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Sample records for diffusive optical cavity

  1. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  2. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  3. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  4. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  5. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  6. Cavity quantum electro-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei

    2010-06-15

    The quantum dynamics of the coupling between a cavity optical field and a resonator microwave field via the electro-optic effect is studied. This coupling has the same form as the optomechanical coupling via radiation pressure, so all previously considered optomechanical effects can in principle be observed in electro-optic systems as well. In particular, I point out the possibilities of laser cooling of the microwave mode, entanglement between the optical mode and the microwave mode via electro-optic parametric amplification, and back-action-evading optical measurements of a microwave quadrature.

  7. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  8. Optically coupled cavities for wavelength switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costazo-Caso, Pablo A.; Granieri, Sergio; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2011-01-01

    An optical bistable device which presents hysteresis behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The system finds applications in wavelength switching, pulse reshaping and optical bistability. It is based on two optically coupled cavities named master and slave. Each cavity includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), acting as the gain medium of the laser, and two pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) which define the lasing wavelength (being different in each cavity). Finally, a variable optical coupler (VOC) is employed to couple both cavities. Experimental characterization of the system performance is made analyzing the effects of the coupling coefficient between the two cavities and the driving current in each SOA. The properties of the hysteretic bistable curve and switching can be controlled by adjusting these parameters and the loss in the cavities. By selecting the output wavelength (λ1 or λ2) with an external filter it is possible to choose either the invert or non-invert switched signal. Experiments were developed employing both optical discrete components and a photonic integrated circuit. They show that for 8 m-long cavities the maximum switching frequency is about 500 KHz, and for 4 m-long cavities a minimum rise-time about 21 ns was measured. The switching time can be reduced by shortening the cavity lengths and using photonic integrated circuits.

  9. Instrumentation in Diffuse Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is highly versatile and has a very broad range of applications in biology and medicine. It covers diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, bioluminescence, and a number of other new imaging methods. These methods of diffuse optical imaging have diversified instrument configurations but share the same core physical principle – light propagation in highly diffusive media, i.e., the biological tissue. In this review, the author summarizes the latest development in instrumentation and methodology available to diffuse optical imaging in terms of system architecture, light source, photo-detection, spectral separation, signal modulation, and lastly imaging contrast. PMID:24860804

  10. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhle, Katharina; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V.; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-05-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1× 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (>1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  11. Optical nanofiber-based photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Nayak, K P; Zhang, Pengfei; Hakuta, K

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities on optical nanofibers using femtosecond laser ablation. PhC cavities with cavity lengths varying from 0.54 to 3.43 mm are fabricated by controlling the profile of the nanocrater array formed on the nanofiber. Such PhC cavities show high transmission of 87% for a finesse of 39. For higher finesse values from 150 to 500, the transmission can still be maintained at 20%-25%. Due to the strong confinement of the field and the efficient coupling to single-mode optical fibers, such nanofiber-based PhC cavities may become an interface between quantum and classical networks. PMID:24562114

  12. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  13. Atom interferometry in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul; Jaffe, Matt; Brown, Justin M; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2015-03-13

    We propose and demonstrate a new scheme for atom interferometry, using light pulses inside an optical cavity as matter wave beam splitters. The cavity provides power enhancement, spatial filtering, and a precise beam geometry, enabling new techniques such as low power beam splitters (<100  μW), large momentum transfer beam splitters with modest power, or new self-aligned interferometer geometries utilizing the transverse modes of the optical cavity. As a first demonstration, we obtain Ramsey-Raman fringes with >75% contrast and measure the acceleration due to gravity, g, to 60  μg/sqrt[Hz] resolution in a Mach-Zehnder geometry. We use >10(7) cesium atoms in the compact mode volume (600  μm 1/e(2) waist) of the cavity and show trapping of atoms in higher transverse modes. This work paves the way toward compact, high sensitivity, multiaxis interferometry. PMID:25815912

  14. Atom Interferometry in an Optical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul; Jaffe, Matt; Brown, Justin M.; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2015-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new scheme for atom interferometry, using light pulses inside an optical cavity as matter wave beam splitters. The cavity provides power enhancement, spatial filtering, and a precise beam geometry, enabling new techniques such as low power beam splitters (<100 μ W ), large momentum transfer beam splitters with modest power, or new self-aligned interferometer geometries utilizing the transverse modes of the optical cavity. As a first demonstration, we obtain Ramsey-Raman fringes with >75 % contrast and measure the acceleration due to gravity, g , to 60 μ g /√{Hz } resolution in a Mach-Zehnder geometry. We use >107 cesium atoms in the compact mode volume (600 μ m 1 /e2 waist) of the cavity and show trapping of atoms in higher transverse modes. This work paves the way toward compact, high sensitivity, multiaxis interferometry.

  15. Optical Resonant Cavity in a Nanotaper

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Goto, Takenari; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Chang, Jiho; Yao, Takafumi

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes an optical resonant cavity in a nanotaper with scale reduction from micro to several nanometers. Both experimental results and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulation suggested that the nanometer-scale taper with a diameter similar to the wavelength of light acted as a mirror, which facilitated the formation of a laser cavity and caused lasing in ZnO nanotapers. As the light inside the nanotaper propagated toward the apex, the lateral mode was reduced and reflection occurred. This report suggests that use of the resonant optical cavities in nanotapers might result in novel active and passive optical components, which will broaden the horizons of photonic technology.

  16. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  17. Derivation of anisotropic diffusion coefficients in a large annular cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Eiichi Suetomi; Hiroshi Sekimoto )

    1993-06-01

    A small reactor for a spacecraft or a small liquid-metal reactor for urban siting, decentralized electrical units, or seawater desalination is designed for a large leakage of neutrons from the reactor core. In these reactors, a movable annular reflector is used for reactivity control. Therefore, a large annular cavity exists between the core and the shielding materials. In this paper, anisotropic diffusion coefficients for a large annular cavity are derived by equating the neutron currents obtained by the diffusion equation and by the transport equation. These diffusion coefficients depend only on the geometrical configuration of the cavity. A numerical comparison of diffusion calculations using these diffusion coefficients and transport calculations shows good agreement.

  18. Rotationally induced vortices in optical cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2009-09-01

    We show that vortices appear in the modes of an astigmatic optical cavity when it is put into rotation about its optical axis. We study the properties of these vortices and discuss numerical results for a specific realization of such a set-up. Our method is exact up to first order in the time-dependent paraxial approximation and involves bosonic ladder operators in the spirit of the quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  19. 850-nm Zn-diffusion vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with with oxide-relief structure for high-speed and energy-efficient optical interconnects from very-short to medium (2km) reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Wei; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jason (Jyehong); Yang, Ying-Jay

    2015-03-01

    High-speed and "green" ~850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have lately attracted lots of attention due to their suitability for applications in optical interconnects (OIs). To further enhance the speed and its maximum allowable linking distance of VCSELs are two major trends to meet the requirement of OI in next generation data centers. Recently, by use of the advanced 850 nm VCSEL technique, data rate as high as 64 Gbit/sec over 57m and 20 Gbit/sec over 2km MMF transmission have been demonstrated, respectively. Here, we will review our recent work about 850 nm Zn-diffusion VCSELs with oxide-relief apertures to further enhance the above-mentioned performances. By using Zn-diffusion, we can not only reduce the device resistance but also manipulate the number of optical modes to benefit transmission. Combing such device, which has excellent single-mode (SMSR >30 dB) and high-power (~7mW) performance, with advanced modulation format (OFDM), record-high bit-rate-distance-product through MMF (2.3 km×28 Gbit/sec) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by selective etching away the oxide aperture inside Zn-diffusion VCSEL, significant enhancement of device speed, D-factor, and reliability can be observed. With such unique VCSEL structure, >40 Gbit/sec energy-efficient transmission over 100m MMF under extremely low-driving current density (<10kA/cm2) has been successfully demonstrated.

  20. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. Because of the Einstein principle of equivalence (EEP), one can find a local coordinate system (a local freely falling frame), in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate, . Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to unambiguously decide whether atomic clocks based on quantum transitions of atoms, ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of a cavity. To resolve this ambiguity we have to analyse the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its electromagnetic modes in an expanding universe by employing the full machinery of the Maxwell equations irrespectively of the underlying theory of gravity. We proceed in this way and found out that the size of the cavity and the electromagnetic frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal (unphysical) coordinates as the universe expands in accordance with the Hubble law. We set up the oscillation equation for the resonant electromagnetic modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect mutual cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by space transformation to local coordinates and the time counted by the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that if general relativity is correct and the local expansion of space is isotropic there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a

  1. Hybrid ion chains inside an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zichao; Siverns, James; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    Trapped ions remain a leading candidate for the implementation of large-scale quantum networks. These networks require nodes that can store and process quantum information as well as communicate with each other though photonic flying qubits. We propose to use hybrid ion chains of barium, for communication, and ytterbium, for quantum information processing. We report on progress in setting up a hybrid ion chain in a versatile four-blade trap using high numerical aperture collection optics. Although the visible photons produced from barium ions are more favorable as they are not suitable for long distance fiber communication. With this in mind, we intend to implement frequency conversion to overcome this issue. Also, with the view toward increasing the flying-qubit production rate, we propose a cavity-based system to enhance interactions between the ions and photons. The cavity axis is to be placed along the axial direction of the trap allowing a chain of multiple ions to interact with the cavity at the same time. With this configuration the atom-photon coupling strength can be improved by sqrt(N), where N is the number of ions. Experiments will focus on exploring the dynamics of hybrid ion chain, dual species quantum information processing, two-colour entanglement and phase gates assisted by the ion-cavity coupling are to be explored.

  2. Specimen illumination apparatus with optical cavity for dark field illumination

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Sudar, Damir; Albertson, Donna

    1999-01-01

    An illumination apparatus with a specimen slide holder, an illumination source, an optical cavity producing multiple reflection of illumination light to a specimen comprising a first and a second reflective surface arranged to achieve multiple reflections of light to a specimen is provided. The apparatus can further include additional reflective surfaces to achieve the optical cavity, a slide for mounting the specimen, a coverslip which is a reflective component of the optical cavity, one or more prisms for directing light within the optical cavity, antifading solutions for improving the viewing properties of the specimen, an array of materials for analysis, fluorescent components, curved reflective surfaces as components of the optical cavity, specimen detection apparatus, optical detection equipment, computers for analysis of optical images, a plane polarizer, fiberoptics, light transmission apertures, microscopic components, lenses for viewing the specimen, and upper and lower mirrors above and below the specimen slide as components of the optical cavity. Methods of using the apparatus are also provided.

  3. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  4. Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun; Thorpe, Michael J.; Adler, Florian; Cossel, Kevin C.

    2009-06-01

    Cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy is a new technique that realizes simultaneously broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution provided by an optical frequency comb as well as ultrahigh detection sensitivities enabled with a high-finesse optical cavity [1]. These powerful capabilities have been demonstrated in a series of experiments where real-time detection and identification of many different molecular states or species are achieved in a massively parallel fashion [2,3]. We will discuss the principle, technical requirements, and various implementations for this spectroscopic approach, as well as applications that include trace gas detections, human breath analysis, and characterization of cold and ultracold molecules [4,5,6]. References: [1] M. J. Thorpe, K. D. Moll, B. Safdi, and J. Ye, Science 311, 1595 (2006). [2] M. J. Thorpe, D. D. Hudson, K. D. Moll, J. Lasri, and J. Ye, Opt. Lett. 32, 307 (2007). [3] C. Gohle, B. Stein, A. Schliesser, T. Udem, and T. W. Hänsch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 263902 (2007). [4] M. J. Thorpe, D. Balslev-Clausen, M. Kirchner, and J. Ye, Opt. Express. 16, 2387 (2008). [5] M. J. Thorpe and J. Ye, Appl. Phys. B 91, 397 (2008). [6] M. J. Thorpe, F. Adler, K. C. Cossel, M. H. G. de Miranda, and J. Ye, Chem. Phys. Lett. 468, 1 (2009).

  5. Optical single photons on-demand teleported from microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling the optical and microwave output modes of the respective cavities by using a micro mechanical resonator. The micro mechanical resonator, on one side, is capacitively coupled to the microwave cavity and, on the other side, it is coupled to a high-finesses optical cavity. We then show how this continuous variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport the non-Gaussian number state |1> and the superposition (|0\\rangle +|1\\rangle )/\\sqrt 2 from the microwave cavity output mode onto an output of the optical cavity mode with fidelity much larger than the no-cloning limit.

  6. Diffraction-limited high-finesse optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S. R.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2010-04-15

    High-quality optical cavities with wavelength-sized end mirrors are important to the growing field of micro-optomechanical systems. We present a versatile method for calculating the modes of diffraction limited optical cavities and show that it can be used to determine the effect of a wide variety of cavity geometries and imperfections. Additionally, we show these calculations agree remarkably well with FDTD simulations for wavelength-sized optical modes, even though our method is based on the paraxial approximation.

  7. Temporal laser pulse manipulation using multiple optical ring-cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An optical pulse stretcher and a mathematical algorithm for the detailed calculation of its design and performance is disclosed. The optical pulse stretcher has a plurality of optical cavities, having multiple optical reflectors such that an optical path length in each of the optical cavities is different. The optical pulse stretcher also has a plurality of beam splitters, each of which intercepts a portion of an input optical beam and diverts the portion into one of the plurality of optical cavities. The input optical beam is stretched and a power of an output beam is reduced after passing through the optical pulse stretcher and the placement of the plurality of optical cavities and beam splitters is optimized through a model that takes into account optical beam divergence and alignment in the pluralities of the optical cavities. The optical pulse stretcher system can also function as a high-repetition-rate (MHz) laser pulse generator, making it suitable for use as a stroboscopic light source for high speed ballistic projectile imaging studies, or it can be used for high speed flow diagnostics using a laser light sheet with digital particle imaging velocimetry. The optical pulse stretcher system can also be implemented using fiber optic components to realize a rugged and compact optical system that is alignment free and easy to use.

  8. Devitrite-based optical diffusers.

    PubMed

    Butt, Haider; Knowles, Kevin M; Montelongo, Yunuen; Amaratunga, Gehan A J; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2014-03-25

    Devitrite is a novel material produced by heat treatment of commercial soda-lime-silica glass. It consists of fans of needle-like crystals which can extend up to several millimeters and have interspacings of up to a few hundred nanometers. To date, only the material properties of devitrite have been reported, and there has been a distinct lack of research on using it for optical applications. In this study, we demonstrate that randomly oriented fans of devitrite crystals can act as highly efficient diffusers for visible light. Devitrite crystals produce phase modulation of light because of their relatively high anisotropy. The nanoscale spacings between these needles enable light to be diffused to large scattering angles. Experimentally measured results suggest that light diffusion patterns with beam widths of up to 120° are produced. Since devitrite is an inexpensive material to produce, it has the potential to be used in a variety of commercial applications. PMID:24559189

  9. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection.

  10. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection. PMID:22734771

  11. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyreff, G.; Gelens, L.

    2011-08-15

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  12. Feedback-free optical cavity with self-resonating mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, Y.; Hosaka, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kosuge, A.; Sakaue, K.; Omori, T.; Takahashi, T.; Urakawa, J.; Washio, M.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the operation of a high finesse optical cavity without utilizing an active feedback system to stabilize the resonance. The effective finesse, which is a finesse including the overall system performance, of the cavity was measured to be 394 000 ± 10 000, and the laser power stored in the cavity was 2.52 ± 0.13 kW, which is approximately 187 000 times greater than the incident power to the cavity. The stored power was stabilized with a fluctuation of 1.7%, and we confirmed continuous cavity operation for more than two hours. This result has the potential to trigger an innovative evolution for applications that use optical resonant cavities such as compact photon sources with laser-Compton scattering or cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

  13. A master equation for a two-sided optical cavity

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Thomas M.; Bennett, Robert; Beige, Almut

    2015-01-01

    Quantum optical systems, like trapped ions, are routinely described by master equations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a master equation for two-sided optical cavities with spontaneous photon emission. To do so, we use the same notion of photons as in linear optics scattering theory and consider a continuum of travelling-wave cavity photon modes. Our model predicts the same stationary state photon emission rates for the different sides of a laser-driven optical cavity as classical theories. Moreover, it predicts the same time evolution of the total cavity photon number as the standard standing-wave description in experiments with resonant and near-resonant laser driving. The proposed resonator Hamiltonian can be used, for example, to analyse coherent cavity-fiber networks [E. Kyoseva et al., New J. Phys. 14, 023023 (2012)].

  14. Quantum optics, cavity QED, and quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Quantum optomechanics provides a universal tool to achieve the quantum control of mechanical motion. It does that in devices spanning a vast range of parameters, with mechanical frequencies from a few Hertz to GHz, and with masses from 10-20 g to several kilos. Its underlying ideas can be traced back to the study of gravitational wave antennas, quantum optics, cavity QED and laser cooling which, when combined with the recent availability of advanced micromechanical and nanomechanical devices, opens a path to the realization of macroscopic mechanical systems that operate deep in the quantum regime. At the fundamental level this development paves the way to experiments that will lead to a more profound understanding of quantum mechanics; and from the point of view of applications, quantum optomechanical techniques will provide motion and force sensing near the fundamental limit imposed by quantum mechanics (quantum metrology) and significantly expand the toolbox of quantum information science. After a brief summary of key historical developments, the talk will give a broad overview of the current state of the art of quantum optomechanics, and comment on future prospects both in applied and in fundamental science. Work supported by NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuASAR and ORCHID programs.

  15. Optical microfiber-based photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Yi-zhi; Andrews, Steve; Li, Zhi-yuan; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Using a focused ion beam milling technique, we fabricate broad stop band (∼10% wide) photonic crystal (PhC) cavities in adiabatically-tapered silica fibers. Abrupt structural design of PhC mirrors efficiently reduces radiation loss, increasing the cavity finesse to ∼7.5. Further experiments and simulations verify that the remaining loss is mainly due to Ga ion implantation. Such a microfiber PhC cavity probably has potentials in many light-matter interaction applications.

  16. Stability properties of a rotating astigmatic optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2009-02-01

    We study the effects of rotation on the stability properties of an astigmatic two-mirror cavity. We show that rotation can both stabilize and destabilize a cavity and investigate the effects of such a rotationally-induced transition on the spatial structure and the orbital angular momentum of the cavity modes. Our method relies on the connection between ray and wave optics and is exact within the time-dependent paraxial approximation.

  17. Electromagnetic vacuum confinement effects in the optical microscopic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martini, Francesco; Marrocco, Michele; Mataloni, Paolo; Murra, Daniele

    1992-10-01

    The process of the spontaneous emission (SpE) from an active microscopic cavity (microcavity) is shown with emphasis on mirror separation of the order of the optical wavelength. The relevant effects of SpE enhancement and inhibition, non-exponential decay, and emission anisotropy are outlined for a cavity terminated by mirrors bearing either metal -- or semiconductor -- multilayered coatings. Finally, an experiment regarding the possibility of detecting the field distribution within the cavity of the emission wavelength is shown.

  18. Cavity cooling of an optically levitated submicron particle

    PubMed Central

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Blaser, Florian; Delić, Uroš; Grass, David; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of a levitated submicron particle and an optical cavity field promises access to a unique parameter regime both for macroscopic quantum experiments and for high-precision force sensing. We report a demonstration of such controlled interactions by cavity cooling the center-of-mass motion of an optically trapped submicron particle. This paves the way for a light–matter interface that can enable room-temperature quantum experiments with mesoscopic mechanical systems. PMID:23940352

  19. Impurity-free quantum well intermixing for large optical cavity high-power laser diode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Gür, Emre; Aydınlı, Atilla

    2016-08-01

    We report on the correlation of atomic concentration profiles of diffusing species with the blueshift of the quantum well luminescence from both as-grown and impurity free quantum wells intermixed on actual large optical cavity high power laser diode structures. Because it is critical to suppress catastrophic optical mirror damage, sputtered SiO2 and thermally evaporated SrF2 were used both to enhance and suppress quantum well intermixing, respectively, in these (Al)GaAs large optical cavity structures. A luminescence blueshift of 55 nm (130 meV) was obtained for samples with 400 nm thick sputtered SiO2. These layers were used to generate point defects by annealing the samples at 950 °C for 3 min. The ensuing Ga diffusion observed as a shifting front towards the surface at the interface of the GaAs cap and AlGaAs cladding, as well as Al diffusion into the GaAs cap layer, correlates well with the observed luminescence blue shift, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Although this technique is well-known, the correlation between the photoluminescence peak blue shift and diffusion of Ga and Al during impurity free quantum well intermixing on actual large optical cavity laser diode structures was demonstrated with both x ray photoelectron and photoluminescence spectroscopy, for the first time.

  20. Calculations of laser cavity dumping for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.; Rayman, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    For deep-space pulse-position modulation (PPM) optical communication links using Nd:YAG lasers, two types of laser transmitter modulation techniques are available for efficiently producing laser pulses over a broad range of repetition rates: Q-switching and cavity dumping. The desired modulation scheme is dependent on the required pulse repetition frequency and link parameters. These two techniques are discussed, theoretical and numerical calculations of the internal energy of the laser cavity in cavity dumping are described, and an example of cavity dumping is applied to a link for a proposed experiment package on Cassini.

  1. Non-linear optics of ultrastrongly coupled cavity polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimanno, Michael; Liu, Bin; McMaster, Michael; Singer, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Experiments at CWRU have developed organic cavity polaritons that display world-record vacuum Rabi splittings of more than an eV. This ultrastrongly coupled polaritonic matter is a new regime for exploring non-linear optical effects. We apply quantum optics theory to quantitatively determine various non-linear optical effects including types of low harmonic generation (SHG and THG) in single and double cavity polariton systems. Ultrastrongly coupled photon-matter systems such as these may be the foundation for technologies including low-power optical switching and computing.

