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Sample records for digital hf radar

  1. WAVE-DRIVEN SURFACE FROM HF RADAR

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    FEATURE INTERNAL CURRENTS WAVE-DRIVEN SURFACE FROM HF RADAR By Lynn K. Shay Observations from-fre- quency (HF) radar have revealed that not only are the low-frequency and tidal currents resolved of the horizontal flow structure from HF radar pro- vides the spatial context for moored and ship- based

  2. Meridian Digital M2008/M2008HF

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Meridian Digital Telephones M2006 M2008/M2008HF M2616 User Guide Enterprise Solutions Documentation your Meridian Digital Telephone 1 Meridian Digital Telephones ................................................................................................. 3 Selecting a position for your Meridian Digital Telephone .......................... 4 Parts

  3. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    E-print Network

    Kirkwood, Sheila

    Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes Tadahiko Ogawa1 (200x) xx:1­8 Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes Tadahiko radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site), observed polar mesosphere sum

  4. European coordination for coastal HF radar data in EMODnet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Julien; Novellino, Antonio; Gorringe, Patrick; Griffa, Annalisa; Schulz-Stellenfleth, Johannes; Montero, Pedro; Montovani, Carlo; Ayensa, Garbi; Vila, Begoña; Rubio, Anna; Sagarminaga, Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    Historically, joint effort has been put on observing open ocean, organizing, homogenizing, sharing and reinforcing the impact of the acquired information based on one technology: ARGO with profilers Argo floats, EuroSites, ESONET-NoE, FixO3 for deep water platforms, Ferrybox for stations in ships of opportunities, and GROOM for the more recent gliders. This kind of networking creates synergies and makes easier the implementation of this source of data in the European Data exchange services like EMODnet, ROOSs portals, or any applied services in the Blue economy. One main targeted improvement in the second phase of EMODnet projects is the assembling of data along coastline. In that sense, further coordination is recommended between platform operators around a specific technology in order to make easier the implementation of the data in the platforms (4th EuroGOOS DATAMEQ WG). HF radar is today recognized internationally as a cost-effective solution to provide high spatial and temporal resolution current maps (depending on the instrument operation frequency, covering from a few kilometres offshore up to 200 km) that are needed for many applications for issues related to ocean surface drift or sea state characterization. Significant heterogeneity still exists in Europe concerning technological configurations, data processing, quality standards and data availability. This makes more difficult the development of a significant network for achieving the needed accessibility to HF Radar data for a pan European use. EuroGOOS took the initiative to lead and coordinate activities within the various observation platforms by establishing a number of Ocean Observing Task Teams such as HF-Radars. The purpose is to coordinate and join the technological, scientific and operational HF radar communities at European level. The goal of the group is on the harmonization of systems requirements, systems design, data quality, improvement and proof of the readiness and standardization of HFR data access and tools. In this context, a coordinated action between EuroGOOS HF Radar Task Team and EMODnet Physics has been pushed to achieve a pilot integration of the data from existing HF radar systems, with the following operational objectives: definition of needed metadata; standardization for data format and QC; recommendation for the implementation of HF radar data in Regional and European Portals. This coordinated action for organizing and creating links between operators of HF radar platforms will benefit to the implementation of this key information in the European Marine Observation Data Network.

  5. Continental Shelf Research 19 (1999) 271--288 An EOF analysis of HF Doppler radar current

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    1999-01-01

    Continental Shelf Research 19 (1999) 271--288 An EOF analysis of HF Doppler radar current 1998; accepted 21 July 1998 Abstract Surface currents measured by HF Doppler radar as part of a study rights reserved. 1. Introduction Shore-based HF Doppler radars measure at high resolution the spatial

  6. All-digital radar architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.

    2014-10-01

    All digital radar architecture requires exclude mechanical scan system. The phase antenna array is necessarily large because the array elements must be co-located with very precise dimensions and will need high accuracy phase processing system for aggregate and distribute T/R modules data to/from antenna elements. Even phase array cannot provide wide field of view. New nature inspired all digital radar architecture proposed. The fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly simultaneously thee wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Fly eye radar antenna array consist multiple directional antennas loose distributed along perimeter of ground vehicle or aircraft and coupled with receiving/transmitting front end modules connected by digital interface to central processor. Non-steering antenna array allows creating all-digital radar with extreme flexible architecture. Fly eye radar architecture provides wide possibility of digital modulation and different waveform generation. Simultaneous correlation and integration of thousands signals per second from each point of surveillance area allows not only detecting of low level signals ((low profile targets), but help to recognize and classify signals (targets) by using diversity signals, polarization modulation and intelligent processing. Proposed all digital radar architecture with distributed directional antenna array can provide a 3D space vector to the jammer by verification direction of arrival for signals sources and as result jam/spoof protection not only for radar systems, but for communication systems and any navigation constellation system, for both encrypted or unencrypted signals, for not limited number or close positioned jammers.

  7. Noise properties of HF radar measurement of ocean surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    High-frequency (HF) radars are commonly used for coastal circulation monitoring. The objective of the study is to assess what is the minimum timescale of variability of the geophysical surface currents that are accessible to the radar measurement given the intrinsic noise of this measurement. Noise properties are derived from the power density spectra (PDSs) of radial current records, which are compared to a model of the PDS of idealized currents contaminated by an additive white noise. The data were collected by two radar systems operating in the Northwestern Mediterranean. Periods of 3 weeks to 7 months are considered. Most of measured currents are affected by a white noise effect. Noise properties vary in time and space and are not specific to a particular radar station or to the radar signal processing method used (beam forming or direction finding). An increase of the noise level reduces the effective temporal resolution of radar-derived currents and then increases the minimum observable timescale of variability of geophysical currents. Our results are consistent with results of comparison found in literature between in situ sensors and radar measurements as well as between two radars operating along a same base line. The study suggests a self-sufficient method, requiring no external data, to estimate the minimum sampling period to consider for getting data sets having a minimized contamination by instrumental noise. This period can also be taken for smoothing or filtering measured currents.

  8. Mapping high-latitude plasma convection with coherent HF radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Baker, K. B.; Villain, J.-P.; Hanuise, C.

    1989-01-01

    Several methods developed for mapping high-latitude plasma convection with a high-latitude HF radar are described, which utilize coherent backscatter from electron density irregularities at F-region altitudes to observe convective plasma motion. Several examples of two-dimensional convection-velocity maps are presented, showing instances of L-shell-aligned flow in the dusk sector, the reversal of convection near magnetic midnight, and counterstreaming in the dayside cleft.

  9. Development of HF radar inversion algorithm for spectrum estimation (HIAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisaki, Yukiharu

    2015-03-01

    A method for estimating ocean wave directional spectra using an HF (high-frequency) ocean radar was developed. This method represents the development of work conducted in previous studies. In the present method, ocean wave directional spectra are estimated on polar coordinates whose center is the radar position, while spectra are estimated on regular grids. This method can be applied to both single and multiple radar cases. The area for wave estimation is more flexible than that of the previous method. As the signal to noise (SN) ratios of Doppler spectra are critical for wave estimation, we develop a method to exclude low SN ratio Doppler spectra. The validity of the method is demonstrated by comparing results with in situ observed wave data that it would be impossible to estimate by the methods of other groups.

  10. HF radar observations of ionospheric backscatter during geomagnetically quiet periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, T. A.; Makarevich, R. A.; Devlin, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    The quiet-time coherent backscatter from the F-region observed by the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER) Bruny Island HF radar is analysed statistically in order to determine typical trends and controlling factors in the ionospheric echo occurrence. A comparison of the F-region peak density values from the IRI-2007 model and ionosonde measurements in the vicinity of the radar's footprint shows a very good agreement, particularly at subauroral and auroral latitudes, and model densities within the radar's footprint are used in the following analyses. The occurrence of F-region backscatter is shown to exhibit distinct diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle variations and these are compared with model trends in the F-region peak electron density and Pedersen conductance of the underlying ionosphere. The solar cycle effects in occurrence are demonstrated to be strong and more complex than a simple proportionality on a year-to-year basis. The diurnal and seasonal effects are strongly coupled to each other, with diurnal trends exhibiting a systematic gradual variation from month to month that can be explained when both electron density and conductance trends are considered. During the night, the echo occurrence is suggested to be controlled directly by the density conditions, with a direct proportionality observed between the occurrence and peak electron density. During the day, the echo occurrence appears to be controlled by both conductance and propagation conditions. It is shown that the range of echo occurrence values is smaller for larger conductances and that the electron density determines what value the echo occurrence takes in that range. These results suggest that the irregularity production rates are significantly reduced by the highly conducting E layer during the day while F-region density effects dominate during the night.

  11. HF radar observations of small-scale surface current variability in the Straits of Florida

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    HF radar observations of small-scale surface current variability in the Straits of Florida A. B-frequency Wellen radar (WERA), transmitting at 16.045 MHz, was deployed along the eastern Florida Shelf current measurements within the radar footprint along the shelf break at 86-m depth. The shallowest ADCP

  12. Measurements of near surface ocean currents using HF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Kenneth Evans

    High Frequency (HF) radar is unique both in its ability to probe the ocean currents within the top few meters below the surface and to provide synoptic current maps covering thousands of square kilometers. This work focuses on the evaluation of ocean current measurement techniques, using the multi-frequency coastal radar (MCR), a system that operates on four frequencies (4.8, 6.8, 13.4 and 21.8 MHz) concurrently. Two methods of data processing, traditional beam forming and a direction finding approach, MUltiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC), are compared. Simulations and comparisons using real data are used to evaluate the application of MUSIC to the MCR and to design modifications to improve its performance. Uncertainties in the radar measurements as a function of radar operating frequency, sea state parameters and data processing method are estimated. Results show MUSIC to be applicable to the MCR and to outperform beam forming, particularly for the lower frequencies, over most of the real and simulated experiments examined. High resolution ocean wave spectral energy measurements are used to estimate the effect of Stokes drift on MCR measurements. The effect is shown to be small in magnitude relative to the expected errors in the MCR measurements and highly correlated with the wind. Although results show a correlation between the MCR measurements and the expected Stokes drift effect, the correlations could be the result of wind stress-induced currents. Using assumptions as to the form of the vertical current profile, estimates of the near-surface vertical shear are obtained from the MCR data. Analysis of the shear estimates casts doubt on the validity of a near-surface, logarithmic current profile for the open ocean. Further analysis of vertical shear estimates yields an estimate of the ocean current magnitude at the sea surface that is in agreement with the commonly accepted value of about 3% of the wind speed. Results of this work demonstrate a significant advantage to using MUSIC direction finding over conventional beam forming in limited aperture, multi-frequency radar applications and improve the MCR's shear measurement capability.

  13. Comparison of HF radar measurements with Eulerian and Lagrangian surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrs, Johannes; Sperrevik, Ann Kristin; Christensen, Kai Håkon; Broström, Göran; Breivik, Øyvind

    2015-05-01

    High-frequency (HF) radar-derived ocean currents are compared with in situ measurements to conclude if the radar observations include effects of surface waves that are of second order in the wave amplitude. Eulerian current measurements from a high-resolution acoustic Doppler current profiler and Lagrangian measurements from surface drifters are used as references. Directional wave spectra are obtained from a combination of pressure sensor data and a wave model. Our analysis shows that the wave-induced Stokes drift is not included in the HF radar-derived currents, that is, HF radars measure the Eulerian current. A disputed nonlinear correction to the phase velocity of surface gravity waves, which may affect HF radar signals, has a magnitude of about half the Stokes drift at the surface. In our case, this contribution by nonlinear dispersion would be smaller than the accuracy of the HF radar currents, hence no conclusion can be made. Finally, the analysis confirms that the HF radar data represent an exponentially weighted vertical average where the decay scale is proportional to the wavelength of the transmitted signal.

  14. Architecture for a 1-GHz Digital RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallik, Udayan

    2011-01-01

    An architecture for a Direct RF-digitization Type Digital Mode RADAR was developed at GSFC in 2008. Two variations of a basic architecture were developed for use on RADAR imaging missions using aircraft and spacecraft. Both systems can operate with a pulse repetition rate up to 10 MHz with 8 received RF samples per pulse repetition interval, or at up to 19 kHz with 4K received RF samples per pulse repetition interval. The first design describes a computer architecture for a Continuous Mode RADAR transceiver with a real-time signal processing and display architecture. The architecture can operate at a high pulse repetition rate without interruption for an infinite amount of time. The second design describes a smaller and less costly burst mode RADAR that can transceive high pulse repetition rate RF signals without interruption for up to 37 seconds. The burst-mode RADAR was designed to operate on an off-line signal processing paradigm. The temporal distribution of RF samples acquired and reported to the RADAR processor remains uniform and free of distortion in both proposed architectures. The majority of the RADAR's electronics is implemented in digital CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor), and analog circuits are restricted to signal amplification operations and analog to digital conversion. An implementation of the proposed systems will create a 1-GHz, Direct RF-digitization Type, L-Band Digital RADAR--the highest band achievable for Nyquist Rate, Direct RF-digitization Systems that do not implement an electronic IF downsample stage (after the receiver signal amplification stage), using commercially available off-the-shelf integrated circuits.

  15. Wind turbine impacts on HF radar ocean surface measurements in

    E-print Network

    Wyatt, Lucy

    . The characterisation of the wind turbine interference is assessed and the radar cross section estimated. The modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.2 Radar Cross Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.3 Clutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.4 The Radar Cross Section of a Wind Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.5 Noise

  16. Ground backscatter characteristics model for SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinats, Alexey; Nishitani, Nozomu; Ratovsky, Konstantin

    For the first time we present a model of diurnal and seasonal variations of ground backscatter signal propagation characteristics. There are minimal group range, corresponding elevation angle and other parameters. Model is developed for geographic location and specifications of SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar. The model is based on HF ground backscatter signal calculation technique developed in the framework of waveguide approach. IRI-2007 model is used for calculation of background ionosphere. The main topic is a comparison of the presented model with an extensive dataset collected by SuperDARN Hokkaido radar during the whole its operation history since the late 2006 until 2014. The model is designed for both IRI testing and improvement of SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar data interpretation. This work was done under financial support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants 14-05-00259-? and 14-05-00588-?).

  17. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is significantly increased and strong signals persist while the high-power HF is present . Simultaneous observations of topside TEC measurements and lower-ionosphere UHF radar observations suggest there is an optimum altitude region to heat the lower F-region in order to produce topside ionosphere density enhancements. The observations are dependent on HF power levels and we show several examples where heating results are only observed for the high-power levels attainable with the HAARP facility.

  18. Backtracking drifting objects using surface currents from high-frequency (HF) radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abascal, Ana Julia; Castanedo, Sonia; Fernández, Vicente; Medina, Raúl

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the benefits of high-frequency (HF) radar ocean observation technology for backtracking drifting objects are analysed. The HF radar performance is evaluated by comparison of trajectories between drifter buoys versus numerical simulations using a Lagrangian trajectory model. High-resolution currents measured by a coastal HF radar network combined with atmospheric fields provided by numerical models are used to backtrack the trajectory of two dataset of surface-drifting buoys: group I (with drogue) and group II (without drogue). A methodology based on optimization methods is applied to estimate the uncertainty in the trajectory simulations and to optimize the search area of the backtracked positions. The results show that, to backtrack the trajectory of the buoys in group II, both currents and wind fields were required. However, wind fields could be practically discarded when simulating the trajectories of group I. In this case, the optimal backtracked trajectories were obtained using only HF radar currents as forcing. Based on the radar availability data, two periods ranging between 8 and 10 h were selected to backtrack the buoy trajectories. The root mean squared error (RMSE) was found to be 1.01 km for group I and 0.82 km for group II. Taking into account these values, a search area was calculated using circles of RMSE radii, obtaining 3.2 and 2.11 km2 for groups I and II, respectively. These results show the positive contribution of HF radar currents for backtracking drifting objects and demonstrate that these data combined with atmospheric models are of value to perform backtracking analysis of drifting objects.

  19. The Space-Based Calibration of Optical Systems and HF Radars Using the Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P.

    The Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) is designed to provide a relatively simple target in space that can be used to determine the operational parameters of both ground Imaging systems and HF radars. PERCS is a 10 meter diameter wire frame in low earth orbit with corner cube reflectors placed at 60 or more vertices around the wire frame. For optical system calibration, PERCS will provide precisely spaced reflection points on the vertices of a large polyhedron. For HF radar calibration, PERCS will have a known radar cross section that is independent of observation direction within 0.5 dB. Laser satellite tracking will provide accurate orbital position and velocity of PERCS. The PERCS will orbit at 600 km altitude in a high inclination. Because of the wire frame construction, atmospheric drag will be low and the large spherical structure is expected to be available for more than five years. The PERCS satellite will be launched in a stowed configuration that has less than one meter in diameter. After launch, the PERCS will expand to a diameter of almost 10 meters. Hoberman Sphere technology will be used to produce a stable wire-frame to act as a radar scatter target. The sphere is based on a truncated icosahedron commonly known in chemistry as a "buckyball". The 60 vertices (V60) are hinged to be joined to 90 rigid segments. Each segment is hinged so that the PERCS can be folded into a compact package for launch.

  20. Digital frequency synthesizer for radar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, R.; Satorius, E.; Robinett, L.; Olson, E.

    1990-01-01

    The digital frequency synthesizer (DFS) is an integral part of the programmable local oscillator (PLO) which is being developed for the NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) and radar astronomy. Here, the theory of operation and the design of the DFS are discussed, and the design parameters in application for the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) are specified. The spectral purity of the DFS is evaluated by analytically evaluating the output spectrum of the DFS. A novel architecture is proposed for the design of the DFS with a frequency resolution of 1/2(exp 48) of the clock frequency (0.35 mu Hz at 100 MHz), a phase resolution of 0.0056 degrees (16 bits), and a frequency spur attenuation of -96 dBc.

  1. APQ-102 imaging radar digital image quality study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking radar collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data which was digitized and recorded on wideband magnetic tape. These tapes were then ground processed into computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The CCT's may then be processed into high resolution radar images by software on the CYBER computer.

  2. New scattering modes for studying plasma instabilities with a HF radar system

    SciTech Connect

    Hanuise, C.; Crochet, M.

    1980-07-01

    Electron density irregularities and associated plasma instabilities in the equatorial electrojet are usually studied by looking at the direct backscattering signal. New scattering modes have been observed with a HF radar. In the first one, backscatter in the E layer occurs after reflection in the F layer. In the other one, it is possible to study simultaneously different irregularity wavelengths and to observe quasi-horizontal plasma irregularities.

  3. Improving current forecasts for the German Bight using HF radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Stellenfleth, Johannes; Stanev, Emil; Staneva, Joanna

    2015-04-01

    Three HF radar stations located at the islands of Wangerooge and Sylt as well as on the mainland in Büsum are operated in the German Bight as part of COSYNA system. The WERA system operates at 12.4 MHz and provides surface current measurements every 20 min. The observations are merged with numerical model data to optimise state estimates on a pre-operational basis. The presentation introduces the spatio temporal interpolation (STOI) method, which is a statistical approach to correct data from a free model run using an analysis window of typically one tidal cycle. The technique is thus able to resolve intra-tidal time scales. The scheme is based on an EOF analysis to estimate the model error background statistics and is capable of providing improved short term forecasts. Statistics of the free model run, the HF radar data and the STOI analysis are shown for several month. Both the three dimensional primitive equation model GETM and the operational BSH model are used to provide free model run data. GETM setups with boundary forcing from the MYOCEAN North West Shelf model are used. Maps of innovation and residuals are presented. Furthermore forecast errors for different forecast horizons are discussed. Results are also compared to independent measurements taken at the FINO-1 and FINO-2 platforms. The impact of the analysis is, e.g., illustrated by drifter trajectory simulations. First results are also shown regarding an extension of the STOI method, which includes a model restart to further improve the dynamical consistency of the results. Issues related to the treatment of the boundary forcing and the meteo forcing used during the forecast period are discussed. The impact of the HF radar data on water level estimates are analysed. Furthermore, some results concerning the potential impact of existing and hypothetical HF radar systems are presented, which were obtained making use of the STOI method as well as statistical OSE and OSSE techniques.

  4. Digital recording of radar data in an aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouwels, H.

    1987-07-01

    In the Netherlands, Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAT) is operated with a digital recording of the data. A description is given of the airborne recording chain and of the ground based processing. The airborne electronics for the digitizing, formatting and recording of the radar data are described in detail. The system setup is tailored to the use of the SLAR as a research tool.

  5. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) Polarimetric Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Perrine, Martin; McLinden, Matthew; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art radar system developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for the development and implementation of digital beamforming radar techniques. DBSAR was recently upgraded to polarimetric operation in order to enhance its capability as a science instrument. Two polarimetric approaches were carried out which will be demonstrated in upcoming flight campaigns.

  6. Surface current patterns in the Ibiza Channel with the use of High Frequency (HF) Radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lana, Arancha; Fernández, Vicente; Troupin, Charles; Pascual, Ananda; Orfila, Alejandro; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2014-05-01

    The Ibiza Channel located between the East Coast of the Iberian Peninsula, and the West Coast of Ibiza, at the Balearic Islands, is a well-known biodiversity hot spot. This area is relevant due to the interaction of water masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean - ascending through the Iberian Peninsula coast - with the older Atlantic waters descending from the Gulf of Lion. In 2012, the installation of Coastal HF Radar in the area provides valuable information for the study of the surface transport along the channel. The Coastal HF Radar operates since June 2012, and provides hourly surface current maps with a spatial resolution of approximately 3 km and a range reaching up to 70 km offshore. The instrument forms part of a monitoring multi-platform system, which is completed with satellite-derived data, gliders, modelling and fixed and lagrangian buoys. All HF Radar data are processed with standard quality control methods. Drifter velocity obtained from lagrangian buoys for two oceanographic campaigns, satellite-derived data and currentmeter data from a fixed buoy in the Ibiza Channel are used to validate the HF Radar data. All surface current data are used to perform a spectrum analysis in order to show the physical processes, at the main temporal periods. The contribution of the different temporal scales to the total Kinetic Energy has been analysed for the first time at different seasonal intervals. This served to evaluate the energetic importance of the different components of the surface currents. The inertial currents have a lower contribution to the total KE during winter, compared with the summer period. Besides, the spatial distribution of the inertial component to the total KE varies seasonally, and according to the bathymetry of the area. The low-pass (sub-inertial) filtered HF Radar currents show a predominant northern current during the summer months in the channel, and a mean southern current during the winter period. These results are discussed and related with the external forcing, and bathymetry distribution, according to coastal or open ocean data.

  7. STRING: A new drifter for HF radar validation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammou, Anna-Maria; Zervakis, Vassilis; Bellomo, Lucio; Kokkini, Zoi; Quentin, Celine; Mantovani, Carlo; Kalampokis, Alkiviadis

    2015-04-01

    High-Frequency radars (HFR) are an effective mean of remotely monitoring sea-surface currents, based on recording the Doppler-shift of radio-waves backscattered on the sea surface. Validation of HFRs' measurements takes place via comparisons either with in-situ Eulerian velocity data (usually obtained by surface current-meters attached on moorings) or to Lagrangian velocity fields (recorded by surface drifters). The most common surface drifter used for this purpose is the CODE-type drifter (Davis, 1985), an industry-standard design to record the vertical average velocity of the upper 1 m layer of the water column. In this work we claim that the observed differences between the HFR-derived velocities and Lagrangian measurements can be attributed not just to the different spatial scales recorded by the above instruments but also due to the fact that while the HFR-derived velocity corresponds to exponentially weighted vertical average of the velocity field from the surface to 1 m depth (Stewart and Joy, 1974) the velocity estimated by the CODE drifters corresponds to boxcar-type weighted vertical average due to the orthogonal shape of the CODE drifters' sails. After analyzing the theoretical behavior of a drifter under the influence of wind and current, we proceed to propose a new design of exponentially-shaped sails for the drogues of CODE-based drifters, so that the HFR-derived velocities and the drifter-based velocities will be directly comparable, regarding the way of vertically averaging the velocity field.The new drifter, codenamed STRING, exhibits identical behavior to the classical CODE design under relatively homogeneous conditions in the upper 1 m layer, however it is expected to follow a significantly different track in conditions of high vertical shear and stratification. Thus, we suggest that the new design is the instrument of choice for validation of HFR installations, as it can be used in all conditions and behaves identically to CODEs when vertical shear is insignificant. Finally, we present results from three experiments using both drifter types in HFR-covered regions of the Eastern Mediterranean. More experiments are planned, incorporating design improvements dictated by the results of the preliminary field tests. This work was held in the framework of the project "Specifically Targeted for Radars INnovative Gauge (STRING)", funded by the Greek-French collaboration programme "Plato".

  8. Developing tools for digital radar image data evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.; Raggam, J.

    1986-01-01

    The refinement of radar image analysis methods has led to a need for a systems approach to radar image processing software. Developments stimulated through satellite radar are combined with standard image processing techniques to create a user environment to manipulate and analyze airborne and satellite radar images. One aim is to create radar products for the user from the original data to enhance the ease of understanding the contents. The results are called secondary image products and derive from the original digital images. Another aim is to support interactive SAR image analysis. Software methods permit use of a digital height model to create ortho images, synthetic images, stereo-ortho images, radar maps or color combinations of different component products. Efforts are ongoing to integrate individual tools into a combined hardware/software environment for interactive radar image analysis.

  9. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, S.S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Digital image transformation and rectification can be described in three categories: (1) digital rectification of spacecraft pictures on workable stereoplotters; (2) digital correction of radar image geometry; and (3) digital reconstruction of shaded relief maps and perspective views including stereograms. Digital rectification can make high-oblique pictures workable on stereoplotters that would otherwise not accommodate such extreme tilt angles. It also enables panoramic line-scan geometry to be used to compile contour maps with photogrammetric plotters. Rectifications were digitally processed on both Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars as well as radar images taken by various radar systems. By merging digital terrain data with image data, perspective and three-dimensional views of Olympus Mons and Tithonium Chasma, also of Mars, are reconstructed through digital image processing. ?? 1985.

  10. Statistical study of TIDs using HF radar ground backscatter data and chirp sounding network MUF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinats, Alexey; Kurkin, Vladimir; Nishitani, Nozomu; Ratovsky, Konstantin; Ivanova, Vera; Berngardt, Oleg

    We present statistical characteristics of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) revealed from the data of ground mid-latitude high frequency (HF) facilities that cover a wide longitudinal sector. Firstly, we analyzed an extensive dataset collected by SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar since the late 2006 until 2014. A technique based on the cross-correlation analysis of minimal group range variations was used. We discuss diurnal and seasonal dependencies of predominant TIDs azimuth and apparent horizontal velocity as well as its solar and geomagnetic activity dependence. Further, we compare these statistical results with the same obtained using the first Russian SuperDARN Ekaterinburg HF radar data during 2013. In addition, we analyzed maximum usable frequency (MUF) series obtained by Russian oblique chirp sounding network. The network includes transmitters in Magadan, Norilsk, Khabarovsk and receiver in Tory (Irkutsk) and allow us to reveal large-scale TIDs characteristics in 2010-2011. This work was done under financial support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants 14-05-00259-a, 12-05-00865-a and 14-05-00588-a).

  11. DIGITAL VISION he advent of phased array radars and space-time adaptive processing has given radar

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    © DIGITAL VISION T he advent of phased array radars and space-time adaptive processing has given radar designers the ability make radars adaptable on receive. The current state of radar technolo- gy of pairs of complementary sequences. Shortly thereafter, Welti proposed to use Golay sequences in radar

  12. Validation of HF Radar ocean surface currents in the Ibiza Channel using lagrangian drifters, moored current meter and underwater gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lana, Arancha; Fernández, Vicente; Orfila, Alejandro; Troupin, Charles; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2015-04-01

    SOCIB High Frequency (HF) radar is one component of a multi-platform system located in the Balearic Islands and made up of Lagrangian platforms (profilers and drifting buoys), fixed stations (sea-level, weather, mooring and coastal), beach monitoring (camera), gliders, a research vessel as well as an ocean forecast system (waves and hydrodynamics). The HF radar system overlooks the Ibiza Channel, known as a 'choke point" where Atlantic and Mediterranean water masses interact and where meridional exchanges of water mass properties between the Balearic and the Algerian sub-basins take place. In order to determine the reliability of surface velocity measurements in this area, a quality assessment of the HF Radar is essential. We present the results of several validation experiments performed in the Ibiza Channel in 2013 and 2014. Of particular interest is an experiment started in September 2014 when a set of 13 surface drifters with different shapes and drogue lengths were released in the area covered by the HF radar. The drifter trajectories can be examined following the SOCIB Deployment Application (DAPP): http://apps.socib.es/dapp. Additionally, a 1-year long time series of surface currents obtained from a moored surface current-meter located in the Ibiza Channel, inside the area covered by the HF radar, was also used as a useful complementary validation exercise. Direct comparison between both radial surface currents from each radar station and total derived velocities against drifters and moored current meter velocities provides an assessment of the HF radar data quality at different temporal periods and geographical areas. Statistics from these comparisons give good correlation and low root-mean-square deviation. The results will be discussed for different months, geographical areas and types of surface drifters and wind exposure. Moreover, autonomous underwater glider constitutes an additional source of information for the validation of the observed velocity structures and some statistics will be presented.

  13. Characteristics of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances observed near the Antarctic Peninsula by HF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Hosokawa, K.; Ishida, T.; Lester, M.; Milan, S. E.; Freeman, M. P.; Sato, N.; Yukimatu, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    We present a survey of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) observed by a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network HF radar located in the Falkland Islands between May 2010 and April 2011. The radar has a field of view that overlooks the Antarctic Peninsula, a known hot spot of gravity wave activity. We present observations of radar ground-backscatter data, in which the signatures of MSTIDs are manifested as structured enhancements in echo power. Observed periods were in the range 30-80 min, corresponding to frequencies of 0.2-0.6 mHz. Wavelengths were generally in the range 200-800 km and phase speeds in the range 100-300 m s-1. These values are within the ranges typically associated with medium-scale gravity waves. We find a primary population of northward (equatorward) propagating MSTIDs, which demonstrate an association with enhanced solar wind-magnetosphere coupling and a smaller, westward propagating population, that could be associated with atmospheric gravity waves excited by winds over the Andean and Antarctic Peninsula mountains or by the high winds of the Antarctic Polar Vortex.

  14. Observations of very-high-latitude ionospheric irregularities with the Goose Bay HF (high frequency) radar

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B.

    1985-06-07

    The Goose Bay HF radar is a sophisticated instrument capable of providing detailed information on very-high-latitude E- and F-region ionospheric electron-density irregularities which act as a source of clutter on OTH radar systems. Through the use of two parallel phased-array antennas, this instrument is able to image the location of these irregularities within a three-dimensional volume covering much of northeastern Canada and Greenland. It is also capable of following the temporal variability of these irregularities as well as determining unambiguously the Doppler shift and broadening of radar signals scattered by them. This paper presents initial results with a single phased-array antenna, which represent typical examples of the spatial intensity distribution of these irregularities at different local times. Examples are presented of Doppler spectra of the irregularities at different local times. Data of this type are of appreciable value in ascertaining the techniques that must be utilized to improve clutter mitigation on high-latitude radar systems.

  15. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service....

  16. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service....

  17. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service....

  18. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service....

  19. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service....

  20. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddeley, L. J.; Yeoman, T. K.; Wright, D. M.; Davies, J. A.; Trattner, K. J.; Roeder, J. L.

    2002-09-01

    HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45) waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.

  1. Surface circulation patterns at the southeastern Bay of Biscay: new observations from HF radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solabarrieta, L.; Rubio, A.; Medina, R.; Paduan, J. D.; Castanedo, S.; Fontán, A.; Cook, M.; González, M.

    2012-12-01

    A CODAR Seasonde High Frequency (HF) radar network has been operational since the beginning of 2009 for the oceanic region of the Basque Country, Spain (south-eastern Bay of Biscay, Atlantic Ocean). It forms part of the Basque operational data acquisition system, established by the Directorate of Emergency Attention and Meteorology of the Basque Government. It is made up of two antennas, at the capes Higer (43d 23.554' N, 1d 47.745' W) and Matxitxako (43d 7.350' N, 2d 45.163' W), emitting at 4.525 MHz frequency and 30 kHz bandwidth. This system provides hourly surface currents with 5.12 km spatial resolution, covering 10,000 km2. Space- and time-covering measurements have been available in the study area since 2009. The data contribute considerably to the study of surface current patterns and the main physical processes in the area. Additional applications relate to security of navigation, maritime rescue, validation and improvement of numerical models, etc. For comparison with other validation studies and to obtain an estimate of the performance of the Basque system, statistical and spectral analysis of the surface currents obtained through the HF radar and different in-situ platforms have been conducted. The analyses show values of comparison between the different measuring systems consistent with those done by other authors (Paduan and Rosenfeld, 1996; Kaplan et al., 2005). The radar is able to reproduce the time evolution of the currents with a reasonable accuracy; likewise, the main three spectral peaks (inertial, semidiurnal and diurnal) are well resolved. In this context, the aim of this work is to show the HF radar ability to measure accurately the surface currents in the south-eastern Bay of Biscay and to study the ocean circulation in the area (figures 1 and 2). Surface current patterns are analysed and described for the period 2009-2011, for different timescales. A clear seasonality at a large-scale has been observed in accordance with previous work, with an intense poleward circulation over the slope during winter and weaker equatorward currents during summer. Recurrent mesoscale structures and high frequency processes (i.e. barotropic tides and inertial currents) add spatial and temporal complexity to this global scheme.;

  2. Kilometric irregularities in the E and R regions of the daytime equatorial ionosphere observed by a high resolution HF radar

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, E.; Mercandalli, B.; Houngninou, E.

    1996-03-15

    The authors describe results from a vertically oriented HF radar operated in the Ivory Coast, which studied irregularities in the E and F regions of the equatorial ionosphere. The authors report on irregularity observations at heights consistent with the equatorial electrojet, and at heights above the electrojet, and into the F1 layer. They observe irregularities into the F region in this work. The radar operated in the frequency range from 1 to 8 MHz.

  3. HF radar signatures of the cusp and low-latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Dudeney, J. R.; Greenwald, R. A.; Pinnock, M.; Newell, P. T.; Rodger, A. S.; Mattin, N.; Meng, C.-I.

    1995-01-01

    Continuous ground-based observations of ionospheric and magnetospheric regions are critical to the Geospace Environmental Modeling (GEM) program. It is therefore important to establish clear intercalibrations between different ground-based instruments and satellites in order to clearly place the ground-based observations in context with the corresponding in situ satellite measurements. HF-radars operating at high latitudes are capable of observing very large spatial regions of the ionosphere on a nearly continuous basis. In this paper we report on an intercalibration study made using the Polar Anglo-American Conjugate Radar Experiment radars located at Goose Bay, Labrador, and Halley Station, Antarctica, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. The DMSP satellite data are used to provide clear identifications of the ionospheric cusp and the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL). The radar data for eight cusp events and eight LLBL events have been examined in order to determine a radar signature of these ionospheric regions. This intercalibraion indicates that the cusp is always characterized by wide, complex Doppler power spectra, whereas the LLBL is usually found to have spectra dominated by a single component. The distribution of spectral widths in the cusp is of a generally Gaussian form with a peak at about 220 m/s. The distribution of spectral widths in the LLBL is more like an exponential distribution, with the peak of the distribution occurring at about 50 m/s. There are a few cases in the LLBL where the Doppler power spectra are strikingly similar to those observed in the cusp.

  4. Currents, Tides and Waves measured by an HF Radar in the Gulf of Naples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Pierpaolo; Buonocore, Berardino; Cianelli, Daniela; Di Lemma, Roberta; Giordano, Alberto; Iermano, Ilaria; Kalampokis, Alkiviadis; Saviano, Simona; Uttieri, Marco; Zambardino, Giovanni; Zambianchi, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    An HF radar has been operating in the Gulf of Naples (Southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea) since 2004. The system is a SeaSonde manufactured by CODAR Ocean Sensors Ltd. Three mono-static radar units working at about 25 Mhz ensure the surface current mapping over nearly the entire Gulf of Naples area. The grid resolution is 1 Km with a range of approximately 40 Km. From continuous observations of the surface current fields several characteristics of the surface circulation were assessed. One of the most prominent evidences is the wind field forcing of the surface current, which determines different but recurrent circulation patterns affecting the transport and the off-in shore exchanges. The analysis of long and continuous current observations has revealed significant tidal currents. Previous studies regarding the tide magnitude in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea showed a very limited tidal contribution to the current field. The determination of tidal current in the Gulf of Naples has pointed out a prevalent diurnal contribution and intensity values up to a maximum of 10 cm/s. Waves are one of the most important elements in a coastal management framework. HF radar may provide an estimate of the main parameters characterizing the wave field: wave direction, significant height and period. Waves were studied in the Gulf of Naples over a range cell located between 5 and 6 km from the coast. This choice, based upon preliminary sensitivity studies, allowed us to analyze the surface gravity wave field over an area of the Gulf where the depth is not too shallow and the sea echo intensity is sufficiently high to ensure good data quality. A pluriannual wave observation time series was studied in order to depict typical seasonal patterns.

  5. UHF Radar observations at HAARP with HF pump frequencies near electron gyro-harmonics and associated ionospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Brenton; Fallen, Christopher; Secan, James

    Results for HF modification experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska are presented for experiments with the HF pump frequency near third and fourth electron gyro-harmonics. A UHF diagnostic radar with range resolution of 600 m was used to determine time-dependent altitudes of scattering from plasma turbulence during heating experiments. Experiments were conducted with multiple HF frequencies stepped by 20 kHz above and below the gyro-harmonic values. During times of HF heating the HAARP facility has sufficient power to enhance large-scale ionospheric densities in the lower ionosphere (about 150-200 km altitude) and also in the topside ionosphere (above about 350 km). In the lower ionosphere, time-dependent decreases of the altitude of radar scatter result from electron density enhancements. The effects are substantially different even for relatively small frequency steps of 20 kHz. In all cases the time-varying altitude decrease of radar scatter stops about 5-10 km below the gyro-harmonic altitude that is frequency dependent; we infer that electron density enhancements stop at this altitude where the radar signals stop decreasing with altitude. Experiments with corresponding total electron content (TEC) data show that for HF interaction altitudes above about 170 km there is substantial topside electron density increases due to upward electron thermal conduction. For lower altitudes of HF interaction the majority of the thermal energy is transferred to the neutral gas and no significant topside density increases are observed. By selecting an appropriate HF frequency a little greater than the gyro-harmonic value we have demonstrated that the ionospheric response to HF heating is a self-oscillating mode where the HF interaction altitude moves up and down with a period of several minutes. If the interaction region is above about 170 km this also produces a continuously enhanced topside electron density and upward plasma flux. Experiments using an FM scan with the HF frequency increasing near the gyro-harmonic value were conducted. The FM scan rate was sufficiently slow that the electron density was approximately in an equilibrium state. For these experiments the altitude of the HF interaction follows a near straight line downward parallel to the altitude-dependent gyro-harmonic level.

  6. HF (HIGH FREQUENCY) RADAR MEASUREMENTS OF CIRCULATION IN THE EASTERN STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA NEAR PROTECTION ISLAND (JULY, 1979)

    EPA Science Inventory

    During July 1979 the surface currents in the Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca were mapped with a High Frequency (HF) radar system (CODAR). These currents were measured simultaneously over several hundred square kilometers continuously for five days. The strong tidal currents and es...

  7. HF (HIGH FREQUENCY) RADAR MEASUREMENTS OF CIRCULATION IN THE EASTERN STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA (AUGUST, 1978)

    EPA Science Inventory

    During August, 1978, the surface currents in the Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca were mapped with a High Frequency (HF) radar system (CODAR). The surface currents were measured simultaneously over several hundred square kilometers at one hour intervals continuously for five days. ...

  8. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and direction) were obtained during 2013 and 2014 from one 13.5 MHz CODAR SeaSonde radar station from Hydrographic Institute, located in Espichel Cape (Portugal). These data were compared with those obtained from one wave buoy Datawell Directional Waverider, also from Hydrographic Institute, moored inbound Sines (Portugal) at 100 m depth. For this first approach, was assumed that all the waves are in a deep water situation. Results showed that during high energetic periods, the HF radar system revealed a good correlation with wave buoy data following the bulk wave parameters gradient variations.

  9. Spatial and temporal behavior of ULF pulsations observed by the Goose Bay HF radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. D. M.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, K. B.; Greenwald, R. A.; Samson, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques which allow the instantaneous amplitude and phase to be determined as functions of geomagnetic lattitude, longitude, and time are employed to carry out a detailed analysis of HF radar data of a ULF pulsation event in the postmidnight sector on January 11, 1989. Field line resonances with several different frequencies occur simultaneously at different latitudes. These can be associated with cavity mode frequencies of 1.3 mHz, 1.9 mHz, 2.7 mGz, and 3.3 mHz. These frequencies are constant to better than 10 percent over a local time period of nearly 4 hr. The field-aligned currents driven by the resonances can be as large as 5 micro-A/sq m at ionospheric heights. The data support a picture of modes driven by solar wind impulses.

  10. 74. Transmitter building no. 102, view of radar digital test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. Transmitter building no. 102, view of radar digital test and maintenance cabinet area control panel and date storage system showing ampex tape storage devices. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. Observation by HF radar of the Phillips resonance mechanism for generation of wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizna, D. B.; Bogle, R. W.; Moore, J. C.; Howe, C. M.

    1980-09-01

    Measurements are reported of directional ocean wave spectra made over 80° of viewing angle by an HF radar, operating in the surface wave mode in an area 22.5 km north of San Clemente Island, California. Ten azimuths from 280° to 360° true bearing were simultaneously measured for 10 wave frequencies ranging from 0.14 Hz (75 m waves) to 0.35 Hz (13 m waves). A Waverider buoy was used to measure omnidirectional energy in the region, and first-order radar Bragg lines were used to determine the spreading of wave energy with angle. Data are presented in which a bimodal spectrum was present: an attenuated spectrum with wave components to 0.10 Hz from a storm at sea at 270° bearing; plus a transient local wind spectrum, stronger in amplitude at the higher frequencies, with wave cutoff near 0.14 Hz, and running from 315° bearing. Just after the onset of local winds, the westerly spectrum fitted a cosine squared spread at the lowest measured frequencies. With the development of local wind, which blew at a 12-14 kn (6-7 m s-1) speed for a period of 12 hours, the wave spectrum spread about the wind direction as cosine thirty-second at the lowest frequencies measured, 0.14 Hz, and cosine sixty-fourth at the highest frequencies measured, 0.35 Hz. For 0.28 Hz waves the Phillips resonance mechanism for wave generation is proposed to explain the twin peaks in amplitude observed, equally spaced either side of the wind direction. These were dominant for the earliest measurement period and still were major contributions for later measurement periods. This mechanism was found to contribute also at the higher wave frequencies, as predicted by theory. Coherence times are derived from the angular widths of the Phillips resonances based on predictions of Stewart and Manton and are found to agree quite well with theory.

  12. Evaluation of two algorithms for a network of coastal HF radars in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohut, Josh; Roarty, Hugh; Randall-Goodwin, Evan; Glenn, Scott; Lichtenwalner, C. Sage

    2012-06-01

    The National High Frequency (HF) Surface Current Mapping Radar Network is being developed as a backbone system within the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. This paper focuses on the application of HF radar-derived surface current maps to U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue operations along the Mid-Atlantic coast of the USA. In that context, we evaluated two algorithms used to combine maps of radial currents into a single map of total vector currents. In situ data provided by seven drifter deployments and four bottom-mounted current meters were used to (1) evaluate the well-established unweighted least squares (UWLS) and the more recently adapted optimal interpolation (OI) algorithms and (2) quantify the sensitivity of the OI algorithm to varying decorrelation scales and error thresholds. Results with both algorithms were shown to depend on the location within the HF radar data footprint. The comparisons near the center of the HF radar coverage showed no significant difference between the two algorithms. The most significant distinction between the two was seen in the drifter trajectories. With these simulations, the weighting of radial velocities by distance in the OI implementation was very effective at reducing both the distance between the actual drifter and the cluster of simulated particles as well as the scale of the search area that encompasses them. In this study, the OI further reduced the already improved UWLS-based search areas by an additional factor of 2. The results also indicated that the OI output was relatively insensitive to the varying decorrelation scales and error thresholds tested.

