Science.gov

Sample records for digital tomosynthesis mammography

  1. Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Tanya W

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging technology has advanced significantly from the 1930s until the present. American women have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer. Mammography has been proven in multiple clinical trials to reduce breast cancer mortality. Although a mainstay of breast imaging and improved from film-screen mammography, digital mammography is not a perfect examination. Overlapping obscuring breast tissue limits mammographic interpretation. Breast digital tomosynthesis reduces and/or eliminates overlapping obscuring breast tissue. Although there are some disadvantages with digital breast tomosynthesis, this relatively lost-cost technology may be used effectively in the screening and diagnostic settings. PMID:27101241

  2. Single photon counter for digital x-ray mammography tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldan, Amir H.; Karim, Karim S.; Rowlands, John A.

    2006-05-15

    Photon counting is an emerging detection technique that is promising for mammography tomosynthesis imagers. In photon counting systems, the value of each image pixel is equal to the number of photons that interact with the detector. In this research, we introduce the design and implementation of a low noise, photon counting pixel for digital mammography tomosynthesis in 0.18 {mu}m crystalline silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. The design comprises of a low noise, charge-integrating amplifier, a low offset voltage comparator, a decision-making unit, a mode selector, and a pseudorandom counter. Theoretical calculations and simulation results of linearity, gain, and noise of the photon counting pixel are presented.

  3. Digital breast tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) screening: A pictorial review of screen-detected cancers and false recalls attributed to tomosynthesis in prospective screening trials.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Lång, Kristina; Bernardi, Daniela; Tagliafico, Alberto; Zackrisson, Sophia; Skaane, Per

    2016-04-01

    This pictorial review highlights cancers detected only at tomosynthesis screening and screens falsely recalled in the course of breast tomosynthesis screening, illustrating both true-positive (TP) and false-positive (FP) detection attributed to tomosynthesis. Images and descriptive data were used to characterise cases of screen-detection with tomosynthesis, sourced from prospective screening trials that performed standard (2D) digital mammography (DM) and tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) in the same screening participants. Exemplar cases from four trials highlight common themes of relevance to screening practice including: the type of lesions frequently made more conspicuous or perceptible by tomosynthesis (spiculated masses, and architectural distortions); the histologic findings (both TP and FP) of tomosynthesis-only detection; and the need to extend breast work-up protocols (additional imaging including ultrasound and MRI, and tomosynthesis-guided biopsy) if tomosynthesis is adopted for primary screening. PMID:27017251

  4. Three-dimensional Breast Imaging with Full Field Digital Mammography Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.

    2003-03-01

    Although conventional film-screen mammography is the clinical modality of choice for early detection of breast cancer, many cancers are missed because they are masked by radiographically dense fibroglandular breast tissue which may be overlying or surrounding the tumor. The superposition of 3D breast anatomy in a standard 2D x-ray projection is perhaps the most significant problem in mammography today. GE Global Research has developed a new 3D full field digital mammography tomosynthesis prototype system that directly addresses the superimposed tissue problem by enabling volumetric imaging of the breast. High performance digital detectors with low electronic noise and fast read-out times, new reconstruction algorithms customized for tomosynthesis acquisitions, and application of volume rendering methods to enable rapid, effective review of 3D data are among the key enabling technologies for tomosynthesis. Phantom studies have demonstrated significantly enhanced performance of tomosynthesis compared to standard digital mammography exams. Over 200 patients have been imaged with a prototype system. Typical patient images will be shown.

  5. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roganovic, Dragana; Djilas, Dragana; Vujnovic, Sasa; Pavic, Dag; Stojanov, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities. We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. with significant difference between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography (p<0.001), while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20). PMID:26614855

  6. The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, Eman; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Zanca, Federica; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jurgen; Young, Kenneth C.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores (''agreement'') on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. ''Poor'' agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. Results: The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated

  7. Imaging performance of an amorphous selenium digital mammography detector in a breast tomosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Bo; Zhao Wei

    2008-05-15

    In breast tomosynthesis a rapid sequence of N images is acquired when the x-ray tube sweeps through different angular views with respect to the breast. Since the total dose to the breast is kept the same as that in regular mammography, the exposure used for each image of tomosynthesis is 1/N. The low dose and high frame rate pose a tremendous challenge to the imaging performance of digital mammography detectors. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the detector performance in different operational modes designed for tomosynthesis acquisition, e.g., binning or full resolution readout, the range of view angles, and the number of views N. A prototype breast tomosynthesis system with a nominal angular range of {+-}25 deg. was used in our investigation. The system was equipped with an amorphous selenium (a-Se) full field digital mammography detector with pixel size of 85 {mu}m. The detector can be read out in full resolution or 2x1 binning (binning in the tube travel direction). The focal spot blur due to continuous tube travel was measured for different acquisition geometries, and it was found that pixel binning, instead of focal spot blur, dominates the detector modulation transfer function (MTF). The noise power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector were measured with the exposure range of 0.4-6 mR, which is relevant to the low dose used in tomosynthesis. It was found that DQE at 0.4 mR is only 20% less than that at highest exposure for both detector readout modes. The detector temporal performance was categorized as lag and ghosting, both of which were measured as a function of x-ray exposure. The first frame lags were 8% and 4%, respectively, for binning and full resolution mode. Ghosting is negligible and independent of the frame rate. The results showed that the detector performance is x-ray quantum noise limited at the low exposures used in each view of tomosynthesis, and the temporal performance at high frame rate

  8. Research in digital mammography and tomosynthesis at the University of Toronto.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    There have been major advances in the field of breast cancer imaging since the early 1970s, both in technological improvements and in the use of the methods of medical physics and image analysis to optimize image quality. The introduction of digital mammography in 2000 provided a marked improvement in imaging of dense breasts. In addition, it became possible to produce tomographic and functional images on modified digital mammography systems. Digital imaging also greatly facilitated the extraction of quantitative information from images. My laboratory has been fortunate in being able to participate in some of these exciting developments. I will highlight some of the areas of our research interest which include modeling of the image formation process, development of high-resolution X-ray detectors for digital mammography and investigating new methods for analyzing image quality. I will also describe our more recent work on developing new applications of digital mammography including tomosynthesis, contrast-enhanced mammography, and measurement of breast density. Finally, I will point to a new area for our research--the application of the techniques of medical imaging to making pathology more quantitative to contribute to use of biomarkers for better characterizing breast cancer and directing therapeutic decisions. PMID:24961727

  9. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, Eman De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Ongeval, Chantal Van; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly

  10. Digital tomosynthesis: technique.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Martin J; Mainprize, James G

    2014-05-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis is an extension of digital mammography that produces quasi three-dimensional reconstructed images from a set of low-dose x-ray projections acquired over a limited angular range. The quality of the reconstructed image and the dose to the breast are dependent on the angular range and number of projections, the dose used per projection, and detector resolution and noise characteristics. This article discusses various aspects of tomosynthesis optimization. PMID:24792651

  11. Comparison of digital breast tomosynthesis and 2D digital mammography using a hybrid performance test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Aerts, Gwen; Stalmans, Davina; Zanca, Federica; Shaheen, Eman; De Keyzer, Frederik; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Bosmans, Hilde

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a hybrid method for performing detection studies in projection image based modalities, based on image acquisitions of target objects and patients. The method was used to compare 2D mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in terms of the detection performance of spherical densities and microcalcifications. The method starts with the acquisition of spheres of different glandular equivalent densities and microcalcifications of different sizes immersed in a homogeneous breast tissue simulating medium. These target objects are then segmented and the subsequent templates are fused in projection images of patients and processed or reconstructed. This results in hybrid images with true mammographic anatomy and clinically relevant target objects, ready for use in observer studies. The detection study of spherical densities used 108 normal and 178 hybrid 2D and DBT images; 156 normal and 321 hybrid images were used for the microcalcifications. Seven observers scored the presence/absence of the spheres/microcalcifications in a square region via a 5-point confidence rating scale. Detection performance in 2D and DBT was compared via ROC analysis with sub-analyses for the density of the spheres, microcalcification size, breast thickness and z-position. The study was performed on a Siemens Inspiration tomosynthesis system using patient acquisitions with an average age of 58 years and an average breast thickness of 53 mm providing mean glandular doses of 1.06 mGy (2D) and 2.39 mGy (DBT). Study results showed that breast tomosynthesis (AUC = 0.973) outperformed 2D (AUC = 0.831) for the detection of spheres (p  <  0.0001) and this applied for all spherical densities and breast thicknesses. By way of contrast, DBT was worse than 2D for microcalcification detection (AUC2D = 0.974, AUCDBT = 0.838, p  <  0.0001), with significant differences found for all sizes (150-354 µm), for breast thicknesses above 40 mm and for heights

  12. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of phantom and patient data.

    PubMed

    Bouwman, R W; van Engen, R E; Young, K C; den Heeten, G J; Broeders, M J M; Schopphoven, S; Jeukens, C R L P N; Veldkamp, W J H; Dance, D R

    2015-10-21

    For the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) phantoms simulating standard model breasts are used. These phantoms consist of slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE). In the last decades the automatic exposure control (AEC) increased in complexity and became more sensitive to (local) differences in breast composition. The question is how well the AGD estimated using these simple dosimetry phantoms agrees with the average patient AGD. In this study the AGDs for both dosimetry phantoms and for patients have been evaluated for 5 different x-ray systems in DM and DBT modes. It was found that the ratios between patient and phantom AGD did not differ considerably using both dosimetry phantoms. These ratios averaged over all breast thicknesses were 1.14 and 1.15 for the PMMA and PMMA-PE dosimetry phantoms respectively in DM mode and 1.00 and 1.02 in the DBT mode. These ratios were deemed to be sufficiently close to unity to be suitable for dosimetry evaluation in quality control procedures. However care should be taken when comparing systems for DM and DBT since depending on the AEC operation, ratios for particular breast thicknesses may differ substantially (0.83-1.96). Although the predictions of both phantoms are similar we advise the use of PMMA  +  PE slabs for both DM and DBT to harmonize dosimetry protocols and avoid any potential issues with the use of spacers with the PMMA phantoms. PMID:26407015

  13. A comparison of image interpretation times in full field digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Susan; Connor, Sophie; Lim, Yit; Tate, Catriona; Entwistle, Helen; Morris, Julie; Whiteside, Sigrid; Sergeant, Jamie; Wilson, Mary; Beetles, Ursula; Boggis, Caroline; Gilbert, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides three-dimensional images of the breast that enable radiologists to discern whether densities are due to overlapping structures or lesions. To aid assessment of the cost-effectiveness of DBT for screening, we have compared the time taken to interpret DBT images and the corresponding two-dimensional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. Four Consultant Radiologists experienced in reading FFDM images (4 years 8 months to 8 years) with training in DBT interpretation but more limited experience (137-407 cases in the past 6 months) were timed reading between 24 and 32 two view FFDM and DBT cases. The images were of women recalled from screening for further assessment and women under surveillance because of a family history of breast cancer. FFDM images were read before DBT, according to local practice. The median time for readers to interpret FFDM images was 17.0 seconds, with an interquartile range of 12.3-23.6 seconds. For DBT, the median time was 66.0 seconds, and the interquartile range was 51.1-80.5 seconds. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Reading times were significantly longer in family history clinics (p<0.01). Although it took approximately four times as long to interpret DBT than FFDM images, the cases were more complex than would be expected for routine screening, and with higher mammographic density. The readers were relatively inexperienced in DBT interpretation and may increase their speed over time. The difference in times between clinics may be due to increased throughput at assessment, or decreased density.

  14. Radiation dose differences between digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are dependent on breast thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakhras, Maram M.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Bourne, Roger; Rickard, Mary; Diffey, Jennifer; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiation dose derived from digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) at different tube current-exposure time product (mAs) and at 6 phantom thicknesses from 10 to 60 mm. Materials and Methods A total of 240 DM and DBT cranio-caudal (CC) phantom images were acquired at each thickness and at four exposure levels (the baseline mAs, 50%, 25% and 12.5% the baseline mAs). The incident Air Kerma (K) at the surface of the phantoms was measured using a solid state dosimeter. Mean Glandular Doses (MGD) were calculated for both modalities (DM and DBT). Results DBT dose was greater than that of DM for all mAs at each phantom thickness. For a breast thickness of 50 mm (close to average sized breast), the dose for DBT (2.32 mGy) was 13% higher than that for DM (2.05 mGy). The results also show that the difference in MGD between DM and DBT was less for the thicker compared with the thinner phantom, this difference being approximately a factor of 2.58 at 10 mm compared with a factor of 1.08 at 60 mm. While the MGD increased with increasing phantom thickness for both modalities, the dose increase with DBT was less than for DM, with the difference between 10 and 60 mm being a factor of 7 for DM and 3 for DBT. Conclusion The radiation dose from DBT was higher than that of DM and the difference in dose between DM and DBT decreases as phantom thickness increases.

  15. Comparison of computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace digital mammography (DM) for breast cancer screening. An effective computer-aided detection (CAD) system for microcalcification clusters (MCs) on DBT will facilitate the transition. In this study, we collected a data set with corresponding DBT and DM for the same breasts. DBT was acquired with IRB approval and informed consent using a GE GEN2 DBT prototype system. The DM acquired with a GE Essential system for the patient's clinical care was collected retrospectively from patient files. DM-based CAD (CADDM) and DBT-based CAD (CADDBT) were previously developed by our group. The major differences between the CAD systems include: (a) CADDBT uses two parallel processes whereas CADDM uses a single process for enhancing MCs and removing the structured background, (b) CADDBT has additional processing steps to reduce the false positives (FPs), including ranking of candidates of cluster seeds and cluster members and the use of adaptive CNR and size thresholds at clustering and FP reduction, (c) CADDM uses convolution neural network (CNN) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to differentiate true microcalcifications from FPs based on their morphological and CNN features. The performance difference is assessed by FROC analysis using test set (100 views with MCs and 74 views without MCs) independent of their respective training sets. At sensitivities of 70% and 80%, CADDBT achieved FP rates of 0.78 and 1.57 per view compared to 0.66 and 2.10 per image for the CADDM. JAFROC showed no significant difference between MC detection on DM and DBT by the two CAD systems.

  16. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of phantom and patient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, R. W.; van Engen, R. E.; Young, K. C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.; Schopphoven, S.; Jeukens, C. R. L. P. N.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Dance, D. R.

    2015-10-01

    For the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) phantoms simulating standard model breasts are used. These phantoms consist of slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE). In the last decades the automatic exposure control (AEC) increased in complexity and became more sensitive to (local) differences in breast composition. The question is how well the AGD estimated using these simple dosimetry phantoms agrees with the average patient AGD. In this study the AGDs for both dosimetry phantoms and for patients have been evaluated for 5 different x-ray systems in DM and DBT modes. It was found that the ratios between patient and phantom AGD did not differ considerably using both dosimetry phantoms. These ratios averaged over all breast thicknesses were 1.14 and 1.15 for the PMMA and PMMA-PE dosimetry phantoms respectively in DM mode and 1.00 and 1.02 in the DBT mode. These ratios were deemed to be sufficiently close to unity to be suitable for dosimetry evaluation in quality control procedures. However care should be taken when comparing systems for DM and DBT since depending on the AEC operation, ratios for particular breast thicknesses may differ substantially (0.83-1.96). Although the predictions of both phantoms are similar we advise the use of PMMA  +  PE slabs for both DM and DBT to harmonize dosimetry protocols and avoid any potential issues with the use of spacers with the PMMA phantoms.

  17. Digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography: A comparison of figures of merit for various average glandular doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Park, SuJin; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook; Park, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jae-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies on the application of tomosynthesis to breast imaging have demonstrated the potential of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). DBT can improve the specificity of digital mammography (DM) through improved marginal visibility of lesions and early breast cancer detection for women with dense breasts. To investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of lesion detection with DBT systems as compared to DM, we conducted a quantitative evaluation by using simulated lesions embedded in a breast phantom. A prototype DBT and dedicated DM system were used in this study. For the DBT system, the average glandular dose (AGD) was calculated using a formalism that was a simple extension of mammography dosimetry. The DBT and the DM images were acquired with average glandular doses (AGDs) ranging from 1 to 4 mGy. To analyze the results objectively, we calculated metrics for in-plane lesion visibility in the form of the contrast-to-noise ratio for the in-focus plane from the DBT reconstruction image and from the craniocaudal (CC) image from the DM system. The imaging performance of DBT was quantitatively compared with that of DM in terms of the figure of merit. Although the DM showed better results in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the mass due to the reduced overlapping of tissue and lesion, an increase in breast thickness of over 3 cm increased the CNR of the mass with the DBT system. For microcalcification detection, the DBT system showed significantly higher CNR than the DM system and gave better predictions of the microcalcification size. We compared the performances of the DM and the DBT systems for various AGDs and breast thicknesses. In conclusion, the results indicate that the DBT systems can play an important role in the detection of masses or microcalcifications without severe compression.

  18. The TOMMY trial: a comparison of TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY in the UK NHS Breast Screening Programme--a multicentre retrospective reading study comparing the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography with digital mammography alone.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Gillan, Maureen Gc; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Lim, Yit Yoong; Purushothaman, Hema; Strudley, Celia; Astley, Susan M; Morrish, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three-dimensional mammography technique with the potential to improve accuracy by improving differentiation between malignant and non-malignant lesions. OBJECTIVES The objectives of the study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of DBT in conjunction with two-dimensional (2D) mammography or synthetic 2D mammography, against standard 2D mammography and to determine if DBT improves the accuracy of detection of different types of lesions. STUDY POPULATION Women (aged 47-73 years) recalled for further assessment after routine breast screening and women (aged 40-49 years) with moderate/high of risk of developing breast cancer attending annual mammography screening were recruited after giving written informed consent. INTERVENTION All participants underwent a two-view 2D mammography of both breasts and two-view DBT imaging. Image-processing software generated a synthetic 2D mammogram from the DBT data sets. RETROSPECTIVE READING STUDY In an independent blinded retrospective study, readers reviewed (1) 2D or (2) 2D + DBT or (3) synthetic 2D + DBT images for each case without access to original screening mammograms or prior examinations. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each reading arm and by subgroup analyses. RESULTS Data were available for 7060 subjects comprising 6020 (1158 cancers) assessment cases and 1040 (two cancers) family history screening cases. Overall sensitivity was 87% [95% confidence interval (CI) 85% to 89%] for 2D only, 89% (95% CI 87% to 91%) for 2D + DBT and 88% (95% CI 86% to 90%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. The difference in sensitivity between 2D and 2D + DBT was of borderline significance (p = 0.07) and for synthetic 2D + DBT there was no significant difference (p = 0.6). Specificity was 58% (95% CI 56% to 60%) for 2D, 69% (95% CI 67% to 71%) for 2D + DBT and 71% (95% CI 69% to 73%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. Specificity was significantly

  19. Detection of microcalcification clusters by 2D-mammography and narrow and wide angle digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjipanteli, Andria; Elangovan, Premkumar; Looney, Padraig T.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Wells, Kevin; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the detection of microcalcification clusters by human observers in breast images using 2D-mammography and narrow (15°/15 projections) and wide (50°/25 projections) angle digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Simulated microcalcification clusters with a range of microcalcification diameters (125 μm-275 μm) were inserted into 6 cm thick simulated compressed breasts. Breast images were produced with and without inserted microcalcification clusters using a set of image modelling tools, which were developed to represent clinical imaging by mammography and tomosynthesis. Commercially available software was used for image processing and image reconstruction. The images were then used in a series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments conducted for signal detection with the microcalcification clusters as targets. The minimum detectable calcification diameter was found for each imaging modality: (i) 2D-mammography: 164+/-5 μm (ii) narrow angle DBT: 210+/-5 μm, (iii) wide angle DBT: 255+/-4 μm. A statistically significant difference was found between the minimum detectable calcification diameters that can be detected by the three imaging modalities. Furthermore, it was found that there was not a statistically significant difference between the results of the five observers that participated in this study. In conclusion, this study presents a method that quantifies the threshold diameter required for microcalcification detection, using high resolution, realistic images with observers, for the comparison of DBT geometries with 2D-mammography. 2Dmammography can visualise smaller detail diameter than both DBT imaging modalities and narrow-angle DBT can visualise a smaller detail diameter than wide-angle DBT.

  20. In-plane visibility of lesions using breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Timberg, P.; Baath, M.; Andersson, I.; Mattsson, S.; Tingberg, A.; Ruschin, M.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the visibility of simulated lesions in 2D digital mammography (DM) and breast tomosynthesis (BT) images of patients. Methods: Images of the same women were acquired on both a DM system (Mammomat Novation, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and a BT prototype system adapted from the same type of DM system. Using the geometrical properties of the two systems, simulated lesions were projected and added to each DM image as well as to each BT projection image prior to 3D reconstruction. The same beam quality and approximately the same total absorbed dose to the glandular tissue were used for each breast image acquisition on the two systems. A series of four-alternative forced choice human observer experiments was conducted for each of five simulated lesion diameters: 0.2, 1, 3, 8, and 25 mm. An additional experiment was conducted for the 0.2 mm lesion in BT only at twice the dose level (BT{sub 2x}). Threshold signal was defined as the lesion signal intensity required for a detectability index (d{sup '}) of 2.5. Four medical physicists participated in all experiments. One experiment, consisting of 60 cases, was conducted per test condition (i.e., lesion size and signal combination). Results: For the smallest lesions (0.2 mm), the threshold signal for DM was 21% lower than for BT at equivalent dose levels, and BT{sub 2x} was 26% lower than DM. For the lesions larger than 1 mm, the threshold signal increased linearly (in log space) with the lesion diameter for both DM and BT, with DM requiring around twice the signal as BT. The difference in the threshold signal between BT and DM at each lesion size was statistically significant, except for the 0.2 mm lesion between BT{sub 2x} and DM. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that low-signal lesions larger than 1.0 mm may be more visible in BT compared to DM, whereas 0.2 mm lesions may be better visualized with DM compared to BT, when compared at equal dose.

  1. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Liu, Bob; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta

    2006-04-15

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A{sub z}) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically

  2. Digital breast tomosynthesis: application of 2D digital mammography CAD to detection of microcalcification clusters on planar projection image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) has the potential to aid radiologists in detection of microcalcification clusters (MCs). CAD for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can be developed by using the reconstructed volume, the projection views or other derivatives as input. We have developed a novel method of generating a single planar projection (PPJ) image from a regularized DBT volume to emphasize the high contrast objects such as microcalcifications while removing the anatomical background and noise. In this work, we adapted a CAD system developed for digital mammography (CADDM) to the PPJ image and compared its performance with our CAD system developed for DBT volumes (CADDBT) in the same set of cases. For microcalcification detection in the PPJ image using the CADDM system, the background removal preprocessing step designed for DM was not needed. The other methods and processing steps in the CADDM system were kept without modification while the parameters were optimized with a training set. The linear discriminant analysis classifier using cluster based features was retrained to generate a discriminant score to be used as decision variable. For view-based FROC analysis, at 80% sensitivity, an FP rate of 1.95/volume and 1.54/image were achieved, respectively, for CADDBT and CADDM in an independent test set. At a threshold of 1.2 FPs per image or per DBT volume, the nonparametric analysis of the area under the FROC curve shows that the optimized CADDM for PPJ is significantly better than CADDBT. However, the performance of CADDM drops at higher sensitivity or FP rate, resulting in similar overall performance between the two CAD systems. The higher sensitivity of the CADDM in the low FP rate region and vice versa for the CADDBT indicate that a joint CAD system combining detection in the DBT volume and the PPJ image has the potential to increase the sensitivity and reduce the FP rate.

  3. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU

    PubMed Central

    Arefan, D.; Talebpour, A.; Ahmadinejhad, N.; Kamali Asl, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D) images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU) card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU). PMID:26171373

  4. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU.

    PubMed

    Arefan, D; Talebpour, A; Ahmadinejhad, N; Kamali Asl, A

    2015-06-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D) images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU) card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU). PMID:26171373

  5. Breast cancer screening using tomosynthesis in combination with digital mammography compared to digital mammography alone: a cohort study within the PROSPR consortium.

