are formed when crystallinity is still retained in the heavily-damaged Si substrate; however, the morphology of the cavities becomes spherical when the substrate is amorphized. With further irradiation, the cavities appear to become stabilized and begin to act as gettering sites for the Au. As the cavities become fully saturated with Au, the ZrO2/SiO2 interface then acts as a gettering site for the Au. Analysis of the results suggests that oxygen diffusion along the grain boundaries contributes to the growth of cavities and that oxygen within the cavities may affect the gettering of Au. Mechanisms of defect- and strain-enhanced cavity formation and Au precipitation at the interfaces will be discussed with focus on oxygen diffusion and vacancy accumulation, the role of the lattice strain on the morphology of the cavities, and the effect of the binding free energy of the cavities on the Au precipitation.

  8. Diffusion limited aggregation of particles with different sizes: Fractal dimension change by anisotropic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, F. L.; Mattos, O. A.; Amorin, V. S.; Souza, A. B.

    2015-07-01

    Clusters formation models have been extensively studied in literature, and one of the main task of this research area is the analysis of the particle aggregation processes. Some work support that the main characteristics of this processes are strictly correlated to the cluster morphology, for example in DLA. It is expected that in the DLA clusters formation with particles containing different sizes the modification of the aggregation processes can be responsible for changes in the DLA morphology. The present article is going to analyze the formation of DLA clusters of particles with different sizes and show that the aggregates obtained by this approach generate an angle selection mechanism on dendritic growth that influences the shielding effect of the DLA edge and affect the fractal dimension of the clusters.

  9. Morphological diagram of diffusion driven aggregate growth in plane: Competition of anisotropy and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, A. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2011-09-01

    Two-dimensional structures grown with Witten and Sander algorithm are investigated. We analyze clusters grown off-lattice and clusters grown with antenna method with N=3,4,5,6,7 and 8 allowed growth directions. With the help of variable probe particles technique we measure fractal dimension of such clusters D(N) as a function of their size N. We propose that in the thermodynamic limit of infinite cluster size the aggregates grown with high degree of anisotropy ( N=3,4,5) tend to have fractal dimension D equal to 3/2, while off-lattice aggregates and aggregates with lower anisotropy ( N>6) have D≈1.710. Noise-reduction procedure results in the change of universality class for DLA. For high enough noise-reduction value clusters with N⩾6 have fractal dimension going to 3/2 when N→∞.

  10. From Impurity Doping to Metallic Growth in Diffusion Doping: Properties and Structure of Silver-Doped InAs Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Amit, Yorai; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Banin, Uri

    2015-11-24

    Tuning of the electronic properties of presynthesized colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) by doping plays a key role in the prospect of implementing them in printed electronics devices such as transistors and photodetectors. While such impurity doping reactions have already been introduced, the understanding of the doping process, the nature of interaction between the impurity and host atoms, and the conditions affecting the solubility limit of impurities in nanocrystals are still unclear. Here, we used a postsynthesis diffusion-based doping reaction to introduce Ag impurities into InAs NCs. Optical absorption spectroscopy and analytical inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to present a two-stage doping model consisting of a "doping region" and a "growth region", depending on the impurity to NC ratio in the reaction vessel. X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was employed to determine the impurity location and correlate between the structural and electronic properties for different sizes of InAs NCs and dopant concentrations. The resulting structural model describes a heterogeneous system where the impurities initially dope the NC, by substituting for In atoms near the surface of the NC, until the "solubility limit" is reached, after which the rapid growth and formation of metallic structures are identified. PMID:26390173

  11. Modeling growth and dissemination of lymphoma in a co-evolving lymph node: a diffuse-domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Cristini, Vittorio; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Lowengrub, John

    2013-03-01

    While partial differential equation models of tumor growth have successfully described various spatiotemporal phenomena observed for in-vitro tumor spheroid experiments, one challenge towards taking these models to further study in-vivo tumors is that instead of relatively static tissue culture with regular boundary conditions, in-vivo tumors are often confined in organ tissues that co-evolve with the tumor growth. Here we adopt a recently developed diffuse-domain method to account for the co-evolving domain boundaries, adapting our previous in-vitro tumor model for the development of lymphoma encapsulated in a lymph node, which may swell or shrink due to proliferation and dissemination of lymphoma cells and treatment by chemotherapy. We use the model to study the induced spatial heterogeneity, which may arise as an emerging phenomenon in experimental observations and model analysis. Spatial heterogeneity is believed to lead to tumor infiltration patterns and reduce the efficacy of chemotherapy, leaving residuals that cause cancer relapse after the treatment. Understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of in-vivo tumors can be an essential step towards more effective strategies of curing cancer. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  12. Inhibition of COP9-signalosome (CSN) deneddylating activity and tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas by doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Pulvino, Mary; Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Li, Jing; Compitello, George; Rossi, Randy; Spence, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Vijaya; Jordan, Craig; Poligone, Brian; Casulo, Carla; Burack, Richard; Shapiro, Joel L.; Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Land, Hartmut; Zhao, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    In searching for small-molecule compounds that inhibit proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells and may, therefore, be exploited as potential therapeutic agents for this disease, we identified the commonly used and well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline as a strong candidate. Here, we demonstrate that doxycycline inhibits the growth of DLBCL cells both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models. In addition, we show that doxycycline accumulates in DLBCL cells to high concentrations and affects multiple signaling pathways that are crucial for lymphomagenesis. Our data reveal the deneddylating activity of COP-9 signalosome (CSN) as a novel target of doxycycline and suggest that doxycycline may exert its effects in DLBCL cells in part through a CSN5-HSP90 pathway. Consistently, knockdown of CSN5 exhibited similar effects as doxycycline treatment on DLBCL cell survival and HSP90 chaperone function. In addition to DLBCL cells, doxycycline inhibited growth of several other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells in vitro. Together, our results suggest that doxycycline may represent a promising therapeutic agent for DLBCL and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas subtypes. PMID:26142707

  13. Homodimerization Controls the Fibroblast Growth Factor 9 Subfamily's Receptor Binding and Heparan Sulfate-Dependent Diffusion in the Extracellular Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinina, J.; Byron, S; Makarenkova, H; Olsen, S; Eliseenkova, A; Larochelle, W; Dhanabal, M; Blais, S; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling can lead to human diseases, necessitating multiple layers of self-regulatory control mechanisms to keep its activity in check. Herein, we demonstrate that FGF9 and FGF20 ligands undergo a reversible homodimerization, occluding their key receptor binding sites. To test the role of dimerization in ligand autoinhibition, we introduced structure-based mutations into the dimer interfaces of FGF9 and FGF20. The mutations weakened the ability of the ligands to dimerize, effectively increasing the concentrations of monomeric ligands capable of binding and activating their cognate FGF receptor in vitro and in living cells. Interestingly, the monomeric ligands exhibit reduced heparin binding, resulting in their increased radii of heparan sulfate-dependent diffusion and biologic action, as evidenced by the wider dilation area of ex vivo lung cultures in response to implanted mutant FGF9-loaded beads. Hence, our data demonstrate that homodimerization autoregulates FGF9 and FGF20's receptor binding and concentration gradients in the extracellular matrix. Our study is the first to implicate ligand dimerization as an autoregulatory mechanism for growth factor bioactivity and sets the stage for engineering modified FGF9 subfamily ligands, with desired activity for use in both basic and translational research.

  14. Computer simulation of topological evolution in 2-d grain growth using a continuum diffuse-interface field model

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Geng, C.; Chen, L.Q.

    1997-03-01

    The local kinetics and topological phenomena during normal grain growth were studied in two dimensions by computer simulations employing a continuum diffuse-interface field model. The relationships between topological class and individual grain growth kinetics were examined, and compared with results obtained previously from analytical theories, experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations. It was shown that both the grain-size and grain-shape (side) distributions are time-invariant and the linear relationship between the mean radii of individual grains and topological class n was reproduced. The moments of the shape distribution were determined, and the differences among the data from soap froth. Potts model and the present simulation were discussed. In the limit when the grain size goes to zero, the average number of grain edges per grain is shown to be between 4 and 5, implying the direct vanishing of 4- and 5-sided grains, which seems to be consistent with recent experimental observations on thin films. Based on the simulation results, the conditions for the applicability of the familiar Mullins-Von Neumann law and the Hillert`s equation were discussed.

  15. Continuous analysis of δ¹⁸O and δD values of water by diffusion sampling cavity ring-down spectrometry: a novel sampling device for unattended field monitoring of precipitation, ground and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Wurster, Chris M; Bird, Michael I

    2011-12-30

    A novel sampling device suitable for continuous, unattended field monitoring of rapid isotopic changes in environmental waters is described. The device utilises diffusion through porous PTFE tubing to deliver water vapour continuously from a liquid water source for analysis of δ¹⁸O and δD values by Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry (CRDS). Separation of the analysed water vapour from non-volatile dissolved and particulate contaminants in the liquid sample minimises spectral interferences associated with CRDS analyses of many aqueous samples. Comparison of isotopic data for a range of water samples analysed by Diffusion Sampling-CRDS (DS-CRDS) and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) shows significant linear correlations between the two methods allowing for accurate standardisation of DS-CRDS data. The internal precision for an integration period of 3 min (standard deviation (SD) = 0.1‰ and 0.3‰ for δ¹⁸O and δD values, respectively) is similar to analysis of water by CRDS using an autosampler to inject and evaporate discrete water samples. The isotopic effects of variable air temperature, water vapour concentration, water pumping rate and dissolved organic content were found to be either negligible or correctable by analysis of water standards. The DS-CRDS system was used to analyse the O and H isotope composition in short-lived rain events. Other applications where finely time resolved water isotope data may be of benefit include recharge/discharge in groundwater/river systems and infiltration-related changes in cave drip water. PMID:22468325

  16. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity.

    PubMed

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction. PMID:25871175

  17. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation. PMID:26276694

  18. Characterization of Diffusion-Controlled Growth and Dissolution of Methane Hydrate in Aqueous Solution by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Ye, Y.; Chou, I.; Liu, C.; Burruss, R. C.; Wang, F.; Wang, M.

    2010-12-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates occur within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water at pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 2 to 20 °C. The dynamics of growth and dissolution of hydrate phases, in the absence of a vapor phase, due to the change of T, P, and salinity under geologic conditions are not well established by existing experimental studies. In this work, we observed growth and dissolution cycles of methane-hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution in a fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) by changing T in a heating-cooling stage. The maximum T at which this hydrate (H) sample coexists with liquid water (Lw) and vapor was found to be 33.5 °C. At lower T, a ~6 mm long Lw section at one end of the capsule was always separated from the vapor phase at the other end by hydrate crystals in between. After several heating-cooling cycles at T below 30 °C, a large hydrate crystal was formed at the end of the Lw section, which was separated from the vapor phase by other hydrate crystals in between. After keeping the sample at room T for two weeks, we then kept the sample at 2 °C for 6.5 hours until the T was raised to 25 °C for 3 hours. During these T changes, the changes in length of the hydrate crystal were recorded by video, and the changes of methane concentration in Lw at four different points away from the initial H-Lw interface were monitored by Raman spectroscopy (Lu et al., 2006, Appl. Spectr., 60, 122). The rates of growth and dissolution of hydrate crystal were found to be controlled by the rate of methane transfer in solution, which was a function of the concentration gradient and the diffusion coefficient of methane in the solution. The measured apparent diffusion coefficients of methane in water in the presence of hydrate are found to be slightly lower than those without hydrate. Also, the dynamic exchange of methane between solid hydrate and the interstitial water was controlled by the difference

  19. Dynamics of diffusive bubble growth and pressure recovery in a bubbly rhyolitic melt embedded in an elastic solid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Nakano, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    We present a model of gas exsolution and bubble expansion in a melt supersaturated in response to a sudden pressure drop. In our model, the melt contains a suspension of gas bubbles of identical sizes and is encased in a penny-shaped crack embedded in an elastic solid. The suspension is modeled as a three-dimensional lattice of spherical cells with slight overlap, where each elementary cell consists of a gas bubble surrounded by a shell of volatile-rich melt. The melt is then subjected to a step drop in pressure, which induces gas exsolution and bubble expansion, resulting in the compression of the melt and volumetric expansion of the crack. The dynamics of diffusion-driven bubble growth and volumetric crack expansion span 9 decades in time. The model demonstrates that the speed of the crack response depends strongly on volatile diffusivity in the melt and bubble number density and is markedly sensitive to the ratio of crack thickness to crack radius and initial bubble radius but is relatively insensitive to melt viscosity. The net drop in gas concentration in the melt after pressure recovery represents only a small fraction of the initial concentration prior to the drop, suggesting the melt may undergo numerous pressure transients before becoming significantly depleted of gases. The magnitude of pressure and volume recovery in the crack depends sensitively on the size of the input-pressure transient, becoming relatively larger for smaller-size transients in a melt containing bubbles with initial radii less than 10-5 m. Amplification of the input transient may be large enough to disrupt the crack wall and induce brittle failure in the rock matrix surrounding the crack. Our results provide additional basis for the interpretation of volume changes in the magma conduit under Popocatépetl Volcano during Vulcanian degassing bursts in its eruptive activity in April–May 2000.

  20. Toward CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during Ni/Fe-catalyzed carbon nanofiber growth: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chen; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Chen, De; Cheng, Hong-Ye; Zhu, Yi-An

    2011-04-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during the Ni/Fe-catalyzed growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Two bulk models with different Ni to Fe molar ratios (1:1 and 2:1) are constructed, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) simulations are conducted to evaluate their reliability. With the comparison between the calculated and experimental XRD patterns, these models are found to be well suited to reproduce the crystalline structures of Ni/Fe bulk alloys. The calculations indicate the binding of the C1 derivatives to the Ni/Fe closest-packed surfaces is strengthened compared to that on Ni(111), arising from the upshift of the weighted d-band centers of catalyst surfaces. Then, the transition states for the four successive dehydrogenation steps in CH4 dissociation are located using the dimer method. It is found that the energy barriers for the first three steps are rather close on the alloyed Ni/Fe and Ni surfaces, while the activation energy for CH dissociation is substantially lowered with the introduction of Fe. The dissolution of the generated C from the surface into the bulk of the Ni/Fe alloys is thermodynamically favorable, and the diffusion of C through catalyst particles is hindered by the Fe component. With the combination of density functional theory calculations and kinetic analysis, the C concentration in catalyst particles is predicted to increase with the Fe content. Meanwhile, other experimental conditions, such as the composition of carbon-containing gases, feedstock partial pressure, and reaction temperature, are also found to play a key role in determining the C concentration in bulk metal, and hence the microstructures of generated CNFs.

  1. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  2. Unified Heat Kernel Regression for Diffusion, Kernel Smoothing and Wavelets on Manifolds and Its Application to Mandible Growth Modeling in CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Moo K.; Qiu, Anqi; Seo, Seongho; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel kernel regression framework for smoothing scalar surface data using the Laplace-Beltrami eigenfunctions. Starting with the heat kernel constructed from the eigenfunctions, we formulate a new bivariate kernel regression framework as a weighted eigenfunction expansion with the heat kernel as the weights. The new kernel regression is mathematically equivalent to isotropic heat diffusion, kernel smoothing and recently popular diffusion wavelets. Unlike many previous partial differential equation based approaches involving diffusion, our approach represents the solution of diffusion analytically, reducing numerical inaccuracy and slow convergence. The numerical implementation is validated on a unit sphere using spherical harmonics. As an illustration, we have applied the method in characterizing the localized growth pattern of mandible surfaces obtained in CT images from subjects between ages 0 and 20 years by regressing the length of displacement vectors with respect to the template surface. PMID:25791435

  3. Growth and characterization of nanostructured aerosol produced by diffusion flame and spray pyrolysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Hyung

    The present research is aimed at developing methods to characterize and study the growth of nano-particles and nano-structured materials. The thesis is divided into two parts. One part deals with the development of the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA), which is the principal method used in this study to characterize the size and electrical charge of particles formed in a high temperature flame. The second part of the thesis deals with the formation of nano-structured materials with zeolite-type structures. The particles are characterized to determine their size, porosity and surface area. It is well known that nano-sized aerosol particles from combustion sources are charged. Even though the basic charging mechanisms are reasonably well understood qualitatively, techniques for characterizing the charge and size distribution of aerosols from combustion sources are not well developed. In the present study, a method is developed to accurately measure the charge and size distribution of nano-sized combustion aerosols by means of a TDMA. From a series of TDMA measurements, the charge fraction of nano-sized soot particles from a flame is obtained as a function of equivalent mobility particle diameter ranging from 50 to 200nm. The method is then used to characterize the size and charge of combustion aerosols. The results are compared to theory, including the new theory developed in this study. To develop a new synthetic method of nano-structured aerosol particles, a thermal tubular reactor is employed. New spray-pyrolytic and aerosol-gel methods are developed to form nanoporous metal oxides, in which thermally stable and easily leached inorganic matrix is employed to extend the porosity of zeolite-typed materials. The characteristics of the nanoporous material, such as surface area and particle morphology are investigated as a function of relative humidity, temperature, and precursor fractions. The physical and chemical properties of materials synthesized are

  4. Potential Role of Preoperative Conventional MRI Including Diffusion Measurements in Assessing Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Amplification Status in Patients with Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Young, R.J.; Gupta, A.; Shah, A.D.; Graber, J.J.; Schweitzer, A.D.; Prager, A.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Z.; Huse, J.; Omuro, A.M.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification is a common molecular event in glioblastomas. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential usefulness of morphologic and diffusion MR imaging signs in the prediction of epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification status in patients with glioblastoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS We analyzed pretreatment MR imaging scans from 147 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and correlated MR imaging features with tumor epidermal growth factor receptor amplification status. The following morphologic tumor MR imaging features were qualitatively assessed: 1) border sharpness, 2) cystic/necrotic change, 3) hemorrhage, 4) T2-isointense signal, 5) restricted water diffusion, 6) nodular enhancement, 7) subependymal enhancement, and 8) multifocal discontinuous enhancement. A total of 142 patients had DWI available for quantitative analysis. ADC maps were calculated, and the ADCmean, ADCmin, ADCmax, ADCROI, and ADCratio were measured. RESULTS Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification was present in 60 patients (40.8%) and absent in 87 patients (59.2%). Restricted water diffusion correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor amplification (P = .04), whereas the other 7 morphologic MR imaging signs did not (P > .12). Quantitative DWI analysis found that all ADC measurements correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor amplification, with the highest correlations found with ADCROI (P = .0003) and ADCmean (P = .0007). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest a role for diffusion MR imaging in the determination of epidermal growth factor receptor amplification status in glioblastoma. Additional work is necessary to confirm these results and isolate new imaging biomarkers capable of noninvasively characterizing the molecular status of these tumors. PMID:23811973

  5. CRAB Cavity in CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Beam collisions with a crossing angle at the interaction point are often necessary in colliders to reduce the effects of parasitic collisions which induce emittance growth and decrease beam lifetime. The crossing angle reduces the geometrical overlap of the beams and hence the luminosity. Crab cavity offer a promising way to compensate the crossing angle and to realize effective head-on collisions. Moreover, the crab crossing mitigates the synchro-betatron resonances due to the crossing angle. A crab cavity experiment in SPS is proposed as a proof of principle before deciding on a full crab-cavity implementation in the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the effects of a single crab cavity on beam dynamics in the SPS and life time.

  6. PMA/IONO affects diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell growth through upregulation of A20 expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenxiu; Li, Yi; Li, Pinhao; Wang, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A20 and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) are known to be related to DLBCL pathogenesis and progression. This study aimed to assess the effects of phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin (PMA/IONO) on the growth and apoptosis of the DLBCL cell line OCI-LY1, and their associations with A20, MALT1 and survivin levels. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were evaluated using flow cytometry after incubation with Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI) and RNase/PI, respectively. Gene and protein expression levels were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. To further determine the role of A20, this gene was silenced in the OCI-LY1 cell line by specific siRNA transfection. A20 protein levels were higher in the OCI-LY1 cells treated with PMA/IONO compared with the controls, and were positively correlated with the concentration and treatment time of IONO, but not with changes of PMA and MALT1. Meanwhile, survivin expression was reduced in the OCI-LY1 cells after PMA/IONO treatment. In addition, OCI-LY1 proliferation was markedly inhibited, with a negative correlation between cell viability and IONO concentration. In concordance, apoptosis rates were higher in the OCI-LY1 cells after PMA + IONO treatment. Cell cycle distribution differed between the OCI-LY1 cells with and without PMA/IONO treatment only at 24 h, with increased cells in the G0/G1 stage after PMA/IONO treatment. These findings indicate that PMA/IONO promotes the apoptosis and inhibits the growth of DLBCL cells, in association with A20 upregulation. Thus, A20 may be a potential therapeutic target for DLBCL. PMID:27349720

  7. Diffusion and growth of nickel, iron and magnesium adatoms on the aluminum truncated octahedron: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianyu; Hu, Wangyu; Wu, Yurong; Dai, Xiongying

    2012-06-01

    The structure of nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), and magnesium (Mg) adatoms on the aluminum (Al) truncated octahedron is studied using molecular dynamics and the analytic embedded atom method. First, the energy barriers of several typical diffusion processes of Ni, Fe, and Mg adatoms on the Al truncated octahedral cluster were calculated using the nudged elastic band method. The calculated energy barriers were found to be related to the surface energy and atomic radius of the adatom and substrate atom. The result shows that the incorporation of Ni and Fe atoms into Al core easily occurs, and the Mg atom should segregate at the surface of the Al cluster. Thus, the growth of Ni, Fe and Mg on the Al truncated octahedron with 1289 atoms was simulated at several temperatures. In the Ni-Al and Fe-Al cases, the core-shell structure was not obtained. For the Mg-Al system, a good Mg shell on the Al core was found at lower temperatures, and an almost perfect truncated octahedron with more Al shells emerged with an increase in temperature.