  2. Polarization-controlled optical ring cavity (PORC) tunable pulse stretcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew P.; Kiefer, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    A new concept and a theoretical approach for modeling a tunable polarization-controlled optical ring cavity pulse stretcher is demonstrated. The technique discussed herein permits highly simplified and flexible tuning of the temporal shape of nanosecond duration pulses. Using half-wave plates positioned extra- and intracavity, transmission to reflection ratios across both input faces of a polarization beam splitter can easily be controlled. The resulting models indicate a further reduction in peak intensity of 30%, with respect to conventional dielectric beam splitting optical ring cavities, when configured under equivalent and optimized cavity settings.

  3. Diffuse Optics for Tissue Monitoring and Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, T; Choe, R; Baker, W B; Yodh, A G

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the diffusion model for light transport in tissues and the medical applications of diffuse light. Diffuse optics is particularly useful for measurement of tissue hemodynamics, wherein quantitative assessment of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations and blood flow are desired. The theoretical basis for near-infrared or diffuse optical spectroscopy (NIRS or DOS, respectively) is developed, and the basic elements of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) are outlined. We also discuss diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a technique whereby temporal correlation functions of diffusing light are transported through tissue and are used to measure blood flow. Essential instrumentation is described, and representative brain and breast functional imaging and monitoring results illustrate the workings of these new tissue diagnostics. PMID:26120204

  4. Controllable optical switch using a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Shuai; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Evers, Joerg

    2011-05-15

    The optical bistability of an ultracold atomic ensemble located in a small-volume ultrahigh-finesse optical cavity is investigated. We find that a transverse pumping field can be used to control the bistable behavior of the intracavity photons induced by the input pumping along the cavity axis. This phenomenon can be used as a controllable optical switch.

  5. Optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in a linear cavity: model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfred, Katherine M.; Ciaffoni, Luca; Ritchie, Grant A. D.

    2015-08-01

    Optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is a highly sensitive trace gas sensing technique that relies on feedback from a resonant intracavity field to successively lock the laser to the cavity as the wavelength is scanned across a molecular absorption with a comb of resonant frequencies. V-shaped optical cavities have been favoured in the past in order to avoid additional feedback fields from non-resonant reflections that potentially suppress the locking to the resonant cavity frequency. A model of the laser-cavity coupling demonstrates, however, that the laser can stably lock to a resonant linear cavity, within certain constraints on the relative intensity of the two feedback sources. By mode mismatching the field into the linear cavity, we have shown that it is theoretically and practically possible to spatially filter out the unwanted non-resonant component in order for the resonant field to dominate the feedback competition at the laser. A 5.3 cw quantum cascade laser scanning across a absorption feature demonstrated stable locking to achieve a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of for 1-s averaging. Detailed investigations of feedback effects on the laser output verified the validity of our theoretical models.

  6. Enhanced modulation rate in platinum-diffused resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. B.; Yeh, D. H.; Hsieh, L. Z.; Zeng, S. H.

    2005-11-01

    This study is focused on the modulation response of resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes (RCLEDs). Platinum (Pt) atoms are diffused into the 660 nm RCLED epitaxial layers to increase the concentration of recombination centers and to improve the modulation speed. The RCLED has an AlInGaP multi-quantum-well active layer which was embedded into AlGaAs-distributed Bragg reflectors to form a one-wavelength (1-λ) optical resonator. Afterwards, the deep-level Pt impurity was diffused into the RCLED and an improved average rise time, from 18.07 to 12.21 ns, was obtained. The corresponding modulation frequency can be increased from 19.54 to 30.21 MHz.

  7. All-optical light confinement in dynamic cavities in cold atoms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Hui; Artoni, M; La Rocca, G C

    2009-09-25

    We show how to realize in a cold atomic sample a dynamic magneto-optically controlled cavity in which a slow-light pulse can be confined and released on demand. The probe optical pulse is retrieved from the atomic spin coherence initially stored within the cavity and is subsequently confined there subject to a slow-light regime with little loss and diffusion for time intervals as long as a few hundred microseconds before being extracted from either side of the cavity. Our proof-of-principle scheme illustrates the underlying physics of this new mechanism for coherent light confinement and manipulation in cold atoms. This may ease the realization of nonlinear interactions between weak light pulses where strong atom-photon interactions are required for quantum information processing. PMID:19905513

  8. Design and optimization of microbolometer multilayer optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, E.; Al-Khalli, N.; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Debbar, N.; Alduraibi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Microbolometers are the most widely used detectors in long-wave infrared uncooled thermal imagers. An optical cavity is required within a microbolometer structure to increase its optical absorption. In this work we present a detailed study on the design and optimization of a microbolometer optical cavity using Essential-Macleod package. In the simulations, the cavity is considered as thin film multi-layers that form cascaded Fabry-Perot optical cavities. In the design phase, the layers structures are selected including materials and initial thickness. The absorbing layers are chosen to be vanadium-pentoxide (V2O5) and titanium (Ti). In the optimization phase, the designed layer thicknesses are varied to maximize optical absorption within the absorbing layers. The simulations show that Ti layer absorption dominates over V2O5 layer. Also, the optimization proves that the air-gap cavity thickness is not simply quarter-wavelength because of the complex cascaded Fabry-Perot structure. The optimized air-gap thickness here is ≈3.5 µm at 10.6µm wavelength.

  9. Design and optimization of microbolometer multilayer optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, E.; Al-Khalli, N.; Debbar, N.; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Alduraibi, M.

    2015-03-30

    Microbolometers are the most widely used detectors in long-wave infrared uncooled thermal imagers. An optical cavity is required within a microbolometer structure to increase its optical absorption. In this work we present a detailed study on the design and optimization of a microbolometer optical cavity using Essential-Macleod package. In the simulations, the cavity is considered as thin film multi-layers that form cascaded Fabry-Perot optical cavities. In the design phase, the layers structures are selected including materials and initial thickness. The absorbing layers are chosen to be vanadium-pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and titanium (Ti). In the optimization phase, the designed layer thicknesses are varied to maximize optical absorption within the absorbing layers. The simulations show that Ti layer absorption dominates over V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer. Also, the optimization proves that the air-gap cavity thickness is not simply quarter-wavelength because of the complex cascaded Fabry-Perot structure. The optimized air-gap thickness here is ≈3.5 µm at 10.6µm wavelength.

  10. Transmission spectrum of an optical cavity containing N atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, Sabrina; Shenvi, Neil; Brown, Kenneth R.; Whaley, K. Birgitta; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2004-04-01

    The transmission spectrum of a high-finesse optical cavity containing an arbitrary number of trapped atoms is presented in the zero-temperature, low saturation limit. We take spatial and motional effects into account and show that in the limit of strong coupling, the important spectral features can be determined for an arbitrary number of atoms, N. We also show that these results have important ramifications in limiting our ability to determine the number of atoms in the cavity.

  11. Dynamical entanglement purification using chains of atoms and optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gonta, Denis; Loock, Peter van

    2011-10-15

    In the framework of cavity QED, we propose a practical scheme to purify dynamically a bipartite entangled state using short chains of atoms coupled to high-finesse optical cavities. In contrast to conventional entanglement purification protocols, we avoid controlled-not gates, thus reducing complicated pulse sequences and superfluous qubit operations. Our interaction scheme works in a deterministic way and, together with entanglement distribution and swapping, opens a route toward efficient quantum repeaters for long-distance quantum communication.

  12. Non-adiabatic Dynamics of Molecules in Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    Molecular systems coupled to optical cavities are promising candidates for a novel kind of photo chemistry. Strong coupling to the vacuum field of the cavity can modify the potential energy surfaces opening up new reaction pathways. We present a derivation of the non-adiabatic couplings for single molecules in the strong coupling regime. The possibilities for photo chemistry are demonstrated for a set of model systems representing typical situations found in molecules. Supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  13. Electromagnetic Wave Chaos in Gradient Refractive Index Optical Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Fromhold, T. M.; Taylor, R. P.; Micolich, A. P.

    2001-06-11

    Electromagnetic wave chaos is investigated using two-dimensional optical cavities formed in a cylindrical gradient refractive index lens with reflective surfaces. When the planar ends of the lens are cut at an angle to its axis, the geometrical ray paths are chaotic. In this regime, the electromagnetic mode spectrum of the cavity is modulated by both real and ghost periodic ray paths, which also {open_quotes}scar{close_quotes} the electric field intensity distributions of many modes. When the cavity is coupled to waveguides, the eigenmodes generate complex series of resonant peaks in the electromagnetic transmission spectrum.

  14. Optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles in resonant cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Juejun; Lin Shiyun; Crozier, Kenneth; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2010-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the opto-mechanical interactions between a dielectric nanoparticle and the resonantly enhanced optical field inside a high Q, small-mode-volume optical cavity. We develop an analytical method based on open system analysis to account for the resonant perturbation due to particle introduction and predict trapping potential in good agreement with three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations. Strong size-dependent trapping dynamics distinctly different from free-space optical tweezers arise as a consequence of the finite cavity perturbation. We illustrate single nanoparticle trapping from an ensemble of monodispersed particles based on size-dependent trapping dynamics. We further discover that the failure of the conventional dipole approximation in the case of resonant cavity trapping originates from a new perturbation interaction mechanism between trapped particles and spatially localized photons.

  15. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  16. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  17. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  18. Microgel photonics: a breathing cavity onto optical fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, A.; Aliberti, A.; Giaquinto, M.; Micco, A.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel multifunctional optical fiber probe resulting from the integration between two rapidly emerging technologies such as Lab-on-Fiber and Microgel Photonics. The device consists of a microgel based cavity formed by metallic slabs supporting plasmonic resonances, directly integrated on the optical fiber tip. By exploiting the multiresponsivity of microgel systems, variations of temperature, PH, ionic strength, as well as molecular binding events, make the cavity to `breath', thus modulating the interference pattern in the reflection spectrum. The microgel layer can be synthetized in such a way to obtain different thicknesses, corresponding to different operating regimes, opening new avenues for the realization of advanced multifunctional nanoprobes.

  19. Optical cavity integrated surface ion trap for enhanced light collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, Francisco M.

    Ion trap systems allow the faithful storage and manipulation of qubits encoded in the energy levels of the ions, and can be interfaced with photonic qubits that can be transmitted to connect remote quantum systems. Single photons transmitted from two remote sites, each entangled with one quantum memory, can be used to entangle distant quantum memories by interfering on a beam splitter. Efficient remote entanglement generation relies upon efficient light collection from single ions into a single mode fiber. This can be realized by integrating an ion trap with an optical cavity and employing the Purcell effect for enhancing the light collection. Remote entanglement can be used as a resource for a quantum repeater for provably secure long-distance communication or as a method for communicating within a distributed quantum information processor. We present the integration of a 1 mm optical cavity with a micro-fabricated surface ion trap. The plano-concave cavity is oriented normal to the chip surface where the planar mirror is attached underneath the trap chip. The cavity is locked using a 780 nm laser which is stabilized to Rubidium and shifted to match the 369 nm Doppler transition in Ytterbium. The linear ion trap allows ions to be shuttled in and out of the cavity mode. The Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission into the cavity mode would then allow efficient collection of the emitted photons, enabling faster remote entanglement generation.

  20. Thermalization and condensation in an incoherently pumped passive optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, C.; Haelterman, M.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Kaiser, R.; Picozzi, A.

    2011-09-01

    We study theoretically and numerically the condensation and the thermalization of classical optical waves in an incoherently pumped passive Kerr cavity. We show that the dynamics of the cavity exhibits a turbulent behavior that can be described by the wave turbulence theory. A mean-field kinetic equation is derived, which reveals that, in its high finesse regime, the cavity behaves essentially as a conservative Hamiltonian system. In particular, the intracavity turbulent field is shown to relax adiabatically toward a thermodynamic equilibrium state of energy equipartition. As a consequence of this effect of wave thermalization, the incoherent optical field undergoes a process of condensation, characterized by the spontaneous emergence of a plane wave from the incoherently pumped cavity. The condensation process is an equilibrium phase transition that occurs below a critical value of the (kinetic) energy of the incoherent pump. In spite of the dissipative nature of the cavity dynamics, the condensate fraction of the high-finesse cavity field is found in quantitative agreement with the theory inherited from the purely conservative (Hamiltonian) nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  1. Optothermal transport behavior in whispering gallery mode optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M.

    2014-08-04

    Over the past century, whispering gallery mode optical cavities have enabled numerous advances in science and engineering, such as discoveries in quantum mechanics and non-linear optics, as well as the development of optical gyroscopes and add drop filters. One reason for their widespread appeal is their ability to confine light for long periods of time, resulting in high circulating intensities. However, when sufficiently large amounts of optical power are coupled into these cavities, they begin to experience optothermal or photothermal behavior, in which the optical energy is converted into heat. Above the optothermal threshold, the resonance behavior is no longer solely defined by electromagnetics. Previous work has primarily focused on the role of the optothermal coefficient of the material in this instability. However, the physics of this optothermal behavior is significantly more complex. In the present work, we develop a predictive theory based on a generalizable analytical expression in combination with a geometry-specific COMSOL Multiphysics finite element method model. The simulation couples the optical and thermal physics components, accounting for geometry variations as well as the temporal and spatial profile of the optical field. To experimentally verify our theoretical model, the optothermal thresholds of a series of silica toroidal resonant cavities are characterized at different wavelengths (visible through near-infrared) and using different device geometries. The silica toroid offers a particularly rigorous case study for the developed optothermal model because of its complex geometrical structure which provides multiple thermal transport paths.

  2. Optothermal transport behavior in whispering gallery mode optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Soheil; M. Armani, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Over the past century, whispering gallery mode optical cavities have enabled numerous advances in science and engineering, such as discoveries in quantum mechanics and non-linear optics, as well as the development of optical gyroscopes and add drop filters. One reason for their widespread appeal is their ability to confine light for long periods of time, resulting in high circulating intensities. However, when sufficiently large amounts of optical power are coupled into these cavities, they begin to experience optothermal or photothermal behavior, in which the optical energy is converted into heat. Above the optothermal threshold, the resonance behavior is no longer solely defined by electromagnetics. Previous work has primarily focused on the role of the optothermal coefficient of the material in this instability. However, the physics of this optothermal behavior is significantly more complex. In the present work, we develop a predictive theory based on a generalizable analytical expression in combination with a geometry-specific COMSOL Multiphysics finite element method model. The simulation couples the optical and thermal physics components, accounting for geometry variations as well as the temporal and spatial profile of the optical field. To experimentally verify our theoretical model, the optothermal thresholds of a series of silica toroidal resonant cavities are characterized at different wavelengths (visible through near-infrared) and using different device geometries. The silica toroid offers a particularly rigorous case study for the developed optothermal model because of its complex geometrical structure which provides multiple thermal transport paths.

  3. Coupled mode theory in non-Hermitian optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bingbing; Wu, Bei; Xu, Jing; Xiao, Junjun; Chen, Yuntian

    2016-07-25

    We study the coupling of mode in time for non-Hermitian cavities. Using variational principle, we provide a self-consistent approach to study the mode hybridization in non-Hermitian cavities from the first-principle of Maxwell's equations. We first extend the reaction concept for time reversal adjoint system using the scalar inner product. We apply our theory to the non-Hermitian parity-time symmetric cavities, and obtain excellent agreement with results obtained by finite element fullwave simulations. In contrast, the conventional coupled mode theory using complex inner product fails to capture the bifurcation of the dispersion of parity-time symmetric cavities, as non-Hermicity increases. Our theory may have potential applications in non-Hermitian optical systems. PMID:27464111

  4. Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The technique of Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (CEVMS) has recently been developed. By demodulating the detector signal at twice the plasma modulation frequency (2f), the velocity-modulated ionic absorption signal can be extracted. Although the concentration-modulated excited neutral molecules are also observed at 2f, the ion and neutral signals can be distinguished and separated with phase-sensitive demodulation. The optical cavity provides two major benefits. It increases both the optical path length and the intracavity laser power by a factor of 2×Finesse/π. The multipass advantage allows for much longer path length than was previously possible with unidirectional multipass White cells. The power enhancement combined with perfectly overlapped counterpropagating beams within the cavity allows for sub-Doppler spectroscopy. Although CEVMS showed much potential, its sensitivity was ultimately limited by electronic noise from the plasma interfering with the cavity-locking electronics. We have further improved upon CEVMS by combining it with Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The laser is frequency modulated at precisely an integer multiple of the free spectral range of the optical cavity; this allows the heterodyne sidebands to be coupled into the optical cavity. Heterodyne detection of the cavity leak-out is immune to noise in the laser-cavity lock, and 2f demodulation further decreases electronic noise in the system and retains ion-neutral discrimination. The additional level of modulation beyond ordinary CEVMS has the added advantage of enabling the observation of both absorption and dispersion signals simultaneously by using two RF mixers, each driving its own lock-in amplifier. In a single scan, four distinct signals can be obtained: absorption and dispersion for ions and excited neutrals. The technique has been demonstrated in the near-IR for N_2^+. B. M. Siller, A. A. Mills and B. J. Mc

  5. New frontiers in time-domain diffuse optics, a review.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in time-domain diffuse optics that rely on physical concepts (e.g., time-gating and null distance) and advanced photonic components (e.g., vertical cavity source-emitting laser as light sources, single photon avalanche diode, and silicon photomultipliers as detectors, fast-gating circuits, and time-to-digital converters for acquisition) are focused. This study shows how these tools could lead on one hand to compact and wearable time-domain devices for point-of-care diagnostics down to the consumer level and on the other hand to powerful systems with exceptional depth penetration and sensitivity. PMID:27311627

  6. Gain-enhanced optical cooling in cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Faez, Sanli; Marquardt, Florian; Tureci, Hakan

    2013-03-01

    We study the optical cooling of the mechanical motion of the resonator mirror in a cavity-optomechanical system that contains an optical gain medium. We find that the optical damping caused by radiation pressure force is vanishingly small if the active medium is pumped incoherently above its lasing threshold. In addition, we find that the spontaneous emission of the active medium always tends to increase the final effective temperature of the mechanical motion. In the presence of an additional seeding signal, i.e. a coherent drive of fixed frequency within the width of the gain curve however, we find that the cooling rate can be enhanced significantly with respect to that of a passive cavity. We attribute this effect to a reduced effective optical damping in the presence of incoherent pumping.

  7. Augmentation of Cavity Optical Inspection by Replicas Without Performance Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M.; Burk, D.; Hicks, D.; Wu, G.; Thompson, C.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Although cavity optical inspection systems provide a huge amount of qualitative information about surface features, the amount of quantitative topographic informa-tion is limited. Here, we report the use of silicone-based RTV for replicas and moldings that provide increased details of topographic data associated with the optical cavity images. Profilometry scans of the molds yield mi-crometer-scale details associated with equator weld struc-tures and weld pits. This confirms at least two different types of pits, one which is bowl-shaped, and one which has a small peak at the bottom. The contour information extracted from profilometry can be used to evaluate mechanisms by which pits and other features limit RF performance. We present calculations based on a con-formal transformation of the profiles above. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  8. Optical diagnostics in the oral cavity: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Wilder-Smith, P; Holtzman, J; Epstein, J; Le, A

    2014-01-01

    As the emphasis shifts from damage mitigation to disease prevention or reversal of early disease in the oral cavity, the need for sensitive and accurate detection and diagnostic tools become more important. Many novel and emergent optical diagnostic modalities for the oral cavity are becoming available to clinicians with a variety of desirable attributes including: (i) non-invasiveness, (ii) absence of ionizing radiation, (iii) patient-friendliness, (iv) real-time information (v) repeatability, and (vi) high-resolution surface and subsurface images. In this article, the principles behind optical diagnostic approaches, their feasibility and applicability for imaging soft and hard tissues, and their potential usefulness as a tool in the diagnosis of oral mucosal lesions, dental pathologies, and other dental applications will be reviewed. The clinical applications of light-based imaging technologies in the oral cavity and of their derivative devices will be discussed to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of emergent diagnostic modalities. PMID:20561224

  9. Laser Pulse-Stretching Using Multiple Optical Ring-Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a simple and passive nanosecond-long (ns-long) laser 'pulse-stretcher' using multiple optical ring-cavities. We present a model of the pulse-stretching process for an arbitrary number of optical ring-cavities. Using the model, we optimize the design of a pulse-stretcher for use in a spontaneous Raman scattering excitation system that avoids laser-induced plasma spark problems. From the optimized design, we then experimentally demonstrate and verify the model with a 3-cavity pulse-stretcher system that converts a 1000 mJ, 8.4 ns-long input laser pulse into an approximately 75 ns-long (FWHM) output laser pulse with a peak power reduction of 0.10X, and an 83% efficiency.

  10. Optical modeling of certical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presently the subject of intense research due to their potential as compact, efficient, astigmatic laser sources for a number of important applications. Of special interest are the selectively-oxidized VCSELs that have recently set records for threshold current and wall-plug efficiency. The onset of higher-order modes at powers of a few milliWatts, however, presently limits the wide utilization of these devices and indicates the need for improvements in design. Unfortunately, their complexity precludes optimization based solely upon empirical methods, and points instead to the need for better numerical models. Modeling the optical field in a vertical-cavity laser, however, is especially difficult due to both the high Q of the optical cavity and the distributed reflectivity of the mirrors. Our approach to this dilemma has been the development of modeling techniques on two complexity scales. We first derived an effective- index model that is numerically efficient and thus can be included together with carrier transport and thermal models to make up a self-consistent modeling package. In addition to its use in the overall VCSEL model, this simplified optical model has been extremely valuable in elucidating the basic principles of waveguiding in VCSELs that in turn have led to new ideas in device design. More specifically, the derived expression for the effective index shows clearly that index guiding in a VCSEL depends only on variations in optical cavity length, and thus can be engineered without the need to alter the material index of refraction. Also, we have designed index- guided and antiguided devices whose cavity lengths are modified in certain regions by etching of the cavity material prior to growth of the second mirror. Fabrication of these new device designs is presently in progress.