    PubMed

    Conant, Emily F; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Sprague, Brian L; Herschorn, Sally D; Weaver, Donald L; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; McCarthy, Anne Marie; Poplack, Steven P; Haas, Jennifer S; Armstrong, Katrina; Schnall, Mitchell D; Barlow, William E

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is emerging as the new standard of care for breast cancer screening based on improved cancer detection coupled with reductions in recall compared to screening with digital mammography (DM) alone. However, many prior studies lack follow-up data to assess false negatives examinations. The purpose of this study is to assess if DBT is associated with improved screening outcomes based on follow-up data from tumor registries or pathology. Retrospective analysis of prospective cohort data from three research centers performing DBT screening in the PROSPR consortium from 2011 to 2014 was performed. Recall and biopsy rates were assessed from 198,881 women age 40-74 years undergoing screening (142,883 DM and 55,998 DBT examinations). Cancer, cancer detection, and false negative rates and positive predictive values were assessed on examinations with one year of follow-up. Logistic regression was used to compare DBT to DM adjusting for research center, age, prior breast imaging, and breast density. There was a reduction in recall with DBT compared to DM (8.7 vs. 10.4 %, p < 0.0001), with adjusted OR = 0.68 (95 % CI = 0.65-0.71). DBT demonstrated a statistically significant increase in cancer detection over DM (5.9 vs. 4.4/1000 screened, adjusted OR = 1.45, 95 % CI = 1.12-1.88), an improvement in PPV1 (6.4 % for DBT vs. 4.1 % for DM, adjusted OR = 2.02, 95 % CI = 1.54-2.65), and no significant difference in false negative rates for DBT compared to DM (0.46 vs. 0.60/1000 screened, p = 0.347). Our data support implementation of DBT screening based on increased cancer detection, reduced recall, and no difference in false negative screening examinations. PMID:26931450

  6. Computer-aided detection of masses in digital tomosynthesis mammography: Comparison of three approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Chan Heangping; Wei Jun; Zhang Yiheng; Helvie, Mark A.; Moore, Richard H.; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2008-09-15

    The authors are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for masses on digital breast tomosynthesis mammograms (DBT). Three approaches were evaluated in this study. In the first approach, mass candidate identification and feature analysis are performed in the reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) DBT volume. A mass likelihood score is estimated for each mass candidate using a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. Mass detection is determined by a decision threshold applied to the mass likelihood score. A free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve that describes the detection sensitivity as a function of the number of false positives (FPs) per breast is generated by varying the decision threshold over a range. In the second approach, prescreening of mass candidate and feature analysis are first performed on the individual two-dimensional (2D) projection view (PV) images. A mass likelihood score is estimated for each mass candidate using an LDA classifier trained for the 2D features. The mass likelihood images derived from the PVs are backprojected to the breast volume to estimate the 3D spatial distribution of the mass likelihood scores. The FROC curve for mass detection can again be generated by varying the decision threshold on the 3D mass likelihood scores merged by backprojection. In the third approach, the mass likelihood scores estimated by the 3D and 2D approaches, described above, at the corresponding 3D location are combined and evaluated using FROC analysis. A data set of 100 DBT cases acquired with a GE prototype system at the Breast Imaging Laboratory in the Massachusetts General Hospital was used for comparison of the three approaches. The LDA classifiers with stepwise feature selection were designed with leave-one-case-out resampling. In FROC analysis, the CAD system for detection in the DBT volume alone achieved test sensitivities of 80% and 90% at average FP rates of 1.94 and 3.40 per breast, respectively. With the

  7. Mutual information-based template matching scheme for detection of breast masses: from mammography to digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mazurowski, Maciej A; Lo, Joseph Y; Harrawood, Brian P; Tourassi, Georgia D

    2011-10-01

    Development of a computational decision aid for a new medical imaging modality typically is a long and complicated process. It consists of collecting data in the form of images and annotations, development of image processing and pattern recognition algorithms for analysis of the new images and finally testing of the resulting system. Since new imaging modalities are developed more rapidly than ever before, any effort for decreasing the time and cost of this development process could result in maximizing the benefit of the new imaging modality to patients by making the computer aids quickly available to radiologists that interpret the images. In this paper, we make a step in this direction and investigate the possibility of translating the knowledge about the detection problem from one imaging modality to another. Specifically, we present a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for mammographic masses that uses a mutual information-based template matching scheme with intelligently selected templates. We presented principles of template matching with mutual information for mammography before. In this paper, we present an implementation of those principles in a complete computer-aided detection system. The proposed system, through an automatic optimization process, chooses the most useful templates (mammographic regions of interest) using a large database of previously collected and annotated mammograms. Through this process, the knowledge about the task of detecting masses in mammograms is incorporated in the system. Then, we evaluate whether our system developed for screen-film mammograms can be successfully applied not only to other mammograms but also to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructed slices without adding any DBT cases for training. Our rationale is that since mutual information is known to be a robust inter-modality image similarity measure, it has high potential of transferring knowledge between modalities in the context of the mass detection

  8. Visibility of microcalcification clusters and masses in breast tomosynthesis image volumes and digital mammography: A 4AFC human observer study

    SciTech Connect

    Timberg, P.; Baath, M.; Andersson, I.; Mattsson, S.; Tingberg, A.; Ruschin, M.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the visibility of simulated lesions in digital breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes compared with 2D digital mammography (DM). Methods: Simulated lesions (masses and microcalcifications) were added to images of the same women acquired on a DM system (Mammomat Novation, Siemens) and a BT prototype. The same beam quality was used for the DM and BT acquisitions. The total absorbed dose resulting from a 25-projection BT acquisition and reconstruction (BT{sub 25}) was approximately twice that of a single DM view. By excluding every other projection image from the reconstruction (BT{sub 13}), approximately the same dose as in DM was effected. Simulated microcalcifications were digitally added with varying contrast to the DM and BT images. Simulated masses with 8 mm diameter were also added to BT images. A series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments were conducted. Four medical physicists participated in all experiments, each consisting of 60 trials per experimental condition. The observers interpreted the BT image volumes in cine-mode at a fixed image sequence speed. The required threshold contrast (S{sub t}) to achieve a detectability index (d') of 2.5 (i.e., 92.5% correct decisions) was determined. Results: The S{sub t} for mass detection in DM was approximately a factor of 2 higher than required in BT indicating that the detection of masses was improved under BT conditions compared to DM. S{sub t} for microcalcification detection was higher for BT than for DM at both BT dose levels (BT{sub 25} and BT{sub 13}), with a statistically significant difference in S{sub t} between DM and BT{sub 13}. These results indicate a dose-dependent decrease in detection performance in BT for detection of microcalcifications. Conclusions: In agreement with previous investigations, masses of size 8 mm can be detected with less contrast in BT than in DM indicating improved detection performance for BT. However, for the investigated

  9. High-speed large angle mammography tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Staudinger, Paul; Smolenski, Joe; Ding, Jason; Schmitz, Andrea; McCoy, Julie; Rumsey, Michael; Al-Khalidy, Abdulrahman; Ross, William; Landberg, Cynthia E.; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Carson, Paul; Goodsitt, Mitchell; Chan, Heang-Ping; Roubidoux, Marilyn; Thomas, Jerry A.; Osland, Jacqueline

    2006-03-01

    A new mammography tomosynthesis prototype system that acquires 21 projection images over a 60 degree angular range in approximately 8 seconds has been developed and characterized. Fast imaging sequences are facilitated by a high power tube and generator for faster delivery of the x-ray exposure and a high speed detector read-out. An enhanced a-Si/CsI flat panel digital detector provides greater DQE at low exposure, enabling tomo image sequence acquisitions at total patient dose levels between 150% and 200% of the dose of a standard mammographic view. For clinical scenarios where a single MLO tomographic acquisition per breast may replace the standard CC and MLO views, total tomosynthesis breast dose is comparable to or below the dose in standard mammography. The system supports co-registered acquisition of x-ray tomosynthesis and 3-D ultrasound data sets by incorporating an ultrasound transducer scanning system that flips into position above the compression paddle for the ultrasound exam. Initial images acquired with the system are presented.

  10. Fully Automated Quantitative Estimation of Volumetric Breast Density from Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Images: Preliminary Results and Comparison with Digital Mammography and MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pertuz, Said; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Weinstein, Susan P; Conant, Emily F; Kontos, Despina

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To assess a fully automated method for volumetric breast density (VBD) estimation in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and to compare the findings with those of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Bilateral DBT images, FFDM images, and sagittal breast MR images were retrospectively collected from 68 women who underwent breast cancer screening from October 2011 to September 2012 with institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant protocols. A fully automated computer algorithm was developed for quantitative estimation of VBD from DBT images. FFDM images were processed with U.S. Food and Drug Administration-cleared software, and the MR images were processed with a previously validated automated algorithm to obtain corresponding VBD estimates. Pearson correlation and analysis of variance with Tukey-Kramer post hoc correction were used to compare the multimodality VBD estimates. Results Estimates of VBD from DBT were significantly correlated with FFDM-based and MR imaging-based estimates with r = 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74, 0.90) and r = 0.88 (95% CI: 0.82, 0.93), respectively (P < .001). The corresponding correlation between FFDM and MR imaging was r = 0.84 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.90). However, statistically significant differences after post hoc correction (α = 0.05) were found among VBD estimates from FFDM (mean ± standard deviation, 11.1% ± 7.0) relative to MR imaging (16.6% ± 11.2) and DBT (19.8% ± 16.2). Differences between VDB estimates from DBT and MR imaging were not significant (P = .26). Conclusion Fully automated VBD estimates from DBT, FFDM, and MR imaging are strongly correlated but show statistically significant differences. Therefore, absolute differences in VBD between FFDM, DBT, and MR imaging should be considered in breast cancer risk assessment. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26491909

  11. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  12. Ray-tracing-based reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weihua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chen, Ying

    2015-03-01

    As a breast-imaging technique, digital breast tomosynthesis has great potential to improve the diagnosis of early breast cancer over mammography. Ray-tracing-based reconstruction algorithms, such as ray-tracing back projection, maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), ordered-subset MLEM (OS-MLEM), and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), have been developed as reconstruction methods for different breast tomosynthesis systems. This paper provides a comparative study to investigate these algorithms by computer simulation and phantom study. Experimental results suggested that, among the four investigated reconstruction algorithms, OS-MLEM and SART performed better in interplane artifact removal with a fast speed convergence.

  13. Scatter radiation in digital tomosynthesis of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2007-02-15

    Digital tomosynthesis of the breast is being investigated as one possible solution to the problem of tissue superposition present in planar mammography. This imaging technique presents various advantages that would make it a feasible replacement for planar mammography, among them similar, if not lower, radiation glandular dose to the breast; implementation on conventional digital mammography technology via relatively simple modifications; and fast acquisition time. One significant problem that tomosynthesis of the breast must overcome, however, is the reduction of x-ray scatter inclusion in the projection images. In tomosynthesis, due to the projection geometry and radiation dose considerations, the use of an antiscatter grid presents several challenges. Therefore, the use of postacquisition software-based scatter reduction algorithms seems well justified, requiring a comprehensive evaluation of x-ray scatter content in the tomosynthesis projections. This study aims to gain insight into the behavior of x-ray scatter in tomosynthesis by characterizing the scatter point spread functions (PSFs) and the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) maps found in tomosynthesis of the breast. This characterization was performed using Monte Carlo simulations, based on the Geant4 toolkit, that simulate the conditions present in a digital tomosynthesis system, including the simulation of the compressed breast in both the cranio-caudal (CC) and the medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views. The variation of the scatter PSF with varying tomosynthesis projection angle, as well as the effects of varying breast glandular fraction and x-ray spectrum, was analyzed. The behavior of the SPR for different projection angle, breast size, thickness, glandular fraction, and x-ray spectrum was also analyzed, and computer fit equations for the magnitude of the SPR at the center of mass for both the CC and the MLO views were found. Within mammographic energies, the x-ray spectrum was found to have no appreciable

  14. Scatter radiation in digital tomosynthesis of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; D’Orsi, Carl J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis of the breast is being investigated as one possible solution to the problem of tissue superposition present in planar mammography. This imaging technique presents various advantages that would make it a feasible replacement for planar mammography, among them similar, if not lower, radiation glandular dose to the breast; implementation on conventional digital mammography technology via relatively simple modifications; and fast acquisition time. One significant problem that tomosynthesis of the breast must overcome, however, is the reduction of x-ray scatter inclusion in the projection images. In tomosynthesis, due to the projection geometry and radiation dose considerations, the use of an antiscatter grid presents several challenges. Therefore, the use of postacquisition software-based scatter reduction algorithms seems well justified, requiring a comprehensive evaluation of x-ray scatter content in the tomosynthesis projections. This study aims to gain insight into the behavior of x-ray scatter in tomosynthesis by characterizing the scatter point spread functions (PSFs) and the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) maps found in tomosynthesis of the breast. This characterization was performed using Monte Carlo simulations, based on the Geant4 toolkit, that simulate the conditions present in a digital tomosynthesis system, including the simulation of the compressed breast in both the cranio-caudal (CC) and the medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views. The variation of the scatter PSF with varying tomosynthesis projection angle, as well as the effects of varying breast glandular fraction and x-ray spectrum, was analyzed. The behavior of the SPR for different projection angle, breast size, thickness, glandular fraction, and x-ray spectrum was also analyzed, and computer fit equations for the magnitude of the SPR at the center of mass for both the CC and the MLO views were found. Within mammographic energies, the x-ray spectrum was found to have no appreciable

  15. Overview of digital breast tomosynthesis: Clinical cases, benefits and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T; Levy, G; Poncelet, E; Le Thanh, T; Prolongeau, J F; Phalippou, J; Massoni, F; Laurent, N

    2015-09-01

    In France, the national breast cancer-screening program is based on mammography combined with clinical breast examination, and sometimes breast ultrasound for patients with high breast density. Digital breast tomosynthesis is a currently assessed 3D imaging technique in which angular projections of the stationary compressed breast are acquired automatically. When combined with mammography, clinicians can review both conventional (2D) as well as three-dimensional (3D) data. The purpose of this article is to review recent reports on this new breast imaging technique and complements this information with our personal experience. The main advantages of tomosynthesis are that it facilitates the detection and characterization of breast lesions, as well as the diagnosis of occult lesions in dense breasts. However, to do this, patients are exposed to higher levels of radiation than with 2D mammography. In France, the indications for tomosynthesis and its use in breast cancer-screening (individual and organized) are yet to be defined, as is its role in the diagnosis and staging of breast cancer (multiple lesions). Further studies assessing in particular the combined reconstruction of the 2D view using 3D tomosynthesis data acquired during a single breast compression event, and therefore reducing patient exposure to radiation, are expected to provide valuable insight. PMID:26275829

  16. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  17. Digital breast tomosynthesis with minimal breast compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaduto, David A.; Yang, Min; Ripton-Snyder, Jennifer; Fisher, Paul R.; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Breast compression is utilized in mammography to improve image quality and reduce radiation dose. Lesion conspicuity is improved by reducing scatter effects on contrast and by reducing the superposition of tissue structures. However, patient discomfort due to breast compression has been cited as a potential cause of noncompliance with recommended screening practices. Further, compression may also occlude blood flow in the breast, complicating imaging with intravenous contrast agents and preventing accurate quantification of contrast enhancement and kinetics. Previous studies have investigated reducing breast compression in planar mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), though this typically comes at the expense of degradation in image quality or increase in mean glandular dose (MGD). We propose to optimize the image acquisition technique for reduced compression in DBT without compromising image quality or increasing MGD. A zero-frequency signal-difference-to-noise ratio model is employed to investigate the relationship between tube potential, SDNR and MGD. Phantom and patient images are acquired on a prototype DBT system using the optimized imaging parameters and are assessed for image quality and lesion conspicuity. A preliminary assessment of patient motion during DBT with minimal compression is presented.

  18. Frequently Asked Questions about Digital Mammography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information (MQSA) Frequently Asked Questions About Digital Mammography Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... mammography exams, such as DBT? What is digital mammography? Full field digital mammography (FFDM, also known simply ...

  19. Radiation dosimetry in digital breast tomosynthesis: Report of AAPM Tomosynthesis Subcommittee Task Group 223

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Sabol, John M.; Berglund, Johan; Bolch, Wesley E.; Brateman, Libby; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Goodsitt, Mitchell; Flynn, Michael; Geiser, William; Kyle Jones, A.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Paul Segars, W.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Nishino, Kazuyoshi; Nosratieh, Anita; and others

    2014-09-15

    The radiation dose involved in any medical imaging modality that uses ionizing radiation needs to be well understood by the medical physics and clinical community. This is especially true of screening modalities. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has recently been introduced into the clinic and is being used for screening for breast cancer in the general population. Therefore, it is important that the medical physics community have the required information to be able to understand, estimate, and communicate the radiation dose levels involved in breast tomosynthesis imaging. For this purpose, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 223 on Dosimetry in Tomosynthesis Imaging has prepared this report that discusses dosimetry in breast imaging in general, and describes a methodology and provides the data necessary to estimate mean breast glandular dose from a tomosynthesis acquisition. In an effort to maximize familiarity with the procedures and data provided in this Report, the methodology to perform the dose estimation in DBT is based as much as possible on that used in mammography dose estimation.

  20. The effect of lag on image quality for a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainprize, James G.; Wang, Xinying; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited-view, limited-angle computed tomography (CT) technique that has the potential to yield improved lesion conspicuity over that of standard digital mammography. To maintain short acquisition time, the detector must have a rapid temporal response. Transient effects like lag and ghosting have been noted previously in digital mammography systems, but for the times between successive views (approx. 1 minute), their impact on image quality is generally negligible. However, tomosynthesis imaging requires much shorter times between projection images (< 1 s). Under these conditions, detectors that may have been acceptable for digital mammography may not be suitable for tomosynthesis. Transient effects will generally cause both a loss of signal and an increase in image noise. A cascaded systems analysis is used to determine the effect of lag on image quality in a DBT system. It is shown that in the projection images, lag results in artifacts appearing as a "trail" of prior exposures. The effect of lag on image quality is also evaluated with a simple Monte Carlo simulation of a cone-beam tomosynthesis image formation incorporating a filtered back-projection algorithm.

  1. Computation of the glandular radiation dose in digital tomosynthesis of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; D’Orsi, Carl; Karellas, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Tomosynthesis of the breast is currently a topic of intense interest as a logical next step in the evolution of digital mammography. This study reports on the computation of glandular radiation dose in digital tomosynthesis of the breast. Previously, glandular dose estimations in tomosynthesis have been performed using data from studies of radiation dose in conventional planar mammography. This study evaluates, using Monte Carlo methods, the normalized glandular dose (DgN) to the breast during a tomosynthesis study, and characterizes its dependence on breast size, tissue composition, and x-ray spectrum. The conditions during digital tomosynthesis imaging of the breast were simulated using a computer program based on the Geant4 toolkit. With the use of simulated breasts of varying size, thickness and tissue composition, the DgN to the breast tissue was computed for varying x-ray spectra and tomosynthesis projection angle. Tomosynthesis projections centered about both the cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views were simulated. For each projection angle, the ratio of the glandular dose for that projection to the glandular dose for the zero degree projection was computed. This ratio was denoted the relative glandular dose (RGD) coefficient, and its variation under different imaging parameters was analyzed. Within mammographic energies, the RGD was found to have a weak dependence on glandular fraction and x-ray spectrum for both views. A substantial dependence on breast size and thickness was found for the MLO view, and to a lesser extent for the CC view. Although RGD values deviate substantially from unity as a function of projection angle, the RGD averaged over all projections in a complete tomosynthesis study varies from 0.91 to 1.01. The RGD results were fit to mathematical functions and the resulting equations are provided. PMID:17278508

  2. Computation of the glandular radiation dose in digital tomosynthesis of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; D'Orsi, Carl; Karellas, Andrew

    2007-01-15

    Tomosynthesis of the breast is currently a topic of intense interest as a logical next step in the evolution of digital mammography. This study reports on the computation of glandular radiation dose in digital tomosynthesis of the breast. Previously, glandular dose estimations in tomosynthesis have been performed using data from studies of radiation dose in conventional planar mammography. This study evaluates, using Monte Carlo methods, the normalized glandular dose (D{sub g}N) to the breast during a tomosynthesis study, and characterizes its dependence on breast size, tissue composition, and x-ray spectrum. The conditions during digital tomosynthesis imaging of the breast were simulated using a computer program based on the Geant4 toolkit. With the use of simulated breasts of varying size, thickness and tissue composition, the D{sub g}N to the breast tissue was computed for varying x-ray spectra and tomosynthesis projection angle. Tomosynthesis projections centered about both the cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views were simulated. For each projection angle, the ratio of the glandular dose for that projection to the glandular dose for the zero degree projection was computed. This ratio was denoted the relative glandular dose (RGD) coefficient, and its variation under different imaging parameters was analyzed. Within mammographic energies, the RGD was found to have a weak dependence on glandular fraction and x-ray spectrum for both views. A substantial dependence on breast size and thickness was found for the MLO view, and to a lesser extent for the CC view. Although RGD values deviate substantially from unity as a function of projection angle, the RGD averaged over all projections in a complete tomosynthesis study varies from 0.91 to 1.01. The RGD results were fit to mathematical functions and the resulting equations are provided.

  3. Digital breast tomosynthesis and the challenges of implementing an emerging breast cancer screening technology into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Lehman, Constance D

    2013-12-01

    Emerging imaging technologies, including digital breast tomosynthesis, have the potential to transform breast cancer screening. However, the rapid adoption of these new technologies outpaces the evidence of their clinical and cost-effectiveness. The authors describe the forces driving the rapid diffusion of tomosynthesis into clinical practice, comparing it with the rapid diffusion of digital mammography shortly after its introduction. They outline the potential positive and negative effects that adoption can have on imaging workflow and describe the practice management challenges when incorporating tomosynthesis. The authors also provide recommendations for collecting evidence supporting the development of policies and best practices. PMID:24295940

  4. Quantification of resolution in multiplanar reconstructions for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vent, Trevor L.; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Kwon, Young Joon; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) allows tomographic images to be portrayed in various orientations. We have conducted research to determine the resolution of tomosynthesis MPR. We built a phantom that houses a star test pattern to measure resolution. This phantom provides three rotational degrees of freedom. The design consists of two hemispheres with longitudinal and latitudinal grooves that reference angular increments. When joined together, the hemispheres form a dome that sits inside a cylindrical encasement. The cylindrical encasement contains reference notches to match the longitudinal and latitudinal grooves that guide the phantom's rotations. With this design, any orientation of the star-pattern can be analyzed. Images of the star-pattern were acquired using a DBT mammography system at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Images taken were reconstructed and analyzed by two different methods. First, the maximum visible frequency (in line pairs per millimeter) of the star test pattern was measured. Then, the contrast was calculated at a fixed spatial frequency. These analyses confirm that resolution decreases with tilt relative to the breast support. They also confirm that resolution in tomosynthesis MPR is dependent on object orientation. Current results verify that the existence of super-resolution depends on the orientation of the frequency; the direction parallel to x-ray tube motion shows super-resolution. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the direction of the spatial frequency relative to the motion of the x-ray tube is a determinant of resolution in MPR for DBT.

  5. Clinical performance evaluation of the prototype digital breast tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, H.; Park, H.; Choi, J.; Choi, Y.

    2012-03-01

    The rapid development and clinical use of digital mammography in the past decade has made possible the development of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), which can overcome the limitation of conventional mammography and improve the specificity of mammography with improved marginal visibility of lesion and early breast cancer detection, especially for women with dense breast. The purpose of this study is to characterize the physical properties of DBT system and to optimize the exposure condition using effective modulation transfer function (eMTF), effective noise power spectrum (eNPS), and effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE). The first generation KERI prototype digital tomosyntesis system for breast imaging using CMOS flat panel detector was used in this study. It was found that the spatial frequency dependent metrics depend on both the inherent properties of the detector and imaging geometry including breast thickness. For thicker breast, eDQE decreases as scatter fraction increases at fixed tube voltage. Moreover, eMTF shows no significant difference as changing tube voltage while eDQE at 27 kVp is relatively degraded. Consequently, the quantitative evaluation of the DBT system with different exposure condition and breast thickness should be fully considered before building the system and application in clinical hospital.

  6. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Lessons Learned from Early Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Weinstein, Susan P.; Roth, Susan Orel; Conant, Emily F.

    2014-01-01

    The limitations of mammography are well known and are partly related to the fact that with conventional imaging, the three-dimensional volume of the breast is imaged and presented in a two-dimensional format. Because normal breast tissue is similar in x-ray attenuation to some breast cancers, clinically relevant malignancies may be obscured by normal overlapping tissue. In addition, complex areas of normal tissue may be perceived as suspicious. The limitations of two-dimensional breast imaging lead to low sensitivity in detecting some cancers and high false-positive recall rates. Although mammographic screening has been shown to reduce breast cancer deaths by approximately 30%, controversy exists over when and how often screening mammography should occur. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly being implemented in breast imaging clinics around the world as early clinical data demonstrate that it may address some of the limitations of conventional mammography. With DBT, multiple low-dose x-ray images are acquired in an arc and reconstructed to create a three-dimensional image, thus minimizing the impact of overlapping breast tissue and improving lesion conspicuity. Early studies of screening DBT have shown decreased false-positive callback rates and increased rates of cancer detection (particularly for invasive cancers), resulting in increased sensitivity and specificity. In our clinical practice, we have completed more than 2 years of using two-view digital mammography combined with two-view DBT for all screening and select diagnostic imaging examinations (over 25,000 patients). Our experience, combined with previously published data, demonstrates that the combined use of DBT and digital mammography is associated with improved outcomes for screening and diagnostic imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2014 PMID:25019451

  7. Mammography

    MedlinePlus

    ... first test. TYPES OF MAMMOGRAPHY Traditional mammography uses film, similar to routine x-rays. Digital mammography is ... risk of dying of breast cancer compared to film mammography. Three-dimensional (3D) mammography is a type ...