  8. A thin interface asymptotic for a phase-field model of epitaxial growth with different adatom diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, J.; Hubert, J.; Emmerich, H.

    2009-10-01

    Here we extend a phase-field model for epitaxial step-flow growth originally derived by Liu and Metiu to capture the case of different adatom diffusivities at neighboring terraces as well as an arbitrary Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Our extended model approach bridges the atomic to continuum scale in the sense that it takes into account atomic attachment kinetics in full detail and likewise allows to simulate long range transport processes above the surface efficiently. To verify the model we present a matched asymptotic analysis of the derived model equations, which shows that in a special limit the presented model can be related to the Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) model with different kinds of attachment coefficients at either side of a step edge. We demonstrate the capability of our approach by presenting numerical simulations with an Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier, which reproduce the well-known step meandering instability. Thereby we show how mathematical analysis helps to specify and validate a phase-field model and thus contributes to the further development of this modeling approach at the nano- to microscale.

  9. Algal morphogenesis: modelling interspecific variation in Micrasterias with reaction--diffusion patterned catalysis of cell surface growth

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Semi-cell morphogenesis in unicellular desmid algae of the genus Micrasterias generates a stellar shape by repeated dichotomous branching of growing tips of the cell surface. The numerous species of the genus display variations of the branching pattern that differ markedly in number of branchings, lobe width and lobe length. We have modelled this morphogenesis, following previous work by D. M. Harrison and M. Kolar (1988), on the assumptions that patterning occurs by chemical reaction-diffusion activity within the plasma membrane, leading to morphological expression by patterned catalysis of the extension of the cell surface. The latter has been simulated in simplified form by two-dimensional computations. Our results indicate that for generation of repeated branchings and for the control of diverse species-specific shapes, the loss of patterning activity and of rapid growth in regions separating the active growing tips is an essential feature. We believe this conclusion to be much more general than the specific details of our model. We discuss the limitations of the model especially in terms of what extra features might be addressed in three-dimensional computation.

  10. Growth patterns and nuclear distribution in white muscle fibers from black sea bass, Centropristis striata: evidence for the influence of diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Priester, Carolina; Morton, Lindsay C.; Kinsey, Stephen T.; Watanabe, Wade O.; Dillaman, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY This study investigated the influence of fiber size on the distribution of nuclei and fiber growth patterns in white muscle of black sea bass, Centropristis striata, ranging in body mass from 0.45 to 4840 g. Nuclei were counted in 1 μm optical sections using confocal microscopy of DAPIand Acridine-Orange-stained muscle fibers. Mean fiber diameter increased from 36±0.87 μm in the 0.45 g fish to 280±5.47 μm in the 1885 g fish. Growth beyond 2000 g triggered the recruitment of smaller fibers, thus significantly reducing mean fiber diameter. Nuclei in the smaller fibers were exclusively subsarcolemmal (SS), whereas in larger fibers nuclei were more numerous and included intermyofibrillar (IM) nuclei. There was a significant effect of body mass on nuclear domain size (F=118.71, d.f.=3, P<0.0001), which increased to a maximum in fish of medium size (282–1885 g) and then decreased in large fish (>2000 g). Although an increase in the number of nuclei during fiber growth can help preserve the myonuclear domain, the appearance of IM nuclei during hypertrophic growth seems to be aimed at maintaining short effective diffusion distances for nuclear substrates and products. If only SS nuclei were present throughout growth, the diffusion distance would increase in proportion to the radius of the fibers. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in nuclear distribution and fiber growth patterns are mechanisms for avoiding diffusion limitation during animal growth. PMID:21430198

  11. Kinetics of growth of thin-films of Co2Si, Ni2Si, WSi2 and VSi2 during a reactive diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akintunde, S. O.; Selyshchev, P. A.

    A theoretical approach is developed which describes the growth kinetics of thin films of near noble metal silicide (especially of cobalt silicide (Co2Si) and nickel silicide (Ni2Si)) and refractory metal silicide (particularly of tungsten disilicide (WSi2) and vanadium disilicide (VSi2)) at the interfaces of metal-silicon system. In this approach, metal species are presented as A-atoms, silicon as B-atoms, and silicide as AB-compound. The AB-compound is formed as a result of chemical transformation between A- and B-atoms at the reaction interfaces A/AB and AB/B. The growth of AB-compound at the interfaces occurs in two stages. The first growth stage is reaction controlled stage which takes place at the interface with excess A or B-atoms and the second stage is diffusion limited stage which occurs at both interfaces. The critical thickness of AB-compound and the corresponding time is determined at the transition point between the two growth stages. The result that follows from this approach shows that the growth kinetics of any growing silicides depends on the number of kinds of dominant diffusing species in the silicide layer and also on their number densities at the reaction interface. This result shows a linear-parabolic growth kinetics for WSi2, VSi2, Co2Si, and Ni2Si and it is in good agreement with experiment.

  12. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  13. Effective diffusion of confined active Brownian swimmers.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Mario; Dagdug, Leornardo

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically find the effect of confinement and thermal fluctuations on the diffusivity of a spherical active swimmer moving inside a two-dimensional narrow cavity of general shape. The explicit formulas for the effective diffusion coefficient of a swimmer moving inside two particular cavities are presented. We also compare our analytical results with Brownian dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement. PMID:25615133

  14. Modelling non-homogeneous stochastic reaction-diffusion systems: the case study of gemcitabine-treated non-small cell lung cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reaction-diffusion based models have been widely used in the literature for modeling the growth of solid tumors. Many of the current models treat both diffusion/consumption of nutrients and cell proliferation. The majority of these models use classical transport/mass conservation equations for describing the distribution of molecular species in tumor spheroids, and the Fick's law for describing the flux of uncharged molecules (i.e oxygen, glucose). Commonly, the equations for the cell movement and proliferation are first order differential equations describing the rate of change of the velocity of the cells with respect to the spatial coordinates as a function of the nutrient's gradient. Several modifications of these equations have been developed in the last decade to explicitly indicate that the tumor includes cells, interstitial fluids and extracellular matrix: these variants provided a model of tumor as a multiphase material with these as the different phases. Most of the current reaction-diffusion tumor models are deterministic and do not model the diffusion as a local state-dependent process in a non-homogeneous medium at the micro- and meso-scale of the intra- and inter-cellular processes, respectively. Furthermore, a stochastic reaction-diffusion model in which diffusive transport of the molecular species of nutrients and chemotherapy drugs as well as the interactions of the tumor cells with these species is a novel approach. The application of this approach to he scase of non-small cell lung cancer treated with gemcitabine is also novel. Methods We present a stochastic reaction-diffusion model of non-small cell lung cancer growth in the specification formalism of the tool Redi, we recently developed for simulating reaction-diffusion systems. We also describe how a spatial gradient of nutrients and oncological drugs affects the tumor progression. Our model is based on a generalization of the Fick's first diffusion law that allows to model

  15. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  16. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  17. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  18. Photon storage cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1991-08-01

    A general analysis is presented of a photon storage cavity, coupled to free-electron laser (FEL) cavity. It is shown that if the coupling between the FEL cavity and the storage cavity is unidirectional (for example, a ring resonator storage cavity) then storage is possible, but that if the coupling is bi-directional then storage is not possible. Parameters are presented for an infra-red FEL storage cavity giving an order of magnitude increase in the instantaneous photon power within the storage cavity. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  20. Void Nucleation, Growth and Coalescence in Irradiated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Sturgeon, J B; Wolfer, W G

    2008-01-11

    A novel computational treatment of dense, stiff, coupled reaction rate equations is introduced to study the nucleation, growth, and possible coalescence of cavities during neutron irradiation of metals. Radiation damage is modeled by the creation of Frenkel pair defects and helium impurity atoms. A multi-dimensional cluster size distribution function allows independent evolution of the vacancy and helium content of cavities, distinguishing voids and bubbles. A model with sessile cavities and no cluster-cluster coalescence can result in a bimodal final cavity size distribution with coexistence of small, high-pressure bubbles and large, low-pressure voids. A model that includes unhindered cavity diffusion and coalescence ultimately removes the small helium bubbles from the system, leaving only large voids. The terminal void density is also reduced and the incubation period and terminal swelling rate can be greatly altered by cavity coalescence. Temperature-dependent trapping of voids/bubbles by precipitates and alterations in void surface diffusion from adsorbed impurities and internal gas pressure may give rise to intermediate swelling behavior through their effects on cavity mobility and coalescence.

  1. Up-Regulation of Intestinal Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor by Afa/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cane, Gaëlle; Moal, Vanessa Liévin-Le; Pagès, Gilles; Servin, Alain L.; Hofman, Paul; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis has been recently described as a novel component of inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been found increased in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis mucosa. To question whether a pro-inflammatory Escherichia coli could regulate the expression of VEGF in human intestinal epithelial cells, we examine the response of cultured human colonic T84 cells to infection by E. coli strain C1845 that belongs to the typical Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli family (Afa/Dr DAEC). Methodology VEGF mRNA expression was examined by Northern blotting and q-PCR. VEGF protein levels were assayed by ELISA and its bioactivity was analysed in endothelial cells. The bacterial factor involved in VEGF induction was identified using recombinant E. coli expressing Dr adhesin, purified Dr adhesin and lipopolysaccharide. The signaling pathway activated for the up-regulation of VEGF was identified using a blocking monoclonal anti-DAF antibody, Western blot analysis and specific pharmacological inhibitors. Principal Findings C1845 bacteria induce the production of VEGF protein which is bioactive. VEGF is induced by adhering C1845 in both a time- and bacteria concentration-dependent manner. This phenomenon is not cell line dependent since we reproduced this observation in intestinal LS174, Caco2/TC7 and INT407 cells. Up-regulation of VEGF production requires: (1) the interaction of the bacterial F1845 adhesin with the brush border-associated decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) acting as a bacterial receptor, and (2) the activation of a Src protein kinase upstream of the activation of the Erk and Akt signaling pathways. Conclusions Results demonstrate that a Afa/Dr DAEC strain induces an adhesin-dependent activation of DAF signaling that leads to the up-regulation of bioactive VEGF in cultured human intestinal cells. Thus, these results suggest a link between an entero-adherent, pro-inflammatory E. coli strain

  2. Bruch's membrane diffusivity for vascular endothelial growth factors may explain variable response to wet age-related macular degeneration treatment: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Peddada, Ram R

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis presented is that diffusivity of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) across Bruch's membrane is an important parameter that distinguishes prompt and slow responders to anti-VEGF treatment in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Accordingly, slow-responders have a high diffusivity and will attain peak VEGF levels on the choroidal side of Bruch's membrane rapidly, probably before or around the time of the next monthly anti-VEGF injection. If a fixed dose of anti-VEGF is used at each monthly treatment (as is the current practice), depending on the initial level of VEGF at that time of injection, VEGF with each treatment will vary. Therefore, diffusion will occur at a different concentration gradient in each treatment cycle subsequent to the injection. Hence, by Fick's Second Law of Diffusion, the slope of the concentration versus time curve for each treatment cycle will be different from the preceding cycle. This leads to a different peak concentration just prior to the next monthly injection. So, when a fixed dose of the anti-VEGF is used at each monthly treatment peak VEGF level fluctuates instead of going down continuously which prolongs the treatment. Thus, doses of anti-VEGF may have to be tapered to decrease the concentration gradient and to slow down the rate of diffusion of VEGF. Diffusivity of Bruch's membrane with regards to VEGF is a simple concept that can explain the variable response to anti-VEGF treatment in wet AMD. If validated through clinical trial the treatment protocol for wet AMD can be more precise and tailored to individual patients. PMID:25468789

  3. Induced- and alternating-current electro-osmotic control of the diffusion layer growth in a microchannel-membrane interface device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-11-01

    The passage of an electric current through an ionic permselective medium under an applied electric field is characterized by the formation of ionic concentration gradients, which result in regions of depleted and enriched ionic concentration at opposite ends of the medium. Induced-current electro-osmosis (ICEO) and alternating-current-electro-osmosis (ACEO) are shown to control the growth of the diffusion layer (DL) which, in turn, controls the diffusion limited ion transport through the microchannel-membrane system. We fabricated and tested devices made of a Nafion membrane connecting two opposite PDMS microchannels. An interdigitated electrode array was embedded within the microchannel with various distances from the microchannel-membrane interface. The induced ICEO (floating electrodes) / ACEO (active electrodes) vortices formed at the electrode array stir the fluid and thereby suppress the growth of the DL. The intensity of the ACEO vortices is controlled by either varying the voltage amplitude or the frequency, each having its own unique effect. Enhancement of the limiting current by on-demand control of the diffusion length is of importance in on-chip electro-dialysis, desalination and preconcentration of analytes.

  4. Functional characteristics of the growth factor receptor family and some ligands in the oropharyngeal cavity of the Chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar).

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Berna G; Sağsöz, Hakan; Akbalik, Mehmet E; Erdoğan, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study is to describe, immunohistochemically, the expression and cell type localisation of growth factor receptors and some of their ligands in the oropharyngeal organs of the Chukar partridge. 2. The tissue samples from 10 healthy adult partridges were dissected under ether anaesthesia and then embedded in paraffin following routine histological procedures. The immunoreaction for receptors and ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ligand system was localised in the cell membrane, nucleus and cytoplasm of the luminal and glandular epithelial cells, stromal and striated muscle cells, and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. 3. Variations were observed in the avian oropharyngeal organs. The immunostaining for the erbB1/HER1 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 1) and the EGF (epidermal growth factor) and AREG (Amphiregulin) ligands in the luminal epithelial cells was higher than in the glandular epithelial, stromal and striated muscle cells. However, the immunostaining for erbB3/HER3 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 3) and erbB4/HER4 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 4) were similar in the luminal epithelium, stromal and striated muscle cells. 4. Growth factor receptors and some of their ligands were localised in different cell types in the oropharyngeal organs. We suggest that erbB/HERs (human epidermal growth factor receptors) and their ligands play an important role in proliferation, differentiation, growth, survival and migration of the cells. PMID:26569385

  5. Growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on metallic underlayers by diffusion plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (DPECVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. M.; Gangloff, L.

    2009-10-01

    Here, we demonstrate the low-temperature (480-612 °C) synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on different metallic underlayers (i.e., NiV, Ir, Ag, Pt, W, and Ta) using diffusion (dc) plasma-enhanced (~20 W, -600 V) chemical vapour deposition (DPECVD). The catalyst used is bi-layered Fe/Al and the feedstock used is a mixture of C 2H 2 and NH 3 (1:4). The crucial component is the diffusion of radical ions and hydrogen generated such as H 2/H +/H 2+/NH 3+/CH 2+/C 2H 2+ (which are confirmed by in-situ mass spectroscopy) from the nozzle, where it is inserted for most effective plasma diffusion between a substrate and a gas distributor.

  6. Unified heat kernel regression for diffusion, kernel smoothing and wavelets on manifolds and its application to mandible growth modeling in CT images.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Qiu, Anqi; Seo, Seongho; Vorperian, Houri K

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel kernel regression framework for smoothing scalar surface data using the Laplace-Beltrami eigenfunctions. Starting with the heat kernel constructed from the eigenfunctions, we formulate a new bivariate kernel regression framework as a weighted eigenfunction expansion with the heat kernel as the weights. The new kernel method is mathematically equivalent to isotropic heat diffusion, kernel smoothing and recently popular diffusion wavelets. The numerical implementation is validated on a unit sphere using spherical harmonics. As an illustration, the method is applied to characterize the localized growth pattern of mandible surfaces obtained in CT images between ages 0 and 20 by regressing the length of displacement vectors with respect to a surface template. PMID:25791435

  7. Nb-3{sub Sn} layers on high-purity Nb cavities with very high quality factors and accelerating gradients

    SciTech Connect

    G. Muller; Peter Kneisel; D. Mansen; H. Piel; J. Pouryamout; R.W. Roth

    1996-06-01

    We have optimized the vapor diffusion technique to coat high-purity Nb cavities up to RRR=1000 with a micronthick Nb3Sn layer without loss of the thermal stabilization of defects. Systematic measurements on samples have shown no change of RRR of the bulk Nb and homogeneously nucleated growth of the Nb3Sn layers. Rinsing of such layers just with high pressure water resulted in low field emission activity and residual surface resistance values in the nW range, i.e. comparable to the best Nb surfaces. Single-cell 1.5 GHz cavities provided Q0 values up to 1011 at 2 K and above 1010 at 4.2 K, which stayed nearly constant up to peak electric surface fields of 10 MV/m but decreased to about 109 at 20 MV/m. No field emission and no quench could be observed in these cavities up to the maximum achievable accelerating gradients of about 15 MV/m at 2 K as limited by the available rf power. The performance of the Nb3Sn cavities at 4.2 K exceeds the design value of the CEBAF Nb cavities at 2 K. First results on a five-cell cavity are promising.

  8. A selection of high gradient cavity experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel

    1998-01-01

    In the two years since the 7th SRF workshop, a variety of cavity tests have been carried out with the objective to reproducibly achieve surface electric rf fields above 40 MV/m with no or only very little electron loading. This paper reports about a collection of tests on single cell and multi-cell cavities, which received standard surface treatments such as buffered chemical polishing and high pressure ultrapure water rinsing, but no heat treatments. Often the cavities were limited by quenches, posting a limit of 700 to 1,000 Oersted on achievable peak magnetic fields of high purity niobium RRR values between 200 and 250. In a seamless single cell cavity fabricated by V. Palmieri of INFN Legnaro by spinning, a very promising gradient of E{sub acc}=25 MV/m was measured. In collaboration with CERN, several tests on sputtering niobium prepared at CERN were also carried out, and accelerating gradients up to 25 MV/m were achieved. A single cell cavity, electron beam welded after electrochemical buffing, showed only good performance--E{sub p} > 50 MV/m--after the removal of more than 100 {micro}m of material. However, this cavity showed rather heavy Q disease even when cooled down rapidly; the Q degradation could be partially reversed by diffusing the oxygen from an anodized Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer into the niobium by heating the cavity in-situ at T=250 C.

  9. Kinetic characteristics of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic regularities of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity are investigated and the growth order and constants are determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is found that the stage in which the number of particles increases occurs in the range of mixed kinetics and their growth occurs in the diffusion range. The enhancing effect of additives HCO- 3 > C6H12O6 > F- and the retarding effect of Mg2+ are demonstrated. The HCO- 3 and Mg2+ additives, taken in high concentrations, affect the corresponding rate constants. It is revealed the crystallization in DPF is favorable for the growth of small crystallites, while the model solution of saliva is, vice versa, favorable for the growth of larger crystals.

  10. Investigation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline growth: Ga diffusion and surface morphology evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jun-feng; Liao, Cheng; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Hua-mu; Zhao, Kui

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ga diffusion in CIGS absorption layer after annealing treatment. • Phenomenon of surface reconstruction after annealing treatment. • Understand selenium effect on CIGS annealing process. • Explain the kinetic of Ga diffusion and MoSe{sub 2} formation. - Abstract: We report a study of selenization and annealing treatment of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) film. Morphologies and composition of surface and cross section were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra were used to investigate film structure. Depth profiles of element distributions were detected by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). A double-layer structure was formed in the film by selenizing metallic precursor at 450 °C. Further annealing at 600 °C in pure argon enhanced gallium diffusion from the bottom to the top of the film, while additional selenium in the annealing had a negative effect. A MoSe{sub 2} layer was detected between CIGS and Mo layers with annealing in additional Se. The annealing treatment also significantly modified the film surface morphology. A large amount of triangular and polygon shaped islands were observed by SEM. That might be due to different nucleation kinetics for different crystal facets.