  13. Experimental investigation of the relationship between HF radar measurements of currents and the dynamical properties of the upper ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Forget P., Barbin Y., Bellomo L., Doglioli, *Lecuyer E., Fraunié P., Malengros D., Marmain J., Molcard A., Petrenko A., Quentin C., *Sentchev A. Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography-MIO UM 110 UTLN - AMU - CNRS/INSU 7294 - IRD 235 BP 20132 F-83957 La Garde cedex *Laboratoire d'Océanologie et Géosciences CNRS UMR 8187 LOG Université du Littoral - Côte d'Opale 32 avenue Foch, 62930 Wimereux The increasing application of HF radio-oceanography for coastal circulation monitoring requires a validation of the radar derived current velocities using independent velocity estimates. Surface currents measured by radar, as they are relative to some finite patch of the sea (the radar cell), depend on the spatial distribution of the current within the radar cell, its time variability, its vertical structure near the surface and the presence of ocean waves. We present an experimental investigation conducted in the NW Mediterranean to measure radial surface currents by HF radar simultaneously to the dynamical properties of the surface ocean. These latter included high resolution current profiling by ADCP, microprofiling of temperature/salinity by SCAMP and Lagrangian velocities from surface drifting buoys. All the data were GPS geo-localized. The current profiling by towed ADCP was performed along the radar beam directions. The poster shows the first results of the experiment and presents samples of the 3D structure of the horizontal current (down to 15m and over some km2) and of the stratification. The spatial distribution of the surface currents is described from Lagrangian measurements. The radar derived surface currents are discussed on the basis of these in situ data. Acknowledgements : This research was supported by the LEFE IMAGO program of CNRS -INSU, project SUBCORAD.

  14. Comparison between real drifter's trajectories and simulated trajectories using HF radar data, in the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solabarrieta, Lohitzune; Cook, Michael; Paduan, Jeffrey; Sergey, Frolov; Rubio, Anna; Fontán, Almudena; Castanedo, Sonia; Gonzalez, Manuel; Medina, Raúl; Fernández, Vicente; Charria, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    A High Frequency (HF) radar network is operational since the beginning of 2009 for the oceanic region of the Basque Country, Spain (south-eastern part of the Bay of Biscay, Atlantic Ocean). It forms part of the Basque operational data acquisition system, established by the Directorate of Emergency Attention and Meteorology of the Basque Government. It is made up of two antennas emitting at 40 kHz broadband and 4.5 MHz frequency and covering a 150 km range with 5 km radial and 5° angular resolutions. Hourly space- and time-covering measurements are contributing considerably to the study of surface current patterns and the main physical processes in the area. Additional applications relate, for example, to security of navigation, maritime rescue, validation and improvement of numerical models and trajectories prediction. Since 2009, different drifters have been deployed in the study area. Since the radar has been proved to reproduce the time evolution of the currents through comparison with moored buoys with a reasonable accuracy, the aim of this work is to evaluate the capabilities of the system to reproduce the trajectories of a set of drifters available in the study area. To make trajectory simulations, we will use HF radar total velocities, surface velocities obtained from EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Function) analysis of the whole radar data set, forecast velocities for 48 hours and also OMA (Open-Boundary Modal Analysis) derived current velocities.

  15. Coherent HF radar backscatter from small-scale irregularities in the dusk sector of the subauroral ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Villain, J.-P.; Baker, K. B.; Newell, P. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of backscatter from decameter-scale ionospheric plasma density irregualarities, observed with an impressive regularity by the Goose Bay (Labrador) high-frequency (HF) radar in the dusk sector of the winter ionosphere, and discusses the relation of the scatter to the midlatitude trough. It is shown that this dusk scatter can be readily distinguished from other types of late afternoon/early evening scatter by the extreme equatorward position of its source region and by the low values of its associated radar Doppler velocities (not above 200 m/s) and spectral widths (not more than 200 m/s). A comparison of the radar observations with nearly simultaneous particle precipitation data obtained with the DMSP F6 satellite demonstrated that the source region of the backscatter lies within the subauroral ionosphere. It is shown that the characteristics of dusk scatter are compatible with the Spiro et al. (1978) model of the electrodynamics of the midlatitude trough.

  16. Three-Frequency Nonlinear Heterodyne Detection. 2: Digital Communications and Pulsed Radar

    E-print Network

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Three-Frequency Nonlinear Heterodyne Detection. 2: Digital Communications and Pulsed Radar Malvin Carl Teich and Rainfield Y. Yen Part 1 of this paper [Appl. Opt. 14,666 (1975)]dealt with the cw radar the technique for a number of specificpulsed radar and digital communications applications. Both the vacuum

  17. Synthetic aperture radar and digital processing: An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicenzo, A.

    1981-01-01

    A tutorial on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is presented with emphasis on digital data collection and processing. Background information on waveform frequency and phase notation, mixing, Q conversion, sampling and cross correlation operations is included for clarity. The fate of a SAR signal from transmission to processed image is traced in detail, using the model of a single bright point target against a dark background. Some of the principal problems connected with SAR processing are also discussed.

  18. Observation by HF radar of the Phillips resonance mechanism for generation of wind waves

    SciTech Connect

    Trizna, D.B.; Bogle, R.W.; Moore, J.C.; Howe, C.M.

    1980-09-20

    Measurements are reported of directional ocean wave spectra made over 80/sup 0/ of viewing angle by an HF radar, operating in the surface wave mode in an area 22.5 km north of San Clemente Island, California. Ten azimuths from 280/sup 0/ to 360/sup 0/ true bearing were simultaneously measured for 10 wave frequencies ranging from 0.14 Hz (75 m waves) to 0.35 Hz (13 m waves). A Waverider buoy was used to measure omnidirectional energy in the region, and first-order radar Bragg lines were used to determine the spreading of wave energy with angle. Data are presented in which a bimodal spectrum was present: an attenuated spectrum with wave components to 0.10 Hz from a storm at sea at 270/sup 0/ bearing; plus a transient local wind spectrum, stronger in amplitude at the higher frequencies, with wave cutoff near 0.14 Hz, and running from 315/sup 0/ bearing. Just after the onset of local winds, the westerly spectrum fitted a cosine squared spread at the lowest measured frequencies. With the development of local wind, which blew at a 12--14 kn (6--7 m s/sup -1/) speed for a period of 12 hours, the wave spectrum spread about the wind direction as cosine thirty-second at the lowest frequencies measured, 0.14 Hz, and cosine sixty-fourth at the highest frequencies measured, 0.35 Hz. For 0.28 Hz waves the Phillips resonance mechanism for wave generation is proposed to explain the twin peaks in amplitude observed, equally spaced either side of the wind direction. These were dominant for the earliest measurement period and still were major contributions for later measurement periods. This mechanism was found to contribute also at the higher wave frequencies, as predicted by theory. Coherence times are derived from the angular widths of the Phillips resonances based on predictions of Stewart and Manton and are found to agree quite well with theory.

  19. Building a Digital Meteor Radar for Aeronomic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Many billions of meteors enter the atmosphere of the earth every day. At altitudes near 100km these meteors ablate creating an ionized trail that drifts with the neutral wind and diffuses. Using electromagnetic waves near 30MHz the structure of these trails can be probed providing information about the structure of the earth's atmosphere around 100km. Specifically details about the winds and temperature can be extracted. Radar systems measuring meteor parameters have existed for many decades but the recent advances in high speed digital acquisition systems has enabled the development of software agile digital receivers. This paper details the lessons learned regarding a career proposal focusing on the development of a digital receiver for atmospheric research. One key aspect of this project that will be discussed is the bridging of science and engineering in this research. The challenges and benefits of this research will also be addressed.

  20. Interference-Detection Module in a Digital Radar Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischman, Mark; Berkun, Andrew; Chu, Anhua; Freedman, Adam; Jourdan, Michael; McWatters, Dalia; Paller, Mimi

    2009-01-01

    A digital receiver in a 1.26-GHz spaceborne radar scatterometer now undergoing development includes a module for detecting radio-frequency interference (RFI) that could contaminate scientific data intended to be acquired by the scatterometer. The role of the RFI-detection module is to identify time intervals during which the received signal is likely to be contaminated by RFI and thereby to enable exclusion, from further scientific data processing, of signal data acquired during those intervals. The underlying concepts of detection of RFI and rejection of RFI-contaminated signal data are also potentially applicable in advanced terrestrial radio receivers, including software-defined radio receivers in general, receivers in cellular telephones and other wireless consumer electronic devices, and receivers in automotive collision-avoidance radar systems.

  1. Elliptical storm cell modeling of digital radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    A model for spatial distributions of reflectivity in storm cells was fitted to digital radar data. The data were taken with a modified WSR-57 weather radar with 2.6-km resolution. The data consisted of modified B-scan records on magnetic tape of storm cells tracked at 0 deg elevation for several hours. The MIT L-band radar with 0.8-km resolution produced cross-section data on several cells at 1/2 deg elevation intervals. The model developed uses ellipses for contours of constant effective-reflectivity factor Z with constant orientation and eccentricity within a horizontal cell cross section at a given time and elevation. The centers of the ellipses are assumed to be uniformly spaced on a straight line, with areas linearly related to log Z. All cross sections are similar at different heights (except for cell tops, bottoms, and splitting cells), especially for the highest reflectivities; wind shear causes some translation and rotation between levels. Goodness-of-fit measures and parameters of interest for 204 ellipses are considered.

  2. Digital Radar-Signal Processors Implemented in FPGAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew; Andraka, Ray

    2004-01-01

    High-performance digital electronic circuits for onboard processing of return signals in an airborne precipitation- measuring radar system have been implemented in commercially available field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Previously, it was standard practice to downlink the radar-return data to a ground station for postprocessing a costly practice that prevents the nearly-real-time use of the data for automated targeting. In principle, the onboard processing could be performed by a system of about 20 personal- computer-type microprocessors; relative to such a system, the present FPGA-based processor is much smaller and consumes much less power. Alternatively, the onboard processing could be performed by an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), but in comparison with an ASIC implementation, the present FPGA implementation offers the advantages of (1) greater flexibility for research applications like the present one and (2) lower cost in the small production volumes typical of research applications. The generation and processing of signals in the airborne precipitation measuring radar system in question involves the following especially notable steps: The system utilizes a total of four channels two carrier frequencies and two polarizations at each frequency. The system uses pulse compression: that is, the transmitted pulse is spread out in time and the received echo of the pulse is processed with a matched filter to despread it. The return signal is band-limited and digitally demodulated to a complex baseband signal that, for each pulse, comprises a large number of samples. Each complex pair of samples (denoted a range gate in radar terminology) is associated with a numerical index that corresponds to a specific time offset from the beginning of the radar pulse, so that each such pair represents the energy reflected from a specific range. This energy and the average echo power are computed. The phase of each range bin is compared to the previous echo by complex conjugate multiplication to obtain the mean Doppler shift (and hence the mean and variance of the velocity of precipitation) of the echo at that range.

  3. Characteristics of daytime mid-latitude travelling ionospheric disturbances observed over the Antarctic peninsular with HF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Hosokawa, K.; Ishida, T.; Lester, M.; Milan, S. E.; Sato, N.; Yukimatu, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a survey of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) observed by an HF radar located in the Falkland Islands between March 2010 and September 2011. The radar has a field of view that overlooks the Antarctic peninsular, a known hotspot of gravity wave activity. We present observations of radar ground backscatter data, in which the signatures of TIDs are manifest as structured enhancements in received backscattered power. Often, multiple TID signals are observed during an interval of observations and we discuss a new approach to their interpretation. Observed periods were in the range 30 - 60 minutes, corresponding to frequencies of 0.3 - 0.6 mHz. Wavelengths were generally in the range 250 - 400 km and phase speeds in the range 50 - 200 m/s. These values are within the ranges typically associated with medium-scale gravity waves. We discuss these results in terms of seasonal and diurnal variations, as well as in terms of their relationship to the local topography and large-scale geomagnetic activity.

  4. Wallops HF Radar Observations of Penetrating Electric Fields and Plasma Structuring in the Mid-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, R. A.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth's high-latitude ionosphere is subject to strong electric fields of magnetospheric origin that drive drifts of ionospheric plasma to speeds of kilometers per second. Such dramatic effects are usually absent from the ionosphere at mid- and low-latitudes and, consequently, the impact of large electric fields on plasma processes at sub-auroral latitudes has received less scientific attention. This has started to change with the realization that major space weather disturbances enable electric fields to penetrate into the mid- and low-latitude ionospheres and cause a variety of plasma disturbances that adversely impact the performance of technological systems. Understanding the onset and evolution of penetrating electric fields and their impact on mid-latitude ionospheric structure is a top priority for the U.S. National Space Weather Program and the NASA Living With a Star Initiative. In this paper, we describe a new HF radar, located at Wallops Island, Virgina, that was recently developed as a joint project of GSFC/Wallops Flight Facility and JHU/APL. The radar is based on the design of radars in the high-latitude SuperDARN network and will be used to study the penetration of high-latitude electric fields into the mid-latitude ionosphere and to characterize the impact of these fields on the generation of ionospheric plasma structure and small-scale irregularities. The radar was only recently put into observation so we will concentrate on initial observations of electric-field penetration and associated ionospheric structuring. Our observations will be discussed in the context of higher-latitude measurements with SuperDARN.

  5. A combined QC methodology in Ebro Delta HF radar system: real time web monitoring of diagnostic parameters and offline validation of current data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, Pablo; Piedracoba, Silvia; Soto-Navarro, Javier; Ruiz, Maria Isabel; Alvarez Fanjul, Enrique

    2015-04-01

    Over recent years, special attention has been focused on the development of protocols for near real-time quality control (QC) of HF radar derived current measurements. However, no agreement has been worldwide achieved to date to establish a standardized QC methodology, although a number of valuable international initiatives have been launched. In this context, Puertos del Estado (PdE) aims to implement a fully operational HF radar network with four different Codar SeaSonde HF radar systems by means of: - The development of a best-practices robust protocol for data processing and QC procedures to routinely monitor sites performance under a wide variety of ocean conditions. - The execution of validation works with in-situ observations to assess the accuracy of HF radar-derived current measurements. The main goal of the present work is to show this combined methodology for the specific case of Ebro HF radar (although easily expandable to the rest of PdE radar systems), deployed to manage Ebro River deltaic area and promote the conservation of an important aquatic ecosystem exposed to a severe erosion and reshape. To this aim, a web interface has been developed to efficiently monitor in real time the evolution of several diagnostic parameters provided by the manufacturer (CODAR) and used as indicators of HF radar system health. This web, updated automatically every hour, examines sites performance on different time basis in terms of: - Hardware parameters: power and temperature. - Radial parameters, among others: Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), number of radial vectors provided by time step, maximum radial range and bearing. - Total uncertainty metrics provided by CODAR: zonal and meridional standard deviations and covariance between both components. - Additionally, a widget embedded in the web interface executes queries against PdE database, providing the chance to compare current time series observed by Tarragona buoy (located within Ebro HF radar spatial domain) and those measured by the closest radar grid point. A thorough analysis of the temporal evolution of the aforementioned parameters allows to define the standard thresholds for each site within which they are considered to be running optimally. In contrast, a site performance could be categorized as sub-optimal if an erratic and/or anomalous behavior is persistently detected in radial parameters values, related to a significant discrepancy from the mean and clearly outside the limits defined by the associated standard deviations. Consequently, a three colored-based alert system is activated according to each site's current status: green (OK), yellow (acceptable, but issue detected) and red (KO). Since this approach is constrained by the fact that it can not state the intrinsic quality of surface current data, a complementary validation analysis is required: HF radar-derived radial and total vectors are compared with observations from a current meter installed in Tarragona buoy. This validation, conducted for the entire 2014, aims to complete the proposed methodology through the exploration of the existence of bearing errors and the evaluation of intrinsic uncertainties related to HF radar technology by means of objective quality indicators.

  6. The relationship between strength of turbulence and backscattering radar power at HF and VHF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocking, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    The formulae relating turbulence and other atmospheric parameters to backscattered power for radar observations are reviewed. Emphasis is on the case of scatter from turbulent irregularities which have scales corresponding to the range of isotropic, inertial range turbulence. The applicability of this assumption is discussed. A formula is introduced for the mesosphere which relates ionospheric electron densities to backscattered power.

  7. Plasma wave activity in the polar E-region: New insights from HF radar observations in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma structuring at small scales (decameter wavelengths and below) in the high-latitude E-region is normally attributed to plasma instability processes under conditions of strong electric fields and/or favorable plasma density gradients. Establishing the electric field dependence of the wave activity in particular is both fundamentally important and experimentally challenging. In this report, we present direct observations of the polar E-region wave activity in conjunction with the electric field measurements with the recently-deployed SuperDARN South Pole (SPS) and McMurdo (MCM) HF radars. The ability of all Antarctic SuperDARN radars to observe E-region plasma waves is assessed first by modeling their magnetic aspect angle conditions. The diurnal variation of E region echo occurrence is analyzed and shown to be distinctly different between SPS and MCM. It is demonstrated that E-region echo occurrence is largely controlled by the electric field strength which behaves differently at SPS and MCM. The contribution of the E-region plasma waves of different spectral properties and physical origins to the SPS and MCM datasets and their electric field control are also investigated. The results suggest that the electric field control of E-region wave activity is present but perhaps indirect. One possible scenario is a two-step process in which primary waves are generated under strong electric field conditions and create strong polarization electric fields that in turn are responsible for secondary wave generation. The new radar observations in Antarctica suggest that such a process is perhaps more common than previously thought and may be responsible for generation of the large majority of small-scale waves in the polar E-region.

  8. 38. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #414, digital/electrical repair shop; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #414, digital/electrical repair shop; showing work areas available for maintenance and equipment repair - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  9. 4. INTERIOR DETAIL VIEW OF RADCAD1 COMMO DIGITIZER RADAR, BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR DETAIL VIEW OF RADCAD-1 COMMO DIGITIZER RADAR, BUILDING 408, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Operations Building & Annex, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  10. Development of a ground signal processor for digital synthetic array radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking array radar (SLAR) in a B-57 aircraft test bed is used, with other optical and infrared sensors, in remote sensing of Earth surface features for various users at NASA Johnson Space Center. The video from the radar is normally recorded on photographic film and subsequently processed photographically into high resolution radar images. Using a high speed sampling (digitizing) system, the two receiver channels of cross-and co-polarized video are recorded on wideband magnetic tape along with radar and platform parameters. These data are subsequently reformatted and processed into digital synthetic aperture radar images with the image data available on magnetic tape for subsequent analysis by investigators. The system design and results obtained are described.

  11. Development of a ground signal processor for digital synthetic array radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1981-05-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking array radar (SLAR) in a B-57 aircraft test bed is used, with other optical and infrared sensors, in remote sensing of Earth surface features for various users at NASA Johnson Space Center. The video from the radar is normally recorded on photographic film and subsequently processed photographically into high resolution radar images. Using a high speed sampling (digitizing) system, the two receiver channels of cross-and co-polarized video are recorded on wideband magnetic tape along with radar and platform parameters. These data are subsequently reformatted and processed into digital synthetic aperture radar images with the image data available on magnetic tape for subsequent analysis by investigators. The system design and results obtained are described.

  12. HF radar detection of infrasonic waves generated in the ionosphere by the 28 March 2005 Sumatra earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdillon, Alain; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Molinié, Jean-Philippe; Rannou, Véronique

    2014-03-01

    Surface waves generated by earthquakes create atmospheric waves detectable in the ionosphere using radio waves techniques: i.e., HF Doppler sounding, GPS and altimeter TEC measurements, as well as radar measurements. We present observations performed with the over-the-horizon (OTH) radar NOSTRADAMUS after the very strong earthquake (M=8.6) that occurred in Sumatra on March 28, 2005. An original method based on the analysis of the RTD (Range-Time-Doppler) image is suggested to identify the multi-chromatic ionospheric signature of the Rayleigh wave. The proposed method presents the advantage to preserve the information on the range variation and time evolution, and provides comprehensive results, as well as easy identification of the waves. In essence, a Burg algorithm of order 1 is proposed to compute the Doppler shift of the radar signal, resulting in sensitivity as good as obtained with higher orders. The multi-chromatic observation of the ionospheric signature of Rayleigh wave allows to extrapolate information coherent with the dispersion curve of Rayleigh waves, that is, we observe two components of the Rayleigh waves with estimated group velocities of 3.8 km/s and 3.6 km/s associated to 28 mHz (T~36 s) and 6.1 mHz (T~164 s) waves, respectively. Spectral analysis of the RTD image reveals anyway the presence of several oscillations at frequencies between 3 and 8 mHz clearly associated to the transfer of energy from the solid-Earth to the atmosphere, and nominally described by the normal modes theory for a complete planet with atmosphere. Oscillations at frequencies larger than 8 mHz are also observed in the spectrum but with smaller amplitudes. Particular attention is pointed out to normal modes 0S29 and 0S37 which are strongly involved in the coupling process. As the proposed method is frequency free, it could be used not only for detection of ionospheric perturbations induced by earthquakes, but also by other natural phenomena as well as volcanic explosions and particularly tsunamis, for future oceanic monitoring and tsunami warning systems.

  13. HF radar observations of Pc 5 field line resonances in the midnight/early morning MLT sector

    SciTech Connect

    Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B. ); Samson, J.C. )

    1991-09-01

    On a number of occasions The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory HF radar at Goose Bay, Labrador, has observed the effects of field line resonances on the drift velocities of irregularities in the F region of the high-latitude ionosphere. One of the most interesting sets of resonances occurs near midnight MLT and may be associated with shear in the convective flow in the magnetotail. This paper discusses in detail a particularly clear example which shows field line resonance equatorward of a region of shear flow in the early morning sector. The motions were predominantly in the geomagnetic east-west direction, indicating north-south electric fields. As expected of field line resonance pulsations, these oscillations had pronounced peaks in their latitudinal power distribution. The pulsations could occur simultaneously but remained distinct as the latitude of peak response was observed to vary inversely with the frequency of the pulsation. The authors interpret these features in terms of field line resonance theory and discuss the possible sources of the pulsation energy.

  14. Surface circulation in the Iroise Sea (W. Brittany) from high resolution HF radar mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Barbin, Yves; Yaremchuk, Max

    2013-01-01

    The data from two high-frequency radars (HFR) operating in the Iroise Sea are re-processed by applying an improved version of the direction finding algorithm, removing wave-induced surface currents and the variational interpolation on a regular grid. Combining these processing techniques allowed reconstruction of the surface currents at a level of details that was not previously available. Refined resolution enabled to identify fine-scale structures of surface circulation, to quantify the variability of tidal currents and the residual (time averaged) velocity field, and to explain spatial intermittence in polarization of the tidal current ellipses. The analyzed data span two month-long periods in spring and late summer of 2007. The major findings include (a) a dipole structure in the vorticity field characterized by two oppositely rotating eddies, generated on the leeward side of the Ushant Island at flood (negative polarity) and at ebb (positive polarity); (b) an extremely strong fortnightly variability of tidal currents northwest of the Ushant Island with the highest velocity magnitude of 3.9 m/s caused by the interference of the major semi-diurnal tidal constituents; (c) a significant contribution of the higher order nonlinear tidal harmonics to the surface currents in the Fromveur strait, which maintains strong tidal currents and affects the shape of their fortnightly modulation. The residual circulation is characterized by two distinct zones approximately separated by the 100 m isobath: in the offshore zone the residual currents have a significant contribution of the wind-driven component, whereas the nearshore zone is characterized by extremely strong (up to 0.4 m/s) time-independent residual circulation featuring two permanent anticyclonic eddies: north of the western extremity of the Sein archipelago, and north the Ushant Island. The acquired data and the presented results could be useful for regional model validation and studies of the local eddy dynamics, tidal fronts, and passive tracer transport in the region.

  15. Spurious effects of analog-to-digital conversion nonlinearities on radar range-Doppler maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.; Dubbert, D. F.; Tise, B. L.

    2015-05-01

    High-performance radar operation, particularly Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar modes, are very sensitive to anomalous effects of system nonlinearities. System nonlinearities generate harmonic spurs that at best degrade, and at worst generate false target detections. One significant source of nonlinear behavior is the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). One measure of its undesired nonlinearity is its Integral Nonlinearity (INL) specification. We examine in this paper the relationship of INL to radar performance; in particular its manifestation in a range-Doppler map or image.

  16. On the spatiotemporal evolution of the ionospheric backscatter during magnetically disturbed periods as observed by the TIGER Bruny Island HF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V. V.; Makarevich, R. A.; Kane, T. A.; Ye, H.; Devlin, J. C.; Dyson, P. L.

    2011-08-01

    The Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) method is used to examine a 4-year database (2000-2003) of the TIGER Bruny Island radar (MLON=226.78°E, MLAT=55.06°S) measurements to determine typical patterns of the spatiotemporal evolution of ionospheric backscatter during geomagnetically disturbed periods. SEA is performed separately for three disturbance categories: short-, medium-, and long-duration magnetic disturbances, based on the Dst index variation. Prior to SEA, the diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle effects have been accounted for by subtracting the nominal quiet-time values. It is found that the occurrence of ionospheric HF backscatter exhibited strongest enhancements near t=0 h between 65°S and 70°S MLAT (range of 800-2500 km) during short-duration magnetic disturbance. In contrast, a reduction in echo occurrence first occurred near t=0 h at higher ranges (r?2500 km) and expanded equatorwards during the recovery phase of the magnetic disturbances. This reduction in occurrence became progressively stronger and prolonged for medium- and long-duration magnetic disturbances. These categories also showed clear enhancements in the E-region backscatter (r<765 km) commencing from t=0 h. These observations can be explained by three main factors: (1) an enhancement in the E-region densities due to high-energy particle precipitation during magnetically disturbed periods causing the HF radar waves to refract from smaller altitudes and closer ranges, (2) a variability in the F-region densities associated with magnetic disturbances also affecting the propagation of the HF radar waves, and (3) a short-lived strong enhancement in growth rate of decametre-scale ionospheric irregularities when IMF turned southwards causing the highest echo occurrence near t=0 h during SEA.

  17. Drift Velocity of Small-Scale Artificial Ionospheric Irregularities According to Multifrequency HF Doppler Radar. I. Method of Calculation and Its Hardware Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, G. G.; Uryadov, V. P.; Vertogradov, V. G.; Vertogradova, E. G.; Kubatko, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The method of calculating the total drift velocity vector of small-scale artificial ionospheric irregularities as measured by the effective Doppler frequency shift of aspect-scattered signals from several diagnostic illumination transmitters operated at different frequencies is discussed. The technique of adaptive simulation of decameter radio waves propagating in an inhomogeneous magnetized ionosphere with allowance for the aspect scattering effects due to small-scale field-aligned irregularities is developed. A multifrequency HF Doppler radar for simultaneous measurement of the Doppler spectra of radio signals at a set of frequencies is described.

  18. MF and HF radar techniques for investigating the dynamics and structure of the 50 to 110 km height region: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Iain Murray

    2015-12-01

    The application of medium-frequency (MF) and high-frequency (HF) partial reflection radar to investigate the neutral upper atmosphere is one of the oldest such techniques still regularly in use. The techniques have been continuously improved and remain a robust and reliable method of obtaining wind velocities, turbulence intensities, electron densities, and measurements of atmospheric structure in the mesosphere lower thermosphere (MLT) region (50 to 110 km). In this paper, we review recent developments, discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the technique, and consider possible improvements.

  19. An atlas of November 1978 synthetic aperture radar digitized imagery for oil spill studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, H. E.; Oderman, W.; Crosswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A data set is described which consists of digitized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery plus correlative data and some preliminary analysis results. This data set should be of value to experimenters who are interested in the SAR instrument and its application to the detection and monitoring of oil on water and other distributed targets.

  20. An assessment of shuttle radar topography mission digital elevation data for studies of volcano morphology

    E-print Network

    Wright, Robert

    An assessment of shuttle radar topography mission digital elevation data for studies of volcano's volcanoes. Although these data were acquired with a nominal spatial resolution of 30 m, such data are only available for volcanoes located within the U.S.A. and its Territories. For the overwhelming majority

  1. The application of digital signal processing techniques to a teleoperator radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujol, A.

    1982-01-01

    A digital signal processing system was studied for the determination of the spectral frequency distribution of echo signals from a teleoperator radar system. The system consisted of a sample and hold circuit, an analog to digital converter, a digital filter, and a Fast Fourier Transform. The system is interfaced to a 16 bit microprocessor. The microprocessor is programmed to control the complete digital signal processing. The digital filtering and Fast Fourier Transform functions are implemented by a S2815 digital filter/utility peripheral chip and a S2814A Fast Fourier Transform chip. The S2815 initially simulates a low-pass Butterworth filter with later expansion to complete filter circuit (bandpass and highpass) synthesizing.

  2. A novel digital receiver concept for ISRO's future remote sensing radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Nilesh; Vachhani, J. G.; Soin, Sumit; Agrawal, Rinku; Rao, C. V. N.; Gujraty, Virendra; Rana, Surindersingh

    2006-12-01

    Technology development related to digital, antenna and RF subsystems for Microwave Radar Sensors like Synthetic Aperture Radar, Scatterometer, Altimeter and Radiometer is one of the major activities under ISRO's microwave remote sensing programme, since 1980s. These technologies are now being gainfully utilized for building ISRO's operational Earth Observation missions involving microwave sensors like Radar Imaging Satellite, RISAT SAR, Oceansat-2 Scatterometer, Megha-Tropiques, MADRAS and Airborne SAR for Disaster Management, DMSAR. Concurrently, advanced technology developments in these fields are underway to meet the major technological challenges of building ISRO's proposed advanced microwave missions like ultra-high resolution SAR's, Synthetic Aperture Radiometer (SARAD), Milli-meter and sub-millimeter wave sounders and SAR Constellations for Disaster management as well as Interferometric, Polarmetric and polarmetric interferometry applications. Also, these hardware are being designed with core radar electronics concept, in which the same RF and digital hardware sub-units / modules will be utilized to build different microwave radar sensors. One of the major and common requirements for all these active and passive microwave sensors is the moderate to highspeed data acquisition and signal processing system. Traditionally, the Data acquisition units for all these radar sensors are implemented as stand-alone units, following the radar receivers. For ISRO's C-band airborne SAR (ASAR) and RISAT high resolution SAR, we have designed and developed High Speed 8-bit ADC based I/Q Digitisers, operating at 30.814 MHz and 250 MHz sampling rates, respectively. With the increasing demand of wide bandwidth and ultra-high resolution in imaging and non-imaging radar systems, the technology trend worldwide is towards a digital receiver, involving bandpass or IF sampling, thus eliminating the need for RF down converters and analog IQ demodulators. In order to evolve a generic configuration for all the microwave sensors, we have initiated design and development of a generic L-band digital receiver, consisting of receiver elements (LNA, digital attenuator and Bandpass filter) followed by Analog-to-Digital Converter. The digitised data can then be output in parallel or serial format. Additionally, a digital signal processor performing tasks like data compression, convolution or correlation and formatting can also be integrated with this generic digital receiver. The front end of the receiver is wide-band, catering to bandwidths of upto 2 GHz while the digitisation rates are also of the order of 1-2 GHz. It is proposed to standardize the design and use this generic receiver for front end data acquisition of all the future microwave sensors. It will meet the digitisation requirements of 500 MHz to 1 GHz for ultra-high resolution (0.25-0.5 meter) SAR as well as direct sampling of the signal around 1.4GHz for L-band Synthetic Aperture Radiometer. After initial prototyping using discrete receiver elements and ultra-high speed 8-bit ADC, it will be taken up as a custom ASIC or multi-chip module consisting of RF MMIC's and a mixed signal ADC ASIC. These designs will be fabricated using InP, GaAs or SiGe process technologies at competent foundries like GATEC, SCL, Infineon/Germany, X-Fab/Germany and Ommic-Philips/France. This novel digital receiver will offer several advantages like flexibility, stability, reduced RF hardware and miniaturisation. This paper describes the ultra-high speed design requirements, configuration details and target specifications and salient features of this generic L-band digital receiver for ISRO's future spaceborne and airborne radar missions. It also addresses the associated signal integrity, EMI/EMC and thermal issues.

  3. Near-Subsurface Science from a Digital Beamforming Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, L. M.; Rincon, R. F.

    2015-10-01

    Many important questions in planetary science depends on our ability to detect and map surface and subsurface layers of planetary bodies. We are developing a P-band (435 MHz, 70 cm wavelength) digital beamforming radar, called Space Exploration SAR (SESAR), capable of providing the measurement flexibility needed to address multiple types of science goals. SESAR will provide high spatial resolution imaging, full polarimetry, multibeam scatterometry and altimetry of planetary targets such as the Moon and Mars by using beamforming technology that can adjust the radar experiment to meet the specific science goals of each target.

  4. MAS2-8 radar and digital control unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, J. M.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    The design of the MAS 2-8 (2 to 8 GHz microwave-active spectrometer), a ground-based sensor system, is presented. A major modification in 1974 to the MAS 2-8, that of a control subsystem to automate the data-taking operation, is the prime focus. The digital control unit automatically changes all system parameters except FM rate and records the return signal on paper tape. The overall system operation and a detailed discussion of the design and operation of the digital control unit are presented.

  5. The Long Wavelength Array (LWA): A Large HF/VHF Array for Solar Physics, Ionospheric Science, and Solar Radar

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    , and Solar Radar Namir E. Kassim Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Stephen M. White AFRL, Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, NM 87117 Paul Rodriguez Consultant, Washington, DC 20375 Jacob M. Hartman, Brian

  6. The Long Wavelength Array (LWA): A Large HF/VHF Array for Solar Physics, Ionospheric Science, and Solar Radar

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    for solar physics and space weather investigations, through its ability to characterize a diverse range for accurate calibration and imaging of solar and space weather phenomena. As a sensitive monitorThe Long Wavelength Array (LWA): A Large HF/VHF Array for Solar Physics, Ionospheric Science

  7. Occurrence characteristics of subauroral westward plasma flows and lowest speed threshold of SAPS observed by the SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, H.; Nishitani, N.; Hori, T.

    2014-12-01

    Westward rapid plasma flows in the ionosphere at subauroral latitudes are called "Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) [Foster and Burke, 2002]". SAPS is a manifestation of the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (M-I) coupling. Therefore, it is important to know occurrence characteristics of SAPS in order to understand the details of M-I coupling system. As a result of the present analysis of SAPS using the SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar, Kataoka et al. [2009] reported that positions of SAPS shifts toward lower latitude with decreasing Dst index. We investigate the characteristics of SAPS, with focus on the relationship between occurrence characteristics of SAPS and a variety of solar wind and geomagnetic parameters, using the SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar with a field of view covering Far East Russia, which has been in operation since 2006. In particular, we identify the lowest limit of SAPS speed, which has not been discussed in the previous literatures. This is to examine the lowest threshold of electric field to generate SAPS as a result of M-I coupling. In order to investigate SAPS occurrence characteristics comprehensively, we analyzed events with wider ranges of velocity and MLAT than those in the previous studies. As a result of statistical analysis, we found two categories of westward flows that were reasonably separated with a speed threshold of ~150-200 m/s. For the faster flows above the threshold there is a clear correlation between MLAT and Dst index, whereas for the slower flows there is no such correlation. Similar correlation is found for MLT and AL index as well. The faster flows are considered to be SAPS, whereas the slower flows are probably associated with midlatitude F-region ionospheric irregularities not directly related to storms / substorms.

  8. Modern Radar Techniques for Geophysical Applications: Two Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arokiasamy, B. J.; Bianchi, C.; Sciacca, U.; Tutone, G.; Zirizzotti, A.; Zuccheretti, E.

    2005-01-01

    The last decade of the evolution of radar was heavily influenced by the rapid increase in the information processing capabilities. Advances in solid state radio HF devices, digital technology, computing architectures and software offered the designers to develop very efficient radars. In designing modern radars the emphasis goes towards the simplification of the system hardware, reduction of overall power, which is compensated by coding and real time signal processing techniques. Radars are commonly employed in geophysical radio soundings like probing the ionosphere; stratosphere-mesosphere measurement, weather forecast, GPR and radio-glaciology etc. In the laboratorio di Geofisica Ambientale of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Rome, Italy, we developed two pulse compression radars. The first is a HF radar called AIS-INGV; Advanced Ionospheric Sounder designed both for the purpose of research and for routine service of the HF radio wave propagation forecast. The second is a VHF radar called GLACIORADAR, which will be substituting the high power envelope radar used by the Italian Glaciological group. This will be employed in studying the sub glacial structures of Antarctica, giving information about layering, the bed rock and sub glacial lakes if present. These are low power radars, which heavily rely on advanced hardware and powerful real time signal processing. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. Monitoring the coastal ocean surface -The poten-tial use of HF radar for the design and operational

    E-print Network

    Wyatt, Lucy

    cases these needs are being met by single point in situ measurement sys- tems for example wave buoys shooting in harsh environ- ments is not always easy or quick. Where the need for spatial information with three fixed beams for each radar to minimise costs hence the coverage may seem sparser than is often

  10. Digital processing of orbital radar data to enhance geologic structure - Examples from the Canadian Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, Penny M.; Harris, Jeff; Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Blodget, Herbert W.

    1988-01-01

    Various digital enhancement techniques for SAR are compared using SIR-B and Seasat images of the Canadian Shield. The three best methods for enhancing geological structure were found to be: (1) a simple linear contrast stretch; (2) a mean or median low-pass filter to reduce speckle prior to edge enhancement or a K nearest-neighbor average to cosmetically reduce speckle; and (3) a modification of the Moore-Waltz (1983) technique. Three look directions were coregistered and several means of data display were investigated as means of compensating for radar azimuth biasing.

  11. Combined flatland ST radar and digital-barometer network observations of mesoscale processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Gage, K. S.; Einaudi, F. E.; Rottman, J. W.; Hollinger, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a six-station digital-barometer network centered on the Flatland ST radar to support observational studies of gravity waves and other mesoscale features at the Flatland Atmospheric Observatory in central Illinois. The network's current mode of operation is examined, and a preliminary example of an apparent group of waves evident throughout the network as well as throughout the troposphere is presented. Preliminary results demonstrate the capabilities of the current operational system to study wave convection, wave-front, and other coherent mesoscale interactions and processes throughout the troposphere. Unfiltered traces for the pressure and horizontal zonal wind, for days 351 to 353 UT, 1990, are illustrated.

  12. Observational evidence of mesoscale variability of the Northern Current (North-Western Mediterranean Sea): a combined study via gliders, HF RADAR, surface drifters, and vessel data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, Lucio; Berta, Maristella; Pietro Gasparini, Gian; Griffa, Annalisa; Gatimu Magaldi, Marcello; Marmain, Julien; Molcard, Anne; Vetrano, Anna; Béguery, Laurent; Borghini, Mireno

    2013-04-01

    Results from a combined observational effort put forth in December 2011 are here presented. The focus is on the mesoscale variability of the Northern Current (NC), the branch of the general North-Western Mediterranean cyclonic circulation extending from the Ligurian to the Catalan Sea (Albérola et al., Oceanologica Acta, vol. 18, n. 2, 1995). The study area, located between the Ligurian Sea and the Gulf of Lions, includes the part of French coast between Nice and Toulon, where only a few hydrographic data have been collected in the past. Dynamic instabilities of the NC, observed and reported in literature (Picco et al., Ocean Science, vol. 6, 2010), make this region particularly important, with consequences in the recirculation of the Ligurian Gyre and in the NC intrusions in the Gulf of Lions (Millot and Wald, Oceanologica Acta, vol. 3, n. 4, 1980). This works aims at providing experimental evidence of the effects that mesoscale exerts on the NC dynamics via an innovative and complementary data set. Two Slocum Gliders (a Shallow and a Deep one), both equipped with CTD and dissolved oxygen sensors, sampled the area within 70 km from the coast for about 20 days. The shallow one (200 m) realized six transects describing a "W"-shaped pattern from Nice to Toulon, whereas the deep one (1000 m) performed repeated cross-current sections off Toulon. Concurrent observations were obtained via: a) CTD and both Lowered and Vessel-Mounted ADCP transects obtained during a 5-day oceanographic cruise on board of the Research Vessel Urania; b) repeated deployments of surface drifters; c) a continuously-recording High Frequency (HF) RADAR which measures surface currents off Toulon in a 40 × 25 km2 region with high resolution both in space (2 km) and in time (1 hour). The combined use of data from the shallow glider and the ship-based ADCP measurements reveals the presence of an instability of the offshore front of the NC. Its location is confirmed by high-resolution satellite images in the same period and by the trajectories of the drifters. The instability is thought to evolve in a filament which detaches from the main branch and moves eastward, participating to the recirculation of the Ligurian Gyre. Data from the deep glider and the HF RADAR are used to assess the temporal evolution of the NC front in the region off Toulon. The analysis shows that the surface front is here eroded during the observational period. Possible reasons include a) the blowing of Mistral and/or Tramontane, which are the strongest and most persistent winds of the region, with associated offshore Ekman transport and mixing; b) buoyancy loss which induce convective cells at the surface; c) simply lateral advection as the HF RADAR synoptic view reveals that the front is often interrupted or modified because of instabilities.

  13. Multiple-site investigation of the properties of an HF radio channel and the ionosphere using Digital Radio Mondiale broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarczyk, Janusz; Koperski, Piotr; Kulak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM), one of the new digital radio broadcasting standards, has been designed to overcome typical short wave radio channel difficulties, such as the multipath propagation and fast temporal changes of the received signal level, both related to the properties of the ionosphere along the path of propagation. In particular, some of the RF carriers used in the applied COFDM transmission technique serve to estimate the current state of the radio channel to enable the proper demodulation of the received signal.We have been detecting such RF carriers on select frequency channels (standard DRM broadcast) using a network of recording stations located in different parts of Poland in order to collect data on the HF radio channel. We have been also evaluating the usefulness of this procedure in providing information on the current state of the ionosphere in the refraction region between the transmitter and receivers. When the DRM system becomes more widespread, this method can supplement data that comes from the ionosondes, since it does not require much financial resources and the receivers can be easily scattered over a large area. This paper presents a set of experimental data and its analysis.

  14. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR): Performance Analysis During the Eco-3D 2011 and Summer 2012 Flight Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Carter, Lynn; Ranson, K. Jon; Vega, Manuel; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, SeungKuk; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art airborne radar developed at NASA/Goddard for the implementation, and testing of digital beamforming techniques applicable to Earth and planetary sciences. The DBSAR measurements have been employed to study: The estimation of vegetation biomass and structure - critical parameters in the study of the carbon cycle; The measurement of geological features - to explore its applicability to planetary science by measuring planetary analogue targets. The instrument flew two test campaigns over the East coast of the United States in 2011, and 2012. During the campaigns the instrument operated in full polarimetric mode collecting data from vegetation and topography features.

  15. Digital Terrestrial Video Broadcast Interference Suppression in Forward-Looking Ground Penetrating Radar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rial, F. I.; Mendez-Rial, Roi; Lawadka, Lukasz; Gonzalez-Huici, Maria A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we show how radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by digital video broadcasting terrestrial and digital audio broadcasting transmitters can be an important noise source for forward-looking ground penetrating radar (FLGPR) systems. Even in remote locations the average interference power sometimes exceeds ultra-wideband signals by many dB, becoming the limiting factor in the system sensitivity. The overall problem of RFI and its impact in GPR systems is briefly described and several signal processing approaches to removal of RFI are discussed. These include spectral estimation and coherent subtraction algorithms and various filter approaches which have been developed and applied by the research community in similar contexts. We evaluate the performance of these methods by simulating two different scenarios submitted to real RFI acquired with a FLGPR system developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR), (GER). The effectiveness of these algorithms in removing RFI is presented using some performance indices after suppression.

  16. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...73.757(b)(2), notes 1 and 2. (3) Audio-frequency band. The quality of service, using digital source coding within...codec (of the order of 3 kHz). The choice of audio quality is connected to the needs of the...

  17. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...73.757(b)(2), notes 1 and 2. (3) Audio-frequency band. The quality of service, using digital source coding within...codec (of the order of 3 kHz). The choice of audio quality is connected to the needs of the...

  18. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...73.757(b)(2), notes 1 and 2. (3) Audio-frequency band. The quality of service, using digital source coding within...codec (of the order of 3 kHz). The choice of audio quality is connected to the needs of the...

  19. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...73.757(b)(2), notes 1 and 2. (3) Audio-frequency band. The quality of service, using digital source coding within...codec (of the order of 3 kHz). The choice of audio quality is connected to the needs of the...

  20. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...73.757(b)(2), notes 1 and 2. (3) Audio-frequency band. The quality of service, using digital source coding within...codec (of the order of 3 kHz). The choice of audio quality is connected to the needs of the...

  1. HF radar observations of the high-latitude ionospheric convection pattern in the morning sector for northward IMF and motion of the convection reversal boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, J. P. S.; Rodger, A. S.; Pinnock, M.