  8. Uses of megavoltage digital tomosynthesis in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Vikren

    With the advent of intensity modulated radiotherapy, radiation treatment plans are becoming more conformal to the tumor with the decreasing margins. It is therefore of prime importance that the patient be positioned correctly prior to treatment. Therefore, image guided treatment is necessary for intensity modulated radiotherapy plans to be implemented successfully. Current advanced imaging devices require costly hardware and software upgrade, and radiation imaging solutions, such as cone beam computed tomography, may introduce extra radiation dose to the patient in order to acquire better quality images. Thus, there is a need to extend current existing imaging device ability and functions while reducing cost and radiation dose. Existing electronic portal imaging devices can be used to generate computed tomography-like tomograms through projection images acquired over a small angle using the technique of cone-beam digital tomosynthesis. Since it uses a fraction of the images required for computed tomography reconstruction, use of this technique correspondingly delivers only a fraction of the imaging dose to the patient. Furthermore, cone-beam digital tomosynthesis can be offered as a software-only solution as long as a portal imaging device is available. In this study, the feasibility of performing digital tomosynthesis using individually-acquired megavoltage images from a charge coupled device-based electronic portal imaging device was investigated. Three digital tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms, the shift-and-add, filtered back-projection, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique, were compared considering the final image quality and radiation dose during imaging. A software platform, DART, was created using a combination of the Matlab and C++ languages. The platform allows for the registration of a reference Cone Beam Digital Tomosynthesis (CBDT) image against a daily acquired set to determine how to shift the patient prior to treatment. Finally

  9. New method for 3D reconstruction in digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.

    2002-05-01

    Digital tomosynthesis mammography is an advanced x-ray application that can provide detailed 3D information about the imaged breast. We introduce a novel reconstruction method based on simple backprojection, which yields high contrast reconstructions with reduced artifacts at a relatively low computational complexity. The first step in the proposed reconstruction method is a simple backprojection with an order statistics-based operator (e.g., minimum) used for combining the backprojected images into a reconstructed slice. Accordingly, a given pixel value does generally not contribute to all slices. The percentage of slices where a given pixel value does not contribute, as well as the associated reconstructed values, are collected. Using a form of re-projection consistency constraint, one now updates the projection images, and repeats the order statistics backprojection reconstruction step, but now using the enhanced projection images calculated in the first step. In our digital mammography application, this new approach enhances the contrast of structures in the reconstruction, and allows in particular to recover the loss in signal level due to reduced tissue thickness near the skinline, while keeping artifacts to a minimum. We present results obtained with the algorithm for phantom images.

  10. Clinical benefits of combined diagnostic three-dimensional digital breast tomosynthesis and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varjonen, Mari; Pamilo, Martti; Raulisto, Leena

    2005-04-01

    Our goal is to evaluate diagnostic digital breast tomosynthesis and ultrasound imaging clinical value in detecting and diagnosing early stage breast cancers. Determine if fusion imaging would decrease the number of biopsies and reduce further patient workup otherwise required to establish a definitive diagnosis. This paper presents the clinical results based on the study conducted at Helsinki University Central Hospital. Presentation demonstrates clinical dual modality images and results. Tomosynthesis of amorphous selenium based full field digital mammography system will be also presented. Forty asymptomatic women enrolled in the study based on prior identification of suspicious findings on screening mammograms where the possibility of breast cancer could not be excluded. Abnormal screening mammogram findings included tumor-like densities, parenchymal asymmetries and architectural distortions. Eight women were operated and 32 were not referred for surgery. Those cases, which were operated, three lesions represented ductal carcinoma in situ, two ductal carcinomas, one atypical ductal hyperplasia, one fibroadenoma and one radial scar. The 32 not operated cases revealed to be benign or superimposition of normal parenchymal breast tissue. The cases were returned to biennial screening. Ultrasound did not show clearly any lesions, but using tomosynthesis and ultrasound together we were able to analyze and locate the lesions exactly. Special tomosynthesis improves overall lesion detection and analysis. The value of tomosynthesis and ultrasound fusion imaging will be to provide additional clinical information in order to improve decision making accuracy to either confirm or exclude a suspected abnormality and in particular detect small breast cancers.

  11. Power spectrum analysis of the x-ray scatter signal in mammography and breast tomosynthesis projections

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bliznakova, Kristina; Fei, Baowei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the frequency domain characteristics of the signal in mammography images and breast tomosynthesis projections with patient tissue texture due to detected scattered x-rays. Methods: Acquisitions of x-ray projection images of 19 different patient breasts were simulated using previously acquired volumetric patient images. Acquisition of these images was performed with a dedicated breast CT prototype system, and the images were classified into voxels representing skin, adipose, and glandular tissue with a previously validated automated algorithm. The classified three dimensional images then underwent simulated mechanical compression representing that which is performed during acquisition of mammography and breast tomosynthesis images. The acquisition of projection images of each patient breast was simulated using Monte Carlo methods with each simulation resulting in two images: one of the primary (non-scattered) signal and one of the scatter signal. To analyze the scatter signal for both mammography and breast tomosynthesis, two projections images of each patient breast were simulated, one with the x-ray source positioned at 0° (mammography and central tomosynthesis projection) and at 30° (wide tomosynthesis projection). The noise power spectra (NPS) for both the scatter signal alone and the total signal (primary + scatter) for all images were obtained and the combined results of all patients analyzed. The total NPS was fit to the expected power-law relationship NPS(f) = k/f^β and the results were compared with those previously published on the power spectrum characteristics of mammographic texture. The scatter signal alone was analyzed qualitatively and a power-law fit was also performed. Results: The mammography and tomosynthesis projections of three patient breasts were too small to analyze, so a total of 16 patient breasts were analyzed. The values of β for the total signal of the 0° projections agreed well with previously published results

  12. Physical performance testing of digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Takao; Yoshikawa, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis has become accepted in clinical use. It is important to physically evaluate a system to ensure that it is working at full performance. Non-linear reconstruction processing is proposed to improve interpretation of clinical images by enhancing the minute contrasts of breast tissue while suppressing metal artifacts. Because existing measuring methods assume a linear system, physical evaluation applied to images reconstructed with non-linear processing may result in unnatural values. We investigated the influence of different reconstruction methods on physical evaluations. We suggest using images reconstructed by back projection processing without a filter to ensure the device performance directly.

  13. Digital mammography: current state and future aspects.

    PubMed

    Fischer, U; Hermann, K P; Baum, F

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of digital technique in mammography has been the last step in completing the process of digitalization in diagnostic imaging. Meanwhile, some different digital techniques as well as a couple of different digital mammography systems were developed and have already been available for some years. In this review article, the relevant data of key studies are reported, the current status is defined, and perspectives of digital mammography are described. PMID:16132935

  14. A stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system: Design simulation, characterization and image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Ramya

    Conventional screen-film and/or digital mammography, despite being the most popular breast imaging modalities, suffer from certain limitations, most important of which is tissue overlap and false diagnoses arising thereof. A new three-dimensional alternative for breast cancer screening and diagnosis is tomosynthesis in which a limited number of low-dose two-dimensional projection images of a patient are used to reconstruct the three-dimensional tissue information. The tomosynthesis systems currently under development all incorporate an x-ray source that moves over a certain angle to acquire images. This tube motion is a major limitation because it degrades image quality, increases the scan time and causes prolonged patient discomfort. The availability of independently controllable carbon nanotube cathodes enabled us to explore the possibility of setting up a stationary multi-beam imaging system. In this dissertation we have proposed a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis scanner using spatially distributed carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray sources. We have presented details about the design, set-up, characterization and image reconstruction of the completely stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time and improve the image quality in breast imaging. Extensive design simulation results have been used to decide on the final system set-up. The fully assembled actual experimental system is capable of acquiring all the images in as little as eight seconds and yield superior image quality as well. The system has been completely characterized in terms of focal spot size, system resolution and geometric calibration. Certain important results have been obtained during the process that we hope will set the standard for the characterization of the future systems. A novel iterative reconstruction algorithm has been tried on the projection images obtained from the tomosynthesis system. Our algorithm has

  15. Efficacy of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakhras, M.; Mello-Thoms, C.; Rickard, M.; Bourne, R.; Brennan, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in combination with digital mammography (DM) with that of digital mammography alone. Materials and Methods: Twenty six experienced radiologists who specialized in breast imaging read 50 cases (27 cancers and 23 non-cancer cases) of patients who underwent DM and DBT. Both exams included the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Histopathologic examination established truth in all lesions. Each case was interpreted in two modes, once with DM alone followed by DM+DBT, and the observers were asked to mark the location of any lesions, if present, and give it a score based on a five-category assessment by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR). The diagnostic performance of DM compared with that of DM+DBT was evaluated in terms of the difference between areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs), Jackknife free-response receiver operator characteristics (JAFROC) figure-of-merit, sensitivity, location sensitivity and specificity. Results: Average AUC and JAFROC for DM versus DM+DBT was significantly different (AUCs 0.690 vs 0.781, p=< 0.0001), (JAFROC 0.618 vs. 0.732, p=< 0.0001) respectively. In addition, the use of DM+DBT resulted in an improvement in sensitivity (0.629 vs. 0.701, p=0.0011), location sensitivity (0.548 vs. 0.690, p=< 0.0001) and specificity (0.656 vs. 0.758, p=0.0015) when compared to DM alone. Conclusion: Adding DBT to the standard DM significantly improved radiologists' performance in terms of AUCs, JAFROC figure of merit, sensitivity, location sensitivity and specificity values.

  16. Task-based assessment and optimization of digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stefano

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a new technology for breast cancer screening that promises to complement mammography or supersede it to become the standard for breast imaging. DBT involves taking multiple images in order to synthesize a new image that represents a slice through the breast volume---hence the term tomosynthesis. The primary advantage of this paradigm is that it can reduce the amount of overlapping anatomy in the data, leading to improved visualization of potentially-cancerous findings. The difficulty in DBT is quantifying the advantages of the technology and determining the optimal conditions for its clinical use. This dissertation describes a virtual trial framework for assessing and optimizing DBT technology for the specific task of detecting small, low-contrast masses in the breast. It addresses each component of the imaging chain to some degree, from the patients/phantoms to the imaging hardware to the model observers used to measure signal detectability. The main focus, however, is on quantifying tradeoffs between three key parameters that affect image quality: (1) scan angle, (2) number of projections, and (3) exposure. We show that in low-density breast phantoms, detectability generally increases with both scan angle and number of projections in the anatomical-variability-limited (high-exposure) regime. We also investigate how breast density affects the optimal DBT scan parameters. We show task-specific results that support using an adaptive paradigm in DBT, where the imaging system reconfigures itself in response to information about the patient's breast density. The virtual framework described in this dissertation provides a platform for further investigations of image quality in 3D breast imaging.

  17. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliste, Jabari; Tucker, Andrew W.; Gidcumb, Emily; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2015-03-01

    Full field digital mammography (FFDM) has been the gold standard for mammography. It detects the presence, distribution, and morphology of microcalcifications (MCs), helping predict malignancy. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has overcome some limitations of FFDM such as poor sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values, due to superimposition of tissue, especially in dense breasts. Current DBT systems move an x-ray tube in either continuous (CM), or step-and-shoot motion (SSM). These systems are less effective than FFDM in MC detection due to lower spatial resolution. Motion of the x-ray source and system mechanical instability cause image blur. The image quality is further affected by patient motion due to the relatively long scan time. We developed a stationary DBT (s-DBT) system using a carbon nanotube (CNT) X-ray source array. The CNT array is electronically controlled, rapidly acquiring projection images over a large angular span, with zero tube motion. No source motion, coupled with a large angular span, results in improved in-plane and depth resolution. Using physical phantoms and human specimens, this system demonstrated higher spatial resolution than CM DBT. The objective of this study is to compare the diagnostic clinical performance of s-DBT to that of FFDM. Under UNC's IRB regulations, 100 patients with breast lesions are being recruited and imaged with both modalities. A reader study will compare the diagnostic accuracy of the modalities. We have successfully imaged the first 30 patients. Initial results indicate that s-DBT alone produces comparable MC sharpness, and increased lesion conspicuity compared to FFDM.

  18. Design and feasibility studies of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Qian, X; Phan, T; Sprenger, F; Sultana, S; Calderon-Colon, X; Kearse, B; Spronk, D; Lu, J; Zhou, O

    2011-08-21

    Studies have shown that digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can improve breast cancer diagnosis by reconstructing 3D images. However, DBT scanners based on rotation gantry prolong the imaging time and reduce spatial resolution due to motion comparing with the regular two-view mammography. To obtain three dimension reconstruction images and maintain the high image quality of conventional mammography, we proposed a prototype stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system (s-DBT). The proposed s-DBT system acquires projection images without mechanical movement. The core component of the s-DBT system is a specially designed spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray tube based on the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. The multi-beam x-ray source array enables collection of all projection images from different viewing angles without mechanical motion. Preliminary results show the s-DBT system can achieve a scan time comparable to the regular two-view mammography, and improve the spatial resolution comparing with rotating gantry DBT. PMID:21808428

  19. Whole-Body Clinical Applications of Digital Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yuhara, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Mieko; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko; Nye, Katelyn; Sabol, John M

    2016-01-01

    With flat-panel detector mammography, radiography, and fluoroscopy systems, digital tomosynthesis (DT) has been recently introduced as an advanced clinical application that removes overlying structures, enhances local tissue separation, and provides depth information about structures of interest by providing high-quality tomographic images. DT images are generated from projection image data, typically using filtered back-projection or iterative reconstruction. These low-dose x-ray projection images are easily and swiftly acquired over a range of angles during a single linear or arc sweep of the x-ray tube assembly. DT is advantageous in a variety of clinical contexts, including breast, chest, head and neck, orthopedic, emergency, and abdominal imaging. Specifically, compared with conventional mammography, radiography, and fluoroscopy, as a result of reduced tissue overlap DT can improve detection of breast cancer, pulmonary nodules, sinonasal mucosal thickening, and bone fractures and delineation of complex anatomic structures such as the ostiomeatal unit, atlantoaxial joint, carpal and tarsal bones, and pancreatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts. Compared with computed tomography, DT offers reduced radiation exposure, better in-plane resolution to improve assessment of fine bony changes, and less metallic artifact, improving postoperative evaluation of patients with metallic prostheses and osteosynthesis materials. With more flexible patient positioning, DT is also useful for functional, weight-bearing, and stress tests. To optimize patient management, a comprehensive understanding of the clinical applications and limitations of whole-body DT applications is important for improvement of diagnostic quality, workflow, and cost-effectiveness. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163590

  20. Estimation of scattered radiation in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, O.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.; Elangovan, P.; Bakic, P. R.; Wells, K.

    2014-08-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising technique to overcome the tissue superposition limitations found in planar 2D x-ray mammography. However, as most DBT systems do not employ an anti-scatter grid, the levels of scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor are significantly higher than that observed in planar 2D x-ray mammography. Knowledge of this field is necessary as part of any correction scheme and for computer modelling and optimisation of this examination. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are often used for this purpose, however they are computationally expensive and a more rapid method of calculation is desirable. This issue is addressed in this work by the development of a fast kernel-based methodology for scatter field estimation using a detailed realistic DBT geometry. Thickness-dependent scatter kernels, which were validated against the literature with a maximum discrepancy of 4% for an idealised geometry, have been calculated and a new physical parameter (air gap distance) was used to estimate more accurately the distribution of scattered radiation for a series of anthropomorphic breast phantom models. The proposed methodology considers, for the first time, the effects of scattered radiation from the compression paddle and breast support plate, which can represent more than 30% of the total scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor. The results show that the scatter field estimator can calculate scattered radiation images in an average of 80 min for projection angles up to 25° with equal to or less than a 10% error across most of the breast area when compared with direct MC simulations.

  1. Angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Lena R.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-04-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that combines tomography with conventional digital mammography. In developing DBT dosimetry, a direct application of mammographic dosimetry has appeal. However, DBT introduces rotation of the x-ray tube relative to the dosimeter, thus raising questions about the angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters. To measure this dependence, two ionization chambers, two solid-stated detectors, and one photodiode were rotated relative to an incident Mo/Mo x-ray beam. In this isocentric DBT simulation, the signal of each dosimeter was studied over an angular range of 180° for tube voltages of 26 to 34 kV. One ionization chamber was then modeled numerically to study the response to various monoenergetic beams. The results show that all dosimeters underestimate dose to varying degrees; solid-state detectors show the greatest angular dependence while ionization chambers show the least. Correction factors were computed from the data for isocentric DBT images using projection angles up to +/-25° these factors ranged from 1.0014 to 1.1380. The magnitude of the angular dependence generally decreased with increasing energy, as shown with both the measured and modeled data. As a result, the error arising in measuring DBT dose with a mammographic dosimeter varies significantly; it cannot always be disregarded. The use of correction factors may be possible but is largely impractical, as they are specific to the dosimeter, x-ray beam, and DBT geometry. Instead, an angle-independent dosimeter may be more suitable for DBT.

  2. Low dose scatter correction for digital chest tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inscoe, Christina R.; Wu, Gongting; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) provides superior image quality and depth information for thoracic imaging at relatively low dose, though the presence of strong photon scatter degrades the image quality. In most chest radiography, anti-scatter grids are used. However, the grid also blocks a large fraction of the primary beam photons requiring a significantly higher imaging dose for patients. Previously, we have proposed an efficient low dose scatter correction technique using a primary beam sampling apparatus. We implemented the technique in stationary digital breast tomosynthesis, and found the method to be efficient in correcting patient-specific scatter with only 3% increase in dose. In this paper we reported the feasibility study of applying the same technique to chest tomosynthesis. This investigation was performed utilizing phantom and cadaver subjects. The method involves an initial tomosynthesis scan of the object. A lead plate with an array of holes, or primary sampling apparatus (PSA), was placed above the object. A second tomosynthesis scan was performed to measure the primary (scatter-free) transmission. This PSA data was used with the full-field projections to compute the scatter, which was then interpolated to full-field scatter maps unique to each projection angle. Full-field projection images were scatter corrected prior to reconstruction. Projections and reconstruction slices were evaluated and the correction method was found to be effective at improving image quality and practical for clinical implementation.

  3. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J.; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

  4. Increased microcalcification visibility in lumpectomy specimens using a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Andrew W.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Calliste, Jabari; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Current digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems have been shown to have diminished microcalcification (MC) visibility compared to 2D mammography systems. Rotating gantry DBT systems require mechanical motion of the X-ray source which causes motion blurring of the focal spot, thus reducing spatial resolution. We have developed a stationary DBT (s-DBT) technology that uses a carbon nanotube (CNT) based X-ray source array in order to acquire all the projections images without any mechanical motion. It is capable of producing full tomosynthesis datasets with zero motion blur. It has been shown to have significantly higher spatial resolution than continuous motion DBT systems. An s-DBT system also allows for a wider angular span without increasing the acquisition time. A larger angular span covers a larger portion of the Fourier domain, thus decreasing the tissue overlap. In this study, we compare tomosynthesis imaging of MCs, in lumpectomy specimens, between an s-DBT system and a rotating gantry DBT system. Results show that s-DBT produces better MC sharpness and reduced tissue overlap compared to continuous motion DBT systems.

  5. Development of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Andrew Wallace

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to be a very beneficial tool in the fight against breast cancer. However, current DBT systems have poor spatial resolution compared to full field digital mammography (FFDM), the current gold standard for screening mammography. The poor spatial resolution of DBT systems is a result of the single X-ray source design. In DBT systems a single X-ray source is rotated over an angular span in order to acquire the images needed for 3D reconstruction. The rotation of the X-ray source degrades the spatial resolution of the images. DBT systems which are approved for use in the United States for screening mammography are required to also take a full field digital mammogram with every DBT acquisition in order to compensate for the poor spatial resolution. This double exposure essentially doubles the radiation dose to patients. Over the past few years our research group has developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) based X-ray source technology. The unique nature of CNT X-ray sources allows for multiple X-ray focal spots in a single X-ray source. Using this technology we have recently developed a stationary DBT system (s-DBT) system which is capable of producing a full tomosynthesis image dataset with zero motion of the X-ray source. This system has been shown to have increased spatial resolution over other DBT systems in a laboratory setting. The goal of this thesis work was to optimize the s-DBT system, demonstrate its usefulness over other systems, and finally implement it into the clinic for a clinical trial. The s-DBT system was optimized using different image quality measurements. The optimized system was then used in a breast specimen imaging trial which compared s-DBT to magnified 2D mammography and a conventional single source DBT system. Readers preferred s-DBT to magnified 2D mammography for specimen margin delineation and mass detection, these results were not significant. Using physical measures for spatial resolution the s

  6. Optical geometry calibration method for free-form digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Hartman, Allison; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a type of limited angle tomography that allows 3D information to be reconstructed from a set of x-ray projection images taken at various angles using an x-ray tube, a mechanical arm to rotate the tube about the object, and a digital detector. Tomosynthesis reconstruction requires the precise location of the detector with respect to each x-ray source, forcing all current clinical tomosynthesis systems to use a physically coupled source and detector so the geometry is always known and is always the same. This limits the imaging geometries and its large size is impractical for mobile or field operations. To counter this, we have developed a free form tomosynthesis with a decoupled, free-moving source and detector that uses a novel optical method for accurate and real-time geometry calibration to allow for manual, hand-held tomosynthesis and even CT imaging. We accomplish this by using a camera, attached to the source, to track the motion of the source relative to the detector. Attached to the detector is an optical pattern and the image captured by the camera is then used to determine the relative camera/pattern position and orientation by analyzing the pattern distortion and calculating the source positions for each projection, necessary for 3D reconstruction. This allows for portable imaging in the field and also as an inexpensive upgrade to existing 2D systems, such as in developing countries, to provide 3D image data. Here we report the first feasibility demonstrations of free form digital tomosynthesis systems using the method.

  7. Digital tomosynthesis: technique modifications and clinical applications for neurovascular anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Maravilla, K.R.; Murry, R.C. Jr.; Diehl, J.; Suss, R.; Allen, L.; Chang, K.; Crawford, J.; McCoy, R.

    1984-09-01

    Digital tomosynthesis studies (DTS) using a linear tomographic motion can provide good quality clinical images when combined with subtraction angiotomography. By modifying their hardware system and the computer software algorithms, the authors were able to reconstruct tomosynthesis images using an isocentric rotation (IR) motion. Applying a combination of linear tomographic and IR techniques in clinical cases, they performed DTS studies in six patients, five with aneurysms and one with a hypervascular tumor. The results showed detailed definitions of the pathologic entities and the regional neurovascular anatomy. Based on this early experience, DTS would seem to be a useful technique for the preoperative surgical planning of vascular abnormalities.

  8. Fusion of digital mammography with breast ultrasound: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Ajay; Krucker, Jochen; Astley, Oliver; Buckley, Donald; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Alyassin, Abdal M.; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Myers, Heather; Rumsey, Michael; Johnson, Roger N.; Karr, Steve

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this work was to acquire co-registered digital tomosynthesis mammograms and 3-D breast ultrasound images of breast phantoms. A prototype mammography compression paddle was built for this application and installed on an x-ray tomosynthesis prototype system (GE). Following x-ray exposure, an automated two-dimensional ultrasound probe mover assembly is precisely positioned above the compression plate, and an attached high-frequency ultrasound transducer is scanned over the acoustically coupled phantom or localized region of interest within the phantom through computerized control. The co-ordinate system of one of the two data sets is then transformed into that of the other, and matching regions of interest on either image set can be simultaneously viewed on the x-ray and ultrasound images thus enhancing qualitative visualization, localization and characterization of regions of interest. The potentials of structured noise reduction, cyst versus solid mass differentiation and full 3-D visualization of multi-modality registered data sets in a single automated combined examination are realized for the first time. Elements of system design and required image correction algorithms will be described and phantom studies with this prototype, automated system on an anthropomorphic breast phantom will be presented.

  9. Characterization of Breast Lesions: Comparison of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Ah; Cho, Nariya; Yi, Ann; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and conventional breast ultrasound (US) to characterize breast lesions as benign or malignant. Materials and Methods A total of 332 women, presenting for screening examinations or for breast biopsy between March and June 2012 were recruited to undergo digital mammography (DM), DBT, and breast US examination. Among them, 113 patients with 119 breast lesions depicted on DM were finally included. Three blinded radiologists performed an enriched reader study and reviewed the DBT and US images. Each reader analyzed the lesions in random order, assigned Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) descriptors, rated the images for the likelihood of malignancy (%) and made a BI-RADS final assessment. Diagnostic accuracy, as assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, and specificity of DBT and US were compared. Results Among the 119 breast lesions depicted on DM, 75 were malignant and the remaining 44 were benign. The average diagnostic performance for characterizing breast lesions as benign or malignant in terms of area under the curve was 0.899 for DBT and 0.914 for US (p = 0.394). Mean sensitivity (97.3% vs. 98.7%, p = 0.508) and specificity (44.7% vs. 39.4%, p = 0.360) were also not significantly different. Conclusion Digital breast tomosynthesis may provide similar reader lesion characterization performance to that of US for breast lesions depicted on DM. PMID:25741187

  10. System of digital tomosynthesis for nondestructive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.A.; Chekalin, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes a computerized system of tomographic reconstruction of a three-dimensional object from its two-dimensional projections on the basis of the methods of tomosynthesis. It deals with modified algorithms, the structure of program provisions and instrumental realization of the system. Variants of tomographic reconstruction with filtering are suggested. The results of an experiment with tomographic reconstruction of a test object are presented.