  11. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  12. Growth Kinetics of a Reaction Rim Between Iron and Graphite/Diamond and the Carbon Diffusion Mechanism at High Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagno, V.; Crispin, K. L.; Shahar, A.; Fei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of the fo2 on modeled bulk silicate Earth mantle composition predict the formation of Fe-Ni metal alloy at about 250-300 km in depth. At such conditions the speciation of subducted carbon will be mainly affected by the local Fe(Ni)/C ratio, with diamond, Fe3C and C-bearing Fe-Ni alloys being the most likely stable phases. To date however, no data are available to determine the effect of pressure and temperature on 1) the transport of carbon by diffusion in iron metal and 2) the kinetics of formation of carbide phases. We performed multianvil experiments between 3 and 10 GPa and temperatures of 700-1200 ºC with the aim of measuring C diffusion in γ-Fe. Glassy carbon and synthetic diamond were used as diffusants, placed directly in contact with pure iron rod rods with a thickness of 800-1400 μm. FE-SEM was used for accurate analyses of the Fe-C interface and concentration profiles of carbon in iron were measured by electron microprobe. Results show that the diffusion coefficient for carbon in iron metal (~3x10-11 m2s-1) and the activation energy (~62 kJ/mol) are similar to previous data from 1 atm and suggest a small pressure effect. The activation volume (~1.5x10-6 m3/mol) determined from isothermal runs is in agreement with that determined for other elements for which an interstitial diffusion mechanism in iron has been established. At the interface between carbon and Fe the growth of a reaction rim was often observed. Time series experiments were therefore performed, to investigate the growth kinetics of iron carbide (Fe3C). Results will be used to 1) determine a model for the storage of C in metallic phases in the Earth's interior and 2) provide an experimental constraint on the formation of carbide phases during subduction, with implications for the deep carbon cycle and isotopic fractionation.

  13. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  14. Vapour diffusion growth and characterisation of fully deuterated triglycine sulphate (ND 2CD 2COOD) 3D 2SO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, J. M.; Goossens, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    A new vial-in-vial vapour diffusion method for growing single crystals of fully deuterated triglycine sulphate (TGS) has been developed. Single crystals of hydrogenous TGS were also grown for comparison purposes. The crystals have been characterised using x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The phase transition temperature was 334.0±0.5 K for fully deuterated TGS compared to 322.3±0.3 K for hydrogenous TGS. These values compare well with the expected TC.

  15. Cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Zbaeren, Peter; Thoeny, Harriet C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Tumours in the oral cavity and oropharynx differ in presentation and prognosis and the detection of spread of tumour from one subsite to another is essential for the T-staging. This article reviews the anatomy and describes the pattern of spread of different cancers arising in the oral cavity and oropharynx; the imaging findings on computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are also described. Brief mention is made on the role of newer imaging modalities such as [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography, perfusion studies and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:20233682

  16. Diffusion phenomena and crystallization path during the growth of LFZ Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconducting fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, F. M.; Silva, R. F.; Vieira, J. M.

    2001-11-01

    The laser floating zone technique is used to grow highly textured fibres in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconducting system. Composition profiles along the fibre axis show a strong segregation of Bi to the molten zone, this region being depleted of Ca. Maximum and minimum values of the effective distribution coefficients (k) of cations are determined, the extreme values of segregation being kCa = 1.64 and kBi = 0.60. The dependence of k on the pulling rate R allowed the calculation of the equilibrium distribution coefficients k0 of the elements and of the average diffusion coefficients DBi = 1.2×10-10 m2 s-1, DSr = 2.7×10-10 m2 s-1 and DCa = 12.8×10-10 m2 s-1 in the Cu-rich melt. The approximate length of the diffusion layer δ is 21 µm. The crystallization path is represented in the composition tetrahedron of Bi2O3-SrO-CaO-CuO. Liquid immiscibility is observed. The non-superconducting (Sr0.3Ca0.7)CuO2 (`1/1') phase, with dendritic morphology, is the first phase to solidify. The superconducting matrix is the result of an early nucleation of `4413' intergrowth on the surface of `1/1' dendrites followed by the side-by-side crystallization of the `4413' and `2212' phases from a peritetic-type reaction.

  17. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  18. Degenerate astigmatic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, Jérémie; Mohamed, Ajmal; Romanini, Daniele

    2013-10-01

    At the output of a high-finesse cavity a succession of Lissajous patterns may be observed as the cavity length is finely tuned inside a “degenerate region” around a reentrant spherical configuration. This behavior is ascribed to a small parasitic astigmatism of the cavity mirrors. Simple geometrical optics modeling confirms this hypothesis, and then a more realistic analysis using transverse Gaussian modes reveals that the Lissajous patterns correspond to an organization of the astigmatism-split modes into a finer substructure of degenerate modes relative to that of a reentrant spherical cavity. This provides a thorough understanding of the field patterns observed in the degenerate region, including an intriguing spatial symmetry of the patterns corresponding to opposite displacements with respect to a specific central cavity length. This investigation represents a generalization of the theory of reentrant spherical cavities to the astigmatic case.

  19. Segmented Dyke Growth and Associated Seismicity at Bárðarbunga Volcanic System (Iceland) is Driven by Non-Linear Magma Pressure Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.

    2015-12-01

    In August 2014 segmented lateral dyke growth has been observed in a rifting event at Bardarbunga volcanic system, Iceland. The temporal evolution of the magma source and the physical nature of magma flow process during dyke propagation and arrest are unclear. The epidemic-type aftershock sequence model has been used to detect fluid signals in seismicity data. We use the earthquake catalog recorded during the rifting event to reconstruct the magma flow signal at the feeding source of the dyke. We find that the segmentation of dyke growth is caused by a pulsating nature of the magma flow source. We identify two main magma flow pulses, which initiate and propagate the two main segments of the dyke. During phases of dyke arrest magma flow pulses are low and cannot further propagate the dyke. We use the reconstructed magma flow signal to set up a numerical model of non-linear magma pressure diffusion. By using the magma pressure changes resulting from magma flow, we simulate the earthquake catalog caused by the reduction of the effective principal stress. We observe an excellent agreement between the spatio-temporal characteristics of the simulated earthquake catalog and recorded seismicity. Our results suggest that the process of magma pressure relaxation can be described as a non-linear diffusion process. Because the opening of the dyke creates significant new fracture volume, the permeability of the rock is strongly increasing and the diffusion process becomes highly non-linear. Our analysis is based on lessons learned from analysis of seismicity observed during hydraulic fracturing of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Despite large differences in scale, the underlying physical processes are comparable. Finally, we analyze the decay of seismic activity after start of the effusive fissure eruption near the end of the dyke. The magma flow strongly decreases and seismic activity decays according to Omori's law, which describes the decay of aftershock activity after tectonic

  20. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  1. Characterization of cavity wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, James A.

    Scope and Method of Study. This research focused on flow over deep cavities at subsonic speeds with emphasis on the wake downstream of the cavity. Cavity wake behaviors have not been studied in detail and are a major concern for air vehicles with cavities and in particular for optical sensor systems installed in cavities. Other key behaviors for sensor survival and performance are cavity resonance and turbulence scales in the shear layer. A wind tunnel test apparatus was developed to explore cavity and wake characteristics. It consisted of a test section insert for the OSU Indraft Wind Tunnel with an additional contraction cone for significantly increased speed. The test section included a variable depth cavity in a boundary layer splitter plate/fairing assembly, a Y-Z traverse and pitot rake with in-situ pressure transducers for high frequency response. Flows were measured over clean cavities with length to depth (L/D) ratios of 4 to 1/2 and on cavities with a porous fence for resonance suppression. Measurements were taken in streamwise and cross-stream sections to three cavity lengths downstream of the cavity trailing edge. Flow visualization using laser sheet and smoke injection was also used. Findings and Conclusions. The high speed insert demonstrated a significant new capability for the OSU wind tunnel, reaching speeds of 0.35 Mach (390 feet/second) in a 14"x14" test section. Inlet room flow was found to be quite unsteady and recommendations are made for improved flow and quantitative visualization. Key findings for cavity wake flow include its highly three dimensional nature with asymmetric peaks in cross section with boundary layer thicknesses and integral length scales several times that of a normal flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Turbulent intensities (TI) of 35% to 55% of freestream speeds were measured for the clean configuration. Fence configuration TI's were 20% to 35% of free stream and, in both configurations, TI's decayed to

  2. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  3. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  4. LHC Beam Diffusion Dependence on RF Noise: Models And Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Van Winkle, D.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /CERN

    2010-09-14

    Radio Frequency (RF) accelerating system noise and non-idealities can have detrimental impact on the LHC performance through longitudinal motion and longitudinal emittance growth. A theoretical formalism has been developed to relate the beam and RF loop dynamics with the bunch length growth [1]. Measurements were conducted at LHC to validate the formalism, determine the performance limiting RF components, and provide the foundation for beam diffusion estimates for higher energies and intensities. A brief summary of these results is presented in this work. During a long store, the relation between the energy lost to synchrotron radiation and the noise injected to the beam by the RF accelerating voltage determines the growth of the bunch energy spread and longitudinal emittance. Since the proton synchrotron radiation in the LHC is very low, the beam diffusion is extremely sensitive to RF perturbations. The theoretical formalism presented in [1], suggests that the noise experienced by the beam depends on the cavity phase noise power spectrum, filtered by the beam transfer function, and aliased due to the periodic sampling of the accelerating voltage signal V{sub c}. Additionally, the dependence of the RF accelerating cavity noise spectrum on the Low Level RF (LLRF) configurations has been predicted using time-domain simulations and models [2]. In this work, initial measurements at the LHC supporting the above theoretical formalism and simulation predictions are presented.

  5. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  6. Crystal growth of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase, carboxypeptidase t, and thymidine phosphorylase on the international space station by the capillary counter-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranova, I. P.; Smirnova, E. A.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2011-09-01

    Crystals of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thymidine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli, carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris and its mutant forms, and crystals of complexes of these proteins with functional ligands and inhibitors were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the Japanese Experimental Module Kibo on the International Space Station. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction data sets suitable for the determination of high-resolution three-dimensional structures of these proteins were collected from the grown crystals on the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The conditions of crystal growth for the proteins and the data-collection statistics are reported. The crystals grown in microgravity diffracted to a higher resolution than crystals of the same proteins grown on Earth.

  7. Crystal growth of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase, carboxypeptidase t, and thymidine phosphorylase on the international space station by the capillary counter-diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranova, I. P. Smirnova, E. A.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2011-09-15

    Crystals of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thymidine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli, carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris and its mutant forms, and crystals of complexes of these proteins with functional ligands and inhibitors were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the Japanese Experimental Module Kibo on the International Space Station. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction data sets suitable for the determination of high-resolution three-dimensional structures of these proteins were collected from the grown crystals on the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The conditions of crystal growth for the proteins and the data-collection statistics are reported. The crystals grown in microgravity diffracted to a higher resolution than crystals of the same proteins grown on Earth.

  8. Nitrogen doping study in ingot niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Makita, Junki

    2015-09-01

    Thermal diffusion of nitrogen in niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities at temperature ~800 °C has resulted in the increase in quality factor with a low-field Q-rise extending to Bp > 90 mT. However, the maximum accelerating gradient of these doped cavities often deteriorates below the values achieved by standard treatments prior to doping. Here, we present the results of the measurements on ingot niobium cavities doped with nitrogen at 800 °C. The rf measurements were carried out after the successive electropolishing to remove small amount of material from the inner surface layer. The result showed higher breakdown field with lower quality factor as material removal increases.

  9. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  10. Homeostatic Role of Transforming Growth Factor-β in the Oral Cavity and Esophagus of Mice and Its Expression by Mast Cells in These Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vitsky, Allison; Waire, James; Pawliuk, Robert; Bond, Arden; Matthews, Douglas; LaCasse, Emily; Hawes, Michael L.; Nelson, Carol; Richards, Susan; Piepenhagen, Peter A.; Garman, Richard D.; Andrews, Laura; Thurberg, Beth L.; Lonning, Scott; Ledbetter, Steve; Ruzek, Melanie C.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic growth factor; its overexpression has been implicated in many diseases, making it a desirable target for therapeutic neutralization. In initial safety studies, mice were chronically treated (three times per week) with high doses (50 mg/kg) of a murine, pan-neutralizing, anti-TGF-β antibody. Nine weeks after the initiation of treatment, a subset of mice exhibited weight loss that was concurrent with decreased food intake. Histopathology revealed a unique, nonneoplastic cystic epithelial hyperplasia and tongue inflammation, as well as dental dysplasia and epithelial hyperplasia and inflammation of both the gingiva and esophagus. In an effort to determine the cause of this site-specific pathology, we examined TGF-β expression in these tissues and saliva under normal conditions. By immunostaining, we found higher expression levels of active TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 in normal tongue and esophageal submucosa compared with gut mucosal tissues, as well as detectable TGF-β1 in normal saliva by Western blot analysis. Interestingly, mast cells within the tongue, esophagus, and skin co-localized predominantly with the TGF-β1 expressed in these tissues. Our findings demonstrate a novel and restricted pathology in oral and esophageal tissues of mice chronically treated with anti-TGF-β that is associated with basal TGF-β expression in saliva and by mast cells within these tissues. These studies illustrate a previously unappreciated biological role of TGF-β in maintaining homeostasis within both oral and esophageal tissues. PMID:19406991

  11. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  12. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-1 content and pattern of expression correlates with histopathologic grade in diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, H.; Lopes, M. B.; Laws, E. R.; Asakura, T.; Goto, M.; Carpenter, J. E.; Karns, L. R.; VandenBerg, S. R.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of experimental tumorigenesis have strongly implicated signaling of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) as a key component in astrocytic neoplasia; however, its role in the growth of low-grade and malignant human tumors is not well understood. Correlative analyses of IGF-1, p53, and Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) mRNA expression were performed to examine the cellular pattern of IGF-1 signaling in 39 cases of astrocytoma (World Health Organization grades II-IV). Tumor cells expressing IGF-1 and IGF-1R were present in all tumor grades. The proportion of tumor cells that expressed IGF-1 correlated with both histopathologic grade and Ki-67 labeling indices, while expression of IGF-1R mRNA correlated with Ki-67 indices. In cases where stereotactic tissue sampling could be identified with a specific tumor area by neuroimaging features, the numbers of IGF-1 immunoreactive cells correlated with the tumor zones of highest cellularity and Ki-67 labeling. In glioblastomas, the localization of IGF-1 immunoreactivity was notable for several features: frequent accentuation in the perivascular tumor cells surrounding microvascular hyperplasia; increased levels in reactive astrocytes at the margins of tumor infiltration; and selective expression in microvascular cells exhibiting endothelial/pericytic hyperplasia. IGF-1R expression was particularly prominent in tumor cells adjacent to both microvascular hyperplasia and palisading necrosis. These data suggest that IGF-1 signaling occurs early in astroglial tumorigenesis in the setting of cell proliferation. The distinctive correlative patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R expression in glioblastomas also suggest that IGF-1 signaling has an association with the development of malignant phenotypes related to aberrant angiogenesis and invasive tumor interactions with reactive brain. PMID:11550306

  14. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  15. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have

  16. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  17. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  18. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double

  19. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  20. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, Junki; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  1. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  2. Diffusion limited aggregation. The role of surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, Juan M.; Otálora, Fermín

    1991-11-01

    We present a growth model in which the hitting particles are able to diffuse to more stable growth sites in the perimeter of a cluster growing by diffusion limited aggregation. By tuning the diffusion path Ls, the morphological output - from disordered fractal to perfect single crystals - can be controlled. Instabilities appear when the mean length of the crystal faces Lf are greater than 2 Ls.

  3. Suppression of Cavity-Driven Flow Separation in a Simulated Mixed Compression Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    A test facility designed to simulate a bifurcated subsonic diffuser operating within a mixed compression inlet is described. The subsonic diffuser in this facility modeled a bypass cavity feature often used in mixed compression inlets for engine flow matching and normal shock control. A bypass cavity-driven flow separation was seen to occur in the subsonic diffuser without applied flow control. Flow control in the form of vortex generators and/or a partitioned bypass cavity cover plate were used to eliminate this flow separation, providing a 2% increase in area-averaged total pressure recovery, and a 70% reduction in circumferential distortion intensity.

  4. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Park; J. Yoo; K. Huang; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; J. F. Jue; B. Rabin; G. Moore; Y. H. Sohn

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45–345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the a-U phase was found between the UZr2 and U10Mo, while the Mo2Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the a-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si)3Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the a-U, Mo2Zr, and UZr2 phases.

  5. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K.; Keiser, D. D.; Jue, J. F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G.; Sohn, Y. H.

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45-345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr2 and U10Mo, while the Mo2Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si)3Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo2Zr, and UZr2 phases.

  6. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  7. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  8. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  9. Relativistic diffusive motion in thermal electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2013-04-01

    We discuss relativistic dynamics in a random electromagnetic field which can be considered as a high temperature limit of the quantum electromagnetic field in a heat bath (cavity) moving with a uniform velocity w. We derive a diffusion approximation for the particle’s dynamics generalizing the diffusion of Schay and Dudley. It is shown that the Jüttner distribution is the equilibrium state of the diffusion.

  10. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  11. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  12. Metasurface external cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  13. Multicolor cavity soliton.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Liang, Hanxiao; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-25

    We show a new class of complex solitary wave that exists in a nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The cavity soliton consists of multiple soliton-like spectro-temporal components that exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, formed together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor cavity soliton shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which would be very useful for versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy. PMID:27464131

  14. The auroral plasma cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    A region of diminished plasma density has been found to occur at the source of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). The density within this auroral plasma cavity, determined from limited Hawkeye wave data, was less than 1/cu cm from 1.8 to 3 earth radii geocentric, at 70 deg + or - 3 deg invariant magnetic latitude. The altitude variation of the magnetic field produces a minimum in the ratio of plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency within the cavity which accounts for the observed spectrum of AKR.

  15. Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehei; R. Trautz; S. Finsterle; P. Cook; C. Ahlers

    2004-07-01

    Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.

  16. Coupled Geomechanical Simulations of UCG Cavity Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y

    2009-07-13

    This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project to develop predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (both natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). In this paper we will focus upon the development of coupled geomechanical capabilities for simulating the evolution of the UCG cavity using discrete element methodologies. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) has unique advantages for facilitating the prediction of the mechanical response of fractured rock masses, such as cleated coal seams. In contrast with continuum approaches, the interfaces within the coal can be explicitly included and combinations of both elastic and plastic anisotropic response are simulated directly. Additionally, the DEM facilitates estimation of changes in hydraulic properties by providing estimates of changes in cleat aperture. Simulation of cavity evolution involves a range of coupled processes and the mechanical response of the host coal and adjoining rockmass plays a role in every stage of UCG operations. For example, cavity collapse during the burn has significant effect upon the rate of the burn itself. In the vicinity of the cavity, collapse and fracturing may result in enhanced hydraulic conductivity of the rock matrix in the coal and caprock above the burn chamber. Even far from the cavity, stresses due to subsidence may be sufficient to induce new fractures linking previously isolated aquifers. These mechanical processes are key in understanding the risk of unacceptable subsidence and the potential for groundwater contamination. These mechanical processes are inherently non-linear, involving significant inelastic response, especially in the region closest to the cavity. In addition, the response of the rock mass involves both continuum and discrete mechanical behavior. We have recently coupled the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) and NUFT (Non

  17. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  18. Enhanced fluorescence diffuse optical tomography with indocyanine green-encapsulating liposomes targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Xu, Yan; Hamby, Carl V.; Backer, Marina V.; Backer, Joseph M.; Zhu, Quing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. To develop an indocyanine green (ICG) tracer with slower clearance kinetics, we explored ICG-encapsulating liposomes (Lip) in three different formulations: untargeted (Lip/ICG), targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (scVEGF-Lip/ICG) by the receptor-binding moiety single-chain VEGF (scVEGF), or decorated with inactivated scVEGF (inactive-Lip/ICG) that does not bind to VEGF receptors. Experiments were conducted with tumor-bearing mice that were placed in a scattering medium with tumors located at imaging depths of either 1.5 or 2.0 cm. Near-infrared fluorescence diffuse optical tomography that provides depth-resolved spatial distributions of fluorescence in tumor was used for the detection of postinjection fluorescent signals. All liposome-based tracers, as well as free ICG, were injected intravenously into mice in the amounts corresponding to 5 nmol of ICG/mouse, and the kinetics of increase and decrease of fluorescent signals in tumors were monitored. A signal from free ICG reached maximum at 15-min postinjection and then rapidly declined with t1/2 of ∼20  min. The signals from untargeted Lip/ICG and inactive-Lip/ICG also reached maximum at 15-min postinjection, however, declined somewhat slower than free ICG with t1/2 of ∼30  min. By contrast, a signal from targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG grew slower than that of all other tracers, reaching maximum at 30-min postinjection and declined much slower than that of other tracers with t1/2 of ∼90  min, providing a more extended observation window. Higher scVEGF-Lip/ICG tumor accumulation was further confirmed by the analysis of fluorescence on cryosections of tumors that were harvested from animals at 400 min after injection with different tracers. PMID:24346856

  19. Transport and reactions of gold in silicon containing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    We quantified the strength of Au binding on cavity walls and in precipitates of the Au-Si molten phase within Si over the temperature range 1023{endash}1123 K. Also determined was the diffusivity-solubility product of interstitial Au. These properties were obtained by using ion implantation and annealing to form multiple layers containing cavities or Au-Si precipitates and then measuring by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry the rate and extent of Au redistribution between layers during isothermal heating. Results were incorporated into a diffusion-reaction formalism describing the evolution of the coupled concentrations of interstitial Au, substitutional Au, Si interstitial atoms, and Si vacancies. Cavities were shown to be effective sinks for the gettering of Au from solution in Si. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  1. Seamless/bonded niobium cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.