    1999-07-01

    Observations of plasma convection in the morning sector (0000 to 0600 magnetic local time (MLT)) during a period of northward IMF (Bz=+5 to +10 nT) on September 11, 1991, made with the conjugate HF radars at Goose Bay and Halley and supplemented by DMSP plasma flow data, are described. There are several interesting features of the data: the period over which large (>500 m/s) plasma flow velocities are maintained while the IMF is northward; the range of latitudes over which the convection is observed; and the short timescale responses to changes in IMF conditions. The period was characterized by several strong (+/-10 nT) reversals of IMF By and an absence of substorm activity, as seen in geostationary satellite particle data. The effects of these By reversals and the motion of the convection reversal boundary (CRB, the boundary between eastward flow at lower latitudes and westward flow at higher latitudes) are examined. A significant crosscorrelation is found between IMF By and the latitude of the CRB. The observed short time delays and other features are consistent with convection driven by lobe cell merging.

  2. New evidences of ocean surface current processes in the SE Bay of Biscay, using HF radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solabarrieta, Lohitzune; Rubio, Anna; Cardenas, Mar; Méndez, Fernando J.; Esnaola, Ganix; Castanedo, Sonia; Ferrer, Luis; Medina, Raul

    2015-04-01

    High Frequency Radar (HFR) data in the south-eastern Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) offer, since 2009, a new approach to the temporal and spatial variability of the ocean surface processes in the area. Past studies have already described the main characteristics of the surface and subsurface water circulation over the shelf and slope. As they were mainly based upon punctual in time or in space in-situ measurements, the 5 year-long hourly HFR-derived velocity fields analyzed here, contribute considerably to the understanding of surface current patterns in the HFR footprint area. New evidence is given, over different time-scales, on the main ocean surface processes, in an area where surface currents show marked temporal and spatial variability. With cyclonic (anticyclonic) patterns during winter (summer) months, the analysis of lowpass ?ltered currents shows that a key component of this seasonal variability is associated with the surface signature of the Iberian Poleward Current (IPC). Clearly intensi?ed over the upper part of the slope, this current circulates eastward off the Spanish coast and northward over the French shelves and slopes in winter. In order to complete the previous descriptions, a K-means clustering technique, has been applied to HFR and wind data (from the Weather Research and Forecasting model). The results of the K-means analysis offer a deeper insight into the surface circulation patterns together with the wind patterns, after analyzing the occurrence probabilities of the radar current groups into the wind groups. In addition, a composite analysis based on a daily-scale winter-time series of the IPC for the 2009-2012 period deduced from satellite SST data and the low-passed surface currents, allows to identify the surface currents residuals related to the IPC. This HFR network offers data operationally, being, nowadays a key component of the Basque Ocean Observing System, and highly valuable for operational purposes.

  3. Integration of radar altimeter, precision navigation, and digital terrain data for low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Avionic systems that depend on digitized terrain elevation data for guidance generation or navigational reference require accurate absolute and relative distance measurements to the terrain, especially as they approach lower altitudes. This is particularly exacting in low-altitude helicopter missions, where aggressive terrain hugging maneuvers create minimal horizontal and vertical clearances and demand precise terrain positioning. Sole reliance on airborne precision navigation and stored terrain elevation data for above-ground-level (AGL) positioning severely limits the operational altitude of such systems. A Kalman filter is presented which blends radar altimeter returns, precision navigation, and stored terrain elevation data for AGL positioning. The filter is evaluated using low-altitude helicopter flight test data acquired over moderately rugged terrain. The proposed Kalman filter is found to remove large disparities in predicted AGL altitude (i.e., from airborne navigation and terrain elevation data) in the presence of measurement anomalies and dropouts. Previous work suggested a minimum clearance altitude of 220 ft AGL for a near-terrain guidance system; integration of a radar altimeter allows for operation of that system below 50 ft, subject to obstacle-avoidance limitations.

  4. Statistical analysis of digital Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithack, J.

    1985-08-01

    Statistical characteristics of X-Band radar data taken with digital SLAR were analyzed. It is shown that gray value distributions of range strips (50 pixels wide) and of distributed targets are sufficiently described by a normal distribution. Errors of 1st and 2nd kind were evaluated to judge the possibilities of classification, to define the minimum characteristic area of a surface type, and to judge internal equality of different surface types and equality of surface data over range after radiometric correction. A method to derive a correction factor from the SLAR data is demonstrated. This factor comprises system characteristics and geometry parameters only. A calibration concept is described, and requirements concerning calibration normals and overall accuracy are derived from the results of the data analysis.

  5. Digital processing considerations for extraction of ocean wave image spectra from raw synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahaie, I. J.; Dias, A. R.; Darling, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The digital processing requirements of several algorithms for extracting the spectrum of a detected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image from the raw SAR data are described and compared. The most efficient algorithms for image spectrum extraction from raw SAR data appear to be those containing an intermediate image formation step. It is shown that a recently developed compact formulation of the image spectrum in terms of the raw data is computationally inefficient when evaluated directly, in comparison with the classical method where matched-filter image formation is an intermediate result. It is also shown that a proposed indirect procedure for digitally implementing the same compact formulation is somewhat more efficient than the classical matched-filtering approach. However, this indirect procedure includes the image formation process as part of the total algorithm. Indeed, the computational savings afforded by the indirect implementation are identical to those obtained in SAR image formation processing when the matched-filtering algorithm is replaced by the well-known 'dechirp-Fourier transform' technique. Furthermore, corrections to account for slant-to-ground range conversion, spherical earth, etc., are often best implemented in the image domain, making intermediate image formation a valuable processing feature.

  6. The derivation of a sub-canopy digital terrain model of a flooded forest using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc Lee; Gesch, Dean B.

    1990-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar data from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B Mission were combined with the tide surface information to create a digital terrain model for a 70-km by 40-km section of the Mouths of the Ganges forests in southern Bangladesh. The dominance of the interaction phenomenon (canopy to surface or surface to canopy reflection) in flooded forests was exploited to create sub-canopy flood boundary maps for two different tide times. The boundary maps were digitally combined in x, y, z space with tide elevation models created from tide gauge data gridding the survey site and used as input to interpolation routines to create a terrain model. The end product represents a significant step in our ability to characterize the topography and hydrology of wetland ecosystems. The model derived here can be used for simulating tidal flow and nutrient transport from the forest to the marine habitat.

  7. A model for radar images and its application to adaptive digital filtering of multiplicative noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Stiles, J. A.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Standard image processing techniques which are used to enhance noncoherent optically produced images are not applicable to radar images due to the coherent nature of the radar imaging process. A model for the radar imaging process is derived in this paper and a method for smoothing noisy radar images is also presented. The imaging model shows that the radar image is corrupted by multiplicative noise. The model leads to the functional form of an optimum (minimum MSE) filter for smoothing radar images. By using locally estimated parameter values the filter is made adaptive so that it provides minimum MSE estimates inside homogeneous areas of an image while preserving the edge structure. It is shown that the filter can be easily implemented in the spatial domain and is computationally efficient. The performance of the adaptive filter is compared (qualitatively and quantitatively) with several standard filters using real and simulated radar images.

  8. Integration of radar altimeter, precision navigation, and digital terrain data for low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    A Kalman filter for the integration of a radar altimeter into a terrain database-dependent guidance system was developed. Results obtained from a low-altitude helicopter flight test data acquired over moderately rugged terrain showed that the proposed Kalman filter removes large disparities in predicted above-ground-level (AGL) altitude in the presence of measurement anomalies and dropouts. Integration of a radar altimeter makes it possible to operate a near-terrain guidance system at or below 50 ft (subject to obstacle-avoidance limitations), whereas without radar altimeter integration, a minimum clearance altitude of 220 AGL is needed, as is suggested by previous work.

  9. Radar Imaging Systems Joseph Charpentier

    E-print Network

    Radar Imaging Systems Joseph Charpentier Department of Computing Sciences Villanova University types of radar imaging systems; synthetic aperture radar (SAR), through-the-wall radar, and digital holographic near field radar. Each system surveyed experiments that improved the quality of the resulting

  10. VOLUME 78, NUMBER 5 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 3 FEBRUARY 1997 Multifrequency Doppler Radar Observations of Electron Gyroharmonic Effects

    E-print Network

    Doppler Radar Observations of Electron Gyroharmonic Effects during Electromagnetic Pumping the first detailed mul- tifrequency HF Doppler radar (MDR) studies of elec- tron gyroharmonic effects) Experimental results of multifrequency HF Doppler radar studies during electromagnetic pumping

  11. Low resolution radar digital interface. [with data recorder for precipitation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This document describes the design and operation of a low resolution radar data recording system for precipitation measurements. This system records a full azimuth scan on seven track magnetic tapes every five minutes. It is designed to operate on a continuous basis with operator intervention required only for changing tape reels and calibration.

  12. High resolution vertical profiles of wind, temperature and humidity obtained by computer processing and digital filtering of radiosonde and radar tracking data from the ITCZ experiment of 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, E. F.; Hipskind, R. S.; Gaines, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from computer processing and digital filtering of radiosonde and radar tracking data obtained during the ITCZ experiment when coordinated measurements were taken daily over a 16 day period across the Panama Canal Zone. The temperature relative humidity and wind velocity profiles are discussed.

  13. Using X-band Weather Radar Measurements to Monitor the Integrity of Digital Elevation Models for Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Further, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a realtime monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around the Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  14. Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Airborne Radar Using SweepSAR Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Chuang, Chung-Lun; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavey, Brandon A.; Lin, Lung-Sheng S.; Quaddus, Momin

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes a frequency-scaled SweepSAR demonstration that operates at Ka-Band (35.6 GHz), and closely approximates the DESDynl mission antenna geometry, scaled by 28. The concept relies on the SweepSAR measurement technique. An array of digital receivers captures waveforms from a multiplicity of elements. These are combined using digital beamforming in elevation and SAR processing to produce imagery. Ka-band (35.6 GHz) airborne SweepSAR using array-fed reflector and digital beamforming features eight simultaneous receive beams generated by a 40-cm offset-fed reflector and eight-element active array feed, and eight digital receiver channels with all raw data recorded and later used for beamforming. Illumination of the swath is accomplished using a slotted-waveguide antenna radiating 250 W peak power. This experiment has been used to demonstrate digital beamforming SweepSAR systems.

  15. Observations and characterization of HAARP induced F-region decameter scale plasma density irregularities using the new imaging capabilities of the Kodiak Island SuperDARN radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parris, R. T.; Bristow, W. A.

    2009-12-01

    The SuperDARN HF radar on Kodiak Island was upgraded with a new digital receiver system in May 2008. This new system improves on the old time delay beam former by treating each antenna in the radar’s array as an individual sensor, rather than treating the entire array as a single sensor. Given the array geometry, this new receiver system provides radar echo signals along 35 unique baseline separations. The phase of the echo signals along these baselines is used to create images of the target distribution within the radar field-of-view. Hyper-spectral estimation techniques are applied to the spatial phase information to create radar images with significantly better resolution than standard beam forming techniques. A new digital up converter system, installed concurrently with the digital receiver system, allows radar transmit beam broadening to illuminate a larger azimuth. In the case of HAARP, the entire interaction region can now be illuminated by the Kodiak radar with a single beam, rather than over several beams. This broader transmitter beam, combined with hyper spectral radar imaging, allows observations of the whole F-region HAARP interaction region with better temporal and spatial resolutions than were previously possible. Since the imaging receivers were installed, there have been a number of HAARP campaigns that have yielded observations under a range of conditions, including various HAARP transmitter frequencies, and different background environment conditions. This presentation describes the SuperDARN imaging system and compares observations from selected intervals.

  16. A Digital Elevation Model of the Greenland Ice Sheet based on Envisat and CryoSat-2 Radar Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sørensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Forsberg, R.

    2014-12-01

    With the launch of the first radar altimeter by ESA in 1992, more than two decades of radar altimetry data are now available. Therefore, one goal of ESA's Ice Sheet Climate Change Initiative is the estimation of surface elevation changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) based on ERS-1, -2, Envisat, CryoSat-2, and, in the longer term, Sentinel-3 data. This will create a data record from 1992 until present date. In addition to elevation-change records, such data can be processed to produce digital elevation models, or DEMs, of the ice sheets. The DEMs can be used to correct radar altimetry data for slope-induced errors resulting from the large footprint (e.g. 2-10 km for Envisat vs. 60 m for ICESat laser altimetry) or to correct for the underlying surface topography when applying the repeat-track method. DEMs also provide key information in e.g. SAR remote sensing of ice velocities to remove the interferograms' topographic signal or in regional climate modeling. This work focuses on the development of a GrIS DEM from Envisat and CryoSat-2 altimetry, corrected with temporally and spatially coincident NASA ICESat, ATM, and LVIS laser data. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km and the reference year 2010. It is based on 2009 and 2010 data, the 2009 data adjusted to 2010 by accounting for the intermediate elevation changes. This increases the spatial data coverage and reduces data errors. The GIMP DEM has been corrected for negative elevations and errors in the north, and used to constrain the final DEM. The recently acquired observations and increased data coverage give a strong advantage to this DEM relative to previous models, based on lower-resolution, more temporally scattered data (e.g. a decade of observations or only ICESat data, limited to three annual 35-day acquisition periods). Furthermore, as surface changes occur continuously, an up-to-date DEM is necessary to correctly constrain the observations, thereby ensuring an accurate change detection or modeling process.

  17. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Rosen, Paul A.; Caro, Edward; Crippen, Robert; Duren, Riley; Hensley, Scott; Kobrick, Michael; Paller, Mimi; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Roth, Ladislav; Seal, David; Shaffer, Scott; Shimada, Joanne; Umland, Jeffrey; Werner, Marian; Oskin, Michael; Burbank, Douglas; Alsdorf, Douglas

    2007-06-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission produced the most complete, highest-resolution digital elevation model of the Earth. The project was a joint endeavor of NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies and flew in February 2000. It used dual radar antennas to acquire interferometric radar data, processed to digital topographic data at 1 arc sec resolution. Details of the development, flight operations, data processing, and products are provided for users of this revolutionary data set.

  18. Lunar Radar Cross Section at Low Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Kennedy, E. J.; Kossey, P.; McCarrick, M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Tokarev, Y. V.

    2002-01-01

    Recent bistatic measurements of the lunar radar cross-section have extended the spectrum to long radio wavelength. We have utilized the HF Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) radar facility near Gakona, Alaska to transmit high power pulses at 8.075 MHz to the Moon; the echo pulses were received onboard the NASA/WIND spacecraft by the WAVES HF receiver. This lunar radar experiment follows our previous use of earth-based HF radar with satellites to conduct space experiments. The spacecraft was approaching the Moon for a scheduled orbit perturbation when our experiment of 13 September 2001 was conducted. During the two-hour experiment, the radial distance of the satellite from the Moon varied from 28 to 24 Rm, where Rm is in lunar radii.

  19. Investigation and Development of Data-Driven D-Region Model for HF Systems Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.; Sojka, J. J.; Hunsucker, R. D.

    2002-01-01

    Space Environment Corporation (SEC) and RP Consultants (RPC) are to develop and validate a weather-capable D region model for making High Frequency (HF) absorption predictions in support of the HF communications and radar communities. The weather-capable model will assimilate solar and earth space observations from NASA satellites. The model will account for solar-induced impacts on HF absorption, including X-rays, Solar Proton Events (SPE's), and auroral precipitation. The work plan includes: I . Optimize D-region model to quickly obtain ion and electron densities for proper HF absorption calculations. 2. Develop indices-driven modules for D-region ionization sources for low, mid, & high latitudes including X-rays, cosmic rays, auroral precipitation, & solar protons. (Note: solar spectrum & auroral modules already exist). 3. Setup low-cost monitors of existing HF beacons and add one single-frequency beacon. 4. Use PENEX HF-link database with HF monitor data to validate D-region/HF absorption model using climatological ionization drivers. 5. Develop algorithms to assimilate NASA satellite data of solar, interplanetary, and auroral observations into ionization source modules. 6. Use PENEX HF-link & HF-beacon data for skill score comparison of assimilation versus climatological D-region/HF absorption model. Only some satellites are available for the PENEX time period, thus, HF-beacon data is necessary. 7. Use HF beacon monitors to develop HF-link data assimilation algorithms for regional improvement to the D-region/HF absorption model.

  20. Superconductor Digital-RF Receiver Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhanov, Oleg A.; Kirichenko, Dmitri; Vernik, Igor V.; Filippov, Timur V.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Webber, Robert; Dotsenko, Vladimir; Talalaevskii, Andrei; Tang, Jia Cao; Sahu, Anubhav; Shevchenko, Pavel; Miller, Robert; Kaplan, Steven B.; Sarwana, Saad; Gupta, Deepnarayan

    Digital superconductor electronics has been experiencing rapid maturation with the emergence of smaller-scale, lower-cost communications applications which became the major technology drivers. These applications are primarily in the area of wireless communications, radar, and surveillance as well as in imaging and sensor systems. In these areas, the fundamental advantages of superconductivity translate into system benefits through novel Digital-RF architectures with direct digitization of wide band, high frequency radio frequency (RF) signals. At the same time the availability of relatively small 4K cryocoolers has lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled digital electronic systems. Recently, we have achieved a major breakthrough in the development, demonstration, and successful delivery of the cryocooled superconductor digital-RF receivers directly digitizing signals in a broad range from kilohertz to gigahertz. These essentially hybrid-technology systems combine a variety of superconductor and semiconductor technologies packaged with two-stage commercial cryocoolers: cryogenic Nb mixed-signal and digital circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, room-temperature amplifiers, FPGA processing and control circuitry. The demonstrated cryocooled digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals in X-band and performing signal acquisition in HF to L-band at ˜30GHz clock frequencies.

  1. Bistatic radar sea state monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruck, G. T.; Barrick, D. E.; Kaliszewski, T.

    1972-01-01

    Bistatic radar techniques were examined for remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean. One technique operates at high frequencies (HF), 3-30 MHz, and the other at ultrahigh frequencies (UHF), approximately 1 GHz. Only a preliminary theoretical examination of the UHF technique was performed; however the principle underlying the HF technique was demonstrated experimentally with results indicating that an HF bistatic system using a surface transmitter and an orbital receiver would be capable of measuring the two-dimensional wave height spectrum in the vicinity of the transmitter. An HF bistatic system could also be used with an airborne receiver for ground truth ocean wave spectrum measurements. Preliminary system requirements and hardware configurations are discussed for both an orbital system and an aircraft verification experiment.

  2. High-frequency radar observations of ocean surface currents.

    PubMed

    Paduan, Jeffrey D; Washburn, Libe

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the discovery, development, and use of high-frequency (HF) radio wave backscatter in oceanography. HF radars, as the instruments are commonly called, remotely measure ocean surface currents by exploiting a Bragg resonant backscatter phenomenon. Electromagnetic waves in the HF band (3-30 MHz) have wavelengths that are commensurate with wind-driven gravity waves on the ocean surface; the ocean waves whose wavelengths are exactly half as long as those of the broadcast radio waves are responsible for the resonant backscatter. Networks of HF radar systems are capable of mapping surface currents hourly out to ranges approaching 200 km with a horizontal resolution of a few kilometers. Such information has many uses, including search and rescue support and oil-spill mitigation in real time and larval population connectivity assessment when viewed over many years. Today, HF radar networks form the backbone of many ocean observing systems, and the data are assimilated into ocean circulation models. PMID:22809196

  3. The accuracy of using the spectral width boundary measured in off-meridional SuperDARN HF radar beams as a proxy for the open-closed field line boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisham, G.; Freeman, M. P.; Sotirelis, T.; Greenwald, R. A.

    2005-10-01

    Determining reliable proxies for the ionospheric signature of the open-closed field line boundary (OCB) is crucial for making accurate measurements of magnetic reconnection. This study compares the latitudes of spectral width boundaries (SWBs) measured by different beams of the Goose Bay radar of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), with the latitudes of OCBs determined using the low-altitude Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, in order to determine whether the accuracy of the SWB as a proxy for the ionospheric projection of the OCB depends on the line-of-sight direction of the radar beam. The latitudes of SWBs and OCBs were identified using automated algorithms applied to 5 years (1997 2001) of data measured in the 1000 1400 magnetic local time (MLT) range. Six different Goose Bay radar beams were used, ranging from those aligned in the geomagnetic meridional direction to those aligned in an almost zonal direction. The results show that the SWB is a good proxy for the OCB in near-meridionally-aligned beams but becomes progressively more unreliable for beams greater than 4 beams away from the meridional direction. We propose that SWBs are identified at latitudes lower than the OCB in the off-meridional beams due to the presence of high spectral width values that result from changes in the orientation of the beams with respect to the gradient in the large-scale ionospheric convection pattern. Keywords. Ionosphere (Instruments and techniques; Plasma convection) Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers)

  4. Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency radar

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency radar measured by a high-frequency (HF) radar. The Ocean Surface Current Radar (OSCR) was deployed at the U M2 surface tidal current amplitudes in the far field ($40 km) of the radar domain are consistent

  5. Supermarine Spitfire HF VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1944-01-01

    Supermarine Spitfire HF VII: This Supermarine Spitfire HF VII was one of high-altitude versions of the famous fighter, its normal elliptical wingtips replaced by extended 'pointed' tips for its high-altitude role. This is one of the Langley aircraft that has survived. It is in the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum's collection.

  6. Aircraft radar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, Helmut E.

    1987-04-01

    Many changes have taken place in airborne radar antennas since their beginnings over forty years ago. A brief historical review of the advances in technology is presented, from mechanically scanned reflectors to modern multiple function phased arrays. However, emphasis is not on history but on the state-of-the-art technology and trends for future airborne radar systems. The status of rotating surveillance antennas is illustrated by the AN/APY-1 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) slotted waveguide array, which achieved a significant breakthrough in sidelobe suppression. Gimballed flat plate arrays in nose radomes are typified by the AN/APG-66 (F-16) antenna. Multifunction phased arrays are presented by the Electronically Agile Radar (EAR) antenna, which has achieved significant advances in performance versatility and reliability. Trends toward active aperture, adaptive, and digital beamforming arrays are briefly discussed. Antennas for future aircraft radar systems must provide multiple functions in less aperture space, and must perform more reliably.

  7. Linearization using Digital Predistortion of a High-Speed, Pulsed, Radio Frequency Power Amplifier for VHF Radar Depth-Sounder Systems

    E-print Network

    Player, Kevin

    2010-03-29

    Depth-sounding radar systems provide the scientific data that are useful in modeling polar ice sheets and predicting sea-level rise. These radars are typically deployed on crewed aircraft; however, crewed missions over polar regions are difficult...

  8. Digital Base Band Converter As Radar Vlbi Backend / Dbbc K? Ciparošanas Sist?ma Radara Vlbi Nov?rojumiem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccari, G.; Bezrukovs, Vl.; Nechaeva, M.

    2012-12-01

    A digital base band converter (DBBC) system has been developed by the Istituto di Radioastronomia (Noto, Italy) for increasing the sensitivity of European VLBI Network (EVN) by expanding the full observed bandwidth using numerical methods. The output data rate of this VLBI-backend is raised from 1 to 4 Gbps for each radiotelescope. All operations related to the signal processing (frequency translation, amplification, frequency generation with local oscillators, etc.) are transferred to the digital domain, which allows - in addition to well-known advantages coming from digital technologies - achieving better repeatability, precision, simplicity, etc. The maximum input band of DBBC system is 3.5 GHz, and the instantaneous bandwidth is up to 1 GHz for each radio frequency/intermediate frequency (RF/IF) out of the eight possible. This backend is a highly powerful platform for other radioastronomy applications, and a number of additional so-called personalities have been developed and used. This includes PFB (polyphase filter bank) receivers and Spectra for high resolution spectroscopy. An additional new development with the same aim - to use the DBBC system as a multi-purpose backend - is related to the bi-static radar observations including Radar VLBI. In such observations it is possible to study the population of space debris, with detection of even centimetre class fragments. A powerful transmitter is used to illuminate the sky region to be analyzed, and the echoes coming from known or unknown objects are reflected to one or more groundbased telescopes thus producing a single-dish or interferometric detection. The DBBC Radar VLBI personality is able to realize a high-resolution spectrum analysis, maintaining in the central area the echo signal at the expected frequency including the Doppler shift of frequency. For extremely weak signals a very large integration time is needed, so for this personality different input parameters are provided. The realtime information can then allow exploring easily the desired range of search for unknown or not fully determined orbit objects. These features make Radar VLBI personality most useful in the space debris measurements. DBBC sist?ma izstr?d?ta Noto Radioastronomijas instit?t?. Sist?mas galvenaisuzdevums - palielin?t visa Eiropas VLBI t?kla jut?bu - realiz?ts, palielinotvisas nov?rojam?s joslas platumu un pielietojot ciparu sign?lu apstr?des metodes.Izejas datu pl?sma palielin?ta no 1 l?dz 4 Gbps katram radioteleskopam un visasoper?cijas, kas saist?tas ar sign?lu apstr?di (frekvences p?rveidošana, pastiprin?jums,iekš?jie ?eneratori, utt.), realiz?tas digit?l? form?, kas ?auj ieg?t noz?m?gusuzlabojumus atk?rtojam?b?, precizit?t?, vienk?rš?b?, nemaz neminot visp?rzin?m?spriekšroc?bas, ko nodrošina digit?lo tehnolo?iju izmantošana. Maksim?l? ieejassign?la frekven?u josla ir 3.5 GHz, un moment?nais joslas platums ir l?dz 1 GHz uzkatru no asto?iem iesp?jamajiem RF/IF kan?liem. Š? datu re?istr?cijas sist?ma ir?oti veiktsp?j?ga platforma ne tikai EVN, bet ar? citiem radioastronomijas pielietojumiem,un papildus tiek izstr?d?ta vesela virkne programmat?ras pakot?u, kasv?l vair?k paplašina sist?mas funkcionalit?ti. Tas ietver PFB (Polif?zes FiltruBanka) uztv?r?jus "Spectra”, kas piem?roti augstas izš?irtsp?jas spektroskopijasvajadz?b?m. Papildus realiz?ts jaunas programmat?ras risin?jums, ar m?r?iizmantot DBBC sist?mu k? daudzfunkcion?lu datu ciparošanas iek?rtu, kasizmantojama bistatiskiem radara nov?rojumiem, tai skait? ar? rad

  9. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Model (DEM): A Year 2000 Global Baseline for Measuring Topographic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippen, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    The SRTM DEM is the first near-global, high-resolution elevation model. The data were acquired in February 2000 aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour and cover the Earth's land masses between 60N and 56S latitudes at about 30 meters spatial resolution. The data are a virtual global snapshot in that they were acquired in about 10 days by a single sensor. Absolute vertical accuracy was targeted at 16 meters. However, spatially broad temporal changes in topography have been detected and measured down to about one-meter precision by comparing the SRTM DEM to the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED). NED has similar spatial properties, but was independently derived, commonly years (or decades) earlier. Such changes already noted include those related to volcanic processes, alluvial fan deposition, subsidence related to oil extraction, and direct anthropogenic changes such as landfills and major road cuts and fills. Large tectonic changes in topography are likewise potentially evident in such comparisons. New and forthcoming satellites include capabilities to produce elevation models that can be used to detect and measure ongoing and future topographic change when compared to the SRTM DEM. For example, the ASTER instrument on the Terra satellite (launched in 1999) produces targeted DEMs, and SPOT-5 (launched in 2002) is expected to produce a global DEM over a five-year period. Both of these DEM sources (and the NED and others) use optical wavelength sensors which may "observe a different surface" than the SRTM radar, particularly in heavily vegetated areas, and this must be considered in making the comparisons. However, having a "before" data set is often the roadblock in measuring change, and SRTM has now provided the first detailed "before" DEM for most of Earth's land surface.

  10. Application of ground-penetrating radar, digital optical borehole images, and cores for characterization of porosity hydraulic conductivity and paleokarst in the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents examples of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data from two study sites in southeastern Florida where karstic Pleistocene platform carbonates that comprise the unconfined Biscayne aquifer were imaged. Important features shown on resultant GPR profiles include: (1) upward and lateral qualitative interpretative distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity; (2) paleotopographic relief on karstic subaerial exposure surfaces; and (3) vertical stacking of chronostratigraphic high-frequency cycles (HFCs). These characteristics were verified by comparison to rock properties observed and measured in core samples, and identified in digital optical borehole images. Results demonstrate that an empirical relation exists between measured whole-core porosity and hydraulic conductivity, observed porosity on digital optical borehole images, formation conductivity, and GPR reflection amplitudes-as porosity and hydraulic conductivity determined from core and borehole images increases, formation conductivity increases, and GPR reflection amplitude decreases. This relation allows for qualitative interpretation of the vertical and lateral distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within HFCs. Two subtidal HFCs in the uppermost Biscayne aquifer have significantly unique populations of whole-core porosity values and vertical hydraulic conductivity values. Porosity measurements from one cycle has a median value about two to three times greater than the values from the other HFC, and median values of vertical hydraulic-conductivity about three orders of magnitude higher than the other HFC. The HFC with the higher porosity and hydraulic conductivity values is shown as a discrete package of relatively low-amplitude reflections, whereas the HFC characterized by lower porosity and hydraulic-conductivity measurements is expressed by higher amplitude reflections. Porosity and hydraulic-conductivity values measured from whole-core samples, and vuggy porosity identified on digital borehole images from shallowing-upward, peritidal HFCs show that the highest porosity occurs at the base of the cycles, moderate porosity at the middle of the cycles, and lowest porosity occurs at the top of cycles. Hydraulic conductivity is also highest at the base of the peritidal cycles and lowest in the middle to upper parts of cycles. This change in porosity and hydraulic conductivity from bottom to top is visible as an upward variation in reflection amplitude on GPR profiles-lowest amplitudes at the base and highest at the cycle tops. This study demonstrates that GPR can be used to show the qualitative distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within a cycle-stratigraphic framework composed of carbonate HFCs. The distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within HFCs is related to depositional textures. The upward and lateral patterns of the rock facies within the HFCs can be translated to geophysical-log properties and radar facies configurations that could aid in interpretation and prediction of ground-water flow through a carbonate aquifer. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitive radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meer, David E.

    Prospective sensitive radar technologies with sensors operating at both RF and laser frequencies will enhance target detection, localization, classification, identification, and tracking capabilities. Ultrawideband radars operating at lower frequencies promise to detect stealthy targets and furnish simpler, lower cost, more reliable radars which can perform many of the functions of current high resolution radars. High resolution RF sensors for real-time recognition of noncooperative targets will be critical in future engagements, allowing detection of targets hidden in folliage. Laser radar technology will have its greatest impact in cruise missile and robotic vehicle navigation.

  12. Radar vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykin, Simon

    The novel idea called radar vision is introduced. The goal of radar vision is to make radar into an intelligent remote-sensing device that is capable of cognition of the surrounding environment. The attributes of radar as an electromagnetic sensor are reviewed, and the possibility of radar learning from the environment is discussed. The issues of time and knowledge processing and the incorporation of feedback are addressed. The facilities in place at McMaster University for research into the development and perfection of a radar vision system are described. The IPIX radar and the systolic-based computing machinery, which play critical and complementary roles, are described. The IPIX radar permits the collection and invaluable real-life data on the ocean environment and radar targets of interest under varying conditions. The systolic-radar computing machinery processes this database in near real time and computes the neural-network-based algorithms that are designed to perform the different functions of radar vision.

  13. HF wideband modem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellins, V.; Anderson, P. H.; Sandler, M. N.

    1982-04-01

    This was an engineering effort to design, simulate, implement and test two HF modems capable of sustaining data rates of 4800 b/s or greater over standard 3 KHz HF channels. The first twelve months of effort encompassed propagation analysis, modulation waveform parameter selection overall modem and decision feedback equalizer (DFE) design, error control study, computer simulation, and real-time hardware and software design tasks. Subsequent work included the real-time modem implementation, preliminary (factory) acceptance testing and final (RADC DICEF) acceptance testing tasks. Also an initial live link test was included. The two identical high data rate HF modem (HFWBM) terminals offer reliable data communication at rates above 1 b/s/Hz over practical HF radio circuits. The characteristics and performance of the HFWBM have been shown to meet or exceed all contrast specifications. Under the contract operation at 2400 b/s and 4800 b/s were requirements, while operation at 9600 b/s in a 3 kHz channel was stated as a design goal. The HFWBM has been demonstrated to be capable of sustaining rates of 2400 b/s, 4800 b/s, 7200 b/s and 9600 b/s in 3 kHz channels. An innovation developed in this effort, a square-root Kalman equalizer adaptation algorithm, has been shown to have the tracking agility and stability characteristics required to successfully follow the time-varying HF channel.

  14. Temporal Development of HF-Excited Langmuir and Ion Turbulence at Arecibo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuth, F. T.; DuBois, D. F.

    2015-10-01

    The Arecibo high-power, high-frequency (HF) facility and 430 MHz radar are used to examine the temporal development of the HF-induced Langmuir and ion turbulences from 1 ms to many minutes after the turn-on of the HF beam in the F region. All HF observations begin in a smooth, stratified, stable plasma. "Cold start" HF transmissions are employed to avoid remnant irregularities from prior HF transmissions. HF-excited plasma line (HFPL) and ion line echoes are used to monitor the evolution of the turbulence. In the evening/nighttime the HFPL develops in three reproducible stages. Over time scales of 0 to 10-20 ms (possibly 40 ms), the smooth plasma conditions are maintained, and the results are consistent with theoretical models of the excitation of strong Langmuir turbulence near HF reflection. This entails the initiation of the so-called "caviton production cycle." The turbulence from the parametric decay instability is detected at lower altitudes where the radar wave vector matches those of the HF-enhanced waves. The data suggests that the two processes coexist in the region in between. After ~40 ms the "overshoot process" begins and consists of a downward extension of the HFPL from the HF reflection region to heights ~1.1 km below followed by a retreat back to the reflection region. The whole overshoot process takes place over a time scale of ~3 s. Thereafter the echo remains near HF reflection for 20-90 s after HF turn-on. The HFPL echo subsequently breaks up into patches because of the formation of large-scale electron density structures in the plasma. New kinetic models indicate that suprathermal electrons excited in the plasma by, for example, caviton burn-out serve to regulate plasma turbulence in the modified ionospheric volume.

  15. Radar image registration and rectification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, M.; Stromberg, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Two techniques for radar image registration and rectification are presented. In the registration method, a general 2-D polynomial transform is defined to accomplish the geometric mapping from one image into the other. The degree and coefficients of the polynomial are obtained using an a priori found tiepoint data set. In the second part of the paper, a rectification procedure is developed that models the distortion present in the radar image in terms of the radar sensor's platform parameters and the topographic variations of the imaged scene. This model, the ephemeris data and the digital topographic data are then used in rectifying the radar image. The two techniques are then used in registering and rectifying two examples of radar imagery. Each method is discussed as to its benefits, shortcomings and registration accuracy.

  16. Magnetic zenith effect in the ionospheric modification by an X-mode HF heater wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Haggstrom, I.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    We report experimental results aimed at an investigation of the magnetic zenith effect in the high latitude ionosphere F region from ionospheric modification by powerful HF heater wave with X-polarization. The ionospheric modification was produced by the HF heating facility at Tromsø (Norway) using the phased array with a narrow beam with of 6 degrees. Effective radiated power was varied between 450 and 1000 MW. The HF pump wave radiated in different directions relative to the magnetic field from 90 degrees (vertical) to 78 degrees (magnetic zenith) at frequencies near or above the ordinary-mode critical frequency. The response of the ionosphere plasma to the HF pump wave impact was checked by the UHF incoherent scatter radar located in the immediate vicinity of the HF heater. UHF radar was probing the plasma parameters, such as electron density and temperature (Ne and Te), HF-induced plasma and ion lines in the altitude range from 90 to 600 km. It was running in a scanning mode when UHF radar look angles were changed from 74 to 90 degrees by 1 or 2 degree step. It was clearly demonstrated that the strongest heater-induced effects took place in the magnetic field-aligned direction when HF pointing was also to the magnetic zenith. It was found that strong Ne enhancement of up to 80 % along magnetic field (artificial density ducts) were excited only under HF pumping towards magnetic zenith. The width of the artificial ducts comes to only 2 degrees. The Ne increases were accompanied by the Te enhancements of up to about 50 %. Less pronounced Te increases were also observed in the directions of 84 and 90 degrees. Strong Ne enhancements can be accompanied by excitation of strong HF-induced plasma and ion lines. Thus experimental results obtained points to the strong magnetic zenith effect due to self-focusing powerful HF radio wave with X-mode polarization.

  17. Application of ground scatter returns for calibration of HF interferometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Pavlo; Nishitani, Nozomu; Oinats, Alexey V.; Tsuya, Taishi; St.-Maurice, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Information on the vertical angle of arrival (elevation) is crucial in determining propagation modes of high-frequency (HF, 3-30 MHz) radio waves travelling through the ionosphere. The most advanced network of ionospheric HF radars, SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network), relies on interferometry to measure elevation, but this information is rarely used due to intrinsic difficulties with phase calibration as well as with the physical interpretation of the measured elevation patterns. In this work, we propose an empirical method of calibration for SuperDARN interferometry. The method utilises a well-defined dependence of elevation on range of ground scatter returns. "Fine tuning" of the phase is achieved based on a detailed analysis of phase fluctuation effects at very low elevation angles. The proposed technique has been successfully applied to data from the mid-latitude Hokkaido East SuperDARN radar. It can also be used at any other installation that utilises HF interferometry.

  18. A combined quality-control methodology in Ebro Delta (NE Spain) high frequency radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Soto-Navarro, J.; Alvarez-Fanjul, E.

    2015-08-01

    Ebro River Delta is a relevant marine protected area in the western Mediterranean. In order to promote the conservation of its ecosystem and support operational decision making in this sensitive area, a three site standard-range (13.5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde High Frequency (HF) radar was deployed in 2013. Since there is a growing demand for reliable HF radar surface current measurements, the main goal of this work is to present a combined quality control methodology. Firstly, one year-long (2014) real-time web monitoring of nonvelocity-based diagnostic parameters is conducted in order to infer both radar site status and HF radar system performance. Signal-to-noise ratio at the monopole exhibited a consistent monthly evolution although some abrupt decreases (below 10 dB), occasionally detected in June for one of the radar sites, impacted negatively on the spatiotemporal coverage of total current vectors. It seemed to be a sporadic episode since radar site overall performance was found to be robust during 2014. Secondly, a validation of HF radar data with independent in situ observations from a moored current meter was attempted for May-October 2014. The accuracy assessment of radial and total vectors revealed a consistently high agreement. The directional accuracy of the HF radar was rated at better than 8°. The correlation coefficient and RMSE values emerged in the ranges 0.58-0.83 and 4.02-18.31 cm s-1, respectively. The analysis of the monthly averaged current maps for 2014 showed that the HF radar properly represented basic oceanographic features previously reported, namely: the predominant southwestward flow, the coastal clockwise eddy confined south of Ebro Delta mouth or the Ebro River impulsive-type freshwater discharge. Future works should include the use of verified HF radar data for the rigorous skill assessment of operational ocean circulation systems currently running in Ebro estuarine region like MyOcean IBI.

  19. All-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar

    E-print Network

    Zou, Weiwen; Long, Xin; Zhang, Siteng; Cui, Yuanjun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Radar has been widely used in military, security, and rescue. Metamaterial cloak is employed in stealth targets to evade radar detection. Hence modern radar should be reconfigurable at multi-bands for detecting stealth targets, which might be realized based on microwave photonics. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar architecture. It is a coherent system utilizing one mode-locked laser for both signal generation and reception. Heterodyning of two individually filtered optical pulses that are pre-chirped via wavelength-to-time mapping generates wideband linearly-chirped radar signal. The working bands can be flexibly tailored with desired bandwidth at user-preferred carrier frequency. After modulated onto the pre-chirped optical pulse, radar echoes are time-stretched and frequency-compressed by several times. The digitization becomes much easier without loss of detection ability. We believe that the demonstration can innovate the radar's architecture with ultra-high range resolution.

  20. Data volume reduction for imaging radar polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A. (Inventor); Held, Daniel N. (Inventor); van Zul, Jakob J. (Inventor); Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); Norikane, Lynne (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Two alternative methods are disclosed for digital reduction of synthetic aperture multipolarized radar data using scattering matrices, or using Stokes matrices, of four consecutive along-track pixels to produce averaged data for generating a synthetic polarization image.

  1. Data volume reduction for imaging radar polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A. (inventor); Held, Daniel N. (inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (inventor); Dubois, Pascale C. (inventor); Norikane, Lynne (inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Two alternative methods are presented for digital reduction of synthetic aperture multipolarized radar data using scattering matrices, or using Stokes matrices, of four consecutive along-track pixels to produce averaged data for generating a synthetic polarization image.

  2. Illumination of the Air Environment Using Radiation of HF Broadcast Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, V. I.; Lutsenko, I. V.; Popov, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the possibility of using illumination of the HF broadcast stations for location of air objects. The relationships for estimation of the detection range are obtained and requirements for the degree of suppression of a direct signal from the broadcast station are determined. Spectral characteristics of the signals from HF broadcast stations are studied experimentally for different polarizations of the received radiation. The possibility of air object detection using the Doppler effect is shown. Theoretical estimates of the radar cross section of air objects for different polarizations of the incident radiation are given. It is found experimentally that the radar cross section is about the same for the vertical and horizontal polarizations.

  3. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  4. Artificial ionospheric mirrors for radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Robert D.; Wallace, Tom; Stewart, Clayton V.; Lallement, Pierre; Koert, Peter

    1990-10-01

    Recognition of performance limitations associated with traditional skywave over-the-horizon (OTH) HF radars has led a number of investigators to propose the creation of an Artificial Ionospheric Mirror (AIM) in the upper atmosphere, in order to reflect ground-based radar signals for OTH surveillance. The AIM is produced by beaming sufficient electromagnetic power to the lower ionosphere (around 70 km) to enhance the in situ ionization level to 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) electrons/cu cm, thereby providing an ionized layer capable of reflecting radar frequencies of 5 to 90 MHz. A baseline AIM system concept and an associated performance evaluation are presented, based upon the relevant ionization and propagation physics and in the context of air surveillance for the cruise missile threat. Results of the subject indicate that a system using this concept would both complement and enhance the performance of the existing skywave OTH radars.

  5. A MIMO FMCW radar approach to HFSWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, J. O.; Zölzer, U.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we propose one possible approach how to apply the concept of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) to monostatic Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) High-Frequency Surface Wave Radar (HFSWR) in a maritime environment. Common tasks for a HFSWR are sea-state monitoring and ship detection, where our focus is on ship detection. A limiting factor in HFSWR is the available bandwidth, which is inversely proportional to the range resolution capability of the radar and typical below 100 kHz. The question is how to extend or combine a conventional single-input multiple-output (SIMO) FMCW phased-array type radar with stretch processing and the colocated MIMO concept to "reuse" the very limited HF radar band resources. Another important question to answer is how MIMO FMCW waveforms can be separated at the receiver.

  6. Empirical Study of the Multiaxial, Thermomechanical Behavior of NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, Dhwanil; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stebner Aaron P.

    2013-01-01

    An empirical study was conducted to characterize the multiaxial, thermomechanical responses of new high temperature NiTiHf alloys. The experimentation included loading thin walled tube Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 29.7)Hf(sub 20) alloy samples along both proportional and nonproportional axial-torsion paths at different temperatures while measuring surface strains using stereo digital image correlation. A Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 33.7)Hf(sub 16) alloy was also studied in tension and compression to document the effect of slightly depleting the Hf content on the constitutive responses of NiTiHf alloys. Samples of both alloys were made from nearly texture free polycrystalline material processed by hot extrusion. Analysis of the data shows that very small changes in composition significantly alter NiTiHf alloy properties, as the austenite finish (Af) temperature of the 16-at Hf alloy was found to be approximately 60 C less than the 20-at Hf alloy (approximately 120 C vs. 180 C). In addition, the 16-at Hf alloy exhibited smaller compressive transformation strains (2 vs. 2.5 percent). Multi-axial characterization of the 20-at % Hf alloy showed that while the random polycrystal transformation strains in tension (4 percent) and compression (2.5 percent) are modest in comparison with binary NiTi (6 percent, 4 percent), the torsion performance is superior (7 vs. 4 shear strain width to the pseudoelastic plateau).

  7. Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear

    E-print Network

    Marsden, Jerrold

    Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear Dynamics run-off which is a typical source of pollution in the bay. We show that a HF radar-based pollution release scheme using this flow structure reduces the impact of pollution on the coastal envi- ronment

  8. Condor equatorial electrojet campaign: Radar results

    SciTech Connect

    Kudeki, E.; Fejer, B.G.; Farley, D.T.; Hanuise, C.