  11. Stationary digital chest tomosynthesis for coronary artery calcium scoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gongting; Wang, Jiong; Potuzko, Marci; Harman, Allison; Pearce, Caleb; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The coronary artery calcium score (CACS) measures the buildup of calcium on the coronary artery wall and has been shown to be an important predictor of the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD). Currently CACS is measured using CT, though the relatively high cost and high radiation dose has limited its adoption as a routine screening procedure. Digital Chest Tomosynthesis (DCT), a low dose and low cost alternative to CT, and has been shown to achieve 90% of sensitivity of CT in lung disease screening. However commercial DCT requires long scanning time and cannot be adapted for high resolution gated cardiac imaging, necessary for CACS. The stationary DCT system (s- DCT), developed in our lab, has the potential to significantly shorten the scanning time and enables high resolution cardiac gated imaging. Here we report the preliminary results of using s-DCT to estimate the CACS. A phantom heart model was developed and scanned by the s-DCT system and a clinical CT in a phantom model with realistic coronary calcifications. The adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) method, developed specifically for stationary tomosynthesis systems, is used to obtain high resolution tomosynthesis images. A trained cardiologist segmented out the calcifications and the CACS was obtained. We observed a strong correlation between the tomosynthesis derived CACS and CT CACS (r2 = 0.88). Our results shows s-DCT imaging has the potential to estimate CACS, thus providing a possible low cost and low dose imaging protocol for screening and monitoring CAD.

  12. Thickness-dependent scatter correction algorithm for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Trotter, Dinko E.; Tkaczyk, J. Eric; Kaufhold, John; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.

    2002-05-01

    We have implemented a scatter-correction algorithm (SCA) for digital mammography based on an iterative restoration filter. The scatter contribution to the image is modeled by an additive component that is proportional to the filtered unattenuated x-ray photon signal and dependent on the characteristics of the imaged object. The SCA's result is closer to the scatter-free signal than when a scatter grid is used. Presently, the SCA shows improved contrast-to-noise performance relative to the scatter grid for a breast thickness up to 3.6 cm, with potential for better performance up to 6 cm. We investigated the efficacy of our scatter-correction method on a series of x-ray images of anthropomorphic breast phantoms with maximum thicknesses ranging from 3.0 cm to 6.0 cm. A comparison of the scatter-corrected images with the scatter-free signal acquired using a slit collimator shows average deviations of 3 percent or less, even in the edge region of the phantoms. These results indicate that the SCA is superior to a scatter grid for 2D quantitative mammography applications, and may enable 3D quantitative applications in X-ray tomosynthesis.

  13. Semi-automated segmentation and classification of digital breast tomosynthesis reconstructed images.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; Michaelsen, Kelly E; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2011-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited-angle tomographic x-ray imaging technique that reduces the effect of tissue superposition observed in planar mammography. An integrated imaging platform that combines DBT with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to provide co-registered anatomical and functional imaging is under development. Incorporation of anatomic priors can benefit NIRS reconstruction. In this work, we provide a segmentation and classification method to extract potential lesions, as well as adipose, fibroglandular, muscle and skin tissue in reconstructed DBT images that serve as anatomic priors during NIRS reconstruction. The method may also be adaptable for estimating tumor volume, breast glandular content, and for extracting lesion features for potential application to computer aided detection and diagnosis. PMID:22255752

  14. Dose assessment of digital tomosynthesis in pediatric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, Amber; Elbakri, Idris A.; Reed, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the potential for digital tomosynthesis (DT) to reduce pediatric x-ray dose while maintaining image quality. We utilized the DT feature (VolumeRadTM) on the GE DefiniumTM 8000 flat panel system installed in the Winnipeg Children's Hospital. Facial bones, cervical spine, thoracic spine, and knee of children aged 5, 10, and 15 years were represented by acrylic phantoms for DT dose measurements. Effective dose was estimated for DT and for corresponding digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) patient image sets. Anthropomorphic phantoms of selected body parts were imaged by DR, DT, and CT. Pediatric radiologists rated visualization of selected anatomic features in these images. Dose and image quality comparisons between DR, DT, and CT determined the usefulness of tomosynthesis for pediatric imaging. CT effective dose was highest; total DR effective dose was not always lowest - depending how many projections were in the DR image set. For the cervical spine, DT dose was close to and occasionally lower than DR dose. Expert radiologists rated visibility of the central facial complex in a skull phantom as better than DR and comparable to CT. Digital tomosynthesis has a significantly lower dose than CT. This study has demonstrated DT shows promise to replace CT for some facial bones and spinal diagnoses. Other clinical applications will be evaluated in the future.

  15. Workload and transmission data for the installation of a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) differs from conventional mammography in target/filter, kVp range, and imaging geometry. The aim of this study was to assess the breast input exposure of a DBT system by completing a workload survey of DBT installations, and to determine the parameters {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} in the Archer equation for the primary radiation generated by the clinical workload distributions. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective survey of the x-ray breast imaging performed between September 2011 and September 2012 in three clinical DBT rooms equipped with Selenia Dimensions systems (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA). A total of 343 examinations were analyzed to calculate the workload (mA-minute) and the primary air kerma at 1 m from the source (K{sup 1}). Transmission curves were calculated for the primary radiation generated by the workload distributions of the DBT rooms, and were fitted to the Archer equation. Results: There were large variations in patient volume and workload in the three examination rooms. In all these rooms, the average tube voltage (kVp) was about 31, the average K{sup 1} per patient was 16-21 mGy, and the average mA-minute per patient was 1.4-2.2 times higher than that of the mammography room described in NCRP Report No. 147. Most DBT screening examinations consisted of four two-dimensional mammographic views plus four tomosynthesis scans; the numbers of views acquired in diagnostic examinations varied widely. Tomosynthesis scans contributed about 30% of total mA-minute and about 50% of K{sup 1}. For the primary radiation generated by the clinical workload distributions, {alpha} was similar to that of 40-45 kVp W/Al (target/filter), and {alpha}+{beta} was similar to that of 30 kVp W/Al. Conclusions: The workload (mA-minute and K{sup 1}) distributions of mammographic examinations with DBT differ from conventional mammography. A field survey of patient volume and x-ray tube usage is important for the shielding

  16. Authenticity and integrity of digital mammography images.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Q; Huang, H K; Lou, S L

    2001-08-01

    Data security becomes more and more important in telemammography which uses a public high-speed wide area network connecting the examination site with the mammography expert center. Generally, security is characterized in terms of privacy, authenticity and integrity of digital data. Privacy is a network access issue and is not considered in this paper. We present a method, authenticity and integrity of digital mammography, here which can meet the requirements of authenticity and integrity for mammography image (IM) transmission. The authenticity and integrity for mammography (AIDM) consists of the following four modules. 1) Image preprocessing: To segment breast pixels from background and extract patient information from digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) image header. 2) Image hashing: To compute an image hash value of the mammogram using the MD5 hash algorithm. 3) Data encryption: To produce a digital envelope containing the encrypted image hash value (digital signature) and corresponding patient information. 4) Data embedding: To embed the digital envelope into the image. This is done by replacing the least significant bit of a random pixel of the mammogram by one bit of the digital envelope bit stream and repeating for all bits in the bit stream. Experiments with digital IMs demonstrate the following. 1) In the expert center, only the user who knows the private key can open the digital envelope and read the patient information data and the digital signature of the mammogram transmitted from the examination site. 2) Data integrity can be verified by matching the image hash value decrypted from the digital signature with that computed from the transmitted image. 3) No visual quality degradation is detected in the embedded image compared with the original. Our preliminary results demonstrate that AIDM is an effective method for image authenticity and integrity in telemammography application. PMID:11513029

  17. Development Of A Digital Mammography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaffe, M. J.; Nishikawa, R. M.; Maidment, A. D. A.; Fenster, A.

    1988-06-01

    A digital breast imaging system is under development to provide improved detectability of breast cancer. In previous work, the limitations of screen-film mammography were studied using both theoretical and experimental techniques. Important limitations were found in both the acquisition and the display components of imaging. These have been addressed in the design of a scanned-projection digital mammography system. A high resolution x-ray image intensifier (XRII), optically coupled to a self-scanned linear photodiode array, is used to record the image. Pre- and post-patient collimation virtually eliminates scattered radiation and veiling glare of the XRII with only a 20% increase in dose due to penumbra. Geometric magnification of 1.6 times is employed to achieve limiting spatial resolution of 7 1p/mm. For low-contrast objects as small as 0.1 mm in diameter, the digital system is capable of producing images with higher contrast and signal-to-noise ratio than optimally-exposed conventional film-screen mammography systems. Greater latitude is obtainable on the digital system because of its wide dynamic range and linearity. The slit system is limited due to long image acquisition times, and poor quantum efficiency. This motivated our current work on a slot beam digital mammography system which is based on a fiber-optic x-ray detector. Preliminary results of this system will be presented.

  18. Image quality and dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Oliveira, N.; Matela, N.; Janeiro, L.; Almeida, P.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Mammography is considered a standard technique for the early detection of breast cancer. However, its sensitivity is limited essentially due to the issue of the overlapping breast tissue. This limitation can be partially overcome, with a relatively new technique, called digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). For this technique, optimization of acquisition parameters which maximize image quality, whilst complying with the ALARA principle, continues to be an area of considerable research. The aim of this work was to study the best quantum energies that optimize the image quality with the lowest achievable dose in DBT and compare these results with the digital mammography (DM) ones. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program MCNPX 2.7.0 in order to generate several 2D cranio-caudal (CC) projections obtained during an acquisition of a standard DBT examination. Moreover, glandular absorbed doses and photon flux calculations, for each projection image, were performed. A homogeneous breast computational phantom with 50%/50% glandular/adipose tissue composition was used and two compressed breast thicknesses were evaluated: 4 cm and 8 cm. The simulated projection images were afterwards reconstructed with an algebraic reconstruction tool and the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) was calculated in order to evaluate the image quality in DBT and DM. Finally, a thorough comparison between the results obtained in terms of SDNR and dose assessment in DBT and DM was performed.

  19. A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Joseph T.; Dennis, Michael J.

    2006-08-15

    Digital tomosynthesis is an imaging technique to produce a tomographic image from a series of angular digital images in a manner similar to conventional focal plane tomography. Unlike film focal plane tomography, the acquisition of the data in a C-arm geometry causes the image receptor to be positioned at various angles to the reconstruction tomogram. The digital nature of the data allows for input images to be combined into the desired plane with the flexibility of generating tomograms of many separate planes from a single set of input data. Angular datasets were obtained of a low contrast detectability (LCD) phantom and cadaver breast utilizing a Lorad stereotactic biopsy unit with a coupled source and digital detector in a C-arm configuration. Datasets of 9 and 41 low-dose projections were collected over a 30 deg. angular range. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a Backprojection (BP) algorithm, an Iterative Subtraction (IS) algorithm that allows the partial subtraction of out-of-focus planes, and an Algebraic Reconstruction (AR) algorithm. These were compared with single view digital radiographs. The methods' effectiveness at enhancing visibility of an obscured LCD phantom was quantified in terms of the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and Signal to Background Ratio (SBR), all normalized to the metric value for the single projection image. The methods' effectiveness at removing ghosting artifacts in a cadaver breast was quantified in terms of the Artifact Spread Function (ASF). The technology proved effective at partially removing out of focus structures and enhancing SNR and SBR. The normalized SNR was highest at 4.85 for the obscured LCD phantom, using nine projections and IS algorithm. The normalized SBR was highest at 23.2 for the obscured LCD phantom, using 41 projections and an AR algorithm. The highest normalized metric values occurred with the obscured phantom. This supports the assertion that the greatest value of tomosynthesis is in imaging

  20. Digital Mammography: Improvements in Breast Cancer Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-06

    X-ray mammography is the most sensitive imaging technique for early detection of breast cancer (diagnostics). It is performed by a radiological system equipped with a rotating molybdenum (Mo) anode tube with an additional Mo filter. In the production of X-ray, bremsstrahlung photons produce an intense diffuse radiation, affecting the contrast between normal and cancerous tissue. So it is known that a good mammographic imaging can help to detect cancer in the first stages avoiding surgery, amputation or even death. In the last years there has been some developments in new imaging techniques to improve the contrast spatial resolution between different tissues: digital imaging, or the so call digital mammography. Digital mammographic imaging is considered an improvement in the prevention of breast cancer due to the advantages it offers.

  1. Characteristics of megavoltage cone-beam digital tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Descovich, M.; Morin, O.; Aubry, J. F.; Aubin, M.; Chen, J.; Bani-Hashemi, A; Pouliot, J.

    2008-04-15

    This article reports on the image characteristics of megavoltage cone-beam digital tomosynthesis (MVCB DT). MVCB DT is an in-room imaging technique, which enables the reconstruction of several two-dimensional slices from a set of projection images acquired over an arc of 20 deg. - 40 deg. The limited angular range reduces the acquisition time and the dose delivered to the patient, but affects the image quality of the reconstructed tomograms. Image characteristics (slice thickness, shape distortion, and contrast-to-noise ratio) are studied as a function of the angular range. Potential clinical applications include patient setup and the development of breath holding techniques for gated imaging.

  2. Digital tomosynthesis with an on-board kilovoltage imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J. . E-mail: devon.godfrey@duke.edu; Yin, F.-F.; Oldham, Mark; Yoo, Sua; Willett, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To generate on-board digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and reference DTS images for three-dimensional image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Three clinical cases (prostate, head-and-neck, and liver) were selected to illustrate the capabilities of on-board DTS for IGRT. Corresponding reference DTS images were reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiographs computed from planning CT image sets. The effect of scan angle on DTS slice thickness was examined by computing the mutual information between coincident CBCT and DTS images, as the DTS scan angle was varied from 0{sup o} to 165{sup o}. A breath-hold DTS acquisition strategy was implemented to remove respiratory motion artifacts. Results: Digital tomosynthesis slices appeared similar to coincident CBCT planes and yielded substantially more anatomic information than either kilovoltage or megavoltage radiographs. Breath-hold DTS acquisition improved soft-tissue visibility by suppressing respiratory motion. Conclusions: Improved bony and soft-tissue visibility in DTS images is likely to improve target localization compared with radiographic verification techniques and might allow for daily localization of a soft-tissue target. Breath-hold DTS is a potential alternative to on-board CBCT for sites prone to respiratory motion.

  3. Overview of the evidence on digital breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Skaane, Per

    2013-04-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT, or 3D-mammography), a three-dimensional derivative of digital mammography (DM), reduces the effect of tissue superimposition and may improve mammographic interpretation. In this review, we examined the evidence on the accuracy of DBT in clinical studies. Published studies of DBT were relatively small studies, mostly test-set observer (reader) studies or clinical series that included symptomatic and screen-recalled cases, and were generally enriched with cancers. With these limitations in mind, the evidence showed some consistent findings, summarized as follows: two-view DBT has at least equal or better accuracy than standard two-view DM, whereas one-view DBT does not have better accuracy than standard DM; the addition of DBT to standard mammography (for mammographic interpretation or for assessment or triage of screen-recalled abnormalities) increases accuracy; improved accuracy from using DBT (relative to, or added to, DM) may be due to increased cancer detection or due to reduced false positive recalls, or both; and subjective interpretation of cancer conspicuity consistently found that cancers were equally or more conspicuous on DBT relative to DM. Preliminary data from population screening trials suggest that the integration of DBT with conventional DM (screen-reading using combined 2D + 3D mammography) may substantially improve breast cancer detection, although final results are not yet available, and many logistical issues need further evaluation to determine the potential implications and cost of combined 2D + 3D mammographic screening. At present, there is insufficient evidence to justify a change from standard DM to DBT however the available data strongly support investment in new large-scale population screening trials. These trials need to avoid the 'double' acquisitions required for 2D + 3D mammograms, and should therefore focus on evaluating integrated 2Dsynthetic + 3D mammography (where 2D-images are

  4. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Allison E.; Shan, Jing; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping; Heath, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David

    2016-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is the gold standard for image evaluation of lung disease, including lung cancer and cystic fibrosis. It provides detailed information of the lung anatomy and lesions, but at a relatively high cost and high dose of radiation. Chest radiography is a low dose imaging modality but it has low sensitivity. Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is an imaging modality that produces 3D images by collecting x-ray projection images over a limited angle. DCT is less expensive than CT and requires about 1/10th the dose of radiation. Commercial DCT systems acquire the projection images by mechanically scanning an x-ray tube. The movement of the tube head limits acquisition speed. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array in benchtop phantom studies. The stationary x-ray source allows for fast image acquisition. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of s-DCT for patient imaging. We have successfully imaged 31 patients. Preliminary evaluation by board certified radiologists suggests good depiction of thoracic anatomy and pathology.

  5. Optimized exposure control in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shramchenko, Nataliya; Blin, Philippe; Mathey, Claude; Klausz, Remy

    2004-05-01

    A method for the determination of optimal operating points of digital mammography systems is described. The digital mammography equipment uses a flat panel detector and a bi-metal molybdenum/rhodium x-ray tube. An operating point is defined by the selection of the x-ray tube target material, x-ray filtration, kVp and detector entrance dose. Breast thickness and composition are estimated from a low dose pre-exposure, then used to index tables containing sets of operating points. The operating points are determined using a model of the image chain, which computes contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and average glandular dose (AGD) for all possible exposure conditions and breast thickness and composition combinations. The selected operating points are those which provide the required CNR for the lowest AGD. An AGD reduction of 30% to 50% can be achieved for comparable Image Quality, relative to current operating points. Resulting from the optimization process, the rhodium target is used in more than 75% of cases. Measurements of CNR and AGD have been performed on various tissue equivalent materials with good agreement between calculated and measured values. The proposed method provides full Image Quality benefit of digital mammography while minimizing dose to patients in a controlled and predictive way.

  6. Regulatory Compliance in Mammography.

    PubMed

    Loesch, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Although the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) passed when analog mammography and film processors were used across the United States, now most health care facilities have full-field digital mammography. This article reviews MQSA requirements including qualifications for personnel, the clinical image evaluation process, and components of a quality control program. In light of technological advances, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's extension certificate for digital breast tomosynthesis is discussed, along with the American College of Radiology's Breast Imaging Center of Excellence designation and laws regarding density notification. PMID:26952076

  7. Digital tomosynthesis rendering of joint margins for arthritis assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duryea, Jeffrey W.; Neumann, Gesa; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Dobbins, James T., III

    2004-05-01

    PURPOSE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand is a significant healthcare problem. Techniques to accurately quantity the structural changes from RA are crucial for the development and prescription of therapies. Analysis of radiographic joint space width (JSW) is widely used and has demonstrated promise. However, radiography presents a 2D view of the joint. In this study we performed tomosynthesis reconstructions of proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints to measure the 3D joint structure. METHODS: We performed a reader study using simulated radiographs of 12 MCP and 12 PIP joints from skeletal specimens imaged with micro-CT. The tomosynthesis technique provided images of reconstructed planes with 0.75 mm spacing, which were presented to 2 readers with a computer tool. The readers were instructed to delineate the joint surfaces on tomosynthetic slices where they could visualize the margins. We performed a quantitative analysis of 5 slices surrounding the central portion of each joint. Reader-determined JSW was compared to a gold standard. As a figure of merit we calculated the average root-mean square deviation (RMSD). RESULTS: RMSD was 0.22 mm for both joints. For the individual joints, RMSD was 0.18 mm (MCP), and 0.26 mm (PIP). The reduced performance for the smaller PIP joints suggests that a slice spacing less than 0.75 mm may be more appropriate. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated the capability of limited 3D rendering of joint surfaces using digital tomosynthesis. This technique promises to provide an improved method to visualize the structural changes of RA.

  8. Tomosynthesis applied to digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, R.A.; Sedaghati, M.; Roy, D.G.; Liu, P.; Nelson, J.A.; Kubal, W.; Del Rio, P.

    1984-09-01

    This extension of the author's previous work on tomographic digital subtraction angiography (DSA) describes the theory of tomosynthetic DSA image reconstruction techniques. In addition to developing the resolution limits resulting from x-ray exposure length and image intensifier field curvature, the authors describe one method of image formation and show tomosynthetic DSA images of animal and human anatomy. Methods for improving the present technique are discussed.

  9. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-07-15

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications.

  10. Tomosynthesis-detected Architectural Distortion: Management Algorithm with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Durand, Melissa A; Wang, Steven; Hooley, Regina J; Raghu, Madhavi; Philpotts, Liane E

    2016-01-01

    As use of digital breast tomosynthesis becomes increasingly widespread, new management challenges are inevitable because tomosynthesis may reveal suspicious lesions not visible at conventional two-dimensional (2D) full-field digital mammography. Architectural distortion is a mammographic finding associated with a high positive predictive value for malignancy. It is detected more frequently at tomosynthesis than at 2D digital mammography and may even be occult at conventional 2D imaging. Few studies have focused on tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortions to date, and optimal management of these distortions has yet to be well defined. Since implementing tomosynthesis at our institution in 2011, we have learned some practical ways to assess architectural distortion. Because distortions may be subtle, tomosynthesis localization tools plus improved visualization of adjacent landmarks are crucial elements in guiding mammographic identification of elusive distortions. These same tools can guide more focused ultrasonography (US) of the breast, which facilitates detection and permits US-guided tissue sampling. Some distortions may be sonographically occult, in which case magnetic resonance imaging may be a reasonable option, both to increase diagnostic confidence and to provide a means for image-guided biopsy. As an alternative, tomosynthesis-guided biopsy, conventional stereotactic biopsy (when possible), or tomosynthesis-guided needle localization may be used to achieve tissue diagnosis. Practical uses for tomosynthesis in evaluation of architectural distortion are highlighted, potential complications are identified, and a working algorithm for management of tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortion is proposed. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:26963448

  11. Adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gongting; Inscoe, Christine; Calliste, Jabari; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides 3D images which remove tissue overlapping and enables better cancer detection. Stationary DBT (s-DBT) uses a fixed X-ray source array to eliminate image blur associated with the x-ray tube motion and provides better image quality as well as faster scanning speed. For limited angle tomography, it is known that iterative reconstructions generally produces better images with fewer artifacts. However classical iterative tomosynthesis reconstruction methods are considerably slower than the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction. The linear x-ray source array used in s-DBT enables a computationally more efficient volume reconstruction using adapted fan beam slice sampling, which transforms the 3-D cone beam reconstruction to a series of 2-D fan beam slice reconstructions. In this paper, we report the first results of the adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) for the s-DBT system currently undergoing clinical trial at UNC, using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). An analytic breast phantom is used to quantitatively analyze the performance of the AFVR. Image quality of a CIRS biopsy phantom reconstructed using the AFVR method are compared to that using FBP algorithm with a commercial package. Our results show a significant reduction in memory usage and an order of magnitude speed increase in reconstructing speed using AFVR compared to that of classical 3-D cone beam reconstruction. We also observed that images reconstructed by AFVR with SART had a better sharpness and contrast compared to that using FBP. Preliminary results on patient images demonstrates the improved detectability of the s-DBT system over the mammography. By utilizing parallel computing with graphics processing unit (GPU), it is expected that the AFVR method will enable iterative reconstruction technique to be practical for clinical applications.

  12. A task-based comparison of two reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Ravi; Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) generates 3-D reconstructions of the breast by taking X-Ray projections at various angles around the breast. DBT improves cancer detection as it minimizes tissue overlap that is present in traditional 2-D mammography. In this work, two methods of reconstruction, filtered backprojection (FBP) and the Newton-Raphson iterative reconstruction were used to create 3-D reconstructions from phantom images acquired on a breast tomosynthesis system. The task based image analysis method was used to compare the performance of each reconstruction technique. The task simulated a 10mm lesion within the breast containing iodine concentrations between 0.0mg/ml and 8.6mg/ml. The TTF was calculated using the reconstruction of an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured with a structured breast phantom (CIRS 020) over different exposure levels. The detectability index d' was calculated to assess image quality of the reconstructed phantom images. Image quality was assessed for both conventional, single energy and dual energy subtracted reconstructions. Dose allocation between the high and low energy scans was also examined. Over the full range of dose allocations, the iterative reconstruction yielded a higher detectability index than the FBP for single energy reconstructions. For dual energy subtraction, detectability index was maximized when most of the dose was allocated to the high energy image. With that dose allocation, the performance trend for reconstruction algorithms reversed; FBP performed better than the corresponding iterative reconstruction. However, FBP performance varied very erratically with changing dose allocation. Therefore, iterative reconstruction is preferred for both imaging modalities despite underperforming dual energy FBP, as it provides stable results.

  13. Fusion of digital breast tomosynthesis images via wavelet synthesis for improved lesion conspicuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Harishwaran; Pomponiu, Victor; Zheng, Bin; Whiting, Bruce; Gur, David

    2014-03-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is the most common screening procedure for detecting early breast cancer. However, due to complications such as overlapping breast tissue in projection images, the efficacy of FFDM reading is reduced. Recent studies have shown that digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in combination with FFDM, increases detection sensitivity considerably while decreasing false-positive, recall rates. There is a huge interest in creating diagnostically accurate 2-D interpretations from the DBT slices. Most of the 2-D syntheses rely on visualizing the maximum intensities (brightness) from each slice through different methods. We propose a wavelet based fusion method, where we focus on preserving holistic information from larger structures such as masses while adding high frequency information that is relevant and helpful for diagnosis. This method enables the spatial generation of a 2D image from a series of DBT images, each of which contains both smooth and coarse structures distributed in the wavelet domain. We believe that the wavelet-synthesized images, generated from their DBT image datasets, provide radiologists with improved lesion and micro-calcification conspicuity as compared with FFDM images. The potential impact of this fusion method is (1) Conception of a device-independent, data-driven modality that increases the conspicuity of lesions, thereby facilitating early detection and potentially reducing recall rates; (2) Reduction of the accompanying radiation dose to the patient.