  11. Weak Langmuir optical turbulence in a fiber cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Garnier, J.; Mussot, A.; Trillo, S.; Churkin, D.; Tarasov, N.; Turitsyn, S.; Picozzi, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study theoretically and numerically the dynamics of a passive optical fiber ring cavity pumped by a highly incoherent wave: an incoherently injected fiber laser. The theoretical analysis reveals that the turbulent dynamics of the cavity is dominated by the Raman effect. The forced-dissipative nature of the fiber cavity is responsible for a large diversity of turbulent behaviors: Aside from nonequilibrium statistical stationary states, we report the formation of a periodic pattern of spectral incoherent solitons, or the formation of different types of spectral singularities, e.g., dispersive shock waves and incoherent spectral collapse behaviors. We derive a mean-field kinetic equation that describes in detail the different turbulent regimes of the cavity and whose structure is formally analogous to the weak Langmuir turbulence kinetic equation in the presence of forcing and damping. A quantitative agreement is obtained between the simulations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with cavity boundary conditions and those of the mean-field kinetic equation and the corresponding singular integrodifferential reduction, without using adjustable parameters. We discuss the possible realization of a fiber cavity experimental setup in which the theoretical predictions can be observed and studied.

  12. Optical modulator based on coupled photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, Pavel G.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an optical signal modulator based on two-photonic crystal nanobeam cavities coupled through a waveguide. The suggested modulator shifts the resonant frequency over a scalable range. We design a compact optical modulator based on photonic crystal nanobeams cavities that exhibits high stability to manufacturing. Photonic crystal waveguide tuning in the low-intensity region of the resonant mode is demonstrated. The advantages of the suggested approach over the single-resonator optical modulator approaches include the possibilities to shift the modulator frequency over a scalable range that depends on switching energy level and to effectively electrically tune the device in the low-intensity region of the resonant mode.

  13. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    We present noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS), a recently developed technique for sensitive, broadband, and high resolution spectroscopy. In NICE-OFCS an optical frequency comb (OFC) is locked to a high finesse cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency precisely equal to (a multiple of) the cavity free spectral range. Since each comb line and sideband is transmitted through a separate cavity mode in exactly the same way, any residual frequency noise on the OFC relative to the cavity affects each component in an identical manner. The transmitted intensity contains a beat signal at the modulation frequency that is immune to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity, in a way similar to continuous wave noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The light transmitted through the cavity is detected with a fast-scanning Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) and the NICE-OFCS signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform of the synchronously demodulated interferogram. Our NICE-OFCS system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity with a finesse of ˜9000 and a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We measured NICE-OFCS signals from the 3νb{1}+νb{3} overtone band of CO_2 around 1.57 μm and achieved absorption sensitivity 6.4×10-11cm-1 Hz-1/2 per spectral element, corresponding to a minimum detectable CO_2 concentration of 25 ppb after 330 s integration time. We will describe the principles of the technique and its technical implementation, and discuss the spectral lineshapes of the NICE-OFCS signals. A. Khodabakhsh, C. Abd Alrahman, and A. Foltynowicz, Opt. Lett. 39, 5034-5037 (2014). J. Ye, L. S. Ma, and J. L. Hall, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 6-15 (1998). A. Khodabakhsh, A. C. Johansson, and A. Foltynowicz, Appl. Phys. B (2015) doi:10.1007/s00340-015-6010-7.

  14. Resonant modes of optical cavities with phase-conjugate mirrors.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, P A; Hardy, A; Siegman, A E

    1980-02-15

    The lowest-order self-consistent Gaussian transverse modes are derived, also the resonant frequencies of an optical resonator formed by conventional paraxial optical components plus a phase-conjugate mirror (PCM) on one end. The conventional optical elements are described by an over-all ABCD matrix. Cavities with purely real elements (no aperturing) have a continuous set of self-reproducing Gaussian modes described by a semicircular locus in the 1/q plane for one round trip; all Gaussian beams are self-reproducing after two round trips. Complex ABCD matrices, such as are produced by Gaussian aperturing in the cavity, lead to unique self-consistent perturbation-stable Gaussian modes. The resonant frequency spectrum of a PCM cavity consists of a central resonance at the driving frequency omega(0) of the PCM element, independent of the cavity length L, plus half-axial sidebands spaced by Deltaomega(ax) = 2pi(c/4L), with phase and amplitude constraints on each pair of upper and lower sidebands. PMID:20216900

  15. Nanoplasmonics: New Design Concepts For Nanoscale Optical Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Stefan A.

    2010-10-07

    The design of nanoplasmonic cavities exploiting coherent processes such as sub- and superradiance as well as Fano-type interactions will be discussed, under the framework of plasmon hybridization theory. In such cavities, interactions between bright and dark localized plasmon modes lead to a complex mode spectrum, which can be visualized using electron energy loss spectroscopy. First implementations fabricated using electron beam lithography will be presented. Furthermore, it will be shown how the concept of transformation optics can be utilized for the design of nanoresonators with a broadband absorption spectrum, showing high promise for light harvesting over the whole visible and infrared range of the spectrum.

  16. Modes of a twisted optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2007-03-15

    An astigmatic optical resonator consists of two astigmatic mirrors facing each other. The resonator is twisted when the symmetry axes of the mirrors are nonparallel. We present an algebraic method to obtain the complete set of the paraxial eigenmodes of such a resonator. Basic ingredients are the complex eigenvectors of the four-dimensional transfer matrix that describes the transformation of a ray of light over a roundtrip of the resonator. The relation between the fundamental mode and the higher-order modes is expressed in terms of raising operators in the spirit of the ladder operators of the quantum harmonic oscillator.

  17. Suppressing Spectral Diffusion of Emitted Photons with Optical Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotso, H. F.; Feiguin, A. E.; Awschalom, D. D.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    In many quantum architectures the solid-state qubits, such as quantum dots or color centers, are interfaced via emitted photons. However, the frequency of photons emitted by solid-state systems exhibits slow uncontrollable fluctuations over time (spectral diffusion), creating a serious problem for implementation of the photon-mediated protocols. Here we show that a sequence of optical pulses applied to the solid-state emitter can stabilize the emission line at the desired frequency. We demonstrate efficiency, robustness, and feasibility of the method analytically and numerically. Taking nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond as an example, we show that only several pulses, with the width of 1 ns, separated by few ns (which is not difficult to achieve) can suppress spectral diffusion. Our method provides a simple and robust way to greatly improve the efficiency of photon-mediated entanglement and/or coupling to photonic cavities for solid-state qubits.

  18. Time-domain diffuse optics: towards next generation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Davide; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Arridge, Simon; Martelli, Fabrizio; Tosi, Alberto; Boso, Gianluca; Farina, Andrea; Durduran, Turgut; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse optics is a powerful tool for clinical applications ranging from oncology to neurology, but also for molecular imaging, and quality assessment of food, wood and pharmaceuticals. We show that ideally time-domain diffuse optics can give higher contrast and a higher penetration depth with respect to standard technology. In order to completely exploit the advantages of a time-domain system a distribution of sources and detectors with fast gating capabilities covering all the sample surface is needed. Here, we present the building block to build up such system. This basic component is made of a miniaturised source-detector pair embedded into the probe based on pulsed Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) as sources and Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD) or Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as detectors. The possibility to miniaturized and dramatically increase the number of source detectors pairs open the way to an advancement of diffuse optics in terms of improvement of performances and exploration of new applications. Furthermore, availability of compact devices with reduction in size and cost can boost the application of this technique.

  19. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kochergin, Vladimir

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  20. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750–800, 900, and 130–180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  1. Single cavity filters on end-faces of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Stefan; Schweda, Dawid; Dziedzina, Marcus; Al-Saadi, Aws; Franke, Bülent A.; Scharfenorth, Chris; Grimm, Bernd; Dufft, Daniela; Schrader, Sigurd K.; Eichler, Hans J.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed thin film Fabry-Perot filters directly coated on optical fibers to archive a high level of integration with a reduction of optical elements. Such band-pass filters can be used in fiber optical sensor systems, and for fiber communication, e.g. CWDM applications. The filters cavities consist of a single spacer and two dielectric mirrors. The dielectric mirrors are deposited by PVD directly on end-faces of single-mode optical fibers. Dielectric as well as polymeric materials were applied as the spacer layer. Polymeric spacer layers were deposited by dip coating. The influence of the mirror reflectivity on the transmission band of the Fabry-Perot filters was investigated. Furthermore, the optical performance of filters with first order (λ/2) as well as higher order spacers was analyzed. The experimental results are compared with numerical analysis of Fabry-Perot cavities on the end-face of cylindrical waveguides. The spectral characteristic of the filters are calculated using a software solving Maxwelĺs equations by a FDTD method. The layer design of the filters and the deposition process were optimized for maximum transmission and narrow bandwidth of the transmission peak. Passive band-pass filters on fiber end-faces were designed, fabricated and characterized for transmission wavelengths of 945 nm, 1300 nm, as well as 1550 nm. Bandwidths as narrow as 1 nm could be achieved for 945 nm.

  2. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  3. Cooling enhancement in optical refrigeration by non-resonant optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, B. G.; Gragossian, A.; Symonds, G.; Ghasemkhani, M. R.; Albrecht, A. R.; Sheik-Bahae, M.; Epstein, R. I.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of cooling enhancement in optical refrigerators by the implementation of advanced non-resonant optical cavities. Cavity designs have been studied to maximize pump light-trapping to improve absorption and thereby increase the efficiency of optical refrigeration. The approaches of non-resonant optical cavities by Herriott-cell and totalinternal- reflection were studied. Ray-tracing simulations and experiments were performed to analyze and optimize the different light-trapping configurations. Light trapping was studied for laser sources with high quality beams and for beams with large divergences, roughly corresponding to the output from fiber lasers and from diode lasers, respectively. We present a trade-off analysis between performance, reliability, and manufacturability.

  4. Nonperturbative atom-photon interactions in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, H.J.; Tian, L.; Ren, W.

    1994-12-31

    One of the principal developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics in the last few years has been the extension of the ideas originally applied to systems of Rydberg atoms in microwave cavities to optical frequencies. As a corollary of this, more attention is being paid to quantum fluctuations and photon statistics. Another development, still in its infancy, is a move toward experiments using slowed or trapped atoms, or velocity selected beams; these methods are needed to enter the nonperturbative (strong dipole coupling) regime for one atom where there are experiments on subtle quantum-statistical effects go carry out. In this chapter we solve a number of theoretical problems related to these themes. Although the focus of the work is on optical systems, most of what we do is also relevant at microwave frequencies. We emphasize quantum fluctuations and photon statistics, and we try always to separate the quantum physics from those aspects of the physics that are understandable in classical terms. On the whole we only pay attention to the nonperturbative regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics where the dipole coupling strength is larger than the dissipation rates. 59 refs., 14 figs.

  5. Enhancement in Quality Factor of SRF Niobium Cavities by Material Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-06-01

    An increase in the quality factor of superconducting radiofrequency cavities is achieved by minimizing the surface resistance during processing steps. The surface resistance is the sum of temperature independent residual resistance and temperature/material dependent Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) resistance. High temperature heat treatment usually reduces the impurities concentration from the bulk niobium, lowering the residual resistance. The BCS part can be reduced by selectively doping non-magnetic impurities. The increase in quality factor, termed as Q-rise, was observed in cavities when titanium or nitrogen thermally diffused in the inner cavity surface.

  6. A simplified model for thermal-wave cavity self-consistent measurement of thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Gu, Caikang; Neill, Stuart; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Fairbridge, Craig; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-12-01

    A simplified theoretical model was developed for the thermal-wave cavity (TWC) technique in this study. This model takes thermal radiation into account and can be employed for absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivity of gas and liquid samples without any knowledge of geometrical and thermal parameters of the components of the TWC. Using this model and cavity-length scans, thermal diffusivities of air and distilled water were accurately and precisely measured as (2.191 ± 0.004) × 10-5 and (1.427 ± 0.009) × 10-7 m2 s-1, respectively, in very good agreement with accepted literature values.

  7. Single atom as a mirror of an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Hétet, G; Slodička, L; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R

    2011-09-23

    By tightly focusing a laser field onto a single cold ion trapped in front of a far-distant dielectric mirror, we could observe a quantum electrodynamic effect whereby the ion behaves as the optical mirror of a Fabry-Pérot cavity. We show that the amplitude of the laser field is significantly altered due to a modification of the electromagnetic mode structure around the atom in a novel regime in which the laser intensity is already changed by the atom alone. We propose a direct application of this system as a quantum memory for single photons. PMID:22026849

  8. Compact carbon monoxide sensor utilizing a confocal optical cavity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, B.; Magyar, J.; Weyant, R.; Hall, J.

    1973-01-01

    The carbon monoxide sensor discussed in this paper utilizes a unique confocal cavity which allows the complete system to be packaged in a small volume suitable for hand-held use. The optical system is the heart of the instrument with equal emphasis placed on the electronics support circuitry, consisting essentially of a thermal infrared pyroelectric detector and lock-in amplifier. The pyroelectric detector offers a major advantage over other thermal detectors, providing a signal-to-noise ratio and detectivity that remain nearly constant over the frequency range from dc to 2000 Hz. Since bias voltage is not required, low frequency noise is not generated in the detector.

  9. Blood oxygenation monitoring by diffuse optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Patachia, M; Dutu, D.C.A.; Dumitras, D.C.

    2011-01-24

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) makes it possible to reconstruct, in two or three dimensions, the internal structure of the biological tissues based on the distribution of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient, using optical measurements at multiple source - detector positions on the tissue surface. The measurement of the light intensity transmitted through the tissue can be also used to compute the haemoglobin and oxyhaemoglobin concentrations, measuring the selective absorption of the main blood chromophores by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The spectral selectivity of the system and the evaluation of the blood volume and blood oxygenation (BV and OXY distributions), together with the reconstruction of the inner structure of the tissue, can improve the accuracy of early cancer diagnosis, based on the tissue angiogenesis characterisation. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  10. Optical heterodyne detection for cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, Marc D.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Zare, Richard N.

    2000-07-25

    A cavity ring-down system for performing cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using optical heterodyne detection of a ring-down wave E.sub.RD during a ring-down phase or a ring-up wave E.sub.RU during a ring up phase. The system sends a local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and a signal wave E.sub.SIGNAL to the cavity, preferably a ring resonator, and derives an interference signal from the combined local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD (or ring-up wave E.sub.RU). The local oscillator wave E.sub.LO has a first polarization and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD has a second polarization different from the first polarization. The system has a combining arrangement for combining or overlapping local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD at a photodetector, which receives the interference signal and generates a heterodyne current I.sub.H therefrom. Frequency and phase differences between the waves are adjustable.

  11. Dye laser studies using zig-zag optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Klimek, D.E.; Mandl, A.E.; Willman, B. )

    1994-06-01

    The authors report a substantial advance in dye laser performance using a zig-zag optical cavity. This configuration drastically reduces the effects of intrapulse medium disturbances due to acoustics and thermal lensing on pulse duration, beam quality, and extraction efficiency. Laser outputs of up to 2 J were observed from Coumarin-498 dye pumped by a KrF excimer laser. The dye laser output faithfully replicates the flat-top KrF laser pump pulse over the entire 1.7-[mu]s pulse duration. An intrinsic laser photon conversion efficiency (Photons[sub in]/Photons[sub absorbed]) of 44% was measured. When unstable resonator optics were used, beam qualities of about 2 XDL were measured.

  12. Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal-wave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.

    2001-06-01

    A simple methodology for the direct measurement of the thermal wavelength using a thermal-wave cavity, and its application to the evaluation of the thermal diffusivity of liquids is described. The simplicity and robustness of this technique lie in its relative measurement features for both the thermal-wave phase and cavity length, thus eliminating the need for taking into account difficult-to-quantify and time-consuming instrumental phase shifts. Two liquid samples were used: distilled water and ethylene glycol. Excellent agreement was found with reported results in the literature. The accuracy of the thermal diffusivity measurements using the new methodology originates in the use of only difference measurements in the thermal-wave phase and cavity length. Measurement precision is directly related to the corresponding precision on the measurement of the thermal wavelength.

  13. Disorder-induced transparency in a one-dimensional waveguide side coupled with optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongyou Dong, Guangda; Zou, Bingsuo

    2014-05-07

    Disorder influence on photon transmission behavior is theoretically studied in a one-dimensional waveguide side coupled with a series of optical cavities. For this sake, we propose a concept of disorder-induced transparency appearing on the low-transmission spectral background. Two kinds of disorders, namely, disorders of optical cavity eigenfrequencies and relative phases in the waveguide side coupled with optical cavities are considered to show the disorder-induced transparency. They both can induce the optical transmission peaks on the low-transmission backgrounds. The statistical mean value of the transmission also increases with increasing the disorders of the cavity eigenfrequencies and relative phases.

  14. Assessing PDT response with diffuse optical spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used to treat a variety of conditions including cancer. Effective PDT requires three components: a photosensitizer (PS), light of a specific wavelength to activate the PS and oxygen. When all three are present in a lesion it leads to cell death and vascular destruction. Optical techniques such as diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), diffuse fluorescence spectroscopy (DFS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) can be used to quantify vascular parameters and photosensitizer content before and after PDT, providing valuable information for assessing response. For the quantification of vascular parameters, a probe-specific empirical light transport model was developed. A look-up-table was constructed using tissue simulating phantoms made of Intralipid to control the scattering, India Ink to control the absorption and water. The empirical model allowed the quantification of optical properties as well as the vascular parameters blood volume fraction (BVf) and blood oxygen saturation (SO2) with DRS. Blood flow was measured using DCS. For the quantification of PS content two techniques were used. DRS was used to fit the absorption of the PS and DFS measured the fluorescence of the PS. For quantification of PS content from measured fluorescence, a correction factor was developed using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the optical properties at the excitation and emission wavelengths. The three techniques were used to assess PDT response in pre-clinical and clinical studies. For the preclinical study, mice were treated with HPPH-PDT and blood flow was measured continuously with DCS. Blood flow variables were compared to STAT3 crosslinking (a molecular marker for PDT photoreaction) and CD31 staining (to visualize intact endothelial cells after PDT). For the clinical study, patients in a clinical trial for HPPH-PDT were measured with DRS, DFS and DCS before and after treatment. Multiple parameters were compared to the clinical response

  15. Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Maria Angela; Joseph, Danny K.; Huppert, Theodore J.; Diamond, Solomon G.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) and Diffuse Optical Imaging (DOI) are increasingly used to detect hemodynamic changes in the cerebral cortex induced by brain activity. Until recently, the small number of optodes in NIRS instruments has hampered measurement of optical signals from diverse brain regions. Our new DOI system has 32 detectors and 32 sources; by arranging them in a specific pattern we can cover most of the adult head. With the increased number of optodes we can collect optical data from prefrontal, sensorimotor, and visual cortices in both hemispheres simultaneously. In this paper, we describe the system, report system characterization measurements on phantoms as well as on human subjects at rest and during visual, motor and cognitive stimulation. Tacking advantage of the system’s larger number of sources and detectors, we explored the spatiotemporal patterns of physiological signals during rest. These physiological signals, arising from cardiac, respiratory, and blood pressure modulations, interfere with measurement of the hemodynamic response to brain stimulation. Whole-head optical measurements, in addition to providing maps of multiple brain regions’ responses to brain activation, will enable better understandings of the physiological signals ultimately leading to better signal processing algorithms to distinguish physiological signal clutter from brain activation signals. PMID:17092156

  16. Coupling of Solute Vibrational Modes with a Fabry-Perot Optical Cavity Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkelberger, Adam; Compton, Ryan; Fears, Kenan; Spann, Bryan; Long, James; Simpkins, Blake; Owrutsky, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Electronic transitions of systems confined in optical microcavities can strongly couple to cavity modes, giving rise to new, mixed-character modes. Recent studies have demonstrated similar coherent coupling between the vibrational modes of a thin polymer film and a Fabry-Perot optical cavity mode. This coupling manifests experimentally as a splitting of the transmissive cavity mode into two dispersive branches separated by the vacuum Rabi splitting. Here we present recent experimental results for the coupling of solution-phase compounds with an optical cavity. Solutions of W(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and NCS- contained in cavities show strong coupling between the solute chromophores in the mid-infrared and cavity modes. We show that the methodology established with polymer-filled cavities is generally applicable to liquids but that the fluidity of the sample complicates the cavity construction. Varied cavity thicknesses can give rise to spatial gradients in coupling strength and difficulty in targeting a specific cavity-mode order. We also compare the transmission of the mixed vibrational-cavity modes in cavities constructed from either metallic or dielectric reflectors which impacts the cavity resonance line width. NRC Postdoctoral Fellow.

  17. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1996-01-01

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy.