    1987-12-01

    A review of the experimental and theoretical background to the Condor equatorial electrojet compaign is followed by the presentation and discussion of VHF radar interferometer and HF radar backscatter data taken concurrently with two rocket in situ experiments reported in companion papers (Pfaff et al., this issue (a, b). Both experiments were conducted in strongly driven periods with the on-line radar interferometer displaying signatures of what has been interpreted in earlier radar work (Kudeki et al., 1982) as kilometer scale gradient drift waves. Low-frequency density fluctuations detected by in situ rocket sensors confirm the earlier interpretation. VHF radar/rocket data comparisons also indicate the existence of a turbulent layer in the upper portion of the daytime electrojet at about 108 km altitude driven purely by the two-stream instability. Nonlinear mode coupling of linearly growing two-stream waves to linearly damped 3-m vertical modes could account for the radar echoes scattered from this layer, which showed no indication of large-scale gradient drift waves. Nonlinear mode coupling may therefore compete with the wave-induced anomalous diffusion mechanism proposed recently by Sudan (1983) for the saturation of directly excited two-stream waves. Nighttime radar data show a bifurcated layer with the two parts having comparable echo strength but oppositely directed zonal drift velocities. The lower layer shows narrow backscatter spectra; the upper layer is characterized by kilometer scale waves and vertically propagating type 1 waves.

  9. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    E-print Network

    J. E. Lawler; E. A. Den Hartog; Z. E. Labby; C. Sneden; J. J. Cowan; I. I. Ivans

    2006-11-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf/La) = -0.13 +/- 0.02 (sigma = 0.06) and log epsilon (Hf/Eu) = +0.04 +/- 0.02 (sigma = 0.06). The observed average stellar abundance ratio of Hf/Eu and La/Eu is larger than previous estimates of the solar system r-process-only value, suggesting a somewhat larger contribution from the r-process to the production of Hf and La. The newly determined Hf values could be employed as part of the chronometer pair, Th/Hf, to determine radioactive stellar ages.

  10. A FOUNDATION FOR ORBITAL RADAR SOUNDING OF EUROPA FROM NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE BROADBAND DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF TERRESTRIAL POLAR ICE CORES. David E.

    E-print Network

    Stillman, David E.

    A FOUNDATION FOR ORBITAL RADAR SOUNDING OF EUROPA FROM NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE BROADBAND DIELECTRIC. The planned Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) will include HF/VHF radar sounders to probe the ice shell. Knowledge-concentration ranges of the ice shell is critical for both predicting the success of these radar sounders

  11. Radar vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykin, Simon

    1989-09-01

    This paper describes work undertaken at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) at McMaster University on a radar-based intelligent remote sensing device that is capable of developing an understanding or cognition of the surrounding environment. The proposed system has three levels of processing: (1) low level vision will perform preprocessing on incoming data; (2) intermediate level vision will perform feature extraction and target tracking; and (3) high level vision will perform knowledge processing for the purpose of target interpretation. A feedback link from this latter stage allows the radar to be automatically reconfigured for a different look at the target. Interactive probing of the potential target will continue until target recognition occurs. A sophisticated coherent cross polarizing radar with pulse compression capabilities, IPIX, has been developed and successfully tested in an ice infested marine environment off Newfoundland. Image analysis for IPIX is implemented on a Warp systolic machine, a highly parallel processor designed for vision research. A comparison between radar and human vision systems is provided.

  12. Sea surface currents detection with WERA et Stradivarius oceanographic radars Institute : Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, University of Toulon (La Garde)

    E-print Network

    and oil spills, optimization of maritime routes, tsunamis early warning systems, etc). In the HF frequency of electromagnetic wave interaction with the ocean surface in the HF regime 2) the techniques of extraction for the surface current in cas of a bistatic radar with periodic array of antennas. The extraction algorithm

  13. UAS-Based Radar Sounding of Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, R. D.; Keshmiri, S.; Leuschen, C.; Ewing, M.; Yan, J. B.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Gogineni, S.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Kansas Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets developed two Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) to support polar research. We developed a mid-range UAS, called the Meridian, for operating a radar depth sounder/imager at 195 MHz with an eight-element antenna array. The Meridian weighs 1,100 lbs, has a 26-foot wingspan, and a range of 950 nm at its full payload capacity of 120 lbs. Ice-penetrating radar performance drove the configuration design, though additional payloads and sensors were considered to ensure adaptation to multi-mission science payloads. We also developed a short range UAS called the G1X for operating a low-frequency radar sounder that operates at 14 and 35 MHz. The G1X weighs 85 lbs, has a 17-foot wingspan, and a range of about 60 nm per gallon of fuel. The dual-frequency HF/VHF radar depth sounder transmits at 100 W peak power at a pulse repetition frequency of 10 KHz and weighs approximately 4.5 lbs. We conducted flight tests of the G1X integrated with the radar at the Sub-glacial Lake Whillans ice stream and the WISSARD drill site. The tests included pilot-controlled and fully autonomous flights to collect data over closely-spaced lines to synthesize a 2-D aperture. We obtained clear bed echoes with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 50 dB at this location. These are the first-ever successful soundings of glacial ice with a UAS-based radar. Although ice attenuation losses in this location are low in comparison to more challenging targets, in-field performance improvements to the UAS and HF/VHF radar system enabled significant gains in the signal-to-noise ratio, such that the system can now be demonstrated on more challenging outlet glaciers. We are upgrading the G1X UAS and radar system for further tests and data collection in Greenland. We are reducing the weight and volume of the radar, which, when coupled with further reductions in airframe and avionics weight and a larger fuel bladder, will offer extended range. Finally, we are increasing the radar transmit peak power to about 250-500 W using high-efficiency power amplifiers and hardening the aircraft actuators for potential electromagnetic interference. The main focus of the Spring 2015 deployment is to collect fine-resolution data near the outlet and grounding lines of Kangiata Nunaata Sermia (KNS) glacier in Greenland.

  14. Digital communications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boorstyn, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported dealing with problems of digital data transmission and computer communications networks. The results of four individual studies are presented which include: (1) signal processing with finite state machines, (2) signal parameter estimation from discrete-time observations, (3) digital filtering for radar signal processing applications, and (4) multiple server queues where all servers are not identical.

  15. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J. (principal investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Average radar response for L-band like polarized system appeared to be related to the watershed runoff coefficients when the viewing angle was approximately 42 deg off nadir. Four requirements for radar systems used to verify applications of active microwave for water resources were identified: (1) first generation digital data will be required; (2) radar should be calibrated both internally and externally; (3) new systems should avoid radom use; and (4) images should be geometrically rectified prior to delivery to the user.

  16. Multispectral microwave imaging radar for remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Rawson, R.; Ausherman, D.; Bryan, L.; Porcello, L.

    1974-01-01

    A multispectral airborne microwave radar imaging system, capable of obtaining four images simultaneously is described. The system has been successfully demonstrated in several experiments and one example of results obtained, fresh water ice, is given. Consideration of the digitization of the imagery is given and an image digitizing system described briefly. Preliminary results of digitization experiments are included.

  17. Generating nonlinear FM chirp radar signals by multiple integrations

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    A phase component of a nonlinear frequency modulated (NLFM) chirp radar pulse can be produced by performing digital integration operations over a time interval defined by the pulse width. Each digital integration operation includes applying to a respectively corresponding input parameter value a respectively corresponding number of instances of digital integration.

  18. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  19. Satellite remote sensing of landscape freeze/thaw state dynamics for complex Topography and Fire Disturbance Areas Using multi-sensor radar and SRTM digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podest, Erika; McDonald, Kyle; Kimball, John; Randerson, James

    2003-01-01

    We characterize differences in radar-derived freeze/thaw state, examining transitions over complex terrain and landscape disturbance regimes. In areas of complex terrain, we explore freezekhaw dynamics related to elevation, slope aspect and varying landcover. In the burned regions, we explore the timing of seasonal freeze/thaw transition as related to the recovering landscape, relative to that of a nearby control site. We apply in situ biophysical measurements, including flux tower measurements to validate and interpret the remotely sensed parameters. A multi-scale analysis is performed relating high-resolution SAR backscatter and moderate resolution scatterometer measurements to assess trade-offs in spatial and temporal resolution in the remotely sensed fields.

  20. INTEGRATED CONTROL OF COMBINED SEWER REGULATORS USING WEATHER RADAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated operation was simulated of ten dynamic combined sewer regulators on a Montreal interceptor. Detailed review of digital recording weather radar capabilities indicated that it is potentially the best rainfall estimation means for accomplishing the runoff prediction that ...

  1. Radar image processing module development program, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using charge coupled devices in an IPM for processing synthetic aperture radar signals onboard the NASA Convair 990 (CV990) aircraft was demonstrated. Radar data onboard the aircraft was recorded and processed using a CCD sampler and digital tape recorder. A description of equipment and testing was provided. The derivation of the digital presum filter was documented. Photographs of the sampler/tape recorder, real time display and circuit boards in the IPM were also included.

  2. HF ground scatter from the polar cap: Ionospheric propagation and ground surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, P. V.; St. Maurice, J.-P.; Hussey, G. C.; Koustov, A. V.

    2010-10-01

    In addition to being scattered by the ionospheric field-aligned irregularities, HF radar signals can be reflected by the ionosphere toward the Earth and then scattered back to the radar by the rugged ground surface. These ground scatter (GS) echoes are responsible for a substantial part of the returns observed by HF radars making up the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). While a GS component is conventionally used in studying ionosphere dynamics (e.g., traveling ionospheric disturbances, ULF waves), its potential in monitoring the state of the scattering surface remains largely unexploited. To fill this gap, we investigated diurnal and seasonal variation of the ground echo occurrence and location from a poleward-looking SuperDARN radar at Rankin Inlet, Canada. Using colocated ionosonde information, we have shown that seasonal and diurnal changes in the high-latitude ionosphere periodically modulate the overall echo occurrence rate and spatial coverage. In addition, characteristics of GS from a particular geographic location are strongly affected by the state of the underlying ground surface. We have shown that (1) ice sheets rarely produce detectable backscatter, (2) mountain ranges are the major source of GS as they can produce echoes at all seasons of the year, and (3) sea surface becomes a significant source of GS once the Arctic sea ice has melted away. Finally, we discuss how the obtained results can expand SuperDARN abilities in monitoring both the ionosphere and ground surface.

  3. Radar studies related to the earth resources program. [remote sensing programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, J.

    1972-01-01

    The radar systems research discussed is directed toward achieving successful application of radar to remote sensing problems in such areas as geology, hydrology, agriculture, geography, forestry, and oceanography. Topics discussed include imaging radar and evaluation of its modification, study of digital processing for synthetic aperture system, digital simulation of synthetic aperture system, averaging techniques studies, ultrasonic modeling of panchromatic system, panchromatic radar/radar spectrometer development, measuring octave-bandwidth response of selected targets, scatterometer system analysis, and a model Fresnel-zone processor for synthetic aperture imagery.

  4. HF echoes from ionization potentially produced by high-altitude discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Symbalisty, E.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors report on recent radar measurements taken during the month of October 1994 with the LDG HF radar in the Ivory Coast, Africa as part of the International Equatorial Electrojet Year. The purpose of this experimental effort in part was to study the effects of thunderstorms on the ionosphere. At the same time, the authors decided to carry out a set of experiments of an exploratory nature to look for echoes that could potentially arise from ionization produced in the mesosphere. The two leading candidates for producing transient ionization in the mesosphere are meteors and high-altitude discharges. Each is discussed in the context of these measurements.

  5. Observation and theory of the radar aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Sahr, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma density irregularities occurring near the Aurora Borealis cause scattering of HF, VHF, and UHF radio waves. Analysis of the resulting radar signal provides great detail about the spatial and temporal characteristics of these auroral E region irregularities. Observations are presented of the radar aurora from recent campaigns in northern Sweden. After reviewing the basic theory and observations of auroral electrojet irregularities, a simple nonlinear fluid theory of electrojet ion-acoustic waves is introduced, and reduced to a form of the three-wave interaction equations. This theory provides a simple mechanism for excitation of linearly stable waves at large aspect and flow angles, as well as a prediction of the power spectra that a coherent scatter radar should observe. In addition, this theory may be able to account for type 3 waves without resorting to ion gyro modes, such as the electrostatic ion-cyclotron wave. During the course of the research a simple new radar transmitting mode and signal processing algorithm was generated which very simply solves a frequency aliasing problem that often occurs in CUPRI auroral radar studies. Several new radar data analysis routines were developed, including the principally cross-beam image and scatter plots of the second versus first moments of the power spectrum of the irregularities. Analysis of vertical interferometer data shows that type 3 waves originate at ordinary electrojet altitudes, not in the upper E region, from which it is concluded that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron mode does not generate type 3 waves. The measured height of type 3 waves and other spectral analyses provide support for the pure ion-acoustic theory of type 3 waves. Suggestions are offered for hardware improvements to the CUPRI radar, new experiments to test new and existing theories.

  6. Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research

    SciTech Connect

    Held, D.N.; Gasparovic, R.F.; Mansfield, A.W.; Melville, W.K.; Mollo-Christensen, E.L.; Zebker, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Radar non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare (NAASW) became the subject of considerable scientific investigation and controversy in the West subsequent to the discovery by the Seasat satellite in 1978 that manifestations of underwater topography, thought to be hidden from the radar, were visible in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean. In addition, the Seasat radar produced images of ship wakes where the observed angle between the wake arms was much smaller than expected from classical Kelvin wake theory. These observations cast doubt on the radar oceanography community's ability to adequately explain these phenomena, and by extension on the ability of existing hydrodynamic and radar scattering models to accurately predict the observability of submarine-induced signatures. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW is indeed a potentially significant tool in detecting submerged operational submarines, then the Soviet capability, as evidenced throughout this report, will be somewhat daunting. It will be shown that the Soviets have extremely fine capabilities in both theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics, that Soviet researchers have been conducting at-sea radar remote sensing experiments on a scale comparable to those of the United States for several years longer than we have, and that they have both an airborne and spaceborne SAR capability. The only discipline that the Soviet Union appears to be lacking is in the area of digital radar signal processing. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW can have at most a minimal impact on the detection of submerged submarines, then the Soviet effort is of little consequence and poses not threat. 280 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Radar echo processing with partitioned de-ramp

    DOEpatents

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2013-03-19

    The spurious-free dynamic range of a wideband radar system is increased by apportioning de-ramp processing across analog and digital processing domains. A chirp rate offset is applied between the received waveform and the reference waveform that is used for downconversion to the intermediate frequency (IF) range. The chirp rate offset results in a residual chirp in the IF signal prior to digitization. After digitization, the residual IF chirp is removed with digital signal processing.

  8. Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Sathishkumar

    Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN) S. Sathishkumar1, R. Dhanya1, K. Emperumal1, D. Tiwari2, S. Gurubaran1 and A. Bhattacharyya2 1. Equatorial Geophysical Research Laboratory, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli, India 2. Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai, India Email: sathishmaths@gmail.com Abstract The equatorial atmosphere-ionosphere system has been studied theoretically and observationally in the past. In the equatorial atmosphere, oscillations with periods of 3-4 days are often observed in the medium frequency (MF) radar over Tirunelveli (8.7oN, 77.8oE, 1.34oN geomag. lat.). Earlier observations show the clear evidence that these waves can propagate from the stratosphere to ionosphere. A digital ionosonde has been providing useful information on several ionospheric parameters from the same site. Simultaneous observations of mesospheric winds using medium frequency radar and F-layer height (h'F) from ionosonde reveal that the 3-4 day wave was evident in both the component during the 01 June 2007 and 31 July 2007. The 3-4 day wave could have an important role in the day to day variability of the equatorial ionosphere evening uplift. Results from an extensive analysis that is being carried out in the direction of 3-4 day wave present in the ionosphere will be presented.

  9. A 35 GHz seeker testbed radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eison, Edward F.

    1987-01-01

    A tactically sized 35 GHz millimeter wave (MMW) radar sensor has been developed by Martin Marietta Orlando Aerospace to demonstrate functional performance in a compact package. Due to the increased emphasis on packaging, we designed this sensor to meet all required performance parameters and still fit within the seeker envelope of most modern-guided weapons. An envelope of 7 inches diameter x 17 inches long was achieved by employing a planar array monopulse antenna and microwave integrated circuits (MIC) for the transmitter and receiver. The radar sensor is fully coherent, dual circular polarized, and includes a two channel monopulse receiver. A nontactically configured programmable digital signal processor was developed for use with the radar sensor to form a complete testbed radar seeker.

  10. Method for orthorectification of terrestrial radar maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaud, Marion; Rouveure, Raphaël; Faure, Patrice; Moiroux-Arvis, Laure; Monod, Marie-Odile

    2014-11-01

    The vehicle-based PELICAN radar system is used in the context of mobile mapping. The R-SLAM algorithm allows simultaneous retrieval of the vehicle trajectory and of the map of the environment. As the purpose of PELICAN is to provide a means for gathering spatial information, the impact of distortion caused by the topography is not negligible. This article proposes an orthorectification process to correct panoramic radar images and the consequent R-SLAM trajectory and radar map. The a priori knowledge of the area topography is provided by a digital elevation model. By applying the method to the data obtained from a path with large variations in altitude it is shown that the corrected panoramic radar images are contracted by the orthorectification process. The efficiency of the orthorectification process is assessed firstly by comparing R-SLAM trajectories to a GPS trajectory and secondly by comparing the position of Ground Control Points on the radar map with their GPS position. The RMS positioning error moves from 5.56 m for the raw radar map to 0.75 m for the orthorectified radar map.

  11. NASA experimental airborne doppler radar and real time processor for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Philip H.; Richards, Mark A.; Jones, William R.; Crittenden, Lucille H.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: experimental radar system capabilities; an experimental radar system block diagram; wind shear radar signal and data processor (WRSDP); WRSDP hardware architecture; WRSDP system design goals; DSP software development tools; OS-9 software development tools; WRSDP digital signal processing; WRSDP display operational modes; WRSDP division of functions; structure of WRSDP signal and data processing algorithms; and the wind shear radar flight experiment.

  12. Processing for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lybanon, M.

    1973-01-01

    The data handling and processing in using synthetic aperture radar as a satellite-borne earth resources remote sensor is considered. The discussion covers the nature of the problem, the theory, both conventional and potential advanced processing techniques, and a complete computer simulation. It is shown that digital processing is a real possibility and suggests some future directions for research.

  13. Shuttle imaging radar-C science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) mission will yield new and advanced scientific studies of the Earth. SIR-C will be the first instrument to simultaneously acquire images at L-band and C-band with HH, VV, HV, or VH polarizations, as well as images of the phase difference between HH and VV polarizations. These data will be digitally encoded and recorded using onboard high-density digital tape recorders and will later be digitally processed into images using the JPL Advanced Digital SAR Processor. SIR-C geologic studies include cold-region geomorphology, fluvial geomorphology, rock weathering and erosional processes, tectonics and geologic boundaries, geobotany, and radar stereogrammetry. Hydrology investigations cover arid, humid, wetland, snow-covered, and high-latitude regions. Additionally, SIR-C will provide the data to identify and map vegetation types, interpret landscape patterns and processes, assess the biophysical properties of plant canopies, and determine the degree of radar penetration of plant canopies. In oceanography, SIR-C will provide the information necessary to: forecast ocean directional wave spectra; better understand internal wave-current interactions; study the relationship of ocean-bottom features to surface expressions and the correlation of wind signatures to radar backscatter; and detect current-system boundaries, oceanic fronts, and mesoscale eddies. And, as the first spaceborne SAR with multi-frequency, multipolarization imaging capabilities, whole new areas of glaciology will be opened for study when SIR-C is flown in a polar orbit.

  14. Thermal response of the F region ionosphere in artificial modification experiments by HF radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantas, G. P.; Lahoz, C. H.; Carlson, H. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal response of the nighttime F region ionosphere to local heating by HF radio waves has been observed with the incoherent scatter radar at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The observations consist of high-resolution space and time variation of the electron temperature as a high-power HF transmitter is switched on and off with a period 240 s. As soon as the HF transmitter is turned on, the electron temperature begins to rise rapidly in a narrow altitude region near 300 km, below the F2 layer peak. The electron temperature perturbation subsequently spreads over a broader altitude region. The observations are compared with the anticipated thermal response of the ionosphere based on numerical solutions of the coupled time-dependent heat conduction equations for the electron and composite ion gases and are found to be in good agreement over the entire altitude region covered by the observations.

  15. Radar investigation of barium releases over Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuth, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) El Coqui rocket campaign was successfully carried out in Puerto Rico during the period 18 May through 12 July 1992. This report describes five chemical release experiments in the upper ionosphere supported by Geospace Research, Inc. during the El Coqui campaign. Additional spin-off science is also discussed. The El Coqui releases are designated AA-1 (rocket 36-082), AA-2 (rocket 36-081), AA-3b (rocket 36-064), AA-4 (rocket 36-065), and AA-7 (rocket 36-083). Particular attention is paid to releases AA-2 and AA-4. These two experiments involved the illumination of ionospheric release regions with powerful high-frequency (HF) radio waves transmitted from the Arecibo HF facility. In the AA-2 experiment, microinstabilities excited by the HF wave in a Ba(+) plasma were examined. This release yielded a smooth plasma cloud that helped clarify several fundamental issues regarding the physics of wave plasma instabilities. During AA-2 extremely strong HF-induced Langmuir turbulence was detected with the Arecibo 430 MHz radar. CF3Br was released in the AA-4 study to create an ionospheric hole that focused the HF beam. This experiment successfully explored wave-plasma coupling in an O(+) ionosphere under conditions of very high HF electric field strengths.

  16. KAGUYA Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) observation of lunar surface echo and its calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Ryeol Lee, Seung

    2015-04-01

    Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) is an HF radar of which the center frequency of transmitted pulse is 5 MHz. LRS was installed to KAGUYA which flew to the Moon in 2007. During the operation period of 19 months, LRS performed radar sounding observation from the orbit at the nominal altitude of 100 km to cover whole surface of the Moon with its foot print. The total number of LRS observations (pulse transmissions) exceeded 10^8. We extracted the nadir surface echo out of each observation which made a surface echo map of the Moon, i.e. a mosaic image of the Moon of an HF frequency (5 MHz). The observed surface echoes carry information regarding lunar surface and that of shallow subsurface (near-surface) whose depth scale is smaller than the range resolution of the LRS (~ 150 m in vacuum). An inversion algorithm is applied to extract such information. However, inversion algorithms often assume a simple model of Fresnel reflection. One should remove the effect of surface roughness from the LRS data before practicing inversion. For this purpose, we carried out simulation of LRS observation to evaluate the surface roughness effect on the LRS data quantitatively. The simulation is based on Kirchhoff approximation theory. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of KAGUYA Terrain Camera (TC) mission was used in the simulation to simulate the actual lunar terrain. LRS observation simulation was performed in the range from -90 to 70 degrees in longitude and in the range from -30 to 70 degrees in latitude at every 0.1 degree interval in both directions. The simulation revealed 1) LRS surface echo observation is sensible to the surface terrain: even wrinkle ridges and small craters are well recognized in the mosaic image of simulation surface echo map. 2) Little difference was found in the mosaic image of an old mare surface and a young mare surface. 3) However, apparent difference was found in the shape of the distribution functions of echo intensity of an old mare surface and a young mare surface. We used the simulation result to remove the surface roughness effect on the LRS data to obtain the plane surface echo intensity. The resultant data revealed 1) Highland surface presents weak echo intensity than mare surface. 2) Young mare surface presents more intense echo than old mare surface. 3) Some areas in maria presents significantly weak echo than surrounding mare surface. These findings are attributed to the property of near-surface subsurface. Our inversion found that the young mare surface material has larger permittivity than the old mare surface material.

  17. Space shuttle synthetic aperture radar. [using real time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Results of a feasibility study to investigate a digital signal processor for real-time operation with a synthetic aperture radar system aboard the space shuttle are presented. Pertinent digital processing theory, a description of the proposed system, and size, weight, power, scheduling, and development estimates are included.

  18. A Comparative Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation Study of the Nuclear Quadrupole Interaction in HfF4·HF·2H2O Using 180mHf and 181Hf(?-)181Ta as Nuclear Probes: Is Ta an Innocent Spy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Tilman; Das, Satyendra K.; Manzhur, Yurij

    2009-02-01

    We report on a comparative study of the nuclear quadrupole interaction of the nuclear probes 180mHf and 181Hf(? -)181Ta in HfF4?HF?2H2O using time differential perturbed angular correlations (TDPAC) at 300 K. For the first probe, assuming a Lorentzian frequency distribution, we obtained ?Q= 103(4) Mrad/s, an asymmetry parameter ? = 0.68(3), a linewidth ? = 7.3(3.9)%, and full anisotropy within experimental accuracy. For the second probe, assuming a Lorentzian frequency distribution, we obtained three fractions: (1) with 56.5(7)%, ?Q= 126.64(4) Mrad/s and ? = 0.9241(4) with a rather small distribution ? = 0.40(8)% which is attributed to HfF4?HF?2H2O; (2) with 4.6(4)%, ?Q = 161.7(3) Mrad/s and ? = 0.761(4) assuming no line broadening which is tentatively attributed to a small admixture of Hf2OF6?H2O; (3) the remainder of 39.0(7)% accounts for a rapid loss of anisotropy and is modelled by a perturbation function with a sharp frequency multiplied by an exponential factor exp(-? t) with ? = 0.55(2) ns-1. Whereas the small admixture of Hf2OF6?H2O escapes detection by the 180mHf probe, there is no rapid loss of roughly half the anisotropy as is the case with 181Hf(? -)181Ta. This loss could in principle be due to fluctuating electric field gradients originating from movements of nearest neighbour HF adducts and/or H2O molecules after nuclear transmutation to the foreign atom Ta which are absent for the isomeric probe. Alternatively, paramagnetic Ta ions could lead to fluctuating magnetic dipole fields which, when combined with fluctuating electric field gradients, could also lead to a rapid loss of anisotropy. In any case, Ta is not an "innocent spy" in this compound. Although 180mHf is not a convenient probe for conventional spectrometers, the use of fast digitizers and software coincidences would allow to use all ? -quanta in the stretched cascade which would greatly improve the efficiency of the spectrometer. 180mHf could also serve as a Pu analogue in toxicity studies.

  19. The Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) With Applications for Laser Imaging and Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P.; Nicholas, A.; Thomas, L.; Davis, M.; Hoberman, C.; Davis, M.

    The Naval Research Laboratory will provide an orbiting calibration sphere to be used with ground-based laser imaging telescopes and HF radio systems. The Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) is a practical, reliable, high-performance HF calibration sphere and laser imaging target to orbit at about 600 km altitude. The sphere will be made of a spherical wire frame with aspect independent radar cross section in the 3 to 35 MHz frequency range. The necessary launch vehicle to place the PERCS in orbit will be provided by the Department of Defense Space Test Program. The expandable calibration target has a stowed diameter of 1 meter and a fully deployed diameter of 10.2 meters. A separate deployment mechanism is provided for the sphere. After deployment, the Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) with 180 vertices will be in a high inclination orbit to scatter radio pulses from a number of ground systems, including (1) over-the-horizon (OTH) radars operated by the United States and Australia; (2) high power HF facilities such as HAARP in Alaska, EISCAT in Norway, and Arecibo in Puerto Rico; (3) the chain of high latitude SuperDARN radars used for auroral region mapping; and (4) HF direction finding for Navy ships. With the PERCS satellite, the accuracy of HF radars can be periodically checked for range, elevation, and azimuth errors. In addition, each of the 360 vertices on the PERCS sphere will support an optical retro-reflector for operations with ground laser facilities used to track satellites. The ground laser systems will be used to measure the precise location of the sphere within one cm accuracy and will provide the spatial orientation of the sphere as well as the rotation rate. The Department of Defense facilities that can use the corner-cube reflectors on the PERCS include (1) the Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS), (2) the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), and (3) the NRL Optical Test Facility (OTF).

  20. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression technique could bring significant impact on future radar development. The novel feature of this innovation is the non-linear FM (NLFM) waveform design. The traditional linear FM has the limit (-20 log BT -3 dB) for achieving ultra-low-range sidelobe in pulse compression. For this study, a different combination of 20- or 40-microsecond chirp pulse width and 2- or 4-MHz chirp bandwidth was used. These are typical operational parameters for airborne or spaceborne weather radars. The NLFM waveform design was then implemented on a FPGA board to generate a real chirp signal, which was then sent to the radar transceiver simulator. The final results have shown significant improvement on sidelobe performance compared to that obtained using a traditional linear FM chirp.

  1. Signal Processing Techniques for a Planetary Subsurface Radar Onboard Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagitani, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagano, I.; Kojima, H.; Matsumoto, H.

    2001-12-01

    We are developing a satellite-borne HF ( ~ 10 MHz) radar system to be used to investigate planetary subsurface layered structures. Before deciding the design of a high-performance subsurface radar system, in this study we calculate the propagation and reflection characteristics of various HF radar pulses through subsurface layer models, in order to examine the wave forms and frequencies of the radar pulses suitable to discriminate and pick up weak subsurface echoes buried in stronger surface reflection and scattering echoes. In the numerical calculations the wave form of a transmitted radar pulse is first Fourier-transformed into a number of elementary plane waves having different frequencies, for each of which the propagation and reflection characteristics through subsurface layer models are calculated by a full wave analysis. Then the wave form of the reflected radar echo is constructed by synthesizing all of the elementary plane waves. As the transmitted pulses, we use several different types of wave form modulation to realize the radar pulse compression to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and time resolution of the subsurface echoes: the linear FM chirp (conventional), the M (maximal-length) sequence and the complementary sequences. We will discuss the characteristics of these pulse compression techniques, such as the improvement in the S/N ratio and the time resolution to identify the subsurface echoes. We will also present the possibility of applying the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) method to further improve both the S/N ratio and time resolution to extract the weaker subsurface echoes.

  2. Nostradamus: The radar that wanted to be a seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, Giovanni; Dorey, Philippe; Farges, Thomas; Lognonné, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Surface waves emitted after large earthquakes are known to induce, by dynamic coupling, atmospheric infrasonic waves propagating upward through the neutral and ionized atmosphere. Those waves have been detected in the past at ionospheric heights using a variety of techniques, such as HF Doppler sounding or GPS receivers. The HF Doppler technique, particularly sensitive to the ionospheric signature of Rayleigh waves is used here to show ionospheric perturbations consistent with the propagation of Rayleigh wave phases R1 and R2 following the Sumatra earthquake on the 28 March 2005 (M = 8.6). This is in our knowledge the first time that the phase R2 is detected by ionospheric sounding. In addition, we prove here that the ionospheric signature of R2 is also observed by over-the-horizon (OTH) Radar. The latter was never used before to detect seismic signature in the ionosphere. Adding the OTH Radar to the list of the “ionospheric seismometers” we discuss and compare the performances of the three different instruments mentioned above, namely HF Doppler sounding, GPS receivers and OTH radar.

  3. Radar images analysis for scattering surfaces characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Enrico

    1998-10-01

    According to the different problems and techniques related to the detection and recognition of airplanes and vehicles moving on the Airport surface, the present work mainly deals with the processing of images gathered by a high-resolution radar sensor. The radar images used to test the investigated algorithms are relative to sequence of images obtained in some field experiments carried out by the Electronic Engineering Department of the University of Florence. The radar is the Ka band radar operating in the'Leonardo da Vinci' Airport in Fiumicino (Rome). The images obtained from the radar scan converter are digitized and putted in x, y, (pixel) co- ordinates. For a correct matching of the images, these are corrected in true geometrical co-ordinates (meters) on the basis of fixed points on an airport map. Correlating the airplane 2-D multipoint template with actual radar images, the value of the signal in the points involved in the template can be extracted. Results for a lot of observation show a typical response for the main section of the fuselage and the wings. For the fuselage, the back-scattered echo is low at the prow, became larger near the center on the aircraft and than it decrease again toward the tail. For the wings the signal is growing with a pretty regular slope from the fuselage to the tips, where the signal is the strongest.

  4. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  5. Space Radar Image of Owens Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Owens Valley, near the town of Bishop, California that was created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this one are helpful to scientists because they clarify the relationships of the different types of surfaces detected by the radar and the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. The view is looking southeast along the eastern edge of Owens Valley. The White Mountains are in the center of the image, and the Inyo Mountains loom in the background. The high peaks of the White Mountains rise more than 3,000 meters (10,000 feet) above the valley floor. The runways of the Bishop airport are visible at the right edge of the image. The meandering course of the Owens River and its tributaries appear light blue on the valley floor. Blue areas in the image are smooth, yellow areas are rock outcrops, and brown areas near the mountains are deposits of boulders, gravel and sand known as alluvial fans. The image was constructed by overlaying a color composite radar image on top of a digital elevation map. The radar data were taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on board the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The elevation data were derived from a 1,500-km-long (930-mile) digital topographic map processed at JPL. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; and blue is the ratio of C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received to L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. This image is centered near 37.4 degrees north latitude and 118.3 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  6. Space Radar Image of Saline Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Saline Valley, about 30 km (19 miles) east of the town of Independence, California created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this one are helpful to scientists because they clarify the relationships of the different types of surfaces detected by the radar and the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. The view is looking southwest across Saline Valley. The high peaks in the background are the Inyo Mountains, which rise more than 3,000 meters (10,000 feet) above the valley floor. The dark blue patch near the center of the image is an area of sand dunes. The brighter patches to the left of the dunes are the dry, salty lake beds of Saline Valley. The brown and orange areas are deposits of boulders, gravel and sand known as alluvial fans. The image was constructed by overlaying a color composite radar image on top of a digital elevation map. The radar image was taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-bandSynthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on board the space shuttleEndeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was producedusing radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The elevation data were derived from a 1,500-km-long (930-mile) digital topographic map processed at JPL. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vetically received; and blue is the ratio of C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received to L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. This image is centered near 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  7. Imaging Radar Applications in the Death Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    1996-01-01

    Death Valley has had a long history as a testbed for remote sensing techniques (Gillespie, this conference). Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the valley since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of that technology. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in Death Valley because it has a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. In one of the classic references of these early radar studies, in a semi-quantitative way the response of an imaging radar to surface roughness near the radar wavelength, which typically ranges from about 1 cm to 1 m was explained. This laid the groundwork for applications of airborne and spaceborne radars to geologic problems in and regions. Radar's main advantages over other sensors stems from its active nature- supplying its own illumination makes it independent of solar illumination and it can also control the imaging geometry more accurately. Finally, its long wavelength allows it to peer through clouds, eliminating some of the problems of optical sensors, especially in perennially cloudy and polar areas.

  8. Ultrawideband radar clutter measurements of forested terrain, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, D.M.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, K.C.; Collins, H.D.

    1993-06-01

    The ultrawideband (UWB) radar clutter measurements project was conducted to provide radar clutter data for new ultrawideband radar systems which are currently under development. A particular goal of this project is to determine if conventional narrow band clutter data may be extrapolated to the UWB case. This report documents measurements conducted in 1991 and additional measurements conducted in 1992. The original project consisted of clutter measurements of forested terrain in the Olympic National Forest near Sequim, WA. The impulse radar system used a 30 kW peak impulse source with a 2 Gigasample/second digitizer to form a UHF (300--1000 MHz) ultrawideband impulse radar system. Additional measurements were conducted in parallel using a Systems Planning Corporation (SPC) step-chirp radar system. This system utilized pulse widths of 1330 nanoseconds over a bandwidth of 300--1000 MHz to obtain similar resolution to the impulse system. Due to the slow digitizer data throughput in the impulse radar system, data collection rates were significantly higher using the step-chirp system. Additional forest clutter measurements were undertaken in 1992 to increase the amount of data available, and especially to increase the amount of data from the impulse radar system.

  9. Lunar radar backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

  10. Radar Location Equipment Development Program: Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Davis, K.C.

    1985-06-01

    The work described in this report represents the first phase of a planned three-phase project designed to develop a radar system for monitoring waste canisters stored in a thick layer of bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The canisters will be contained in holes drilled into the floor of the underground waste storage facility. It is hoped that these measurements can be made to accuracies of +-5 cm and +-2/sup 0/, respectively. The initial phase of this project was primarily a feasibility study. Its principal objective was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the radar method in the planned canister monitoring application. Its scope included an investigation of the characteristics of radar signals backscattered from waste canisters, a test of preliminary data analysis methods, an assessment of the effects of salt and bentonite (a proposed backfill material) on the propagation of the radar signals, and a review of current ground-penetrating radar technology. A laboratory experiment was performed in which radar signals were backscattered from simulated waste canisters. The radar data were recorded by a digital data acquisition system and were subsequently analyzed by three different computer-based methods to extract estimates of canister location and tilt. Each of these methods yielded results that were accurate within a few centimeters in canister location and within 1/sup 0/ in canister tilt. Measurements were also made to determine the signal propagation velocities in salt and bentonite (actually a bentonite/sand mixture) and to estimate the signal attenuation rate in the bentonite. Finally, a product survey and a literature search were made to identify available ground-penetrating radar systems and alternative antenna designs that may be particularly suitable for this unique application. 10 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Surface current observations using high frequency radar and its assimilation into the New York Harbor Observing and Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    A surface current observation system based on high-frequency (HF) radar (CODAR) has been constructed for Raritan Bay, NJ; and the New York Bight (NYB) Apex. The availability of surface current data measured using HF radar in real-time over a synoptic scale makes it appropriate for data assimilation (DA). The present work is an attempt to validate HF radar data in the NYB Apex and to develop a practical, but still nearly optimal, method to assimilate HF radar data into an estuarine and coastal ocean circulation model in a tidally-dominated region of NY/NJ Harbor Estuary and the NYB Apex. This model, forced by an extensive real-time observational network, is called the New York Harbor Observing and Prediction System (NYHOPS). A nudging or Newtonian damping scheme is developed to assimilate HF radar data. A nudging parameter is introduced into the equations of motion which affects the model dynamics. The data is imparted to neighboring (three-dimensional) grid points via model dynamics. The effectiveness of HF radar DA is studied by computing the DA skill based on mean square error. A positive DA skill (0 -- 100%) represents an improvement in the model performance by HF radar DA. The HF radar data validation study showed a reasonable comparison between HF radar surface currents and near-surface in-situ currents obtained from one out of the two moorings. HF radar DA experiments focused on both the hindcasting as well as forecast capabilities of the NYHOPS model with respect to three regions; inner-shelf region (0 -- 30 m), mid-shelf (30 -- 90m), and outer-shelf (90 -- 120 m). For the inner-NJ shelf region, based on NYHOPS model hindcasts, a 40 day long DA study using HF radar data in Raritan Bay and the NYB Apex region yielded a DA skill of +22% for near-surface currents (with respect to mooring data), and +53% and +38% for near-surface temperature and salinity (with respect to Glider/fixed sensor data). Based on NYHOPS model forecasts, for the inner-NJ shelf region, another 120 days long DA study using HF radar data in the NYB region yielded a DA skill of +11% for near-surface currents (with respect to mooring data), and +10% and +16% for near-surface temperature and salinity (with respect to Glider/fixed sensor data). The DA skill for temperature and salinity is higher in the inner-NJ shelf (0 -- 30m) region and decreases steadily towards mid-NJ shelf (30 -- 90m) and outer-NJ shelf (90 -- 120m) regions. The nudging scheme is found to be robust and efficient for the NYHOPS model with minimum computational burden.

  12. Simultaneous Multi-angle Radar Observations of Langmuir Turbulence Excited by RF Ionospheric Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watanabe, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including cascade, collapse, and co-existence spectra and an outshifted plasma line under certain ionospheric conditions. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Bursty turbulence is observed in the collapse and cascade lines. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  13. Simultaneous Multi-angle Radar Observations of Langmuir Turbulence Excited by RF Ionospheric Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Watanabe, N.; Rayyan, N.; Spry, D.; Adham, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Spaleta, J.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including cascade, collapse, and co-existence spectra and an outshifted plasma line under certain ionospheric conditions. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Bursty turbulence is observed in the collapse and cascade lines. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  14. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  15. Topography from single radar images.

    PubMed

    Wildey, R L

    1984-04-13

    A mathematical theory and a corresponding numerical procedure have been developed to produce digital topography from radar images as digital photometric arrays. Thus, as radargrammetry is to photogrammetry, so radarclinometry is to photoclinometry. Photoclinometry encompasses a fundamental indeterminacy principle even for terrain that is homogeneous in normal albedo, because the surface normal consistent with a given reflected specific intensity is not unique. A geometric locus of such normal directions is implied, which generates a surface. For microwave backscatter, in specific application to radarclinometry, this surface is a cone whose half-angle is the incidence angle, whose axis contains the radar, and whose apex coincides with the terrain point. Although the indeterminacy can be removed if a properly directed profile of ground truth is available as a constraint, such is seldom the case. In its absence, an auxiliary assumption, such as that the strike line runs perpendicular to the illumination line, is needed. If metric integrity is a goal, then this is an absurd assumption. Herein, "the hypothesis of local cylindricity" has been assumed, a premise regarding the nature of topographic curvature that seems more realistic and that makes possible the production of topography as a set of parallel line integrals. PMID:17744680

  16. space Radar Image of Long Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An area near Long Valley, California, was mapped by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavor on April 13, 1994, during the first flight of the radar instrument, and on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the radar instrument. The orbital configurations of the two data sets were ideal for interferometric combination -- that is overlaying the data from one image onto a second image of the same area to create an elevation map and obtain estimates of topography. Once the topography is known, any radar-induced distortions can be removed and the radar data can be geometrically projected directly onto a standard map grid for use in a geographical information system. The 50 kilometer by 50 kilometer (31 miles by 31 miles) map shown here is entirely derived from SIR-C L-band radar (horizontally transmitted and received) results. The color shown in this image is produced from the interferometrically determined elevations, while the brightness is determined by the radar backscatter. The map is in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Elevation contour lines are shown every 50 meters (164 feet). Crowley Lake is the dark feature near the south edge of the map. The Adobe Valley in the north and the Long Valley in the south are separated by the Glass Mountain Ridge, which runs through the center of the image. The height accuracy of the interferometrically derived digital elevation model is estimated to be 20 meters (66 feet) in this image. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  17. Delineate subsurface structures with ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, D. E.; Hu, L. Z.; Ramaswamy, M.; Sexton, B. G.

    High resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina in late 1991 to demonstrate the radar techniques in imaging shallow utility and soil structures. Targets of interest at two selected sites, designated as H- and D-areas, were a buried backfilled trench, buried drums, geologic stratas, and water table. Multiple offset 2-D and single offset 3-D survey methods were used to acquire high resolution radar data. This digital data was processed using standard seismic processing software to enhance signal quality and improve resolution. Finally, using a graphics workstation, the 3D data was interpreted. In addition, a small 3D survey was acquired in The Woodlands, Texas, with very dense spatial sampling. This data set adequately demonstrated the potential of this technology in imaging subsurface features.

  18. A short history of geophysical radar at Arecibo Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    2013-03-01

    As Arecibo Observatory (AO) approaches its 50th anniversary, it is appropriate to review the many radars and ionospheric heaters that have been deployed on or near the 305 m dish and to summarize some of the innovative radar-based geophysical research that has resulted. The reasons William E. (Bill) Gordon developed the 305 m Arecibo dish are well known but are briefly reviewed. The early and then more recent radar/feed designs are reviewed as geophysical uses of Arecibo have evolved and as the full potential of the dish and nearby facilities was and is being realized from HF through S-band frequencies. This history surely has some gaps and there are a few mysteries. The community is encouraged to fill these gaps and to help complete the history.

  19. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  20. MAGNETOSPHERIC WAVE INJECTION BY MODULATED HF HEATING

    E-print Network

    MAGNETOSPHERIC WAVE INJECTION BY MODULATED HF HEATING OF THE AURORAL ELECTROJET A DISSERTATION in the Earth's magnetosphere. Experimental evidence is presented of the first HF heater generated signals the magnetospheric propagation paths and associated cold plasma densities. It is found that HAARP induced triggered

  1. Measurements of spatial and frequency coherence of an equatorial hf path during spread-F

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Argo, P.E.; Carlos, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    In August 1990, the authors set up an hf path on the equatorial path between Maloelap Atoll and Bikini Atoll. This path, which had a range of 702 km, reflected in the ionosphere approximately 100 km north of the Altair radar location on Kwajalein. Transmitters at Maloelap broadcasted four cw tones within bandwidth of either 4 kHz, 9 kHz, or 70 kHz to be used to determine frequency coherence and also a phase-coded pseudo random sequence with a bandwidth of 60 kHz (channel probe) to be used to determine time delay spread. A spatial array of antennas was deployed at Bikini to measure spatial and frequency coherence using the cw broadcasts. The system was run in the post-sunset time period over two weeks during which almost every night showed significant degradation due to spread F resulting in rapid fading, decreased spatial and frequency coherence, and increased time delay spread. Doppler spreads of greater than 20 Hz were not uncommon, and the spatial correlation distances and frequency coherence bandwidths became so small (50 meters and 1 kHz respectively) that the experiment had to be readjusted. Measurements taken by the Altair incoherent scatter radar and the CUPRI 50 MHz coherent scatter radar indicate that although the bistatic hf channel is affected by the large scale plume structures, most of the {open_quotes}damage{close_quotes} is done by the bottomside spread F.