  14. Dual-energy contrast enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis: concept, method, and evaluation on phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puong, Sylvie; Patoureaux, Fanny; Iordache, Razvan; Bouchevreau, Xavier; Muller, Serge

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we present the development of dual-energy Contrast-Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (CEDBT). A method to produce background clutter-free slices from a set of low and high-energy projections is introduced, along with a scheme for the determination of the optimal low and high-energy techniques. Our approach consists of a dual-energy recombination of the projections, with an algorithm that has proven its performance in Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography1 (CEDM), followed by an iterative volume reconstruction. The aim is to eliminate the anatomical background clutter and to reconstruct slices where the gray level is proportional to the local iodine volumetric concentration. Optimization of the low and high-energy techniques is performed by minimizing the total glandular dose to reach a target iodine Signal Difference to Noise Ratio (SDNR) in the slices. In this study, we proved that this optimization could be done on the projections, by consideration of the SDNR in the projections instead of the SDNR in the slices, and verified this with phantom measurements. We also discuss some limitations of dual-energy CEDBT, due to the restricted angular range for the projection views, and to the presence of scattered radiation. Experiments on textured phantoms with iodine inserts were conducted to assess the performance of dual-energy CEDBT. Texture contrast was nearly completely removed and the iodine signal was enhanced in the slices.

  15. Automated detection of microcalcification clusters for digital breast tomosynthesis using projection data only: A preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, I.; Nishikawa, R. M.; Edwards, A. V.; Kopans, D. B.; Schmidt, R. A.; Papaioannou, J.; Moore, R. H.

    2008-04-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising modality for breast imaging in which an anisotropic volume image of the breast is obtained. We present an algorithm for computerized detection of microcalcification clusters (MCCs) for DBT. This algorithm operates on the projection views only. Therefore it does not depend on reconstruction, and is computationally efficient. The algorithm was developed using a database of 30 image sets with microcalcifications, and a control group of 30 image sets without visible findings. The patient data were acquired on the first DBT prototype at Massachusetts General Hospital. Algorithm sensitivity was estimated to be 0.86 at 1.3 false positive clusters, which is below that of current MCC detection algorithms for full-field digital mammography. Because of the small number of patient cases, algorithm parameters were not optimized and one linear classifier was used. An actual limitation of our approach may be that the signal-to-noise ratio in the projection images is too low for microcalcification detection. Furthermore, the database consisted of predominantly small MCC. This may be related to the image quality obtained with this first prototype.

  16. Cancer risk estimation in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations and voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, P; Baptista, M; Di Maria, S; Vaz, P

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate the risk of radiation induced cancer following the Portuguese breast screening recommendations for Digital Mammography (DM) when applied to Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) and to evaluate how the risk to induce cancer could influence the energy used in breast diagnostic exams. The organ doses were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations using a female voxel phantom and considering the acquisition of 25 projection images. Single organ cancer incidence risks were calculated in order to assess the total effective radiation induced cancer risk. The screening strategy techniques considered were: DBT in Cranio-Caudal (CC) view and two-view DM (CC and Mediolateral Oblique (MLO)). The risk of cancer incidence following the Portuguese screening guidelines (screening every two years in the age range of 50-80years) was calculated by assuming a single CC DBT acquisition view as standalone screening strategy and compared with two-view DM. The difference in the total effective risk between DBT and DM is quite low. Nevertheless in DBT an increase of risk for the lung is observed with respect to DM. The lung is also the organ that is mainly affected when non-optimal beam energy (in terms of image quality and absorbed dose) is used instead of an optimal one. The use of non-optimal energies could increase the risk of lung cancer incidence by a factor of about 2. PMID:27133140

  17. An experimental study of practical computerized scatter correction methods for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, H.; Park, H.; Choi, J.; Choi, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technique developed to overcome the limitations of conventional digital mammography by reconstructing slices through the breast from projections acquired at different angles. In developing and optimizing DBT, the x-ray scatter reduction technique remains a significant challenge due to projection geometry and radiation dose limitations. The most common approach for scatter reduction technique is a beam-stop-array (BSA) algorithm while this method has a concern of additional exposure to acquire the scatter distribution. The compressed breast is roughly symmetry and the scatter profiles from projection acquired at axially opposite angle are similar to mirror image from each other. The purpose of this study was to apply the BSA algorithm acquiring only two scans with a beam stop array, which estimates scatter distribution with minimum additional exposure. The results of scatter correction with angular interpolation were comparable to those of scatter correction with all scatter distributions at each angle and exposure increase was less than 13%. This study demonstrated the influence of scatter correction by BSA algorithm with minimum exposure which indicates the practical application in clinical situations.

  18. Scatter characterization using a beam-stop-array algorithm for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-12-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technique developed to overcome the limitations of conventional digital mammography by reconstructing slices through the breast from projections acquired at different angles from the X-ray source. In the development and the optimization of DBT, the X-ray scatter reduction technique remains a significant challenge due to projectiongeometry and radiation-dose concerns. The purpose of this study was to apply the scatter correction method, which estimates scatter patterns with a beam-stop-array (BSA) by spatial interpolation and obtains primary projections by subtracting the scatter patterns from raw detected projections. The DBT prototype is based on the CsI phosphor/Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor flat panel detector, which was optimized for low exposures with rapid readout. A simplified beam-stop-array algorithm was used to estimate the scatter pattern for each projection and to obtain only primary projections. We evaluated the distribution of the scatter intensity by using a BSA algorithm and reconstructed breast images based on projections with and without a scatter correction. Comparing corrected and uncorrected slices, we measured the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) over a breast phantom. These quantitative comparisons indicated improved image quality in terms of contrast, background noise and contrast-to-noise ratio.

  19. Parenchymal Texture Analysis in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis for Breast Cancer Risk Estimation: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kontos, Despina; Bakic, Predrag R.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Troxel, Andrea B.; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Studies have demonstrated a relationship between mammographic parenchymal texture and breast cancer risk. Although promising, texture analysis in mammograms is limited by tissue superimposition. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel tomographic x-ray breast imaging modality that alleviates the effect of tissue superimposition, offering superior parenchymal texture visualization compared to mammography. Our study investigates the potential advantages of DBT parenchymal texture analysis for breast cancer risk estimation. Materials and Methods DBT and digital mammography (DM) images of 39 women were analyzed. Texture features, shown in studies with mammograms to correlate with cancer risk, were computed from the retroareolar breast region. We compared the relative performance of DBT and DM texture features in correlating with two measures of breast cancer risk: (i) the Gail and Claus risk estimates, and (ii) mammographic breast density. Linear regression was performed to model the association between texture features and increasing levels of risk. Results No significant correlation was detected between parenchymal texture and the Gail and Claus risk estimates. Significant correlations were observed between texture features and breast density. Overall, the DBT texture features demonstrated stronger correlations with breast percent density (PD) than DM (p ≤0.05). When dividing our study population in groups of increasing breast PD, the DBT texture features appeared to be more discriminative, having regression lines with overall lower p-values, steeper slopes, and higher R2 estimates. Conclusion Although preliminary, our results suggest that DBT parenchymal texture analysis could provide more accurate characterization of breast density patterns, which could ultimately improve breast cancer risk estimation. PMID:19201357

  20. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a review of the evidence for use as a screening tool.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Young, Ken C

    2016-02-01

    Breast screening with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) fails to detect 15-30% of cancers. This figure is higher for women with dense breasts. A new tomographic technique in mammography has been developed--digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)--which allows images to be viewed in sections through the breast and has the potential to improve cancer detection rates. Results from retrospective reading studies comparing DBT with FFDM have been largely favourable with improvement in sensitivity and specificity. Increases in diagnostic accuracy have been reported as being independent of breast density; however there are mixed reports regarding the detection of microcalcification. Prospective screening studies using DBT with FFDM have demonstrated increased rates in cancer detection compared with FFDM alone. A reduction in false-positive recall rates has also been shown. Screening with the addition of DBT would approximately double radiation dose; however a simulated FFDM image can be generated from a DBT scan. The combination of simulated FFDM images and DBT is being evaluated within several studies and some positive results have been published. Interval cancer rates for the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) demonstrate the limited sensitivity of FFDM in cancer detection. DBT has the potential to increase sensitivity and decrease false-positive recall rates. It has approval for screening and diagnostics in several countries; however, there are issues with DBT as a screening tool including additional reading time, IT storage and connectivity, over-diagnosis, and cost effectiveness. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness trials are needed before the implementation of DBT in NHSBSP can be considered. PMID:26707815

  1. Generalized filtered back-projection for digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Klaus; Grass, Michael; Hitziger, Sebastian; Iske, Armin; Nielsen, Tim

    2012-03-01

    Filtered backprojection (FBP) has been commonly used as an efficient and robust reconstruction technique in tomographic X-ray imaging during the last decades. For standard geometries like circle or helix it is known how to efficiently filter the data. However, for geometries with only few projection views or with a limited angular range, the application of FBP algorithms generally provides poor results. In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) these limitations give rise to image artifacts due to the limited angular range and the coarse angular sampling. In this work, a generalized FBP algorithm is presented, which uses the filtered projection data of all acquired views for backprojection along one direction. The proposed method yields a computationally efficient generalized FBP algorithm for DBT, which provides similar image quality as iterative reconstruction techniques while preserving the ability for region of interest reconstructions. To demonstrate the excellent performance of this method, examples are given with a simulated breast phantom and the hardware BR3D phantom.

  2. Fast microcalcification detection on digital breast tomosynthesis datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, S.; Muller, S.; Peters, G.; Iordache, R.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we present a fast method for microcalcification detection in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis. Instead of applying the straight-forward reconstruction/filtering/thresholding approach, the filtering is performed on projections before simple back-projection reconstruction. This leads to a reduced computation time since the number of projections is generally much smaller than the number of slices. For an average breast thickness and a typical number of projections, the number of operations is reduced by a factor in the range of 2 to 4. At the same time, the approach yields a negligible decrease of the contrast to noise ratio in the reconstructed slices. Image segmentation results are presented and compared to the previous method as visual performance assessment.

  3. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Izdihar; Chelliah, Kanaga K.; Mustafa, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD) of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50) and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80) commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA) with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy) for two dimension (2D) and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D) images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error. PMID:26052465

  4. Lung cancer detection with digital chest tomosynthesis: first round results from the SOS observational study

    PubMed Central

    Viti, Andrea; Tavella, Chiara; Priotto, Roberto; Ghirardo, Donatella; Grosso, Maurizio; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Baseline results of the Studio OSservazionale (SOS), observational study, a single-arm observational study of digital chest tomosynthesis for lung cancer detection in an at-risk population demonstrated a detection rate of lung cancer comparable to that of studies that used low dose CT scan (LDCT). We present the results of the first round. Methods Totally 1,703 out of 1,843 (92%) subjects who had a baseline digital chest tomosynthesis underwent a first round reevaluation after 1 year. Results At first round chest digital tomosynthesis, 13 (0.7%) subjects had an indeterminate nodule larger than 5 mm and underwent low-dose CT scan for nodule confirmation. PET/CT study was obtained in 10 (0.5%) subjects and 2 subjects had a low-dose CT follow up. Surgery, either video-assisted thoracoscopic or open surgery for indeterminate pulmonary nodules was performed in 10 (0.2%) subjects. A lung cancer was diagnosed and resected in five patients. The lung cancer detection rate at first round was 0.3% (5/1,703). Conclusions The detection rate of lung cancer at first round for tomosynthesis is comparable to rates reported for CT. In addition, results of first round digital chest tomosynthesis confirm chest tomosynthesis as a possible first-line lung cancer-screening tool. PMID:25992366

  5. Digital mammography, cancer screening: Factors important for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.; Blaine, G. James; Doi, Kunio; Yaffe, Martin J.; Shtern, Faina; Brown, G. Stephen; Winfield, Daniel L.; Kallergi, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The use of digital mammography for breast cancer screening poses several novel problems such as development of digital sensors, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) methods for image noise suppression, enhancement, and pattern recognition, compression algorithms for image storage, transmission, and remote diagnosis. X-ray digital mammography using novel direct digital detection schemes or film digitizers results in large data sets and, therefore, image compression methods will play a significant role in the image processing and analysis by CAD techniques. In view of the extensive compression required, the relative merit of 'virtually lossless' versus lossy methods should be determined. A brief overview is presented here of the developments of digital sensors, CAD, and compression methods currently proposed and tested for mammography. The objective of the NCI/NASA Working Group on Digital Mammography is to stimulate the interest of the image processing and compression scientific community for this medical application and identify possible dual use technologies within the NASA centers.

  6. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  7. Evaluation of time-efficient reconstruction methods in digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Svahn, T M; Houssami, N

    2015-07-01

    Three reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis were compared in this article: filtered back-projection (FBP), iterative adapted FBP and maximum likelihood-convex iterative algorithms. Quality metrics such as signal-difference-to-noise ratio, normalised line-profiles and artefact-spread function were used for evaluation of reconstructed tomosynthesis images. The iterative-based methods offered increased image quality in terms of higher detectability and reduced artefacts, which will be further examined in clinical images. PMID:25855075

  8. Breast tissue classification in digital tomosynthesis images based on global gradient minimization and texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Lu, Guolan; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a pseudo-three-dimensional x-ray imaging modality proposed to decrease the effect of tissue superposition present in mammography, potentially resulting in an increase in clinical performance for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Tissue classification in DBT images can be useful in risk assessment, computer-aided detection and radiation dosimetry, among other aspects. However, classifying breast tissue in DBT is a challenging problem because DBT images include complicated structures, image noise, and out-of-plane artifacts due to limited angular tomographic sampling. In this project, we propose an automatic method to classify fatty and glandular tissue in DBT images. First, the DBT images are pre-processed to enhance the tissue structures and to decrease image noise and artifacts. Second, a global smooth filter based on L0 gradient minimization is applied to eliminate detailed structures and enhance large-scale ones. Third, the similar structure regions are extracted and labeled by fuzzy C-means (FCM) classification. At the same time, the texture features are also calculated. Finally, each region is classified into different tissue types based on both intensity and texture features. The proposed method is validated using five patient DBT images using manual segmentation as the gold standard. The Dice scores and the confusion matrix are utilized to evaluate the classified results. The evaluation results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method for classifying breast glandular and fat tissue on DBT images.

  9. Feasibility of Amorphous Selenium Based Photon Counting Detectors for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; O'Connor, P.; Lehnert, J., De Geronimo, G., Dolazza, E., Tousignant, O., Laperriere, L., Greenspan, J., Zhao, W.

    2009-02-27

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been incorporated successfully in direct conversion flat panel x-ray detectors, and has demonstrated superior image quality in screening mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under energy integration mode. The present work explores the potential of a-Se for photon counting detectors in DBT. We investigated major factors contributing to the variation in the charge collected by a pixel upon absorption of each x-ray photon. These factors included x-ray photon interaction, detector geometry, charge transport, and the pulse shaping and noise properties of the photon counting readout circuit. Experimental measurements were performed on a linear array test structure constructed by evaporating an a-Se layer onto an array of 100 {mu}m pitch strip electrodes, which are connected to a 32 channel low noise photon counting integrated circuit. The measured pulse height spectrum (PHS) under polychromatic xray exposure was interpreted quantitatively using the factors identified. Based on the understanding of a-Se photon counting performance, design parameters were proposed for a 2D detector with high quantum efficiency and count rate that could meet the requirements of photon counting detector for DBT.

  10. Effect of the glandular composition on digital breast tomosynthesis image quality and dose optimisation.

    PubMed

    Marques, T; Ribeiro, A; Di Maria, S; Belchior, A; Cardoso, J; Matela, N; Oliveira, N; Janeiro, L; Almeida, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    In the image quality assessment for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a breast phantom with an average percentage of 50 % glandular tissue is seldom used, which may not be representative of the breast tissue composition of the women undergoing such examination. This work aims at studying the effect of the glandular composition of the breast on the image quality taking into consideration different sizes of lesions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program PENELOPE to validate the image acquisition system of the DBT equipment as well as to calculate the mean glandular dose for each projection image and for different breast compositions. The integrated PENELOPE imaging tool (PenEasy) was used to calculate, in mammography, for each clinical detection task the X-ray energy that maximises the figure of merit. All the 2D cranial-caudal projections for DBT were simulated and then underwent the reconstruction process applying the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique. Finally, through signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the image quality in DBT was assessed. PMID:25836692

  11. Investigation of Megavoltage Digital Tomosynthesis using a Cobalt-60 Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Amy

    The ability for megavoltage computed tomography patient setup verification using a cobalt-60 (Co-60) gamma ray source has been established in the context of cobalt tomotherapy. However, it would be beneficial to establish improved cobalt imaging that could be used on more conventional units. In terms of safety and efficiency, this imaging technique would provide the patient with less exposure to radiation. Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is an imaging modality that may provide improved depth localization and in-plane visibility compared to conventional portal imaging in modern Co-60 radiation therapy. DT is a practical and efficient method of achieving depth localization from a limited gantry rotation and a limited number of projections. In DT, each plane of the imaging volume can be brought into focus by relatively displacing the composite images and superimposing the shifted dataset according to the acquisition geometry. Digital flat-panel technology has replaced the need for multiple film exposures and therefore the speed of imaging and capabilities for image processing has put DT in the forefront of both clinical and industrial imaging applications. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate the performance of an experimental system for megavoltage digital tomosynthesis ( MVDT) imaging using a Co-60 gamma ray source. Linear and isocentric acquisition geometries are implemented using tomographic angles of 20--60° and 10--60 projections. Reconstruction algorithms are designed for both acquisition geometries. Using the backprojection approach, the data are shifted and added to reconstruct focal planes of interest. Depth localization and its dependence on tomographic angle and projection density are visualized with an anthropomorphic head phantom. High contrast resolution at localized depths is quantified using the modulation transfer function approach. Results show that focal-plane visibility is improved for larger tomographic angles and that focal

  12. Optimizing the anode-filter combination in the sense of image quality and average glandular dose in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varjonen, Mari; Strömmer, Pekka

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the optimized image quality and average glandular dose in digital mammography, and provides recommendations concerning anode-filter combinations in digital mammography, which is based on amorphous selenium (a-Se) detector technology. The full field digital mammography (FFDM) system based on a-Se technology, which is also a platform of tomosynthesis prototype, was used in this study. X-ray tube anode-filter combinations, which we studied, were tungsten (W) - rhodium (Rh) and tungsten (W) - silver (Ag). Anatomically adaptable fully automatic exposure control (AAEC) was used. The average glandular doses (AGD) were calculated using a specific program developed by Planmed, which automates the method described by Dance et al. Image quality was evaluated in two different ways: a subjective image quality evaluation, and contrast and noise analysis. By using W-Rh and W-Ag anode-filter combinations can be achieved a significantly lower average glandular dose compared with molybdenum (Mo) - molybdenum (Mo) or Mo-Rh. The average glandular dose reduction was achieved from 25 % to 60 %. In the future, the evaluation will concentrate to study more filter combinations and the effect of higher kV (>35 kV) values, which seems be useful while optimizing the dose in digital mammography.

  13. Accelerating reconstruction of reference digital tomosynthesis using graphics hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui; Ren Lei; Godfrey, Devon J.; Yin Fangfang

    2007-10-15

    The successful implementation of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) requires fast DTS image reconstruction. Both target and reference DTS image sets are required to support an image registration application for IGRT. Target images are usually DTS image sets reconstructed from on-board projections, which can be accomplished quickly using the conventional filtered backprojection algorithm. Reference images are DTS image sets reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) previously generated from conventional planning CT data. Generating a set of DRRs from planning CT is relatively slow using the conventional ray-casting algorithm. In order to facilitate DTS reconstruction within a clinically acceptable period of time, we implemented a high performance DRR reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit of commercial PC graphics hardware. The performance of this new algorithm was evaluated and compared with that which is achieved using the conventional software-based ray-casting algorithm. DTS images were reconstructed from DRRs previously generated by both hardware and software algorithms. On average, the DRR reconstruction efficiency using the hardware method is improved by a factor of 67 over the software method. The image quality of the DRRs was comparable to those generated using the software-based ray-casting algorithm. Accelerated DRR reconstruction significantly reduces the overall time required to produce a set of reference DTS images from planning CT and makes this technique clinically practical for target localization for radiation therapy.

  14. DART, a platform for the creation and registration of cone beam digital tomosynthesis datasets.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Vikren; Shi, Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-04-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is an imaging modality that allows for tomographic reconstructions using only a fraction of the images needed for CT reconstruction. Since it offers the advantages of tomographic images with a smaller imaging dose delivered to the patient, the technique offers much promise for use in patient positioning prior to radiation delivery. This paper describes a software environment developed to help in the creation of digital tomosynthesis image sets from digital portal images using three different reconstruction algorithms. The software then allows for use of the tomograms for patient positioning or for dose recalculation if shifts are not applied, possibly as part of an adaptive radiotherapy regimen. PMID:21161469

  15. Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Palma, B. A.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.; Brandan, M. E.

    2007-11-26

    Angiogenesis could be a means for pouring contrast media around tumors. In this work, optimization of radiological parameters for contrast-enhanced subtraction techniques in mammography has been performed. A modification of Lemacks' analytical formalism was implemented to model the X-ray absorption in the breast with contrast medium and detection by a digital image receptor. Preliminary results of signal-to-noise ratio analysis show the advantage of subtracting two images taken at different energies, one prior and one posterior to the injection of contrast medium. Preliminary experimental results using a custom-made phantom have shown good agreement with calculations. A proposal is presented for the clinical application of the optimized technique, which aims at finding correlations between angiogenesis indicators and dynamic variables of contrast medium uptake.

  16. Characterizing X-ray detectors for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-s.; Park, H.-s.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Lee, D.; Choi, Y.-W.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-03-01

    The digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a newly developed 3-D imaging technique that overcomes the tissue superposition problems of conventional mammography. Therefore, it produces fewer false positives. In DBT system, several parameters are involved in image acquisition, including geometric components. A series of projections should be acquired at low exposure. This makes the system strongly dependent on the detector's characteristic performance. This study compares two types of x-ray detectors developed by the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). The first prototype DBT system has a CsI (Tl) scintillator/CMOS based flat panel digital detector (2923 MAM, Dexela Ltd.), with a pixel size of 0.0748 mm. The second uses a-Se based direct conversion full field detector (AXS 2430, analogic) with a pixel size of 0.085 mm. The geometry of both systems is same, with a focal spot 665.8 mm from the detector, and a center of rotation 33 mm above the detector surface. The systems were compared with regard to modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and a new metric, the relative object detectability (ROD). The ROD quantifies the relative performance of each detector at detecting specified objects. The system response function demonstrated excellent linearity (R2>0.99). The CMOS-based detector had a high sensitivity, while the Anrad detector had a large dynamic range. The higher MTF and noise power spectrum (NPS) values were measured using an Anrad detector. The maximum DQE value of the Dexela detector was higher than that of the Anrad detector with a low exposure level, considering one projection exposure for tomosynthesis. Overall, the Dexela detector performed better than did the Anrad detector with regard to the simulated Al wires, spheres, test objects of ROD with low exposure level. In this study, we compared the newly developed prototype DBT system with two different types of x

  17. Comparison study of reconstruction algorithms for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis using various breast phantoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-suk; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a recently developed system for three-dimensional imaging that offers the potential to reduce the false positives of mammography by preventing tissue overlap. Many qualitative evaluations of digital breast tomosynthesis were previously performed by using a phantom with an unrealistic model and with heterogeneous background and noise, which is not representative of real breasts. The purpose of the present work was to compare reconstruction algorithms for DBT by using various breast phantoms; validation was also performed by using patient images. DBT was performed by using a prototype unit that was optimized for very low exposures and rapid readout. Three algorithms were compared: a back-projection (BP) algorithm, a filtered BP (FBP) algorithm, and an iterative expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. To compare the algorithms, three types of breast phantoms (homogeneous background phantom, heterogeneous background phantom, and anthropomorphic breast phantom) were evaluated, and clinical images were also reconstructed by using the different reconstruction algorithms. The in-plane image quality was evaluated based on the line profile and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and out-of-plane artifacts were evaluated by means of the artifact spread function (ASF). Parenchymal texture features of contrast and homogeneity were computed based on reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. The clinical images were studied to validate the effect of reconstruction algorithms. The results showed that the CNRs of masses reconstructed by using the EM algorithm were slightly higher than those obtained by using the BP algorithm, whereas the FBP algorithm yielded much lower CNR due to its high fluctuations of background noise. The FBP algorithm provides the best conspicuity for larger calcifications by enhancing their contrast and sharpness more than the other algorithms; however, in the case of small-size and low

  18. Optimizing configuration parameters of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system based on carbon nanotube x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Gidcumb, Emily; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Kuo, Johnny; Ng, Susan; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2012-03-01

    The stationary Digital Breast Tomosynthesis System (s-DBT) has the advantage over the conventional DBT systems as there is no motion blurring in the projection images associated with the x-ray source motion. We have developed a prototype s-DBT system by retrofitting a Hologic Selenia Dimensions rotating gantry tomosynthesis system with a distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The linear array consists of 31 x-ray generating focal spots distributed over a 30 degree angle. Each x-ray beam can be electronically activated allowing the flexibility and easy implementation of novel tomosynthesis scanning with different scanning parameters and configurations. Here we report the initial results of investigation on the imaging quality of the s-DBT system and its dependence on the acquisition parameters including the number of projections views, the total angular span of the projection views, the dose distribution between different projections, and the total dose. A mammography phantom is used to visually assess image quality. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of a line wire phantom is used to evaluate the system spatial resolution. For s-DBT the in-plan system resolution, as measured by the MTF, does not change for different configurations. This is in contrast to rotating gantry DBT systems, where the MTF degrades for increased angular span due to increased focal spot blurring associated with the x-ray source motion. The overall image quality factor, a composite measure of the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) for mass detection and the z-axis artifact spread function for microcalcification detection, is best for the configuration with a large angular span, an intermediate number of projection views, and an even dose distribution. These results suggest possible directions for further improvement of s-DBT systems for high quality breast cancer imaging.