    2006-07-01

    Technological aspects and performance of seamless cavities produced by hydroforming are presented. Problems related to the fabrication of seamless cavities from bulk niobium are mainly solved thanks to the progress of the last years. The highest achieved accelerating gradients are comparable for both seamless and welded versions (ca. 40 MV/m) Nevertheless further development of seamless cavities is desirable in order to avoid the careful preparation of parts for welding and get reliable statistic. Fabrication of NbCu clad cavities from bimetallic tubes is an interesting option that gives new opportunity to the seamless technique. On the one hand it allows reducing the niobium costs contribution; on the other hand it increases the thermal stability of the cavity. The highest accelerating gradient achieved on seamless NbCu clad single cell cavities (ca. 40 MV/m) is comparable to the one reached on bulk Nb cavities. Fabrication of multi-cell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was recently proven.

  2. Effective Cavity Length of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotron oscillators for electron cyclotron heating and non-inductive current drive (ECH&CD) in magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas have relatively low cavity quality factors in the range of 1000 to 2000. The effective length of their cavities cannot be simply deduced from the cavity electric field profile, since this has by far not a Gaussian shape. The present paper presents a novel method to estimate the effective length of a gyrotron cavity just from the eigenvalue of the operating TEm,n mode, the cavity radius and the exact oscillation frequency which may be numerically computed or precisely measured. This effective cavity length then can be taken to calculate the Fresnel parameter in order to confirm that the cavity is not too short so that the transverse structure of any mode in the cavity is the same as that of the corresponding mode in a long circular waveguide with the same diameter.

  3. Lithium diffusion at Si-C interfaces in silicon-graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; McNutt, N. W.; Nicholson, D. M.; Rios, O.; Keffer, D. J.

    2014-08-01

    Models of intercalated Li and its diffusion in Si-Graphene interfaces are investigated using density functional theory. Results suggest that the presence of interfaces alters the energetics of Li binding and diffusion significantly compared to bare Si or Graphene surfaces. Our results show that cavities along reconstructed Si surface provide diffusion paths for Li. Diffusion barriers calculated along these cavities are significantly lower than penetration barriers to bulk Si. Interaction with Si surface results in graphene defects, creating Li diffusion paths that are confined along the cavities but have still lower barrier than in bulk Si.

  4. Lithium diffusion at Si-C interfaces in Silicon-Graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; McNutt, Nichiolas William; Nicholson, Donald M.; Rios, Orlando; Keffer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Models of intercalated Li and its diffusion in Si-Graphene interfaces are investigated using Density Functional Theory. Results suggest that the presence of interfaces alters the energetics of Li binding and diffusion significantly compared to bare Si or Graphene surfaces. Our results show that cavities along reconstructed Si surface provide diffusion paths for Li. Diffusion barriers calculated along these cavities are significantly lower than penetration barriers to bulk Si. Interaction with Si surface results in graphene defects, creating Li diffusion paths that are confined along the cavities but have still lower barrier than in bulk Si.

  5. Lithium diffusion at Si-C interfaces in silicon-graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; McNutt, N. W.; Nicholson, D. M.; Rios, O.; Keffer, D. J.

    2014-08-04

    Models of intercalated Li and its diffusion in Si-Graphene interfaces are investigated using density functional theory. Results suggest that the presence of interfaces alters the energetics of Li binding and diffusion significantly compared to bare Si or Graphene surfaces. Our results show that cavities along reconstructed Si surface provide diffusion paths for Li. Diffusion barriers calculated along these cavities are significantly lower than penetration barriers to bulk Si. Interaction with Si surface results in graphene defects, creating Li diffusion paths that are confined along the cavities but have still lower barrier than in bulk Si.

  6. Holographic diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadle, Stephen; Wuest, Daniel; Cantalupo, John; Lakes, Roderic S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic diffusers are prepared using silver halide (Agfa 8E75 and Kodak 649F) and photopolymer (Polaroid DMP 128 and DuPont 600, 705, and 150 series) media. It is possible to control the diffusion angle in three ways: by selection of the properties of the source diffuser, by control of its subtended angle, and by selection of the holographic medium. Several conventional diffusers based on refraction or scattering of light are examined for comparison.

  7. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  8. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  9. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-09-20

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth.

  10. BEAM DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FLILLER,R.P.,IIIDREES,A.GASSNER,D.MCINTYRE,G.PEGGS,S.TRBOJEVIC,D.

    2003-05-12

    During a store, particles from the beam core continually diffuse outwards into the halo through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the diffusion rate as a function of particle amplitude can help discover which processes are important to halo growth. A collimator can be used to measure the amplitude growth rate as a function of the particle amplitude. In this paper we present results of diffusion measurements performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with fully stripped gold ions, deuterons, and protons. We compare these results with measurements from previous years, and simulations, and discuss any factors that relate to beam growth in RHIC.

  11. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  12. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  13. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  14. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  15. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  16. Gyromultiplier with sectioned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Mishakin, S. V.

    2010-11-15

    A novel scheme of a self-exciting single-cavity terahertz gyromultiplier is proposed and theoretically investigated. Simulations predict a possibility to obtain a power of 75 W at the frequency of 1.3 THz from the 80 kV/0.7 A electron beam when operating at the fourth cyclotron harmonic at the relatively low magnetic field of 14 T.

  17. Single mode cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.W.; Levy, J.L.

    1984-01-17

    This external cavity laser utilizes an unstable resonator in conjuction with a high reflectivity stripe end mirror which is oriented substantially parallel to the plane of the maximum divergence of the laser diode output beam and whose axis is substantially parallel to the plane of the junction of the laser diode. This configuration operates with high efficiency to select only the fundamental mode of the laser diode with a minimal divergence in the output beam.

  18. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  19. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  20. Effective diffusion of confined active Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Mario; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    We find theoretically the effect of confinement and thermal fluctuations, on the diffusivity of a spherical active swimmer moving inside a two-dimensional narrow cavity of general shape. The explicit formulas for the effective diffusion coefficient of a swimmer moving inside two particular cavities are presented. We also compare our analytical results with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement. L.D. thanks Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACyT) Mexico, for partial support by Grant No. 176452. M. S. thanks CONACyT and Programa de Mejoramiento de Profesorado (PROMEP) for partially funding this work under Grant No. 103.5/13/6732.

  1. Experimental investigation of a chemical-laser-cavity flowfield. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stiglich, S.W.

    1989-12-01

    Chemical lasers require a cavity that establishes and maintains the proper gas dynamic properties during lasing. The design and performance of a flow system capable of supporting the hypersonic flow conditions in a lasing cavity are described. Using cold air as the working medium, the flow control system configuration and nozzle-cavity-supersonic diffuser assembly configuration were developed to establish acceptable flow conditions in the test section. Performance evaluation was based on pressure measurements in the nozzle-cavity-diffuser assembly and schlieren photographs of the flowfield in the cavity. Flow conditions in the test section were broken up into three different regions: flow in the hypersonic nozzles, flow in the base region and flow in the cavity region. Flow in the nozzles was analyzed using one-dimensional, steady, isentropic flow theory. Test results indicated that the hypersonic nozzles performed to design specifications. The Korst two-dimensional base-pressure flow model was used to describe the flow in the nozzle exit plane and base region. Experimentally calculated Mach numbers and static pressures corresponded very closely to theoretical values. Static pressure ports and schlieren photographs were used to describe the flow-field conditions in the cavity region. Pressure measurements indicated that supersonic conditions were reached in the cavity for specific supersonic diffuser throat areas settings, but conditions were short lived. Boundary layer, frictional, and three-dimensional effects were suspected as the main contributors to the flowfield degradation.

  2. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities. PMID:25424655

  3. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  4. Heat and mass transfer in multi-porous cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Saghir, M.Z.

    1998-10-01

    The study of heat and mass transfer in porous media has a large number of applications in the areas of environmental geothermal and petroleum engineering. Problems such as the disposal of waste material and groundwater contamination are only few applications of the present work. When heat and species transfer takes place within a fluid layer, the temperature and concentration gradients create a convection mode. This phenomenon is called double-diffusive convection. In this paper, two-dimensional non-linear double diffusive convection in a multiporous cavity is considered. The Darcy equation, including Brinkman term to account for the viscous effects, is used as the momentum equation. The model consists of two rectangular cavities filled with glass beads having a diameter d{sub 1} of either 5.25 mm (Case 1) or 3.25 mm (Case 2). The smaller cavity is located at the top left corner of the larger one. The larger cavity is filled initially with hot salty fluid while the smaller one contains initially cold fresh fluid. At the initial time, the obstacle between the two cavities was released and the double diffusive phenomena were studied in details. The momentum, solutal, energy and continuity equations are solved numerically using the finite element technique. This transient problem is solved for two different Darcy numbers. For each Darcy number, the influence of the solutal Rayleigh number on double diffusive convection was studied in details. The permeability in the horizontal and vertical direction was assumed identical. A comparison of the intruding force between this case and the open flow case studied by Saghir et al. showed that it is inversely proportional to the Darcy number. Finite element modeling results indicate that salinity induces stronger convection than the thermal ones.

  5. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  6. Multicolor cavity metrology.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kiwamu; Arai, Koji; Barr, Bryan; Betzwieser, Joseph; Brooks, Aidan; Dahl, Katrin; Doravari, Suresh; Driggers, Jennifer C; Korth, W Zach; Miao, Haixing; Rollins, Jameson; Vass, Stephen; Yeaton-Massey, David; Adhikari, Rana X

    2012-10-01

    Long-baseline laser interferometers used for gravitational-wave detection have proven to be very complicated to control. In order to have sufficient sensitivity to astrophysical gravitational waves, a set of multiple coupled optical cavities comprising the interferometer must be brought into resonance with the laser field. A set of multi-input, multi-output servos then lock these cavities into place via feedback control. This procedure, known as lock acquisition, has proven to be a vexing problem and has reduced greatly the reliability and duty factor of the past generation of laser interferometers. In this article, we describe a technique for bringing the interferometer from an uncontrolled state into resonance by using harmonically related external fields to provide a deterministic hierarchical control. This technique reduces the effect of the external seismic disturbances by 4 orders of magnitude and promises to greatly enhance the stability and reliability of the current generation of gravitational-wave detectors. The possibility for using multicolor techniques to overcome current quantum and thermal noise limits is also discussed. PMID:23201656

  7. Effects of surface diffusion on high temperature selective emitters.

    PubMed

    Peykov, Daniel; Yeng, Yi Xiang; Celanovic, Ivan; Joannopoulos, John D; Schuh, Christopher A

    2015-04-20

    Using morphological and optical simulations of 1D tantalum photonic crystals at 1200K, surface diffusion was determined to gradually reduce the efficiency of selective emitters. This was attributed to shifting resonance peaks and declining emissivity caused by changes to the cavity dimensions and the aperture width. Decreasing the structure's curvature through larger periods and smaller cavity widths, as well as generating smoother transitions in curvature through the introduction of rounded cavities, was found to alleviate this degradation. An optimized structure, that shows both high efficiency selective emissivity and resistance to surface diffusion, was presented. PMID:25969039

  8. Power coupler kick of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang; E. Laxdal, R.; Zvyagintsev, V.; Yu., Chao; C., Gong; Koscielniak, S.

    2011-06-01

    The TRIUMF Injector CryoModule (ICM) adapted two superconducting single cavities as the capture section for the low injecting energy of 100 keV electrons. Coupler kick induced beam deflection and projected emittance growth are one of the prime concerns of the beam stability, especially at low energies. In low energy applications, the electron velocity changes rapidly inside the cavity, which makes the numerical analysis much more complicated. The commonly used theoretical formulas of the direct integral or the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is not suitable for the kick calculation of β < 1 electrons. Despite that, the above mentioned kick calculation method doesn't consider injecting electron energy, the beam offset due to the coupler kick may not be negligible because of the low injection energy even if the kick is optimized. Thus the beam dynamics code TRACK is used here for the simulation of the power coupler kick perturbation. The coupler kick can be compensated for by a judicious choice of the coupler position in successive cavities from upstream to downstream. The simulation shows that because of the adiabatic damping by the following superconducting 9-cell cavity, even for the worst orbit distortion case after two capture cavities, the kick is still acceptable at the exit of the ICM after reaching 10 MeV. This paper presents the analysis of the transverse kick and the projected emittance growth induced by the coupler for β < 1 electrons. The simulated results of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities are described and presented.

  9. Observation of Cavity Rydberg Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Jia, Ningyuan; Ryou, Albert; Schine, Nathan; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate hybridization of optical cavity photons with atomic Rydberg excitations using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The resulting dark state Rydberg polaritons exhibit a compressed frequency spectrum and enhanced lifetime indicating strong light-matter mixing. We study the coherence properties of cavity Rydberg polaritons and identify the generalized EIT linewidth for optical cavities. Strong collective coupling suppresses polariton losses due to inhomogeneous broadening, which we demonstrate by using different Rydberg levels with a range of polarizabilities. Our results point the way towards using cavity Rydberg polaritons as a platform for creating photonic quantum materials.

  10. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  11. Extremely Large Cusp Diamagnetic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, which is unexpected by the current MHD (or ISM) models, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash, which provides a challenge to the existing MHD (or ISM) models. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. During high solar wind pressure period on April 21, 1999, the POLAR spacecraft observed lower ion flux in the dayside high-latitude magnetosheath than that in the neighbouring cusp cavities. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity have significant global impacts on the geospace environment research and will be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in upstream ion events.

  12. Extremely large cusp diamagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T.; Siscoe, G.

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities are always there day by day. Some of the diamagnetic cavities have been observed in the morningside during intervals when the IMF By component was positive (duskward), suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity to the entire magnetopause may have significant global impacts on the geospace environment. They will possibly be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in the regions upstream of the subsolar magnetopause where energetic ion events frequently are observed.

  13. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  14. Effect of H and He Irradiation on Cavity Formation and Blistering in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    ) for a-SiC, {l_brace}001{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} for MgO, and {l_brace}110{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The bubble formation and blistering behavior of the ceramics was similar to that observed in other studies of metals irradiated at comparable homologous temperatures. Ionization-induced diffusion effects associated with dual-beam light ion irradiation appeared to exert only a weak effect on cavity and dislocation loop growth compared to the single ion irradiation conditions.

  15. Convection-Enhanced Transport into Open Cavities : Effect of Cavity Aspect Ratio.

    PubMed

    Horner, Marc; Metcalfe, Guy; Ottino, J M

    2015-09-01

    Recirculating fluid regions occur in the human body both naturally and pathologically. Diffusion is commonly considered the predominant mechanism for mass transport into a recirculating flow region. While this may be true for steady flows, one must also consider the possibility of convective fluid exchange when the outer (free stream) flow is transient. In the case of an open cavity, convective exchange occurs via the formation of lobes at the downstream attachment point of the separating streamline. Previous studies revealed the effect of forcing amplitude and frequency on material transport rates into a square cavity (Horner in J Fluid Mech 452:199-229, 2002). This paper summarizes the effect of cavity aspect ratio on exchange rates. The transport process is characterized using both computational fluid dynamics modeling and dye-advection experiments. Lagrangian analysis of the computed flow field reveals the existence of turnstile lobe transport for this class of flows. Experiments show that material exchange rates do not vary linearly as a function of the cavity aspect ratio (A = W/H). Rather, optima are predicted for A ≈ 2 and A ≈ 2.73, with a minimum occurring at A ≈ 2.5. The minimum occurs at the point where the cavity flow structure bifurcates from a single recirculating flow cell into two corner eddies. These results have significant implications for mass transport environments where the geometry of the flow domain evolves with time, such as coronary stents and growing aneurysms. Indeed, device designers may be able to take advantage of the turnstile-lobe transport mechanism to tailor deposition rates near newly implanted medical devices. PMID:26577366

  16. Mass diffusion in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, H. U.

    Dimensionless number analysis indicates that diffusion-controlled conditions with liquid samples having characteristic dimensions larger than one millimetre can only be established under microgravity conditions.Consequently, heat and mass transport properties of fluids can only be quantitatively investigated in space.Results obtained from experiments on selfdiffusion, interdiffusion and thermodiffusion carried out during the SL-1 and D-1 Spacelab missions clearly demonstrate the potential of space platforms to determine such properties with a precision unattainable on earth. These results imply also that crystal growth from solutions, vapours and melts in the diffusive regime can be realised in space only.

  17. Lateral Diffusion in an Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules in lipid bilayer membranes can be hindered by the presence of impermeable domains of gel-phase lipid or of proteins. Effective-medium theory and percolation theory are used to evaluate the effective lateral diffusion constant as a function of the area fraction of fluid-phase lipid and the permeability of the obstructions to the diffusing species. Applications include the estimation of the minimum fraction of fluid lipid needed for bacterial growth, and the enhancement of diffusion-controlled reactions by the channeling effect of solid patches of lipid. PMID:7052153

  18. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  19. Spatially-resolved spectral image of a microwave-induced plasma with Okamoto-cavity for nitridation of steel substrate.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeo; Arai, Yuuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    When a nitrogen microwave-induced plasma produced with an Okamoto-cavity was employed as a source for the nitridation of steel samples, the characteristics of the plasma were investigated by analyzing a spatially-resolved emission image of nitrogen excited species obtained with a two-dimensionally imaging spectrograph. Our previous study had reported on an excellent performance of the Okamoto-cavity microwave-induced plasma (MIP), enabling a nitrided layer having a several-micrometer-thickness to form on an iron substrate, even if the treatment is completed within 1 min, which is superior to a conventional plasma nitriding using low-pressure glow discharges requiring a prolonged treatment time. In this paper, the reason for this is discussed based on a spectrometric investigation. The emission images of band heads of nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecule ion extended toward the axial/radial directions of the plasma at larger microwave powers supplied to the MIP, thus elevating the number density of the excited species of nitrogen, which would activate any chemical reaction on the iron substrate. However, a drastic increase in the growth rate of the nitrided layer when increasing the microwave power from 600 to 700 W, which had been observed in our previous study, could not be explained only from such a variation in the excited species of nitrogen. This result is probably because the growth process is dominantly controlled by thermal diffusion of nitrogen atom after it enters into the iron substrate, where the substrate temperature is the most important parameter concerning the mobility in the iron lattice. Therefore, the Okamoto-cavity MIP could contribute to a thermal source through radiative heating as well as a source of nitrogen excited species, especially in the growth process of the nitrided layer. PMID:24521910

  20. A scanning cavity microscope.

    PubMed

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm(2); we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  1. Accessory oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneswaran, Manica Ramamoorthy; Varadarajan, Usha; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Kamatchi, Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a patient around 11 years with the complaint of extra mouth who reported to the hospital for removal of that extra mouth. On examination there was accessory oral cavity with small upper and lower lips, seven teeth and saliva was drooling out. Under general anesthesia crevicular incision from 32 to 43 was put and labial gingiva with alveolar mucosa was reflected completely and bone exposed to lower border of mandible. There were seven teeth resembling lower permanent anterior teeth in the accessory mouth, which was excised with the accessory lips. 41 extracted and osteotomy carried out extending the incision from the extracted site and osteotomy carried out. Dermoid cyst both below and above the mylohyoid muscle and rudimentary tongue found and excised and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. The wound was closed and uneventful healing noted to the satisfaction of the patient. This is a rare and interesting case which has been documented. PMID:23833508

  2. A scanning cavity microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm2; we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  3. High reflected cubic cavity as long path absorption cell for infrared gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    One direct and efficient method to improve the sensitivity of infrared gas sensors is to increase the optical path length of gas cells according to Beer-Lambert Law. In this paper, cubic shaped cavities with high reflected inner coating as novel long path absorption cells for infrared gas sensing were developed. The effective optical path length (EOPL) for a single cubic cavity and tandem cubic cavities were investigated based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measuring oxygen P11 line at 763 nm. The law of EOPL of a diffuse cubic cavity in relation with the reflectivity of the coating, the port fraction and side length of the cavity was obtained. Experimental results manifested an increase of EOPL for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of port fraction of the connecting aperture f', and the EOPL equaled to the sum of that of two single cubic cavities at f'<0.01. The EOPL spectra at infrared wavelength range for different inner coatings including high diffuse coatings and high reflected metallic thin film coatings were deduced.

  4. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E.; Norby, Richard J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-10-13

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earthmore » System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.« less

  5. Impact of Mesophyll Diffusion on Estimated Global Land CO2 Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Gu, L.; Dickinson, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earth System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.