  2. Measurements of spatial and frequency coherence of an equatorial hf path during spread-F

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Argo, P.E.; Carlos, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    In August 1990, the authors set up an hf path on the equatorial path between Maloelap Atoll and Bikini Atoll. This path, which had a range of 702 km, reflected in the ionosphere approximately 100 km north of the Altair radar location on Kwajalein. Transmitters at Maloelap broadcasted four cw tones within bandwidth of either 4 kHz, 9 kHz, or 70 kHz to be used to determine frequency coherence and also a phase-coded pseudo random sequence with a bandwidth of 60 kHz (channel probe) to be used to determine time delay spread. A spatial array of antennas was deployed at Bikini to measure spatial and frequency coherence using the cw broadcasts. The system was run in the post-sunset time period over two weeks during which almost every night showed significant degradation due to spread F resulting in rapid fading, decreased spatial and frequency coherence, and increased time delay spread. Doppler spreads of greater than 20 Hz were not uncommon, and the spatial correlation distances and frequency coherence bandwidths became so small (50 meters and 1 kHz respectively) that the experiment had to be readjusted. Measurements taken by the Altair incoherent scatter radar and the CUPRI 50 MHz coherent scatter radar indicate that although the bistatic hf channel is affected by the large scale plume structures, most of the [open quotes]damage[close quotes] is done by the bottomside spread F.

  3. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  4. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  5. Apollo experience report: Lunar module landing radar and rendezvous radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozas, P.; Cunningham, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    A developmental history of the Apollo lunar module landing and rendezvous radar subsystems is presented. The Apollo radar subsystems are discussed from initial concept planning to flight configuration testing. The major radar subsystem accomplishments and problems are discussed.

  6. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  7. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  8. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1983-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with planetary radar research reported during the time from 1979 to 1982. A brief synopsis of radar definitions and technical terminology is also provided. In connection with the proximity of the moon to earth, lunar radar studies have been performed over a wider range of wavelengths than radar investigations of other planetary targets. The most recent study of lunar quasispecular scattering is due to Simpson and Tyler (1982). The latest efforts to interpret the lunar radar maps focus on maria-highlands regolith differences and models of crater ejecta evolution. The highly successful Pioneer Venus Radar Mapper experiment has provided a first look at Venus' global distributions of topography, lambda 17-cm radar reflectivity, and rms surface slopes. Attention is given to recent comparisons of Viking Orbiter images of Mars to groundbased radar altimetry of the planet, the icy Galilean satellites, radar observations of asteroids and comets, and lambda 4-cm and lambda 13-cm observations of Saturn's rings.

  9. Generation of Artificial Acoustic-Gravity Waves and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances in HF Heating Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.; Cohen, J. A.; Watkins, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our ionospheric HF heating experiments to generate artificial acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID), which were conducted at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility in Gakona, Alaska. Based on the data from UHF radar, GPS total electron content, and ionosonde measurements, we found that artificial AGW/TID can be generated in ionospheric modification experiments by sinusoidally modulating the power envelope of the transmitted O-mode HF heater waves. In this case, the modulation frequency needs to be set below the characteristic Brunt-Vaisala frequency at the relevant altitudes. We avoided potential contamination from naturally-occurring AGW/TID of auroral origin by conducting the experiments during geomagnetically quiet time period. We determine that these artificial AGW/TID propagate away from the edge of the heated region with a horizontal speed of approximately 160 m/s.

  10. Improved HF183 Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for Characterization of Human Fecal Pollution in Ambient Surface Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Green, Hyatt C.; Haugland, Richard A.; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Field, Katharine G.; Walters, William A.; Knight, R.; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters. PMID:24610857

  11. Integrating a Microwave Radiometer into Radar Hardware for Simultaneous Data Collection Between the Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matthew; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The conventional method for integrating a radiometer into radar hardware is to share the RF front end between the instruments, and to have separate IF receivers that take data at separate times. Alternatively, the radar and radiometer could share the antenna through the use of a diplexer, but have completely independent receivers. This novel method shares the radar's RF electronics and digital receiver with the radiometer, while allowing for simultaneous operation of the radar and radiometer. Radars and radiometers, while often having near-identical RF receivers, generally have substantially different IF and baseband receivers. Operation of the two instruments simultaneously is difficult, since airborne radars will pulse at a rate of hundreds of microseconds. Radiometer integration time is typically 10s or 100s of milliseconds. The bandwidth of radar may be 1 to 25 MHz, while a radiometer will have an RF bandwidth of up to a GHz. As such, the conventional method of integrating radar and radiometer hardware is to share the highfrequency RF receiver, but to have separate IF subsystems and digitizers. To avoid corruption of the radiometer data, the radar is turned off during the radiometer dwell time. This method utilizes a modern radar digital receiver to allow simultaneous operation of a radiometer and radar with a shared RF front end and digital receiver. The radiometer signal is coupled out after the first down-conversion stage. From there, the radar transmit frequencies are heavily filtered, and the bands outside the transmit filter are amplified and passed to a detector diode. This diode produces a DC output proportional to the input power. For a conventional radiometer, this level would be digitized. By taking this DC output and mixing it with a system oscillator at 10 MHz, the signal can instead be digitized by a second channel on the radar digital receiver (which typically do not accept DC inputs), and can be down-converted to a DC level again digitally. This unintuitive step allows the digital receiver to sample both the radiometer and radar data at a rapid, synchronized data rate (greater than 1 MHz bandwidth). Once both signals are sampled by the same digital receiver, high-speed quality control can be performed on the radiometer data to allow it to take data simultaneously with the radar. The radiometer data can be blanked during radar transmit, or when the radar return is of a power level high enough to corrupt the radiometer data. Additionally, the receiver protection switches in the RF front end can double as radiometer calibration sources, the short (four-microsecond level) switching periods integrated over many seconds to estimate the radiometer offset. The major benefit of this innovation is that there is minimal impact on the radar performance due to the integration of the radiometer, and the radiometer performance is similarly minimally affected by the radar. As the radar and radiometer are able to operate simultaneously, there is no extended period of integration time loss for the radiometer (maximizing sensitivity), and the radar is able to maintain its full number of pulses (increasing sensitivity and decreasing measurement uncertainty).

  12. Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems

    E-print Network

    Paper Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems Ivan Prudyus, Sviatoslav Voloshynovskiy, Andriy- ing simulation based on radar, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and radiometry systems are presented systems, synthetic aperture radar, spatio-temporal imaging. 1. Introduction Resolution of radar

  13. Computing Ocean Surface Currents from Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, Waqas A.

    Ocean surface currents play an important role in ocean-atmosphere interactions and global ocean circulation, and are also significant for fishing, ocean navigation, and search & rescue. Existing in-situ and remote sensing techniques for measuring ocean surface currents are limited by spatial and temporal data coverage, and thermal IR feature tracking methods are limited by clouds and weak thermal gradients. High-resolution spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) offers repeatable cloud-penetrating measurements of the ocean surface. This research explores methods for ocean surface current measurement through satellite-based SAR. The major part of this research is concerned with the development and application of a semi-automated algorithm to generate ocean surface currents at ˜1.9 km resolution from sequential spaceborne C-band SAR intensity images using the Maximum Cross-Correlation(MCC) method. The primary geographical area of study is the coastal California Current System (CCS), and nearly two years (2008-2009) of 30-min lag data from the Envisat ASAR and ERS-2 AMI SAR sensors is analyzed. The velocity wavenumber spectrum of the derived MCC SAR currents agrees with the k-2 power law as predicted by submesoscale resolution models, and also shows seasonal mesoscale variability. The derived MCC SAR currents are validated against High frequency (HF) radar currents, and the two show some agreement in vector direction, with MCC SAR vectors oriented slightly anti-clockwise relative to HF radar vectors. The unimodal mean-symmetric residual histograms indicate that errors between the two datasets are random, except for a mean positive bias of ? 11 cm/s in MCC SAR currents relative to HF radar currents. This magnitude difference occurs primarily in the along-shore component ( ? 6 cm/s) and is negligible in the cross-shore component. Doppler Centroid Cross-Track (XT) radial currents from Envisat Wide Swath Mode (WSM) scenes are compared with HF radar radial currents, and are seen to have much larger extreme values, which is attributed to the Doppler wind correction process. Ignoring the extreme values, errors between the two datasets appear to be random, with a near-zero mean bias, and are also linked with the Doppler radial estimation errors attributed to model wind corrections. Comparison of Doppler radials with MCC SAR radials for two ? 12-hour lag cases also shows promising results. Finally, experiments conducted with TerraSAR-X experimental Dual Receive Aperture (DRA) mode Along-Track Interferometry (ATI) datasets suggest possible solutions for the absolute phase calibration problem using interferometric phase over ocean only.

  14. Three-Dimensional Views of Titan's Diverse Surface Features from Cassini RADAR Stereogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Redding, B. L.; Becker, T. L.; Lee, E. M.; Stiles, B. W.; Hensley, S.; Hayes, A. G.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mitchell, K. L.; Radebaugh, J.; Paganelli, F.; Soderblom, L. A.; Stofan, E. R.; Wood, C. A.; Wall, S. D.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2009-03-01

    Cassini RADAR has returned high resolution stereo images of dozens of areas on Titan. Digital topography extracted from the images provides new insight into lakes, dunes, mountains, flows, and other features including the enigmatic Ganesa Macula.

  15. Radar Beam Occultation Studies Using GIS and DEM Technology: An Example Study of Guam

    E-print Network

    Kucera, Paul A.; Krajewski, Witold F.; Young, Bryan

    2004-07-01

    Geographic information systems (GISs) combined with digital elevation models (DEMs) provide opportunities to evaluate weather radar beam blockage and other ground clutter phenomena. The authors explore this potential using ...

  16. Radar cross calibration investigation TAMU radar polarimeter calibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, A. J.; Newton, R. W.; Bong, S.; Kronke, C.; Warren, G. L.; Carey, D.

    1982-01-01

    A short pulse, 20 MHz bandwidth, three frequency radar polarimeter system (RPS) operates at center frequencies of 10.003 GHz, 4.75 GHz, and 1.6 GHz and utilizes dual polarized transmit and receive antennas for each frequency. The basic lay-out of the RPS is different from other truck mounted systems in that it uses a pulse compression IF section common to all three RF heads. Separate transmit and receive antennas are used to improve the cross-polarization isolation at each particular frequency. The receive is a digitally controlled gain modulated subsystem and is interfaced directly with a microprocesser computer for control and data manipulation. Antenna focusing distance, focusing each antenna pair, rf head stability, and polarization characteristics of RPS antennas are discussed. Platform and data acquisition procedures are described.

  17. Description and availability of airborne Doppler radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrah, S. D.; Bracalente, E. M.; Schaffner, P. R.; Baxa, E. G.

    1993-01-01

    An airborne, forward-looking, pulse, Doppler radar has been developed in conjunction with the joint FAA/NASA Wind Shear Program. This radar represents a first in an emerging technology. The radar was developed to assess the applicability of an airborne radar to detect low altitude hazardous wind shears for civil aviation applications. Such a radar must be capable of looking down into the ground clutter environment and extracting wind estimates from relatively low reflectivity weather targets. These weather targets often have reflectivities several orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding ground clutter. The NASA radar design incorporates numerous technological and engineering achievements in order to accomplish this task. The basic R/T unit evolved from a standard Collins 708 weather radar, which supports specific pulse widths of 1-7 microns and Pulse Repetition Frequencies (PRF) of less than 1-10 kHz. It was modified to allow for the output of the first IF signal, which fed a NASA developed receiver/detector subsystem. The NASA receiver incorporated a distributed, high-speed digital attenuator, producing a range bin to range bin automatic gain control system with 65 dB of dynamic range. Using group speed information supplied by the aircraft's navigation system, the radar signal is frequency demodulated back to base band (zero Doppler relative to stationary ground). The In-phase & Quadrature-phase (I/Q) components of the measured voltage signal are then digitized by a 12-bit A-D converter (producing an additional 36 dB of dynamic range). The raw I/Q signal for each range bin is then recorded (along with the current radar & aircraft state parameters) by a high-speed Kodak tape recorder.

  18. Subsurface "radar" camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1977-01-01

    Long-wave length multiple-frequency radar is used for imaging and determining depth of subsurface stratified layers. Very-low frequency radar signals pinpoint below-ground strata via direct imagery techniques. Variation of frequency and scanning angle adjusts image depth and width.

  19. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  20. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  1. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  2. Wind Turbine Clutter Mitigation in Coastal UHF Radar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caijun; Jiang, Dapeng; Wen, Biyang

    2014-01-01

    Coastal UHF radar provides a unique capability to measure the sea surface dynamic parameters and detect small moving targets, by exploiting the low energy loss of electromagnetic waves propagating along the salty and good conducting ocean surface. It could compensate the blind zone of HF surface wave radar at close range and reach further distance than microwave radars. However, its performance is susceptible to wind turbines which are usually installed on the shore. The size of a wind turbine is much larger than the wavelength of radio waves at UHF band, which results in large radar cross section. Furthermore, the rotation of blades adds time-varying Doppler frequency to the clutter and makes the suppression difficult. This paper proposes a mitigation method which is based on the specific periodicity of wind turbine clutter and performed mainly in the time-frequency domain. Field experimental data of a newly developed UHF radar are used to verify this method, and the results prove its effectiveness. PMID:24550709

  3. Wind turbine clutter mitigation in coastal UHF radar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Pan, Chao; Wang, Caijun; Jiang, Dapeng; Wen, Biyang

    2014-01-01

    Coastal UHF radar provides a unique capability to measure the sea surface dynamic parameters and detect small moving targets, by exploiting the low energy loss of electromagnetic waves propagating along the salty and good conducting ocean surface. It could compensate the blind zone of HF surface wave radar at close range and reach further distance than microwave radars. However, its performance is susceptible to wind turbines which are usually installed on the shore. The size of a wind turbine is much larger than the wavelength of radio waves at UHF band, which results in large radar cross section. Furthermore, the rotation of blades adds time-varying Doppler frequency to the clutter and makes the suppression difficult. This paper proposes a mitigation method which is based on the specific periodicity of wind turbine clutter and performed mainly in the time-frequency domain. Field experimental data of a newly developed UHF radar are used to verify this method, and the results prove its effectiveness. PMID:24550709

  4. The RITMARE coastal radar network and applications to monitor marine transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Paola; Corgnati, Lorenzo; Cosoli, Simone; Griffa, Annalisa; Kalampokis, Alkiviadis; Mantovani, Carlo; Oggioni, Alessandro; Pepe, Monica; Raffa, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco; Uttieri, Marco; Zambianchi, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Coastal radars provide information on the environmental state of oceans, namely maps of surface currents at time intervals of the order of one hour with spatial coverage of the order of several km, depending on the transmission frequency. The observations are of crucial importance for monitoring ports and ship tracks close to the coast, providing support for safe navigation in densely operated areas and fast response in case of accidents at sea, such as oil spill or search and rescue. Besides these applications, coastal radar observations provide fundamental support in MPAs surveillance, connectivity and marine population circulation. In the framework of the Italian RITMARE flagship project coordinated by CNR (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche), a coastal radar network has been designed and implemented with a number of innovative characteristics. The network includes both HF and X-band radars, allowing coverage of wide areas with different spatial and temporal resolutions. HF radars cover up to 80 km with a spatial resolution ranging between 1 and 5 km, while X-band radars provide 5 km coverage with a spatial resolution of 10 m. Joining these two capabilities, the RITMARE coastal radar network enables both a highly effective coverage of wide coastal areas and integrated monitoring of different phenomena, thus allowing the collection of current and wave parameters and detection of bathymetries of both open sea and coastal areas. A dedicated action to foster interoperability among data providers has been undertaken within RITMARE; an IT framework is under development to provide software tools for data collection and data sharing. It suggests standard, data format definitions, Quality Control strategies, data management and dissemination policies. In particular, the implementation of tools exploits both standards of OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) and web services offered to manage, access and deliver geospatial data. Radar data produced in RITMARE by the coastal radar network represent a challenge to the nowadays definition of OGC web services: the network will suggest and test solutions.

  5. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system" for Master Plan 2014 of the Science Council of Japan (SCJ). We show the EMU project and its science in the presentation.

  6. Evaluating the surface circulation in the Ebro delta (northeastern Spain) with quality-controlled high-frequency radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Soto-Navarro, J.; Alvarez-Fanjul, E.

    2015-11-01

    The Ebro River delta is a relevant marine protected area in the western Mediterranean. In order to promote the conservation of its ecosystem and support operational decision making in this sensitive area, a three-site standard-range (13.5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde high-frequency (HF) radar was deployed in December 2013. The main goal of this work is to explore basic features of the sea surface circulation in the Ebro deltaic region as derived from reliable HF radar surface current measurements. For this aim, a combined quality control methodology was applied: firstly, 1-year long (2014) real-time web monitoring of nonvelocity-based diagnostic parameters was conducted to infer both radar site status and HF radar system performance. The signal-to-noise ratio at the monopole exhibited a consistent monthly evolution, although some abrupt decreases (below 10 dB), occasionally detected in June for one of the radar sites, impacted negatively on the spatiotemporal coverage of total current vectors. It seemed to be sporadic episodes since radar site overall performance was found to be robust during 2014. Secondly, a validation of HF radar data with independent in situ observations from a moored current meter was attempted for May-October 2014. The accuracy assessment of radial and total vectors revealed a consistently high agreement. The directional accuracy of the HF radar was rated at better than 8°. The correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE) values emerged in the ranges [0.58-0.83] and [4.02-18.31] cm s-1, respectively. The analysis of the monthly averaged current maps for 2014 showed that the HF radar properly represented basic oceanographic features previously reported, namely, the predominant southwestward flow, the coastal clockwise eddy confined south of the Ebro delta mouth, or the Ebro River impulsive-type freshwater discharge. The EOF analysis related the flow response to local wind forcing and confirmed that the surface current field evolved in space and time according to three significantly dominant modes of variability.

  7. Compressive wideband microwave radar holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Scott A.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    Compressive sensing has emerged as a topic of great interest for radar applications requiring large amounts of data storage. Typically, full sets of data are collected at the Nyquist rate only to be compressed at some later point, where information-bearing data are retained and inconsequential data are discarded. However, under sparse conditions, it is possible to collect data at random sampling intervals less than the Nyquist rate and still gather enough meaningful data for accurate signal reconstruction. In this paper, we employ sparse sampling techniques in the recording of digital microwave holograms over a two-dimensional scanning aperture. Using a simple and fast non-linear interpolation scheme prior to image reconstruction, we show that the reconstituted image quality is well-retained with limited perceptual loss.

  8. Ground validation of Dual Precipitation Radar (DPR) on GPM by rapid scan Phased Array weahter Radar (PAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Mega, T.; Shimamura, S.; Wu, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Ushio, T.; Yoshikawa, E.; Chandra, C. V.

    2014-12-01

    The core observatory satellite of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched on February 27th 2014. The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the GPM core observatory is the succession of the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). The DPR consists of a Ku-band precipitation radar and a Ka-band precipitation radar. The DPR is expected to be more sensitive than the PR especially in the measurement of light rainfall and snowfall in high latitude regions. Because of the difference of spatial and temporal resolutions, Space Radar (SR) and conventional type of Ground Radar (GR) are hard to compare.The SR observes each point of earth in short time, for example one footprint is an observation in some microseconds. Rain-gauge measurements have accurate rainfall rate, but rain-gage observes small area and accumulated rainfall in some minutes. The conventional GR can cover a wide area, however, a volume scan requires several minutes. The Phased Array weather Radar (PAR) is developed by Osaka University, Toshiba, and NICT. The PAR is a weather-radar on X-band within 100m range sampling. High spatial and temporal resolution is achieved by the PAR with pulse compression and the digital beam-forming technique. The PAR transmits a wide beam and receives narrow beams by using digital beam forming. Then, the PAR observes many elevation angles from a single pulse. The time of each volume scan is 10-30 seconds in operation, typically 30 seconds. The study shows comparisons between the DPR and the PAR by more similar spatial and temporal resolution. The rainfall region of DPR is similar to the one of PAR. Correlation coefficient of both radar reflectivity suggests more than 0.8 in the 20km range of PAR. As a result, it is considered that DPR can observe with high accuracy. We present the case study which DPR overpassed the PAR observation region in detail.

  9. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  10. Browse > Conferences> Radar Conference, 2008. RADAR ... INDEX TERMS

    E-print Network

    Préaux, Jean-Philippe

    Browse > Conferences> Radar Conference, 2008. RADAR ... INDEX TERMS REFERENCES CITING DOCUMENTS Force, MorphoAnalysis in Signal Process. Lab., Salon-de-Provence This paper appears in: Radar Conference, 2008. RADAR '08. IEEE Issue Date: 26-30 May 2008 On page(s): 1 - 5 Location: Rome ISSN: 1097-5659 Print

  11. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  12. Multiple excitation modes in 163Hf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. B.; Ma, W. C.; Marsh, J. C.; Ijaz, Q. A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Hoffman, C. R.; Lauritsen, T.; Zhu, S.; Kondev, F. G.; Gürdal, G.; Hagemann, G. B.; Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-11-01

    Excited states of 163Hf were populated using the 94Zr(74Ge,5 n ) reaction and the decay ? rays were measured with the Gammasphere spectrometer. Two previously known bands were extended to higher spins, and nine new bands were identified. In addition to bands associated with three- and five-quasiparticle configurations, two ? - vibrational bands coupled to the i13 /2 excitation were also observed. The lowest level of a newly identified, negative-parity band is proposed to be the ground state of the nucleus. A systematic delay of the high-spin proton crossing frequency with increasing quadrupole deformation from 162Hf to 172Hf was established. Extensive band searches failed to reveal a triaxial, strongly deformed structure in 163Hf similar to the one observed in several nuclei around A ˜165 .

  13. Ground-penetrating radar methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use in agriculture. With the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method, an electromagnetic radio energy (radar) pulse is directed into the subsurface, followed by measurement of the elapsed time taken by the radar signal as it ...

  14. Digital-Difference Processing For Collision Avoidance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, Paul; Lichtenberg, Chris; Kobayashi, Herbert S.; Cunningham, Allen R.

    1988-01-01

    Digital system for automotive crash avoidance measures and displays difference in frequency between two sinusoidal input signals of slightly different frequencies. Designed for use with Doppler radars. Characterized as digital mixer coupled to frequency counter measuring difference frequency in mixer output. Technique determines target path mathematically. Used for tracking cars, missiles, bullets, baseballs, and other fast-moving objects.

  15. A radar array to locate buried landmines using the radar/acoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiemeyer, B.; Wright, V.; Shipley, C. A.

    2005-06-01

    An array of compact, inexpensive radars has been developed that utilizes commercial Doppler radar transceivers and box horn array antennas operating in the near field. The 25 x 25 radar unit array acts as a set of vibrometers that detect the acoustic mechanical resonances of buried land mines by sensing the ground motion above them. Operating with the antenna apertures 35 cm above the ground, spatial resolution, grid spacing, and location accuracy are 10 cm. The outputs of each radar unit, voltages directly proportional to the amplitude of the ground vibration displacement, include in-phase and quadrature components that are digitized to 18 bits resolution. A portable PC based LabVIEW program serves as the data processor to provide 25 simultaneous DFT spectra that isolate the mine resonances. Tests showed that the radar derived spectra are clearly discernible but, to some extent, subject to fluctuations due to coherent scattering from features on rough ground surface. One partially successful attempt to ameliorate these fluctuations is discussed.

  16. Earth Penetration Radar Imaging System (EPRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    The Earth Penetration Radar Imaging System (EPRIS) has been developed and has the capability to detect and locate buried mines, buried ordnance delivered by precision munitions, buried drums, buried waste/contaminants, and geological structures/features. The detected objects or features are mapped in three dimensions with high resolution. This information is then available for integration into a site characterization study. The EPRIS is a significant improvement in non-intrusive sensing and imaging capability. This phase of the EPRIS development has been extremely successful. Coleman Research Corporation (CRC) has implemented significant advances in technology into the EPRIS equipment. The frequency stepped radar sensor design has a very wide dynamic signal range and improved sensitivity over currently available equipment. The two- and three-dimensional image processing algorithms allow high-resolution placement and sizing of buried objects and/or features. The discussions related to the analog-to-digital converter and the spiral antenna, define the source of the dynamic range capability realized by EPRIS. The processing for this new radar makes use of unique synthetic aperature imaging (SAI) algorithms developed by CRC for frequency stepped radar systems. The SAI algorithms are necessary to obtain excellent spatial resolution on objects buried up to seven meters. The sensor signal processing represents a significant improvement in imaging systems. The CRC test facility permitted tests on objects buried up to 2.44 meters.

  17. Spaceborne laser radar.

    PubMed

    Flom, T

    1972-02-01

    Laser radar systems are being developed to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. To search effectively for and locate a target using a narrow laser beam, a scanning system is needed. This paper describes a scan technique whereby a narrow laser beam is synchronously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described. PMID:20111497

  18. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  19. System concept and analysis of an Artificial Ionospheric Mirror (AIM) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Robert D.; Stewart, Clayton V.; Wallace, Tom; Lallement, Pierre; Koert, Peter

    1990-08-01

    Recognition of performance limitations associated with traditional skywave over-the-horizon (OTH) high frequency (HF) radars has led a number of investigators to propose the creation of an Artificial Ionospheric Mirror (AIM) in the upper atmosphere, in order to reflect ground-based radar signals for OTH surveillance. The AIM is produced by beaming sufficient electromagnetic power to the lower ionosphere (around 70 km) to enhance the in situ ionization level to 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) electrons/cu cm, thereby providing an ionized layer capable of reflecting radar frequencies of 30 to 90 MHz. This paper presents a baseline AIM system concept and an associated performance evaluation, based upon the relevant ionization and propagation physics and in the context of air surveillance for the cruise missile threat. Results of the subject study indicate that a system using this concept would both complement and enhance the performance of the existing skywave OTH radars.

  20. Asynchronous Compressive Sensing in Radar Systems , Samuel Palermo

    E-print Network

    Palermo, Sam

    Asynchronous Compressive Sensing in Radar Systems Jun Zhou 1 , Samuel Palermo 1 , Brian M. Sadler 2 from oversampling is reduced by using compressive sensing (CS) in the digital domain. Moreover, compressive sensing, continuous-time ternary encoding, part-time randomization, time-delay accuracy. I

  1. Wuhan Atmosphere Radio Exploration (WARE) radar: System design and online winds measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyu, Zhao; Chen, Zhou; Haiyin, Qing; Guobin, Yang; Yuannong, Zhang; Gang, Chen; Yaogai, Hu

    2013-05-01

    The basic configuration of the Wuhan MST (mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere) radar, which was designed and constructed by the School of Electronic Information, Wuhan University, is preliminarily described in this paper. The Wuhan MST radar operates at very high frequency (VHF) band (53.8 MHz) by observing the real-time characteristics of turbulence and the wind field vector in the height range of 3.5-90 km (not including 25-60 km) with high temporal and height resolutions. This all-solid-state, all-coherent pulse Doppler radar is China's first independent development of an MST radar focusing on atmospheric observation. The subsystems of the Wuhan MST radar include an antenna system, a feeder line system, all-solid-state radar transmitters, digital receivers, a beam control system, a signal processing system, a data processing system, a product generation system, and a user terminal. Advanced radar technologies are used, including highly reliable all-solid-state transmitters, low-noise large dynamic range digital receivers, an active phased array, high-speed digital signal processing, and real-time graphic terminals. This paper describes the design and implementation of the radar. Preliminary online wind measurements and results of the comparison to simultaneous observations by a GPS rawinsonde are presented as well.

  2. Space Radar Image of Rocky Mountains, Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective of the eastern front range of the Rocky Mountains, about 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Great Falls, Montana. The image was created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this are useful to scientists because they show the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. This technique helps to clarify the relationships of the different types of materials on the surface detected by the radar. The view is looking south-southeast. Along the right edge of the image is the valley of the north fork of the Sun River. The western edge of the Great Plains appears on the left side. The valleys in the lower center, running off into the plains on the left, are branches of the Teton River. The highest mountains are at elevations of 2,860 meters (9,390 feet), and the plains are about 1,400 meters (4,500 feet) above sea level. The dark brown areas are grasslands, bright green areas are farms, light brown, orange and purple areas are scrub and forest, and bright white and blue areas are steep rocky slopes. The two radar images were taken on successive days by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on board the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; and blue are the differences seen in the L-band data between the two days. This image is centered near 47.7 degrees north latitude and 112.7 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's program entitled Mission to Planet Earth.

  3. HF inversion in the 2,5-dihydrofuran⋯HF complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan C.; Blanco, Susana; Lesarri, Alberto; Sanz, M. Eugenia; Lorenzo, Felipe J.; Alonso, José L.

    2001-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the hydrogen bond heterodimer 2,5-dihydrofuran⋯HF has been investigated in the frequency region 6-18.5 GHz using molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The R-branch ?a-type spectra of the parent, 2,5-dihydrofuran⋯DF, 13C?-2,5-dihydrofuran⋯HF and 13C?-2,5-dihydrofuran⋯HF species have been measured. All the observed lines are split into two components due to the tunneling of HF between the two equivalent hydrogen bonding sites at the oxygen atom. A value for the barrier to HF inversion of 100 cm-1 has been calculated from the analysis of the rotational constants of both tunneling states on the basis of a simple one-dimensional model. Ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311+G(d,p) and MP2/6-311+G(2df,p) levels of theory have been carried out to complement the experimental data. The results on the HF inversion barrier and hydrogen bond angular geometry of 2,5-dihydrofuran⋯HF have been compared to those previously obtained for the H2O⋯HF complex.

  4. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles to derive more accurate HF electron flux spectra.

  5. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  6. GMTI MIMO radar

    E-print Network

    Bliss, Daniel W., Jr.

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) extensions to radar systems enable a number of advantages compared to traditional approaches. These advantages include improved angle estimation and target detection. In this paper, ...

  7. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole.

  8. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  9. The 94 GHz MMW imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alon, Yair; Ulmer, Lon

    1993-01-01

    The 94 GHz MMW airborne radar system that provides a runway image in adverse weather conditions is now undergoing tests at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). This system, which consists of a solid state FMCW transceiver, antenna, and digital signal processor, has an update rate of 10 times per second, 0.35x azimuth resolution and up to 3.5 meter range resolution. The radar B scope (range versus azimuth) image, once converted to C scope (elevation versus azimuth), is compatible with the standard TV presentation and can be displayed on the Head Up Display (HUD) or Head Down Display (HDD) to aid the pilot during landing and takeoff in limited visibility conditions.

  10. Effects in the ionosphere and HF radio-wave propagation during an intense substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.; Borisova, T. D.; Rogov, D. D.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of combined radiophysical studies during the period of an intense magnetospheric substorm which occurred from 00:00 to 02:00 UT in April 12, 1999. Measurements of the ionospheric parameters by a chain of European ionosondes for this period were compared with the variations in ionospheric parameters averaged over more than 70 substorms. The latter variations were obtained by data from the ionosondes of Europe, Central Siberia, and North America in 1993-1999. Data from the CUTLASS radar as well as the DMSP and POES satellites were used for the analysis of the April 11-12 substorm. Numerical calculations of HF radio-wave propagation on the St. Petersburg—Longyearbyen (Svalbard) high-latitude path were carried out by the ray tracing technique. Two simultaneous effects have been revealed in the ionosphere. One occurs immediately during the substorm and another is associated with the end of the magnetic storm in April 10, 1999. According to the CUTLASS radar data, the number of backscattering irregularities in the ionospheric F layer notably decreased during the substorm expansion phase. Satellite data showed an increase in the “soft” (hundreds of eV) particle precipitation before and after the substorm. Numerical calculations of HF radio-wave propagation on the St. Petersburg—Longyearbyen path have demonstrated an essential change of propagation mechanisms during the substorm and a tangible change in the wave arrival angles before and after the substorm.

  11. Sporadic E ionization layers observed with radar imaging and ionospheric modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; McCarrick, M.

    2014-10-01

    Sporadic E ionization layers have been observed in the daytime subauroral ionospheric E layer by a 30 MHz radar in Alaska. The radar detects coherent backscatter from meter-scale field-aligned plasma density irregularities. The irregularities were generated by ionospheric modification—by the emission of strong HF electromagnetic waves directly beneath the layers—making the layers visible to the radar. Aperture-synthesis methods are used to generate imagery of the layers from the radar data. The layers are patchy, with patches organized along fronts spaced by tens of kilometers and propagating slowly toward the southwest. Similar, naturally occurring layers are commonly observed at middle latitudes at night in the absence of ionospheric modification. That the patchy layers can be found at high magnetic latitudes during the day argues that they are most likely produced through the interaction of the ionospheric layer with neutral atmospheric waves and instabilities. Attenuation of the radar echoes when the HF emission frequency exceeded the third harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency was observed and is discussed.

  12. Soil moisture detection from radar imagery of the Phoenix, Arizona test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.; Mueller, R.

    1975-01-01

    The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) dual-polarization X and L band radar was flown to acquire radar imagery over the Phoenix (Arizona) test site. The site was covered by a north-south pass and an east-west pass. Radar response to soil moisture was investigated. Since the ERIM radar does not have accurately measured antenna patterns, analysis of the L band data was performed separately for each of several strips along the flight line, each corresponding to a narrow angle of incidence. For the NS pass, good correlation between the radar return and mositure content was observed for each of the two nearest (to nadir) angular ranges. At higher angular ranges, no correlation was observed. The above procedure was not applied to the EW pass due to flight path misalignments. The results obtained stress the importance of radar calibration, the digitization process, and the angle of incidence.

  13. HF Propagation Effects Caused by an Artificial Plasma Cloud in the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D. R.; Groves, K. M.; McNeil, W. J.; Caton, R. G.; Parris, R. T.; Pedersen, T. R.; Cannon, P. S.; Angling, M. J.; Jackson-Booth, N. K.

    2014-12-01

    In a campaign carried out by the NASA sounding rocket team, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) launched two sounding rockets in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, in May 2013 known as the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment to study the interactions of artificial ionization and the background plasma and measure the effects on high frequency (HF) radio wave propagation. The rockets released samarium metal vapor in the lower F-region of the ionosphere that ionized forming a plasma cloud that persisted for tens of minutes to hours in the post-sunset period. Data from the experiments has been analyzed to understand the impacts of the artificial ionization on HF radio wave propagation. Swept frequency HF links transiting the artificial ionization region were employed to produce oblique ionograms that clearly showed the effects of the samarium cloud. Ray tracing has been used to successfully model the effects of the ionized cloud. Comparisons between observations and modeled results will be presented, including model output using the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), the Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM) and PIM constrained by electron density profiles measured with the ALTAIR radar at Kwajalein. Observations and modeling confirm that the cloud acted as a divergent lens refracting energy away from direct propagation paths and scattering energy at large angles relative to the initial propagation direction. The results confirm that even small amounts of ionized material injected in the upper atmosphere can result in significant changes to the natural propagation environment.

  14. Generation and detection of super small striations by F region HF heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A.; Milikh, G.; Secan, J.; Chiang, K.; Psiaki, M.; Bernhardt, P.; Briczinski, S.; Siefring, C.; Chang, C. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-07-01

    Recent theoretical models and preliminary observations indicate that super small striations (SSS) in the plasma density with scale size of 10 cm can be excited by F region HF heating at frequencies close to multiples of the electron gyrofrequency. We present here new experimental results using the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ionospheric heater at a frequency close to the fourth electron gyroharmonic with simultaneous GPS, Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission, ionosonde, and occasional Incoherent Radar Scattering diagnostics. Differential phase measurements of GPS signals through the heated region indicated the presence of SSS with extremely high amplitude (?n/n = 0.2-0.3) at scale size comparable to the electron gyroradius. The highest amplitude of GPS scintillations coincide with the highest level of the Broad Upshifted Maximum (BUM) and occurred when the HF frequency is slightly above the fourth harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. Frequency sweeps indicate that the scintillation amplitude exhibits hysteresis similar to that observed for the BUM amplitude when the HF frequency is cycled about the fourth harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The results favor a four wave parametric process as the physical mechanism of the SSS. Additional experiments allowed the determination of the excitation and decay rates of the SSS.

  15. Triangulation using synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.

    1991-01-01

    For the extraction of topographic information about Venus from stereoradar images obtained from the Magellan Mission, a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) compilation system was developed on analytical stereoplotters. The system software was extensively tested by using stereoradar images from various spacecraft and airborne radar systems, including Seasat, SIR-B, ERIM XCL, and STAR-1. Stereomodeling from radar images was proven feasible, and development is on a correct approach. During testing, the software was enhanced and modified to obtain more flexibility and better precision. Triangulation software for establishing control points by using SAR images was also developed through a joint effort with the Defense Mapping Agency. The SAR triangulation system comprises four main programs, TRIDATA, MODDATA, TRISAR, and SHEAR. The first two programs are used to sort and update the data; the third program, the main one, performs iterative statistical adjustment; and the fourth program analyzes the results. Also, input are flight data and data from the Global Positioning System and Inertial System (navigation information). The SAR triangulation system was tested with six strips of STAR-1 radar images on a VAX-750 computer. Each strip contains images of 10 minutes flight time (equivalent to a ground distance of 73.5 km); the images cover a ground width of 22.5 km. All images were collected from the same side. With an input of 44 primary control points, 441 ground control points were produced. The adjustment process converged after eight iterations. With a 6-m/pixel resolution of the radar images, the triangulation adjustment has an average standard elevation error of 81 m. Development of Magellan radargrammetry will be continued to convert both SAR compilation and triangulation systems into digital form.

  16. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry of Okmok volcano, Alaska: radar observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Mann, Dörte; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, David

    2000-01-01

    ERS-1/ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar interferometry was used to study the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano in Alaska. First, we derived an accurate digital elevation model (DEM) using a tandem ERS-1/ERS-2 image pair and the preexisting DEM. Second, by studying changes in interferometric coherence we found that the newly erupted lava lost radar coherence for 5-17 months after the eruption. This suggests changes in the surface backscattering characteristics and was probably related to cooling and compaction processes. Third, the atmospheric delay anomalies in the deformation interferograms were quantitatively assessed. Atmospheric delay anomalies in some of the interferograms were significant and consistently smaller than one to two fringes in magnitude. For this reason, repeat observations are important to confidently interpret small geophysical signals related to volcanic activities. Finally, using two-pass differential interferometry, we analyzed the preemptive inflation, coeruptive deflation, and posteruptive inflation and confirmed the observations using independent image pairs. We observed more than 140 cm of subsidence associated with the 1997 eruption. This subsidence occurred between 16 months before the eruption and 5 months after the eruption, was preceded by ?18 cm of uplift between 1992 and 1995 centered in the same location, and was followed by ?10 cm of uplift between September 1997 and 1998. The best fitting model suggests the magma reservoir resided at 2.7 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, which was ?5 km from the eruptive vent. We estimated the volume of the erupted material to be 0.055 km3 and the average thickness of the erupted lava to be ?7.4 m. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. HF Radio Wave Production of Artificial Ionospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert

    In 1993 it was predicted that artificial ionospheres would be produced by high power HF radio waves, once HF transmitters approached a GWatt ERP. When that threshold was very recently achieved, such production was indeed detected and published at two high latitude high power HF facilities. Here we review: the first-principles logic behind that prediction, which aspects of such production are critically dependent on magnetic latitude, and which aspects of such production depend only on physical parameters independent of latitude. These distinctions follow directly from decomposition of the problem of ionization production into its components of: radio-wave propagation, wave-particle interactions, electron transport, and quantitative elastic/inelastic cross-sections. We outline this analysis to show that, within the context of early observations, the production of ionization is inevitable, and only a question of competing instability thresholds, and scale of ionization production. This illustrates complimentary aeronomy and plasma physics to advance understanding of both.

  18. Radar MeteorologyRadar Meteorology Feb 20, 1941 10 cm (S-band) radar used to track rain showers (Ligda)

    E-print Network

    Rutledge, Steven

    Radar MeteorologyRadar Meteorology Feb 20, 1941 10 cm (S-band) radar used to track rain showers similar observations in the early 1940's (U.S. Air Corps meteorologists receiving "radar" training at MIT in 1943 First operational weather radar, Panama, 1943 Science of radar meteorology born from WWII research

  19. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission: A Global DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Kobrick, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Digital topographic data are critical for a variety of civilian, commercial, and military applications. Scientists use Digital Elevation Models (DEM) to map drainage patterns and ecosystems, and to monitor land surface changes over time. The mountain-building effects of tectonics and the climatic effects of erosion can also be modeled with DEW The data's military applications include mission planning and rehearsal, modeling and simulation. Commercial applications include determining locations for cellular phone towers, enhanced ground proximity warning systems for aircraft, and improved maps for backpackers. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) (Fig. 1), is a cooperative project between NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense. The mission is designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60 degrees north and south latitude. The DEM will have 30 m pixel spacing and about 15 m vertical errors.

  20. 2-D inner-shelf current observations from a single VHF WEllen RAdar (WERA) station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voulgaris, G.; Kumar, N.; Gurgel, K.-W.; Warner, J.C.; List, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of High Frequency (HF) radars used worldwide operate at medium to high frequencies (8 to 30 MHz) providing spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 1.5 km and ranges from 150 to 50 km. This paper presents results from the deployment of a single Very High Frequency (VHF, 48 MHz) WEllen RAdar (WERA) radar with spatial resolution of 150 m and range 10-15 km, used in the nearshore off Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. It consisted of a linear array of 12 antennas operating in beam forming mode. Radial velocities were estimated from radar backscatter for a variety of wind and nearshore wave conditions. A methodology similar to that used for converting acoustically derived beam velocities to an orthogonal system is presented for obtaining 2-D current fields from a single station. The accuracy of the VHF radar-derived radial velocities is examined using a new statistical technique that evaluates the system over the range of measured velocities. The VHF radar velocities showed a bias of 3 to 7 cm/s over the experimental period explainable by the differences in radar penetration and in-situ measurement height. The 2-D current field shows good agreement with the in-situ measurements. Deviations and inaccuracies are well explained by the geometric dilution analysis. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  1. 66. VIEW SHOWING HOLD FOR RADAR CABLES AT RADAR SITE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. VIEW SHOWING HOLD FOR RADAR CABLES AT RADAR SITE, LOOKING NORTH Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar operations center (PAROC), contains the tactical command and control group equipment required to control the par site. Showing spacetrack monitor console - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  3. Computer Simulation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Adam E. Robertson, David V.Arnold, David G . Long

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    Computer Simulation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Adam E. Robertson, David V.Arnold, David G for simulating a distributed scene which is capable of modeling SAR data under mod- erate motion of the radar, will be used for numerous ap- plications requiring high resolution digital elevation maps. Both systems

  4. Acidizing of Sandstone Reservoirs Using HF and Organic Acids 

    E-print Network

    Yang, Fei

    2012-10-19

    Mud acid, which is composed of HCl and HF, is commonly used to remove the formation damage in sandstone reservoirs. However, many problems are associated with HCl, especially at high temperatures. Formic-HF acids have served as an alternative...

  5. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) is an extremely

    E-print Network

    Lance, Veronica P.

    be stored in tightly closed polyethylene or fluorocarbon plastic lead or platinum containers Place storage.854.8749 #12;WASTE DISPOSAL Drain disposal of HF is not permitted Spent HF is hazardous waste and MUST

  6. Inversion to estimate ocean wave directional spectrum from high-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisaki, Yukiharu

    2015-04-01

    An high-frequency (HF) radar observes ocean surface currents and waves by radiating HF radio waves to the sea surface and analyzing the backscattered signals. Ocean wave spectrum is estimated from the first- and the second-order scattering of Doppler spectra by the inversion. The estimation of ocean surface currents is robust, because the surface currents can be derived from the peak Doppler frequency of the first-order scattering in the Doppler spectrum. The method to estimate ocean wave spectra is complicated and the second-order scattering in the Doppler spectrum is fragile, which is affected by the noise in the Doppler spectrum. A new method to estimate ocean wave spectra from HF radar is developed. This method is the extension of Hisaki (1996, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2014). The new method can be applied to both the single radar and dual radar array case, while the previous methods can be applied only the single radar case (Hisaki, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2014) or dual radar case (Hisaki, 1996). Ocean wave spectra are estimated in the regular grid cells, while wave spectra are estimated on the polar grids points with the origin of the radar position in the previous method for single radar case. The governing equations for wave estimation are the integral equations which relate the wave spectrum to the Doppler spectrum, and the energy balance equation under the assumption of stationarity. The regularization constraints in the horizontal space and the wave frequency-direction space are also used for the estimation. The unknowns, which are spectral values, surface wind speeds and directions, are estimated by seeking the minimum of the objective function, which is defined as the sum of weighted squares of the equations. The signal to noise ratio in the Doppler spectrum for wave estimation must be high. We selected the Doppler spectra using the SOM (Self organization map ) analysis method. The method will be demonstrated by comparing with in-situ observed data, in which only the Doppler spectrum from the single radar can be available.