  18. Long distance measurement using optical sampling by cavity tuning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Li, Jianshuang; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a method enabling absolute distance measurement based on optical sampling by cavity tuning. The cross-correlation patterns can be obtained by sweeping the repetition frequency of the frequency comb. The 114 m long fiber delay line, working as the reference arm, is actively stabilized by using a feedback servo loop with 10-10 level stability. The unknown distance can be measured via the instantaneous repetition frequency corresponding to the peak of the fringe packet. We compare the present technique with the reference incremental interferometer, and the experimental results show an agreement within 3 μm over 60 m distance, corresponding to 10-8 level in relative. PMID:27177004

  19. Suppressing spectral diffusion of emitted photons with optical pulses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fotso, H. F.; Feiguin, A. E.; Awschalom, D. D.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2016-01-22

    In many quantum architectures the solid-state qubits, such as quantum dots or color centers, are interfaced via emitted photons. However, the frequency of photons emitted by solid-state systems exhibits slow uncontrollable fluctuations over time (spectral diffusion), creating a serious problem for implementation of the photon-mediated protocols. Here we show that a sequence of optical pulses applied to the solid-state emitter can stabilize the emission line at the desired frequency. We demonstrate efficiency, robustness, and feasibility of the method analytically and numerically. Taking nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond as an example, we show that only several pulses, with the width of 1more » ns, separated by few ns (which is not difficult to achieve) can suppress spectral diffusion. As a result, our method provides a simple and robust way to greatly improve the efficiency of photon-mediated entanglement and/or coupling to photonic cavities for solid-state qubits.« less

  20. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  1. Optical diffusion property of chicken tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Patricia S.; Flamholz, Alex; Wong, Peter K.; Lieberman, David H.; Cheung, Tak D.; Itoka, Harriet; Minott, Troy; Quizhpi, Janie; Rodriguez, Jacquelin

    2004-11-01

    Chicken tissue acts as a turbid medium in optical wavelength. Optical characterization data of fresh chicken dark and white meat were studied using the theory of light diffusion. The gaussian-like transmission profile was used to determine the transport mean free path and absorption. The refractive index, a fundamental parameter, was extracted via transmission correlation function analysis without using index-matching fluid. The variation in refractive index also produced various small shifts in the oscillatory feature of the intensity spatial correlation function at distance shorter than the transport mean free path. The optical system was calibrated with porous silicate slabs containing different water contents and also with a solid alumina slab. The result suggested that the selective scattering/absorption of myoglobin and mitochondria in the dark tissues is consistent with the transmission data. The refractive index was similar for dark and white tissues at the He-Ne wavelength and suggested that the index could serve as a marker for quality control. Application to chicken lunchmeat samples revealed that higher protein and lower carbohydrate would shift the correlation toward smaller distance. The pure fat refractive index was different from that of the meat tissue. Application of refractive index as a fat marker is also discussed

  2. Few-Cycle and Cavity-Enhanced Optical Parametric Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Aleem Mohammad

    Optical parametric amplifiers have emerged as important optical sources by extending the properties of few-cycle laser sources, which exist only in materials with sufficiently large gain bandwidths, to wide array of spectral ranges. The work reported in this thesis relates to two areas for the continued development of optical parametric amplification based sources. First, we present a white light seeded, carrier-envelope stable, degenerately pumped OPA producing near tranform-limited sub 7 fs, 3 microJ pulses at the driver wavelength from a long pulse, non-CEP stable Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. Problems to the spectral phase jump at the driver wavelength, 800 nm, were avoided by using a near infrared OPA to produce white light continuum down to 800 nm where the spectral phase is smooth. Secondly, enhancement cavities are used in conjunction with parametric amplifiers resulting in a new technique entitled, cavity-enhanced optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (C-OPCPA). C-OPCPA increases the capabilities of nonlinear crystals and can allow continued scaling of parametric amplifier systems to high repetition rate. This work contains the first theoretical and experimental investigation of C-OPCPA. Numerically, passive pump pulse shaping of the intracavity pump power is shown to enable octave spanning gain. Experimentally, a first proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates a 78 MHz C-OPCPA with more than 50% conversion with under 1 W of incident pump power. A comparison to a single pass system shows improvements in the C-OPCPA of orders of magnitude in conversion efficiency and 3 fold increase in phase matching bandwidth in 10 and 20 mm periodically poled lithium niobate phase matched for parametric amplification with 1030 nm pump wavelength and a 1550 nm signal wavelength. A Yb-fiber laser based CPA system producing up to 5 W of 500 fs pulses comprises the pump source, and a Er-fiber laser the signal. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries

  3. Optical-Fiber Thermal-Wave-Cavity Technique to Study Thermal Properties of Silver/Clay Nanofliuds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, M.; Radiman, S.; Zakaria, A.; Shameli, K.; Deraman, M.; Soltaninejad, S.; Abedini, A.

    2014-10-01

    Thermal properties enhancement of nanofluids have varied strongly with synthesis technique, particle size and type, concentration and agglomeration with time. This study explores the possibility of changing the thermal wave signal of Ag/clay nanofluids into a thermal diffusivity measurement at well dispersion or aggregation of nanoparticles in the base fluid. Optical-Fiber Thermal-Wave-Cavity (OF-TWC) technique was achieved by using a small amount of nanofluid (only 0.2 mL) between fiber optic tip and the Pyroelectric detector and the cavity-length scan was performed. We established the accuracy and precision of this technique by comparing the thermal diffusivity of distilled water to values reported in the literature. Assuming a linear Pyroelectric signal response, the results show that adding clay reduced the thermal diffusivity of water, while increasing the Ag concentration from 1 to 5 wt.% increased the thermal diffusivity of the Ag nanofluid from 1.524×10-3 to 1.789×10-3 cm2/s. However, in particular, nanoparticles show the tendency to form aggregates over time that correlated with the performance change of thermal properties of nanofluid. Our results confirm the high sensitivity of OF-TWC technique raises the potential to be applied to measuring the optical and thermal properties of nanofluids. Furthermore, this technique allows the extraction of information not obtained using other traditional techniques.

  4. Direct Measurement of Large, Diffuse, Optical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saif, Babak N.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee; Wyant, J. C.; Atkinson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) is a well-established method for the measurement of diffuse objects in experimental mechanics. DSPIs are phase shifting interferometers. Three or four bucket temporal phase shifting algorithms are commonly used to provide phase shifting. These algorithms are sensitive to vibrations and can not be used to measure large optical structures far away from the interferometer. In this research a simultaneous phase shifted interferometer, PhaseCam product of 4D Technology Corporation in Tucson Arizona, is modified to be a Simultaneous phase shifted Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometer (SDSPI). Repeatability, dynamic range, and accuracy of the SDSPI are characterized by measuring a 5 cm x 5 cm carbon fiber coupon.

  5. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Larusson, Fridrik; Fantini, Sergio; Miller, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the development and performance of algorithms for hyperspectral diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for which data from hundreds of wavelengths are collected and used to determine the concentration distribution of chromophores in the medium under investigation. An efficient method is detailed for forming the images using iterative algorithms applied to a linearized Born approximation model assuming the scattering coefficient is spatially constant and known. The L-surface framework is employed to select optimal regularization parameters for the inverse problem. We report image reconstructions using 126 wavelengths with estimation error in simulations as low as 0.05 and mean square error of experimental data of 0.18 and 0.29 for ink and dye concentrations, respectively, an improvement over reconstructions using fewer specifically chosen wavelengths. PMID:21483616

  6. A simplified model for thermal-wave cavity self-consistent measurement of thermal diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jun Zhou, Jianqin; Gu, Caikang; Neill, Stuart; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Fairbridge, Craig; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-12-15

    A simplified theoretical model was developed for the thermal-wave cavity (TWC) technique in this study. This model takes thermal radiation into account and can be employed for absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivity of gas and liquid samples without any knowledge of geometrical and thermal parameters of the components of the TWC. Using this model and cavity-length scans, thermal diffusivities of air and distilled water were accurately and precisely measured as (2.191 ± 0.004) × 10{sup −5} and (1.427 ± 0.009) × 10{sup −7} m{sup 2} s{sup −1}, respectively, in very good agreement with accepted literature values.

  7. Controlled optical high-order sidebands via bichromatic driving of a cavity mode detected by an undriven second cavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Li, Jiahui; Yu, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2015-08-01

    We propose a scheme for optical high-order sideband generation and efficient sideband information transfer from one optical mode to the other in a hybrid system consisting of a quantum dot coupled to both modes of a lossy bimodal photonic crystal cavity. Here one mode of the cavity is coherently driven by a two-tone continuous-wave laser field and the two cavity modes are not coupled to each other due to their orthogonal polarizations. The influences of the system parameters including the cavity-waveguide coupling rate and all kinds of relative detunings on optical high-order sideband generation and transfer efficiency are discussed. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism and an experimental feasibility of the proposed bimodal cavity scheme are also presented. Due to an intrinsic highly multimode sideband structure in the proposed scheme, the ability to engineer and convert photons between different frequencies in a solid-state approach has extensive technological implications not only for classical communication systems, but also future integrated quantum networks.

  8. One-dimensional array of ion chains coupled to an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetina, Marko; Bylinskii, Alexei; Karpa, Leon; Gangloff, Dorian; Beck, Kristin M.; Ge, Yufei; Scholz, Matthias; Grier, Andrew T.; Chuang, Isaac; Vuletić, Vladan

    2013-05-01

    We present a novel system where an optical cavity is integrated with a microfabricated planar-electrode ion trap. The trap electrodes produce a tunable periodic potential allowing the trapping of up to 50 separate ion chains aligned with the cavity and spaced by 160 μm in a one-dimensional array along the cavity axis. Each chain can contain up to 20 individually addressable Yb+ ions coupled to the cavity mode. We demonstrate deterministic distribution of ions between the sites of the electrostatic periodic potential and control of the ion-cavity coupling. The measured strength of this coupling should allow access to the strong collective coupling regime with ≲10 ions. The optical cavity could serve as a quantum information bus between ions or be used to generate a strong wavelength-scale periodic optical potential.

  9. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOEpatents

    Pipino, Andrew Charles Rule

    1999-11-16

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  10. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOEpatents

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.

    1999-08-24

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  11. Duality relation between nonspherical mirror optical cavities and its application to gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Agresti, Juri; Chen, Yanbei; D'Ambrosio, Erika; Savov, Pavlin

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we analytically prove a unique duality relation between the eigenspectra of paraxial optical cavities with nonspherical mirrors: a one-to-one mapping between eigenmodes and eigenvalues of cavities deviating from flat mirrors by h(r) and cavities deviating from concentric mirrors by -h(r), where h need not be a small perturbation. We then illustrate its application to optical cavities, proposed for advanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, where the mirrors are designed to support beams with rather flat intensity profiles over the mirror surfaces. This unique mapping might be very useful in future studies of alternative optical designs for advanced gravitational wave interferometers or experiments employing optical cavities with nonstandard mirrors. PMID:23201935

  12. Deterministic Loading of Individual Atoms to a High-Finesse Optical Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fortier, Kevin M.; Kim, Soo Y.; Gibbons, Michael J.; Ahmadi, Peyman; Chapman, Michael S.

    2007-06-08

    Individual laser-cooled atoms are delivered on demand from a single atom magneto-optic trap to a high-finesse optical cavity using an atom conveyor. Strong coupling of the atom with the cavity field allows simultaneous cooling and detection of individual atoms for time scales exceeding 15 s. The single atom scatter rate is studied as a function of probe-cavity detuning and probe Rabi frequency, and the experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. We demonstrate the ability to manipulate the position of a single atom relative to the cavity mode with excellent control and reproducibility.

  13. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the door or wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy. The quartz for the diffuser plate is surface etched (to give the quartz diffusive qualities) in the furnace during a high intensity burn-in process.

  14. α-bandlimited diffuser in fractional Fourier optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño-Vanegas, Alberto; Durand, Pierre-Emmanuel; Torres, Rafael; Pellat-Finet, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    We propose a method for calculating appropriate α-band limited diffusers using the fractional Fourier transform. In order to do this, we implement a method for performing a numerical interpolation in the fractional Fourier domain. Such diffusers with compact support in the Fresnel regime may be used in fractional Fourier optical systems where the use of diffusers produce speckles, e.g. digital holography or optical encryption. Numerical simulations are presented.

  15. Generation of atom-light entanglement in an optical cavity for quantum enhanced atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haine, Simon A.; Lau, Wing Yung Sarah

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the generation of atom-light entanglement via Raman superradiance in an optical cavity, and show how this can be used to enhance the sensitivity of atom interferometry. We model a realistic optical cavity, and show that by careful temporal shaping of the optical local oscillator used to measure the light emitted from the cavity, information in the optical mode can be combined with the signal from the atom interferometer to reduce the quantum noise, and thus increase the sensitivity. It was found in Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 053002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.053002 that an atomic "seed" was required in order to reduce spontaneous emission and allow for single mode behavior of the device. In this paper we find that the optical cavity reduces the need for an atomic seed, which allows for stronger atom-light correlations and a greater level of quantum enhancement.

  16. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction: ultra-short pulse generation as seeded Hawking radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eilenberger, Falk; Kabakova, Irina V.; de Sterke, C. Martijn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Pertsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We show that light trapped in an optical cavity can be extracted from that cavity in an ultrashort burst by means of a trigger pulse. We find a simple analytic description of this process and show that while the extracted pulse inherits its pulse length from that of the trigger pulse, its wavelength can be completely different. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction is thus well suited for the development of ultrashort laser sources in new wavelength ranges. We discuss similarities between this process and the generation of Hawking radiation at the optical analogue of an event horizon with extremely high Hawking temperature. Our analytic predictions are confirmed by thorough numerical simulations. PMID:24060831

  17. A photonic crystal cavity-optical fiber tip nanoparticle sensor for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambat, Gary; Rajasekhar Kothapalli, Sri; Khurana, Aman; Provine, J.; Sarmiento, Tomas; Cheng, Kai; Cheng, Zhen; Harris, James; Daldrup-Link, Heike; Sam Gambhir, Sanjiv; Vučković, Jelena

    2012-05-01

    We present a sensor capable of detecting solution-based nanoparticles using an optical fiber tip functionalized with a photonic crystal cavity. When sensor tips are retracted from a nanoparticle solution after being submerged, we find that a combination of convective fluid forces and optically induced trapping cause an aggregation of nanoparticles to form directly on cavity surfaces. A simple readout of quantum dot photoluminescence coupled to the optical fiber shows that nanoparticle presence and concentration can be detected through modified cavity properties. Our sensor can detect both gold and iron oxide nanoparticles and can be utilized for molecular sensing applications in biomedicine.

  18. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1996-11-19

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer is disclosed comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy. 5 figs.

  19. On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

    2010-03-09

    An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

  20. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-13

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  1. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  2. Performance of resonator fiber optic gyroscope using external-cavity laser stabilization and optical filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tiequn; Wu, Jianfeng; Strandjord, Lee K.; Sanders, Glen A.

    2014-05-01

    A bench-top resonator fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG) was assembled and tested, showing encouraging progress toward navigation grade performance. The gyro employed a fiber length of 19 meters of polarizing fiber for the sensing coil which was wound on an 11.5 cm diameter PZT cylinder. A bias stability of approximately 0.1 deg/hr was observed over a 2 hour timeframe, which is the best bias stability reported to date in an RFOG to our knowledge. Special care was taken to minimize laser phase noise, including stabilization to an optical cavity which was also used for optical filtering, giving angle random walk (ARW) values in the range of 0.008 deg/rt-hr. The ARW performance and bias stability are within 2x and 10x, respectively, of many civil inertial navigation grade requirements.

  3. All-optical signal amplifier and distributor using cavity-atom coupling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yafan; Lin, Gongwei; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2016-05-01

    We report an all-optical signal amplifier and a signal distributor using cavity-atom coupling systems. In this system we couple atoms with an optical cavity and realize the great enhancement of a control laser by the cavity with the help of two high coupling lasers. By this effect, we can use one weak control field to control another strong target field and the intensity changes are linear with our experimental conditions. This can be used as an all-optical signal amplifier, also known as a ‘transphasor’. In our experiment, the gain of the weak field to strong field can be as high as 60. Furthermore, we can realize the distribution of optical signals, if we coordinate multiple cavity-atom coupling systems.

  4. Diffuse Optical Monitoring of the Neoadjuvant Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Regine; Durduran, Turgut

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the use of diffuse optical techniques for monitoring the hemodynamic, metabolic and physiological signatures of the neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy effectiveness is critically reviewed. An extensive discussion of the state-of-theart diffuse optical mammography is presented alongside a discussion of the current approaches to breast cancer therapies. Overall, the diffuse optics field is growing rapidly with a great deal of promise to fill an important niche in the current approaches to monitor, predict and personalize neoadjuvant breast cancer therapies. PMID:23243386

  5. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  6. History of Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy of Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Theodore J.

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy is a noninvasive method that uses low levels of near-infrared light to measure blood oxygenation in the brain. Over the last 35 years, the number of diffuse optical studies and the range of clinical and research applications have grown steadily. Compared to other neuroimaging methods to measure cerebral blood oxygenation, such as magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography, diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is more cost effective and often uses small portable instrumentation. Wireless and bedside optical systems are currently produced commercially. The portability of these instruments has extended the use of optical methods into several unique applications including brain imaging in infants and children, studies of the brain during ambulatory tasks such as walking or balance, and interoperative brain assessments. This chapter will introduce the history and basic principles of DOI including discussion of the factors contributing to the optical properties of tissue, instrumentation, and an overview of applications of the technology.

  7. Low light level all-optical switching in a four-level atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yafan; Lin, Gongwei; Zhang, Shicheng; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2016-01-01

    We report on an all-optical switching in a double ∧ four-level atom-cavity system both theoretically and experimentally. In this system, an extra coherence between two ground states is induced by two coupling lasers, thus the loss of the cavity field decreases. Then, we can use one weak field to control another weak field at low light levels. Compared to the three-level atom-cavity system, the power of the switching laser can be much weaker in the four-level atom-cavity system.

  8. External cavity diode laser based upon an FBG in an integrated optical fiber platform.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Stephen G; Holmes, Christopher; Berry, Sam A; Gates, James C; Jantzen, Alexander; Ferreiro, Teresa I; Smith, Peter G R

    2016-04-18

    An external cavity diode laser is demonstrated using a Bragg grating written into a novel integrated optical fiber platform as the external cavity. The cavity is fabricated using flame-hydrolysis deposition to bond a photosensitive fiber to a silica-on-silicon wafer, and a grating written using direct UV-writing. The laser operates on a single mode at the acetylene P13 line (1532.83 nm) with 9 mW output power. The noise properties of the laser are characterized demonstrating low linewidth operation (< 14 kHz) and superior relative intensity noise characteristics when compared to a commercial tunable external cavity diode laser. PMID:27137276

  9. Tuning the Sensitivity of an Optical Cavity with Slow and Fast Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, H.; Toftul, A.; Schambeau, C.; Odutola, J. A.; Diels, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured mode pushing by the dispersion of a rubidium vapor in a Fabry-Perot cavity and have shown that the scale factor and sensitivity of a passive cavity can be strongly enhanced by the presence of such an anomalous dispersion medium. The enhancement is the result of the atom-cavity coupling, which provides a positive feedback to the cavity response. The cavity sensitivity can also be controlled and tuned through a pole by a second, optical pumping, beam applied transverse to the cavity. Alternatively, the sensitivity can be controlled by the introduction of a second counter-propagating input beam that interferes with the first beam, coherently increasing the cavity absorptance. We show that the pole in the sensitivity occurs when the sum of the effective group index and an additional cavity delay factor that accounts for mode reshaping goes to zero, and is an example of an exceptional point, commonly associated with coupled non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems. Additionally we show that a normal dispersion feature can decrease the cavity scale factor and can be generated through velocity selective optical pumping

  10. Nonlinear spectroscopy of Sr atoms in an optical cavity for laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Tieri, David; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray J.; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-11-01

    We study the nonlinear interaction of a cold sample of 88Sr atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit, and we investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak intercombination line |5 s21S0>-|5 s 5 p 3P1> at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures—the cavity transmitted phase and absorption—by employing frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy (noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical-heterodyne molecular spectroscopy). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free-space situation in which no cavity is present. Furthermore, the nonlinear dynamics of the phase dispersion slope is experimentally investigated, and the optimal conditions for laser stabilization are established. Our experimental results are compared to state-of-the-art cavity QED theoretical calculations.

  11. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrary macropulse width and repetition rate.

  12. Coupled-Cavity Interferometer for the Optics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a flexible coupled-cavity interferometer for student use. A helium-neon laser and phonograph turntable are the main components. Lists activities which may be performed with the apparatus. (Author/CP)

  13. Nonorthogonal pairs of copropagating optical modes in deformed microdisk cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersig, Jan; Eberspaecher, Alexander; Shim, Jeong-Bo; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Shinohara, Susumu; Hentschel, Martina; Schomerus, Henning

    2011-08-15

    Recently, it has been shown that spiral-shaped microdisk cavities support highly nonorthogonal pairs of copropagating modes with a preferred sense of rotation (spatial chirality) [J. Wiersig et al., Phys. Rev. A 78, 053809 (2008)]. Here, we provide numerical evidence which indicates that such pairs are a common feature of deformed microdisk cavities which lack mirror symmetries. In particular, we demonstrate that discontinuities of the cavity boundary such as the notch in the spiral cavity are not needed. We find a quantitative relation between the nonorthogonality and the chirality of the modes which agrees well with the predictions from an effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. A comparison to ray-tracing simulations is given.

  14. Vacuum-induced suppression and enhancement of four-wave mixing in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haixia; Wang, Xiuxiu; Ahmed, Irfan; Yao, Xin; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhu, Dayu; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-01

    We report on an experimental study of vacuum-induced suppression and enhancement of four-wave mixing (FWM) signal in a composite atom-cavity system. By scanning the additional dressing field, the suppression ratio of the FWM signal can reach 90 % compared with 40 % without cavity. We attribute the enhanced suppression and enhancement to the atom-cavity coupling arising from a vacuum-induced Raman process, which amplifies the dressing effect from the additional field. Also, the dressing asymmetry of the atom-cavity coupling is discussed and used to estimate the nonlinearity of atomic medium in the cavity. The suppression and enhancement can be interpreted by a dressed-state picture and agree with theoretical calculations. The investigation may find applications in optical switch and quantum memory controlled by cavity.

  15. High finesse optical fiber cavities: optimal alignment and robust stabilization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Gallego, Jose; Ghosh, Sutapa; Alavi, Seyed; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications. Some of the most promising areas of application of these optical micro-resonators with high finesse and small mode volume are in the field of quantum communication and information. The resonator-enhanced light-matter interaction, for instance, provide basis for the realization of efficient optical interfaces between stationary matter-based quantum nodes and flying single-photon qubits. To date fiber Fabry-Perot cavities have been successfully applied in experiments interfacing single photons with a wide range of quantum systems, including cold atoms, ions and solid state emitters as well as quantum optomechanical experiments. Here we address some important practical questions that arise during the experimental implementation of high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: How can optimal fiber cavity alignment be achieved and how can the efficiency of coupling light from the optical fibers to the cavity mode and vice versa be characterized? How should optical fiber cavities be constructed and stabilized to fulfill their potential for miniaturization and integration into robust scientific and technological devices that can operate outside of dedicated laboratory environments in the future? The first two questions we answer with an analytic mode matching calculation that relates the alignment dependent fiber-to-cavity mode-matching efficiency to the easily measurable dip in the reflected light power at the cavity resonance. Our general analysis provides a simple recipe for the optimal alignment of fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and moreover for the first time explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes. The latter question we explore by investigating a novel, intrinsically rigid fiber cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal

  16. Feasibility of a feedback control of atomic self-organization in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D. A. Ivanova, T. Yu.