  6. Between Scylla and Charybdis: Hydrophobic Graphene-Guided Water Diffusion on Hydrophilic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Bae Ho; Bukhvalov, Danil; Son, Young-Woo; Yoon, Duhee; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Yun, Jun-Nyeong; Jung, Yousung; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    The structure of water confined in nanometer-sized cavities is important because, at this scale, a large fraction of hydrogen bonds can be perturbed by interaction with the confining walls. Unusual fluidity properties can thus be expected in the narrow pores, leading to new phenomena like the enhanced fluidity reported in carbon nanotubes. Crystalline mica and amorphous silicon dioxide are hydrophilic substrates that strongly adsorb water. Graphene, on the other hand, interacts weakly with water. This presents the question as to what determines the structure and diffusivity of water when intercalated between hydrophilic substrates and hydrophobic graphene. Using atomic force microscopy, we have found that while the hydrophilic substrates determine the structure of water near its surface, graphene guides its diffusion, favouring growth of intercalated water domains along the C-C bond zigzag direction. Molecular dynamics and density functional calculations are provided to help understand the highly anisotropic water stripe patterns observed. PMID:23896759

  7. FORWARD MODELING CAVITY DENSITY: A MULTI-INSTRUMENT DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, D. J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2011-05-20

    The thermodynamic properties of coronal prominence cavities present a unique probe into the energy and mass budget of prominences. Using a three-dimensional morphological model, we forward model the polarization brightness and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) emission of a cavity and its surrounding streamer. Using a genetic algorithm, we find the best-fit density model by comparing the models to Mauna Loa Solar Observatory MK4 and Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer data. The effect of temperature variations on the derived density is also measured. We have measured the density inside a cavity down to 1.05 R{sub sun} with height-dependent error bars. Our forward modeling technique compensates for optically thin projection effects. This method provides a complementary technique to traditional line ratio diagnostics that is useful for diffuse off-limb coronal structures.

  8. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  9. Trislot-cavity microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flush-mountable assembly composed of disk radiator sandwiched between planes of metal-clad dielectric board has greater bandwidths and beamwidths than simple disk antenna. Conducting planes connect so that disk is enclosed in cavity with Y-shaped slot in top plane. Cavity is excited by microwave energy from disk and radiates from trislot aperature.

  10. [Evaluation of vitamin B6 and calcium pantothenate effectiveness on hair growth from clinical and trichographic aspects for treatment of diffuse alopecia in women].

    PubMed

    Brzezińska-Wcisło, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was the clinical and trichological examination (trichogram and hair loss evaluation) conducted comparatively before and after the treatment in 46 women between pubescence and 30 years of age who had symptoms of diffuse alopecia. Calcium pantothenate was administered twice a day orally in doses 100 mg for 4-5 months. Vitamin B6 was injected every day (i ampoule intramusculary) for the period of 20 to 30 days and repeated again after 6 month. On the basis of clinical and trichological studies it was revealed that vitamin B6 administered parenterally for a period of several weeks induces improvement in the hair condition in a number of women and it reduces the hair loss especially in alopecia of telogenic patomechanism. Whereas calcium pantothenate in feminine diffuse alopecia did not show clearly the positive effect. PMID:11344694

  11. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  12. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  13. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  14. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  15. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  16. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  17. LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

    2014-11-11

    An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

  18. Gigahertz Modulation of a Photonic Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aaron Karim Taylor

    Photonic crystal (PtC) cavities are an increasingly important way to create all optical methods to control optical data. Not only must the data be controlled, but interfacing it with high frequency electrical signals is particularly interesting especially if this occurs in the 1.55microm telecom band. We present an experiment that uses Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to modulate the frequency of the guided mode of an L3-cavity PtC created on a silicon slab. This work has the potential to interface optical and electrical signals via a mechanical strain wave operating at gigahertz frequencies. Defects are carefully designed into a triangular lattice PtC to realize a waveguide coupled optical cavity. The cavity can be experimentally accessed through grating couplers excited by polarized light at 10° incidence from normal. The optical components are fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator platform, with light confined to the silicon slab region. Through transmission experiments, the L3 cavity was found to have a narrow resonance characterized by a Lorentzian distribution. A quality factor of 165 centered at 6255cm --1 (1.599microm) was measured. Aluminum interdigitated transducers (IDTs) were fabricated through a lithography liftoff process. Their ability to create SAWs requires a piezoelectric medium. As silicon does not have this property, growth of a thin ZnO film was required. The transducers were measured using a network analyzer and were found to produce Rayleigh SAWs at a frequency of 179MHz and a wavelength of 24microm. The acoustic energy traveled 70microm to the target optical device. The L3 cavity has dimensions of around 4microm a side - less than 1/2 a SAW wavelength. Modulation of the L3 PtC resonant frequency was monitored through a repeat of the transmission experiment but with RF excitation of the IDTs at the SAW frequency. A broadening of the transmission spectrum was expected. Unfortunately no change in the fitting parameters could be measured

  19. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    PubMed Central

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka³a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20–30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O’Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca2+, Pi, Na+, Cl−, total protein, albumins, F− and Sr2+ were determined. Results The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca2+ (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K+ (P<.04), Sr2+ (P<.03), Na+ (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Conclusion Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters. PMID:19212491

  20. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  1. Emissivity of isothermal spherical cavity with gray lambertian walls.

    PubMed

    Nicodemus, F E

    1968-07-01

    An exact expression for the emissivity of an ideally diffuse, gray, isothermal, spherical cavity is derived directly, making no geometrical approximations, and is shown to agree with the results of DeVos, Gouffé, and Sparrow and Jonsson, as compared by Fecteau. It appears that, even under ideal conditions, the spherical configuration is the only one that will have uniform isotropic emissivity over a wide angle, approaching a full hemisphere, across the entire aperture. PMID:20068803

  2. Sucrose diffusion in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Price, Hannah C; Mattsson, Johan; Murray, Benjamin J

    2016-07-28

    The diffusion of sugar in aqueous solution is important both in nature and in technological applications, yet measurements of diffusion coefficients at low water content are scarce. We report directly measured sucrose diffusion coefficients in aqueous solution. Our technique utilises a Raman isotope tracer method to monitor the diffusion of non-deuterated and deuterated sucrose across a boundary between the two aqueous solutions. At a water activity of 0.4 (equivalent to 90 wt% sucrose) at room temperature, the diffusion coefficient of sucrose was determined to be approximately four orders of magnitude smaller than that of water in the same material. Using literature viscosity data, we show that, although inappropriate for the prediction of water diffusion, the Stokes-Einstein equation works well for predicting sucrose diffusion under the conditions studied. As well as providing information of importance to the fundamental understanding of diffusion in binary solutions, these data have technological, pharmaceutical and medical implications, for example in cryopreservation. Moreover, in the atmosphere, slow organic diffusion may have important implications for aerosol growth, chemistry and evaporation, where processes may be limited by the inability of a molecule to diffuse between the bulk and the surface of a particle. PMID:27364512

  3. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  4. Counterion Diffusion in Ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Russell; Winey, Karen; Kim, Joon-Seop; Composto, Russell

    2004-03-01

    Diffusion of Cs counterions to the air/ionomer film interface is followed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and results compared with the "sticky reptation" model[1]. The ionomer system is poly(styrene-ran-methacrylic acid) (Cs-SMAA) neutralized at 100% by Cs. The concentration profiles exhibit a surface excess, z*, of Cs followed by a depletion of Cs. The z* and depletion layer thickness grow as t1/2, consistent with diffusion limited growth. Annealing studies at 130 °C, 145 °C and 208 °C were used to extract the diffusion coefficient, D. In all cases, D is greater than that of the matrix chains. These results suggest that the diffusion rate is controlled by the fraction of counterions that disassociate from the acid groups and migrate through the matrix. Moreover, the "sticky reptation" model doesn't appear to predict the diffusion behavior in the Cs-SMAA system. [1] Leibler, L, Ludwick, L., Rubinstein, M., Colby, R.H., Macromolecules 24 (1991) 4701.

  5. Preliminary Experience with ''In-Site'' Baking of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    P. Kneisel

    2000-01-01

    In a series of experiments several single cell and multi-cell niobium cavities made from reactor grade and high RRR niobium (frequencies were 700 MHz, 1300 MHz and 1497 MHz) have been baked--after initial testing--in-situ around 145 C for up to 90 hours prior to being recooled. Surprisingly, all cavities showed significant improvements in Q-values between 4.2 and 1.6K. The BCS surface resistance was lowered by nearly a factor of two. This cannot be explained by solely a reduction of dielectric losses caused by adsorbates at the surface or by a decrease of the mean free path due to possibly diffusion of oxygen into the surface layer. In several experiments also the high field behavior of the cavity improved after the in-situ baking procedure. The observed effect opens the possibility for the CEBAF upgrade cavities, which in turn will permit to run the cavities at higher gradients if field emission loading can be prevented. Utilizing this effect can possibly translate into sizeable cost savings since fewer modules are needed for the upgrade program.

  6. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  7. Progressive cavity pump

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.W.

    1989-04-04

    A progressive cavity pump is described, comprising: a first housing portion defining an inlet; a second housing portion attachable to the first housing portion and defining an outlet; a substantially elastomeric stator comprising an outer portion removably attached to the first and second housing portions, having a first end and a second end spaced from the first end, an inner portion defining a pumping chamber and spaced an annular end portion interconnecting the first ends of the outer and inner portions; a rotor disposed in the inner portion of the stator and extending through the pumping chamber for pumping fluid from the inlet to the outlet in response to rotation of the rotor; and an elongated member disposed in the housing portions and generally annularly between the inner and outer portions of the stator and longitudinally between the annular end portion of the stator and a portion of the second housing portion, the member being removable from the housing portions and separable from the stator.

  8. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  9. Devil's staircase in an optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Dhayalan, Yuvaraj; Buks, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEOs) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. While the phase of SEOs randomly diffuses in time when the laser power injected into the cavity is kept constant, phase locking may occur when the laser power is periodically modulated in time. We investigate the dependence of phase locking on the amplitude and frequency of the laser-power modulation. We find that phase locking can be induced with a relatively low modulation amplitude provided that the ratio between the modulation frequency and the frequency of SEOs is tuned close to a rational number of relatively low hierarchy in the Farey tree. To account for the experimental results, a one-dimensional map, which allows evaluating the time evolution of the phase of SEOs, is theoretically derived. By calculating the winding number of the one-dimensional map, the regions of phase locking can be mapped in the plane of modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. Comparison between the theoretical predictions and the experimental findings yields a partial agreement.

  10. Novel Crab Cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Sah, R.; Rimmer, B.; Wang, H.

    2011-03-01

    A 20-50 MV integrated transverse voltage is required for the Electron-Ion Collider. The most promising of the crab cavity designs that have been proposed in the last five years are the TEM type crab cavities because of the higher transverse impedance. The TEM design approach is extended here to a hybrid crab cavity that includes the input power coupler as an integral part of the design. A prototype was built with Phase I monies and tested at JLAB. The results reported on, and a system for achieving 20-50 MV is proposed.

  11. Call for Papers: Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, W.; Gerard, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    Cavity QED interactions of light and matter have been investigated in a wide range of systems covering the spectrum from microwaves to optical frequencies, using media as diverse as single atoms and semiconductors. Impressive progress has been achieved technologically as well as conceptually. This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is intended to provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of cavity QED by uniting contributions from researchers active across this field. As Guest Editors of this topical issue, we invite manuscripts on current theoretical and experimental work on any aspects of cavity QED. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletCavity QED in optical microcavities bulletSemiconductor cavity QED bulletQuantum dot cavity QED bulletRydberg atoms in microwave cavities bulletPhotonic crystal cavity QED bulletMicrosphere resonators bulletMicrolasers and micromasers bulletMicrodroplets bulletDielectric cavity QED bulletCavity QED-based quantum information processing bulletQuantum state engineering in cavities The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the

  12. A Comprehensive study of Cavities on the Sun: Structure, Formation, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Nishu; Zhang, Jie; Pesnell, William D.

    2016-05-01

    pole. The long life of cavities was due to continuous and sustained adding of trailing flux from multiple active regions as their remnants diffused toward the pole.

  13. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  14. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  15. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control. PMID:27521039

  16. In-situ imaging of creep cavities by synchrotron microradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbyn, R.C.; Fields, R.J. ); Farris, J.; Harlow, D.G.; Delph, T.J. )

    1989-05-01

    The long term, high temperature failure mechanism for most polycrystalline metals and ceramics is creep cavitation. Small voids or cavities have been observed to nucleate and grow on stressed grain boundaries. Eventually, so many of the boundaries are covered by cavities that fracture occurs. Many theories have been proposed to predict the details of cavity nucleation and growth and this is still an area of current theoretical interest. Experiments designed to evaluate these theories have mainly compared predicted times-to-fracture with those observed in traditional polycrystalline creep specimens. One interesting approach compared the density change in specimens from interrupted tests with that predicted from theory. There have often been large discrepancies among the various theories and the above observations. More recently cryogenic fracturing followed by scanning electron microscopy, small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and quantitative metallographic image analysis coupled with appropriate stereology have been used to follow the size distribution development in time. There are more direct means of evaluating the theories of cavity nucleation and growth than comparison with time-to-fracture. Most of the experiments have been performed on polycrystals while the theories can most readily be applied to a single boundary. The stress acting on a particular grain boundary in a polycrystal is, in general, not known due to grain boundary sliding and load shedding. To address this problem, copper bicrysatl experiments have been performed in the presented research. While this approach permits evaluation of the stress dependence of the times-to-fracture, it has now proven to be easy to study the cavity growth rate or spacial distribution on the boundary. The authors have now overcome this drawback by imaging individual cavities in-situ using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (SR) microradiography.

  17. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  18. Characteristics of Turbulent Flow Past Passive Rectangular Cavity at Large Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhil Kumar, Perumal Kumaresan; Mishra, Debi Prasad

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, turbulent flow past passive rectangular cavity is investigated numerically for four mainstream Reynolds numbers namely Re ms = 20,000-50,000. Validation study reveals that the numerical models used in the present investigation predicts the data close to the existing experimental results. Further attempts are made to bring out the flow structure in terms of velocity profile, velocity gradients, shear layer growth rate, and turbulence characteristics. Numerical results are analyzed to bring out the variation in the velocity profile at different axial locations within the cavity. Also, the velocity gradient, turbulence level at the shear layer and the reverse flow velocity in the cavity are found to be sensitive to the mainstream Reynolds number. Finally, the cavity drag is estimated and its relation to the pressure drop across the cavity is brought out. These results reveal the nature of interaction between the passive cavity flow and mainstream flow.

  19. Growth of tantalum nitride film as a Cu diffusion barrier by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition from bis((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)(methyl)amido)methyl(tert-butylimido)tantalum complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Hyo Yeon; Lee, Sang Chan; Kim, Da Hye; Park, Bo Keun; Park, Jin-Seong; Jeon, Dong Ju; Chung, Taek-Mo; Kim, Chang Gyoun

    2016-01-01

    A new bis((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)(methyl)amido)methyl(tert-butylimido)tantalum complex was synthesized for plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of tantalum nitride (TaN) film. Using the synthesized Ta compound, PEALD of TaN was conducted at growth temperatures of 150-250 °C in combination with NH3 plasma. The TaN PEALD showed a saturated growth rate of 0.062 nm/cycle and a high film density of 9.1-10.3 g/cm3 at 200-250 °C. Auger depth profiling revealed that the deposited TaN film contained low carbon and oxygen impurity levels of approximately 3-4%. N-rich amorphous TaN films were grown at all growth temperatures and showed highly resistive characteristic. The Cu barrier performance of the TaN film was evaluated by annealing of Cu/TaN (0-6 nm)/Si stacks at 400-800 °C, and excellent Cu diffusion barrier properties were observed even with ultrathin 2 nm-thick TaN film.

  20. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  1. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  2. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  3. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed. PMID:19391727

  4. Numerical and experimental study on flame structure characteristics in a supersonic combustor with dual-cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Zhenguo; Sun, Mingbo; Wang, Hongbo; Li, Li

    2015-12-01

    Combined numerical and experimental approaches have been implemented to investigate the quasi-steady flame characteristics of supersonic combustion in tandem and parallel dual-cavity. In simulation, a hybrid Large Eddy Simulation (LES)/assumed sub-grid Probability Density Function (PDF) closure model was carried out. Comparison of calculation and experiment as well as comparison of the two configurations are qualitatively and quantitatively performed regarding the flame structure and other flowfield features. Simulation shows a good level of agreement with experimental observation and measurement in terms of instantaneous and time-averaged results. Given the same fuel equivalence ratio, the parallel dual-cavity with the two opposite injections gathers the major combustion around the cavities, thus leading to the concentrated heat release, the greatly extended recirculation zones and the converging-diverging core flow path. Only intermittent stray flame packets can be found in the downstream region. Flame in the combustor with tandem dual-cavity appears to be stabilized by the upstream cavity shear layer and grows gradually to the second cavity, peaking its most intensity in the middle section between the two cavities. For both dual-cavity configurations, the strongest reaction takes place in near chemistry stoichiometric region around the flame edge, and is mainly confined in the supersonic region supported by the inner subsonic combustion. The coexistence of three parts plays a vital role in flame stabilization in the parallel and tandem dual-cavity: a reacting reservoir transferring hot products and activated radicals within the cavity recirculation zone, the hydrogen-rich premixed flame in the jet mixing region, and the downstream diffusion flames supported by the upstream premixed combustion region. In addition, for the parallel dual-cavity under the given condition, significant reaction are present near jet exit upstream the cavity leading edge.

  5. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Pontes, Flavia Sirotheau Correa; Miyahara, Ligia Akiko Ninokata; Guerreiro, Marcella Yasmin Reis; de Almeida, Maria Clara Lopes; Pontes, Helder Antonio Rebelo; Pinto, Decio Dos Santos

    2016-09-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are extremely rare events, representing less than 1% of all malignant oral tumors. Renal cell carcinoma constitutes about 3% of solid tumors in adults, and it is the most frequent kidney neoplasm, representing about 90% of kidney malignancies. Due to the silent growth of this neoplasm, most patients have no symptoms and the diagnosis is belated, usually after metastases. The present study reports an additional patient of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the oral cavity regarding the clinical and pathologic features. PMID:27607131

  6. Probing Water Density and Dynamics in the Chaperonin GroEL Cavity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent binding of the chaperonin GroEL to its cofactor GroES forms a cavity in which encapsulated substrate proteins can fold in isolation from bulk solution. It has been suggested that folding in the cavity may differ from that in bulk solution owing to steric confinement, interactions with the cavity walls, and differences between the properties of cavity-confined and bulk water. However, experimental data regarding the cavity-confined water are lacking. Here, we report measurements of water density and diffusion dynamics in the vicinity of a spin label attached to a cysteine in the Tyr71 → Cys GroES mutant obtained using two magnetic resonance techniques: electron-spin echo envelope modulation and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. Residue 71 in GroES is fully exposed to bulk water in free GroES and to confined water within the cavity of the GroEL–GroES complex. Our data show that water density and translational dynamics in the vicinity of the label do not change upon complex formation, thus indicating that bulk water-exposed and cavity-confined GroES surface water share similar properties. Interestingly, the diffusion dynamics of water near the GroES surface are found to be unusually fast relative to other protein surfaces studied. The implications of these findings for chaperonin-assisted folding mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24888581

  7. The relationship between transplacental O2 diffusion and placental expression of PlGF, VEGF and their receptors in a placental insufficiency model of fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Regnault, Timothy R H; de Vrijer, Barbra; Galan, Henry L; Davidsen, Meredith L; Trembler, Karen A; Battaglia, Frederick C; Wilkening, Randall B; Anthony, Russell V

    2003-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in placental angiogenesis through interactions with the VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 receptors. The placenta of pregnancies whose outcome is fetal growth restriction (FGR) are characterized by abnormal angiogenic development, classically associated with hypoxia. The present study evaluated the near-term expression of this growth factor family in an ovine model of placental insufficiency–FGR, in relationship to uteroplacental oxygenation. Compared to controls, FGR pregnancies demonstrated a 37 % increase in uterine blood flow (FGR vs. control, 610.86 ± 48.48 vs. 443.17 ± 37.39 ml min−1 (kg fetus)−1; P < 0.04), which was associated with an increased maternal uterine venous PO2 (58.13 ± 1.00 vs. 52.89 ± 1.26 mmHg; P < 0.02), increased umbilical artery systolic/diastolic ratio (3.90 ± 0.33 vs. 2.12 ± 0.26, P < 0.05), and fetal hypoxia (arterial PO2; 12.79 ± 0.97 vs. 18.65 ± 1.6 mmHg, P < 0.005). Maternal caruncle PlGF mRNA was increased in FGR (P < 0.02), while fetal cotyledon VEGF mRNA was reduced (P < 0.02). VEGFR-1 mRNA was also reduced in FGR fetal cotyledon (P < 0.001) but was not altered in caruncle tissue. Immunoblot analysis of PlGF and VEGF demonstrated single bands at 19 000 and 18 600 Mr, respectively. Caruncle PlGF concentration was increased (P < 0.04), while cotyledon VEGF was decreased (P < 0.05) in FGR placentae. The data establish that uterine blood flow is not reduced in relationship to metabolic demands in this FGR model and that the transplacental PO2 gradient is increased, maintaining umbilical oxygen uptake per unit of tissue. Furthermore, these data suggest that an increased transplacental gradient of oxygen generates changes in angiogenic growth factors, which may underline the pathophysiology of the post-placental hypoxic FGR. PMID:12740423

  8. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  9. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  10. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exosomes Suppress Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth in a Rat Model: Apparent Diffusion Coefficient, Natural Killer T-Cell Responses, and Histopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Yip, Hon-Kan; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Lee, Chen-Chang; Lee, Chia-Chang; Huang, Chung-Cheng; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Jui-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the effects of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) exosomes on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), natural killer T-cell (NKT-cell) responses, and histopathological features. ADMSC-derived exosomes appeared as nanoparticles (30–90 nm) on electron microscopy and were positive for CD63, tumor susceptibility gene-101, and β-catenin on western blotting. The control (n = 8) and exosome-treated (n = 8) rats with N1S1-induced HCC underwent baseline and posttreatment day 10 and day 20 magnetic resonance imaging and measurement of ADC. Magnetic resonance imaging showed rapidly enlarged HCCs with low ADCs in the controls. The exosome-treated rats showed partial but nonsignificant tumor reduction, and significant ADC and ADC ratio increases on day 10. On day 20, the exosome-treated rats harbored significantly smaller tumors and volume ratios, higher ADC and ADC ratios, more circulating and intratumoral NKT-cells, and low-grade HCC (P < 0.05 for all comparisons) compared to the controls. The ADC and volume ratios exhibited significant inverse correlations (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.679). ADMSC-derived exosomes promoted NKT-cell antitumor responses in rats, thereby facilitating HCC suppression, early ADC increase, and low-grade tumor differentiation. ADC may be an early biomarker of treatment response. PMID:26345219

  11. Coupling of an overdriven cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Garbin, H.D.

    1993-11-01

    It is well known that when a nuclear test is conducted in a sufficiently large cavity, the resulting seismic signal is sharply reduced when compared to a normal tamped event. Cavity explosions are of interest in the seismic verification community because of this possibility of reducing the seismic energy generated which can lower signal amplitudes and make detection difficult. Reduced amplitudes would also lower seismic yield estimates which has implications in a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT). In the past several years, there have been a number of nuclear tests at NTS (Nevada Test Site) inside hemispherical cavities. Two such tests were MILL YARD and MISTY ECHO which had instrumentation at the surface and in the free-field. These two tests differ in one important aspect. MILL YARD was completely decoupled i.e., the cavity wall behaved in an elastic manner. It was estimated that MILL YARD`s ground motion was reduced by a factor of at least 70. In contrast, MISTY ECHO was detonated in a hemispherical cavity with the same dimensions as MILL YARD, but with a much larger device yield. This caused an inelastic behavior on the wall and the explosion was not fully decoupled.