  7. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  8. Analyzing the connectivity potential of landscape geomorphic systems: a radar remote sensing and GIS approach, Estufa Canyon, Texas, USA 

    E-print Network

    Ibrahim, ElSayed Ali Hermas

    2005-11-01

    . The landscape gradient, which is extracted from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM), and the surface roughness, which is extracted from radar images, are used to analyze the connectivity potential of geomorphic systems in the landscape. Integration...

  9. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  10. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Richard L.; Clark, Robert B.; Simonson, Dana L.; Slotwinski, Anthony R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  11. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  12. Imaging Radar in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    2001-01-01

    The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region has had a long history as a test bed for remote sensing techniques. Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the area since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of these technologies. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley region because it contains a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. The earliest imaging radars to be flown over the region included military tests of short-wavelength (3 cm) X-band sensors. Later, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory began its development of imaging radars with an airborne sensor, followed by the Seasat orbital radar in 1978. These systems were L-band (25 cm). Following Seasat, JPL embarked upon a series of Space Shuttle Imaging Radars: SIRA (1981), SIR-B (1984), and SIR-C (1994). The most recent in the series was the most capable radar sensor flown in space and acquired large numbers of data swaths in a variety of test areas around the world. The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region was one of those test areas, and was covered very well with 3 wavelengths, multiple polarizations, and at multiple angles. At the same time, the JPL aircraft radar program continued improving and collecting data over the Mojave Desert Death Valley region. Now called AIRSAR, the system includes 3 bands (P-band, 67 cm; L-band, 25 cm; C-band, 5 cm). Each band can collect all possible polarizations in a mode called polarimetry. In addition, AIRSAR can be operated in the TOPSAR mode wherein 2 antennas collect data interferometrically, yielding a digital elevation model (DEM). Both L-band and C-band can be operated in this way, with horizontal resolution of about 5 m and vertical errors less than 2 m. The findings and developments of these earlier investigations are discussed.

  13. Mobile HF Sources Research & Applica5ons

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    the design of Mobile Ionospheric Hea5ng sources (MIHs) where · No hea5ng experimentsMobile HF Sources Research & Applica5ons AFOSR MURI Kick-Off March 12 ioniza5on) · New concepts requiring mobile sources (e.g. monitor Coronal Mass Ejec5

  14. Hf alkylation unit with acid evacuation system

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, R.B.; Greco, S.G.; McGihon, R.D.; Risinger, Z.K.; Snyder, P.W.

    1992-03-24

    This patent describes improvement in an HF alkylation unit comprising a reactor section comprising an alkylation reactor in which isoparaffins are alkylated with olefins in the presence of an HF alkylation catalyst, means for supplying isoparaffin and olefin to the alkylation reactor, means for supplying HF alkylation catalyst to the reactor, means for separating hydrocarbons from HF in the effluent from the reactor and a fractionation section for separating alkylate product from the separated hydrocarbons. The improvement comprises: an acid evacuation system comprising an acid receiver for receiving the acid from the unit, at least one acid evacuation conduit connecting the acid receiver to the reactor section of the unit, an acid evacuation valve in each the acid evacuation conduit which is actuatable to an open position to evacuate acid from the reactor section of the unit to the acid receiver, means for maintaining the acid receiver at a pressure below that of the reactor section of the alkylation unit such that when the acid evacuation valve is actuated to the open position, acid is evacuated from the reaction portion of the unit to the acid receiver under positive pressure from the reactor section of the unit.

  15. Characteristics of HfO2/Hf-based bipolar resistive memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinshun, Bi; Zhengsheng, Han

    2015-06-01

    Nano-scale Hf/HfO2-based resistive random-access-memory (RRAM) devices were fabricated. The cross-over between top and bottom electrodes of RRAM forms the metal-insulator-metal sandwich structure. The electrical responses of RRAM are studied in detail, including forming process, SET process and RESET process. The correlations between SET voltage and RESET voltage, high resistance state and low resistance state are discussed. The electrical characteristics of RRAM are in a strong relationship with the compliance current in the SET process. The conduction mechanism of nano-scale Hf/HfO2-based RRAM can be explained by the quantum point contact model. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11179003, 61176095).

  16. Nostradamus: the Radar that wonted be a Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanni, O.; Farge, T.; Dorey, P.; Lognonné, P.

    2008-12-01

    Surface waves emitted after large earthquakes are known to induce, by dynamic coupling, atmospheric infrasonic waves propagating upward through the neutral and ionized atmosphere. Those waves have been detected in the past at ionospheric heights using a variety of techniques, such as HF Doppler sounding or GPS receivers. The HF Doppler technique, particularly sensitive to the ionospheric signature of Rayleigh waves is used here to show ionospheric perturbations consistent with the propagation of Rayleigh wave phases R1 and R2 following the Sumatra Earthquakes on the 28 March 2005. This is in our knowledge the first time the the phase R2 is detected by ionospheric sounding. In addition, we prove here that the ionospheric signature of R2 is also observed by over-the-horizon (OTH) Radar. This latter was never used before to detect seismic signature in the ionosphere. Adding the OTH Radar to the list of the "ionospheric seismometers" we discuss and compare the performances of the different instruments mentioned above.

  17. Lithologic differentiation with X-band side-looking airborne radar, Indian Springs quadrangle, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, B.E.; Guth, P.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Analysis of radar imagery together with digital elevation data allows classification of the most likely lithology exposed at the ground surface. The authors extracted a digital X-band side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) mosaic of the Indian Springs 1:100,000 quadrangle from a larger image of the Las Vegas 1:250,000 quadrangle available on CD-ROM from the US Geological Survey, and registered it to landmarks. They modeled radar back scatter as a function of three variables: surface roughness at the scale of the 3 cm wavelength of the X-band radar, the surface lithology, and the incidence angle of the radar beam. They assumed that surface roughness and lithology would correlate strongly, and divided the quadrangle into the following units: late Proterozoic clastic sediments, Paleozoic carbonates, Tertiary sediments, Tertiary volcanics, Quaternary alluvium, and quaternary playas. They subdivided Paleozoic carbonates into forested areas of the Sheep Range and the unforested remainder of the quadrangle, giving a total of seven map units. Graphs of radar back scatter versus incidence angle show widespread scatter, but each lithologic unit shows a characteristic and distinctive trend. Using the relationships derived from selected training areas, they can do a reasonable job classifying the surface lithologies of the quadrangle. While multiple band and polarization radar imagery obviously provides much greater potential for scene classification, single band radar imagery can be combined with elevation data to produce a reasonable estimate of surface lithology.

  18. Analysis of Random Radar Networks

    E-print Network

    Adve, Raviraj

    , detection using distributed radar apertures has received renewed attention. Such a system avails of geometry in distributed radar systems. We first analyze unistatic systems with a single receiver selected of a noise-limited distributed radar system. This notion allows a system designer to evaluate the trade

  19. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) is an extremely

    E-print Network

    Lance, Veronica P.

    ;WASTE DISPOSAL Drain disposal of HF is not permitted Spent HF is hazardous waste and MUST be disposed hazardous. HF can also dissolve and destroy many materials including enamels and metals. In addition AT COLUMBIA Fabrication of electronic components Biological staining Glass etching Mineral processing

  20. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  1. Spaceborne laser radar.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of laser systems to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. A scan technique is described whereby a narrow laser beam is simultaneously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described.

  2. Augmented reality using ultra-wideband radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Koenig, Francois; Sherbondy, Kelly

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has been investigating the utility of ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology for detecting concealed targets in various applications. We have designed and built a vehicle-based, low-frequency UWB SAR radar for proof-of-concept demonstration in detecting obstacles for autonomous navigation, detecting concealed targets (mines, etc.), and mapping internal building structures to locate enemy activity. Although the low-frequency UWB radar technology offers valuable information to complement other technologies due to its penetration capability, it is very difficult to comprehend the radar imagery and correlate the detection list from the radar with the objects in the real world. Using augmented reality (AR) technology, we can superimpose the information from the radar onto the video image of the real world in real-time. Using this, Soldiers would view the environment and the superimposed graphics (SAR imagery, detection locations, digital map, etc.) via a standard display or a head-mounted display. The superimposed information would be constantly changed and adjusted for every perspective and movement of the user. ARL has been collaborating with ITT Industries to implement an AR system that integrates the video data captured from the real world and the information from the UWB radar. ARL conducted an experiment and demonstrated the real-time geo-registration of the two independent data streams. The integration of the AR sub-system into the radar system is underway. This paper presents the integration of the AR and SAR systems. It shows results that include the real-time embedding of the SAR imagery and other information into the video data stream.

  3. Design guidelines for SAR digital receiver/exciter boards.

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, Peter A.

    2009-08-01

    High resolution radar systems generally require combining fast analog to digital converters and digital to analog converters with very high performance digital signal processing logic. These mixed analog and digital printed circuit boards present special challenges with respect to electromagnetic interference. This document first describes the mechanisms of interference on such boards then follows up with a discussion of prevention techniques and finally provides a checklist for designers to help avoid common mistakes.

  4. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  5. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  6. Plasma modifications induced by an X-mode HF heater wave in the high latitude F region of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Yeoman, T. K.; Rietveld, M. T.; Häggström, I.; Ivanova, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    We presented experimental results of strong plasma modifications induced by X-mode powerful HF radio waves injected towards the magnetic zenith into the high latitude F region of the ionosphere. The experiments were conducted in 2009-2011 using the EISCAT Heating facility, UHF incoherent scatter radar and the EISCAT ionosonde at Tromsø, Norway; and the CUTLASS SuperDARN HF coherent radar at Hankasalmi, Finland. The results showed that the X-mode HF pump wave can generate strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the F region of the high-latitude ionosphere. These irregularities, with spatial scales across the geomagnetic field of the order of 9-15 m, were excited when the heater frequency (fH) was above the ordinary-mode critical frequency (foF2) by 0.1-1.2 MHz. It was found that the X-mode AFAIs appeared between 10 s and 4 min after the heater is turned on. Their decay time varied over a wide range between 3 min and 30 min. The excitation of X-mode AFAIs was accompanied by electron temperature (Te) enhancements and an increase in the electron density (Ne) depending on the effective radiated power (ERP). Under ERPs of about 75-180 MW the Te enhances up to 50% above the background level and an increase in Ne of up to 30% were observed. Dramatic changes in the Te and Ne behavior occurred at effective radiated powers of about 370-840 MW, when the Ne and Te values increased up to 100% above the background ones. It was found that AFAIs, Ne and Te enhancements occurred, when the extraordinary-mode critical frequency (fxF2) lied in the frequency range fH-fce/2?fxF2?fH+fce/2, where fce is the electron gyrofrequency. The strong Ne enhancements were observed only in the magnetic field-aligned direction in a wide altitude range up to the upper limit of the UHF radar measurements. In addition, the maximum value of Ne is about 50 km higher than the Te enhancement peak. Such electron density enhancements (artificial ducts) cannot be explained by temperature-dependent reaction rates. They can be attributed to HF-induced ionization production by accelerated electrons. The possible mechanisms for plasma modifications induced by powerful X-mode HF radio waves were discussed.

  7. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Walker, K. M.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Aims: Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. Methods: The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H2 colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. Results: The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to j = 20 were performed for kinetic energies from 10-5 to 15 000 cm-1. State-to-state rate coefficients for temperatures between 0.1 and 3000 K are also presented. The comparison of the present results with previous work for lowly-excited rotational levels reveals significant differences. In estimating HF-H2 rate coefficients, the reduced-potential method is found to be more reliable than the standard reduced-mass approach. Conclusions: The current state-to-state rate coefficient calculations are the most comprehensive to date for HF-He collisions. We attribute the differences between previously reported data and our results to differences in the adopted interaction potential energy surfaces. The new He rate coefficients can be used in a variety of applications. The estimated H2 and H collision rates can also augment the smaller datasets previously developed for H2 and electrons. Rate coefficient tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A65

  8. Stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOEpatents

    Vadnais, Kenneth G. (Ojai, CA); Bashforth, Michael B. (Buellton, CA); Lewallen, Tricia S. (Ventura, CA); Nammath, Sharyn R. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A stepped frequency ground penetrating radar system is described comprising an RF signal generating section capable of producing stepped frequency signals in spaced and equal increments of time and frequency over a preselected bandwidth which serves as a common RF signal source for both a transmit portion and a receive portion of the system. In the transmit portion of the system the signal is processed into in-phase and quadrature signals which are then amplified and then transmitted toward a target. The reflected signals from the target are then received by a receive antenna and mixed with a reference signal from the common RF signal source in a mixer whose output is then fed through a low pass filter. The DC output, after amplification and demodulation, is digitized and converted into a frequency domain signal by a Fast Fourier Transform. A plot of the frequency domain signals from all of the stepped frequencies broadcast toward and received from the target yields information concerning the range (distance) and cross section (size) of the target.

  9. The Shuttle Imaging Radar B (SIR-B) experiment report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, Jo Bea; Holt, Benjamin; Richardson, Annie

    1988-01-01

    The primary objective of the SIR-B experiment was to acquire multiple-incidence-angle radar imagery of a variety of Earth's surfaces to better understand the effects of imaging geometry on radar backscatter. A complementary objective was to map extensive regions of particular interest. Under these broad objectives, many specific scientific experiments were defined by the 43 SIR-B Science Team members, including studies in the area of geology, vegetation, radar penetration, oceanography, image analysis, and calibration technique development. Approximately 20 percent of the planned digital data were collected, meeting 40 percent of the scientific objectives. This report is an overview of the SIR-B experiment and includes the science investigations, hardware design, mission scenario, mission operations, events of the actual missions, astronaut participation, data products (including auxiliary data), calibrations, and a summary of the actual coverage. Also included are several image samples.

  10. Development of land based radar polarimeter processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronke, C. W.; Blanchard, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The processing subsystem of a land based radar polarimeter was designed and constructed. This subsystem is labeled the remote data acquisition and distribution system (RDADS). The radar polarimeter, an experimental remote sensor, incorporates the RDADS to control all operations of the sensor. The RDADS uses industrial standard components including an 8-bit microprocessor based single board computer, analog input/output boards, a dynamic random access memory board, and power supplis. A high-speed digital electronics board was specially designed and constructed to control range-gating for the radar. A complete system of software programs was developed to operate the RDADS. The software uses a powerful real time, multi-tasking, executive package as an operating system. The hardware and software used in the RDADS are detailed. Future system improvements are recommended.

  11. Description, characteristics and testing of the NASA airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Altiz, O.; Schaffner, P.; Schrader, J. H.; Blume, H. J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a description of a coherent radar scattermeter and its associated signal processing hardware, which have been specifically designed to detect microbursts and record their radar characteristics. Radar parameters, signal processing techniques and detection algorithms, all under computer control, combine to sense and process reflectivity, clutter, and microburst data. Also presented is the system's high density, high data rate recording system. This digital system is capable of recording many minutes of the in-phase and quadrature components and corresponding receiver gains of the scattered returns for selected spatial regions, as well as other aircraft and hardware related parameters of interest for post-flight analysis. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  12. GEOS-2 C-band radar system project. Spectral analysis as related to C-band radar data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Work performed on spectral analysis of data from the C-band radars tracking GEOS-2 and on the development of a data compaction method for the GEOS-2 C-band radar data is described. The purposes of the spectral analysis study were to determine the optimum data recording and sampling rates for C-band radar data and to determine the optimum method of filtering and smoothing the data. The optimum data recording and sampling rate is defined as the rate which includes an optimum compromise between serial correlation and the effects of frequency folding. The goal in development of a data compaction method was to reduce to a minimum the amount of data stored, while maintaining all of the statistical information content of the non-compacted data. A digital computer program for computing estimates of the power spectral density function of sampled data was used to perform the spectral analysis study.

  13. Considerations for integration of a physiological radar monitoring system with gold standard clinical sleep monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Baboli, Mehran; Gao, Xiaomeng; Yavari, Ehsan; Padasdao, Bryson; Soll, Bruce; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A design for a physiological radar monitoring system (PRMS) that can be integrated with clinical sleep monitoring systems is presented. The PRMS uses two radar systems at 2.45 GHz and 24 GHz to achieve both high sensitivity and high resolution. The system can acquire data, perform digital processing and output appropriate conventional analog outputs with a latency of 130 ms, which can be recorded and displayed by a gold standard sleep monitoring system, along with other standard sensor measurements. PMID:24110139

  14. 25. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #2M4, (mezzanine), power supply ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #2M4, (mezzanine), power supply room; computer power supply on left and water flow on right. This room is directly below data processing area (room #318). Sign on right reads: High purity water digital rack - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  15. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  16. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater spectral efficiency than the MSK waveform, such as linear frequency modulation (LFM) and Costas frequency hopping, have a fixed peak sidelobe level that is therefore not configurable, and can be exceeded by high contrast targets. Furthermore, in the case of a multistatic experiment observing a target in motion, self-interference from the transmitter to the receiver is mitigated by the MSK waveform. Waveforms that have delay Doppler coupling, such as LFM, provide no such protection.

  17. EISCAT Incoherent Scatter Radars Probing High-Latitude Near-Earth Geospace for the EURIPOS Proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, E.

    2009-04-01

    EISCAT Scientific Association operates currently three incoherent scatter radars in Northern Scandinavia on behalf of its associate members in Finland, China, Germany, Japan, Norway, Sweden and United Kingdom, as well as currently supporting partners in France and Russia. The radar sites include transmitter/receiver site in Tromsø, Norway with a monostatic VHF radar and a tristatic UHF radar transmitter/receiver, UHF receiver sites in Kiruna, Sweden and Sodankylä, Finland and a 2-dish monostatic radar in Longyearbyen, Svalbard. Incoherent scatter radar method is known to be the most sophisticated radio method to remotely sense the ionosphere. The standard parameters analysed from the recorded scattered signals are the electron density, electron temperature, ion temperature, line-of-sight plasma velocity, ion-neutral collision frequency and ion mass. With more assumptions also information for example on neutral density and temperature, neutral velocity, Pedersen and Hall conductivities, electric current density and heat flux is available. Current applications of the radars include also interferometric applications for small-scale structures, mapping of meteroid orbits and monitoring space debris, as well as high-resolution mapping the radar reflectivity of the Moon surface. In addition to incoherent scatter radars, EISCAT also has a powerful HF heating facility for ionospheric modification experiments, and a dynasonde in Tromsø, as well as another dynasonde in Svalbard for routine ionospheric observations. All the current EISCAT facilities would serve the EURIPOS proposal quantifying the ionospheric variability and response to space weather events at high latitudes. Although the main ISR facilities cannot be run continuously, regular Common Programmes, measurement campaign modes - especially combined with coordinated satellite observations and specific model studies, and the continuous operation of supporting dynasondes, would greatly enhance the EURIPOS proposal. EISCAT real-time analysis of data is available and all measured data is accessible to researchers via the Madrigal database. In the near future, unprecedented science and technology application opportunities will open up with the construction of the new EISCAT 3D radar arrays. The new multiple site phased-array radar has a design goal of ten times higher temporal and spatial resolution than the present radars, a volumetric radar imaging capability in an extended spatial area with simultaneous full-vector drift velocities, avoiding spatial and temporal ambiguities, having continuous operation modes, short baseline interferometry capability for imaging sub-beamwidth scales, real-time data access for applications and extensive data archiving facilities. Some arrays are very large, in the scale of 30 000 individual antenna elements. The first design study is to be finished in 2009 and a modular construction of the facility would provide first measurements in 2013-2015.

  18. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell`s equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ({approximately}100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  19. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell's equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ([approximately]100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  20. MODELING VESTA'S RADAR E. M. Palmer (UCLA)

    E-print Network

    Strangeway, Robert J.

    MODELING VESTA'S RADAR PROPERTIES E. M. Palmer (UCLA) E. Heggy (JPL), M. T. Capria (INAFIAPS), ( ) ll ( )F. Tosi (INAFIAPS), C. T. Russell (UCLA) #12;Observing Asteroids with Radar The Issue with Radar · We measure the radar backscatter · Can get shape and spin Transmitting Earthbased Radar

  1. Radar cross-sectional study using noise radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    A noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar cross-section (RCS) of targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 50 GHz. The noise radar RCS measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-5000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used.

  2. 41. Perimeter acquisition radar building radar element and coaxial display, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Perimeter acquisition radar building radar element and coaxial display, with drawing of typical antenna section. Drawing, from left to right, shows element, aluminum ground plane, cable connectors and hardware, cable, and back-up ring. Grey area is the concrete wall - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  3. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Detection of Transionospheric SuperDARN HF Waves by the Radio Receiver Instrument on the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, R. G.; Yau, A. W.; James, H. G.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) Canadian small-satellite was launched in September 2013. Included in this suite of eight scientific instruments is the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI). The RRI has been used to measure VLF and HF radio waves from various ground and spontaneous ionospheric sources. The first dedicated ground transmission that was detected by RRI was from the Saskatoon Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar on Nov. 7, 2013 at 14 MHz. Several other passes over the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar have been recorded since then. Ground transmissions have also been observed from other radars, such as the SPEAR, HAARP, and SURA ionospheric heaters. However, the focus of this study will be on the results obtained from the SuperDARN passes. An analysis of the signal recorded by the RRI provides estimates of signal power, Doppler shift, polarization, absolute time delay, differential mode delay, and angle of arrival. By comparing these parameters to similar parameters derived from ray tracing simulations, ionospheric electron density structures may be detected and measured. Further analysis of the results from the other ground transmitters and future SuperDARN passes will be used to refine these results.

  5. Radar cross section measurements of a scale model of the space shuttle orbiter vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    A series of microwave measurements was conducted to determine the radar cross section of the Space Shuttle Orbiter vehicle at a frequency and at aspect angles applicable to re-entry radar acquisition and tracking. The measurements were performed in a microwave anechoic chamber using a 1/15th scale model and a frequency applicable to C-band tracking radars. The data were digitally recorded and processed to yield statistical descriptions useful for prediction of orbiter re-entry detection and tracking ranges.

  6. FMCW radar for the sense function of sense and avoid systems onboard UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itcia, Eric; Wasselin, Jean-Philippe; Mazuel, Sébastien; Otten, Matern; Huizing, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Rockwell Collins France (RCF) radar department is currently developing, in close collaboration with TNO in The Hague, The Netherlands, a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor dedicated to Obstacle Warning function and potentially to air traffic detection. The sensor combines flood light illumination and digital beam forming to accommodate demanding detection and coverage requirements. Performances have been evaluated in flight tests and results prove that such a radar sensor is a good candidate for the Sense Function of Sense and Avoid Systems onboard UAV.

  7. Hf-W chronometry of primitive achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, T.; Münker, C.; Mezger, K.; Palme, H.

    2010-03-01

    Metal segregation and silicate melting on asteroids are the most incisive differentiation events in the early evolution of planetary bodies. The timing of these events can be constrained using the short-lived 182Hf- 182W radionuclide system. Here we present new 182Hf- 182W data for major types of primitive achondrites including acapulcoites, winonaites and one lodranite. These meteorites are of particular interest because they show only limited evidence for partial melting of silicates and are therefore intermediate between chondrites and achondrites. For acapulcoites we derived a 182Hf- 182W age of ? tCAI = 4.1 +1.2/ -1.1 Ma. A model age for winonaite separates calculated from the intercept of the isochron defines an age of ? tCAI = 4.8 +3.1/ -2.6 Ma (assuming a bulk Hf/W ratio of ˜1.2). Both ages most likely define primary magmatic events on the respective parent bodies, such as melting of metal, although metal stayed in place and did not segregate to form a core. A later thermal event is responsible for resetting of the winonaite isochron, yielding an age of ? tCAI = 14.3 +2.7/ -2.2 Ma, significantly younger than the model age. Assuming a co-genetic relationship between winonaites and silicates present in IAB iron meteorites (based on oxygen isotope composition) and including data by Schulz et al. (2009), a common parent body chronology can be established. Magmatic activity occurred between ˜1.5 and 5 Ma after CAIs. More than 5 Ma later, intensive thermal metamorphism has redistributed Hf-W. Average cooling rates calculated for the winonaite/IAB parent asteroid range between ˜35 and ˜4 K/Ma, most likely reflecting different burial depths. Cooling rates obtained for acapulcoites were ˜40 K/Ma to ˜720 K and then ˜3 K/Ma to ˜550 K. Accretion and subsequent magmatism on the acapulcoite parent body occurred slightly later if compared to most achondrite parent bodies (e.g., angrites, ureilites and eucrites), in this case supporting the concept of an inverse correlation between accretion-age of asteroids and intensity of heating in their interiors as expected from heating by 26Al and 60Fe decay. However, the early accretion of the parent asteroid of primitive IAB silicates (˜1.0 Ma after CAIs; Schulz et al., 2009) and the possibly impact-induced melting-history of winonaites show that this concept is too simplistic. Parent body size, impact-driven melting as well as heat-insulating regolith cover also need to be considered in the early history of asteroid differentiation.

  8. LU-HF Age and Isotope Systematics of ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, M.; Lapen, T. J.; Brandon, A. D.; Beard, B. L.; Shafer, J. T.; Peslier, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is an orthopyroxenite that is unique among the Martian meteorites in having the oldest inferred crystallization age (approx..4.5 to 4.0 Gyr) [e.g., 1-6 and references therein 7]. Its ancient origin makes this stone a critical constraint on early history of Mars, in particular the evolution of different planetary crust and mantle reservoirs. However, because there is significant variability in reported crystallization ages, determination of initial isotope compositions is imprecise making assessment of planetary reservoirs difficult. Here we report a new Lu-Hf mineral isochron age, initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope composition, and inferred Martian mantle source compositions for ALH84001 that place constraints on longlived source reservoirs for the enriched shergottite suite of Martian meteorites including Shergotty, Zagami, NWA4468, NWA856, RBT04262, LAR06319, and Los Angeles. Sm-Nd isotope analyses are under way for the same mineral aliquots analyzed for Lu-Hf. The Lu-Hf system was utilized because Lu and Hf are both lithophile and refractory and are not easily redistributed during short-lived thermal pulses associated with shock metamorphism. Moreover, chromite has relatively modest Hf concentrations with very low Lu/Hf ratios [9] yielding tight constraints on initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope compositions

  9. RADAR Reveals Titan Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Callahan, P.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.; Elachi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper is a K(sub u)-band (13.78 GHz, lambda = 2.17 cm) linear polarized RADAR instrument capable of operating in synthetic aperture (SAR), scatterometer, altimeter and radiometer modes. During the first targeted flyby of Titan on 26 October, 2004 (referred to as Ta) observations were made in all modes. Evidence for topographic relief based on the Ta altimetry and SAR data are presented here. Additional SAR and altimetry observations are planned for the T3 encounter on 15 February, 2005, but have not been carried out at this writing. Results from the T3 encounter relevant to topography will be included in our presentation. Data obtained in the Ta encounter include a SAR image swath

  10. Kuiper Belt Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Nilsen, E.

    2001-01-01

    Since their initial discovery in 1992, to date only a relatively small number of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBO's) have been discovered. Current detection techniques rely on frame-to-frame comparisons of images collected by optical telescopes such as Hubble, to detect KBO's as they move against the background stellar field. Another technique involving studies of KBO's through occultation of known stars has been proposed. Such techniques are serendipitous, not systematic, and may lead to an inadequate understanding of the size, range, and distribution of KBO's. In this paper, a future Kuiper Belt Mapping Radar is proposed as a solution to the problem of mapping the size distribution, extent, and range of KBO's. This approach can also be used to recover radar albedo and object rotation rates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Miniature L-Band Radar Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, Dalia; Price, Douglas; Edelstein, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    A miniature L-band transceiver that operates at a carrier frequency of 1.25 GHz has been developed as part of a generic radar electronics module (REM) that would constitute one unit in an array of many identical units in a very-large-aperture phased-array antenna. NASA and the Department of Defense are considering the deployment of such antennas in outer space; the underlying principles of operation, and some of those of design, also are applicable on Earth. The large dimensions of the antennas make it advantageous to distribute radio-frequency electronic circuitry into elements of the arrays. The design of the REM is intended to implement the distribution. The design also reflects a requirement to minimize the size and weight of the circuitry in order to minimize the weight of any such antenna. Other requirements include making the transceiver robust and radiation-hard and minimizing power demand. Figure 1 depicts the functional blocks of the REM, including the L-band transceiver. The key functions of the REM include signal generation, frequency translation, amplification, detection, handling of data, and radar control and timing. An arbitrary-waveform generator that includes logic circuitry and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a linear-frequency-modulation chirp waveform. A frequency synthesizer produces local-oscillator signals used for frequency conversion and clock signals for the arbitrary-waveform generator, for a digitizer [that is, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC)], and for a control and timing unit. Digital functions include command, timing, telemetry, filtering, and high-rate framing and serialization of data for a high-speed scientific-data interface. The aforementioned digital implementation of filtering is a key feature of the REM architecture. Digital filters, in contradistinction to analog ones, provide consistent and temperature-independent performance, which is particularly important when REMs are distributed throughout a large array. Digital filtering also enables selection among multiple filter parameters as required for different radar operating modes. After digital filtering, data are decimated appropriately in order to minimize the data rate out of an antenna panel. The L-band transceiver (see Figure 2) includes a radio-frequency (RF)-to-baseband down-converter chain and an intermediate- frequency (IF)-to-RF up-converter chain. Transmit/receive (T/R) switches enable the use of a single feed to the antenna for both transmission and reception. The T/R switches also afford a built-in test capability by enabling injection of a calibration signal into the receiver chain. In order of decreasing priority, components of the transceiver were selected according to requirements of radiation hardness, then compactness, then low power. All of the RF components are radiation-hard. The noise figure (NF) was optimized to the extent that (1) a low-noise amplifier (LNA) (characterized by NF < 2 dB) was selected but (2) the receiver front-end T/R switches were selected for a high degree of isolation and acceptably low loss, regardless of the requirement to minimize noise.

  12. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Bryan L. (Tijeras, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  13. Goldstone solar system radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, Raymond F.

    1991-01-01

    Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radar astronomers made use of the Very Large Array (VLA) at Socorro, NM, during February 1990, to receive radio echoes from the planet Venus. The transmitter was the 70 meter antenna at the Goldstone complex northwest of Barstow, CA. These observations contain new information about the roughness of Venus at cm to decimeter scales and are complementary to information being obtained by the Magellan spacecraft. Asteroid observations are also discussed.

  14. HF echoes from ionization potentially produced by high-altitude discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Blanc, E.

    1997-03-01

    The presence of ionization associated with high-altitude discharges has been detected using an HF radar operating at 2.2, 2.5, and 2.8 MHz. On several occasions, oblique echoes lasting several hundred ms at night and 1{r_arrow}10s during the day were observed. The echoes turned on in several interpulse times of 70 ms and were generally correlated with strong lightning activity prior to onset. The angles of arrival of sferics detected at three goniometer stations were used to determine the distance to thunderstorms. The data are consistent with specular reflections from columns of ionization produced at 55{endash}65 km altitude and having minimum electron densities of 6{times}10{sup 4}{endash}10{sup 5}cm{sup {minus}3}. The source of the ionization is believed to be high-altitude discharges.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  15. The Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder. [lunar orbit coherent radar experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Jordan, R.; Adams, G. F.; Jackson, P.; Peeples, W. J.; Porcello, L. J.; Ryu, J.; Eggleton, R. E.; Schaber, G.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Sounder Experiment, a coherent radar operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission, has scientific objectives of mapping lunar subsurface structure, surface profiling, surface imaging, and galactic noise measurement. Representative results from each of the four disciplines are presented. Subsurface reflections have been interpreted in both optically and digitally processed data. Images and profiles yield detailed selenomorphological information. The preliminary galactic noise results are consistent with earlier measurements by other workers.

  16. 3-D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiley, Michael F.; Carmer, Dwayne C.; Pont, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    A sophisticated 3D laser radar sensor simulation, developed and applied to the task of autonomous hazard detection and avoidance, is presented. This simulation includes a backward ray trace to sensor subpixels, incoherent subpixel integration, range dependent noise, sensor point spread function effects, digitization noise, and AM-CW modulation. Specific sensor parameters, spacecraft lander trajectory, and terrain type have been selected to generate simulated sensor data.

  17. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Neil

    1986-01-01

    In June of 1985 the Project Initiation Agreement was signed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project (SIR). The thrust of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project is to continue the evolution of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) science and technology developed during SEASAT, SIR-A and SIR-B missions to meet the needs of the Earth Observing System (EOS) in the mid 1990's. As originally formulated, the Project plans were for a reflight of the SIR-B in 1987, the development of a new SAR, SIR-C, for missions in mid 1989 and early 1990, and the upgrade of SIR-C to EOS configuration with a qualification flight aboard the shuttle in the 1993 time frame (SIR-D). However, the loss of the shuttle Challenger has delayed the first manifest for SIR to early 1990. This delay prompted the decision to drop SIR-B reflight plans and move ahead with SIR-C to more effectively utilize this first mission opportunity. The planning for this project is discussed.

  18. Cognitive processing for nonlinear radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, Anthony; Ranney, Kenneth; Hedden, Abigail; Mazzaro, Gregory; McNamara, David

    2013-05-01

    An increasingly cluttered electromagnetic environment (EME) is a growing problem for radar systems. This problem is becoming critical as the available frequency spectrum shrinks due to growing wireless communication device usage and changing regulations. A possible solution to these problems is cognitive radar, where the cognitive radar learns from the environment and intelligently modifies the transmit waveform. In this paper, a cognitive nonlinear radar processing framework is introduced where the main components of this framework consist of spectrum sensing processing, target detection and classification, and decision making. The emphasis of this paper is to introduce a spectrum sensing processing technique that identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar. It will be shown that the proposed technique successfully identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar from data collected from the EME.

  19. Molecular sieve separation of ground state HF molecules in a non-chain HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lianying; Zhou, Songqing; Huang, Chao; Cheng, Hongwei; Zhu, Feng

    2015-05-01

    A 3A molecular sieve separation device was designed and mounted in a closed-cycled non-chain HF laser to separate the ground state molecule being produced in discharge region from gas stream in order to improve the stability of laser output energy. Experiments were carried out with several different discharge voltages and gas flow velocities, and the preliminary results show that the molecular sieve separation device could dramatically decrease the decay of output energy of HF laser while improving the laser energy stability.

  20. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  1. Radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of bird migration with NASA radars were made at Wallops Island, Va. Simultaneous observations were made at a number of radar sites in the North Atlantic Ocean in an effort to discover what happened to those birds that were observed leaving the coast of North America headed toward Bermuda, the Caribbean and South America. Transatlantic migration, utilizing observations from a large number of radars is discussed. Detailed studies of bird movements at Wallops Island are presented.

  2. Bistatic radar sea state monitoring field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruck, G. T.; Kirchbaum, G. K.; Everly, J. O.

    1975-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the physical phenomena controlling the interaction of electromagnetic energy with the ocean surface have revealed the possiblity of remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean using bistatic radar techniques. The basic feasibility of such a technique operating at frequencies in the HF region (3 to 30 MHz) was examined during previous studies and hardware for an experimental verification experiment was specified. The activities have resulted in a determination of the required hardware and system parameters for both satellite and aircraft systems, the development, assembly, and testing of hardware for an experimental aircraft system, the development and initial testing of data processing procedures, and the conduct of an initial flight test experiment. Activities were devoted to completing the assembly and testing of the experimental hardware, completing the experiment planning, conducting a field test experiment, and the processing and analysis of the experimental data. Even though directional spectrum maps of the test area cannot be generated from the measured data, the hardware concept employed appears viable, and solutions to the problems encountered have been identified.

  3. Python-ARM Radar Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-03-17

    The Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) is a collection of radar quality control and retrieval codes which all work on two unifying Python objects: the PyRadar and PyGrid objects. By building ingests to several popular radar formats and then abstracting the interface Py-ART greatly simplifies data processing over several other available utilities. In addition Py-ART makes use of Numpy arrays as its primary storage mechanism enabling use of existing and extensive community software tools.

  4. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273 Telecommunication...Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar installations on board ships that are...

  5. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273 Telecommunication...Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar installations on board ships that are...

  6. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273 Telecommunication...Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar installations on board ships that are...

  7. Overview of Radar Data Compression Valliappa Lakshmanan

    E-print Network

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    Overview of Radar Data Compression Valliappa Lakshmanan Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma & National Severe Storms Laboratory Abstract Radar data is routinely transmitted in real-time from the coterminous United States (CONUS) radar sites and placed

  8. REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Christopher T. Allen Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory University of Kansas Abstract. This paper provides a brief review of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (In

  9. Anomolous Radar Backscatter from Titan's Xanadu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, M. A.; Le Gall, A.; Wye, L. C.; Zebker, H. A.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paillou, P.; Paganelli, F.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2009-03-01

    We use simultaneously measured radar reflectivity and microwave emission from the Cassini Radar instrument to show that the radar backscattering seen across Titan's Xanadu region is too high to be explained by any known surface model.

  10. Automatic Calibrations for Improved Quality Assurance of Coastal HF Radar Currents

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    -time data are used for Coast Guard Search and Rescue, Hazardous Materials Spills Response, Water Quality are providing ocean surface current maps that are used in Coast Guard Search and Rescue, Hazardous Materials at the site [2][3]. Fig. 1. SeaSonde compact cross-loop antenna installed at coast. These differences can

  11. Modification of the high latitude ionosphere F region by X-mode powerful HF radio waves: Experimental results from multi-instrument diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Yeoman, T. K.; Häggström, I.; Kalishin, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results concentrating on a variety of phenomena in the high latitude ionosphere F2 layer induced by an extraordinary (X-mode) HF pump wave at high heater frequencies (fH=6.2-8.0 MHz), depending on the pump frequency proximity to the ordinary and extraordinary mode critical frequencies, foF2 and fxF2. The experiments were carried out at the EISCAT HF heating facility with an effective radiated power of 450-650 MW in October 2012 and October-November 2013. Their distinctive feature is a wide diapason of critical frequency changes, when the fH/foF2 ratio was varied through a wide range from 0.9 to 1.35. It provides both a proper comparison of X-mode HF-induced phenomena excited under different ratios of fH/foF2 and an estimation of the frequency range above foF2 in which such X-mode phenomena are still possible. It was shown that the HF-enhanced ion and plasma lines are excited above foF2 when the HF pump frequency is lying in range between the foF2 and fxF2, foF2?fH?fxF2, whereas small-scale field-aligned irregularities continued to be generated even when fH exceeded fxF2 by up to 1 MHz and an X-polarized pump wave cannot be reflected from the ionosphere. Another parameter of importance is the magnetic zenith effect (HF beam/radar angle direction) which is typical for X-mode phenomena under fH/foF2 >1 as well as fH/foF2 ?1. We have shown for the first time that an X-mode HF pump wave is able to generate strong narrowband spectral components in the SEE spectra (within 1 kHz of pump frequency) in the ionosphere F region, which were recorded at distance of 1200 km from the HF heating facility. The observed spectral lines can be associated with the ion acoustic, electrostatic ion cyclotron, and electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves (otherwise known as neutralized ion Bernstein waves). The comparison between the O- and X-mode SEE spectra recorded at distance far from HF heating facility clearly demonstrated that variety of the narrowband spectral structures were only observed under X-mode HF pumping. The potential generation mechanisms of the different narrowband spectral components are discussed.

  12. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  13. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  14. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  15. Application of Radar Data to Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanZyl, Jakob J.

    2000-01-01

    The field of synthetic aperture radar changed dramatically over the past decade with the operational introduction of advance radar techniques such as polarimetry and interferometry. Radar polarimetry became an operational research tool with the introduction of the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system in the early 1980's, and reached a climax with the two SIR-C/X-SAR flights on board the space shuttle Endeavour in April and October 1994. Radar interferometry received a tremendous boost when the airborne TOPSAR system was introduced in 1991 by NASA/JPL, and further when data from the European Space Agency ERS-1 radar satellite became routinely available in 1991. Several airborne interferometric SAR systems are either currently operational, or are about to be introduced. Radar interferometry is a technique that allows one to map the topography of an area automatically under all weather conditions, day or night. The real power of radar interferometry is that the images and digital elevation models are automatically geometrically resampled, and could be imported into GIS systems directly after suitable reformatting. When combined with polarimetry, a technique that uses polarization diversity to gather more information about the geophysical properties of the terrain, a very rich multi-layer data set is available to the remote sensing scientist. This talk will discuss the principles of radar interferometry and polarimetry with specific application to the automatic categorization of land cover. Examples will include images acquired with the NASA/JPL AIRSAR/TOPSAR system in Australia and elsewhere.

  16. Instantaneous Normal Mode analysis of liquid HF

    E-print Network

    G. Garberoglio; R. Vallauri

    2000-04-04

    We present an Instantaneous Normal Modes analysis of liquid HF aimed to clarify the origin of peculiar dynamical properties which are supposed to stem from the arrangement of molecules in linear hydrogen-bonded network. The present study shows that this approach is an unique tool for the understanding of the spectral features revealed in the analysis of both single molecule and collective quantities. For the system under investigation we demonstrate the relevance of hydrogen-bonding ``stretching'' and fast librational motion in the interpretation of these features.

  17. Planetary radar studies. [radar mapping of the Moon and radar signatures of lunar and Venus craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress made in studying the evolution of Venusian craters and the evolution of infrared and radar signatures of lunar crater interiors is reported. Comparison of radar images of craters on Venus and the Moon present evidence for a steady state Venus crater population. Successful observations at the Arecibo Observatory yielded good data on five nights when data for a mix of inner and limb areas were acquired. Lunar craters with radar bright ejects are discussed. An overview of infrared radar crater catalogs in the data base is included.

  18. Development of a 1310-nm, Coherent Laser Radar with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Yanki Cobanoglu, Sekken Kenny Chong, Sivaprasad Gogineni

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1310-nm, Coherent Laser Radar with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Yanki, and aerosol characteristics. LIDARs on these satellites will transmit short, high-peak power pulses to obtain, coherent laser radar (lidar) that uses traditional RF pulse compression and digital signal processing

  19. Digital materials for digital fabrication

    E-print Network

    Popescu, George A

    2007-01-01

    This thesis introduces digital materials by analogy with digital computation and digital communications. Traditional fabrication techniques include pick-and-place, roll-to-roll, molding, patterning and more. Current research ...

  20. Thermal-wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, N.; Mandelis, A.

    2010-03-01

    Using matched-filtering principles and linear frequency modulation a powerful photothermal depth-profilometry method is introduced. Unlike FD-PTR, in thermal-wave radar (TWR) the frequency of the optical excitation increases linearly within the chirp period, enabling the method to scan a depth range in a single iteration. Simulations and experimental results suggest a significant improvement in the dynamic range when using TWR instead of conventional PTR. Analytical solutions to the TWR heat diffusion problem for both opaque and transparent solids are provided.

  1. Imaging Radar for Ecosystem Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, Richard H.; Way, JoBea; Hunt, E. Raymond J.; Morrissey, Leslie; Ranson, K. Jon; Weishampel, John F.; Oren, Ram; Franklin, Steven E.

    1996-01-01

    Recently a number of satellites have been launched with radar sensors, thus expanding opportunities for global assessment. In this article we focus on the applications of imaging radar, which is a type of sensor that actively generates pulses of microwaves and, in the interval between sending pulses, records the returning signals reflected back to an antenna.

  2. Low-brightness quantum radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2015-05-01

    One of the major scientific thrusts from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to dramatically increase the performance of a wide variety of classical information processing devices. These advances in quantum information science have had a considerable impact on the development of standoff sensors such as quantum radar. In this paper we analyze the theoretical performance of low-brightness quantum radar that uses entangled photon states. We use the detection error probability as a measure of sensing performance and the interception error probability as a measure of stealthiness. We compare the performance of quantum radar against a coherent light sensor (such as lidar) and classical radar. In particular, we restrict our analysis to the performance of low-brightness standoff sensors operating in a noisy environment. We show that, compared to the two classical standoff sensing devices, quantum radar is stealthier, more resilient to jamming, and more accurate for the detection of low reflectivity targets.

  3. Shuttle Imaging Radar - Geologic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.; Bridges, L.; Waite, W.; Kaupp, V.

    1982-01-01

    The Space Shuttle, on its second flight (November 12, 1981), carried the first science and applications payload which provided an early demonstration of Shuttle's research capabilities. One of the experiments, the Shuttle Imaging Radar-A (SIR-A), had as a prime objective to evaluate the capability of spaceborne imaging radars as a tool for geologic exploration. The results of the experiment will help determine the value of using the combination of space radar and Landsat imagery for improved geologic analysis and mapping. Preliminary analysis of the Shuttle radar imagery with Seasat and Landsat imagery from similar areas provides evidence that spaceborne radars can significantly complement Landsat interpretation, and vastly improve geologic reconnaissance mapping in those areas of the world that are relatively unmapped because of perpetual cloud cover.