    2015-08-15

    Many interesting nonlinear effects are based on the strong interaction of motional degrees of freedom of atoms with an optical cavity field. Among them is the spatial self-organization of atoms in a pattern where the atoms group in either odd or even sites of the cavity-induced optical potential. An experimental observation of this effect can be simplified by using, along with the original cavity-induced feedback, an additional electronic feedback based on the detection of light leaking the cavity and the control of the optical potential for the atoms. Following our previous study, we show that this approach is more efficient from the laser power perspective than the original scheme without the electronic feedback.

  17. Photonic controlled-phase gates through Rydberg blockade in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumanta; Grankin, Andrey; Iakoupov, Ivan; Brion, Etienne; Borregaard, Johannes; Boddeda, Rajiv; Usmani, Imam; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Grangier, Philippe; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a scheme for high-fidelity photonic controlled-phase gates using a Rydberg blockade in an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. The gate operation is obtained by first storing a photonic pulse in the ensemble and then scattering a second pulse from the cavity, resulting in a phase change depending on whether the first pulse contained a single photon. We show that the combination of a Rydberg blockade and optical cavities effectively enhances the optical nonlinearity created by the strong Rydberg interaction and makes the gate operation more robust. The resulting gate can be implemented with cavities of moderate finesse, allowing for highly efficient processing of quantum information encoded in photons. As an illustration, we show how the gate can be employed to increase the communication rate of quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles.

  18. Nano-scale optical actuation based on two-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Zhou, Guangya; Chau, Fook Siong; Tian, Feng; Deng, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) actuators using electrostatic forces are facing the bottleneck of the electromagnetic interference which greatly degrades their performances. On the contrary, the hybrid circuits driven by optical gradient forces which are immune to the electromagnetic interference show prominent advantages in communication, quantum computation, and other application systems. In this paper we propose an optical actuator utilizing the optical gradient force generated by a hetero-structure photonic crystal cavity. This type of cavity has a longitudinal air-slot and characteristics of ultrahigh quality factor (Q) and ultra-small mode volume (V) which is capable of producing a much larger force compared with the waveguide-based structures. Due to the symmetry property, attractive optical gradient force is generated. Additionally, the optomechanical coefficient (gom) of this cavity is two orders of magnitude larger than that of the coupled nanobeam photonic crystal cavities. The 2D hetero-structure cavity, comb drives, folded beam suspensions and the displacement sensor compose the whole device. The cavity serves as the optical actuator whilst the butt-coupled waveguide acts as the displacement sensor which is theoretically proved to be insensitive to the temperature variations. As known, the thermo-optic effect prevails especially in the cavity-based structures. The butt-coupled waveguide can be used to decouple the thermal effect and the optoemchanical effect (OM) with the aid of comb drives. The results demonstrate that the proposed optical gradient force actuator show great potential in the future of all-optical reconfigurable circuits.

  19. Detection of optical properties in small region by diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Shengcai; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Zongping; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The optical properties of small and highly absorbing tissues can be determined by measurement of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance at short source-detector separations. Spatial resolution and number of measuring point influence the inverting precision of optical property directly from the experimental diffuse reflectance. To increase spatial resolution and number of measuring point, a high-resolution and multiple points detection system is designed. A special optical fiber array probe is employed. Its spatial resolution is 0.125mm. The system is proved to be reliable by comparing the experimental result of diffuse reflectance from small region 0.125mm-1.25mm with that of numerical simulation. The inverting method based on Monte Carlo simulation is designed, by which optical properties can be achieved by building optical parameter date base and training artificial neural network (ANN).

  20. Motion of an atom in a weakly driven fiber-Bragg-grating cavity: Force, friction, and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K.

    2010-06-15

    We study the translational motion of an atom in the vicinity of a weakly driven nanofiber with two fiber-Bragg-grating mirrors. We calculate numerically and analytically the force, the friction coefficients, and the momentum diffusion. We find that the spatial dependences of the force, the friction coefficients, and the momentum diffusion are very complicated due to the evanescent-wave nature of the atom-field coupling as well as the effect of the van der Waals potential. We show that the time development of the mean number of photons in the cavity closely follows the translational motion of the atom through the nodes and antinodes of the fiber-guided cavity standing-wave field even though the cavity finesse is moderate, the cavity is long, and the probe field is weak.

  1. Scheme for a compact cold-atom clock based on diffuse laser cooling in a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Xiao, Ling; Cheng, Huadong; Liu, Liang

    2015-12-01

    We present a scheme for a compact rubidium cold-atom clock which performs diffuse light cooling, microwave interrogation, and detection of the clock signal in a cylindrical microwave cavity. The diffuse light is produced by laser light reflection at the inner surface of the microwave cavity. The pattern of the injected laser beams is specially designed to accumulate the majority of the cold atoms in the center of the microwave cavity. Microwave interrogation of the cold atoms in the cavity leads to Ramsey fringes, which have a linewidth of 24.5 Hz with a contrast of 95.6 % when the free evolution time is 20 ms. Recently, a frequency stability of 7.3 ×10-13τ-1 /2 has been achieved. The scheme of this physical package can largely reduce the cold-atom clock complexity and increase clock performance.

  2. Optical quantum computation with cavities in the intermediate coupling region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Yu, Y. F.; Feng, X. L.; Zhu, S. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2010-07-01

    Large-scale quantum computation is currently a hot area of research. The scalable quantum computation scheme with cavities originally proposed by Duan and Kimble (Phys. Rev. Lett., 92 (2004) 127902) is further developed here to operate in the intermediate coupling region, which not only greatly relaxes experimental demands on the Purcell factor, but also eliminates the need to consider internal trade-off between cavity quality and efficiency. In our scheme, by controlling the reflectivity of the input single-photon pulse in the cavity, we can realize local atom-photon and nonlocal atom-atom controlled phase-flip (CPF) gates. We also introduce a theoretical model to analyze the performance of our scheme under practical noise. Furthermore, we show that the nonlocal CPF gate can be used to realize a quantum repeater.

  3. Flight-Like Optical Reference Cavity for GRACE Follow-On Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Pierce, R.; Shaddock, D.; Lam, T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a prototype optical cavity and associated optics that has been developed to provide a stable frequency reference for a future space-based laser ranging system. This instrument is being considered for inclusion as a technology demonstration on the recently announced GRACE follow-on mission, which will monitor variations in the Earth's gravity field.

  4. Optical bistability and second-harmonic generation in thin film coupled cavity photonic crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Liyong

    This thesis deals with design, fabrication and modeling of bistable and multi-stable switching dynamics and second-harmonic generation in two groups of thin film coupled cavity photonic crystal structures. The first component studies optical bistability and multistability in such structures. Optical bistability and multistability are modelled by a nonlinear transfer matrix method. The second component is focused on the modelling and experimental measurement of second-harmonic generation in such structures. It is found that coupled cavity structures can reduce the threshold and index change for bistable operation, but single cavity structures can do the same. However, there is a clear advantage in using coupled cavity structures for multistability in that the threshold for multistability can be reduced. Second-harmonic generation is enhanced by field localization due to the resonant effect at the fundamental wavelength in single and coupled cavity structures by simulated and measured results. The work in this thesis makes three significant contributions. First, in the successful fabrication of thin film coupled cavity structures, the simulated linear transmissions of such structures match those of the fabricated structures almost exactly. Second, the newly defined figure of merit at the maximum transmission point on the bistable curve can be used to compare the material damage tolerance to any other Kerr effect nonlinear gate. Third, the simulated second-harmonic generation agrees excellently with experimental results. More generally optical thin film fabrication has commercial applications in many industry sections, such as electronics, opto-electronics, optical coating, solar cell and MEMS.

  5. Lateral shearing optical gradient force in coupled nanobeam photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Han; Zhang, Xingwang; Deng, Jie; Zhao, Yunshan; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya

    2016-04-01

    We report the experimental observation of lateral shearing optical gradient forces in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) controlled dual-coupled photonic crystal (PhC) nanobeam cavities. With an on-chip integrated NEMS actuator, the coupled cavities can be mechanically reconfigured in the lateral direction while maintaining a constant coupling gap. Shearing optical gradient forces are generated when the two cavity centers are laterally displaced. In our experiments, positive and negative lateral shearing optical forces of 0.42 nN and 0.29 nN are observed with different pumping modes. This study may broaden the potential applications of the optical gradient force in nanophotonic devices and benefit the future nanooptoelectromechanical systems.

  6. Cavity Nonlinear Optics at Low Photon Numbers from Collective Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Subhadeep; Moore, Kevin L.; Murch, Kater W.; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2007-11-23

    We report on Kerr nonlinearity and dispersive optical bistability of a Fabry-Perot optical resonator due to the displacement of ultracold atoms trapped within. In the driven resonator, such collective motion is induced by optical forces acting upon up to 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb atoms prepared in the lowest band of a one-dimensional intracavity optical lattice. The longevity of atomic motional coherence allows for strongly nonlinear optics at extremely low cavity photon numbers, as demonstrated by the observation of both branches of optical bistability at photon numbers below unity.

  7. Optical and Infrared Observations of Diffuse Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Benjamin J.

    2005-08-01

    In the past several years, great progress has been made on the spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules in diffuse interstellar clouds. In this talk, I will review recent developments involving H_3^+, C_3, and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs).The simplest polyatomic molecular ion, H_3^+, has long been recognized as the cornerstone of ion-neutral chemistry in dense molecular clouds (Herbst & Klemperer 1973; Watson 1973). However, in diffuse clouds (where electrons are abundantly produced from photoionization of atomic carbon) the H_3^+ number density was expected to be considerably lower than in dense clouds, owing to the efficiency of electron recombination. It was, therefore, a surprise when a large column density of H_3^+ was detected (McCall et al.1998) in the diffuse line of sight towards Cygnus OB2 12, and subsequently in a sample of heavily reddened diffuse sightlines (McCall et al.2002). Recently, we have detected H_3^+ even in the classical diffuse cloud sightline towards ζ Persei; together with a new measurement of the electron recombination rate coefficient, this result suggests that the cosmic-ray ionization rate is much higher in diffuse clouds than in dense clouds (McCall et al. 2003a)!In 2001, interstellar C_3 was first detected by J. P. Maier and colleagues (maier et al. 2001) in three diffuse cloud sightlines. This was quickly followed up by another detection (Roueff et al. 2002) and a survey conducted at low-resolution (Okaet al. 2003). This was followed by a high-resolution survey (Ádámkovics, Blake, & McCall 2003) that yielded rotationally resolved spectra of C_3 in 10 sightlines. Much like C_2, C_3 has no permanent dipole moment, and therefore its rotational distribution serves as a sensitive diagnostic of both temperature and density.The existence of larger polyatomic molecules in diffuse clouds is clear from the presence of the DIBs, which have remained an enigma since their discovery some eight decades ago. A recent survey of the DIBs at

  8. Electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms inside a high-finesse optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Kumar, Santosh; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Chao, Yuanxi; Fan, Haoquan; Shaffer, James

    2016-05-01

    We present experimental work on the observation of Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) inside a high-finesse optical cavity. We show that a cold atomic cloud with controllable number of atoms can be transported into the cavity by using a focus-tunable lens. Rydberg atoms are excited via a two-photon transition in a ladder-type EIT configuration. A three-peak structure in the cavity transmission can be observed when Rydberg EIT atoms are generated inside the cavity. The two side peaks are caused by ``bright state polaritons'', while the central peak corresponds to a ``dark-state polariton'' The cavity Rydberg EIT system can be useful for single photon generation using the Rydberg blockade effect, studying many-body physics, and generating novel quantum states amongst many other applications. This work is supported by AFOSR.

  9. New limit on Lorentz violation using a double-pass optical ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Michimura, Yuta; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Ohmae, Noriaki; Kokuyama, Wataru; Aso, Yoichi; Ando, Masaki; Tsubono, Kimio

    2013-05-17

    A search for Lorentz violation in electrodynamics was performed by measuring the resonant frequency difference between two counterpropagating directions of an optical ring cavity. Our cavity contains a dielectric element, which makes our cavity sensitive to the violation. The laser frequency is stabilized to the counterclockwise resonance of the cavity, and the transmitted light is reflected back into the cavity for resonant frequency comparison with the clockwise resonance. This double-pass configuration enables a null experiment and gives high common mode rejection of environmental disturbances. We found no evidence for odd-parity anisotropy at the level of δc/c ≲ 10(-14). Within the framework of the standard model extension, our result put more than 5 times better limits on three odd-parity parameters κ(o+)(JK) and a 12 times better limit on the scalar parameter κ(tr) compared with the previous best limits. PMID:25167384

  10. In situ characterization of an optically thick atom-filled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munns, J. H. D.; Qiu, C.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.; Saunders, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    A means for precise experimental characterization of the dielectric susceptibility of an atomic gas inside an optical cavity is important for the design and operation of quantum light-matter interfaces, particularly in the context of quantum information processing. Here we present a numerically optimized theoretical model to predict the spectral response of an atom-filled cavity, accounting for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening at high optical densities. We investigate the regime where the two broadening mechanisms are of similar magnitude, which makes the use of common approximations invalid. Our model agrees with an experimental implementation with warm caesium vapor in a ring cavity. From the cavity response, we are able to extract important experimental parameters, for instance the ground-state populations, total number density, and the magnitudes of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening.

  11. High-Q silica zipper cavity for optical radiation pressure driven MOMS switch

    SciTech Connect

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2014-07-15

    We design a silica zipper cavity that has high optical and mechanical Q (quality factor) values and demonstrate numerically the feasibility of a radiation pressure driven micro opto-mechanical system (MOMS) directional switch. The silica zipper cavity has an optical Q of 4.0 × 10{sup 4} and an effective mode volume V{sub mode} of 0.67λ{sup 3} when the gap between two cavities is 34 nm. The mechanical Q (Q{sub m}) is determined by thermo-elastic damping and is 2.0 × 10{sup 6} in a vacuum at room temperature. The opto-mechanical coupling rate g{sub OM} is as high as 100 GHz/nm, which allows us to move the directional cavity-waveguide system and switch 1550-nm light with 770-nm light by controlling the radiation pressure.

  12. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T. Tanaka, R.; Uesugi, Y.; Yoshitama, H.; Sakaue, K.; Washio, M.

    2015-04-15

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  13. Self-organisation and cooling of a large ensemble of particles in optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongkai; Lu, Weiping; Barker, P F; Dong, Guangjiong

    2009-01-01

    We present an investigation of the dynamics of centre-of-mass of a neutral particle cloud in a cavity pumped by an optical field. We derive an expression for the pump threshold for spatial self-organization of the particles and analyze its scaling laws in terms of the system parameters. Using a newly developed statistical model, we simulate the dynamics of the particles and numerically obtain the scaling laws. We show good agreement between the analytic formulae and simulations. We further use the scaling relation to discuss the operating conditions for cavity cooling a large ensemble of particles. Finally, we study cavity cooling of an ensemble of molecules with an initial temperature of around 10 mK. We show that 35% of the molecules are trapped by the optical field intensity in the cavity and a final temperature below 1 mK is reached. PMID:20151551

  14. XTREME OPTICS: the behavior of cavity optics for the Jefferson Lab free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; Fred Dylla; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; George Neil; and Shukui Zhanga

    2006-09-25

    The cavity optics within high power free-electron lasers based on energy-recovering accelerators are subjected to extreme conditions associated with illumination from a broad spectrum of radiation, often at high irradiances. This is especially true for the output coupler, where absorption of radiation by both the mirror substrate and coating places significant design restrictions to properly manage heat load and prevent mirror distortion. Besides the fundamental lasing wavelength, the mirrors are irradiated with light at harmonics of the fundamental, THz radiation generated by the bending magnets downstream of the wiggler, and x-rays produced when the electron beam strikes accelerator diagnostic components (e.g., wire scanners and view screens) or from inadvertent beam loss. The optics must reside within high vacuum at ~ 10-8 Torr and this requirement introduces its own set of complications. This talk discusses the performance of numerous high reflector and output coupler optics assemblies and provides a detailed list of lessons learned gleaned from years of experience operating the Upgrade IR FEL, a 10 kW-class, sub-ps laser with output wavelength from 1 to 6 microns.

  15. Comparison of diffusion approximation and higher order diffusion equations for optical tomography of osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Zhang, Qizhi; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-09-01

    In this study, a simplified spherical harmonics approximated higher order diffusion model is employed for 3-D diffuse optical tomography of osteoarthritis in the finger joints. We find that the use of a higher-order diffusion model in a stand-alone framework provides significant improvement in reconstruction accuracy over the diffusion approximation model. However, we also find that this is not the case in the image-guided setting when spatial prior knowledge from x-rays is incorporated. The results show that the reconstruction error between these two models is about 15 and 4%, respectively, for stand-alone and image-guided frameworks.

  16. Generation and purification of maximally entangled atomic states in optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Walther, H.; Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We present a probabilistic scheme for generating and purifying maximally entangled states of two atoms inside an optical cavity via no-photon detection at the cavity output, where ideal detectors are not required. The intermediate mixed states can be continuously purified so as to violate Bell inequalities in a parametrized manner. The scheme relies on an additional strong-driving field that realizes, atypically, simultaneous Jaynes-Cummings and anti-Jaynes-Cummings interactions.

  17. Development of Nb{sub 3}Sn Cavity Vapor Diffusion Deposition System

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Macha, Kurt M.; Clemens, William A.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-02-01

    Nb{sub 3}Sn is a BCS superconductors with the superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium, so theoretically it surpasses the limitations of niobium in RF fields. The feasibility of technology has been demonstrated at 1.5 GHz with Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor deposition technique at Wuppertal University. The benefit at these frequencies is more pronounced at 4.2 K, where Nb{sub 3}Sn coated cavities show RF resistances an order of magnitude lower than that of niobium. At Jefferson Lab we started the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn vapor diffusion deposition system within an R\\&D development program towards compact light sources. Here we present the current progress of the system development.

  18. Collective atomic motion and spin dynamics in a driven optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics generally highlights the interchange of quantum noise and information between light and matter. I will discuss experiments in which the collective motion and spin of a trapped gas of ultracold atoms interact with and are detected by light in a single mode of a high-finesse optical cavity. I will present recent results on quantum-limited force detection, on the damping and amplification of Larmor precession through dynamical backaction, and on cavity-induced coupling between mechanical oscillators and between spin and motional degrees of freedom.

  19. Complex ABCD transformations for optical ring cavities with losses and gain

    SciTech Connect

    Kudashov, V N; Radin, A M; Plachenov, A B

    1999-04-30

    Complex ABCD field transformations are investigated for inhomogeneous optical ring cavities with losses and gain. It is shown that the sets of eigenfunctions, corresponding to counterpropagating waves, are really biorthogonal: the functions in each of these sets are really orthogonal relative to one another, and have a complex weighting factor independent of the mode number. Bidirectional and unidirectional stability conditions are formulated for such cavities. These conditions are qualitatively different from those for loss-free cavities. A simple algorithm is proposed for the evaluation of the ABCD matrix for a medium with an arbitrary longitudinal inhomogeneity along the beam. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Modeling of optically controlled reflective bistability in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, L.

    2015-05-01

    Bistability switching between two optical signals has been studied theoretically utilizing the concept of cross absorption modulation in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber (VCSSA). The probe beam is fixed at a wavelength other than the low power cavity resonance wavelength, which exhibits bistable characteristic by controlling the power of a pump beam (λpump≠λprobe). The cavity nonlinear effects that arises simultaneously from the excitonic absorption bleaching, and the carrier induced nonlinear index change has been considered in the model. The high power absorption in the active region introduces thermal effects within the nonlinear cavity due to which the effective cavity length changes. This leads to a red-shift of the cavity resonance wavelength, which results a change in phase of the optical fields within the cavity. In the simulation, the phase-change due to this resonance shifting is considered to be constant over time, and it assumes the value corresponding to the maximum input power. Further, an initial phase detuning of the probe beam has been considered to investigate its effect on switching. It is observed from the simulated results that, the output of the probe beam exhibits either clockwise or counter-clockwise bistability, depending on its initial phase detuning.

  1. Enhanced photocoagulation with catheter-based diffusing optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Kim, Jeehyun; Oh, Jungwhan

    2012-11-01

    A novel balloon catheter-based diffusing optical device was designed and evaluated to assist in treating excessive menstrual bleeding. A synthetic fused-silica fiber was micro-machined precisely to create scattering segments on a 25 mm long fiber tip for uniform light distribution. A visible wavelength (λ=532 nm) was used to specifically target the endometrium due to the high vascularity of the uterine wall. Optical simulation presented 30% wider distribution of photons along with approximately 40% higher irradiance induced by addition of a glass cap to the diffuser tip. Incorporation of the optical diffuser with a polyurethane balloon catheter considerably enhanced coagulation depth and area (i.e., 3.5 mm and 18.9 cm2 at 1 min irradiation) in tissue in vitro. The prototype device demonstrated the coagulation necrosis of 2.8±1.2 mm (n=18) and no thermal damage to myometrium in in vivo caprine models. A prototype 5 cm long balloon catheter-assisted optical diffuser was also evaluated with a cadaveric human uterus to confirm the coagulative response of the uterine tissue as well as to identify the further design improvement and clinical applicability. The proposed catheter-based diffusing optical device can be a feasible therapeutic tool to photocoagulate endometrial cell layers in an efficient and safe manner.