  12. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Bousson, Sebastien; Duthil, Patxi; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  13. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Olivier, Gilles; Renard, Bertrand; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  14. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousson, Sebastien; Darve, Christine; Duthil, Patxi; Elias, Nuno; Molloy, Steve; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  15. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Renard, Bertrand; Olivier, Gilles; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  16. Cavity optomechanics and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Mishkatul

    2009-05-01

    Cavity optomechanics is an emerging field at the intersection of quantum optics, atomic physics, nanoscience and gravitational wave interferometry. It involves cavities (with one or more mechanical degrees of freedom) driven by laser radiation. The ensuing optical control of macroscopic mechanical motion may have implications for precision sensing, coherent control of atoms and molecules, and quantum information processing. Due to recent innovations optomechanical physics has been realized in a variety of experimental systems spanning many orders of magnitude in mass and time-scales. In this talk, I will first introduce the basic paradigm of a laser-driven two mirror cavity used for cooling a vibrational mode. A three-mirror configuration recently implemented using a partially transmissive dielectric membrane in a high finesse cavity will then be discussed, and shown to be superior to the two-mirror design in a number of ways. One implication of the three-mirror configuration is the possibility of scaling optomechanical techniques to multiple oscillators. This topic will be explored by analysing the case of two membranes in a cavity where it will be shown that the collective(center-of-mass and breathing) modes of vibration can be cooled independently, analogous to a chain of trapped ions. Finally, future directions for possible applications to the control of atoms and molecules will be indicated briefly.

  17. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Reponen, M; Moore, I D; Pohjalainen, I; Rothe, S; Savonen, M; Sonnenschein, V; Voss, A

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary (107)Ag(21+) ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z (94)Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined. PMID:26724021

  18. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D. Pohjalainen, I.; Savonen, M.; Voss, A.; Rothe, S.; Sonnenschein, V.

    2015-12-15

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary {sup 107}Ag{sup 21+} ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z {sup 94}Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  19. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rothe, S.; Savonen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A.

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary 107Ag21+ ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z 94Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  20. Measurements of planing forces and cavity shapes on cylindrical afterbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellum, Aren; Belden, Jesse; Beal, David; Huyer, Stephen; Henoch, Charles; Hrubes, Dana

    2015-11-01

    Supercavitation is a drag reduction technique by which an underwater body is enclosed over a significant portion of its length in a bubble of gas. Hydrodynamic forces act on the body only through contact with the nose and a planing section at the rear. Models of the planing forces typically assume that the body is placed into a cavity which is unchanged by the presence of the body, and the present study was designed to test the validity of this assumption. Measurements were taken of the planing forces for five afterbody lengths over a range of angles concurrently with photographs showing the size and shape of the cavity produced. These observations reveal that the cavity form and growth rate are significantly affected by both the length and angle of attack of the body; the length of the cavity shrinks at the same angle of attack as the body length is reduced past a critical threshold, suggesting a hydrodynamic interaction between the afterbody trailing edge and the cavity. Additionally, the planing forces demonstrate a non-monotonic dependence on attack angle that is not readily explained by existing models, specifically a ``lift crisis'' for short bodies in which the planing lift goes to zero over a range from -1 to -3 degrees.

  1. Phoxonic crystals and cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; El-Jallal, Said; Pennec, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Phoxonic crystals are dual phononic/photonic crystals exhibiting simultaneously band gaps for both types of excitations. Therefore, they have the ability to confine phonons and photons in the same cavity and in turn allow the enhancement of their interaction. In this paper, we review some of our theoretical works on cavity optomechanical interactions in different types of phoxonic crystals, including two-dimensional, slab, and nanobeam structures. Two mechanisms are behind the phonon-photon interaction, namely the photoelastic and the moving interface effects. Coupling rates of a few MHz are obtained with high-frequency phonons of a few GHz. Finally, we give some preliminary results about the optomechanical interaction when a metallic nanoparticle is introduced into the cavity, giving rise to coupled photon-plasmon modes or, in the case of very small particles, to an enhancement of the electric field at the position of the particle. xml:lang="fr"

  2. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  3. Experimental cavity pressure distributions at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to define pressure distributions for rectangular cavities over a range of free-stream Mach numbers and cavity dimensions. These pressure distributions together with schlieren photographs are used to define the critical values of cavity length-to-depth ratio that separate open type cavity flows from closed type cavity flows. For closed type cavity flow, the shear layer expands over the cavity leading edge and impinges on the cavity floor, whereas for open type cavity flow, the shear layer bridges the cavity. The tests were conducted by using a flat-plate model permitting the cavity length to be remotely varied from 0.5 to 12 in. Cavity depths and widths were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 in. The flat-plate boundary layer approaching the cavity was turbulent and had a thickness of approximately 0.2 in. at the cavity front face for the range of test Mach numbers from 1.5 to 2.86. Presented are a discussion of the results and a complete tabulation of the experimental data.

  4. Quantum diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, S.

    1994-10-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ``quantum diffusion`` terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source.

  5. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  6. Diffuse interstellar bands in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, O.; Henning, Thomas; Pfau, Werner; Stognienko, R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code for radiation transport calculations is used to compare the profiles of the lambda lambda 5780 and 6613 Angstrom diffuse interstellar bands in the transmitted and the reflected light of a star embedded within an optically thin dust cloud. In addition, the behavior of polarization across the bands were calculated. The wavelength dependent complex indices of refraction across the bands were derived from the embedded cavity model. In view of the existence of different families of diffuse interstellar bands the question of other parameters of influence is addressed in short.

  7. Progress on a Be Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Palmer, R.; Stratakis, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-12-24

    Previous RF experiments with normal-conducting cavities have demonstrated that there is a significant degradation in maximum gradient when the cavity is subjected to a strong axial magnetic field. We have developed a model suggesting that a cavity with beryllium walls may perform better than copper cavities. In this paper we outline the issues that led us to propose fabricating a Be-wall cavity. We also discuss a concept for fabricating such a cavity and mention some of the manufacturing issues we expect to face.

  8. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  9. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  10. Water vapor permeabilities through polymers: diffusivities from experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seethamraju, Sindhu; Chandrashekarapura Ramamurthy, Praveen; Madras, Giridhar

    2014-09-01

    This study experimentally determines water vapor permeabilities, which are subsequently correlated with the diffusivities obtained from simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for determining the diffusion of water vapor in various polymeric systems such as polyethylene, polypropylene, poly (vinyl alcohol), poly (vinyl acetate), poly (vinyl butyral), poly (vinylidene chloride), poly (vinyl chloride) and poly (methyl methacrylate). Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) based methodology has been used to determine the water vapor transmission rates. These values were then used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for water vapor through these polymers. A comparative analysis is provided for diffusivities calculated from CRDS and MD based results by correlating the free volumes.

  11. A hot cavity laser ion source at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Kessler, T.; Moore, I. D.; Rothe, S.; Äystö, J.

    2009-12-01

    A development program is underway at the IGISOL (Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line) facility, University of Jyväskylä, to efficiently and selectively produce low-energy radioactive ion beams of silver isotopes and isomers, with a particular interest in N = Z 94Ag . A hot cavity ion source has been installed, based on the FEBIAD (Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge) technique, combined with a titanium:sapphire laser system for selective laser ionization. The silver recoils produced via the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reaction, 40Ca(58Ni, p3n)94Ag , are stopped in a graphite catcher, diffused, extracted and subsequently ionized using a three-step laser ionization scheme. The performance of the different components of the hot cavity laser ion source is discussed and initial results using stable 107, 109Ag are presented.

  12. Cavity-QED enhancement of fluorescence yields in microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    Measurements of the integrated fluorescence yield of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in levitated microdroplets (4 to 16 {mu}m diameter) display a size dependence which is attributed to a decreased probability per excitation cycle of photochemical bleaching as a result of cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates. The average number of fluorescence photons detected per molecule in 4 {mu}m droplets (where emission rate enhancement has been previously demonstrated) is shown to be approximately a factor of 2 larger than the yield measured for larger droplets where emission rate enhancement does not occur. Within some simple approximations, these results suggest that essentially no emission rate inhibition occurs in this system. A mechanism based on spectral diffusion is postulated for the apparent absence of cavity-inhibited emission and is illustrated by Monte Carlo calculations using time-dependent lineshape functions.

  13. Large-mode enhancement cavities.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Henning; Holzberger, Simon; Kaster, Jan; Weitenberg, Johannes; Pervak, Volodymyr; Apolonski, Alexander; Fill, Ernst; Krausz, Ferenc; Pupeza, Ioachim

    2013-05-01

    In passive enhancement cavities the achievable power level is limited by mirror damage. Here, we address the design of robust optical resonators with large spot sizes on all mirrors, a measure that promises to mitigate this limitation by decreasing both the intensity and the thermal gradient on the mirror surfaces. We introduce a misalignment sensitivity metric to evaluate the robustness of resonator designs. We identify the standard bow-tie resonator operated close to the inner stability edge as the most robust large-mode cavity and implement this cavity with two spherical mirrors with 600 mm radius of curvature, two plane mirrors and a round trip length of 1.2 m, demonstrating a stable power enhancement of near-infrared laser light by a factor of 2000. Beam radii of 5.7 mm × 2.6 mm (sagittal × tangential 1/e(2) intensity radius) on all mirrors are obtained. We propose a simple all-reflective ellipticity compensation scheme. This will enable a significant increase of the attainable power and intensity levels in enhancement cavities. PMID:23670017

  14. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  15. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  16. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  17. ADPF spoke cavity cryomodule concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J. P.; Roybal, P. L.; La Fave, R. P.; Waynert, J. A.; Schrage, D. L.; Schmierer, E. N.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Garnett, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Driven Test Facility (ADTF) is being developed as a reactor concepts test bed for transmutation of nuclear waste. A 13.3 mA continuous-wave (CW) proton beam will be accelerated to 600 MeV and impinged on a spallation target. The subsequent neutron shower is used to create a nuclear reaction within a subcritical assembly of waste material that reduces the waste half-life from the order of 10{sup 5} years to 10{sup 2} years. Additionally, significant energy is produced that can be used to generate electrical power. The ADTF proton accelerator consists of room-temperature (RT) structures that accelerate the beam to 6.7-MeV and superconducting (SC) elements that boost the beam's energy to 600-MeV. Traditional SC elliptical cavities experience structural difficulties at low energies due to their geometry. Therefore, stiff-structured SC spoke cavities have been adopted for the energy range between 6.7 and 109 MeV. Elliptical cavities are used at the higher energies. This paper describes a multi-spoke-cavity cryomodule concept for ADTF.

  18. Nanobeam cavities for Reconfigurable Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deotare, Parag B.

    We investigate the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, with theoretical quality factors of 1.4 x 107 in silicon, operating at ˜ 1550 nm. By detecting the cross-polarized resonantly scattered light from a normally incident laser beam, we measure a quality factor of nearly 7.5 x 105. We show on-chip integration of the cavities using waveguides and an inverse taper geometry based mode size converters, and also demonstrate tuning of the optical resonance using thermo-optic effect. We also study coupled cavities and show that the single nanobeam cavity modes are coupled into even and odd superposition modes. Using electrostatic force and taking advantage of the highly dispersive nature of the even mode to the nanobeam separation, we demonstrate dynamically reconfigurable optical filters tunable continuously and reversibly over a 9.5 nm wavelength range. The electrostatic force, obtained by applying bias voltages directly to the nanobeams, is used to control the spacing between the nanobeams, which in turn results in tuning of the cavity resonance. The observed tuning trends were confirmed through simulations that modeled the electrostatic actuation as well as the optical resonances in our reconfigurable geometries. Finally we demonstrate reconfiguration of coupled cavities by using optical gradient force induced mechanical actuation. Propagating waveguide modes that exist over wide wavelength range are used to actuate the structures and in that way control the resonance of a localized cavity mode. Using this all-optical approach, more than 18 linewidths of tuning range is demonstrated. Using an on-chip temperature self-referencing method that we developed, we determined that 20% of the total tuning was due to optomechanical reconfiguration and the rest due to thermo-optic effects. By operating the device at frequencies higher than the thermal cut-off, we show high speed operation dominated by

  19. Extinction measurement with open-path cavity ring-down technique of variable cavity length.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao; Li, Bincheng; Han, Yanling; Wang, Jing; Gao, Chunming; Wang, Yafei

    2016-06-13

    Open-path cavity ring down (OPCRD) technique with variable cavity length was developed to measure optical extinction including scattering and absorption of air in laboratory environment at 635 nm wavelength. By moving the rear cavity mirror of the ring-down cavity to change cavity length, ring-down time with different cavity lengths was experimentally obtained and the dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length was determined. The extinction coefficient of air was determined by the slope of linear dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length. The extinction coefficients of air with different particle concentrations at 635 nm wavelength were measured to be from 10.46 to 84.19 Mm-1 (ppm/m) in a normal laboratory environment. This variable-cavity-length OPCRD technique can be used for absolute extinction measurement and real-time environmental monitoring without closed-path sample cells and background measurements. PMID:27410351

  20. Measuring Thermal Diffusivity of Molten Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R.; Holland, L.; Taylor, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity of molten and solid mercury cadmium telluride measured with aid of new apparatus. Knowledge gained from such measurements help efforts to grow high-quality single crystals of this semiconductor for use in infrared detectors: Without knowledge of thermal diffusivity, difficult to control growth rate of solid from molten material.

  1. Cavity Alighment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Frisch, J.; Hacker, K.E.; Jones, R.M.; McCormick, D.; O'Connell, C.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.; Baboi, N.; Wendt, M.; /DESY

    2005-07-06

    Each nine cell superconducting (SC) accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY [1] has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power [2]. They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and tested a time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present a preliminary experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  2. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Pozina, G.; Jmerik, V. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Hemmingsson, C.; Andrianov, A. V.; Kazanov, D. R.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large ’ripened’ crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies.

  3. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared

    PubMed Central

    Shubina, T. V.; Pozina, G.; Jmerik, V. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Hemmingsson, C.; Andrianov, A. V.; Kazanov, D. R.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large ’ripened’ crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies. PMID:26656267

  4. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  6. Understanding cavity resonances with intracavity dispersion properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Jiteng; Wu Haibin; Mumba, M.; Gea-Banacloche, J.; Xiao Min

    2011-02-15

    We experimentally study the strongly coupled three-level atom-cavity system at both cavity and coupling frequency detuning cases. Side peak splitting and anti-crossing-like phenomena are observed under different experimental conditions. Intracavity dispersion properties are used to explain qualitatively the complicated cavity resonance structures in the composite system of inhomogeneously broadened three-level atoms inside an optical ring cavity with relatively strong driving intensities.

  7. Optical modeling of certical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presently the subject of intense research due to their potential as compact, efficient, astigmatic laser sources for a number of important applications. Of special interest are the selectively-oxidized VCSELs that have recently set records for threshold current and wall-plug efficiency. The onset of higher-order modes at powers of a few milliWatts, however, presently limits the wide utilization of these devices and indicates the need for improvements in design. Unfortunately, their complexity precludes optimization based solely upon empirical methods, and points instead to the need for better numerical models. Modeling the optical field in a vertical-cavity laser, however, is especially difficult due to both the high Q of the optical cavity and the distributed reflectivity of the mirrors. Our approach to this dilemma has been the development of modeling techniques on two complexity scales. We first derived an effective- index model that is numerically efficient and thus can be included together with carrier transport and thermal models to make up a self-consistent modeling package. In addition to its use in the overall VCSEL model, this simplified optical model has been extremely valuable in elucidating the basic principles of waveguiding in VCSELs that in turn have led to new ideas in device design. More specifically, the derived expression for the effective index shows clearly that index guiding in a VCSEL depends only on variations in optical cavity length, and thus can be engineered without the need to alter the material index of refraction. Also, we have designed index- guided and antiguided devices whose cavity lengths are modified in certain regions by etching of the cavity material prior to growth of the second mirror. Fabrication of these new device designs is presently in progress.

  8. Field Fluctuation Spectroscopy in a Reverberant Cavity with Moving Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosny, Julien; Roux, Philippe; Fink, Mathias; Page, J. H.

    2003-03-01

    We report a study of transient ultrasonic waves inside a reverberant cavity containing moving scatterers. We show that the elastic mean free path and the dynamics of the scatterers govern the evolution of the autocorrelation of acoustic wave field. A parallel is established between these results and a closely related technique, diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is found between experiment and theory for a moving stainless steel ball in a water tank, thereby elucidating the underlying physics, and a potential application, fish monitoring inside aquariums, is demonstrated.

  9. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  10. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.

    1992-08-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity toning and matching problems.

  11. The nasal cavity microbiota of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the nares has been widely studied. However, relatively few studies have investigated the microbiota of the nasal cavity posterior to the nares. This distinct environment has the potential to contain a distinct microbiota and play an important role in health. Results We obtained 35,142 high-quality bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequence reads from the nasal cavity and oral cavity (the dorsum of the tongue and the buccal mucosa) of 12 healthy adult humans and deposited these data in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) (Bioproject: PRJNA248297). In our initial analysis, we compared the bacterial communities of the nasal cavity and the oral cavity from ten of these subjects. The nasal cavity bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria and were statistically distinct from those on the tongue and buccal mucosa. For example, the same Staphylococcaceae operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was present in all of the nasal cavity samples, comprising up to 55% of the community, but Staphylococcaceae was comparatively uncommon in the oral cavity. Conclusions There are clear differences between nasal cavity microbiota and oral cavity microbiota in healthy adults. This study expands our knowledge of the nasal cavity microbiota and the relationship between the microbiota of the nasal and oral cavities. PMID:25143824

  12. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  16. Potassium ions in the cavity of a KcsA channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Qiao, Baofu; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The high rate of ion flux and selectivity of potassium channels has been attributed to the conformation and dynamics of the ions in the filter which connects the channel cavity and the extracellular environment. The cavity serves as the reservoir for potassium ions diffusing from the intracellular medium. The cavity is believed to decrease the dielectric barrier for the ions to enter the filter. We study here the equilibrium and dynamic properties of potassium ions entering the water-filled cavity of a KcsA channel model. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that are supplemented by electrostatic calculations reveal the important role of water molecules and the partially charged protein helices at the bottom of the cavity in overcoming the energy barrier and stabilizing the potassium ion in the cavity. We further show that the average time for a potassium ion to enter the cavity is much shorter than the conduction rate of a potassium passing through the filter, and this time duration is insensitive over a wide range of the membrane potential. The conclusions drawn from the study of the channel model are applicable in generalized contexts, including the entry of ions in artificial ion channels and other confined geometries.