  19. Radiologists' interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection when screen-reading with tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) relative to standard mammography in population screening.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Tony M; Macaskill, Petra; Houssami, Nehmat

    2015-12-01

    We examined interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection (TP, FP) for radiologists screen-reading with digital breast tomosynthesis as adjunct to full-field digital mammography (2D/3D) relative to 2D alone in population-based screening studies. A systematic literature search was performed to identify screening studies that provided radiologist-specific data for TP and FP detection. Radiologist interpretive efficiency (trade-off between TPs and FPs) was calculated using the FP:TP ratio which expresses the number of FP recalls for each screen-detected breast cancer. We modeled a pooled FP:TP ratio to assess variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency at study-level using random effects logistic regression. FP:TP ratio improved (ratio decreased) for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D) for a majority of radiologists (18 of 22) across all studies. Variability in radiologists' FP:TP ratio was consistently lower in all studies for 2D/3D screen-reading, as suggested by lower variance in ratios. Study-level pooled FP:TP ratio for 2D- and 2D/3D-mammography respectively, were 5.96 (95%CI: 4.08 to 8.72) and 3.17 (95%CI: 2.25 to 4.47) for the STORM trial; 10.25 (95%CI: 6.42 to 16.35) and 7.07 (95%CI: 4.99 to 10.02) for the Oslo trial; and 20.84 (95%CI: 13.95 to 31.12) and 8.37 (95%CI: 5.87 to 11.93) for the Houston study. This transfers into study-level improved interpretative efficiencies of 48%, 30% and 55%, respectively, for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D). In summary, study-level FP:TP trade-off improved using 2D/3D-mammography for all studies, which was also seen for most individual radiologists. There was variability in the FP:TP trade-off between readers and studies for 2D-as well as for 2D/3D-interpretations but variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency was relatively lower using 2D/3D-mammography. PMID:26433751

  20. Dose assessment in contrast enhanced digital mammography using simple phantoms simulating standard model breasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, R. W.; van Engen, R. E.; Young, K. C.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Dance, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    Slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE) slabs are used to simulate standard model breasts for the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). These phantoms are optimized for the energy spectra used in DM and DBT, which normally have a lower average energy than used in contrast enhanced digital mammography (CEDM). In this study we have investigated whether these phantoms can be used for the evaluation of AGD with the high energy x-ray spectra used in CEDM. For this purpose the calculated values of the incident air kerma for dosimetry phantoms and standard model breasts were compared in a zero degree projection with the use of an anti scatter grid. It was found that the difference in incident air kerma compared to standard model breasts ranges between -10% to +4% for PMMA slabs and between 6% and 15% for PMMA-PE slabs. The estimated systematic error in the measured AGD for both sets of phantoms were considered to be sufficiently small for the evaluation of AGD in quality control procedures for CEDM. However, the systematic error can be substantial if AGD values from different phantoms are compared.

  1. Geometric estimation method for x-ray digital intraoral tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Yao; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-01

    It is essential for accurate image reconstruction to obtain a set of parameters that describes the x-ray scanning geometry. A geometric estimation method is presented for x-ray digital intraoral tomosynthesis (DIT) in which the detector remains stationary while the x-ray source rotates. The main idea is to estimate the three-dimensional (3-D) coordinates of each shot position using at least two small opaque balls adhering to the detector surface as the positioning markers. From the radiographs containing these balls, the position of each x-ray focal spot can be calculated independently relative to the detector center no matter what kind of scanning trajectory is used. A 3-D phantom which roughly simulates DIT was designed to evaluate the performance of this method both quantitatively and qualitatively in the sense of mean square error and structural similarity. Results are also presented for real data acquired with a DIT experimental system. These results prove the validity of this geometric estimation method.

  2. Digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction with an adaptive voxel grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, Bernhard; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2014-03-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume datasets are typically reconstructed with an anisotropic voxel size, where the in-plane voxel size usually reflects the detector pixel size (e.g., 0.1 mm), and the slice separation is generally between 0.5-1.0 mm. Increasing the tomographic angle is expected to give better 3D image quality; however, the slice spacing in the reconstruction should be reduced, otherwise one may risk losing fine-scale image detail (e.g., small microcalcifications). An alternative strategy consists of reconstructing on an adaptive voxel grid, where the voxel height at each location is adapted based on the backprojected data at this location, with the goal to improve image quality for microcalcifications. In this paper we present an approach for generating such an adaptive voxel grid. This approach is based on an initial reconstruction step that is performed at a finer slice-spacing combined with a selection of an "optimal" height for each voxel. This initial step is followed by a (potentially iterative) reconstruction acting now on the adaptive grid only.

  3. Digital tomosynthesis in lung cancer: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a limited angle image tomography, which improves the visibility of anatomy compared with radiographic imaging. Due to the limited acquisition angle of CDT, it has the potential to significantly increase the temporal resolution of patient surveillance at the cost of reduced resolution in one direction. CDT is 3 times more effective in identifying pulmonary nodules compared to conventional radiography and at lower doses and cost compared with routine chest computed tomography (CT) examinations. There is only one report in which CDT was used in a single-arm observational study for lung cancer detection in at-risk population while a few studies suggested that CDT sensitivity is superior to radiography but inferior to CT in detecting lung nodules, other studies on the accuracy of CDT suggest that the specificity is much closer to CT than radiography. Therefore, large-scale randomized controlled trial would be needed to confirm benefits of CDT and identify where it is best used in the clinical setting. CDT seems to be a cost-effectiveness first-line lung cancer screening tool to detect potential lung cancer nodule. PMID:26207232

  4. Fast reconstruction of digital tomosynthesis using on-board images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui; Godfrey, Devon J.; Yin Fangfang

    2008-05-15

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional (3D) volume images from two-dimensional x-ray projections acquired over limited scan angles. Compared with cone-beam computed tomography, which is frequently used for 3D image guided radiation therapy, DTS requires less imaging time and dose. Successful implementation of DTS for fast target localization requires the reconstruction process to be accomplished within tight clinical time constraints (usually within 2 min). To achieve this goal, substantial improvement of reconstruction efficiency is necessary. In this study, a reconstruction process based upon the algorithm proposed by Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress was implemented on graphics hardware for the purpose of acceleration. The performance of the novel reconstruction implementation was tested for phantom and real patient cases. The efficiency of DTS reconstruction was improved by a factor of 13 on average, without compromising image quality. With acceleration of the reconstruction algorithm, the whole DTS generation process including data preprocessing, reconstruction, and DICOM conversion is accomplished within 1.5 min, which ultimately meets clinical requirement for on-line target localization.

  5. Intravenous pyelogram artefacts unique to digital tomosynthesis reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rowberry, B K; Galea, A

    2011-11-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to the realisation of digital tomosynthesis (DT) imaging in routine investigations such as intravenous pyelogram (IVP). The major advantage this technology has over other technologies is its ability to perform a retrospective reconstruction of an arbitrary number of coronal image planes from a single data set consisting of a series of low dose discrete projections acquired over a limited angular range using a stationary detector. It is well documented that because DT relies on an angular limited acquisition, the data set is incomplete. This, in combination with the image reconstruction algorithm, results in reconstructed images containing non-focused information from outside the immediate focal plane. This article describes and suggests the cause of two artefacts unique to DT that cannot be explained by blurring alone. We believe the two artefacts are caused by breathing during data acquisition together with a combination of other factors, including the anatomy of the renal system, the method of data acquisition and the reconstructive algorithm used. This could lead to the unaware reporting radiologist falsely diagnosing a duplex collecting system. To avoid these artefacts, we recommend DT IVP should only be used in patients who can adequately perform a breath-hold for the duration of the data acquisition. In addition, we suggest that the study should be performed with breath-held following expiration. PMID:22011833

  6. Focal spot calibration in a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaegu; Hwang, Sun-Jo; Choi, Young-Wook

    2012-05-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) technology is a promising modality for the early detection of breast cancer and could provide clear diagnostic images in which the effect of tissue overlap is alleviated. Accurate calibration of the system geometry is essential for successful image reconstruction in DBT systems. The geometrical calibration of the focal spot in the X-ray tube at the detector plane is one of the most critical parameters of a DBT system. In this paper, a new method using a multi-hole collimator and an iterative calibration algorithm is reported in order to estimate the position of the focal spot at the detector plane. The iterative algorithm is based on the area-distance relationship in the collimator image. The linearity of this relationship has been verified both empirically and theoretically. A focal spot estimate has been achieved regardless of the location of the focal spot in the image. A total of 15 projection images acquired with the DBT system have been successfully reconstructed with geometric information about the focal spot position provided by our new method, and the focal spot estimate method proposed in this paper could be a useful solution for locating optical sources that cannot be viewed or accessed.

  7. Satellite teleradiology test bed for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Bruce G.; Dudding, Kathryn E.; Abdel-Malek, Aiman A.; Mitchell, Robert J.

    1996-05-01

    Teleradiology offers significant improvement in efficiency and patient compliance over current practices in traditional film/screen-based diagnosis. The increasing number of women who need to be screened for breast cancer, including those in remote rural regions, make the advantages of teleradiology especially attractive for digital mammography. At the same time, the size and resolution of digital mammograms are among the most challenging to support in a cost effective teleradiology system. This paper will describe a teleradiology architecture developed for use with digital mammography by GE Corporate Research and Development in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital under National Cancer Institute (NCI/NIH) grant number R01 CA60246-01. The testbed architecture is based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard, created by the American College of Radiology and National Electrical Manufacturers Association. The testbed uses several Sun workstations running SunOS, which emulate a rural examination facility connected to a central diagnostic facility, and uses a TCP-based DICOM application to transfer images over a satellite link. Network performance depends on the product of the bandwidth times the round- trip time. A satellite link has a round trip of 513 milliseconds, making the bandwidth-delay a significant problem. This type of high bandwidth, high delay network is called a Long Fat Network, or LFN. The goal of this project was to quantify the performance of the satellite link, and evaluate the effectiveness of TCP over an LFN. Four workstations have Sun's HSI/S (High Speed Interface) option. Two are connected by a cable, and two are connected through a satellite link. Both interfaces have the same T1 bandwidth (1.544 Megabits per second). The only difference was the round trip time. Even with large window buffers, the time to transfer a file over the satellite link was significantly longer, due to the bandwidth-delay. To

  8. A comparative analysis of 2D and 3D CAD for calcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Conant, Emily F.

    2015-03-01

    Many medical centers offer digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and 2D digital mammography acquired under the same compression (i.e., "Combo" examination) for screening. This paper compares a conventional 2D CAD algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® CAD v9.4) for calcification detection against a prototype 3D algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® 3D Calc CAD v1.0). Due to the newness of DBT, the development of this 3D CAD algorithm is ongoing, and it is currently not FDA-approved in the United States. For this study, DBT screening cases with suspicious calcifications were identified retrospectively at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert radiologist (E.F.C.) reviewed images with both 2D and DBT CAD marks, and compared the marks to biopsy results. Control cases with one-year negative follow-up were also studied; these cases either possess clearly benign calcifications or lacked calcifications. To allow the user to alter the sensitivity for cancer detection, an operating point is assigned to each CAD mark. As expected from conventional 2D CAD, increasing the operating point in 3D CAD increases sensitivity and reduces specificity. Additionally, we showed that some cancers are occult to 2D CAD at all operating points. By contrast, 3D CAD allows for detection of some cancers that are missed on 2D CAD. We also demonstrated that some non-cancerous CAD marks in 3D are not present at analogous locations in the 2D image. Hence, there are additional marks when using both 2D and 3D CAD in combination, leading to lower specificity than with conventional 2D CAD alone.

  9. The role of digital tomosynthesis in reducing the number of equivocal breast reportings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakhras, Maram; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Rickard, Mary; Bourne, Roger; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose To compare radiologists' confidence in assessing breast cancer using combined digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared with DM alone as a function of previous experience with DBT. Materials and Methods Institutional ethics approval was obtained. Twenty-three experienced breast radiologists reviewed 50 cases in two modes, DM alone and DM+DBT. Twenty-seven cases presented with breast cancer. Each radiologist was asked to detect breast lesions and give a confidence score of 1-5 (1- Normal, 2- Benign, 3- Equivocal, 4- Suspicious, 5- Malignant). Radiologists were divided into three sub-groups according to their prior experience with DBT (none, workshop experience, and clinical experience). Confidence scores using DM+DBT were compared with DM alone for all readers combined and for each DBT experience subgroup. Statistical analyses, using GraphPad Prism 5, were carried out using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test with statistical significance set at p< 0.05. Results Confidence scores were higher for true positive cancer cases using DM+DBT compared with DM alone for all readers (p < 0.0001). Confidence scores for normal cases were lower (indicating greater confidence in the non-cancer diagnosis) with DM+DBT compared with DM alone for all readers (p= 0.018) and readers with no prior DBT experience (p= 0.035). Conclusion Addition of DBT to DM increases the confidence level of radiologists in scoring cancer and normal/benign cases. This finding appears to apply across radiologists with varying levels of DBT experience, however further work involving greater numbers of radiologists is required.

  10. Combination of conspicuity improved synthetic mammograms and digital breast tomosynthesis: a promising approach for mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Tae; Kim, Dae Hoe; Ro, Yong Man

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a novel mass detection framework that utilizes the information from synthetic mammograms has been developed for detecting masses in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In clinical study, it is demonstrated that the combination of DBT and full field digital mammography (FFDM) increases the reader performance. To reduce the radiation dose in this approach, synthetic mammogram has been developed in previous researches and it is demonstrated that synthetic mammogram can alternate the FFDM when it is used with DBT. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of the combined approach of DBT and synthetic mammogram in point of computer-aided detection (CAD). As a synthetic mammogram, two-dimensional image was generated by adopting conspicuous voxels of three-dimensional DBT volume in our study. The mass likelihood scores estimated for each mass candidates in synthetic mammogram and DBT are merged to differentiate masses and false positives (FPs) in combined approach. We compared the performance of detecting masses in the proposed combined approach and DBT alone. A clinical data set of 196 DBT volumes was used to evaluate the different detection schemes. The combined approach achieved sensitivity of 80% and 89% with 1.16 and 2.37 FPs per DBT volume. The DBT alone approach achieved same sensitivities with 1.61 and 3.46 FPs per DBT volume. Experimental results show that statistically significant improvement (p = 0.002) is achieved in combined approach compared to DBT alone. These results imply that the information fusion of synthetic mammogram and DBT is a promising approach to detect masses in DBT.

  11. Screening Outcomes Following Implementation of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis in a General-Population Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Anne Marie; Kontos, Despina; Synnestvedt, Marie; Tan, Kay See; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Schnall, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Background Early data on breast cancer screening utilizing digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) combined with digital mammography (DM) have shown improvements in false-positive and false-negative screening rates compared with DM alone. However, these trials were performed at sites where conventional mammographic screening was concurrently performed, possibly leading to selection biases or with complex, multireader algorithms not reflecting general clinical practice. Our study reports the impact on screening outcomes for DBT screening implemented in an entire clinic population. Methods Recall rates, cancer detection, and positive predictive values of screening were compared for 15571 women screened with DBT and 10728 screened with DM alone prior to DBT implementation at a single breast imaging center. Generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) for recall rate adjusted for age, race, presence of prior mammograms, breast density and reader. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results DBT screening showed a statistically significant reduction in recalls compared to DM alone. For the entire population, there were 16 fewer recalls (8.8% vs 10.4%, P <.001, adjusted OR = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.74 to 0.88, P < .001) and 0.9 additional cancers detected per 1000 screened with DBT compared to DM alone. There was a statistically significant increase in PPV1 (6.2% vs 4.4%, P = .047). In women younger than age 50 years screened with DBT, there were 17 fewer recalls (12.3% vs 14.0%, P = .02) and 3.6 additional cancer detected per 1000 screened (5.7 vs 2.2 per 1000, P = .02). Conclusions Our data support the clinical implementation of DBT in breast cancer screening; however, larger prospective trials are needed to validate our findings in specific patient subgroups. PMID:25313245

  12. Feasibility study of dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using non-local denoising algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Marcelo A. C.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the ability of denoising algorithms to reduce the radiation dose in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) examinations. Clinical use of DBT is normally performed in "combo-mode", in which, in addition to DBT projections, a 2D mammogram is taken with the standard radiation dose. As a result, patients have been exposed to radiation doses higher than used in digital mammography. Thus, efforts to reduce the radiation dose in DBT examinations are of great interest. However, a decrease in dose leads to an increased quantum noise level, and related decrease in image quality. This work is aimed at addressing this problem by the use of denoising techniques, which could allow for dose reduction while keeping the image quality acceptable. We have studied two "state of the art" denoising techniques for filtering the quantum noise due to the reduced dose in DBT projections: Non-local Means (NLM) and Block-matching 3D (BM3D). We acquired DBT projections at different dose levels of an anthropomorphic physical breast phantom with inserted simulated microcalcifications. Then, we found the optimal filtering parameters where the denoising algorithms are capable of recovering the quality from the DBT images acquired with the standard radiation dose. Results using objective image quality assessment metrics showed that BM3D algorithm achieved better noise adjustment (mean difference in peak signal to noise ratio < 0.1dB) and less blurring (mean difference in image sharpness ~ 6%) than the NLM for the projections acquired with lower radiation doses.

  13. Digital Tomosynthesis System Geometry Analysis Using Convolution-Based Blur-and-Add (BAA) Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Yoon, Sungwon; Solomon, Edward G; Star-Lack, Josh; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a three-dimensional imaging technique with a lower radiation dose than computed tomography (CT). Due to the missing data in tomosynthesis systems, out-of-plane structures in the depth direction cannot be completely removed by the reconstruction algorithms. In this work, we analyzed the impulse responses of common tomosynthesis systems on a plane-to-plane basis and proposed a fast and accurate convolution-based blur-and-add (BAA) model to simulate the backprojected images. In addition, the analysis formalism describing the impulse response of out-of-plane structures can be generalized to both rotating and parallel gantries. We implemented a ray tracing forward projection and backprojection (ray-based model) algorithm and the convolution-based BAA model to simulate the shift-and-add (backproject) tomosynthesis reconstructions. The convolution-based BAA model with proper geometry distortion correction provides reasonably accurate estimates of the tomosynthesis reconstruction. A numerical comparison indicates that the simulated images using the two models differ by less than 6% in terms of the root-mean-squared error. This convolution-based BAA model can be used in efficient system geometry analysis, reconstruction algorithm design, out-of-plane artifacts suppression, and CT-tomosynthesis registration. PMID:26208308

  14. An object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system.

    PubMed

    Seyyedi, Saeed; Cengiz, Kubra; Kamasak, Mustafa; Yildirim, Isa

    2013-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV) are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM) values. PMID:24371468

  15. Triple-energy contrast enhanced digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puong, Sylvie; Milioni de Carvalho, Pablo; Muller, Serge

    2010-04-01

    With the injection of iodine, Contrast Enhanced Digital Mammography (CEDM) provides functional information about breast tumour angiogenesis that can potentially help in cancer diagnosis. In order to generate iodine images in which the gray level is proportional to the iodine thickness, temporal and dual-energy approaches have already been considered. The dual-energy method offers the advantage of less patient motion artifacts and better comfort during the exam. However, this approach requires knowledge of the breast thickness at each pixel. Generally, as compression is applied, the breast thickness at each pixel is taken as the compression thickness. Nevertheless, in the breast border region, this assumption is not correct anymore and this causes inaccuracies in the iodine image. Triple-Energy CEDM could overcome these limitations by providing supplemental information in the form of a third image acquired with a different spectrum than the other two. This precludes the need of a priori knowledge of the breast thickness. Moreover, with Triple-Energy CEDM, breast thickness and glandularity maps could potentially be derived. In this study, we first focused on the method to recombine the three images in order to generate the iodine image, analyzing the performance of either quadratic, cubic or conic recombination functions. Then, we studied the optimal acquisition spectra in order to maximize the iodine SDNR in the recombined image for a given target total glandular dose. The concept of Triple-Energy CEDM was validated on simulated textured images and poly-energetic images acquired with a conventional X-ray mammography tube.

  16. Scattering estimation from digital breast tomosynthesis guiding near infrared spectral tomographic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Pogue, Brian W.; Poplack, Steven P.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-03-01

    X-ray image pixel intensity and optical scattering are compared for 11 normal subjects to assess the feasibility of using X-ray imaging as a surrogate for optical scattering in NIR spectral tomography. Digital breast tomosynthesis exams, as well as twenty single point reflectance measurements of optical breast scattering are compared for a wide variety of breast sizes and densities to determine if scattering can be accurately predicted based on x-ray attenuation. If implemented, x-ray based scattering estimation will decrease exam time and cost as well as simplify the design of a newly developed integrated near infrared spectral tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system.

  17. Mammography

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Mammography Mammography is a specific type of breast imaging ... What are the limitations of Mammography? What is Mammography? Mammography is specialized medical imaging that uses a ...

  18. Digital mammography: tradeoffs between 50- and 100-micron pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Matthew T.; Steller Artz, Dorothy E.; Jafroudi, Hamid; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Zuurbier, Rebecca A.; Katial, Raj; Hayes, Wendelin S.; Wu, Chris Y.; Lin, Jyh-Shyan; Steinman, Richard M.; Tohme, Walid G.; Mun, Seong K.

    1995-05-01

    Improvements in mammography equipment related to a decrease in pixel size of digital mammography detectors raise questions of the possible effects of these new detectors. Mathematical modeling suggested that the benefits of moving from 100 to 50 micron detectors were slight and might not justify the cost of these new units. Experiments comparing screen film mammography, a storage phosphor 100 micron digital detector, a 50 micron digital breast spot device, 100 micron film digitization and 50 micron film digitization suggests that object conspicuity should be better for digital compared to conventional systems, but that there seemed to be minimal advantage to going from 100 to 50 microns. The 50 micron pixel system appears to provide a slight advantage in object contrast and perhaps in shape definition, but did not allow smaller objects to be detected.

  19. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector

  20. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  1. Automatic correspondence detection in mammogram and breast tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Krüger, Julia; Bischof, Arpad; Barkhausen, Jörg; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Two-dimensional mammography is the major imaging modality in breast cancer detection. A disadvantage of mammography is the projective nature of this imaging technique. Tomosynthesis is an attractive modality with the potential to combine the high contrast and high resolution of digital mammography with the advantages of 3D imaging. In order to facilitate diagnostics and treatment in the current clinical work-flow, correspondences between tomosynthesis images and previous mammographic exams of the same women have to be determined. In this paper, we propose a method to detect correspondences in 2D mammograms and 3D tomosynthesis images automatically. In general, this 2D/3D correspondence problem is ill-posed, because a point in the 2D mammogram corresponds to a line in the 3D tomosynthesis image. The goal of our method is to detect the "most probable" 3D position in the tomosynthesis images corresponding to a selected point in the 2D mammogram. We present two alternative approaches to solve this 2D/3D correspondence problem: a 2D/3D registration method and a 2D/2D mapping between mammogram and tomosynthesis projection images with a following back projection. The advantages and limitations of both approaches are discussed and the performance of the methods is evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using a software phantom and clinical breast image data. Although the proposed 2D/3D registration method can compensate for moderate breast deformations caused by different breast compressions, this approach is not suitable for clinical tomosynthesis data due to the limited resolution and blurring effects perpendicular to the direction of projection. The quantitative results show that the proposed 2D/2D mapping method is capable of detecting corresponding positions in mammograms and tomosynthesis images automatically for 61 out of 65 landmarks. The proposed method can facilitate diagnosis, visual inspection and comparison of 2D mammograms and 3D tomosynthesis images for

  2. Visibility of single spiculations in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberg, Pontus; Dustler, Magnus; Förnvik, Daniel; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the visibility of single spiculations in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Method: Simulated spheres (6 mm diameter) with single spiculations were added to projection images acquired on a DBT system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration, Siemens). The spiculations had a cylindrical shape and were randomly, diagonally aligned (at four different positions: +/- π/4 or +/- 3π/4) at a plane parallel to the detector. They were assumed to consist of a fibroglandular tissue composition. The length of the spiculations was 5 mm while the diameter varied (0.12 - 0.28 mm). Reconstructed central slices of the lesion, separated by insertion in fatty or dense breasts (100 images in each), were used in 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments. Three different reconstructions were used: filtered back projection (FBP) with 1 mm thick slices and a statistical artifact reduction reconstruction (SAR) method generating 1 and 2 mm thick slices. Five readers participated and their task was to locate the spiculation in randomly presented images from the whole image set (4 diameters × 100 images). The percent correct (PC) decision was determined in both fat and dense tissue for all spiculation diameters and reconstructions. Results: At a PC level of 95% the required diameter was about 0.17 - 0.22 mm in dense tissue, and 0.18 - 0.26 mm in fatty tissue (depending upon reconstruction). Conclusions: SAR was found to be a promising alternative to FBP. The visibility of single spiculations was determined. The required diameter depends on both tissue composition and reconstruction.