  4. Radar SLAM using visual features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callmer, Jonas; Törnqvist, David; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Svensson, Henrik; Carlbom, Pelle

    2011-12-01

    A vessel navigating in a critical environment such as an archipelago requires very accurate movement estimates. Intentional or unintentional jamming makes GPS unreliable as the only source of information and an additional independent supporting navigation system should be used. In this paper, we suggest estimating the vessel movements using a sequence of radar images from the preexisting body-fixed radar. Island landmarks in the radar scans are tracked between multiple scans using visual features. This provides information not only about the position of the vessel but also of its course and velocity. We present here a navigation framework that requires no additional hardware than the already existing naval radar sensor. Experiments show that visual radar features can be used to accurately estimate the vessel trajectory over an extensive data set.

  5. Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

  6. Land subsidence measured by satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Brooks, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Radar altimeter measurements from the GEOS-3 and SEASAT satellites are being evaluated to assess their potential contribution to terrain mapping. The primary evaluation area is the San Joaquin Valley of southern California; 40,000/sq km of the Valley have been mapped at a contour interval of 10 m from the satellite altimeter measurements. The accuracy of the altimeter derived terrain elevations is being assessed by comparison with 1:24,000 and digitized 1:250,000 maps and by intercomparisons at the crossover altimeter intersections. Comparisons of the altimeter derived elevations with historical maps archived at the U.S. Geological Survey confirms the USGS 1926-1972 subsidence contours for this area. Preliminary results from a similar analysis in the Houston-Galveston area of subsidence also demonstrates a capability of measuring land subsidence by satellite altimetry.

  7. 40 CFR 180.1273 - Beauveria bassiana HF23; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Beauveria bassiana HF23; exemption from the requirement...Tolerances § 180.1273 Beauveria bassiana HF23; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Beauveria bassiana HF23 are exempt from the...

  8. Mars Radar Observations with the Goldstone Solar System Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Larsen, K. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Slade, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has successfully collected radar echo data from Mars over the past 30 years. As such, the GSSR has played a role as a specific mission element within Mars exploration. The older data provided local elevation information for Mars, along with radar scattering information with global resolution. Since the upgrade to the 70-m Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna at Goldstone completed in 1986, Mars data has been collected during all but the 1997 Mars opposition. Radar data, and non-imaging delay-Doppler data in particular, requires significant data processing to extract elevation, reflectivity and roughness of the reflecting surface. The spatial resolution of these experiments is typically some 20 km in longitude by some 150 km in latitude. The interpretation of these parameters while limited by the complexities of electromagnetic scattering, do provide information directly relevant to geophysical and geomorphic analyses of Mars. The usefulness of radar data for Mars exploration has been demonstrated in the past. Radar data were critical in assessing the Viking Lander 1 site as well as, more recently, the Pathfinder landing site. In general, radar data have not been available to the Mars exploration community at large. A project funded initially by the Mars Exploration Directorate Science Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and later funded by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program has reprocessed to a common format a decade's worth of raw GSSR Mars delay-Doppler data in aid of landing site characterization for the Mars Program. These data will soon be submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS). The radar data used were obtained between 1988 and 1995 by the GSSR, and comprise some 63 delay-Doppler radar tracks. Of these, 15 have yet to be recovered from old 9-track tapes, and some of the data may be permanently lost.

  9. Fractionation of Zr and Hf in surface processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chyi, L.L.; Garg, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Zircons from a pegmatite near Tuxedo, North Carolina were crushed and treated with different reagents under different conditions. The treated and untreated samples were determined for Zr and Hf with radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Zircons treated with 50% sulfuric acid were having lowered Zr content and Zr/Hf ratio. The conclusions are that a portion of Zr and Hf in zircons is sensitive to leaching, and Zr appears to be selectively leached over Hf. The conclusions of this work support the observations of small dissolutions of Zr in both acidic podzolic soils and in alkaline laterites, of lower Zr content in soils on glacial drift, and of lower Zr/Hf ratios in loess deposits from various parts of the world. The fractionation of Zr and Hf in surface processes appears to be due to selective leaching. Weakening of Zr-O over Hf-O bonds in zircon by fission projectiles is postulated to be the viable process. The observed fractionation from leaching experiments suggest that areas receiving leachates such as swamps, lakes, and oceans should have high to very high Zr/Hf ratios preserved in rocks. High ratios are found in the Springfield (No. 9) Coal, the Green River Shale, and various limestones. High ratio is also found in orchard leaves, which grow by absorbing leachate from soil.

  10. CW (Continuous Wave) HF R-branch laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Injeyan, Hagop; Wang, John H.

    1986-07-01

    A continuous wave HF R-branch chemical laser uses a linear array nozzle system having primary and secondary nozzles for exciting HF and a laser resonator having mirrors with reflectance to discriminate against P-branch lasing of the excited Hydrogen Fluoride.

  11. Continental sedimentary processes decouple Nd and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garçon, Marion; Chauvel, Catherine; France-Lanord, Christian; Huyghe, Pascale; Lavé, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The neodymium and hafnium isotopic compositions of most crustal and mantle rocks correlate to form the "Terrestrial Array". However, it is now well established that whereas coarse detrital sediments follow this trend, fine-grained oceanic sediments have high Hf ratios relative to their Nd isotopic ratios. It remains uncertain whether this "decoupling" of the two isotopic systems only occurs in the oceanic environment or if it is induced by sedimentary processes in continental settings. In this study, the hafnium and neodymium isotopic compositions of sediments in large rivers is expressly used to constrain the behavior of the two isotopic systems during erosion and sediment transport from continent to ocean. We report major and trace element concentrations together with Nd and Hf isotopic compositions of bedloads, suspended loads and river banks from the Ganges River and its tributaries draining the Himalayan Range i.e. the Karnali, the Narayani, the Kosi and the Marsyandi Rivers. The sample set includes sediments sampled within the Himalayan Range in Nepal, at the Himalayan mountain front, and also downstream on the floodplain and at the outflow of the Ganges in Bangladesh. Results show that hydrodynamic sorting of minerals explains the entire Hf isotopic range, i.e. more than 10 ?Hf units, observed in the river sediments but does not affect the Nd isotopic composition. Bedloads and bank sediments have systematically lower ?Hf values than suspended loads sampled at the same location. Coarse-grained sediments lie below or on the Terrestrial Array in an ?Hf vs. ?Nd diagram. In contrast, fine-grained sediments, including most of the suspended loads, deviate from the Terrestrial Array toward higher ?Hf relative to their ?Nd, as is the case for oceanic terrigenous clays. The observed Nd-Hf decoupling is explained by mineralogical sorting processes that enrich bottom sediments in coarse and dense minerals, including unradiogenic zircons, while surface sediments are enriched in fine material with radiogenic Hf signatures. The data also show that Nd-Hf isotopic decoupling increases with sediment transport in the floodplain to reach its maximum at the river mouth. This implies that the Nd-Hf isotopic decoupling observed in worldwide oceanic clays and river sediments is likely to have the same origin. Finally, we estimated the Nd-Hf isotopic composition of the present-day mantle if oceanic sediments had never been subducted and conclude that the addition of oceanic sediments with their anomalous Nd-Hf isotopic compositions has slowly shifted the composition of the Earth's mantle towards more radiogenic Hf values through time.

  12. Airborne Doppler radar observations of convective plumes and radar `fine-lines' ERAD02-A-00007

    E-print Network

    Geerts, Bart

    Airborne Doppler radar observations of convective plumes and radar `fine-lines' ERAD02-A-00007 Bart; email: geerts@uwyo.edu #12;Airborne Doppler radar observations of convective plumes and radar `fine-lines' Abstract Reflectivities and Doppler velocities from an airborne 95 GHz radar are used to describe

  13. P15R.1 THE DETECTABILITY OF TORNADIC SIGNATURES WITH DOPPLER RADAR: A RADAR EMULATOR STUDY

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ming

    P15R.1 THE DETECTABILITY OF TORNADIC SIGNATURES WITH DOPPLER RADAR: A RADAR EMULATOR STUDY Ryan M of WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler) scanning strategies on the sampling of mesocyclones describes a radar emulator designed to simulate the returns from a scanning Doppler radar on a pulse

  14. A 100 GHz Polarimetric Compact Radar Range for Scale-Model Radar Cross Section Measurements

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    A 100 GHz Polarimetric Compact Radar Range for Scale-Model Radar Cross Section Measurements Guy B for obtaining radar cross section, inverse synthetic aperture radar imagery and high range resolution profiles-- A fully polarimetric compact radar range operating at a center frequency of 100 GHz has been developed

  15. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, C. R. (editor); Wolf, W. (editor); Klassen, W. (editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  16. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  17. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  18. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  19. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  20. FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-25

    FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR Project Title:  FIRE II CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Platform:  Ground Station Instrument:  Radar Spatial Coverage:  (37.06, -95.34) Spatial ... Search Guide Documents:  ETL_RADAR Guide Readme Files:  Readme ETL_RADAR (PS) ...

  1. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  2. Understanding Radar Refractivity: Sources of Uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jidong

    Understanding Radar Refractivity: Sources of Uncertainty David Bodine1,2 , Dan Michaud1,2 , Robert Radar Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA 3 NOAA/OAR National Severe Storms validation of WSR-88D radar refractiv- ity retrievals, and discusses some challenges to implementing radar

  3. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  4. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  5. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  6. Digital Preservation for Digital Repositories

    E-print Network

    Southampton, University of

    Med Spreadsheet CrossRef ACM Digital Library BibTeX OAI-ORE ORE Resource Map Google Maps Simile Timeline Bibtex. #12;#12;Import Export XML EndNote PubMed Spreadsheet CrossRef ACM Digital Library BibTeX OAI-ORE ORE" Digital Preservation for Digital Repositories David Tarrant University of Southampton (UK) dct05r

  7. Compact Radar Transceiver with Included Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matthew; Rincon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is an eight-channel phased array radar system that employs solid-state radar transceivers, a microstrip patch antenna, and a reconfigurable waveform generator and processor unit. The original DBSAR transceiver design utilizes connectorized electronic components that tend to be physically large and heavy. To achieve increased functionality in a smaller volume, PCB (printed circuit board) transceivers were designed to replace the large connectorized transceivers. One of the most challenging problems designing the transceivers in a PCB format was achieving proper performance in the calibration path. For a radar loop-back calibration path, a portion of the transmit signal is coupled out of the antenna feed and fed back into the receiver. This is achieved using passive components for stability and repeatability. Some signal also leaks through the receive path. As these two signal paths are correlated via an unpredictable phase, the leakage through the receive path during transmit must be 30 dB below the calibration path. For DBSAR s design, this requirement called for a 100-dB isolation in the receiver path during transmit. A total of 16 solid-state L-band transceivers on a PCB format were designed. The transceivers include frequency conversion stages, T/R switching, and a calibration path capable of measuring the transmit power-receiver gain product during transmit for pulse-by-pulse calibration or matched filtering. In particular, this calibration path achieves 100-dB isolation between the transmitted signal and the low-noise amplifier through the use of a switching network and a section of physical walls achieving attenuation of radiated leakage. The transceivers were designed in microstrip PCBs with lumped elements and individually packaged components for compactness. Each transceiver was designed on a single PCB with a custom enclosure providing interior walls and compartments to isolate transceiver subsystems from radiated interference. The enclosure also acts as a heat sink for the voltage regulators and power amplifiers inside the system. The PCB transceiver design produces transmit pulses of 2 W with an arbitrary duty cycle. Each transceiver is fed by an external 120-MHz signal transmit and two 1,140-MHz local oscillator signals. The received signal is amplified and down-converted to 120 MHz and is fed to the data processor. The transceiver dimensions are approximately 3.5 11.5 0.6 in. (9 29 1.5 cm). The PCB transceiver design reduces the volume and weight of the DBSAR instrument while maintaining the functionality found in the original design. Both volume and weight are critical for airborne and flight remote sensing instrumentation.

  8. Hf propagation through actively modified ionospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Wolcott, J.H.; Simons, D.J. ); Warshaw, S.; Carlson, R. )

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a computer modeling capability to predict the effect of localized electron density perturbations created by chemical releases or high-power radio frequency heating upon oblique, one-hop hf propagation paths. We have included 3-d deterministic descriptions of the depleted or enhanced ionization, including formation, evolution, and drift. We have developed a homing ray trace code to calculate the path of energy propagation through the modified ionosphere in order to predict multipath effects. We also consider the effect of random index of refraction variations using a formalism to calculate the mutual coherence functions for spatial and frequency separations based upon a path integral solution of the parabolic wave equation for a single refracted path through an ionosphere which contains random electron density fluctuations. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  10. The (178m2)Hf Controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J A; Gemmell, D S; Schiffer, J P; Wilhelmy, J B

    2003-07-24

    Since its discovery in the 1960's the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer has garnered high attention from both the basic and applied communities in nuclear science. It's combination of high spin (16+), long half life (31 yrs), and high excitation energy (2.446 MeV) offer unique possibilities as an energy storage medium. Interest in the isomer was rekindled beginning in 1999 when a series of publications began to appear from a group (referred to here as the ''Texas collaboration'') primarily based at the University of Texas, Dallas [1]. They reported observations that some of the stored energy could be released (''triggered'') when the isomer was exposed to a fluence of photons in the energy range {approx}10 to {approx}60 keV. The implications of this observation are profound. Even though the claimed cross section for the process was {approx}7 orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted from the known systematics of photon absorption by nuclei in this mass range [2], such a highly efficient method for triggering the isomeric deexcitation immediately suggested applications utilizing the explosive or the controlled gradual energy release from a very compact source. The prospect of such applications has focused considerable interest on realizing the promise that is implicit in the reported observations. However, two experiments performed by a group from ANL/LANL/LLNL at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (the ''APS collaboration'') reported negative results for the observation of any photon-triggered deexcitation of the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer [3]. This has led to a continued controversy, where both sides have adamantly defended their observations. At this point an outsider has difficulty determining whether there is indeed a triggering effect that should be pursued energetically with substantial resources, or whether the phenomenon consists of overly optimistic interpretation of data.

  11. The Clementine Bistatic Radar Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C. L.; Spudis, P.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, beta, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same-sense polarization enhancement around beta = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

  12. Seasat views North America, the Caribbean, and Western Europe with imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Blom, R. G.; Bryan, M. L.; Daily, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Elachi, C.; Xenos, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    Forty-one digitally correlated Seasat synthetic-aperture radar images of land areas in North America, the Caribbean, and Western Europe are presented to demonstrate this microwave orbital imagery. The characteristics of the radar images, the types of information that can be extracted from them, and certain of their inherent distortions are briefly described. Each atlas scene covers an area of 90 X 90 kilometers, with the exception of the one that is the Nation's Capital. The scenes are grouped according to salient features of geology, hydrology and water resources, urban landcover, or agriculture. Each radar image is accompanied by a corresponding image in the optical or near-infrared range, or by a simple sketch map to illustrate features of interest. Characteristics of the Seasat radar imaging system are outlined.

  13. Computer-aided methods of the LPI radar signal detection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, Yury; Janczak, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a possible structure of the LPI radar signal classification algorithm based on using a computer system with elements of the artificial intelligence (AI). Such an algorithm uses a combination of different signal processing tools such as the Wigner-Ville Distribution, the Wavelet Transform and the Cyclostationary Signal Analysis. The efficiency of these transformations with respect to different kinds of digital LPI radar signal modulation is considered. For a final classification and parameters extraction on the base of time-frequency or bifrequency representation the artificial intelligence methods can be used. One of the possible approaches to solving the radar signal classification problem is to use a proposed in the paper algorithm which consists of several steps: time-frequency or bifrequency transformations, a noise reduction procedure with using a two-dimensional filter, the RBF artificial neural network (NN) probability density function estimator which extracts the feature vector used for the final radar signal classification without an operator.

  14. Ganymede: observations by radar.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R M; Morris, G A

    1975-06-20

    Radar cross-section measurements indicate that Ganymede scatters to Earth 12 percent of the power expected from a conducting sphere of the same size and distance. This compares with 8 percent for Mars, 12 percent for Venus, 6 percent for Mercury, and about 8 percent for the asteroid Toro. Furthermore, Ganymede is considerably rougher (to the scale of the wavelength used, 12.6 centimeters) than Mars, Venus, or Mercury. Roughness is made evident in this experiment by the presence of echoes away from the center of the disk. A perfectly smooth target would reflect only a glint from the center, whereas a very rough target would reflect power from over the entire disk. PMID:17818164

  15. Multistatic radar resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horridge, Paul R.; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we implement a previously developed sensor management framework within the domain of multistatic radar resource management. The methodology is based on controlling the Posterior Cram³er-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB) which provides a bound on the performance of any unbiased target state estimator. In the second part of the paper, the additional complication of the Doppler Blind Zone, inside which the target cannot be detected, is considered. In the case of missed detections, the PCRLB has been shown to be overly optimistic, so we use a performance measure which more accurately accounts for missed detections. However, existing measures fail to accommodate constraints arising from the blind zone, so we modify the measure to incorporate this extra information. The modified measure is shown to give a more accurate estimate of tracking performance, facilitating efficient resource management.

  16. Multistatic radar resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horridge, Paul R.; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we implement a previously developed sensor management framework within the domain of multistatic radar resource management. The methodology is based on controlling the Posterior Cra?er-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB) which provides a bound on the performance of any unbiased target state estimator. In the second part of the paper, the additional complication of the Doppler Blind Zone, inside which the target cannot be detected, is considered. In the case of missed detections, the PCRLB has been shown to be overly optimistic, so we use a performance measure which more accurately accounts for missed detections. However, existing measures fail to accommodate constraints arising from the blind zone, so we modify the measure to incorporate this extra information. The modified measure is shown to give a more accurate estimate of tracking performance, facilitating efficient resource management.

  17. Advanced digital SAR processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Gaffney, B. P.; Liu, B.; Perry, R. P.; Ruvin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A highly programmable, land based, real time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor requiring a processed pixel rate of 2.75 MHz or more in a four look system was designed. Variations in range and azimuth compression, number of looks, range swath, range migration and SR mode were specified. Alternative range and azimuth processing algorithms were examined in conjunction with projected integrated circuit, digital architecture, and software technologies. The advaced digital SAR processor (ADSP) employs an FFT convolver algorithm for both range and azimuth processing in a parallel architecture configuration. Algorithm performace comparisons, design system design, implementation tradeoffs and the results of a supporting survey of integrated circuit and digital architecture technologies are reported. Cost tradeoffs and projections with alternate implementation plans are presented.

  18. Historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Susumu

    1989-01-01

    A review of the history of radar techniques which have been applied to atmospheric observation is given. The author starts with ionosphere observation with the ionosonde, symbolizing as it does the earliest history of radar observation, and proceeds to later developments in radar observation such as the use of partial reflection, meteor, and incoherent scatter radars. Mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) radars are discussed in terms of lower atmosphere observation.

  19. Nearshore Processes, Currents and Directional Wave Spectra Monitoring Using Coherent and Non-coherent Imaging Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizna, D.; Hathaway, K.

    2007-05-01

    Two new radar systems have been developed for real-time measurement of near-shore processes, and results are presented for measurements of ocean wave spectra, near-shore sand bar structure, and ocean currents. The first is a non-coherent radar based on a modified version of the Sitex radar family, with a data acquisition system designed around an ISR digital receiver card. The card operates in a PC computer with inputs from a Sitex radar modified for extraction of analogue signals for digitization. Using a 9' antenna and 25 kW transmit power system, data were collected during 2007 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF), Duck, NC during winter and spring of 2007. The directional wave spectrum measurements made are based on using a sequence of 64 to 640 antenna rotations to form a snapshot series of radar images of propagating waves. A square window is extracted from each image, typically 64 x 64 pixels at 3-m resolution. Then ten sets of 64 windows are submitted to a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform process to generate radar image spectra in the frequency-wavenumber space. The relation between the radar image spectral intensity and wave spectral intensity derived from the FRF pressure gauge array was used for a test set of data, in order to establish a modulation transfer function (MTF) for each frequency component. For 640 rotations, 10 of such spectra are averaged for improved statistics. The wave spectrum so generated was compared for extended data sets beyond those used to establish the MTF, and those results are presented here. Some differences between the radar and pressure sensor data that are observed are found to be due to the influence of the wind field, as the radar echo image weakens for light winds. A model is developed to account for such an effect to improve the radar estimate of the directional wave spectrum. The radar ocean wave imagery is severely influenced only by extremely heavy rain-fall rates, so that acceptable quality were assured for most weather conditions on a diurnal basis using a modest tower height. A new coherent microwave radar has recently been developed by ISR and preliminary testing was conducted in the spring of 2007. The radar is based on the Quadrapus four-channel transceiver card, mixed up to microwave frequencies for pulse transmission and back down to base-band for reception. We use frequency-modulated pulse compression methods to obtain 3-m spatial resolution. A standard marine radar pedestal is used to house the microwave components, and rotating radar PPI images similar to marine radar images are obtained. Many of the methods used for the marine radar system have been transferred to the coherent imaging radar. New processing methods applied to the coherent data allow summing of radial velocity images to map mean currents in the near shore zone, such as rip currents. A pair of such radars operating with a few hundred meter separation can be used to map vector currents continuously in the near shore zone and in harbors on a timely basis. Results of preliminary testing of the system will be presented.

  20. Improvement of radar ice-thickness measurements of Greenland outlet glaciers using SAR processing

    E-print Network

    Braaten, David A.; Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Namburi, Saikiran; Paden, John; Gurumoorthy, Krishna K.

    2002-01-01

    . The radar has evolved during this period to a highly versatile system capable of characterizing ice thickness over a wide variety of ice-sheet conditions. Before 1997, the digital system was limited, only capable of storing incoherent data or coherent data...

  1. QUANTIFYING SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY WITH GROUND PENETRATING RADAR AND AGRICULTURAL MONITORING DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrology, especially subsurface-water flow can influence crop growth patterns within a production field as well as the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides migrating thru agricultural land. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEM) were used to locate and quanti...

  2. Fly eye radar or micro-radar sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    To compensate for its eye's inability to point its eye at a target, the fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly the wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Based on a similar concept a revolutionary new micro-radar sensor technology is proposed for detecting and tracking ground and/or airborne low profile low altitude targets in harsh urban environments. Distributed along a border or around a protected object (military facility and buildings, camp, stadium) small size, low power unattended radar sensors can be used for target detection and tracking, threat warning, pre-shot sniper protection and provides effective support for homeland security. In addition it can provide 3D recognition and targets classification due to its use of five orders more pulses than any scanning radar to each space point, by using few points of view, diversity signals and intelligent processing. The application of an array of directional antennas eliminates the need for a mechanical scanning antenna or phase processor. It radically decreases radar size and increases bearing accuracy several folds. The proposed micro-radar sensors can be easy connected to one or several operators by point-to-point invisible protected communication. The directional antennas have higher gain, can be multi-frequency and connected to a multi-functional network. Fly eye micro-radars are inexpensive, can be expendable and will reduce cost of defense.

  3. Recent Advances in Radar Polarimetry and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    2005-01-01

    The development of Radar Polarimetry and Radar Interferometry is advancing rapidly, and these novel radar technologies are revamping Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging decisively. In this exposition the successive advancements are sketched; beginning with the fundamental formulations and high-lighting the salient points of these diverse remote sensing techniques. Whereas with radar polarimetry the textural fine-structure, target-orientation and shape, symmetries and material constituents can be recovered with considerable improvements above that of standard amplitude-only Polarization Radar ; with radar interferometry the spatial (in depth) structure can be explored. In Polarimetric-Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POL-IN-SAR) Imaging it is possible to recover such co-registered textural plus spatial properties simultaneously. This includes the extraction of Digital Elevation Maps (DEM) from either fully Polarimetric (scattering matrix) or Interferometric (dual antenna) SAR image data takes with the additional benefit of obtaining co-registered three-dimensional POL-IN-DEM information. Extra-Wide-Band POL-IN-SAR Imaging - when applied to Repeat-Pass Image Overlay Interferometry - provides differential background validation and measurement, stress assessment, and environmental stress-change monitoring capabilities with hitherto unattained accuracy, which are essential tools for improved global biomass estimation. More recently, by applying multiple parallel repeat-pass EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging along stacked (altitudinal) or displaced (horizontal) flight-lines will result in Tomographic (Multi- Interferometric) Polarimetric SAR Stereo-Imaging , including foliage and ground penetrating capabilities. It is shown that the accelerated advancement of these modern EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging techniques is of direct relevance and of paramount priority to wide-area dynamic homeland security surveillance and local-to-global environmental ground-truth measurement and validation, stress assessment, and stress-change monitoring of the terrestrial and planetary covers. In addition, various closely related topics of (i) acquiring additional and protecting existing spectral windows of the Natural Electromagnetic Spectrum (NES) pertinent to Remote Sensing; (ii) mitigating against common "Radio Frequency Interference (RFI)" and intentional Directive Jamming of Airborne & Space borne POL-IN-SAR Imaging Platforms are appraised.

  4. Asteroid orbit fitting with radar and angular observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The asteroid orbit fitting problem using their radar and angular observations has been considered. The problem was solved in a standanrd way by means of minimization of weighted sum of squares of residuals. In the orbit fitting both kinds of radar observa-tions have been used: the observations of time delays and of Doppler frequency shifts. The weight for angular observations has been set the same for all of them and has been determined as inverse mean-square residual obtained in the orbit fitting using just angular observations. The weights of radar observations have been set as inverse squared errors of these observations published together with them in the Minor Planet Center electronical circulars (MPECs). For the orbit fitting some five asteroids have been taken from these circulars. The asteroids have been chosen fulfilling the requirement of more than six radar observations of them to be available. The asteroids are 1950 DA, 1999 RQ36, 2002 NY40, 2004 DC and 2005 EU2. Several orbit fittings for these aster-oids have been done: with just angular observations; with just radar observations; with both angular and radar observations. The obtained results are quite acceptable because in the last case the mean-square angular residuals are approximately equal to the same ones obtained in the fitting with just angular observations. As to radar observations mean-square residuals, the time delay residuals for three asteroids do not exceed 1 ?s, for two others ˜ 10 ?s and the Doppler shift residuals for three asteroids do not exceed 1 Hz, for two others ˜ 10 Hz. The motion equations included perturbations from 9 planets and the Moon using their ephemerides DE422. The numerical integration has been performed with Everhart 27-order method with variable step. All calculations have been exe-cuted to a 34-digit decimal precision (i.e. using 128-bit floating-point numbers). Further, the sizes of confidence ellipsoids of im-proved orbit parameters have been compared. It has been accepted that an indicator of ellipsoid size is a geometric mean of its six semi-axes. A comparison of sizes has shown that confidence ellipsoids obtained in orbit fitting with both angular and radar obser-vations are several times less than ellipsoids obtained with just angular observations.

  5. Space Radar Image of Missoula, Montana in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Missoula, Montana, created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this are useful because they show scientists the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. This technique helps to clarify the relationships of the different types of materials on the surface detected by the radar. The view is looking north-northeast. The blue circular area at the lower left corner is a bend of the Bitterroot River just before it joins the Clark Fork, which runs through the city. Crossing the Bitterroot River is the bridge of U.S. Highway 93. Highest mountains in this image are at elevations of 2,200 meters (7,200 feet). The city is about 975 meters (3,200 feet) above sea level. The bright yellow areas are urban and suburban zones, dark brown and blue-green areas are grasslands, bright green areas are farms, light brown and purple areas are scrub and forest, and bright white and blue areas are steep rocky slopes. The two radar images were taken on successive days by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; and blue are differences seen in the L-band data between the two days. This image is centered near 46.9 degrees north latitude and 114.1 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  6. Detecting Oil Films on Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assyl, Bakasheva; Shagarova, Ludmila; Trishkina, Victoria

    AALR "Institute of Space Research" (Kazakhstan) is equipped with receiving stations and specialized software, which enables to receive, process and archive Earth observation images from satellite RADARSAT -1. Receiving and standard processing of RADARSAT-1 data are certified and approved by the International Corporation RADARSAT and Canadian Space Agency. The data from radar spacecrafts with synthesized aperture (SAR) have a number of properties which enable to use them in a wide range of applied tasks. In particular, these data may be used to detect and monitor oil spills and to discover oil films. Microwave energy of the radiator of Radarsat-1 enables to detect oil spots in any weather conditions. Oil films on water surface may have anthropogenic or natural origin. Taking into account the fact that oil films cover water surface only for the first 10 hours and are rather quickly destroyed under the action of various physical chemical processes, they may be discovered only in the monitoring mode. Natural or anthropogenic films on water surface may be detected on radar images due to local reduction of roughness of water surface, as a result of which the film is seen as a dark spot on the light background of water surface. In order to easily detect a local spot the resolution of SAR must be higher than the spot area. To solve this problem we used software PHOTOMOD Radar, group "Marine applications" -"Processor for oil spots recognition" developed to detect oil spots on the background of uniform water surface and software ENVI, module SARscape for the geographical adjustment of the radar image. The input data were images from RADARSAT-1, (rays in regimes Wide ScanSAR with a small angle of inclination) taken from the SRI operational and long-storage archives. Data processing for each visually chosen fragment of water surface with supposed oil spill consists of several stages. The procedure takes into account water roughness (from 3 to 12 m/s), spot geometry and other factors. The following stages include auto-search for the spot, adaptive threshold and iterative classification, filtration of binary image and calculation of statistics. Threshold classification values are determined by local statistical characteristics of the image. Processing of a radar image in the oil spot recognition processor gives raster binary image with detected oil spots and additional output parameters characterizing spots (area, geographical coordinates of angles). The adjustment of the radar image in SARscape is made more precise using one pixel, which is well identified in the area. This procedure requires additional information -height and coordinates of ground point. To determine these values we used files accessible in the Internet -digital relief model and ortoimage Landsat. The information is introduced into the window Generate Ground Control Point File and adjustment procedure is fulfilled. As a result, the image adjustment is corrected, and superposition with optical Landsat image does not show ghosting of the image. The results of geoadjustment in ENVI after exportation into format Geotiff can be used as input data in other software products. Therefore, we have developed a technological chain for processing of radiolocation data from the operational and long-storage archives using up-to-date program packages in order to solve various scientific and applied problems including environmental problems -monitoring of oil spills.

  7. The U.S. Geological Survey side-looking airborne radar database: an aid to the interpretation of space images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kover, Allan N.; Schoonmaker, James W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a database of side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) images of a significant part of the continental United States. These images provide a regional view of terrains and should be an aid to better understanding image data of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and other systems. The USGS has been systematically collecting SLAR since 1980, initially in analog form, then in both analog and digital format since 1984.

  8. Large Nd-Hf isotopic decoupling in Himalayan River Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcon, M.; Chauvel, C.; France-Lanord, C.

    2011-12-01

    Nd isotopic compositions of river sediments are widely used to trace sediment provenance in the Himalayan mountain range. In contrast, Hf isotopic compositions are not used even though they are excellent proxies to record the history of continental areas (Hawkesworth and Kemp, Chem. Geol. 226, 2006). Here, we focus on the Hf isotopic message carried by Himalayan river sediments and combine it to the more classical Nd isotopes to better understand the behavior of the two systems during erosion. We report Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of bedloads and suspended loads sampled at different depths in the Narayani River in Nepal (upstream of the Ganga floodplain), in the Ganga River in Bangladesh (downstream of the Ganga floodplain) and in the Yamuna River, a major tributary of the Ganga in India. Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of bedloads span a small range of values (-18< ?Nd <-16 and -30< ?Hf <-23) and lie next to the terrestrial array in a ?Hf vs. ?Nd diagram. Nd isotopic compositions are similar to those of the main Himalayan sources. By contrast, suspended loads have much more variable ratios (-19< ?Nd <-10 and -25< ?Hf <-7) and plot well above the terrestrial array in a ?Hf vs. ?Nd diagram. Like oceanic sediments, they are characterized by high ?Hf compared to their ?Nd. We explain this Nd-Hf decoupling by mineralogical sorting, a process that enriches bottom sediments in coarse and dense minerals, such as unradiogenic zircons, while the surface sediments are enriched in fine material with radiogenic Hf signatures. Bedloads and suspended loads, collected at the same sampling site at different depths in the Narayani and Ganga Rivers, share similar ?Nd. However, differences of about 5 ?Nd and 15 ?Hf units are observed between bedload and surface samples in the Yamuna River. In this river, both Nd and Hf isotopic ratios decrease from surface to bottom. We believe that part of the Hf isotopic variability is due to mineralogical sorting but the rest of it, together with the entire Nd range, results from provenance effects. While material transported by the Narayani and Ganga Rivers mainly originates from the highly-resistant crystalline and metamorphic rocks of the Himalayan range, the material present in the Yamuna River partly comes from the more weatherable basaltic Deccan traps. We thus suggest that bedloads and suspended loads do not carry similar provenance information in the Yamuna River. Material produced by the erosion of basalts has highly-radiogenic Nd-Hf isotopic signatures and is preferentially transported in suspension near the river surface. In contrast, crystalline and metamorphic erosion products of the Himalayas have less radiogenic isotopic signatures and are preferentially transported near the river bottom. Our results demonstrate that bedloads and suspended loads do not necessarily share similar sediment sources. In addition, we show that Hf isotopic compositions of bedloads are good proxies of sediment sources in the Himalayan range. This is not the case of the Hf isotopic compositions of suspended loads, which resemble worldwide oceanic sediments. This suggests that the puzzling decoupling of Nd and Hf isotopes in oceanic fine-grain sediments could have its origin in continental areas.

  9. Power-Stepped HF Cross Modulation Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.; Langston, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. In this paper, we apply experimental observations of HF cross-modulation to the related problem of ELF/VLF wave generation. HF cross-modulation measurements are used to evaluate the efficiency of ionospheric conductivity modulation during power-stepped modulated HF heating experiments. The results are compared to previously published dependencies of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF peak power. The experiments were performed during the March 2013 campaign at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory. HAARP was operated in a dual-beam transmission format: the first beam heated the ionosphere using sinusoidal amplitude modulation while the second beam broadcast a series of low-power probe pulses. The peak power of the modulating beam was incremented in 1-dB steps. We compare the minimum and maximum cross-modulation effect and the amplitude of the resulting cross-modulation waveform to the expected power-law dependence of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF power.

  10. Theory of Solar Radar Experiments

    E-print Network

    wave-kinetic theory, we obtain expressions for the frequency shift, the scattering cross-section experimental results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.2.1 Effective cross-sectionsTheory of Solar Radar Experiments: Combination Scattering by Anisotropic Langmuir Turbulence

  11. Ground Penetrating Radar, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    John Peterson

    2015-03-06

    This is 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar collected along the AB Line in Intensive Site 1 beginning in October 2012 and collected along L2 in Intensive Site 0 beginning in September 2011. Both continue to the present.

  12. Advanced Borehole Radar for Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar is a useful tool for monitoring the hydrogeological environment. We have developed GPR systems which can be applied to these purposes, and we will demonstrate examples borehole radar measurements. In order to have longer radar detection range, frequency lower than100MHz has been normally adopted in borehole radar. Typical subsurface fractures of our interests have a few mm aperture and radar resolution is much poorer than a few cm in this frequency range. We are proposing and demonstrating to use radar polarimetry to solve this problem. We have demonstrated that a full-polarimetry borehole radar can be used for characterization of subsurface fractures. Together with signal processing for antenna characteristic compensation to equalize the signal by a dipole antenna and slot antennas, we could demonstrate that polarimetric borehole radar can estimate the surface roughness of subsurface fractures, We believe the surface roughness is closely related to water permeability through the fractures. We then developed a directional borehole radar, which uses optical field sensor. A dipole antenna in a borehole has omni-directional radiation pattern, and we cannot get azimuthal information about the scatterers. We use multiple dipole antennas set around the borehole axis, and from the phase differences, we can estimate the 3-diemnational orientation of subsurface structures. We are using optical electric field sensor for receiver of borehole radar. This is a passive sensor and connected only with optical fibers and does not require any electric power supply to operate the receiver. It has two major advantages; the first one is that the receiver can be electrically isolated from other parts, and wave coupling to a logging cable is avoided. Then, secondary, it can operate for a long time, because it does not require battery installed inside the system. It makes it possible to set sensors in fixed positions to monitor the change of environmental conditions for a long period. We demonstrated this idea using cross- hole borehole radar measurement. We think this method is useful for detecting any changes in hydrogeological situations, which will be useful for subsurface storage such as LNG and nuclear waste.

  13. The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the NASA NPOL S-band dual-polarimetric radar are presented including its operating characteristics, field configuration, scanning capabilities and calibration approaches. Examples of precipitation science data collections conducted using various scan types, and associated products, are presented for different convective system types and previous field campaign deployments. Finally, the NASA NPOL radar location is depicted in its home base configuration within the greater Wallops Flight Facility precipitation research array supporting NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission ground validation.

  14. Digital Collections, Digital Libraries & the Digitization of Cultural Heritage Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital collections and digital libraries. Topics include broadband availability; digital rights protection; content, both non-profit and commercial; digitization of cultural content; sustainability; metadata harvesting protocol; infrastructure; authorship; linking multiple resources; data mining; digitization of reference works;…

  15. Space Radar Image of West Texas - SAR scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image of the Midland/Odessa region of West Texas, demonstrates an experimental technique, called ScanSAR, that allows scientists to rapidly image large areas of the Earth's surface. The large image covers an area 245 kilometers by 225 kilometers (152 miles by 139 miles). It was obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. The smaller inset image is a standard SIR-C image showing a portion of the same area, 100 kilometers by 57 kilometers (62 miles by 35 miles) and was taken during the first flight of SIR-C on April 14, 1994. The bright spots on the right side of the image are the cities of Odessa (left) and Midland (right), Texas. The Pecos River runs from the top center to the bottom center of the image. Along the left side of the image are, from top to bottom, parts of the Guadalupe, Davis and Santiago Mountains. North is toward the upper right. Unlike conventional radar imaging, in which a radar continuously illuminates a single ground swath as the space shuttle passes over the terrain, a Scansar radar illuminates several adjacent ground swaths almost simultaneously, by 'scanning' the radar beam across a large area in a rapid sequence. The adjacent swaths, typically about 50 km (31 miles) wide, are then merged during ground processing to produce a single large scene. Illumination for this L-band scene is from the top of the image. The beams were scanned from the top of the scene to the bottom, as the shuttle flew from left to right. This scene was acquired in about 30 seconds. A normal SIR-C image is acquired in about 13 seconds. The ScanSAR mode will likely be used on future radar sensors to construct regional and possibly global radar images and topographic maps. The ScanSAR processor is being designed for 1996 implementation at NASA's Alaska SAR Facility, located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and will produce digital images from the forthcoming Canadian RADARSAT satellite. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations, and data processing of X-SAR.

  16. Stratospheric HF and HCl observations /15 June 1981/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.; Chance, K. V.

    1981-01-01

    Balloon measurements of the stratospheric HF/HCl ratio are reported. Seven far-infrared rotational lines of HF and HCl were observed at elevation angles of 25, 18 and 8 deg by a far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer on board a balloon platform at 28.5 km. Analysis of line intensities yields an average HF/HCl ratio of 0.18 + or - 0.02 at an effective altitude of 33 km, with a water vapor mixing ratio of about 4 ppmv. Results are noted to be in reasonable agreement with the calculated profile of Sze and Ko (1981) with 4.5 ppmv H2O.

  17. Digital orthophotos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1993-01-01

    A digital orthophoto is a digital image of an aerial photograph with displacements caused by the camera angle and the terrain removed. It, thus, combines the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map.

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition of HfO2 onto Si Using Hf(NMe2)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Chan; Cho, Yong Seok; Heup Moon, Sang

    2009-06-01

    The temperature window for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 onto Si using Hf(NMe2)4 [tetrakis(dimethylamino)hafnium] as an Hf precursor was determined based on the thermal decomposition characteristics of Hf(NMe2)4, as observed by temperature-programmed decomposition in an ultra-high vacuum. The growth rate of the HfO2 obtained in the temperature window was ca. 1.2 Å/cycle. The prepared film had electrical properties suitable for use in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices, showing an equivalent-oxide thickness (EOT) of 2.5 nm and a leakage current density of 1.3 ×10-6 A/cm2 at -1 V. The leakage current was three orders of magnitude lower than that of SiO2 with the same EOT. The lower current leakage was obtained because N atoms in the Hf(NMe2)4 formed an SiNx interlayer by reaction with the Si substrate during the ALD, as confirmed by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by the analysis of residue on the substrate after the decomposition of the Hf precursor.

  19. Development and Observation of the Phase Array Radar at X band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushio, T.; Shimamura, S.; Wu, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kawasaki, Z.; Mizutani, F.; Wada, M.; Satoh, S.; Iguchi, T.

    2013-12-01

    A new Phased Array Radar (PAR) system for thunderstorm observation has been developed by Toshiba Corporation and Osaka University under a grant of NICT, and installed in Osaka University, Japan last year. It is now well known that rapidly evolving severe weather phenomena (e.g., microbursts, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes) are a threat to our lives particularly in a densely populated area and is closely related to the production of lightning discharges. Over the past decade, mechanically rotating radar systems at the C-band or S-band have been proved to be effective for weather surveillance especially in a wide area more than 100 km in range. However, severe thunderstorm sometimes develops rapidly on the temporal and spatial scales comparable to the resolution limit (-10 min. and -500m) of typical S-band or C-band radar systems, and cannot be fully resolved with these radar systems. In order to understand the fundamental process and dynamics of such fast changing weather phenomena like lightning and tornado producing thunderstorm, volumetric observations with both high temporal and spatial resolution are required. The phased array radar system developed has the unique capability of scanning the whole sky with 100m and 10 to 30 second resolution up to 60 km. The system adopts the digital beam forming technique for elevation scanning and mechanically rotates the array antenna in azimuth direction within 10 to 30 seconds. The radar transmits a broad beam of several degrees with 24 antenna elements and receives the back scattered signal with 128 elements digitizing at each elements. Then by digitally forming the beam in the signal processor, the fast scanning is realized. After the installation of the PAR system in Osaka University, the initial observation campaign was conducted in Osaka urban area with Ku-band Broad Band Radar (BBR) network, C-band weather radar, and lightning location system. The initial comparison with C band radar system shows that the developed PAR system can observe the behavior of the thunderstorm structure in much more detail than any other radar system. The observed high temporal resolution images of the severe thunderstorm and lightning are introduced, showing the potential capabilities of the PAR and lightning location system.

  20. Digital Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Canan Gungoren, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Era in which we live is known and referred as digital age.In this age technology is rapidly changed and developed. In light of these technological advances in 21st century, schools have the responsibility of training "digital citizen" as well as a good citizen. Digital citizens must have extensive skills, knowledge, Internet and …

  1. Multiparameter radar analysis using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Ben Bella Sayed

    Multiparameter radars have been used in the interpretation of many meteorological phenomena. Rainfall estimates can be obtained from multiparameter radar measurements. Studying and analyzing spatial variability of different rainfall algorithms, namely R(ZH), the algorithm based on reflectivity, R(ZH, ZDR), the algorithm based on reflectivity and differential reflectivity, R(KDP), the algorithm based on specific differential phase, and R(KDP, Z DR), the algorithm based on specific differential phase and differential reflectivity, are important for radar applications. The data used in this research were collected using CSU-CHILL, CP-2, and S-POL radars. In this research multiple objectives are addressed using wavelet analysis namely, (1)space time variability of various rainfall algorithms, (2)separation of convective and stratiform storms based on reflectivity measurements, (3)and detection of features such as bright bands. The bright band is a multiscale edge detection problem. In this research, the technique of multiscale edge detection is applied on the radar data collected using CP-2 radar on August 23, 1991 to detect the melting layer. In the analysis of space/time variability of rainfall algorithms, wavelet variance introduces an idea about the statistics of the radar field. In addition, multiresolution analysis of different rainfall estimates based on four algorithms, namely R(ZH), R( ZH, ZDR), R(K DP), and R(KDP, Z DR), are analyzed. The flood data of July 29, 1997 collected by CSU-CHILL radar were used for this analysis. Another set of S-POL radar data collected on May 2, 1997 at Wichita, Kansas were used as well. At each level of approximation, the detail and the approximation components are analyzed. Based on this analysis, the rainfall algorithms can be judged. From this analysis, an important result was obtained. The Z-R algorithms that are widely used do not show the full spatial variability of rainfall. In addition another intuitively obvious result was observed namely, R( KDP) has reduced the spatial variability due to smoothing of KDP estimates. The convective and stratiform separation was studied using multiresolution analysis. The June 22, 1995 data collected by CSU-CHILL radar were used to evaluate the technique. Another set of data collected on August 23, 1991 representing stratiform conditions were also studied.