  2. Optomechanical Entanglement Between an Ion and an Optical Cavity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2016-04-01

    I study an optomechanical system in which the mechanical motion of a single trapped ion is coupled to a cavity field for the realization of a strongly quantum correlated two-mode system. I show that for large pump intensities the steady state photon number exhibits bistable behaviour. I further analyze the occurrence of normal mode splitting (NMS) due to mixing of the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the ion motion which indicates a coherent energy exchange. I also find that in the parameter regime where NMS exists, the steady state of the system shows continuous variable entanglement. Such a two-mode optomechanical system can be used for the realization of continuous variable quantum information interfaces and networks.

  3. Non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-01

    Strong coupling of molecules to the vacuum field of micro cavities can modify the potential energy surfaces thereby opening new photophysical and photochemical reaction pathways. While the influence of laser fields is usually described in terms of classical field, coupling to the vacuum state of a cavity has to be described in terms of dressed photon-matter states (polaritons) which require quantized fields. We present a derivation of the non-adiabatic couplings for single molecules in the strong coupling regime suitable for the calculation of the dressed state dynamics. The formalism allows to use quantities readily accessible from quantum chemistry codes like the adiabatic potential energy surfaces and dipole moments to carry out wave packet simulations in the dressed basis. The implications for photochemistry are demonstrated for a set of model systems representing typical situations found in molecules.

  4. Effect of irradiation on nonlinear optical recirculation cavity performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitta, M.; Tikhoplav, R.; Jovanovic, I.

    2012-02-01

    In applications such as the production of hydrogen ions for accelerators in spallation neutron sources, charge stripping of hydrogen ions using high-power lasers represents an attractive technical approach. The use of laser-ion interaction in conjunction with a laser recirculation cavity holds promise for improved efficiency, but the high-radiation environment raises concerns about the longevity of the key components of such a system, especially the nonlinear crystal used for frequency conversion. We present the results of an in-reactor irradiation experiment in which a sample beta-barium borate crystal has been irradiated with fast neutrons and gamma-rays, accompanied with the Monte Carlo analysis of the irradiation dose and its comparison with typical conditions at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results suggest that our design of the laser recirculation cavity exhibits a radiation hardness consistent with maintaining enhancement factors of the order of 10 over >10 years, but a more detailed experimental study is needed to investigate the radiation hardness of cavity designs exhibiting greater enhancement factors.

  5. Thermal analysis of optical reference cavities for low sensitivity to environmental temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Yanyi; Hang, Chao; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2015-02-23

    The temperature stability of optical reference cavities is significant in state-of-the-art ultra-stable narrow-linewidth laser systems. In this paper, the thermal time constant and thermal sensitivity of reference cavities are analyzed when reference cavities respond to environmental perturbations via heat transfer of thermal conduction and thermal radiation separately. The analysis as well as simulation results indicate that a reference cavity enclosed in multiple layers of thermal shields with larger mass, higher thermal capacity and lower emissivity is found to have a larger thermal time constant and thus a smaller sensitivity to environmental temperature perturbations. The design of thermal shields for reference cavities may vary according to experimentally achievable temperature stability and the coefficient of thermal expansion of reference cavities. A temperature fluctuation-induced length instability of reference cavities as low as 6 × 10(-16) on a day timescale can be achieved if a two-layer thermal shield is inserted between a cavity with the coefficient of thermal expansion of 1 × 10(-10) /K and an outer vacuum chamber with temperature fluctuation amplitude of 1 mK and period of 24 hours. PMID:25836547

  6. Optical-bistability-enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The control of light transmission through a standing-wave Fabry-Pérot cavity containing atoms is theoretically and numerically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained. The response of the intracavity intensity to an intersecting beam on atomic resonance is understood in the presence of stationary atoms (closed system) and nonstatic atoms (open system) in the cavity. The nonstatic system of atoms is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, which corresponds to a thermal environment where atoms are moving in and out of the cavity mode volume. The control behavior with three- and two-level atomic systems is also studied, and the rich physics arising out of these systems for closed and open atomic systems is discussed. The solutions to the models are used to interpret the steady-state and transient behavior observed by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 043824 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.043824.

  7. Novel laser machining of optical fibers for long cavities with low birefringence.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Morphew, Jack; Oručević, Fedja; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kassa, Ezra; Keller, Matthias

    2014-12-15

    We present a novel method of machining optical fiber surfaces with a CO₂ laser for use in Fiber-based Fabry-Perot Cavities (FFPCs). Previously FFPCs were prone to large birefringence and limited to relatively short cavity lengths (≤ 200 μm). These characteristics hinder their use in some applications such as cavity quantum electrodynamics with trapped ions. We optimized the laser machining process to produce large, uniform surface structures. This enables the cavities to achieve high finesse even for long cavity lengths. By rotating the fibers around their axis during the laser machining process the asymmetry resulting from the laser's transverse mode profile is eliminated. Consequently we are able to fabricate fiber mirrors with a high degree of rotational symmetry, leading to remarkably low birefringence. Through measurements of the cavity finesse over a range of cavity lengths and the polarization dependence of the cavity linewidth, we confirmed the quality of the produced fiber mirrors for use in low-birefringence FFPCs. PMID:25607080

  8. High contrast all-optical diode based on direction-dependent optical bistability within asymmetric ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiu-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Qin; Xu, Jing-Ping; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple all-optical diode which is comprised of an asymmetric ring cavity containing a two-level atomic ensemble. Attributed to spatial symmetry breaking of the ring cavity, direction-dependent optical bistability is obtained in a classical bistable system. Therefore, a giant optical non-reciprocity is generated, which guarantees an all-optical diode with a high contrast up to 22 dB. Furthermore, its application as an all-optical logic AND gate is also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274242, 11474221, and 11574229), the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. U1330203), and the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922203 and 2013CB632701).

  9. Extreme nonlinear response of ultranarrow optical transitions in cavity QED for laser stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M. J.; Meiser, D.; Ye Jun; Holland, M. J.; Thomsen, J. W.

    2011-12-15

    We explore the potential of direct spectroscopy of ultranarrow optical transitions of atoms localized in an optical cavity. In contrast to stabilization against a reference cavity, which is the approach currently used for the most highly stabilized lasers, stabilization against an atomic transition does not suffer from Brownian thermal noise. Spectroscopy of ultranarrow optical transitions in a cavity operates in a very highly saturated regime in which nonlinear effects such as bistability play an important role. From the universal behavior of the Jaynes-Cummings model with dissipation, we derive the fundamental limits for laser stabilization using direct spectroscopy of ultranarrow atomic lines. We find that, with current lattice clock experiments, laser linewidths of about 1 mHz can be achieved in principle, and the ultimate limitations of this technique are at the 1 {mu}Hz level.

  10. Acid-etched Fabry-Perot micro-cavities in optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machavaram, V. R.; Badcock, R. A.; Fernando, G. F.

    2007-07-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the design and fabrication of optical fibre-based sensor systems for applications in structural health monitoring. Two sensor designs have tended to dominate namely, fibre Bragg gratings and extrinsic fibre Fabry-Perot sensors. However, the cost and time associated with these sensors is relatively high and as a consequence, the current paper describes a simple procedure to fabricate intrinsic fibre Fabry-Perot interferometric strain sensors. The technique involves the use of hydrofluoric acid to etch a cavity in a cleaved optical fibre. Two such etched cavities were fusion spliced to create an intrinsic fibre Fabry-Perot cavity. The feasibility of using this device for strain monitoring was demonstrated. Excellent correlation was obtained between the optical and surface-mounted electrical resistance strain gauge.

  11. Single-shot optical readout of a quantum bit using cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuo; Waks, Edo

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method to perform single-shot optical readout of a quantum bit (qubit) using cavity quantum electrodynamics. We selectively couple the optical transitions associated with different qubit basis states to the cavity and utilize the change in cavity transmissivity to generate a qubit readout signal composed of many photons. We show that this approach enables single-shot optical readout even when the qubit does not have a good cycling transition, which is required for standard resonance fluorescence measurements. We calculate the probability that the measurement detects the correct qubit state using the example of a quantum-dot spin under various experimental conditions and demonstrate that it can exceed 0.99.

  12. Very high repetition-rate electro-optical cavity-dumped Nd: YVO4 laser with optics and dynamics stabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuesong; Shi, Zhaohui; Huang, Yutao; Fan, Zhongwei; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing; Hou, Liqun

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a very high repetition-rate, short-pulse, electro-optical cavity-dumped Nd: YVO4 laser is experimentally and theoretically investigated. The laser performance is optimized from two aspects. Firstly, the laser resonator is designed for a good thermal stability under large pump power fluctuation through optics methods. Secondly, dynamics simulation as well as experiments verifies that cavity dumping at very high repetition rate has better stability than medium/high repetition rate. At 30 W, 880 nm pump power, up to 500 kHz, constant 5 ns, stable 1064 nm fundamental-mode laser pulses can be obtained with 10 W average output power.

  13. Passive intrinsic-linewidth narrowing of ultraviolet extended-cavity diode laser by weak optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samutpraphoot, Polnop; Weber, Sophie; Lin, Qian; Gangloff, Dorian; Bylinskii, Alexei; Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Raab, Christoph; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Vuletić, Vladan

    2014-05-01

    We present a simple method for narrowing the intrinsic Lorentzian linewidth of a commercial ultraviolet grating extended-cavity diode laser (TOPTICA DL Pro) using weak optical feedback from a long external cavity. We achieve a suppression in frequency noise spectral density of 20 dB measured at frequencies around 1 MHz, corresponding to the narrowing of the intrinsic Lorentzian linewidth from 200 kHz to 2 kHz. The system is suitable for experiments requiring a tunable ultraviolet laser with narrow linewidth and low high-frequency noise, such as precision spectroscopy, optical clocks, and quantum information science experiments.

  14. Control of light polarization using optically spin-injected vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Frougier, J. Jaffrès, H.; Deranlot, C.; George, J.-M.; Baili, G.; Dolfi, D.; Alouini, M.; Sagnes, I.; Garnache, A.

    2013-12-16

    We fabricated and characterized an optically pumped (100)-oriented InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum well Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL). The structure is designed to allow the integration of a Metal-Tunnel-Junction ferromagnetic spin-injector for future electrical injection. We report here the control at room temperature of the electromagnetic field polarization using optical spin injection in the active medium of the VECSEL. The switching between two highly circular polarization states had been demonstrated using an M-shaped extended cavity in multi-modes lasing. This result witnesses an efficient spin-injection in the active medium of the LASER.

  15. Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.; Garcia, J. A.

    2000-07-01

    A liquid-ambient-compatible thermal wave resonant cavity (TWRC) has been constructed for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol, ethylene glycol, and olive oil were determined at room temperature (25 °C), with four-significant-figure precision as follows: (0.1445±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (distilled water); (0.0922±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (glycerol); (0.0918±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (ethylene glycol); and (0.0881±0.0004)×10-2 cm2/s (olive oil). The liquid-state TWRC sensor was found to be highly sensitive to various mixtures of methanol and salt in distilled water with sensitivity limits 0.5% (v/v) and 0.03% (w/v), respectively. The use of the TWRC to measure gas evolution from liquids and its potential for environmental applications has also been demonstrated.

  16. [Determining the volume of solution necessary for intraoperative disinfection lavage of the abdominal cavity in diffuse suppurative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Nifant'ev, O E; Popov, A E; Voevodina, T V; Okolelova, E V

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of lavage of the abdominal cavity in diffuse purulent peritonitis by means of a developed device "Geyser" are shown. Changes in the bacterial contamination, toxicity and metabolite contents in the lavage solution and peritoneum depended on a volume of the fluid used. PMID:2338787

  17. Control of diffusion of nanoparticles in an optical vortex lattice.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Ivar; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Sáenz, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    A two-dimensional periodic optical force field, which combines conservative dipolar forces with vortices from radiation pressure, is proposed in order to influence the diffusion properties of optically susceptible nanoparticles. The different deterministic flow patterns are identified. In the low-noise limit, the diffusion coefficient is computed from a mean first passage time and the most probable escape paths are identified for those flow patterns which possess a stable stationary point. Numerical simulations of the associated Langevin equations show remarkable agreement with the analytically deduced expressions. Modifications of the force field are proposed so that a wider range of phenomena could be tested. PMID:27415231

  18. Computational analysis of endometrial photocoagulation with diffusing optical device

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jinhee; Lee, Chang-Yong; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2013-01-01

    A balloon-catheter optical diffuser for endometrial treatment was evaluated with computational thermal analysis. Various catheter materials and dimensions were implemented to identify the optimal design for the device. Spatial and temporal development of temperature during 30-sec irradiation of 532-nm light demonstrated thermal insulation effects of polyurethane on temperature increase up to 384 K, facilitating the irreversible denaturation. The current model revealed the degree of thermal coagulation 13% thicker than experimental results possibly due to lack of tissue dynamics and light intensity distribution. In combination with photon distribution, the analytical simulation can be a feasible tool to optimize the new optical diffuser for efficient and safe endometrial treatment. PMID:24298406

  19. Onset of Double-Diffusive Convection in a Rectangular Cavity and Its Generation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Jiro; Yasumizu, Yuto; Ohashi, Shunsuke

    2013-08-01

    Two-dimensional double diffusive convection in a binary fluid mixture filled in a container with a rectangular cross section is investigated by linear stability analyses, numerical simulations and numerical calculations of steady solutions in the present paper. We mainly consider an ethanol--water mixture as the binary fluid, in which heat and ethanol diffuse in different time scales affecting the fluid motion through buoyancy force and the Soret effect. The bottom of the cavity is kept at a higher temperature than the top, and the side boundary walls are assumed to be perfectly insulating. The impermeability condition of mass is applied on all the boundaries. We obtain the critical condition for the onset of double diffusive convection, and examine the flow field at the criticality. It is found that the most unstable mode of disturbance is oscillatory at the criticality for negative values of the separation number, though it is a steady mode of disturbance for positive or null values of the separation number. We discuss the driving mechanism of the steady and oscillatory convections by evaluating torques exerted on the fluid due to the buoyancy force, the pressure and the viscosity separately in each. We find in numerical simulations that the convection, even if it is oscillatory initially, always attains a steady state in due course in the case of a container with a square cross section. The bifurcation diagram of the steady convection is obtained numerically and the relation between the steady convection and the oscillatory mode of disturbance arising due to the linear instability is briefly discussed.

  20. Transportable cavity-stabilized laser system for optical carrier frequency transmission experiments.

    PubMed

    Parker, B; Marra, G; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Webster, S A; Wright, L; Lea, S N; Gill, P; Bayvel, P

    2014-12-10

    We report the design and performance of a transportable laser system at 1543 nm, together with its application as the source for a demonstration of optical carrier frequency transmission over 118 km of an installed dark fiber network. The laser system is based around an optical reference cavity featuring an elastic mounting that bonds the cavity to its support, enabling the cavity to be transported without additional clamping. The cavity exhibits passive fractional frequency insensitivity to vibration along the optical axis of 2.0×10(-11)  m(-1) s(2). With active fiber noise cancellation, the optical carrier frequency transmission achieves a fractional frequency instability, measured at the user end, of 2.6×10(-16) at 1 s, averaging down to below 3×10(-18) after 20,000 s. The fractional frequency accuracy of the transfer is better than 3×10(-18). This level of performance is sufficient for comparison of state-of-the-art optical frequency standards and is achieved in an urban fiber environment. PMID:25608055

  1. Quantum memory and phase gate in Optical cavities based on EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Halyne; Villas-Bôas, Celso

    In this work we investigate theoretically the implementation of an optical quantum memory in a system composed by a single atom, trapped in a high finesse optical cavity. In order to analyse the feasibility of implementing a quantum memory in the atom-cavity system based on the EIT phenomenon, we investigated in detail which parameter configuration the memory efficiency is optimized considering the two different setups. Our results shows that for a asymmetric one-sided cavity, which is the experimental setup commonly used to observe the EIT effect, the memory efficiency value saturates at about 8 . 5 % . Meanwhile, for an one-sided cavity, we observe for a sufficiently high value of the coupling constant g, the efficiency has its maximum value increased considerably, close to 100 % . However, this experimental setup is not suitable to observe cavity-EIT in the transmission spectrum, being necessary another kind of experiment, such as measurements phase difference field that leaves the cavity induced by the control field. Considering this configuration we also showed the implementation of a quantum phase gate based on the same nonlinear effect, where the pulse probe can experience a phase shift on the order of π, due to the presence or absence of a control pulse. Supported by FAPESP (Proc. 2014/12740-1) and INCT-IQ.

  2. Ultra-low-loss optical fiber cavities for applications in quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Niemietz, Dominik; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Single atoms strongly coupled to optical cavities are well suited as light-matter interfaces at the single photon level. The strength of the coupling is inversely proportional to the square root of the mode volume of the cavity, which depends on the radius of curvature of the mirrors. We report on the fabrication of near-spherical surfaces with small radii of curvature on the end facets of optical fibers using a CO2 laser at 9.3 μm wavelength. The surfaces are coated with a commercial, highly reflective, dielectric coating. Cavities built from two of these fibers show a finesse of up to 190000. Due to the small radii of curvature and the high finesse of these cavities, deviations from the paraxial approximation become relevant. This results in a frequency splitting of polarization eigenmodes depending on the eccentricity of the mirrors. Our analytic model that explains this effect is in excellent agreement with our measurements. This allows for the control of the frequency splitting by the geometry of the mirror surfaces. Our results confirm the great prospects of laser-machined cavities for experiments in quantum information processing. The possibility of implementing a quantum repeater node based on our cavity technologies will also be discussed.

  3. Fiber optical accelerometer based on 45 degrees Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Zhang, Wentao; Wang, Zhaogang; Sun, Baochen; Xu, Binhong; Li, Fang

    2014-11-01

    The paper proposes an accelerometer construction based on 45-degrees Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer cavity. The uniform intensity cantilever consists of a mass block in the middle and a 45-degrees F-P cavity fixed inside the mass. The mass block can oscillate freely when the vibrating sensor is subject to the vibration and the F-P cavity length is changing. The G-lens end face and total reflective film make up the two reflective films of the F-P cavity, and the reflectivity are 4% and 90% respectively. In the F-P cavity, a 45-degrees mirror fixed in the middle of the G-lens and total reflective film. The mirror can change the transmission of the light and increase the optical path difference. The total reflective film fixed in the steel tube and the G-lens fixed in the fine tuning bolt. The bolt can fine adjust the F-P cavity in sensor encapsulating. The sensor structure lead to the optical loss in the airborne and tilted mirror, besides the distance of F-P gap in steel tube and the optical coupling efficiency can't work out accurately, so we did a series deterministic test before encapsulating, for example the selection of the structures, the diameter of the optical fibers and the diameter of the reflective films. At last, 9/125 μm optical fiber, 1.4 mm total reflective film and the structure of total reflective film out of steel tube were used for the accelerometer. The sensitivity can reach 0.042 rad/g and the resonant frequency of the accelerometer is 400 Hz.

  4. Assessment of finger joint inflammation by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Klose, Alexander D.; Scheel, Alexander K.; Backhaus, Marina; Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Juergen

    2003-10-01

    Inflammatory processes as they occur during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lead to changes in the optical properties of joint tissues and fluids. These changes occur early on in the disease process and can potentially be used as diagnostic parameter. In this work we report on in vivo studies involving 12 human subjects, which show the potential of diffuse optical tomographic techniques for the diagnosis of inflammatory processes in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints.

  5. External electro-optic sampling utilizing a poled polymer asymmetric Fabry Perot cavity as an electro-optical probe tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaixin; Zhang, Hongbo; Zhang, Daming; Yang, Han; Yi, Maobin

    2002-09-01

    External electro-optic sampling utilizing a poled polymer asymmetry Fabry-Perot cavity as electro-optic probe tip has been demonstrated. Electro-optical polymer spin coated on the high-reflectivity mirror (HRM) was corona poled. Thus, an asymmetric F-P cavity was formed based on the different reflectivity of the polymer and HRM and it converted the phase modulation that originates from electro-optic effect of the poled polymer to amplitude modulation, so only one laser beam is needed in this system. The principle of the sampling was analyzed by multiple reflection and index ellipsoid methods. A 1.2 GHz microwave signal propagating on coplanar waveguide transmission line was sampled, and the voltage sensitivity about 0.5 mV/ Hz was obtained.

  6. Design a high-q optical cavity for the project of laser notching h- beam at 38.5 mhz

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    Ray matrix formalism is used to represent a two-mirror resonator with a thermal lens in the middle. By tracking a ray vector, which starts from the place where the laser and H{sup -} beams intercept, through the optical cavity, the cavity property can be analyzed. The cavity design can be optimized in such a way that at the interception, the spacious jitter of the laser beam caused by the cavity misalignment is the minimum.

  7. An integrated quantum repeater at telecom wavelength with single atoms in optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Quantum repeaters promise to enable quantum networks over global distances by circumventing the exponential decrease in success probability inherent in direct photon transmission. We propose a realistic, functionally integrated quantum-repeater implementation based on single atoms in optical cavities. Entanglement is directly generated between the single-atom quantum memory and a photon at telecom wavelength. The latter is collected with high efficiency and adjustable temporal and spectral properties into a spatially well-defined cavity mode. It is heralded by a near-infrared photon emitted from a second, orthogonal cavity. Entanglement between two remote quantum memories can be generated via an optical Bell-state measurement, while we propose entanglement swapping based on a highly efficient, cavity-assisted atom-atom gate. Our quantum-repeater scheme eliminates any requirement for wavelength conversion such that only a single system is needed at each node. We investigate a particular implementation with rubidium and realistic parameters for Fabry-Perot cavities based on hbox {CO}_2 laser-machined optical fibers. We show that the scheme enables the implementation of a rather simple quantum repeater that outperforms direct entanglement generation over large distances and does not require any improvements in technology beyond the state of the art.