  3. Assessing and improving cobalt-60 digital tomosynthesis image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Matthew B.; Schreiner, L. John; Kerr, Andrew T.

    2014-03-01

    Image guidance capability is an important feature of modern radiotherapy linacs, and future cobalt-60 units will be expected to have similar capabilities. Imaging with the treatment beam is an appealing option, for reasons of simplicity and cost, but the dose needed to produce cone beam CT (CBCT) images in a Co-60 treatment beam is too high for this modality to be clinically useful. Digital tomosynthesis (DT) offers a quasi-3D image, of sufficient quality to identify bony anatomy or fiducial markers, while delivering a much lower dose than CBCT. A series of experiments were conducted on a prototype Co-60 cone beam imaging system to quantify the resolution, selectivity, geometric accuracy and contrast sensitivity of Co-60 DT. Although the resolution is severely limited by the penumbra cast by the ~2 cm diameter source, it is possible to identify high contrast objects on the order of 1 mm in width, and bony anatomy in anthropomorphic phantoms is clearly recognizable. Low contrast sensitivity down to electron density differences of 3% is obtained, for uniform features of similar thickness. The conventional shift-and-add reconstruction algorithm was compared to several variants of the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress filtered backprojection algorithm result. The Co-60 DT images were obtained with a total dose of 5 to 15 cGy each. We conclude that Co-60 radiotherapy units upgraded for modern conformal therapy could also incorporate imaging using filtered backprojection DT in the treatment beam. DT is a versatile and promising modality that would be well suited to image guidance requirements.

  4. Computerized mass detection for digital breast tomosynthesis directly from the projection images

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, I.; Nishikawa, R.M.; Giger, M.L.; Wu, T.; Rafferty, E.A.; Moore, R.; Kopans, D.B.

    2006-02-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has recently emerged as a new and promising three-dimensional modality in breast imaging. In DBT, the breast volume is reconstructed from 11 projection images, taken at source angles equally spaced over an arc of 50 degrees. Reconstruction algorithms for this modality are not fully optimized yet. Because computerized lesion detection in the reconstructed breast volume will be affected by the reconstruction technique, we are developing a novel mass detection algorithm that operates instead on the set of raw projection images. Mass detection is done in three stages. First, lesion candidates are obtained for each projection image separately, using a mass detection algorithm that was initially developed for screen-film mammography. Second, the locations of a lesion candidate are backprojected into the breast volume. In this feature volume, voxel intensities are a combined measure of detection frequency (e.g., the number of projections in which a given lesion candidate was detected), and a measure of the angular range over which a given lesion was detected. Third, features are extracted after reprojecting the three-dimensional (3-D) locations of lesion candidates into projection images. Features are combined using linear discriminant analysis. The database used to test the algorithm consisted of 21 mass cases (13 malignant, 8 benign) and 15 cases without mass lesions. Based on this database, the algorithm yielded a sensitivity of 90% at 1.5 false positives per breast volume. Algorithm performance is positively biased because this dataset was used for development, training, and testing, and because the number of algorithm parameters was approximately the same as the number of patient cases. Our results indicate that computerized mass detection in the sequence of projection images for DBT may be effective despite the higher noise level in those images.

  5. Wavelet processing techniques for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Andrew F.; Song, Shuwu

    1992-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for accomplishing mammographic feature analysis through multiresolution representations. We show that efficient (nonredundant) representations may be identified from digital mammography and used to enhance specific mammographic features within a continuum of scale space. The multiresolution decomposition of wavelet transforms provides a natural hierarchy in which to embed an interactive paradigm for accomplishing scale space feature analysis. Similar to traditional coarse to fine matching strategies, the radiologist may first choose to look for coarse features (e.g., dominant mass) within low frequency levels of a wavelet transform and later examine finer features (e.g., microcalcifications) at higher frequency levels. In addition, features may be extracted by applying geometric constraints within each level of the transform. Choosing wavelets (or analyzing functions) that are simultaneously localized in both space and frequency, results in a powerful methodology for image analysis. Multiresolution and orientation selectivity, known biological mechanisms in primate vision, are ingrained in wavelet representations and inspire the techniques presented in this paper. Our approach includes local analysis of complete multiscale representations. Mammograms are reconstructed from wavelet representations, enhanced by linear, exponential and constant weight functions through scale space. By improving the visualization of breast pathology we can improve the chances of early detection of breast cancers (improve quality) while requiring less time to evaluate mammograms for most patients (lower costs).

  6. Toward quantification of breast tomosynthesis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Christina M.; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S.; Zerhouni, Moustafa; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2008-03-01

    Due to the high prevalence of breast cancer among women, much is being done to detect breast cancer earlier and more accurately. In current clinical practice, the most widely-used mode of breast imaging is mammography. Its main advantages are high sensitivity and low patient dose, although it is still merely a two-dimensional projection of a three-dimensional object. In digital breast tomosynthesis, a three-dimensional image of the breast can be reconstructed, but x-ray projection images of the breast are taken over a limited angular span. However, the breast tomosynthesis device itself is more similar to a digital mammography system and thus is a feasible replacement for mammography. Because of the angular undersampling in breast tomosynthesis, the reconstructed images are not considered quantitative, so a worthwhile question to answer would be whether the voxel values (VVs) in breast tomosynthesis images can be made to indicate tissue type as Hounsfield units do in CT. through some image processing scheme. To investigate this, simple phantoms were imaged consisting of layers of uniform, tissue-equivalent plastic for the background sandwiching a layer of interest containing multiple, small cuboids of tissue-equivalent plastic. After analyzing the reconstructed tomosynthesis images, it was found that the VV in each lesion increases linearly with tissue glandularity. However, for the two different x-ray tube energies and for the two different beam exposure levels tested, the trend-lines all have different slopes and y-intercepts. Thus, breast tomosynthesis has a definite potential to be quantitative, and it would be worthwhile to study other possible dependent parameters (phantom thickness, overall density, etc.) as well as alternative reconstruction algorithms.

  7. Usefulness of Digital Tomosynthesis for the Detection of Airway Obstruction: A Case Report of Bronchial Carcinosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Joon; Choo, Ji Yung; Lee, Ki Yeol; Kim, Je-Hyeong; Choi, Jung-Woo; Yeom, Suk Keu; Kim, Baek Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial carcinosarcoma is a very rare malignant tumor that is composed of carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements. We describe the first case in which digital tomosynthesis was useful for the evaluation of airway obstruction by bronchial carcinosarcoma that was overlooked on initial chest radiography. PMID:25381829

  8. Comparison of Sonography versus Digital Breast Tomosynthesis to Locate Intramammary Marker Clips

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Dankerl, P.; Dilbat, G.; Bani, M.; Fasching, P. A.; Heusinger, K.; Lux, M. P.; Loehberg, C. R.; Jud, S. M.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C. M.; Beckmann, M. W.; Wachter, D. L.; Uder, M.; Meier-Meitinger, M.; Brehm, B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the accuracy of sonography versus digital breast tomosynthesis to locate intramammary marker clips placed under ultrasound guidance. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients with suspicion of breast cancer (lesion diameter less than 2 cm [cT1]) had ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy with placement of a marker clip in the center of the tumor. Intramammary marker clips were subsequently located with both sonography and digital breast tomosynthesis. Results: Sonography detected no dislocation of intrammammary marker clips in 42 of 50 patients (84 %); dislocation was reported in 8 patients (16 %) with a maximum dislocation of 7 mm along the x-, y- or z-axis. Digital breast tomosynthesis showed accurate placement without dislocation of the intramammary marker clip in 48 patients (96 %); 2 patients (4 %) had a maximum clip dislocation of 3 mm along the x-, y- or z-axis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The use of digital breast tomosynthesis could improve the accuracy when locating intramammary marker clips compared to sonography and could, in future, be used to complement or even completely replace sonography. PMID:25684789

  9. Scatter radiation intensities around full-field digital mammography units.

    PubMed

    Judge, M A; Keavey, E; Phelan, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the scatter radiation intensity around digital mammography systems and apply these data to standard shielding calculations to reveal whether shielding design of existing breast screening rooms is adequate for the use of digital mammography systems. Three digital mammography systems from GE Healthcare, Hologic and Philips were employed in the study. A breast-equivalent phantom was imaged under clinical workload conditions and scatter radiation intensities around the digital mammography systems were measured for a range of angles in three planes using an ionisation chamber. The results were compared with those from previous studies of film-screen systems. It may be deduced from the results that scattering in the backward direction is significant for all three systems, while scattering in the forward direction can be significant for some planes around the GE and Hologic systems. Measurements at typical clinical settings on each system revealed the Philips system to have markedly lower scatter radiation intensities than the other systems. Substituting the measured scattered radiation intensity into shielding calculations yielded barrier requirements similar to those already in place at the screening centres operating these systems. Current radiation protection requirements based on film-screen technology remain sufficient when applied to rooms with digital mammography installations and no alteration is required to the structural shielding. PMID:23239693

  10. Introductory pictorial atlas of 3D tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stuart L; Margolies, Laurie R; Szabo, Janet R; Patel, Neesha S; Hermann, George

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is an essential tool for early detection of breast cancer. Breast imaging based on three-dimensional digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a new method for breast cancer screening and diagnosis that uses three-dimensional digital images to allow separation of overlapping breast structures, which may allow for improved visualization of potentially significant findings. This article will highlight the utility of DBT as a tool for the detection of breast pathology; it will demonstrate normal findings as well as breast pathology on DBT and two-dimensional conventional mammography. DBT is a very promising modality, which may decrease the false-positive rate of mammography and find additional abnormalities not seen on two-dimensional mammography. PMID:24113063

  11. Observation of super-resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D x-ray imaging modality in which tomographic sections of the breast are generated from a limited range of tube angles. Because oblique x-ray incidence shifts the image of an object in subpixel detector element increments with each increasing projection angle, it is demonstrated that DBT is capable of super-resolution (i.e., subpixel resolution). Methods: By convention, DBT reconstructions are performed on planes parallel to the breast support at various depths of the breast volume. In order for resolution in each reconstructed slice to be comparable to the detector, the pixel size should match that of the detector elements; hence, the highest frequency that can be resolved in the plane of reconstruction is the alias frequency of the detector. This study considers reconstruction grids with much smaller pixelation to visualize higher frequencies. For analytical proof of super-resolution, a theoretical framework is developed in which the reconstruction of a high frequency sinusoidal input is calculated using both simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection. To study the frequency spectrum of the reconstruction, its Fourier transform is also determined. The experimental feasibility of super-resolution was investigated by acquiring images of a bar pattern phantom with frequencies higher than the detector alias frequency. Results: Using analytical modeling, it is shown that the central projection cannot resolve frequencies exceeding the detector alias frequency. The Fourier transform of the central projection is maximized at a lower frequency than the input as evidence of aliasing. By contrast, SBP reconstruction can resolve the input, and its Fourier transform is correctly maximized at the input frequency. Incorporating filters into the reconstruction smoothens pixelation artifacts in the spatial domain and reduces spectral leakage in the Fourier domain. It is also demonstrated that the existence of super

  12. Improved digital breast tomosynthesis images using automated ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Jie; Du, Sidan; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.; Liu, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) offers poor image quality along the depth direction. This paper presents a new method that improves the image quality of DBT considerably through the a priori information from automated ultrasound (AUS) images. Methods: DBT and AUS images of a complex breast-mimicking phantom are acquired by a DBT/AUS dual-modality system. The AUS images are taken in the same geometry as the DBT images and the gradient information of the in-slice AUS images is adopted into the new loss functional during the DBT reconstruction process. The additional data allow for new iterative equations through solving the optimization problem utilizing the gradient descent method. Both visual comparison and quantitative analysis are employed to evaluate the improvement on DBT images. Normalized line profiles of lesions are obtained to compare the edges of the DBT and AUS-corrected DBT images. Additionally, image quality metrics such as signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) and artifact spread function (ASF) are calculated to quantify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results: In traditional DBT image reconstructions, serious artifacts can be found along the depth direction (Z direction), resulting in the blurring of lesion edges in the off-focus planes parallel to the detector. However, by applying the proposed method, the quality of the reconstructed DBT images is greatly improved. Visually, the AUS-corrected DBT images have much clearer borders in both in-focus and off-focus planes, fewer Z direction artifacts and reduced overlapping effect compared to the conventional DBT images. Quantitatively, the corrected DBT images have better ASF, indicating a great reduction in Z direction artifacts as well as better Z resolution. The sharper line profiles along the Y direction show enhancement on the edges. Besides, noise is also reduced, evidenced by the obviously improved SDNR values. Conclusions: The proposed method provides great improvement on

  13. The Impact of Acquisition Dose on Quantitative Breast Density Estimation with Digital Mammography: Results from ACRIN PA 4006.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M; Pertuz, Said; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Conant, Emily F; Kontos, Despina

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of radiation dose on breast density estimation in digital mammography. Materials and Methods With institutional review board approval and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance under waiver of consent, a cohort of women from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network Pennsylvania 4006 trial was retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent breast screening with a combination of dose protocols, including standard full-field digital mammography, low-dose digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis. A total of 5832 images from 486 women were analyzed with previously validated, fully automated software for quantitative estimation of density. Clinical Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density assessment results were also available from the trial reports. The influence of image acquisition radiation dose on quantitative breast density estimation was investigated with analysis of variance and linear regression. Pairwise comparisons of density estimations at different dose levels were performed with Student t test. Agreement of estimation was evaluated with quartile-weighted Cohen kappa values and Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Results Radiation dose of image acquisition did not significantly affect quantitative density measurements (analysis of variance, P = .37 to P = .75), with percent density demonstrating a high overall correlation between protocols (r = 0.88-0.95; weighted κ = 0.83-0.90). However, differences in breast percent density (1.04% and 3.84%, P < .05) were observed within high BI-RADS density categories, although they were significantly correlated across the different acquisition dose levels (r = 0.76-0.92, P < .05). Conclusion Precision and reproducibility of automated breast density measurements with digital mammography are not substantially affected by variations in radiation dose; thus, the use of low-dose techniques for the purpose of density estimation

  14. An experimental study of the scatter correction by using a beam-stop-array algorithm with digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu

    2014-12-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technique that was developed to overcome the limitations of conventional digital mammography by reconstructing slices through the breast from projections acquired at different angles. In developing and optimizing DBT, The x-ray scatter reduction technique remains a significant challenge due to projection geometry and radiation dose limitations. The most common approach to scatter reduction is a beam-stop-array (BSA) algorithm; however, this method raises concerns regarding the additional exposure involved in acquiring the scatter distribution. The compressed breast is roughly symmetric, and the scatter profiles from projections acquired at axially opposite angles are similar to mirror images. The purpose of this study was to apply the BSA algorithm with only two scans with a beam stop array, which estimates the scatter distribution with minimum additional exposure. The results of the scatter correction with angular interpolation were comparable to those of the scatter correction with all scatter distributions at each angle. The exposure increase was less than 13%. This study demonstrated the influence of the scatter correction obtained by using the BSA algorithm with minimum exposure, which indicates its potential for practical applications.

  15. Comparison of Image Quality Criteria between Digital Storage Phosphor Plate in Mammography and Full-Field Digital Mammography in the Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thevi Rajendran, Pushpa; Krishnapillai, Vijayalakshmi; Tamanang, Sulaiman; Kumari Chelliah, Kanaga

    2012-01-01

    Background: Digital mammography is slowly replacing screen film mammography. In digital mammography, 2 methods are available in acquiring images: digital storage phosphor plate and full-field digital mammography. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality acquired from the 2 methods of digital mammography in the detection of breast cancer. Methods: The study took place at the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, and followed 150 asymptomatic women for the duration of 1 year. Participating women gave informed consent and were exposed to 4 views from each system. Two radiologists independently evaluated the printed images based on the image quality criteria in mammography. McNemar’s test was used to compare the image quality criteria between the systems. Results: The agreement between the radiologists for the digital storage phosphor plate was к = 0.551 and for full-field digital mammography was к = 0.523. Full-field digital mammography was significantly better compared with the digital storage phosphor plate in right and left mediolateral oblique views (P < 0.05) in the detection of microcalcifications, which are early signs of breast cancer. However, both systems were comparable in all other aspects of image quality. Conclusion: Digital mammography is a useful screening tool for the detection of early breast cancer and ensures better prognosis and quality of life. PMID:22977375

  16. Characterization of lesions in dense breasts: Does tomosynthesis help?

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Krithika; Hari, Smriti; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Sanjay; Srivastava, Anurag; Parshad, Rajinder

    2016-01-01

    Context: Mammography in dense breasts is challenging due to lesion obscuration by tissue overlap. Does tomosynthesis offers a solution? Aims: To study the impact of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in characterizing lesions in breasts of different mammographic densities. Settings and Design: Prospective blinded study comparing mammography in two views with Mammography + Tomosynthesis. Methods and Material: Tomosynthesis was performed in 199 patients who were assigned Breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) categories 0, 3, 4, or 5 on two-dimensional (2D) mammogram. Mammograms were first categorized into one of 4 mammographic breast densities in accordance with the American College of Radiology (ACR). Three radiologists independently analyzed these images and assigned a BIRADS category first based on 2D mammogram alone, and then assigned a fresh BIRADS category after taking mammography and tomosynthesis into consideration. A composite gold-standard was used in the study (histopathology, ultrasound, follow-up mammogram, magnetic resonance imaging). Each lesion was categorized into 3 groups—superior categorization with DBT, no change in BIRADS, or inferior BIRADS category based on comparison with the gold-standard. The percentage of lesions in each group was calculated for different breast densities. Results: There were 260 lesions (ages 28–85). Overall, superior categorization was seen in 21.2% of our readings on addition of DBT to mammography. DBT was most useful in ACR Densities 3 and 4 breasts where it led to more appropriate categorization in 27 and 42% of lesions, respectively. DBT also increased diagnostic confidence in 54.5 and 63.6% of lesions in ACR Densities 3 and 4, respectively. Conclusions: In a diagnostic setting, the utility of tomosynthesis increases with increasing breast density. This helps in identifying the sub category of patients where DBT can actually change management.

  17. Breast Cancer Risk Estimation Using Parenchymal Texture Analysis in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kontos, Despina; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-10-11

    Mammographic parenchymal texture has been shown to correlate with genetic markers of developing breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique in which tomographic images of the breast are reconstructed from multiple source projections acquired at different angles of the x-ray tube. Compared to digital mammography (DM), DBT eliminates breast tissue overlap, offering superior parenchymal tissue visualization. We hypothesize that texture analysis in DBT could potentially provide a better assessment of parenchymal texture and ultimately result in more accurate assessment of breast cancer risk. As a first step towards validating this hypothesis, we investigated the association between DBT parenchymal texture and breast percent density (PD), a known breast cancer risk factor, and compared it to DM. Bilateral DBT and DM images from 71 women participating in a breast cancer screening trial were analyzed. Filtered-backprojection was used to reconstruct DBT tomographic planes in 1 mm increments with 0.22 mm in-plane resolution. Corresponding DM images were acquired at 0.1 mm pixel resolution. Retroareolar regions of interest (ROIs) equivalent to 2.5 cm{sup 3} were segmented from the DBT images and corresponding 2.5 cm{sup 2} ROIs were segmented from the DM images. Breast PD was mammographically estimated using the Cumulus scale. Overall, DBT texture features demonstrated a stronger correlation than DM to PD. The Pearson correlation coefficients for DBT were r = 0.40 (p<0.001) for contrast and r = -0.52 (p<0.001) for homogeneity; the corresponding DM correlations were r = 0.26 (p = 0.002) and r = -0.33 (p<0.001). Multiple linear regression of the texture features versus breast PD also demonstrated significantly stronger associations in DBT (R{sup 2} = 0.39) compared to DM (R{sup 2} = 0.33). We attribute these observations to the superior parenchymal tissue visualization in DBT. Our study is the first to perform DBT texture analysis in a

  18. Automatic segmentation of mammogram and tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Dusty; Park, Sun Young

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a one of the most common forms of cancer in terms of new cases and deaths both in the United States and worldwide. However, the survival rate with breast cancer is high if it is detected and treated before it spreads to other parts of the body. The most common screening methods for breast cancer are mammography and digital tomosynthesis, which involve acquiring X-ray images of the breasts that are interpreted by radiologists. The work described in this paper is aimed at optimizing the presentation of mammography and tomosynthesis images to the radiologist, thereby improving the early detection rate of breast cancer and the resulting patient outcomes. Breast cancer tissue has greater density than normal breast tissue, and appears as dense white image regions that are asymmetrical between the breasts. These irregularities are easily seen if the breast images are aligned and viewed side-by-side. However, since the breasts are imaged separately during mammography, the images may be poorly centered and aligned relative to each other, and may not properly focus on the tissue area. Similarly, although a full three dimensional reconstruction can be created from digital tomosynthesis images, the same centering and alignment issues can occur for digital tomosynthesis. Thus, a preprocessing algorithm that aligns the breasts for easy side-by-side comparison has the potential to greatly increase the speed and accuracy of mammogram reading. Likewise, the same preprocessing can improve the results of automatic tissue classification algorithms for mammography. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation algorithm for mammogram and tomosynthesis images that aims to improve the speed and accuracy of breast cancer screening by mitigating the above mentioned problems. Our algorithm uses information in the DICOM header to facilitate preprocessing, and incorporates anatomical region segmentation and contour analysis, along with a hidden Markov model (HMM) for

  19. Quantification of breast arterial calcification using full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, Sabee; Xu Tong; Ducote, Justin; Iribarren, Carlos

    2008-04-15

    Breast arterial calcification is commonly detected on some mammograms. Previous studies indicate that breast arterial calcification is evidence of general atherosclerotic vascular disease and it may be a useful marker of coronary artery disease. It can potentially be a useful tool for assessment of coronary artery disease in women since mammography is widely used as a screening tool for early detection of breast cancer. However, there are currently no available techniques for quantification of calcium mass using mammography. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is possible to quantify breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital mammography. An anthropomorphic breast phantom along with a vessel calcification phantom was imaged using a full field digital mammography system. Densitometry was used to quantify calcium mass. A calcium calibration measurement was performed at each phantom thickness and beam energy. The known (K) and measured (M) calcium mass on 5 and 9 cm thickness phantoms were related by M=0.964K-0.288 mg (r=0.997 and SEE=0.878 mg) and M=1.004K+0.324 mg (r=0.994 and SEE=1.32 mg), respectively. The results indicate that accurate calcium mass measurements can be made without correction for scatter glare as long as careful calcium calibration is made for each breast thickness. The results also indicate that composition variations and differences of approximately 1 cm between calibration phantom and breast thickness introduce only minimal error in calcium measurement. The uncertainty in magnification is expected to cause up to 5% and 15% error in calcium mass for 5 and 9 cm breast thicknesses, respectively. In conclusion, a densitometry technique for quantification of breast arterial calcium mass was validated using standard full field digital mammography. The results demonstrated the feasibility and potential utility of the densitometry technique for accurate quantification of breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital

  20. Diagnostic clinical benefits of digital spot and digital 3D mammography following analysis of screening findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtimaki, Mari; Pamilo, Martti; Raulisto, Leena; Roiha, Marja; Kalke, Martti; Siltanen, Samuli; Ihamäki, Timo

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the impact of 3-dimensional digital mammography and digital spot imaging following analysis of the abnormal findings of screening mammograms. Over a period of eight months, digital 3-D mammography imaging TACT Tuned Aperture Computed Tomography+, digital spot imaging (DSI), screen-film mammography imaging (SFM) and diagnostic film imaging (DFM) examinations were performed on 60 symptomatic cases. All patients were recalled because it was not possible to exclude the presence of breast cancer on screening films. Abnormal findings on the screening films were non-specific tumor-like parenchymal densities, parenchymal asymmetries or distortions with or without microcalcifications or just microcalcifications. Mammography work-up (film imaging) included spot compression and microfocus magnification views. The 3-D softcopy reading in all cases was done with Delta 32 TACT mammography workstation, while the film images were read using a mammography-specific light box. During the softcopy reading only windowing tools were allowed. The result of this study indicates that the clinical diagnostic image quality of digital 3-D and digital spot images are better than in film images, even in comparison with diagnostic work-up films. Potential advantages are to define if the mammography finding is caused by a real abnormal lesion or by superimposition of normal parenchymal structures, to detect changes in breast tissue which would otherwise be missed, to verify the correct target for biopsies and to reduce the number of biopsies performed.