  17. Non-reacting flow visualization of supersonic combustor based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Liang, Jianhan; Zhao, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Nano-particle planer laser scattering and particle image velocimetry technology are employed to observe the flow field of scramjet combustors based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder. Density field and velocity distribution inside combustors are obtained. Mainstream fluid enters into cavity nearby side wall in experimental observation because side wall shock waves interact with bottom wall boundary layer. Cavity fluid is entrained into mainstream in the middle of combustor meanwhile. Flow past cavity displays obvious three dimensional characteristics in both combustors. But cavity-strut combustor displays asymmetrical flow field because of strut configuration. Mass exchange between mainstream and cavity fluid is evaluated by statistic mass flow rate into cavity. Mass flow rate near side wall is raised to 6.62 times of the value in the middle of cavity combustor while it is 5.1 times in cavity-strut combustor. Further study is needed to injection strategies and realistic flow characteristics on condition of combustion.

  18. Anomalous diffusion in time-fluctuating non-stationary diffusivity landscapes.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, Andrey G; Metzler, Ralf

    2016-08-24

    We investigate the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements for particle diffusion in a simple model for disordered media by assuming that the local diffusivity is both fluctuating in time and has a deterministic average growth or decay in time. In this study we compare computer simulations of the stochastic Langevin equation for this random diffusion process with analytical results. We explore the regimes of normal Brownian motion as well as anomalous diffusion in the sub- and superdiffusive regimes. We also consider effects of the inertial term on the particle motion. The investigation of the resulting diffusion is performed for unconfined and confined motion. PMID:27523709

  19. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  20. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  1. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  2. RF cavity vacuum interlock system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K.; Crawford, K.; Bundy, R.; Dylla, H. F.; Heckman, J.; Marshall, J.; Nichols, R.; Osullivan, S.; Preble, J.; Robb, J.

    1992-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a continuous wave (CW) 4 GeV Electron Accelerator is undergoing construction in Newport News, Virginia. When completed in 1994, the accelerator will be the largest installation of radio-frequency superconductivity. Production of cryomodules, the fundamental building block of the machine, has started. A cryomodule consists of four sets of pairs of 1497 MHz, 5 cell niobium cavities contained in separate helium vessels and mounted in a cryostat with appropriate end caps for helium supply and return. Beam vacuum of the cavities, the connecting beam piping, the waveguides, and the cryostat insulating vacuum are crucial to the performance of the machine. The design and initial experience of the vacuum systems for the first 2 1/4 cryomodules that makeup the 45 MEV injector are discussed.

  3. Calculations of HOMs and coupled bunch instabilities due to the RHIC rf cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.

    1994-09-01

    The cavities for the two RHIC rf systems have been defined, a 26.7 MHz cavity developed by the RHIC rf group and the well documented CERN SPS 200 MHz cavity tuned to 196.1 MHz for operation in RHIC. Calculations of the shunt impedances and Q`s of the higher order modes (HOMs) are summarized along with beadpull measurements of R/Q of selected modes. Estimates of coupled bunch instability growth rates are calculated with both analytical techniques and using the code ZAP and used to make projections of mode damping requirements.

  4. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Extending into the Oral Cavity: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Neha; Agarwal, Deshant; Jain, Manish; Vijay, Pradkhshana

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare vascular tumour which is benign but locally aggressive and occurs invariably in young and adolescent males. It seldom involves the oral cavity but has the tendency to invade the adjacent structures. Its characteristic features include slow progression, aggressive growth & an increased rate of persistence and recurrence due to its location in inaccessible areas. In literature, very few cases of JNA have been reported with extension into the oral cavity. Here, a case of JNA with extension into the oral cavity has been discussed who reported to our institute. PMID:26266232

  5. Phase II open label study of the oral vascular endothelial growth factor-receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (vatalanib) in adult patients with refractory or relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Brander, Danielle; Rizzieri, David; Gockerman, Jon; Diehl, Louis; Shea, Thomas Charles; Decastro, Carlos; Moore, Joseph O; Beaven, Anne

    2013-12-01

    PTK787/ZK222584 (vatalanib), an orally active inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs), was evaluated in this phase II study of 20 patients with relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients received once-daily PTK787/ZK222584 at a target dose of 1250 mg. Eighteen patients were evaluable for response: one patient had a complete response (CR), six patients had stable disease but subsequently progressed, 10 patients had progressive disease by three cycles and one subject withdrew before response evaluation. The patient who attained a CR underwent autologous stem cell transplant and remains disease-free 76 months after study completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Grade 3 thrombocytopenia occurred in 20% and grade 3 hypertension occurred in 10%. There were no episodes of grade 3 proteinuria. In conclusion, PTK787/ZK222584 was well tolerated in a heavily pretreated population of patients with DLBCL, although its therapeutic potential as a single agent in DLBCL appears limited. PMID:23488610

  6. 3-D Modeling of Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe Growth Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical calculation for a non-dilute alloy solidification was performed using the FIDAP finite element code. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. Estimates of convection contributions for various gravity conditions was performed parametrically. For gravity levels higher then 1 0 -7 of earth's gravity it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by factor of 50% for precise orientation of the ampoule in the microgravity environment. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D modeling are compared with previous 2-D finding. A video film featuring melt convection will be presented.

  7. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Calaga, R.; Assmann, R.; Barranco, J.; Tomas, R.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Morita, A.

    2009-10-14

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit, also degrade the collimation cleaning efficiency, and so on. In this paper, we explore the principal feasibility of LHC crab cavities from a beam dynamics point of view. The implications of the crab cavities for the LHC optics, analytical and numerical luminosity studies, dynamic aperture, aperture and beta beating, emittance growth, beam-beam tune shift, long-range collisions, and synchrobetatron resonances, crab dispersion, and collimation efficiency will be discussed.

  8. Grinding Inside A Toroidal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Walter; Adams, James F.; Burley, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Weld lines ground smooth within about 0.001 in. Grinding tool for smoothing longitudinal weld lines inside toroidal cavity includes curved tunnel jig to guide grinding "mouse" along weld line. Curvature of tunnel jig matched to shape of toroid so grinding ball in mouse follows circular arc of correct radius as mouse is pushed along tunnel. Tool enables precise control of grindout shape, yet easy to use.

  9. Microwave energy storage in resonant cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    One method of generating short, high-power microwave pulses is to store rf energy in a resonant cavity over a relatively long fill time and extract is rapidly. A power gain roughly equal to the ratio of fill time to extraction time can be obtained. During the filling of a resonant cavity some of the energy is lost in heating the cavity walls, and some will generally be reflected at the input coupling of the cavity. In this paper we discuss the time dependence of the stored energy and related quantities and the way in which it depends on the coupling of the source to the cavity.

  10. Controlled directional scattering cavity for tubular absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1982-01-01

    A specular cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity is provided with a series of V groove-like indentations (or pyramidal-type indentations) which redirect energy entering between the receiver and cavity structure onto the receiver. The aperture opening of each V groove is less than half the cavity opening and in most preferred embodiments, much less than half. This enables the optical receiver to be emplaced a distance g from the cavity wherein 0.414r

  11. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  12. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  13. Cavity lining in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesEmbase, Medline, Cochrane Central, Biomed Central and Open Grey databases and bibliographies of identified studies.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials investigating humans with primary caries lesions receiving operative treatment involving caries removal and restoration, with minimum two treatment groups comparing different cavity treatments before restoration (no lining versus lining) were included.Data extraction and synthesisData were extracted independently by two reviewers and study quality assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Random effect meta-analysis was carried out.ResultsThree studies involving a total of 89 patients were included. All the studies involved primary teeth and were conducted in Brazil. Follow-up periods ranged from 26-53 months. All the studies were considered to be at high risk of bias. Restoring the cavity without lining did not significantly affect the risk of failure. The quality of the evidence was low.ConclusionsCurrent evidence does not support strong recommendations to use or not to use liners after caries removal and before restoring cavities. Our findings are restricted to primary teeth after selective excavation, with only one liner (calcium hydroxide) being used for comparison. PMID:27012571

  14. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan; El-Jallal, Said

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  15. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  16. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing ‘Air Crescent’ sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma. PMID:27625451

  17. Filling cavities or restoring teeth?

    PubMed

    Versluis, Antheunis; Versluis-Tantbirojn, Daranee

    2011-01-01

    Teeth seldom fracture under normal functional loading. This indicates that the natural tooth design is optimized for the distribution of regular masticatory forces by means of its properties and structure. When a tooth is restored with an intracoronal restoration, however, the incidence of tooth fracture increases. Since remaining tissues do not change, the restorative actions apparently alter the original stress distributions. In this study, the effect of different restoration types (unbonded amalgam and bonded composite restorations) were compared with the original stress conditions of the intact tooth, using finite element analysis. It was shown that an unbonded amalgam restoration did not restore the original stress conditions but led to much higher stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel and to higher tensile stresses in the cavity floor. The unbonded amalgam thus filled the cavity but did not restore the tooth. In contrast, a bonded composite restoration restored the original stress pattern in the tooth if there was no polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage causes residual tensile stresses in the dentin around the cavity and in the buccal and lingual enamel. Residual tensile stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel are momentary compensated by compressive stress components during occlusal loading. It was concluded that bonding and elimination of residual stresses are prerequisites for restoring the original tooth integrity. PMID:21748978

  18. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity.

    PubMed

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing 'Air Crescent' sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma. PMID:27625451

  19. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  20. Organized Oscillations of Initially-Turbulent Flow Past a Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2002-09-17

    Flow past an open cavity is known to give rise to self-sustained oscillations in a wide variety of configurations, including slotted-wall, wind and water tunnels, slotted flumes, bellows-type pipe geometries, high-head gates and gate slots, aircraft components and internal piping systems. These cavity-type oscillations are the origin of coherent and broadband sources of noise and, if the structure is sufficiently flexible, flow-induced vibration as well. Moreover, depending upon the state of the cavity oscillation, substantial alterations of the mean drag may be induced. In the following, the state of knowledge of flow past cavities, based primarily on laminar inflow conditions, is described within a framework based on the flow physics. Then, the major unresolved issues for this class of flows will be delineated. Self-excited cavity oscillations have generic features, which are assessed in detail in the reviews of Rockwell and Naudascher, Rockwell, Howe and Rockwell. These features, which are illustrated in the schematic of Figure 1, are: (i) interaction of a vorticity concentration(s) with the downstream corner, (ii) upstream influence from this corner interaction to the sensitive region of the shear layer formed from the upstream corner of the cavity; (iii) conversion of the upstream influence arriving at this location to a fluctuation in the separating shear layer; and (iv) amplification of this fluctuation in the shear layer as it develops in the streamwise direction. In view of the fact that inflow shear-layer in the present investigation is fully turbulent, item (iv) is of particular interest. It is generally recognized, at least for laminar conditions at separation from the leading-corner of the cavity, that the disturbance growth in the shear layer can be described using concepts of linearized, inviscid stability theory, as shown by Rockwell, Sarohia, and Knisely and Rockwell. As demonstrated by Knisely and Rockwell, on the basis of experiments interpreted

  1. Bi-global Stability Analysis of Compressible Open Cavity Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiyang; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    The effect of compressibility on stability characteristics of rectangular open cavity flows is numerically examined. In our earlier work with two-dimensional direct numerical simulation of open cavity flows, we found that increasing Mach number destabilizes the flow in the subsonic regime but stabilizes the flow in the transonic regime. To further examine the compressibility effect, linear bi-global stability analysis is performed over the same range of Mach numbers to investigate the influence of three-dimensional instabilities in flows over open cavities with length-to-depth ratios of 2 and 6. We identify dominant eigenmodes for varied Mach numbers and spanwise wavelengths with respect to two-dimensional stable and unstable steady states. Over a range of spanwise wavelengths, we reveal the growth/damp rates and frequencies of the dominant global modes. Based on the insights from the present analysis, we compare our findings from global stability analysis with our companion three-dimensional flow control experiments aimed at reducing pressure fluctuation caused by cavity flow unsteadiness. This work was supported by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant FA9550-13-1-0091).

  2. Generalized magneto-thermoviscoelasticity in a perfectly conducting thermodiffusive medium with a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkour, Ashraf M.; Alzahrani, Ebraheem O.; Abouelregal, Ahmed E.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the effects of viscosity and diffusion on thermoelastic interactions in an infinite medium with a spherical cavity are studied. The formulation is applied to the generalized thermoelasticity based on the theory of generalized thermoelastic diffusion with one relaxation time. The surface of the spherical cavity is taken to be traction free and subjected to both heating and external constant magnetic field. The solution is obtained in the Laplace transform domain by using a direct approach. The solution of the problem in the physical domain obtained numerically using a method based on Fourier expansion techniques. The temperature, displacement, stress, concentration as well as the chemical potential are obtained and represented graphically. Comparisons are made within the theory in the presence and absence of viscosity and diffusion.

  3. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Smith, J. D.A.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; Delayen, J.; Calaga, R.

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  4. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  5. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    + density and the control offered by the precise epitaxy. The growth and fabrication methods are discussed. Spectral measurements at cryogenic and room temperatures show negligible background losses and resonant Er3+ absorption strong enough to produce cavity-polaritons that persist to above 361 K. Cooperative relaxation and upconversion limit the optical performance in the telecommunications bands by transferring the excitations to quenching sites or by further exciting the ions up to visible transitions. Future prospects and alternative applications for Er2O3 and other epitaxial rare-earth oxides are also considered.

  6. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Lingwood, C.; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  7. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhle, Katharina; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V.; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-05-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1× 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (>1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  8. Scaled experiments of explosions in cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, J.; Cranch, G. A.; Lunsford, R.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Weaver, J.; Dunlop, W.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-05-01

    Consequences of an explosion inside an air-filled cavity under the earth's surface are partly duplicated in a laboratory experiment on spatial scales 1000 smaller. The experiment measures shock pressures coupled into a block of material by an explosion inside a gas-filled cavity therein. The explosion is generated by suddenly heating a thin foil that is located near the cavity center with a short laser pulse, which turns the foil into expanding plasma, most of whose energy drives a blast wave in the cavity gas. Variables in the experiment are the cavity radius and explosion energy. Measurements and GEODYN code simulations show that shock pressures measured in the block exhibit a weak dependence on scaled cavity radius up to ˜25 m/kt1/3, above which they decrease rapidly. Possible mechanisms giving rise to this behavior are described. The applicability of this work to validating codes used to simulate full-scale cavity explosions is discussed.

  9. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  10. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  11. Influence of Er:YAG laser ablation on cavity surface and cavity shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Krejsa, Otakar; Hamal, Karel; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1996-04-01

    The cavity surface and shape after Er:YAG laser ablation at different energies, number of pulses and at a different repetition rate were observed. Longitudinal sections of extracted human incisors and transverse sections of ivory tusk were cut and polished to flat and glazed surfaces. The samples thickness was from 3 to 5 mm. The Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running (long pulse) mode. The laser radiation was focused onto the tooth surface by CaF2 lens (f equals 55 mm). During the experiment, the teeth were steady and the radiation was delivered by a special mechanical arm fixed in a special holder; fine water mist was also used (water-mJ/min, a pressure of two atm, air-pressure three atm). The shapes of the prepared cavities were studied either by using a varying laser energies (from 70 mJ to 500 mJ) for a constant number of pulses, or a varying number of pulses (from one to thirty) for constant laser energy. The repetition rate was changed from 1 to 2 Hz. For evaluating the surfaces, shapes, and profiles, scanning electron microscopy and photographs from a light microscope were used. The results were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. It is seen that there is no linear relation between the radiation pulse energy and the size of the prepared holes. With increasing the incident energy the cavity depth growth is limited. There exists some saturation not only in the enamel and dentin but especially in the homogeneous ivory.

  12. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  13. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  14. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  15. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  16. Performance Capability of Single-Cavity Vortex Gaseous Nuclear Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.

    1963-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine the maximum powerplant thrust-to-weight ratio possible with a single-cavity vortex gaseous reactor in which all the hydrogen propellant must diffuse through a fuel-rich region. An assumed radial temperature profile was used to represent conduction, convection, and radiation heat-transfer effects. The effect of hydrogen property changes due to dissociation and ionization was taken into account in a hydrodynamic computer program. It is shown that, even for extremely optimistic assumptions of reactor criticality and operating conditions, such a system is limited to reactor thrust-to-weight ratios of about 1.2 x 10(exp -3) for laminar flow. For turbulent flow, the maximum thrust-to-weight ratio is less than 10(exp -3). These low thrusts result from the fact that the hydrogen flow rate is limited by the diffusion process. The performance of a gas-core system with a specific impulse of 3000 seconds and a powerplant thrust-to-weight ratio of 10(exp -2) is shown to be equivalent to that of a 1000-second advanced solid-core system. It is therefore concluded that a single-cavity vortex gaseous reactor in which all the hydrogen must diffuse through the nuclear fuel is a low-thrust device and offers no improvement over a solid-core nuclear-rocket engine. To achieve higher thrust, additional hydrogen flow must be introduced in such a manner that it will by-pass the nuclear fuel. Obviously, such flow must be heated by thermal radiation. An illustrative model of a single-cavity vortex system employing supplementary flow of hydrogen through the core region is briefly examined. Such a system appears capable of thrust-to-weight ratios of approximately 1 to 10. For a high-impulse engine, this capability would be a considerable improvement over solid-core performance. Limits imposed by thermal radiation heat transfer to cavity walls are acknowledged but not evaluated. Alternate vortex concepts that employ many parallel vortices to achieve higher

  17. Acute subendocardial infarction with diffuse intense Tc-99m PYP uptake and minimal Tl-201 abnormality.

    PubMed

    Taki, J; Taki, S; Ichiyanagi, K; Akashi, Y; Hisada, K

    1992-08-01

    Tc-99m PYP scintigraphy performed on a patient with severe anterior chest pain showed diffuse intense uptake with central decreased activity corresponding to the left ventricular cavity. Tl-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy at rest revealed a minimal perfusion abnormality with decreased apical uptake in the lateral view. Because of these findings, diffuse subendocardial infarction was suggested. PMID:1387053

  18. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  19. Observation and characterization of cavity Rydberg polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningyuan, Jia; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Ryou, Albert; Schine, Nathan; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the emergence of a robust quasiparticle, the cavity Rydberg polariton, when an optical cavity photon hybridizes with a collective Rydberg excitation of a laser-cooled atomic ensemble. Free-space Rydberg polaritons have recently drawn intense interest as tools for quantum information processing and few-body quantum science. Here, we explore the properties of their cavity counterparts in the single-particle sector, observing an enhanced lifetime and slowed dynamics characteristic of cavity dark polaritons. We measure the range of cavity frequencies over which the polaritons persist, corresponding to the spectral width available for polariton quantum dynamics, and the speed limit for quantum information processing. Further, we observe a cavity-induced suppression of inhomogeneous broadening channels and demonstrate the formation of Rydberg polaritons in a multimode cavity. In conjunction with recent demonstrations of Rydberg-induced cavity nonlinearities, our results point the way towards using cavity Rydberg polaritons as a platform for creating high-fidelity photonic quantum materials and, more broadly, indicate that cavity dark polaritons offer enhanced stability and control uniquely suited to optical quantum information processing applications beyond the Rydberg paradigm.

  20. Outbursts from cavities in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S.

    2014-07-01

    In 2005 the impact module of the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft collided with Comet 9P/Tempel 1. Based on analysis of the images made during the first 13 minutes after the collision of the DI impact module with the comet, Ipatov and A'Hearn [1] studied time variations of ejection of material after this impact. Observed brightness of the cloud of ejected material was mainly due to particles with diameters d<3 micron, and so we discussed ejection of such particles. It was shown that, besides the normal ejection of material from the crater, at time t_{e} after the DI collision between 8 s and 60 s there was a considerable additional ejection (a triggered outburst) of small (micron size) particles. It increased the mean velocities of observed small ejected particles (compared with the normal ejection). It is difficult to explain the time variations in the brightness of the DI cloud at distance 1cavity with dust and gas under pressure. Though the model of a layered target can play some role in an explanation of the variation in brightness of the DI cloud, it cannot explain all details of such variation (for example, at t_{e} sim 10 s there was simultaneously a jump in the direction from the place of ejection to the brightest pixel in an image of the DI cloud by 50 degrees, an increase in the rate of ejection of small particles, and an increase in the brightness of the brightest pixel; at t_{e} ≈ 60 s there was a sharp decrease in the rate of ejection of small particles, and at t_{e} ≈ 60 s the direction from the place of ejection to the brightest pixel returned to the direction at 1 < t_{e} <12 s; the mean ejection velocities of observed particles were almost the same at t_{e} about 10-20 s, etc.). In [1] it was concluded that particles could not increase their velocities by more than a few meters per second during those

  1. Broadband tuning of optomechanical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhecker, Gustavo S.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Lee, Sunwoo; Lipson, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate broadband tuning of an optomechanical microcavity optical resonance by exploring the large optomechanical coupling of a double-wheel microcavity and its uniquely low mechanical stiffness. Using a pump laser with only 13 mW at telecom wavelengths we show tuning of the silicon nitride microcavity resonances over 32 nm. This corresponds to a tuning power efficiency of only 400 $\\mu$W/nm. By choosing a relatively low optical Q resonance ($\\approx$18,000) we prevent the cavity from reaching the regime of regenerative optomechanical oscillations. The static mechanical displacement induced by optical gradient forces is estimated to be as large as 60 nm.