  8. Collective state synthesis in an optical cavity using Rydberg atom dipole blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon A.; Fan, Haoquan; Shaffer, James P.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the coherent manipulation of interacting Rydberg atoms placed inside a high-finesse optical cavity for the deterministic preparation of strongly coupled light-matter systems. We consider a four-level diamond scheme with one common Rydberg level for N interacting atoms. One side of the diamond is used to excite the atoms into a collective ‘superatom’ Rydberg state using either π-pulses or stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) pulses. The upper transition on the other side of the diamond is used to transfer the collective state to one that is coupled to a field mode of an optical cavity. Due to the strong interaction between the atoms in the Rydberg level, the Rydberg blockade mechanism plays a key role in the deterministic quantum state synthesis of the atoms in the cavity. We use numerical simulation to show that non-classical states of light can be generated and that the state that is coupled to the cavity field is a collective one. We also investigate how different decay mechanisms affect this interacting many-body system. We also analyze our system in the case of two Rydberg excitations within the blockade volume. The simulations are carried out with parameters corresponding to realizable high-finesse optical cavities and alkali atoms like rubidium.

  9. Proposal for a telecom quantum repeater with single atoms in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Niemietz, Dominik; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Quantum repeaters hold the promise to enable long-distance quantum communication via entanglement generation over arbitrary distances. Single atoms in optical cavities have been shown to be ideally suited for the experimental realization of many tasks in quantum communication. To utilize these systems for a quantum repeater, it would be desirable to operate them at telecom wavelengths. We propose to use a cascaded scheme employing transitions at telecom wavelengths between excited states of alkali atoms for entanglement generation between a single photon at telecom wavelength and a single atom at the crossing point of two cavity modes. A cavity-assisted quantum gate can be used for entanglement swapping. We estimate the performance of these systems using numerical simulations based on experimental parameters obtained for CO2 laser-machined fiber cavities in our laboratory. Finally, we show that a quantum repeater employing the aforementioned scheme and current technology could outperform corresponding schemes based on direct transmission.

  10. Self-amplified lock of an ultra-narrow linewidth optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kiwamu; Sigg, Daniel; Barsotti, Lisa

    2014-09-15

    High finesse optical cavities are an essential tool in modern precision laser interferometry. The incident laser field is often controlled and stabilized with an active feedback system such that the field resonates in the cavity. The Pound-Drever-Hall reflection locking technique is a convenient way to derive a suitable error signal. However, it only gives a strong signal within the cavity linewidth. This poses a problem for locking an ultra-narrow linewidth cavity. We present a novel technique for acquiring lock by utilizing an additional weak control signal, but with a much larger capture range. We numerically show that this technique can be applied to the laser frequency stabilization system used in the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which has a linewidth of 0.8 Hz. This new technique will allow us to robustly and repeatedly lock the LIGO laser frequency to the common mode of the interferometer. PMID:26466252

  11. Cavity-Free Scheme for Nondestructive Detection of a Single Optical Photon.

    PubMed

    Xia, Keyu; Johnsson, Mattias; Knight, Peter L; Twamley, Jason

    2016-01-15

    Detecting a single photon without absorbing it is a long-standing challenge in quantum optics. All experiments demonstrating the nondestructive detection of a photon make use of a high quality cavity. We present a cavity-free scheme for nondestructive single-photon detection. By pumping a nonlinear medium we implement an interfield Rabi oscillation which leads to a ∼π phase shift on a weak probe coherent laser field in the presence of a single signal photon without destroying the signal photon. Our cavity-free scheme operates with a fast intrinsic time scale in comparison with similar cavity-based schemes. We implement a full real-space multimode numerical analysis of the interacting photonic modes and confirm the validity of our nondestructive scheme in the multimode case. PMID:26824538

  12. All-optical transistor based on a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2011-11-15

    We propose a scheme of an all-optical transistor based on a coupled Bose-Einstein condensate cavity system. The calculated results show that, in such an optomechanical system, the transmission of the probe beam is strongly dependent on the optical pump power. Therefore, the optical pump field can serve as a ''gate'' field of the transistor, effectively controlling the propagation of the probe field (the ''signal'' field). The scheme proposed here may have potential applications in optical communication and quantum information processing.

  13. Changes in diffusion path length with old age in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnéry, Clément; Leclerc, Paul-Olivier; Desjardins, Michèle; Hoge, Rick; Bherer, Louis; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2012-05-01

    Diffuse, optical near infrared imaging is increasingly being used in various neurocognitive contexts where changes in optical signals are interpreted through activation maps. Statistical population comparison of different age or clinical groups rely on the relative homogeneous distribution of measurements across subjects in order to infer changes in brain function. In the context of an increasing use of diffuse optical imaging with older adult populations, changes in tissue properties and anatomy with age adds additional confounds. Few studies investigated these changes with age. Duncan et al. measured the so-called diffusion path length factor (DPF) in a large population but did not explore beyond the age of 51 after which physiological and anatomical changes are expected to occur [Pediatr. Res. 39(5), 889-894 (1996)]. With increasing interest in studying the geriatric population with optical imaging, we studied changes in tissue properties in young and old subjects using both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided Monte-Carlo simulations and time-domain diffuse optical imaging. Our results, measured in the frontal cortex, show changes in DPF that are smaller than previously measured by Duncan et al. in a younger population. The origin of these changes are studied using simulations and experimental measures.

  14. Time-delay concealment and complexity enhancement of an external-cavity laser through optical injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianqiang; Pan, Wei; Locquet, A; Citrin, D S

    2015-10-01

    The concealment of the time-delay signature (TDS) of chaotic external-cavity lasers is necessary to ensure the security of optical chaos-based cryptosystems. We show that this signature can be removed simply by optically injecting an external-cavity laser with a large linewidth-enhancement factor into a second, noninjection-locked, semiconductor laser. Concealment is ensured both in the amplitude and in the phase of the optical field, satisfying a sought-after property of optical chaos-based communications. Meanwhile, enhancement of the dynamical complexity, characterized by permutation entropy, coincides with strong TDS suppression over a wide range of parameters, the area for which depends sensitively on the linewidth-enhancement factor. PMID:26421545

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. M.; Cui, F. C.; Zhou, D. L.; Liu, W. M.

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a combined system which is composed of a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate and an optical cavity with the two sides coupled dispersively. This system is characterized by the cavity-induced nonlinearity; after integrating out the fast degree of freedom of the cavity mode, the potential felt by the condensate depends on the condensate itself. Adopting a discrete-mode approximation for the condensate, we map out the steady configurations of the system. It is found that due to the nonlinearity of the system, the nonlinear levels of the system may fold up in some parameter regimes. That will lead to the breakdown of adiabatic evolution of the system. Analysis of the dynamical stability of the steady states indicates that the same level structure also results in optical bistability.

  16. Entanglement of movable mirror and cavity field enhanced by an optical parametric amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai-yun, Zhang; Hu, Li; Gui-xia, Pan; Zong-qiang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    A scheme to generate entanglement in a cavity optomechanical system filled with an optical parametric amplifier is proposed. With the help of the optical parametric amplifier, the stationary macroscopic entanglement between the movable mirror and the cavity field can be notably enhanced, and the entanglement increases when the parametric gain increases. Moreover, for a given parametric gain, the degree of entanglement of the cavity optomechanical system increases with increasing input laser power. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11247001), the Scientific Research Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. KJ2012A083), and the Doctor (Master) Fund of Anhui University of Science and Technology, China.

  17. Controllable optical bistability in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose–Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamideh Kazemi, Seyedeh; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    The optical bistability (OB) in a two-mode optomechanical system with a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is studied. By investigating the behavior of steady state solutions, we show that how OB develops in the system for a certain range of cavity-pump detunings and pump amplitudes. We then investigate the effects of the decay rate of the cavity photons and coupling strength between the cavity and the BEC as well as the pump-atom detuning on the optical behaviour of the system. We find that one can control the OB threshold and width of the bistability curve via adjusting properly the coupling strength and the detuning. By applying Routh–Hurwitz criterion, we then derive stability conditions for different branches of the OB curve. Moreover, by introducing an effective potential for the system, a simple physical interpretation is obtained.

  18. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrarymore » macropulse width and repetition rate.« less

  19. The measurement of the optical cavity length for the Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Curtis; J.C. Dahlberg; W.A. Oren; K.J. Tremblay

    1999-10-01

    One of the final tasks involved in the alignment of the newly constructed Free Electron Laser at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility was to accurately measure the length between two mirrors which make up the optical cavity. This presentation examines the survey techniques and equipment assembled in order to complete these measurements, together with the possible sources of error, and the accuracy achieved.

  20. Geometric phase in cavity QED containing a nonlinear optical medium and a quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.-B. A.; Eleuch, H.

    2015-11-01

    The geometric phase (GP) in cavity QED filled with a nonlinear medium and containing a quantum well is analyzed. We observe collapses and revivals. The optical nonlinearity leads to high frequency oscillations of the GP. The GP is very sensitive not only to the dissipation rates but also to the amplitude of the laser pump.

  1. Observation of motion-dependent nonlinear dispersion with narrow-linewidth atoms in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Christensen, Bjarke T R; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-03-01

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilization using ultrastable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the nonlinear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here, we have constructed such a system and observed nonlinear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by a strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multiphoton scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intracavity power, we systematically study this nonlinear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub-100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow-line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation to ultranarrow clock transitions. PMID:25793810

  2. Multiconical emission of a monolithic mini-cavity optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckus, Martynas; Staliunas, Kestutis; Saffman, Mark; Slekys, Gintas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Smilgevicius, Valerijus; Grigonis, Rimantas

    2005-07-01

    We show experimentally, and interpret theoretically the conical and multiconical emission of degenerate optical parametric oscillators in monolithic mini-cavities. We show the tunability of the conical emission angle, the switching between different resonant cones, and simultaneous emission on different cones, depending on the pump angle as well as on the length of the resonator.

  3. Transverse patterns of mini-cavity optical parametric oscillator with seed injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckus, Martynas; Staliunas, Kestutis; Smilgevicius, Valerijus; Slekys, Gintas; Rukavicius, Valdemaras; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2007-02-01

    We show experimentally, and interpret theoretically the conical and multiconical emission of optical parametric oscillators with seed injection in monolithic mini-cavities. We show the tunability of the conical emission angle, the switching between different resonant cones, and simultaneous emission on different cones, depending on the pump angle as well as on the length of the resonator.

  4. Observation of Motion-Dependent Nonlinear Dispersion with Narrow-Linewidth Atoms in an Optical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergaard, Philip G.; Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-03-01

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilization using ultrastable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the nonlinear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here, we have constructed such a system and observed nonlinear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by a strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multiphoton scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intracavity power, we systematically study this nonlinear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub-100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow-line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation to ultranarrow clock transitions.

  5. Application of principles of nonimaging optics to the construction of solid state laser pump cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janevski, Zoran; Pantelic, Dejan V.

    1990-07-01

    In laser systems where it is impossible or impractical to use lamps and rod whose effective perimeters are matched, some elements of construction of cavities using nonimaging optical concentrators can be used to achieve improved designs in regard to efficiency and pumping uniformity.

  6. Photoacoustic tomography: Ultrasonically beating optical diffusion and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    A decade of research has pushed photoacoustic computed tomography to the forefront of molecular-level imaging, notes SPIE Fellow Lihong Wang (Washington University, St. Louis) in his plenary talk, "Photoacoustic Tomography: Ultrasonically Beating Optical Diffusion and Diffraction." Modern optical microscopy has resolution and diffraction limitations. But noninvasive functional photoacoustic computed tomography has overcome this limit, offering deep penetration with optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution of 1 cm depth or more -- up to 7 cm of penetration in some cases, such as evaluating sentinel lymph nodes for breast cancer staging. This opens up applications in whole body imaging, brain function, oxygen saturation, label-free cell analysis, and noninvasive cancer biopsies.

  7. About diffusers and their importance in diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, Frank; Schimmel, Hagen

    2006-08-01

    With their introduction of diffused illumination Leith and Upatnieks introduced one the most essential inventions in holography and in modern optical engineering in general. They observed for the first time the enormous capability of utilizing the phase of a light field in a random-like manner for manipulating its characteristics when propagating in space. The use of phase freedom beyond lens-like manipulations in optical engineering was born. We like to place their invention into a broader context and discuss its enormous impact on most actual developments in optical engineering.

  8. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L E

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics. PMID:27078351

  9. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L. E.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics.

  10. Two diffusion photopolymer for sharp diffractive optical elements recording.

    PubMed

    Gallego, S; Fernández, R; Márquez, A; Ortuño, M; Neipp, C; Gleeson, M R; Sheridan, J T; Beléndez, A

    2015-07-15

    Photopolymers as recording media are widely used in optical applications. In such materials, changes in the phase of the transmittance function are generated during exposure due to refractive index and thickness modulations. These changes arise primarily as a consequence of photopolymerization and mass transport processes. Characterizing polymers' performance, for example, quantifying the value of monomer diffusion, is therefore very important. Applying index matching, the volume and surface optical effect are separated in an acrylamide/polyvinylalcohol (AA/PVA) material. Using a simplified model that includes the effects of the holes produced during polymerization, both hole and monomer diffusion are analyzed. The analysis presented indicates higher material sensitivity than previously estimated. The results also indicate the possibility of recording sharper diffractive optical elements profiles, like blazed gratings, having diffraction efficiencies higher than 80%. PMID:26176434

  11. Light scattering and optical diffusion from willemite spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Kevin M.; Butt, Haider; Batal, Afif; Sabouri, Aydin; Anthony, Carl J.

    2016-02-01

    Willemite is a zinc silicate mineral used in modern day pottery as a decorative feature within glazes. It is produced by controlled heat treatment of zinc oxide-containing ceramic glazes. The heat-treated glazes devitrify, producing thin nanoscale needle-like willemite crystals growing in spherulitic morphologies through branching of the needles. We show here that this resulting morphology of willemite crystals in an inorganic glass matrix has a previously unreported strong interaction with light, displaying remarkable optical diffraction patterns. Thin sections of such spherulites act as optical diffusers, enabling light beams to be spread up to 160° in width. Analysis of the interaction between the willemite spherulites and light suggests that the high density of willemite crystals in the spherulites and the length scales associated with both the thickness of the needles and the spacings between branches are together responsible for this optical diffusion behaviour.

  12. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Radiations after Acute Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Walt, Anneke; Butzkueven, Helmut; Klistorner, Alexander; Egan, Gary F.; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes within the optic radiations of patients after optic neuritis (ON). We aimed to study optic radiation DTI changes over 12 months following acute ON and to study correlations between DTI parameters and damage to the optic nerve and primary visual cortex (V1). We measured DTI parameters [fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD)] from the optic radiations of 38 acute ON patients at presentation and 6 and 12 months after acute ON. In addition, we measured retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, visual evoked potential amplitude, optic radiation lesion load, and V1 thickness. At baseline, FA was reduced and RD and MD were increased compared to control. Over 12 months, FA reduced in patients at an average rate of −2.6% per annum (control = −0.51%; p = 0.006). Change in FA, RD, and MD correlated with V1 thinning over 12 months (FA: R = 0.450, p = 0.006; RD: R = −0.428, p = 0.009; MD: R = −0.365, p = 0.029). In patients with no optic radiation lesions, AD significantly correlated with RNFL thinning at 12 months (R = 0.489, p = 0.039). In conclusion, DTI can detect optic radiation changes over 12 months following acute ON that correlate with optic nerve and V1 damage. PMID:27555964

  13. Response of a Fabry Perot optical cavity to phase modulation sidebands for use in electro-optic control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeldon, Kenneth D.; Strain, Kenneth A.

    1997-09-01

    The worldwide endeavor to build long baseline laser interferometers to detect and study gravitational radiation is well under way. In the German British GEO600 project, it is proposed to pass the sidebands induced on the light by an electro-optic phase modulator through a Fabry Perot optical cavity used in transmission, called a mode cleaner. This can be achieved when the phase modulation frequency is matched to the first longitudinal-mode frequency of the mode cleaner cavity so that both carrier and sidebands are transmitted. The primary function of the mode cleaner is to reduce the geometry fluctuations associated with the light, and thus any such noise induced by the modulation process is also suppressed. We present the results of an experiment that investigates the feasibility of passing modulation sidebands through an optical cavity and the factors limiting its success. In particular, we show that it is possible to avoid introducing excess noise associated with the transmitted sidebands, provided that certain experimental criteria are satisfied. The research was carried out on a prototype mode cleaner cavity built and tested at Glasgow University but which is similar to the equivalent apparatus planned for GEO600.

  14. Response of a Fabry-Perot optical cavity to phase modulation sidebands for use in electro-optic control systems.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, K D; Strain, K A

    1997-09-20

    The worldwide endeavor to build long baseline laser interferometers to detect and study gravitational radiation is well under way. In the German-British GEO600 project, it is proposed to pass the sidebands induced on the light by an electro-optic phase modulator through a Fabry-Perot optical cavity used in transmission, called a mode cleaner. This can be achieved when the phase modulation frequency is matched to the first longitudinal-mode frequency of the mode cleaner cavity so that both carrier and sidebands are transmitted. The primary function of the mode cleaner is to reduce the geometry fluctuations associated with the light, and thus any such noise induced by the modulation process is also suppressed. We present the results of an experiment that investigates the feasibility of passing modulation sidebands through an optical cavity and the factors limiting its success. In particular, we show that it is possible to avoid introducing excess noise associated with the transmitted sidebands, provided that certain experimental criteria are satisfied. The research was carried out on a prototype mode cleaner cavity built and tested at Glasgow University but which is similar to the equivalent apparatus planned for GEO600. PMID:18259548

  15. Water-walled microfluidics for high-optical finesse cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maayani, Shai; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In submerged microcavities there is a tradeoff between resonant enhancement for spatial water and light overlap. Why not transform the continuously resonating optical mode to be fully contained in a water microdroplet per se? Here we demonstrate a sustainable 30-μm-pure water device, bounded almost completely by free surfaces, enabling >1,000,000 re-circulations of light. The droplets survive for >16 h using a technique that is based on a nano-water bridge from the droplet to a distant reservoir to compensate for evaporation. More than enabling a nearly-perfect optical overlap with water, atomic-level surface smoothness that minimizes scattering loss, and ~99% coupling efficiency from a standard fibre. Surface tension in our droplet is 8,000 times stronger than gravity, suggesting a new class of devices with water-made walls, for new fields of study including opto-capillaries.

  16. Water-walled microfluidics for high-optical finesse cavities

    PubMed Central

    Maayani, Shai; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In submerged microcavities there is a tradeoff between resonant enhancement for spatial water and light overlap. Why not transform the continuously resonating optical mode to be fully contained in a water microdroplet per se? Here we demonstrate a sustainable 30-μm-pure water device, bounded almost completely by free surfaces, enabling >1,000,000 re-circulations of light. The droplets survive for >16 h using a technique that is based on a nano-water bridge from the droplet to a distant reservoir to compensate for evaporation. More than enabling a nearly-perfect optical overlap with water, atomic-level surface smoothness that minimizes scattering loss, and ∼99% coupling efficiency from a standard fibre. Surface tension in our droplet is 8,000 times stronger than gravity, suggesting a new class of devices with water-made walls, for new fields of study including opto-capillaries. PMID:26794271

  17. Resonant microwave cavity for 8.5-12 GHz optically detected electron spin resonance with simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, J. S.; Wienkes, L. R.

    2009-03-01

    We present a newly developed microwave resonant cavity for use in optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) experiments. The cylindrical quasi-TE011 mode cavity is designed to fit in a 1 in. magnet bore to allow the sample to be optically accessed and to have an adjustable resonant frequency between 8.5 and 12 GHz. The cavity uses cylinders of high dielectric material, so-called "dielectric resonators," in a double-stacked configuration to determine the resonant frequency. Wires in a pseudo-Helmholtz configuration are incorporated into the cavity to provide frequencies for simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The system was tested by measuring cavity absorption as microwave frequencies were swept, by performing ODMR on a zinc-doped InP sample, and by performing optically detected NMR on a GaAs sample. The results confirm the suitability of the cavity for ODMR with simultaneous NMR.

  18. Fabrication of optical cavities with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jintian; Song, Jiangxin; Tang, Jialei; Fang, Wei; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2014-03-01

    We report on fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) high-quality (Q) whispering-gallery-mode microcavities by femtosecond laser micromachining. The main fabrication procedures include the formation of on-chip freestanding microdisk through selective material removal by femtosecond laser pulses, followed by surface smoothing processes (CO2 laser reflow for amorphous glass and focused ion beam (FIB) sidewall milling for crystalline materials) to improve the Q factors. Fused silica microcavities with 3D geometries are demonstrated with Q factors exceeding 106. A microcavity laser based on Nd:glass has been fabricated, showing a threshold as low as 69μW via free space continuous-wave optical excitation at the room temperature. CaF2 crystalline microcavities with Q factor of ~4.2×104 have also been demonstrated. This technique allows us to fabricate 3D high-Q microcavities in various transparent materials such as glass and crystals, which will benefit a broad spectrum of applications such as nonlinear optics, quantum optics, and bio-sensing.

  19. Breast cancer detection using phase contrast diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qizhi; Li, Changqing; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-02-01

    In this report, a phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography system, which can measure the refractive indices of human breast masses in vivo, is described. To investigate the utility of phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography (PCDOT) for differentiation of malignant and benign breast masses in humans, and to compare PCDOT with conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for analysis of breast masses in humans. 35 breast masses were imaged in 33 patients (mean age = 51 years; range 22-80 years) using PCDOT. Images characterizing the tissue refractive index, absorption and scattering of breast masses were obtained with a finite element-based reconstruction algorithm. The accuracies of absorption and scattering images were compared with images of refractive index in light of the pathology results. Absorption and scattering images were unable to accurately discriminate benign from malignant lesions. Malignant lesions tended to have decreased refractive index allowing them to discriminate from benign lesions in most cases. The sensitivity, specificity, false positive value, and overall accuracy for refractive index were 81.8%, 70.8%, 29.2%, and 74.3%, respectively. Overall we show that benign and malignant breast masses in humans demonstrate different refractive index and differences in refractive index properties can be used to discriminate benign from malignant masses in patients with high accuracy. This opens up a new avenue for improved breast cancer detection using NIR diffusing light.