  2. Space Radar Image of Long Island Optical/Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This pair of images of the Long Island, New York region is a comparison of an optical photograph (top) and a radar image (bottom), both taken in darkness in April 1994. The photograph at the top was taken by the Endeavour astronauts at about 3 a.m. Eastern time on April 20, 1994. The image at the bottom was acquired at about the same time four days earlier on April 16,1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) system aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Both images show an area approximately 100 kilometers by 40 kilometers (62 miles by 25 miles) that is centered at 40.7 degrees North latitude and 73.5 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The optical image is dominated by city lights, which are particularly bright in the densely developed urban areas of New York City located on the left half of the photo. The brightest white zones appear on the island of Manhattan in the left center, and Central Park can be seen as a darker area in the middle of Manhattan. To the northeast (right) of the city, suburban Long Island appears as a less densely illuminated area, with the brightest zones occurring along major transportation and development corridors. Since radar is an active sensing system that provides its own illumination, the radar image shows a great amount of surface detail, despite the night-time acquisition. The colors in the radar image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In this image, the water surface - the Atlantic Ocean along the bottom edge and Long Island Sound shown at the top edge - appears red because small waves at the surface strongly reflect the horizontally transmitted and received L-band radar signal. Networks of highways and railroad lines are clearly visible in the radar image; many of them can also be seen as bright lines i the optical image. The runways of John F. Kennedy International Airport appear as a dark rectangle in Jamaica Bay on the left side of the image. Developed areas appear generally as bright green and orange, while agricultural, protected and undeveloped areas appear darker blue or purple. This contrast can be seen on the barrier islands along the south coast of Long Island, which are heavily developed in the Rockaway and Long Beach areas south and east of Jamaica Bay, but further to the east, the islands are protected and undeveloped.

  3. High resolution radar map of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    Previous radar mappings of the Moon at 70 cm wavelength in the late 1960's by Thompson have been replaced with a new set of observations using the 430 MHz radar at the Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico. Radar resolution was reduced to 2 to 5 km radar cell size and a beam-sweep, limb-to-limb calibration was conducted. Advances in computer technology provided the principle means of improving lunar radar mapping at this wavelength. Observation techniques and data processing are described and scattering differences found in the orthographic projection of the radar data are discussed.

  4. Planetary surface roughness derived from ice penetrating radar data: Method and concept validation in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, C.; Schroeder, D. M.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Geological and climatic processes shaping the landscape of planetary bodies imprint the surface with particular textures, i.e. continuous topographic entities at meters to decameters scales where the surface elevation is dominated by a stochastic behavior. The so-called roughness is a proxy to get insights into the type of surface terrain and its ongoing evolution. It is also an important descriptor involved in landing site selection processes to ensure the safe delivery of a lander/rover over a stable work zone. Planetary surface roughnesses are usually derived from point-to-point elevation models acquired by laser altimetry or stereo-imagery. However, in the last decade, nadir-looking penetrating radars have become another remote-sensing technology commonly used for planetary surface and sub-surface characterization (e.g. MARSIS/SHARAD on Mars, LRS on the Moon, and Ice Penetrating Radars for future missions to Europa). Here, we present a statistical method to extract the reflected and scattered components embedded in the surface echoes of HF (3-30 MHz) and VHF (30-300 MHz) penetrating radars in order to derive significant roughness information. We demonstrate the reliability of the method with an application to a radar dataset acquired during the 2004-05 austral summer campaign of the Airborne Geophysical Survey of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, Antarctica, (AGASEA) project with the High-Capability Radar Sounder (HiCARS, 60 MHz) system operated by the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). Results are thoroughly compared with simultaneously acquired laser altimetry and nadir imagery of the surface. We emphasize the possibilities and advantages of the method in light of the future exploration of the Europa and Ganymede icy moons by multi-frequency ice penetrating radars.

  5. Lu-Hf CONSTRAINTS ON THE EVOLUTION OF LUNAR BASALTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujimaki, Hirokazu; Tatsumoto, Mistunobu

    1984-01-01

    The authors show that a cumulate-remelting model best explains the recently acquired data on the Lu-Hf systematics of lunar mare basalts. The authors model is first constructed using the Lu and Hf concentration data and it is then further strengthened by the Hf isotopic evidence. The authors also show that the similarity of MgO/FeO ratios and the Cr//2O//3 contents between high-Ti and low-Ti basalts, which have been given significance by A. E. Ringwood and D. H. Green are not important constraints for lunar basalt petrogenesis. The authors principal aim is to revive the remelting model for further consideration with the powerful constraints of Lu-Hf systematics of lunar basalts.

  6. Theoretical Assessment of 178m2Hf De-Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, E P; Chen, M; Descalle, M A; Escher, J E; Loshak, A; Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Pruet, J; Thompson, I J; Wang, T F

    2008-10-06

    This document contains a comprehensive literature review in support of the theoretical assessment of the {sup 178m2}Hf de-excitation, as well as a rigorous description of controlled energy release from an isomeric nuclear state.

  7. Lu-Hf constraints on the evolution of lunar basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimaki, H.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that a cumulate-remelting model best explains the recently acquired data on the Lu-Hf systematics of lunar mare basalts. The model is constructed using Lu and Hf concentration data and is strengthened by Hf isotopic evidence of Unruh et al. (1984). It is shown that the similarity in MgO/FeO ratios and Cr2O3 content in high-Ti and low-Ti basalts are not important constraints on lunar basalt petrogenesis. The model demonstrates that even the very low Ti or green glass samples are remelting products of a cumulate formed after at least 80-90 percent of the lunar magma ocean had solidified. In the model, all the mare basalts and green glasses were derived from 100-150 km depth in the lunar mantle. The Lu-Hf systematics of KREEP basalts clearly indicate that they would be the final residual liquid of the lunar magma ocean.

  8. Radar reflectivity calibration using differential propagation phase measurement

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Guifu

    Radar reflectivity calibration using differential propagation phase measurement J. Vivekanandan,1 June 2002; accepted 12 June 2002; published 12 March 2003. [1] A method for calibrating radar reflectivity using polarization radar measurements in rain is described. Accurate calibration of radar

  9. Generation of topographic terrain models utilizing synthetic aperture radar and surface level data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Topographical terrain models are generated by digitally delineating the boundary of the region under investigation from the data obtained from an airborne synthetic aperture radar image and surface elevation data concurrently acquired either from an airborne instrument or at ground level. A set of coregistered boundary maps thus generated are then digitally combined in three dimensional space with the acquired surface elevation data by means of image processing software stored in a digital computer. The method is particularly applicable for generating terrain models of flooded regions covered entirely or in part by foliage.

  10. Validation of High Frequency (HF) Propagation Prediction Models in the Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athieno, R.; Jayachandran, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the emergence of modern techniques for long distance communication, Ionospheric communication in the high frequency (HF) band (3-30 MHz) remains significant to both civilian and military users. However, the efficient use of the ever-varying ionosphere as a propagation medium is dependent on the reliability of ionospheric and HF propagation prediction models. Most available models are empirical implying that data collection has to be sufficiently large to provide good intended results. The models we present were developed with little data from the high latitudes which necessitates their validation. This paper presents the validation of three long term High Frequency (HF) propagation prediction models over a path within the Arctic region. Measurements of the Maximum Usable Frequency for a 3000 km range (MUF (3000) F2) for Resolute, Canada (74.75° N, 265.00° E), are obtained from hand-scaled ionograms generated by the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI). The observations have been compared with predictions obtained from the Ionospheric Communication Enhanced Profile Analysis Program (ICEPAC), Voice of America Coverage Analysis Program (VOACAP) and International Telecommunication Union Recommendation 533 (ITU-REC533) for 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2013. A statistical analysis shows that the monthly predictions seem to reproduce the general features of the observations throughout the year though it is more evident in the winter and equinox months. Both predictions and observations show a diurnal and seasonal variation. The analysed models did not show large differences in their performances. However, there are noticeable differences across seasons for the entire period analysed: REC533 gives a better performance in winter months while VOACAP has a better performance for both equinox and summer months. VOACAP gives a better performance in the daily predictions compared to ICEPAC though, in general, the monthly predictions seem to agree more with the observations compared to the daily predictions.

  11. Lifetime measurements in {sup 178}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, R.C. de; Aprahamian, A.; Boerner, H.G.; Doll, C.; Jentschel, M.; Bruce, A.M.; Lesher, S.R.

    2000-02-01

    Lifetimes of levels from K{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +}, K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} and several K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} bands have been measured in the {sup 178}Hf nucleus using the GRID technique. Lifetimes of the 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} levels were measured within the K{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +} {gamma} band. A lower limit was established for the lifetime of the 4{sup +} level of the K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} band. The resulting upper limits for the absolute B(E2) values exclude collective transitions from the K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} to the ground state band but not to the K{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +} {gamma} band. Level lifetimes were also measured for several states within three separate K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} bands. Evidence is presented for a previously unobserved case of two excited K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} bands being connected via collective E2 transitions.

  12. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 ?m and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  13. Forecasting weather radar propagation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, J.; Codina, B.; Lorente, J.

    2007-06-01

    The increasing use of weather radar quantitative precipitation estimates, particularly in automatic applications such as operational hydrometeorological modelling or assimilation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, has promoted the development of quality control procedures on radar data. Anomalous propagation (AP) of the radar beam due to deviation from the standard refractivity vertical profile, is one of the factors that may affect seriously the quality of radar observations because of the increase in quantity and intensity of non-precipitating clutter echoes and consequent contamination of the estimated rainfall field. Another undesired effect of AP is the change in the expected radar echo height, which may be relevant when correcting for beam blockage in radar rainfall estimation in complex terrain. The aim of this paper is to study the use of NWP mesoscale forecasts to predict and monitor AP events. A nested 15-km grid resolution version of the MASS model has been used to retrieve refractivity profiles in the coastal area of Barcelona, near a weather radar and a radiosonde station. Using the refractivity profiles two different magnitudes were computed: the vertical refractivity profile of the lowest 1000 m layer and a ducting index which describes the existence and intensity of the most super-refractive layer contained in the lowest 3-km layer. A comparison between model forecasts and radiosonde diagnostics during a six-month period showed that the model tended to underestimate the degree of super-refraction, with a bias of 4 km-1 and RMSE of 11 km-1 in the 1-km vertical refractivity gradient. Further analysis of the data showed that a combination of previous observations and forecasts allowed to produce modified forecasts improving the original direct model output, decreasing substantially the bias, reducing the RMSE by 20% and improving the skill by 40%, beating also radiosonde observations persistence.

  14. Tracking magmatic processes through Zr/Hf ratios in rocks and Hf and Ti zoning in zircons: An example from the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowery, Claiborne L.E.; Miller, C.F.; Walker, B.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.; Bea, F.

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium and Hf are nearly identical geochemically, and therefore most of the crust maintains near-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios of ???35-40. By contrast, many high-silica rhyolites and granites have anomalously low Zr/Hf (15-30). As zircon is the primary reservoir for both Zr and Hf and preferentially incorporates Zr, crystallization of zircon controls Zr/ Hf, imprinting low Zr/Hf on coexisting melt. Thus, low Zr/Hf is a unique fingerprint of effective magmatic fractionation in the crust. Age and compositional zonation in zircons themselves provide a record of the thermal and compositional histories of magmatic systems. High Hf (low Zr/ Hf) in zircon zones demonstrates growth from fractionated melt, and Ti provides an estimate of temperature of crystallization (TTiZ) (Watson and Harrison, 2005). Whole-rock Zr/Hf and zircon zonation in the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada, document repeated fractionation and thermal fluctuations. Ratios of Zr/Hf are ???30-40 for cumulates and 18-30 for high-SiO2 granites. In zircons, Hf (and U) are inversely correlated with Ti, and concentrations indicate large fluctuations in melt composition and TTiZ (>100??C) for individual zircons. Such variations are consistent with field relations and ion-probe zircon geochronology that indicate a >1 million year history of repeated replenishment, fractionation, and extraction of melt from crystal mush to form the low Zr/Hf high-SiO2 zone. ?? 2006 The Mineralogical Society.

  15. Adherence to clinical guidelines in heart failure (HF) outpatients: Impact of an interprofessional HF team on evidence-based medication use.

    PubMed

    Crissinger, Megan E; Marchionda, Katherine M; Dunlap, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    Clinical systolic heart failure (HF) guidelines specify recommendations for ACE inhibitors (ACEI), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), and beta blockers according to doses used in clinical trials. However, many HF patients remain suboptimally treated. We sought to determine which provider type, between an interprofessional HF team, non-HF cardiologists, and primary care physicians (PCP), most optimally manages HF medications and doses. A retrospective chart review was performed on adult patients at an academic county hospital with an ejection fraction ?40% and a diagnosis of HF, seen by a single provider type (HF team, cardiologist, or PCP) at least twice within a 12-month period. Utilization rates of any ACEI/ARB and any beta blocker were robust across provider types, though evidence-based ACEI/ARB and beta blocker were greatest from the HF team. Doses of evidence-based therapies dropped markedly in the non-HF team groups. The percent of patients prescribed optimal doses of an evidence-based ACEI/ARB AND beta blocker was 69%, 33%, and 25% for the HF team, cardiologists and PCPs, respectively (p?HF team were more frequently prescribed evidence-based medications at optimal doses. This supports using specialized interprofessional HF teams to attain greater adherence to evidence-based recommendations in treating systolic HF. PMID:26091371

  16. Challenging the assumptions of Lu-Hf dating in spinel-peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerly, B. L.; Lassiter, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Lu-Hf 'pseudoisochrons' using peridotite-derived clinopyroxene separates are commonly used to constrain timing of melt depletion and lithosphere formation. However, cpx-based pseudoisochrons are only valid if 1) almost all Hf and Lu is hosted in the cpx, or 2) the system is below the mineral closure temperature. We tested these assumptions by examining Lu and Hf partitioning and Hf-isotope variations in cpx, opx, and bulk peridotite in xenoliths from the eastern Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande Rift. The samples primarily derive from Proterozoic SCLM, span a range of fertility (spinel Cr# range from 0.1-0.5), and have equilibration temperatures ranging from 950-1050°C, similar to temperatures reported for other xenoliths utilized in Lu-Hf isotope studies. Cpx have Hf and Lu concentrations ranging from 40-1000 ppb and 80-290 ppb, respectively. Opx have much lower Hf and Lu concentrations (5-60 ppb and 21-51 ppb). Concentrations of Lu, Hf, and other trace elements are well correlated between cpx and opx, indicating mineral equilibrium. DLucpx/opx and DHfcpx/opx range from 3.5-6.1 and 7.0-20, and are negatively correlated with cpx MgO content and other indices of peridotite fertility (e.g., spinel Cr#). Our results agree with (and extend the compositional range of) partition coefficients estimated following the formulation of [1]. The fraction of Lu and Hf hosted in opx increases in highly refractory samples. Although Lu/Hf in cpx is close to WR Lu/Hf in fertile samples, in refractory samples it is much lower. Hf isotopes in cpx are well correlated with cpx Lu/Hf (r2 = 0.998) and yield a pseudoisochron age of ~1.6 Ga (initial ?Hf of +30). Opx have systematically higher Lu/Hf than cpx, but in most samples have identical Hf isotopes. Some opx and WR have lower 176Hf/177Hf, similar to the host magma, likely reflecting melt contamination. The identical Hf isotopes in cpx and opx indicate that xenoliths evolved above the Lu-Hf closure temperature. Therefore, cpx (and opx) 176Hf/177Hf is supported by the bulk-xenolith Lu/Hf ratio, not the mineral ratio. Because many xenoliths have experienced recent metasomatism, most likely along grain boundaries, pseudoisochrons utilizing measured WR Lu/Hf show considerable scatter (r2 = 0.501). Therefore, we calculated WR Lu/Hf from cpx and opx modes and mineral Lu and Hf concentrations. A pseudoisochron with cpx 176Hf/177Hf and 'calculated' WR Lu/Hf yields an age of ~1.3 Ga (r2 = 0.999, initial ?Hf of +20). This initial ?Hf is closer to (but still higher than) the depleted mantle estimate at Tinitial of +12 [2]. Use of cpx Lu/Hf in pseudoisochrons yields systematically older ages and higher initial ?Hf values than when WR Lu/Hf is used. For example, xenoliths from the North China Craton [3] have a cpx pseudoisochron age of 1.6 Ga (initial ?Hf of +16), whereas a pseudoisochron using 'calculated' WR Lu/Hf yields a much younger age of 0.8 Ga (and more reasonable initial ?Hf of +11). Most studies report anomalously high initial ?Hf, which may be the result of using cpx Lu/Hf when WR Lu/Hf is more appropriate. [1] Witt-Eickschen, G., O'Neill, H.S.C., (2005). Chem. Geo., 221, 65-101. [2] Vervoort, J.D., Blichert-Toft, J., (1999). GCA, 63, 533-556. [3] Liu, J., et al., (2012). Chem. Geo., 332-333, 1-14.

  17. DESDynI Quad First Stage Processor - A Four Channel Digitizer and Digital Beam Forming Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Chung-Lun; Shaffer, Scott; Smythe, Robert; Niamsuwan, Noppasin; Li, Samuel; Liao, Eric; Lim, Chester; Morfopolous, Arin; Veilleux, Louise

    2013-01-01

    The proposed Deformation, Eco-Systems, and Dynamics of Ice Radar (DESDynI-R) L-band SAR instrument employs multiple digital channels to optimize resolution while keeping a large swath on a single pass. High-speed digitization with very fine synchronization and digital beam forming are necessary in order to facilitate this new technique. The Quad First Stage Processor (qFSP) was developed to achieve both the processing performance as well as the digitizing fidelity in order to accomplish this sweeping SAR technique. The qFSP utilizes high precision and high-speed analog to digital converters (ADCs), each with a finely adjustable clock distribution network to digitize the channels at the fidelity necessary to allow for digital beam forming. The Xilinx produced FX130T Virtex 5 part handles the processing to digitally calibrate each channel as well as filter and beam form the receive signals. Demonstrating the digital processing required for digital beam forming and digital calibration is instrumental to the viability of the proposed DESDynI instrument. The qFSP development brings this implementation to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. This paper will detail the design and development of the prototype qFSP as well as the preliminary results from hardware tests.

  18. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  19. Simulation of radar echoes from Mars' surface/subsurface and inversion of surface media parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan; Ye, Hongxia; Jin, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    A two-layer model of Mars' regolith/bedrock media with a cratered rough surface/subsurface is presented for radar echo simulation of planetary exploration research. The numerical approach of geometric ray tracing for the scattering of rough surfaces, which is digitized by the triangulated network, is applied to the calculation of the scattering and imaging simulation of radar range echoes. Numerical simulations of a cratered rough surface generated by the Monte Carlo method are used to analyze the functional dependence of radar range echoes at 1-50 MHz center frequencies upon the surface/subsurface feature and the parameters of the layering media, that is, layer depth and dielectric properties. The radar range echoes from two areas of the real Mars surface, which is described by digital elevation model data with a resolution of 1 m × 1 m and a vertical error of less than 1 m, are also simulated and analyzed. Based on these simulations, this study presents a numerical imaging test of radar sounder at center frequencies 1-50 MHz for exploration of different dielectric regolith and bedrock media. The channel 50 MHz with high resolution might be an optimal frequency. Finally, inversion of the dielectric constants of the two-layer media and the regolith layer thickness are developed.

  20. Quantifying the Differences in Low Probability of Intercept Radar Waveforms Using Quadrature Mirror Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarpa, Pedro

    2002-09-01

    Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) radars are a class of radar systems that possess certain performance% characteristics causing them to be nearly undetectable by most modern digital intercept receivers, Consequently, LPI radar systems can operate undetected until the intercept receiver is much closer than the radar's target detector, The enemy is thus faced with a significant problem To detect these types of radar, new direct digital receivers that use sophisticated signal processing are required, This thesis describes a novel signal processing architecture, and shows simulation results for a number of LPI waveforms. The LPI signal detection receiver is based on Quadrature Minor Filter Bank (QMFB) Tree processing and orthogonal wavelet techniques to decompose the input waveform into components representing the signal energy in rectangular "tiles" in the time-frequency plane, By analyzing the outputs at different layers of the tree it is possible to do feature extraction, identify and classify the LPI waveform parameters, and distinguish among the various LPI signal modulations Waveforms used as input signals to the detection algorithm include Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave, Polyphase Codes, Costas Codes and Frequency Shift Keying/Phase Shift Keying waveforms. The output matrices resulting from the most relevant layers of the QMFB tree processing are examined and the LPI modulation parameters are extracted under various signal-to-noise ratios,

  1. Synthesis of freestanding HfO2 nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two new methods for synthesizing nanostructured HfO2 have been developed. The first method entails exposing HfTe2 powders to air. This simple process resulted in the formation of nanometer scale crystallites of HfO2. The second method involved a two-step heating process by which macroscopic, freestanding nanosheets of HfO2 were formed as a byproduct during the synthesis of HfTe2. These highly two-dimensional sheets had side lengths measuring up to several millimeters and were stable enough to be manipulated with tweezers and other instruments. The thickness of the sheets ranged from a few to a few hundred nanometers. The thinnest sheets appeared transparent when viewed in a scanning electron microscope. It was found that the presence of Mn enhanced the formation of HfO2 by exposure to ambient conditions and was necessary for the formation of the large scale nanosheets. These results present new routes to create freestanding nanostructured hafnium dioxide. PACS: 81.07.-b, 61.46.Hk, 68.37.Hk. PMID:21711786

  2. A user's manual for the NASA/JPL synthetic aperture radar and the NASA/JPL L and C band scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne synthetic aperture radars and scatterometers are operated with the goals of acquiring data to support shuttle imaging radars and support ongoing basic active microwave remote sensing research. The aircraft synthetic aperture radar is an L-band system at the 25-cm wavelength and normally operates on the CV-990 research aircraft. This radar system will be upgraded to operate at both the L-band and C-band. The aircraft scatterometers are two independent radar systems that operate at 6.3-cm and 18.8-cm wavelengths. They are normally flown on the C-130 research aircraft. These radars will be operated on 10 data flights each year to provide data to NASA-approved users. Data flights will be devoted to Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) underflights. Standard data products for the synthetic aperture radars include both optical and digital images. Standard data products for the scatterometers include computer compatible tapes with listings of radar cross sections (sigma-nought) versus angle of incidence. An overview of these radars and their operational procedures is provided by this user's manual.

  3. Space Radar Image Isla Isabela in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional view of Isabela, one of the Galapagos Islands located off the western coast of Ecuador, South America. This view was constructed by overlaying a Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) image on a digital elevation map produced by TOPSAR, a prototype airborne interferometric radar which produces simultaneous image and elevation data. The vertical scale in this image is exaggerated by a factor of 1.87. The SIR-C/X-SAR image was taken on the 40th orbit of space shuttle Endeavour. The image is centered at about 0.5 degree south latitude and 91 degrees west longitude and covers an area of 75 by 60 kilometers (47 by 37 miles). The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees. The western Galapagos Islands, which lie about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles)west of Ecuador in the eastern Pacific, have six active volcanoes similar to the volcanoes found in Hawaii and reflect the volcanic processes that occur where the ocean floor is created. Since the time of Charles Darwin's visit to the area in 1835, there have been more than 60 recorded eruptions on these volcanoes. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. Vertical exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (for example, faults, and fractures) and topography. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI).

  4. SEASAT views oceans and sea ice with synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. L.; Holt, B.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the oceans and sea ice are presented. Surface and internal waves, the Gulf Stream system and its rings and eddies, the eastern North Pacific, coastal phenomena, bathymetric features, atmospheric phenomena, and ship wakes are represented. Images of arctic pack and shore-fast ice are presented. The characteristics of the SEASAT SAR system and its image are described. Maps showing the area covered, and tables of key orbital information, and listing digitally processed images are provided.

  5. Using of standard marine radar for determination of a water surface and an atmosphere near-surface layer parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatov, Nikolay A.; Bakhanov, Victor V.; Ermoshkin, Aleksei V.; Kazakov, Vasily I.; Kemarskaya, Olga N.; Titov, Victor I.; Troitskaya, Yulia I.

    2014-10-01

    At present time radar methods of the seas and oceans diagnostics are actively developing. Using of the radar stations based on satellites and planes allows to receive information on a sea surface and a atmosphere near-surface layer with coverage of big water surface areas independently of day time. The developed methods of satellite radio images processing can be applied to marine radar stations. In Institute of Applied Physics RAS works on sea surface diagnostics systems development on the basis of standard marine radar are actively conducted. Despite smaller coverage of the territory in comparison with satellite data, marine radar have possibility to record spatially temporary radar images and to receive information on a surrounding situation quickly. This work deals with results of the researches which were conducted within the international expedition in the Atlantic Ocean in the autumn of 2012 on a route Rotterdam (Netherlands) - Ushuaya (Argentina) - Antarctica — Ushuaya. During this expedition a complex measurements of a sea surface, a atmosphere near-surface layer parameters and subsurface currents in the wide range of hydroweather conditions, including the storm were carried out. The system developed in IAP RAS on the basis of a marine radar ICOM MR-1200RII and the ADC (Analog Digital Converter) block for data recording on the personal computer was used. Display of a non-uniform near-surface current on sea surface radar images in storm conditions is shown. By means of the high-speed anemometer and meteorological station the measurements of the atmosphere parameters were carried out. Comparison of the anemometer data with calculated from radar images is carried out. Dependence of radar cross section from wind speed in the wide range of wind speeds, including storm conditions is investigated. Possibility of marine radar using for surface waves intensity and ice situation estimates also as icebergs detection is shown.

  6. The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar

    SciTech Connect

    P Kollias; MA Miller; KB Widener; RT Marchand; TP Ackerman

    2005-12-30

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates millimeter wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several climatological regimes. The MMCRs, are the primary observing tool for quantifying the properties of nearly all radiatively important clouds over the ACRF sites. The first MMCR was installed at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site nine years ago and its original design can be traced to the early 90s. Since then, several MMCRs have been deployed at the ACRF sites, while no significant hardware upgrades have been performed. Recently, a two-stage upgrade (first C-40 Digital Signal Processors [DSP]-based, and later the PC-Integrated Radar AcQuisition System [PIRAQ-III] digital receiver) of the MMCR signal-processing units was completed. Our future MMCR related goals are: 1) to have a cloud radar system that continues to have high reliability and uptime and 2) to suggest potential improvements that will address increased sensitivity needs, superior sampling and low cost maintenance of the MMCRs. The Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) technology, the frequency (35-GHz), the radio frequency (RF) layout, antenna, the calibration and radar control procedure and the environmental enclosure of the MMCR remain assets for our ability to detect the profile of hydrometeors at all heights in the troposphere at the ACRF sites.

  7. Description and demonstration of the new Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar imaging system: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D imaging of troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Luce, H.; Fukao, S.

    2008-04-01

    The Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (MUR) was upgraded in March 2004 for radar imaging capability with 5 frequencies across a 1 MHz bandwidth and 25 digital receivers. Although digitization introduces problems of its own, the uniformity of digitization is a great benefit over the analogue system in place before. This increased reliability will help make the new system an important component of long-term atmospheric science programs. We demonstrate 3-D imaging with Capon's method, which can provide information about structure morphology. In addition, we demonstrate an experimental 0.5 ?s pulse mode and compare this to Capon method imaging results.

  8. Automated Target Recognition Using Passive Radar and Coordinated Flight Models

    E-print Network

    Lanterman, Aaron

    approach to ATR compares the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of targets detected by a passive radar system, Passive Radar, Coordinated Flight Model, Radar Cross Section 1. INTRODUCTION Passive radar systems which if the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of the targets vary "slowly" with small changes in these components

  9. Radar Mosaic of Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is an image of equatorial Africa, centered on the equator at longitude 15degrees east. This image is a mosaic of almost 4,000 separate images obtained in 1996 by the L-band imaging radar onboard the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite. Using radar to penetrate the persistent clouds prevalent in tropical forests, the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite was able for the first time to image at high resolution this continental scale region during single flooding seasons. The area shown covers about 7.4 million square kilometers (2.8 million square miles) of land surface, spans more than 5,000 kilometers(3,100 miles) east and west and some 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles) north and south. North is up in this image. At the full resolution of the mosaic (100 meters or 330 feet), this image is more than 500 megabytes in size, and was processed from imagery totaling more than 60 gigabytes.

    Central Africa was imaged twice in 1996, once between January and March, which is the major low-flood season in the Congo Basin, and once between October and November, which is the major high-flood season in the Congo Basin. The red color corresponds to the data from the low-flood season, the green to the high-flood season, and the blue to the 'texture' of the low-flood data. The forests appear green as a result, the flooded and palm forests, as well as urban areas, appear yellow, the ocean and lakes appear black, and savanna areas appear blue, black or green, depending on the savanna type, surface topography and other factors. The areas of the image that are black and white were mapped only between January and March 1996. In these areas, the black areas are savanna or open water, the gray are forests, and the white areas are flooded forests or urban areas. The Congo River dominates the middle of the image, where the nearby forests that are periodically flooded by the Congo and its tributaries stand out as yellow. The Nile River flows north from Lake Victoria in the middle right of the color portion of the mosaic.

    This image is one of the products resulting from the Global Rain Forest Mapping project, a joint project between the National Space Development Agency of Japan, the Space Applications Institute of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and an international team of scientists. The goal of the Global Rain Forest Mapping mission is to map with the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite the world's tropical rain forests. The Japanese satellite was launched in 1992 by the National Space Development Agency of Japan and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry, with support from the Remote Sensing Technology Center of Japan.

  10. Role of Hf on Phase Formation in Ti45Zr(38-x)Hf(x)Ni17 Liquids and Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessels, V.; Sahu, K. K.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Huett, V. T.; Canepari, S.; Goldman, A. I.; Hyers, R. W.; Kramer, M. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Kelton, K. F.; Robinson, D.

    2008-01-01

    Hafnium and zirconium are very similar, with almost identical sizes and chemical bonding characteristics. However, they behave differently when alloyed with Ti and Ni. A sharp phase formation boundary near 18-21 at.% Hf is observed in rapidly-quenched and as-cast Ti45Zr38-xHfxNi17 alloys. Rapidly-quenched samples that contain less than 18 at.% Hf form the icosahedral quasicrystal phase, whiles samples containing more than 21 at.% form the 3/2 rational approximant phase. In cast alloys, a C14 structure is observed for alloys with Hf lower than the boundary concentration, while a large-cell (11.93 ) FCC Ti2Ni-type structure is found in alloys with Hf concentrations above the boundary. To better understand the role of Hf on phase formation, the structural evolution with supercooling and the solidification behavior of liquid Ti45Zr38-xHfxNi17 alloys (x=0, 12, 18, 21, 38) were studied using the Beamline Electrostatic Levitation (BESL) technique using 125keV x-rays on the 6ID-D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. For all liquids primary crystallization was to a BCC solid solution phase; interestly, an increase in Hf concentration leads to a decrease in the BCC lattice parameter in spite of the chemical similarity between Zr and Hf. A Reitveld analysis confirmed that as in the cast alloys, the secondary phase that formed was the C14 below the phase formation boundary and a Ti2Ni-type structure at higher Hf concentrations. Both the liquidus temperature and the reduced undercooling change sharply on traversing the phase formation boundary concentration, suggesting a change in the liquid structure. Structural information from a Honeycutt-Anderson index analysis of reverse Monte Carlo fits to the S(q) liquid data will be presented to address this issue.

  11. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  12. The Accuracy of Radar Estimates of Ice Terminal Fall Speed from Vertically Pointing Doppler Radar Measurements

    E-print Network

    Protat, Alain

    vertically pointing cloud radar. For the observed vertical air motions, it is found that the mean vertical as a reference. It is found that the variability of the terminal fall speed­radar reflectivity relationship (VtThe Accuracy of Radar Estimates of Ice Terminal Fall Speed from Vertically Pointing Doppler Radar

  13. Imaging coherent scatter radar, incoherent scatter radar, and optical observations of quasiperiodic structures associated with sporadic

    E-print Network

    Mendillo, Michael

    Imaging coherent scatter radar, incoherent scatter radar, and optical observations of quasiperiodic; published 20 June 2007. [1] During June and July 2002, a 30-MHz imaging coherent scatter radar was installed scatter radar. In six of those events, simultaneous measurements were made with the Arecibo 430-MHz

  14. VALIDATION OF A RADAR DOPPLER SPECTRA SIMULATOR USING MEASUREMENTS FROM THE ARM CLOUD RADARS

    E-print Network

    VALIDATION OF A RADAR DOPPLER SPECTRA SIMULATOR USING MEASUREMENTS FROM THE ARM CLOUD RADARS to compare models with observations contains advantages and challenges. Radar Doppler spectra simulators model output with the Doppler spectra recorded from the vertically pointing cloud radars at the ARM

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AEROSPACE AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS 1 MIMO-MC Radar: A MIMO Radar Approach

    E-print Network

    Bajwa, Waheed U.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AEROSPACE AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS 1 MIMO-MC Radar: A MIMO Radar Approach Based. Petropulu, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--In a typical MIMO radar scenario, transmit nodes transmit orthogonal, leads to target detection and parameter estimation. In MIMO radars with compressive sensing (MIMO- CS

  16. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... onboard radar-equipped vessels of 300 GRT or over must hold an endorsement as radar observer. (c) Each... service as master or mate onboard an uninspected towing vessel of 8 meters (26 feet) or more in...

  17. Extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yimin; Meng, Huadong; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Xiqin

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive waveform design for extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks. A closed-loop active target recognition radar system is extended to the case of a centralized cognitive radar network, in which a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) framework is employed. Using Doppler velocities measured by multiple radars, the target aspect angle for each radar is calculated. The joint probability of each target hypothesis is then updated using observations from different radar line of sights (LOS). Based on these probabilities, a minimum correlation algorithm is proposed to adaptively design the transmit waveform for each radar in an amplitude fluctuation situation. Simulation results demonstrate performance improvements due to the cognitive radar network and adaptive waveform design. Our minimum correlation algorithm outperforms the eigen-waveform solution and other non-cognitive waveform design approaches. PMID:22163464

  18. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Carlos E. (Livermore, CA); Zumstein, James E. (Livermore, CA); Chang, John T. (Danville, CA); Leach, Jr.. Richard R. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2006-12-12

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  19. Signal processing for airborne bistatic radar 

    E-print Network

    Ong, Kian P

    The major problem encountered by an airborne bistatic radar is the suppression of bistatic clutter. Unlike clutter echoes for a sidelooking airborne monostatic radar, bistatic clutter echoes are range dependent. Using ...

  20. MIMO Radar Waveform Constraints for GMTI

    E-print Network

    Forsythe, Keith W.

    Ground moving-target indication (GMTI) provides both an opportunity and challenge for coherent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. MIMO techniques can improve a radar's angle estimation and the minimum detectable ...

  1. A Through-Dielectric Radar Imaging System

    E-print Network

    Charvat, Gregory L.

    Through-lossy-slab radar imaging will be shown at stand-off ranges using a low-power, ultrawideband (UWB), frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar system. FMCW is desirable for through-slab applications because ...

  2. Relationship between CCR and NT-proBNP in Chinese HF Patients, and Their Correlations with Severity of HF

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhigang; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yunliang; Qian, Xueqing; Zheng, Wei; Wei, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the relationship between creatinine clearance rate (CCR) and the level of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in heart failure (HF) patients and their correlations with HF severity. Methods and Results. Two hundred and one Chinese patients were grouped according to the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification as NYHA 1-2 and 3-4 groups and 135 cases out of heart failure patients as control group. The following variables were compared among these three groups: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, hypertension, diabetes, NT-proBNP, creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), and CCR. The biomarkers of NT-proBNP, Cr, UA, LVEDD, and CCR varied significantly in the three groups, and these variables were positively correlated with the NHYA classification. The levels of NT-proBNP and CCR were closely related to the occurrence of HF and were independent risk factors for HF. At the same time, there was a significant negative correlation between the levels of NT-proBNP and CCR. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve suggested that the NT-proBNP and CCR have high accuracy for diagnosis of HF and have clinical diagnostic value. Conclusion. NT-proBNP and CCR may be important biomarkers in evaluating the severity of HF. PMID:25250312

  3. SMAP RADAR Processing and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission uses L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This presentation will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation. To obtain the desired high spatial resolution the level 1 radar ground processor employs synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging techniques. Part of the challenge of the SMAP data processing comes from doing SAR imaging on a conically scanned system with rapidly varying squint angles. The radar echo energy will be divided into range/Doppler bins using time domain processing algorithms that can easily follow the varying squint angle. For SMAP, projected range resolution is about 250 meters, while azimuth resolution varies from 400 meters to 1.2 km. Radiometric calibration of the SMAP radar means measuring, characterizing, and where necessary correcting the gain and noise contributions from every part of the system from the antenna radiation pattern all the way to the ground processing algorithms. The SMAP antenna pattern will be computed using an accurate antenna model, and then validated post-launch using homogeneous external targets such as the Amazon rain forest to look for uncorrected gain variation. Noise subtraction is applied after image processing using measurements from a noise only channel. Variations of the internal electronics are tracked by a loopback measurement which will capture most of the time and temperature variations of the transmit power and receiver gain. Long-term variations of system performance due to component aging will be tracked and corrected using stable external reference targets. Candidate targets include the Amazon rain forest and a model-corrected global ocean measurement. Radio frequency interference (RFI) signals are expected in the L-band frequency window used by the SMAP radar because many other users also operate in this band. Based on results of prior studies at JPL, SMAP L1 radar processing will use a "Slow-time thresholding" or STT algorithm to handle RFI contamination. The STT technique looks at the slow-time series associated with a given range sample, sets an appropriate threshold, and identifies any samples that rise above this threshold as RFI events. The RFI events are removed and the data are azimuth compressed without those samples. Faraday rotation affects L-band signals by rotating the polarization vector during propagation through the ionosphere. This mixes HH, VV, HV, and VH results with each other introducing another source of error. The SMAP radar is not fully polarimetric so the radar data do not provide a correction by themselves. Instead a correction must be derived from other sources. L1 radar processing will use estimates of Faraday rotation derived from externally supplied GPS-based measurements of the ionosphere total electron content (TEC). This work is supported by the SMAP project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  4. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the differential reflectivity and Doppler as functions of the center frequency, frequency difference, and median mass diameter. For a fixed pair of frequencies, the detectability of the differential signals can be expressed as the number of independent samples required to detect rain or snow with a particular median mass diameter. Because sampling numbers on the order of 1000 are needed to detect the differential signal over a range of size distributions, the instrument must be confined to a near-nadir, narrow swath. Radar measurements from a zenith directed radar operated at 9.1 GHz and 10 GHz are used to investigate the qualitative characteristics of the differential signals. Disdrometer and rain gauge data taken at the surface, just below the radar, are used to test whether the differential signals can be used to estimate characteristics of the raindrop size distribution.

  5. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  6. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  7. Goldstone solar system radar signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R.; Satorius, E.; Sanchez, O.

    1992-01-01

    A performance analysis of the planetary radar data acquisition system is presented. These results extend previous computer simulation analysis and are facilitated by the development of a simple analytical model that predicts radar system performance over a wide range of operational parameters. The results of this study are useful to both the radar system designer and the science investigator in establishing operational radar data acquisition parameters which result in the best systems performance for a given set of input conditions.

  8. Goldstone solar system radar signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.; Satorius, E.; Sanchez, O.

    1992-01-01

    A performance analysis of the planetary radar data acquisition system is presented. These results extend previous computer simulation analysis and are facilitated by the development of a simple analytical model that predicts radar system performance over a wide range of operational parameters. The results of this study are useful to both the radar systems designer and the science investigator in establishing operational radar data acquisition parameters which result in the best systems performance for a given set of input conditions.

  9. Radar reflection off extensive air showers

    E-print Network

    Stasielak, J; Bertaina, M; Blümer, J; Chiavassa, A; Engel, R; Haungs, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Krömer, O; Ludwig, M; Mathys, S; Neunteufel, P; Pekala, J; Rautenberg, J; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Šmída, R; Unger, M; Weber, M; Werner, F; Wilczy?ski, H; Wochele, J

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique. Considering a bistatic radar system and different shower geometries, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the static plasma produced by the shower in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for radio wave reflection, we obtain the time evolution of the signal received by the antennas. The frequency upshift of the radar echo and the power received are studied to verify the feasibility of the radar detection technique.

  10. Shuttle orbiter radar cross-sectional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; James, R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and model simulation studies on signal to noise levels and shuttle radar cross section are described. Pre-mission system calibrations, system configuration, and postmission system calibration of the tracking radars are described. Conversion of target range, azimuth, and elevation into radar centered east north vertical position coordinates are evaluated. The location of the impinging rf energy with respect to the target vehicles body axis triad is calculated. Cross section correlation between the two radars is presented.

  11. Radar operation in a hostile electromagnetic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-03-01

    Radar ISR does not always involve cooperative or even friendly targets. An adversary has numerous techniques available to him to counter the effectiveness of a radar ISR sensor. These generally fall under the banner of jamming, spoofing, or otherwise interfering with the EM signals required by the radar sensor. Consequently mitigation techniques are prudent to retain efficacy of the radar sensor. We discuss in general terms a number of mitigation techniques.

  12. Estimation of Canopy Water Content in Konza Parry Grasslands Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Measurements During FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; van Zyl, Jacob J.; Asrar, Ghassem

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an algorithm to retrieve the canopy water contents of natural grasslands and pasture from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. The development on this algorithm involves three interrelated steps: (1) calibration of SAR data for ground topographic variations, (2) development and validation of backscatter model for cross-polarized ratio. The polarimetric radar data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory AIRSAR system during the 1989 First International Satellite land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) used for this study. The SAR data have been calibrated and corrected for the topographical effects by using the digital elevation map of the study area.

  13. Course Syllabus Course name: Radar Meteorology

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Course Syllabus Course name: Radar Meteorology Course number: AT741 Instructor: Prof. Steven a foundational understanding of radar meteorology. Topics presented include microwave scattering theory, Doppler is to provide the student with a working knowledge of radar meteorology including applications to remote sensing

  14. Radar Soundings of the Ionosphere of Mars

    E-print Network

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Radar Soundings of the Ionosphere of Mars D. A. Gurnett,1 * D. L. Kirchner,1 R. L. Huff,1 D. D4 We report the first radar soundings of the ionosphere of Mars with the MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding) instrument on board the orbiting Mars Express spacecraft. Several types

  15. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  16. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  17. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  18. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  19. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  20. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  1. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping... Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the...

  2. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  3. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  4. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815...REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in...vessels of 300 gross tons or over which are radar equipped, shall hold an endorsement...

  5. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping... Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the...

  6. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  7. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480...Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains...that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter...

  8. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  9. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  10. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping... Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the...

  11. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  12. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  13. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480...Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains...that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter...

  14. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  15. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480...Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains...that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter...

  16. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  17. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping... Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the...

  18. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480...Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains...that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter...

  19. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping... Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the...

  20. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  1. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  2. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815...REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in...inspected vessels of 300 GRT or over which are radar equipped, must hold an endorsement...

  3. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815...REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in...vessels of 300 gross tons or over which are radar equipped, shall hold an endorsement...

  4. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815...REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in...vessels of 300 gross tons or over which are radar equipped, shall hold an endorsement...

  5. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  6. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480...Deck Officer Endorsements § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains...that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (b) If an applicant...

  7. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  8. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  9. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  10. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  11. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  12. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  13. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  14. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815...REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in...vessels of 300 gross tons or over which are radar equipped, shall hold an endorsement...

  15. Tracking radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.; Teal, J. M.; Kanwisher, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The application of tracking radar for determining the flight paths of migratory birds is discussed. The effects produced by various meteorological parameters are described. Samples of radar scope presentations obtained during tracking studies are presented. The characteristics of the radars and their limitations are examined.

  16. Comparison of radar data versus rainfall data

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, B.; Hromadka, T.V.; Perez, R.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler radar data are increasingly used in rainfall-runoff synthesis studies, perhaps due to radar data availability, among other factors. However, the veracity of the radar data are often a topic of concern. In this paper, three Doppler radar outcomes developed by the United States National Weather Service at three radar sites are examined and compared to actual rain gage data for two separate severe storm events in order to assess accuracy in the published radar estimates of rainfall. Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells. It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings. The paper establishes and describes•the need for “ground-truthing” of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference. PMID:26649276

  17. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...

  18. APPLICATION OF SENSOR SCHEDULING CONCEPTS TO RADAR

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    Chapter 10 APPLICATION OF SENSOR SCHEDULING CONCEPTS TO RADAR William Moran University of Melbourne time illustrating the ideas on sensor schedul- ing in a specific context: that of a radar system. A typical pulse radar system operates by illuminating a scene with a short pulse of electromagnetic energy

  19. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse....

  20. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...