  2. A terahertz plasmon cavity detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, G. C.; Vinh, N. Q.; Allen, S. J.; Aizin, G. R.; Mikalopas, J.; Reno, J. L.; Shaner, E. A.

    2010-11-08

    Sensitivity of a plasmonic detector is enhanced by integrating a broadband log-periodic antenna with a two-dimensional plasma cavity that is defined by source, drain, and multiple gates of a GaAs/AlGaAs high electron mobility transistor. Both narrow-band terahertz detection and a rich harmonic spectrum are evident. With a bolometric sensor in the channel, we report responsivity, on resonance at 235-240 GHz and at 20 K, of up to 7 kV/W and a noise equivalent power of 5x10{sup -10} W/Hz{sup 1/2}.

  3. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  4. Cavity quantum electro-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei

    2010-06-15

    The quantum dynamics of the coupling between a cavity optical field and a resonator microwave field via the electro-optic effect is studied. This coupling has the same form as the optomechanical coupling via radiation pressure, so all previously considered optomechanical effects can in principle be observed in electro-optic systems as well. In particular, I point out the possibilities of laser cooling of the microwave mode, entanglement between the optical mode and the microwave mode via electro-optic parametric amplification, and back-action-evading optical measurements of a microwave quadrature.

  5. Mass renormalization in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Matloob, Reza

    2011-01-15

    We show that the presence of a background medium and a boundary surface or surfaces in cavity QED produces no change in the energy shift of a free charged particle due to its coupling to the fluctuating electromagnetic field of the vacuum. This clarifies that the electromagnetic and the observed mass of the charged particle are not affected by the modification of the field of the vacuum. The calculations are nonrelativistic and restricted to the dipole approximation but are otherwise based on the general requirements of causality.

  6. Primary Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma involving the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Faleh Ali A; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Motabi, Ibraheem Hm; Alrashed, Abdullah; Anil, Sukumaran

    2015-10-01

    Lymphomas of the oral cavity are rare and typically present as intraosseous lesions that are most commonly diffuse large B-cell type. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma histologically characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphoid cells with a nuclear size equal to or exceeding normal histiocytic nuclei. A case of DLBCL of the mandible in an 18 years old male patient is presented. This report discusses this rare malignancy, including clinical presentation, histopathologic features, immunologic profile, treatment and prognosis. Though lymphoma of mandible is rare, it must be considered in differential diagnosis of swellings arising in the region. PMID:26581467

  7. Hom dampers for ALS storage ring RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, S.; Baptiste, K.; Byrd, J.; DeSantis, S.; Julian, J.; Low, R.; Lyn, L.; Plate, D.

    2003-05-08

    The main source of narrowband impedance in the Advanced Light Source (ALS) are higher order modes (HOMs) of the two main RF and three third harmonic cavities. These HOMs drive longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities, which are controlled using active beam feedback systems. The dominant longitudinal HOMs in both systems are TM011-like modes with the R/Q factor an order of magnitude higher than all other longitudinal modes. To reduce the growth rates within the range of the longitudinal feedback system (LFB), these modes were tuned away from beam resonances by means of cooling water temperature control (main rf system), and the combination of two tuners (third harmonic system). To improve the reliability of the longitudinal dampening system, we have built and installed E-type HOM dampers for the fundamental and harmonic cavities. We present the design, commissioning and performance of the HOM dampers in this paper.

  8. Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

    1992-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

  9. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Dhanaraj, N.; Hocker, A.; Orlov, Y.; Peterson, T.; Premo, K.

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  10. Tunable-cavity QED with phase qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Jed D.; da Silva, Fabio; Allman, Michael Shane; Lecocq, Florent; Cicak, Katarina; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a tunable-cavity QED architecture with an rf SQUID phase qubit inductively coupled to a single-mode, resonant cavity with a tunable frequency that allows for both tunneling and dispersive measurements. Dispersive measurement is well characterized by a three-level model, strongly dependent on qubit anharmonicity, qubit-cavity coupling and detuning. The tunable cavity frequency provides dynamic control over the coupling strength and qubit-cavity detuning helping to minimize Purcell losses and cavity-induced dephasing during qubit operation. The maximum decay time T1 = 1 . 5 μs is limited by dielectric losses from a design geometry similar to planar transmon qubits. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  11. An Experimental Investigation of Supersonic Cavity Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Ning; Alvi, Farrukh. S.; Shih, Chiang; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu; Alkislar, Mehmet. B.

    2003-11-01

    A series of experiments were conducted on supersonic, Mach = 2, cavity flow over variable length / depth ratios, L/D=1 ˜5. Large-scale structures in the cavity shear layer were clearly captured by particle image velocimetry method. The convective velocities of the structures were measured around 60% of the freestream velocity. Supersonic microjets at the leading edge of the cavity were implemented to control the flow-induced resonance in the cavities. The size and strength of the large-scale structure were also significant altered by the microjets. More than 9 dB reduction in Prms and more than 20 dB reduction in cavity tones were obtained with an extremely low mass flux, the cavity blowing ratio Bc < 0.2%.

  12. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  13. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  14. Cavity-Dumped Communication Laser Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Cavity-dumped lasers have significant advantages over more conventional Q-switched lasers for high-rate operation with pulse position modulation communications, including the ability to emit laser pulses at 1- to 10-megahertz rates, with pulse widths of 0.5 to 5 nanoseconds. A major advantage of cavity dumping is the potential to vary the cavity output percentage from pulse to pulse, maintaining the remainder of the energy in reserve for the next pulse. This article presents the results of a simplified cavity-dumped laser model, establishing the requirements for cavity efficiency and projecting the ultimate laser efficiency attainable in normal operation. In addition, a method of reducing or eliminating laser dead time is suggested that could significantly enhance communication capacity. The design of a laboratory demonstration laser is presented with estimates of required cavity efficiency and demonstration potential.

  15. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  16. Some Nuclear Calculations of U-235-D2O Gaseous-Core Cavity Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.; Hyland, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    The results of a multigroup, diffusion theory study of spherical gaseous-core cavity reactors are presented in this report. The reactor cavity of gaseous U235 is enclosed by a region of hydrogen gas and is separated from an external D2O moderator-reflector by a zirconium structural shell. Some cylindrical reactors are also investigated. A parametric study of spherical reactors indicates that, for the range of variables studied, critical mass increases as: (1) Fuel region is compressed within the reactor cavity, (2) moderator thickness is decreased, (3) structural shell thickness is increased, and (4) moderator temperature is increased. A buckling analogy is used to estimate the critical mass of fully reflected cylindrical reactors from spherical results without fuel compression. For a reactor cavity of a 120-centimeter radius uniformly filled with fuel, no structural shell, a moderator temperature of 70 F, and a moderator thickness of 100 centimeters, the critical mass of a spherical reactor is 3.1 kilograms while that of a cylinder with a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.0 (L/D = 1) is approximately 3.8 kilograms and, with L/D = 2, 5.9 kilograms. For the range of variables considered for U235-D2O gaseous-core cavity reactors, the systems are characterized by 95 to 99 percent thermal absorptions, with the flux reaching a maximum in the moderator about 10 to 15 centimeters from the reactor cavity.

  17. Quantum coherence in a coupled-cavity array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, De-Wei; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Jicheng; Hu, Zheng-Da

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical properties of quantum coherence in the system of two-coupled-cavities, each of which resonantly interacts with a two-level atom, is investigated via the relative entropy measure. We focus on the coherences for the atom-atom, atom-cavity and cavity-cavity subsystems and find that the dynamical behaviors of these coherences depend largely on the cavity-cavity coupling, which may indicate the Mott insulator-superfluid transition in the thermodynamic limit. We also study the influences of the initial cavity-cavity correlation on the coherences and show that the initial correlation of the cavity-cavity subsystem can enhance the revival ability for the atom-atom and cavity-cavity coherences while reduce that for the atom-cavity coherence. Besides, we demonstrate the qualitative difference of dynamics between coherence and entanglement. Finally, the influences of dissipations including cavity losses and atomic decays on the coherence are explored.

  18. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    ScienceCinema

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2014-05-21

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  19. Silicon Integrated Cavity Optomechanical Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jie; Miao, Houxun; Michels, Thomas; Liu, Yuxiang; Srinivasan, Kartik; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    Cavity optomechanics enables measurements of mechanical motion at the fundamental limits of precision imposed by quantum mechanics. However, the need to align and couple devices to off-chip optical components hinders development, miniaturization and broader application of ultrahigh sensitivity chip-scale optomechanical transducers. Here we demonstrate a fully integrated and optical fiber pigtailed optomechanical transducer with a high Q silicon micro-disk cavity near-field coupled to a nanoscale cantilever. We detect the motion of the cantilever by measuring the resonant frequency shift of the whispering gallery mode of the micro-disk. The sensitivity near the standard quantum limit can be reached with sub-uW optical power. Our on-chip approach combines compactness and stability with great design flexibility: the geometry of the micro-disk and cantilever can be tailored to optimize the mechanical/optical Q factors and tune the mechanical frequency over two orders of magnitudes. Electrical transduction in addition to optical transduction was also demonstrated and both can be used to effectively cool the cantilever. Moreover, cantilevers with sharp tips overhanging the chip edge were fabricated to potentially allow the mechanical cantilever to be coupled to a wide range of off-chip systems, such as spins, DNA, nanostructures and atoms on clean surfaces.

  20. SPINNING MOTIONS IN CORONAL CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Stenborg, G. E-mail: guillermo.stenborg.ctr.ar@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-08-20

    In movies made from Fe XII 19.5 nm images, coronal cavities that graze or are detached from the solar limb appear as continually spinning structures, with sky-plane projected flow speeds in the range 5-10 km s{sup -1}. These whirling motions often persist in the same sense for up to several days and provide strong evidence that the cavities and the immediately surrounding streamer material have the form of helical flux ropes viewed along their axes. A pronounced bias toward spin in the equatorward direction is observed during 2008. We attribute this bias to the poleward concentration of the photospheric magnetic flux near sunspot minimum, which leads to asymmetric heating along large-scale coronal loops and tends to drive a flow from higher to lower latitudes; this flow is converted into an equatorward spinning motion when the loops pinch off to form a flux rope. As sunspot activity increases and the polar fields weaken, we expect the preferred direction of the spin to reverse.

  1. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-03-01

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  2. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W.; Chiu, Shiu-Chu; Parks, Paul; Rawls, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  3. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  4. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Marty; Eloranta, Ed

    2016-06-01

    A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  5. Grating cavity dual wavelength dye laser.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Nava, Oscar Javier; Rodríguez-Montero, Ponciano; Iturbe-Castillo, M David; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2011-02-14

    We report simultaneous dual wavelength dye laser emission using Littman-Metcalf and Littrow cavity configurations with minimum cavity elements. Dual wavelength operation is obtained by laser operation in two optical paths inside the cavity, one of which uses reflection in the circulating dye cell. Styryl 14 laser dye operating in the 910 nm to 960 nm was used in a 15%:85% PC/EG solvent green pumped with a Q-switched doubled Nd3+:YAG laser. PMID:21369171

  6. Optical microfiber-based photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Yi-zhi; Andrews, Steve; Li, Zhi-yuan; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Using a focused ion beam milling technique, we fabricate broad stop band (∼10% wide) photonic crystal (PhC) cavities in adiabatically-tapered silica fibers. Abrupt structural design of PhC mirrors efficiently reduces radiation loss, increasing the cavity finesse to ∼7.5. Further experiments and simulations verify that the remaining loss is mainly due to Ga ion implantation. Such a microfiber PhC cavity probably has potentials in many light-matter interaction applications.

  7. Impurity-free quantum well intermixing for large optical cavity high-power laser diode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Gür, Emre; Aydınlı, Atilla

    2016-08-01

    We report on the correlation of atomic concentration profiles of diffusing species with the blueshift of the quantum well luminescence from both as-grown and impurity free quantum wells intermixed on actual large optical cavity high power laser diode structures. Because it is critical to suppress catastrophic optical mirror damage, sputtered SiO2 and thermally evaporated SrF2 were used both to enhance and suppress quantum well intermixing, respectively, in these (Al)GaAs large optical cavity structures. A luminescence blueshift of 55 nm (130 meV) was obtained for samples with 400 nm thick sputtered SiO2. These layers were used to generate point defects by annealing the samples at 950 °C for 3 min. The ensuing Ga diffusion observed as a shifting front towards the surface at the interface of the GaAs cap and AlGaAs cladding, as well as Al diffusion into the GaAs cap layer, correlates well with the observed luminescence blue shift, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Although this technique is well-known, the correlation between the photoluminescence peak blue shift and diffusion of Ga and Al during impurity free quantum well intermixing on actual large optical cavity laser diode structures was demonstrated with both x ray photoelectron and photoluminescence spectroscopy, for the first time.

  8. Outbursts and cavities in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, Sergei

    Based on analysis of the images made during the first 13 minutes after the collision of the impact module of the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft with Comet 9P/Tempel 1, Ipatov & A'Hearn [1] studied time variations of ejection of material after this impact. They showed that, besides the normal ejection, at time t_{e} after the DI collision between 8 s and 60 s there was a considerable additional ejection (a triggered outburst) of small (micron size) particles. It increased the mean velocities of observed small ejected particles (compared with the normal ejection). The outburst could be caused by excavation of a large cavity with dust and gas under pressure. The largest cavity excavated after the collision could be relatively deep because a considerable excess ejection lasted during about 50 s. Schultz et al. [2] concluded that the diameter d_{tc} of the DI transient crater was about 200 m. Some authors support smaller values of d_{tc}. The depth of the DI crater at t_{e}=8 s was estimated in [3] to be about 6 m for d_{tc}=200 m and 4 m for d_{tc}=100 m. The distance between the pre-impact surface of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 and the upper border of the largest excavated cavity equal to about 4-6 m, and sizes of particles inside the cavities of a few microns are in good agreement with the results obtained by Kossacki & Szutowicz [4]. In their models of the explosion of Comet 17P/Holmes, the initial sublimation front of the CO ice was located at a depth of 4 m, 10 m, or 20 m, and calculations were finished when the CO pressure exceeded the threshold value 10 kPa. It was shown that the pressure of CO vapor can rise to this value only when the nucleus is composed of very fine grains, a few microns in radius. The porous structure of comets provides enough space for sublimation. The projection of the velocity of the leading edge of the DI cloud (onto the plane perpendicular to the line of sight) was about 100-200 m/s and is typical for outburst particles ejected from comets

  9. Comparing the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model

    PubMed Central

    Öztaş, Nurhan; Sümer, Zeynep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model. Study Design: Twenty-one human molars were divided into 3 groups. Cavities were then cut into the teeth (4 per tooth, 28 cavities per group). After sterilization, the teeth were left in broth cultures of 106 colony-forming units (CFU) ml-1 of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) at 36°C for 48 h. The appropriate treatment followed (group A, control; group B, 2% chlorhexidine solution; and group C, 80s of treatment with ozone, and the cavities were then filled with composite resin. After 72h, the restorations were removed, dentin chips were collected with an excavator, and the total number of microorganisms was determined. Results: Both of the treatments significantly reduced the number of S. mutans present compared with the control group and there was a significant difference between the all groups in terms of the amount of the microorganisms grown (p < 0.05). Group B was beter than group C; and group C was better than group A. Moreover, it was found that the amount of the growth in the group of chlorhexidine was significantly less than that of the ozone group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution was the antibacterial treatment most efficacious on S. mutans; however, ozone application could be an anlternative cavity disinfection method because of ozone’s cavity disinfection activity. Key words:Antibacterial activity, chlorhexidine, ozone, streptococcus mutans, tooth cavity. PMID:24455068

  10. Mineralogy and provenance of clays in miarolitic cavities of the Pikes Peak Batholith, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Clay samples from 105 cavities within miarolitic granitic pegmatites throughout the Pikes Peak batholith, in Colorado, were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Smectite (beidellite), illite, and kaolinite were found within the cavities. Calculation of crystallite-thickness distribution (CTD), mean thickness of the crystallites, and variance in crystallite thickness, as deduced from XRD patterns, allowed a determination of provenance and mode of formation for illite and smectite. Authigenic miarolitic-cavity illite and smectite show lognormal CTDs and larger mean thicknesses of crystallites than do their soil-derived counterparts; non-lognormal illite in a cavity results from mixing of cavity and soil illite. Analysis of mean thickness and thickness variance shows that crystal growth of illite is initiated by a nucleation event of short duration, followed by surface-controlled kinetics. Crystallization of the miarolitic cavity clays is presumed to occur by neoformation from hydrothermal fluids. The assessment of provenance allows a determination of regional and local distributions of clay minerals in miarolitic cavities within the Pikes Peak batholith.

  11. Environmental enhancement of creep crack growth in Inconel 718 by oxygen and water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio, P.; Gao, M.; Wei, R.P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics)

    1994-05-15

    Inconel 718 alloy is widely used in high temperature applications. Because of its sensitivity to environmentally enhanced crack growth at high temperatures, its use has been limited to modest temperatures (i.e., below 973 K). To improve its performance and to better predict its service life, it is important to develop a better understanding of the processes of crack growth at high temperatures in this alloy. It has been shown that the creep crack growth rates (CCGR) in air are at least two orders of magnitude faster than those in vacuum or inert environments. CCGR were also found to depend strongly on temperature. Fractographic studies showed that crack growth was intergranular in air and in vacuum with brittle appearing grain boundary separation in air and extensive cavity formation in vacuum. The increased CCGR in air has been attributed to the enhancement by oxygen; principally through enhanced cavity nucleation and growth by high-pressure carbon monoxide/dioxide formed by the reactions of oxygen that diffused into the material with the grain boundary carbides. The appropriateness of this mechanism, however, may be questioned by the absence of cavitation on the crack surfaces produced in air. As such the mechanism for crack growth needs to be re-examined. Because of the presence of moisture in air, the possible influence of hydrogen needs to be considered as well. In this study, preliminary experiments were conducted to examine the process of environmentally enhanced creep crack growth in Inconel 718 alloy in terms of possible mechanisms and rate controlling processes. Creep crack growth experiments were carried out in air, oxygen (from 2.67 to 100 kPa), moist argon (water vapor) and pure argon at temperatures from 873 to 973 K.

  12. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  13. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  14. Optically coupled cavities for wavelength switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costazo-Caso, Pablo A.; Granieri, Sergio; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2011-01-01

    An optical bistable device which presents hysteresis behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The system finds applications in wavelength switching, pulse reshaping and optical bistability. It is based on two optically coupled cavities named master and slave. Each cavity includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), acting as the gain medium of the laser, and two pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) which define the lasing wavelength (being different in each cavity). Finally, a variable optical coupler (VOC) is employed to couple both cavities. Experimental characterization of the system performance is made analyzing the effects of the coupling coefficient between the two cavities and the driving current in each SOA. The properties of the hysteretic bistable curve and switching can be controlled by adjusting these parameters and the loss in the cavities. By selecting the output wavelength (λ1 or λ2) with an external filter it is possible to choose either the invert or non-invert switched signal. Experiments were developed employing both optical discrete components and a photonic integrated circuit. They show that for 8 m-long cavities the maximum switching frequency is about 500 KHz, and for 4 m-long cavities a minimum rise-time about 21 ns was measured. The switching time can be reduced by shortening the cavity lengths and using photonic integrated circuits.

  15. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  16. Theory of clustered-cavity gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M.; Guo, H.; Granatstein, V. L.

    2002-09-01

    An analytical theory of a new device configuration, a clustered-cavity gyroklystron, is developed. The device considered has two clusters of cavities: an input cluster and an output cluster. The results show that, by using a cluster cavity concept, the bandwidth of gyroklystrons can be enlarged significantly without sacrifice of gain or efficiency which may lead to the development of a new type of high power, moderate bandwidth millimeter-wave amplifier. The theory has also been used to analyze the effect of stagger tuning between cavity frequencies within a single cluster, as well as between different clusters on the bandwidth and gain of the device.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  18. CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, S.; Casassus, S.; Van der Plas, G.; Christiaens, V.; Ménard, F.; Roman, P.; Cieza, L.; Hales, A. S.; Pinte, C.

    2015-01-10

    Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 AU from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J = 2-1 line of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the {sup 12}CO emission is optically thick, while {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is ∼1.5-2 M {sub Jup}. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best-fit model shows that the cavity radius is much smaller in CO than it is in millimeter continuum and scattered light observations, with a gas cavity that does not extend beyond 105 AU (at 3σ). The gap wall at its outer edge is diffuse and smooth in the gas distribution, while in dust continuum it is manifestly sharper. The inclination angle, as estimated from the high velocity channel maps, is 28 ± 0.5 deg, higher than in previous estimates, assuming a fix central star mass of 2.2 M {sub ☉}.

  19. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows an individual cell from the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  20. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.