  20. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness. PMID:27338250

  1. Tunable all-optical plasmonic diode based on Fano resonance in nonlinear waveguide coupled with cavities.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cairong; Shi, Fenghua; Wu, Hongxing; Chen, Yihang

    2015-06-01

    Tunable all-optical plasmonic diode is proposed based on the Fano resonance in an asymmetric and nonlinear system, comprising metal-insulator-metal waveguides coupled with nanocavities. The spatial asymmetry of the system gives rise to the nonreciprocity of the field localizations at the nonlinear gap between the coupled cavities and to the nonreciprocal nonlinear response. Nonlinear Fano resonance, originating from the interference between the discrete cavity mode and the continuum traveling mode, is observed and effectively tuned by changing the input power. By combining the unidirectional nonlinear response with the steep dispersion of the Fano asymmetric line shape, a transmission contrast ratio up to 41.46 dB can be achieved between forward and backward transmission. Our all-optical plasmonic diode with compact structure can find important applications in integrated optical nanocircuits. PMID:26030529

  2. Thermal lens microscope sensitivity enhancement using a passive Fabry–Perot-type optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, H.; Cedeño, E.; Grima, P.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.; Delgado, O.

    2016-05-01

    We developed a thermal lens microscope equipped with a passive optical cavity, which provides an optical feedback for the multiple pass of the probe laser beam to enhance sensitivity. Considering the maximum absorption peak for Fe(II) at 532 nm wavelength, we have achieved a 6.6-fold decrease in the limit of detection (LOD) to a level of 0.077 μg · l‑1 without a cavity. The possibilities to use thermal lens detection combined with an optical resonator was proposed and a drastic thermal lens signal enhancement was achieved using very low excitation power. The corresponding LOD for Fe(II) was further decreased to the level of 0.006 μg · l‑1 which represents an 85-fold decrease of the LOD value. This setup is a promising device, which can be applied as a sensitive tool for detecting chemical traces in small volumes of solutions.

  3. All-optical transistor using a photonic-crystal cavity with an active Raman gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, V. G.; Myslivets, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a design of an all-optical transistor based on a one-dimensional photonic-crystal cavity doped with a four-level N-type active Raman gain medium. The calculated results show that in a photonic-crystal cavity of this kind transmission and reflection of the probe (Raman) beam are strongly dependent on the optical switching power. Transmission and reflection of the probe beam can be greatly amplified or attenuated. Therefore the optical switching field can serve as a gate field of the transistor to effectively control propagation of the weak probe field. It is shown that the group velocity of the probe pulse can be controlled in the range from subluminal (slow light) to superluminal (fast light).

  4. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness. PMID:27338250

  5. Realizing mode conversion and optical diode effect by coupling photonic crystal waveguides with cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Han; Zhang, Jin-Qian-Nan; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Dong-Lin; Chen, Zhi-Hui

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel two-dimensional photonic crystal structure consisting of two line defect waveguides and a cavity to realize mode conversion based on the coupling effect. The W1/cavity/W2 structure breaks the spatial symmetry and successfully converts the even (odd) mode to the odd (even) mode in the W2 waveguide during the forward (backward) transmission. When considering the incidence of only the even mode, the optical diode effect emerges and achieves approximate 35 dB unidirectionality at the resonant frequency. Moreover, owing to the narrow bandpass feature and the flexibility of the tuning cavity, utilization of the proposed structure as a wavelength filter is demonstrated in a device with a Y-branch splitter. Here, we provide a heuristic design for a mode converter, optical diode, and wavelength filter derived from the coupling effect between a cavity and adjacent waveguides, and expect that the proposed structure can be applied as a building block in future all-optical integrated circuits. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61372037 and 61307069), Beijing Excellent Ph. D. Thesis Guidance Foundation, China (Grant No. 20131001301), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013021017-3).

  6. Time- and space-modulated Raman signals in graphene-based optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reserbat-Plantey, Antoine; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Reita, Valérie; Marty, Laëtitia; Arcizet, Olivier; Ruben, Mario; Bendiab, Nedjma; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    We present fabrication and optical characterization of micro-cavities made of multilayer graphene (MLG) cantilevers clamped by metallic electrodes and suspended over Si/SiO2 substrates. Graphene cantilevers act as semi-transparent mirrors closing air wedge optical cavities. This simple geometry implements a standing-wave optical resonator along with a mechanical one. Equal thickness interference fringes are observed in both Raman and Rayleigh backscattered signals, with interfringe given by their specific wavelength. Chromatic dispersion within the cavity makes possible the spatial modulation of graphene Raman lines and selective rejection of the silicon background signal. Electrostatic actuation of the multilayer graphene cantilever by a gate voltage tunes the cavity length and induces space and time modulation of the backscattered light, including the Raman lines. We demonstrate the potential of these systems for high-sensitivity Raman measurements of generic molecular species grafted on a multilayer graphene surface. The Raman signal of the molecular layer can be modulated both in time and space in a similar fashion and shows enhancement with respect to a collapsed membrane.

  7. High precision optical cavity length and width measurements using double modulation.

    PubMed

    Staley, A; Hoak, D; Effler, A; Izumi, K; Dwyer, S; Kawabe, K; King, E J; Rakhmanov, M; Savage, R L; Sigg, D

    2015-07-27

    We use doubly phase modulated light to measure both the length and the linewidth of an optical resonator with high precision. The first modulation is at RF frequencies and is set near a multiple of the free spectral range, whereas the second modulation is at audio frequencies to eliminate offset errors at DC. The light in transmission or in reflection of the optical resonator is demodulated while sweeping the RF frequency over the optical resonance. We derive expressions for the demodulated power in transmission, and show that the zero crossings of the demodulated signal in transmission serve as a precise measure of the cavity linewidth at half maximum intensity. We demonstrate the technique on two resonant cavities, with lengths 16 m and a 4 km, and achieve an absolute length accuracy as low as 70 ppb. The cavity width for the 16 m cavity was determined with an accuracy of approximately 6000 ppm. Through an analysis of the systematic errors we show that this result could be substantially improved with the reduction of technical sources of uncertainty. PMID:26367601

  8. High-quality-factor planar optical cavities with laterally stopped, slowed, or reversed light.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Steven J; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    In a planar optical cavity, the resonance frequencies increase as a function of in-plane wavevector according to a standard textbook formula. This has well-known consequences in many different areas of optics, from the shifts of etalon peaks at non-normal angles, to the properties of transverse modes in laser diodes, to the effective mass of microcavity photons, and so on. However, this standard formula is valid only when the reflection phase of each cavity mirror is approximately independent of angle. There is a certain type of mirror-a subwavelength dielectric grating near a guided mode resonance-with not only a strongly angle-dependent reflection phase, but also very high reflectance and low losses. Simulations show that by using such mirrors, high-quality-factor planar cavities can be designed that break all these textbook rules, leading to resonant modes that are slow, stopped or even backward-propagating in the in-plane direction. In particular, we demonstrate experimentally high-Q planar cavities whose resonance frequency is independent of in-plane wavevector-i.e., the resonant modes have zero in-plane group velocity, for one polarization but both in-plane directions. We discuss potential applications in various fields including lasers, quantum optics, and exciton-polariton condensation. PMID:27505803

  9. Negative and positive hysteresis in double-cavity optical bistability in a three-level atom

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, H. Aswath; Wanare, Harshawardhan

    2011-03-15

    We present dual hysteretic behavior of a three-level ladder system exhibiting optical bistability in a double-cavity configuration in the mean-field limit. The two fields coupling the atomic system experience competing cooperative effects along the two transitions. We observe a hump-like feature in the bistable curve arising due to cavity-induced inversion, which transforms into a negative-hysteresis loop. Apart from negative- and positive-hysteresis regions, the system offers a variety of controllable nonlinear dynamical features, ranging from switching, periodic self-pulsing to chaos.

  10. Cavity-Enhanced Light Scattering in Optical Lattices to Probe Atomic Quantum Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-03-09

    Different quantum states of atoms in optical lattices can be nondestructively monitored by off-resonant collective light scattering into a cavity. Angle resolved measurements of photon number and variance give information about atom-number fluctuations and pair correlations without single-site access. Observation at angles of diffraction minima provides information on quantum fluctuations insensitive to classical noise. For transverse probing, no photon is scattered into a cavity from a Mott insulator phase, while the photon number is proportional to the atom number for a superfluid.

  11. Electro-optic harmonic conversion to switch a laser beam out of a cavity

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Roger A.; Henesian, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a switch to permit a laser beam to escape a laser cavity through the use of an externally applied electric field across a harmonic conversion crystal. Amplification takes place in the laser cavity, and then the laser beam is switched out by the laser light being harmonically converted with dichroic or polarization sensitive elements present to alter the optical path of the harmonically converted laser light. Modulation of the laser beam can also be accomplished by varying the external electric field.

  12. Nanofiber Fabry-Perot microresonator for nonlinear optics and cavity quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, C; Becker, M; Brückner, S; Rothhardt, M; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2012-06-01

    We experimentally realize a Fabry-Perot-type optical microresonator near the cesium D2 line wavelength based on a tapered optical fiber, equipped with two fiber Bragg gratings that enclose a subwavelength diameter waist. Owing to the very low taper losses, the finesse of the resonator reaches F=86 while the on-resonance transmission is T=11%. The characteristics of our resonator fulfill the requirements of nonlinear optics and cavity quantum electrodynamics in the strong coupling regime. These characteristics, combined with the demonstrated ease of use and advantageous mode geometry, open a realm of applications. PMID:22660083

  13. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharthi, S. S.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  14. Overview of diffuse optical tomography and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Yoko; Yamada, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT), one of the most sophisticated optical imaging techniques for observations through biological tissue, allows 3-D quantitative imaging of optical properties, which include functional and anatomical information. With DOT, it is expected to be possible to overcome the limitations of conventional near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as well as offering the potential for diagnostic optical imaging. However, DOT has been under development for more than 30 years, and the difficulties in development are attributed to the fact that light is strongly scattered and that diffusive photons are used for the image reconstruction. The DOT algorithm is based on the techniques of inverse problems. The radiative transfer equation accurately describes photon propagation in biological tissue, while, because of its high computation load, the diffusion equation (DE) is often used as the forward model. However, the DE is invalid in low-scattering and/or highly absorbing regions and in the vicinity of light sources. The inverse problem is inherently ill-posed and highly undetermined. Here, we first summarize NIRS and then describe various approaches in the efforts to develop accurate and efficient DOT algorithms and present some examples of clinical applications. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of DOT. PMID:27420810

  15. Optical tracking of anomalous diffusion kinetics in polymer microspheres.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Matthew R; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-03-20

    In this Letter we propose the use of whispering gallery mode resonance tracking as a label-free optical means to monitor diffusion kinetics in glassy polymer microspheres. Approximate solutions to the governing diffusion equations are derived for the case of slow relaxation and small Stefan number. Transduction of physical changes in the polymer, including formation of a rubbery layer, swelling, and dissolution, into detectable resonance shifts are described using a perturbative approach. Concrete examples of poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene spheres in water are considered. PMID:25839311

  16. Optical Tracking of Anomalous Diffusion Kinetics in Polymer Microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    In this Letter we propose the use of whispering gallery mode resonance tracking as a label-free optical means to monitor diffusion kinetics in glassy polymer microspheres. Approximate solutions to the governing diffusion equations are derived for the case of slow relaxation and small Stefan number. Transduction of physical changes in the polymer, including formation of a rubbery layer, swelling, and dissolution, into detectable resonance shifts are described using a perturbative approach. Concrete examples of poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene spheres in water are considered.

  17. Enhanced gain and narrow linewidth of an optical cavity by the Doppler effect in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Li, Peng; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Luyin

    2013-07-01

    A scheme for high gain and narrow linewidth of an optical cavity with a four-level atomic system is proposed by the Doppler effect via active Raman gain (ARG) process. Atomic motion leads to Doppler frequency shift which induces constructive interference for the linear susceptibility. The enhanced normal dispersion greatly narrows the cavity linewidth, and the amplified gain gives rise to a high cavity transmission. Simulation results show that the cavity linewidth based on ARG is about one order of magnitude narrower than that based on electromagnetically-induced transparency under the same conditions, and the cavity transmission intensity could be enhanced by nearly 30 times.

  18. Temporal characterization of FEL micropulses as function of cavity length detuning using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-12-31

    Results of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements on the Stanford mid-IR FEL system show the effect of FEL cavity length detuning on the micropulse temporal structure. The FROG technique enables the acquisition of complete and uniquely invertible amplitude and phase temporal dependence of optical pulses. Unambiguous phase and amplitude profiles are recovered from the data. The optical pulses are nearly transform limited, and the pulse length increases with cavity length detuning.

  19. Planar Waveguides Formed by Ag Na Ion Exchange in Nonlinear Optical Glasses: Diffusion and Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Marc; Videau, Jean J.; Canioni, Lionel; Adamietz, Frédéric; Sarger, Laurent; Le Flem, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    All-optical communication systems are the subject of intense research related to the integration of nonlinear optical materials. In sodiocalcic borophosphate glasses that contain niobium oxide and exhibit high nonlinear optical indices, planar waveguides have been formed by a Ag Na ion-exchange technique. WKB analysis has been used to characterize the diffusion profiles of silver ions exchanged in glass substrate samples chemically by an electron microprobe technique and optically by an M -line technique. These methods permit the Ag penetration depth and diffusion profile shape and index profiles to be determined. The results are analyzed and discussed in relation to Ca 2 concentration and exchange conditions in glasses. The Ag diffusion in these glasses can be almost entirely controlled for index-profile engineering.

  20. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min p<0.001) in the tissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  1. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics: A Universal Quantum Optics Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic resonators provide unparalleled capabilities in controlling the interaction between light and matter. The recently developed techniques for trapping and cooling atoms between closely spaced mirrors now open up new experimental avenues for genuine quantum-mechanical experiments. Particularly exciting possibilities concern long-distance quantum networking and scalable quantum computation. Recent achievements like the nondestructive detection of an optical photon, the realization of a quantum gate between a single atom and a single photon, and the heralded and efficient conversion of a flying qubit into a stationary qubit are past highlights. The longstanding dream of a quantum gate between individually addressable photonic qubits might become reality in the future. The talk will summarize recent experiments and give an outlook onto future directions.

  2. Nonequilibrium phase transition of interacting bosons in an intra-cavity optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiari, M Reza; Hemmerich, A; Ritsch, H; Thorwart, M

    2015-03-27

    We investigate the nonlinear light-matter interaction of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in an external periodic potential inside an optical cavity which is weakly coupled to vacuum radiation modes and driven by a transverse pump field. Based on a generalized Bose-Hubbard model which incorporates a single cavity mode, we include the collective backaction of the atoms on the cavity light field and determine the nonequilibrium quantum phases within the nonperturbative bosonic dynamical mean-field theory. With the system parameters adapted to recent experiments, we find a quantum phase transition from a normal phase to a self-organized superfluid phase, which is related to the Hepp-Lieb-Dicke superradiance phase transition. For even stronger pumping, a self-organized Mott insulator phase arises. PMID:25860742

  3. Quantum phases and dynamics of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments performed by R. Landig et al. (arXiv:1511.00007), we theoretically explore the behavior of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity in the presence of a two-dimensional optical lattice. As explained by arXiv:1511.00007, Rayleigh scattering of light from the lattice-inducing beams into the cavity produces infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions between the atoms, leading to competition between superfluid, supersolid, Mott insulating and charge density wave phases. We calculate the phase diagram for a uniform trap using a variation of the Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also calculate the spatial distribution of the different phases in the gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We explore hysteretic behavior when parameters of the system are changed.

  4. Small animal optical diffusion tomography with targeted fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Gaind, Vaibhav; Tsai, Hsiao-Rho; Webb, Kevin J; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Low, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Despite the broad impact in medicine that optics can bring, thus far practical approaches are limited to weak scatter or near-surface monitoring. We show a method that utilizes a laser topography scan and a diffusion equation model to describe the photon transport, together with a multiresolution unstructured grid solution to the nonlinear optimization measurement functional, that overcomes these limitations. We conclude that it is possible to achieve whole body optical imaging with a resolution suitable for finding cancer nodules within an organ during surgery, with the aid of a targeted imaging agent. PMID:24323101

  5. Monitoring the Evaporation of Fluids from Fiber-Optic Micro-Cell Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Preter, Eyal; Preloznik, Borut; Artel, Vlada; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Donlagic, Denis; Zadok, Avi

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors provide remote access, are readily embedded within structures, and can operate in harsh environments. Nevertheless, fiber-optic sensing of liquids has been largely restricted to measurements of refractive index and absorption spectroscopy. The temporal dynamics of fluid evaporation have potential applications in monitoring the quality of water, identification of fuel dilutions, mobile point-of-care diagnostics, climatography and more. In this work, the fiber-optic monitoring of fluids evaporation is proposed and demonstrated. Sub-nano-liter volumes of a liquid are applied to inline fiber-optic micro-cavities. As the liquid evaporates, light is refracted out of the cavity at the receding index boundary between the fluid and the ambient surroundings. A sharp transient attenuation in the transmission of light through the cavity, by as much as 50 dB and on a sub-second time scale, is observed. Numerical models for the transmission dynamics in terms of ray-tracing and wavefront propagation are provided. Experiments show that the temporal transmission profile can distinguish between different liquids. PMID:24212122

  6. Diffuse optical tomography based on multiple access coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuanqing; Su, Jinshan; Xu, Fan

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has the advantages of being a non-invasive, non-radiation emitting and low-cost biological tissue imaging method, and many recent studies have employed this technology. By improving the spatial resolution and developing a new method for constantly improving the flexibility of the experimental device, the system can perform data acquisition rapidly and conveniently. We propose a method for rapid data acquisition based on multiple access coding; it can acquire data in parallel, and the system can greatly improve the temporal resolution of the data acquisition step in diffuse optical tomography thereafter. We simulate the encoding and decoding process of the source-detector pair and successfully isolate the source signal from mixed signals. The DOT image reconstruction highlight the effectiveness of the system.

  7. Use of diffusive optical fibers for plant lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, T.; Kitaya, Y.; Fujiwara, K.; Kino, S.; Kinowaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    Lighting is one of the most critical aspects in plant production and environmental research with plants. Much research has been repeated on the effect of light intensity, spectral distribution of light and lighting cycle, but comparatively little research done on the effect of lighting direction on the growth, development and morphology of plants. When plants are grown with lamps above, light is directed downward to the plants. Downward or overhead lighting is utilized in almost all cases. However, downward lighting does not always give the best result in terms of lighting efficiency, growth, development and morphology of plants. In the present study, a sideward lighting system was developed using diffusive optical fiber belts. More higher quality tissue-cultured transplants could be produced in a reduced space with the sideward lighting system than with a downward lighting system. An application of the sideward lighting system using diffusive optical fiber belts is described and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  8. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer from poor spatial resolution due to the diffuse propagation of light in biological tissue. The application of model-based image reconstruction is reviewed in this paper, together with a numerical modelling approach to light propagation in tissue as well as generalized image reconstruction using boundary data. A comprehensive review and details of the basis for using spatial and structural prior information are also discussed, whereby the use of spectral and dual-modality systems can improve contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:19581256

  9. Cavity Self-Stabilization and Enhancement of Laser Gyroscopes by (Coupled) Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the modulation to determine the conditions for cavity self-stabilization and enhanced gyroscopic sensitivity. Hence, we model cavity rotation or instability by an arbitrary AM/FM modulation, and the dispersive element as a phase and amplitude filter. We find that anomalous dispersion may be used to self-stabilize a laser cavity, provided the magnitude of the group index of refraction is smaller than the phase index of refraction in the cavity. The optimal stabilization is found to occur when the group index is zero. Group indices with magnitudes larger than the phase index (both normal and anomalous dispersion) are found to enhance the sensitivity of a laser gyroscope to rotation. Furthermore, our results indicate that atomic media, even coherent superpositions in multilevel atoms, are not useful for these applications, because the amplitude and phase filters work against one another, i.e., decreasing the modulation frequency increases its amplitude and vice versa, with one exception: negative group indices whose magnitudes are larger than the phase index result in negative, but enhanced, beat frequencies. On the other hand, for optical resonators the dispersion reversal associated with critical coupling enables the amplitude and phase filters to work together under a greater variety of circumstances than for atomic media. We find that for single over-coupled resonators, or in the case of under-coupled coupled-resonator-induced absorption, the absorption and normal dispersion on-resonance increase the contrast and frequency of the beat-note, respectively, resulting in a substantial enhancement of the gyroscopic response. Moreover, for cavity self-stabilization, we propose the use of a variety of coupled-resonator induced transparency that is accompanied by anomalous dispersion.

  10. Commissioning results of Nb3Sn cavity vapor diffusion deposition system at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Clemens, William A.; Macha, Kurt M.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R.

    2015-09-01

    Nb3Sn as a BCS superconductor with a superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium offers potential benefit for SRF cavities via a lower-than-niobium surface resistance at the same temperature and frequency. A Nb3Sn vapor diffusion deposition system designed for coating of 1.5 and 1.3 GHz single-cell cavities was built and commissioned at JLab. As the part of the commissioning, RF performance at 2.0 K of a single-cell 1.5 GHz CEBAF-shaped cavity was measured before and after coating in the system. Before Nb3Sn coating the cavity had a Q0 of about 1010 and was limited by the high field Q-slope at Eacc ≅ 27 MV/m. Coated cavity exhibited the superconducting transition at about 17.9 K. The low-field quality factor was about 5∙109 at 4.3 K and 7∙109 at 2.0 K decreasing with field to about 1∙109 at Eacc ≅ 8 MV/m at both temperatures. The highest field was limited by the available RF power.