  1. Measurements of system sharpness for two digital breast tomosynthesis systems.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N W; Bosmans, H

    2012-11-21

    The aim of this work was to propose system sharpness parameters for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems that include the influence of focus size and focus motion for use in quality assurance protocols. X-ray focus size was measured using a multiple pinhole test object, while detector presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured from projection images of a 10 cm × 10 cm, 1 mm thick steel edge, for the Siemens Inspiration and Hologic Selenia Dimensions DBT systems. The height of the edge above the table was then varied from 1 to 78 mm. The MTF expected from theory for the projection images was calculated from the measured detector MTF, focus size MTF and focus motion MTF and was compared against measured curves. Two methods were used to measure the in-plane MTF in the DBT volume: a tungsten wire of diameter 25 µm and an Al edge 0.2 mm thick, both imaged with a 15 mm thick poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plate. The in-depth point spread function (PSF) was measured using an angled tungsten wire. The full 3D MTF was estimated with a 0.5 mm diameter aluminium bead held in a 45 mm thick PMMA phantom, with the bead 15 and 65 mm above the table. Inspiration DBT projection images are saved at native detector resolution (85 µm), while the Dimensions re-bins projections to 140 µm pixels (2 × 2 binning); both systems used 2 × 2 binning of projection data before reconstruction. The 50% point for the MTF (MTF(0.50)) measured in the DBT projection images for the tube-travel direction fell as a function of height above the table from 3.60 to 0.90 mm(-1) for the Inspiration system and from 2.50 to 1.20 mm(-1) for the Dimensions unit. The maximum deviation of measured MTF(0.50) from the calculated value was 13%. MTF(0.50) measured in-plane (tube-travel direction) fell as a function of height above the table from 1.66 to 0.97 mm(-1) for the Inspiration system and from 2.21 to 1.31 mm(-1) for the Dimensions system. The full-width half-maximum for the in

  2. Measurements of system sharpness for two digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, N. W.; Bosmans, H.

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work was to propose system sharpness parameters for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems that include the influence of focus size and focus motion for use in quality assurance protocols. X-ray focus size was measured using a multiple pinhole test object, while detector presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured from projection images of a 10 cm × 10 cm, 1 mm thick steel edge, for the Siemens Inspiration and Hologic Selenia Dimensions DBT systems. The height of the edge above the table was then varied from 1 to 78 mm. The MTF expected from theory for the projection images was calculated from the measured detector MTF, focus size MTF and focus motion MTF and was compared against measured curves. Two methods were used to measure the in-plane MTF in the DBT volume: a tungsten wire of diameter 25 µm and an Al edge 0.2 mm thick, both imaged with a 15 mm thick poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plate. The in-depth point spread function (PSF) was measured using an angled tungsten wire. The full 3D MTF was estimated with a 0.5 mm diameter aluminium bead held in a 45 mm thick PMMA phantom, with the bead 15 and 65 mm above the table. Inspiration DBT projection images are saved at native detector resolution (85 µm), while the Dimensions re-bins projections to 140 µm pixels (2 × 2 binning); both systems used 2 × 2 binning of projection data before reconstruction. The 50% point for the MTF (MTF0.50) measured in the DBT projection images for the tube-travel direction fell as a function of height above the table from 3.60 to 0.90 mm-1 for the Inspiration system and from 2.50 to 1.20 mm-1 for the Dimensions unit. The maximum deviation of measured MTF0.50 from the calculated value was 13%. MTF0.50 measured in-plane (tube-travel direction) fell as a function of height above the table from 1.66 to 0.97 mm-1 for the Inspiration system and from 2.21 to 1.31 mm-1 for the Dimensions system. The full-width half-maximum for the in-depth PSF was 3

  3. Numerical solution of a nonlinear least squares problem in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, G.; Loli Piccolomini, E.; Nagy, J. G.

    2015-11-01

    In digital tomosynthesis imaging, multiple projections of an object are obtained along a small range of different incident angles in order to reconstruct a pseudo-3D representation (i.e., a set of 2D slices) of the object. In this paper we describe some mathematical models for polyenergetic digital breast tomosynthesis image reconstruction that explicitly takes into account various materials composing the object and the polyenergetic nature of the x-ray beam. A polyenergetic model helps to reduce beam hardening artifacts, but the disadvantage is that it requires solving a large-scale nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. We formulate the image reconstruction process (i.e., the method to solve the ill-posed inverse problem) in a nonlinear least squares framework, and use a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme to solve it. Some implementation details are discussed, and numerical experiments are provided to illustrate the performance of the methods.

  4. Mean glandular dose estimation using MCNPX for a digital breast tomosynthesis system with tungsten/aluminum and tungsten/aluminum+silver x-ray anode-filter combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Andy K. W.; Darambara, Dimitra G.; Stewart, Alexander; Gunn, Spencer; Bullard, Edward

    2008-12-15

    Breast cancer screening with x-ray mammography, using one or two projection images of the breast, is an indispensible tool in the early detection of breast cancer in women. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging technique that promises higher sensitivity and specificity in breast cancer screening at a similar radiation dose to conventional two-view screening mammography. In DBT a 3D volume is reconstructed with anisotropic voxels from a limited number of x-ray projection images acquired over a limited angle. Although the benefit of early cancer detection through screening mammography outweighs the potential risks associated with radiation, the radiation dosage to women in terms of mean glandular dose (MGD) is carefully monitored. This work studies the MGD arising from a prototype DBT system under various parameters. Two anode/filter combinations (W/Al and W/Al+Ag) were investigated; the tube potential ranges from 20 to 50 kVp; and the breast size varied between 4 and 10 cm chest wall-to-nipple distance and between 3 and 7 cm compressed breast thickness. The dosimetric effect of breast positioning with respect to the imaging detector was also reviewed. It was found that the position of the breast can affect the MGD by as much as 5% to 13% depending on the breast size.

  5. Issues to consider before implementing digital breast tomosynthesis into a breast imaging practice.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Lara A

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to discuss issues surrounding the implementation of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) into a clinical breast imaging practice and assist radiologists, technologists, and administrators who are considering the addition of this new technology to their practices. CONCLUSION. When appropriate attention is given to image acquisition, interpretation, storage, technologist and radiologist training, patient selection, billing, radiation dose, and marketing, implementation of DBT into a breast imaging practice can be successful. PMID:25714303

  6. Identification of error making patterns in lesion detection on digital breast tomosynthesis using computer-extracted image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengyu; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Walsh, Ruth; Johnson, Karen S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can improve lesion visibility by eliminating the issue of overlapping breast tissue present in mammography. However, this new modality likely requires new approaches to training. The issue of training in DBT is not well explored. We propose a computer-aided educational approach for DBT training. Our hypothesis is that the trainees' educational outcomes will improve if they are presented with cases individually selected to address their weaknesses. In this study, we focus on the question of how to select such cases. Specifically, we propose an algorithm that based on previously acquired reading data predicts which lesions will be missed by the trainee for future cases (i.e., we focus on false negative error). A logistic regression classifier was used to predict the likelihood of trainee error and computer-extracted features were used as the predictors. Reader data from 3 expert breast imagers was used to establish the ground truth and reader data from 5 radiology trainees was used to evaluate the algorithm performance with repeated holdout cross validation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to measure the performance of the proposed individual trainee models. The preliminary experimental results for 5 trainees showed the individual trainee models were able to distinguish the lesions that would be detected from those that would be missed with the average area under the ROC curve of 0.639 (95% CI, 0.580-0.698). The proposed algorithm can be used to identify difficult cases for individual trainees.

  7. Experimental investigation for determination of optimal X-ray beam tube voltages in a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu; Rhee, Yong-Chun; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-11-01

    Our purpose was to investigate optimal tube voltages (kVp) for a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) process and to determine tube current-exposure time products (mA s) for the average glandular dose (AGD), which is similar to that of the two views in conventional mammography (CM). In addition, the optimal acquisition parameters for this system were compared with those of CM. The analysis was based on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the simulated micro-calcifications on homogeneous phantoms, and the figure of merit (FOM) was retrieved from the CNR and AGD at X-ray tube voltages ranging from 24 to 40 kVp at intervals of 2 kV. The optimal kVp increased more than 2 kV with increasing glandularity for thicker (≥50 mm) breast phantoms. The optimal kVp for DBT was found to be 4-7 kV higher than that calculated for CM with breast phantoms thicker than 50 mm. This is likely due to the greater effect of noise and dose reduction by kVp increment when using the lower dose per projection in DBT. It is important to determine optimum acquisition conditions for a maximally effective DBT system. The results of our study provide useful information to further improve DBT for high quality imaging.

  8. Study of signal-to-noise ratio in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    Mammography techniques have recently advanced from those using analog systems (the screen-film system) to those using digital systems; for example, computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs) are nowadays used in mammography. Further, phase contrast mammography (PCM)-a digital technique by which images with a magnification of 1.75× can be obtained-is now available in the market. We studied the effect of the air gap in PCM and evaluated the effectiveness of an antiscatter x-ray grid in conventional mammography (CM) by measuring the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and relative signal-to-noise ratio (rSNR) and comparing them between PCM and the digital CM. The results indicated that the SFRs for the CM images obtained with a grid were the lowest and that these ratios were almost the same as those for the PCM images. In contrast, the rSNRs for the PCM images were the highest, which means that the scattering of x-rays was sufficiently reduced by the air gap without the loss of primary x-rays.

  9. A dual-axis tilt acquisition geometry for digital musculoskeletal tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levakhina, Yulia M.; Duschka, Robert L.; Vogt, Florian M.; Barkhausen, Joerg; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2013-07-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is a limited angle tomographic x-ray technique. It is an attractive low-dose alternative to computed tomography (CT) in many imaging applications. However, the DT dataset is incomplete, which leads to out-of-focus artifacts and limited axial resolution. In this paper, a novel dual-axis tilt acquisition geometry is proposed and evaluated. This geometry solves some issues in tomosynthesis with the traditional scanning geometry by scanning the object with a set of perpendicular arcs. In this geometry the acquisition in the additional perpendicular direction is done using a tiltable object supporting platform. The proposed geometry allows for capturing more singularities of the Radon transform, filling the Fourier space with more data and better approximating the Tuy-Smith conditions. In order to evaluate the proposed system, several studies have been carried out. To validate the simulation setup the performance of the traditional scanning geometry has been simulated and compared to known results from the literature. It has also been shown that the possible improvement of the image quality in the traditional geometry is limited. These limitations can be partially overcome by using the proposed dual-axis tilt geometry. The novel geometry is superior and with the same number of projections better reconstructed images can be obtained. All studies have been made using a software tomosynthesis simulator. A micro-CT reconstruction of a bone has been used as a software phantom. Simultaneous algebraic reconstruction has been used to reconstruct simulated projections. As a conclusion, acquiring data outside the standard arc allows for improving performance of musculoskeletal tomosynthesis. With the proposed dual-axis acquisition geometry a performance gain is achieved without an increase in dose and major modifications to the instrumentation of existing tomosynthesis devices.

  10. A dual-axis tilt acquisition geometry for digital musculoskeletal tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Levakhina, Yulia M; Duschka, Robert L; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Joerg; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2013-07-21

    Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is a limited angle tomographic x-ray technique. It is an attractive low-dose alternative to computed tomography (CT) in many imaging applications. However, the DT dataset is incomplete, which leads to out-of-focus artifacts and limited axial resolution. In this paper, a novel dual-axis tilt acquisition geometry is proposed and evaluated. This geometry solves some issues in tomosynthesis with the traditional scanning geometry by scanning the object with a set of perpendicular arcs. In this geometry the acquisition in the additional perpendicular direction is done using a tiltable object supporting platform. The proposed geometry allows for capturing more singularities of the Radon transform, filling the Fourier space with more data and better approximating the Tuy-Smith conditions. In order to evaluate the proposed system, several studies have been carried out. To validate the simulation setup the performance of the traditional scanning geometry has been simulated and compared to known results from the literature. It has also been shown that the possible improvement of the image quality in the traditional geometry is limited. These limitations can be partially overcome by using the proposed dual-axis tilt geometry. The novel geometry is superior and with the same number of projections better reconstructed images can be obtained. All studies have been made using a software tomosynthesis simulator. A micro-CT reconstruction of a bone has been used as a software phantom. Simultaneous algebraic reconstruction has been used to reconstruct simulated projections. As a conclusion, acquiring data outside the standard arc allows for improving performance of musculoskeletal tomosynthesis. With the proposed dual-axis acquisition geometry a performance gain is achieved without an increase in dose and major modifications to the instrumentation of existing tomosynthesis devices. PMID:23787371

  11. kV x-ray dual digital tomosynthesis for image guided lung SBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partain, Larry; Boyd, Douglas; Kim, Namho; Hernandez, Andrew; Daly, Megan; Boone, John

    2016-03-01

    Two simulated sets of digital tomosynthesis images of the lungs, each acquired at a 90 degree angle from the other, with 19 projection images used for each set and SART iterative reconstructed, gives dual tomosynthesis slice image quality approaching that of spiral CT, and with a data acquisition time that is 3% of that of cone beam CT. This fast kV acquisition, should allow near real time tracking of lung tumors in patients receiving SBRT, based on a novel TumoTrakTM multi-source X-ray tube design. Until this TumoTrakTM prototype is completed over the next year, its projected performance was simulated from the DRR images created from a spiral CT data set from a lung cancer patient. The resulting dual digital tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the lung tumor were exceptional and approached that of the gold standard Feldkamp CT reconstruction of breath hold, diagnostic, spiral, multirow, CT data. The relative dose at 46 mAs was less than 10% of what it would have been if the digital tomosynthesis had been done at the 472 mAs of the CT data set. This is for a 0.77 fps imaging rate sufficient to resolve respiratory motion in many free breathing patients during SBRT. Such image guidance could decrease the magnitudes of targeting error margins by as much as 20 mm or more in the craniocaudal direction for lower lobe lesions while markedly reducing dose to normal lung, heart and other critical structures. These initial results suggest a wide range of topics for future work.

  12. Experience with a proposed teleradiology system for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Emilie T.; Mitchell, Robert J.; Abdel-Malek, Aiman A.; Dudding, Kathryn E.

    1995-05-01

    Teleradiology offers significant improvement in efficiency and effectiveness over current practices in traditional film/screen-based diagnosis. In the context of digital mammography, the increasing number of women who need to be screened for breast cancer, including those in remote rural regions, make the advantages of teleradiology especially attractive for digital mammography. At the same time, the size and resolution of digital mammograms are among the most challenging to support in a cost effective teleradiology system. This paper describes a teleradiology architecture developed for use with digital mammography by GE Corporate Research and Development in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital under National Cancer Institute (NCI/NIH) grant number R01 CA60246-01. Experience with a testbed prototype is described. The telemammography architecture is intended to consist of a main mammography diagnostic site serving several remote screening sites. As patient exams become available, they are forwarded by an image server to the diagnostic site over a WAN communications link. A radiologist at the diagnostic site views a patient exam as it arrives, interprets it, and then relays a report back to the technician at the remote site. A secondary future scenario consists of mobile units which forward images to a remote site, which then forwards them to the main diagnostic site. The testbed architecture is based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard, created by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). A specification of vendor-independent data formats and data transfer services for digital medical images, DICOM specifies a protocol suite starting at the application layer downward, including the TCP/IP layers. The current DICOM definition does not provide an information element that is specifically tailored to mammography, so we have used the DICOM secondary capture data format

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray scatter based on patient model from digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bob; Wu, Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-03-01

    We are developing a breast specific scatter correction method for digital beast tomosynthesis (DBT). The 3D breast volume was initially reconstructed from 15 projection images acquired from a GE prototype tomosynthesis system without correction of scatter. The voxel values were mapped to the tissue compositions using various segmentation schemes. This voxelized digital breast model was entered into a Monte Carlo package simulating the prototype tomosynthesis system. One billion photons were generated from the x-ray source for each projection in the simulation and images of scattered photons were obtained. A primary only projection image was then produced by subtracting the scatter image from the corresponding original projection image which contains contributions from the both primary photons and scatter photons. The scatter free projection images were then used to reconstruct the 3D breast using the same algorithm. Compared with the uncorrected 3D image, the x-ray attenuation coefficients represented by the scatter-corrected 3D image are closer to those derived from the measurement data.

  14. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Findings after Surgical Lipomodeling in a Breast Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    Daye, Dania; Conant, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting or lipomodeling is a newly-adopted technique that is gaining increasing popularity in the treatment of contour deformities following breast conservation therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with a prior history of breast cancer treated with a lumpectomy and radiation therapy. She underwent lipomodeling not only of her treated breast but also of the contralateral breast. She presented for her annual mammogram which was performed with digital breast tomosynthesis. On imaging, a space-occupying lesion of mixed density was seen, expanding the lumpectomy site. There was also subtle distortion in the contralateral, non-treated breast. This case aims to highlight the mammographic and tomosynthesis findings seen following lipomodeling that may present diagnostic challenges in this patient population. PMID:25426245

  15. A clinical image preference study comparing digital tomosynthesis with digital radiography for pediatric spinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jenna M.; Elbakri, Idris A.; Reed, Martin; Wrogemann, Jens

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic quality of digital tomosynthesis (DT) images for pediatric imaging of the spine. We performed a phantom image rating study to assess the visibility of anatomical spinal structures in DT images relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). We collected DT and DR images of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine using anthropomorphic phantoms. Four pediatric radiologists and two residents rated the visibility of structures on the DT image sets compared to DR using a four point scale (0 = not visible; 1 = visible; 2 = superior to DR; 3 = excellent, CT unnecessary). In general, the structures in the spine received ratings between 1 and 3 (cervical), or 2 and 3 (thoracic, lumbar), with a few mixed scores for structures that are usually difficult to see on diagnostic images, such as vertebrae near the cervical-thoracic joint and the apophyseal joints of the lumbar spine. The DT image sets allow most critical structures to be visualized as well or better than DR. When DR imaging is inconclusive, DT is a valuable tool to consider before sending a pediatric patient for a higher-dose CT exam.

  16. Digital Mammography in Young Women: Is a Single View Sufficient?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Single view mammography may be a less time consuming, more comfortable and radiation reduced alternative for young women, but there are no studies examining this approach after the implementation of digital mammography into clinical practice. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of all mammographies performed in women younger than 40 years during a 24 month period. The sample consisted of 109 women with 212 examined breasts. All patients initially received standard two- view mammography. In the study setting the MLO- views were read by a single viewer and compared to a composite reference standard. Results In this sample 7 malignant findings were present and the review of the MLO-view detected 6 of them (85%). In patients with dense breasts 4 out of 5 malignant findings were found on the single-view (sensitivity 80%) and all 2 malignant findings were detected in patients with low breast density (sensitivity 100%). There were 7 false positive findings (3.3%). i.e. in total 8 out of 212 examined breasts were therefore misinterpreted (3.8%). Conclusion Single view digital mammography detects the vast majority of malignant findings, especially in low density breast tissue and the rate of false-positive findings is within acceptable limits. Therefore this approach may be used in different scenarios (for example in increasing patient throughput, in resource poor settings, reducing radiation burden in the young or in combination with ultrasound to use the strengths of both methods). More research on this topic is needed to establish its potential role in breast imaging. PMID:27134963

  17. A task-based quality control metric for digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Bloomquist, A K Maki; Mainprize, J G; Mawdsley, G E; Yaffe, M J

    2014-11-01

    A reader study was conducted to tune the parameters of an observer model used to predict the detectability index (dʹ ) of test objects as a task-based quality control (QC) metric for digital mammography. A simple test phantom was imaged to measure the model parameters, namely, noise power spectrum,modulation transfer function and test-object contrast. These are then used ina non-prewhitening observer model, incorporating an eye-filter and internal noise, to predict dʹ. The model was tuned by measuring dʹ of discs in a four-alternative forced choice reader study. For each disc diameter, dʹ was used to estimate the threshold thicknesses for detectability. Data were obtained for six types of digital mammography systems using varying detector technologies and x-ray spectra. A strong correlation was found between measured and modeled values of dʹ, with Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.96. Repeated measurements from separate images of the test phantom show an average coefficient of variation in dʹ for different systems between 0.07 and 0.10. Standard deviations in the threshold thickness ranged between 0.001 and 0.017 mm. The model is robust and the results are relatively system independent, suggesting that observer model dʹ shows promise as a cross platform QC metric for digital mammography. PMID:25325670

  18. A task-based quality control metric for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki Bloomquist, A. K.; Mainprize, J. G.; Mawdsley, G. E.; Yaffe, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    A reader study was conducted to tune the parameters of an observer model used to predict the detectability index (dʹ ) of test objects as a task-based quality control (QC) metric for digital mammography. A simple test phantom was imaged to measure the model parameters, namely, noise power spectrum, modulation transfer function and test-object contrast. These are then used in a non-prewhitening observer model, incorporating an eye-filter and internal noise, to predict dʹ. The model was tuned by measuring dʹ of discs in a four-alternative forced choice reader study. For each disc diameter, dʹ was used to estimate the threshold thicknesses for detectability. Data were obtained for six types of digital mammography systems using varying detector technologies and x-ray spectra. A strong correlation was found between measured and modeled values of dʹ, with Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.96. Repeated measurements from separate images of the test phantom show an average coefficient of variation in dʹ for different systems between 0.07 and 0.10. Standard deviations in the threshold thickness ranged between 0.001 and 0.017 mm. The model is robust and the results are relatively system independent, suggesting that observer model dʹ shows promise as a cross platform QC metric for digital mammography.

  19. Comparison of slot scanning digital mammography system with full-field digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.-J.; Shaw, Chris C.; Geiser, William; Chen, Lingyun; Arribas, Elsa; Stephens, Tanya; Davis, Paul L.; Ayyar, Geetha P.; Dogan, Basak E.; Nguyen, Victoria A.; Whitman, Gary J.; Yang, Wei T.

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microcalcification detectability of two commercial full-field digital mammography (DM) systems. The first unit was a flat panel based DM system (FFDM) which employed an anti-scatter grid method to reject scatter, and the second unit was a charge-coupled device-based DM system (SSDM) which used scanning slot imaging geometry to reduce scatter radiation. Both systems have comparable scatter-to-primary ratios. In this study, 125-160 and 200-250 {mu}m calcium carbonate grains were used to simulate microcalcifications and imaged by both DM systems. The calcium carbonate grains were overlapped with a 5-cm-thick 50% adipose/50% glandular simulated breast tissue slab and an anthropomorphic breast phantom (RMI 165, Gammex) for imaging at two different mean glandular dose levels: 0.87 and 1.74 mGy. A reading study was conducted with seven board certified mammographers with images displayed on review workstations. A five-point confidence level rating was used to score each detection task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) was used to quantify and compare the performances of these two systems. The results showed that with the simulated breast tissue slab (uniform background), the SSDM system resulted in higher A{sub z}'s than the FFDM system at both MGD levels with the difference statistically significant at 0.87 mGy only. With the anthropomorphic breast phantom (tissue structure background), the SSDM system performed better than the FFDM system at 0.87 mGy but worse at 1.74 mGy. However, the differences were not found to be statistically significant.

  20. Comparison of slot scanning digital mammography system with full-field digital mammography system

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C.; Geiser, William; Chen, Lingyun; Arribas, Elsa; Stephens, Tanya; Davis, Paul L.; Ayyar, Geetha P.; Dogan, Basak E.; Nguyen, Victoria A.; Whitman, Gary J.; Yang, Wei T.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microcalcification detectability of two commercial full-field digital mammography (DM) systems. The first unit was a flat panel based DM system (FFDM) which employed an anti-scatter grid method to reject scatter, and the second unit was a charge-coupled device-based DM system (SSDM) which used scanning slot imaging geometry to reduce scatter radiation. Both systems have comparable scatter-to-primary ratios. In this study, 125–160 and 200–250 μm calcium carbonate grains were used to simulate microcalcifications and imaged by both DM systems. The calcium carbonate grains were overlapped with a 5-cm-thick 50% adipose∕50% glandular simulated breast tissue slab and an anthropomorphic breast phantom (RMI 165, Gammex) for imaging at two different mean glandular dose levels: 0.87 and 1.74 mGy. A reading study was conducted with seven board certified mammographers with images displayed on review workstations. A five-point confidence level rating was used to score each detection task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the area under the ROC curve (Az) was used to quantify and compare the performances of these two systems. The results showed that with the simulated breast tissue slab (uniform background), the SSDM system resulted in higher Az’s than the FFDM system at both MGD levels with the difference statistically significant at 0.87 mGy only. With the anthropomorphic breast phantom (tissue structure background), the SSDM system performed better than the FFDM system at 0.87 mGy but worse at 1.74 mGy. However, the differences were not found to be statistically significant. PMID:18649467

  1. Digital tomosynthesis-experiences with a new imaging device for the dental field.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Christoph M; Franetzki, Manfred; Denig, Tina; Mühling, Joachim; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2003-03-01

    Based on the principles of classic film tomography, a new digital X-ray device for dental sites was developed and clinically evaluated. The tomosynthesis process produces several slices from a finite number of radiographs taken from different projection angles, obtaining a three-dimensional image of the jaws and teeth. During evaluation of an industrial prototype, a total of 52 tomosynthesis data sets were made covering different anatomic areas. Of those, 32 sets were assessed by ten radiologically experienced dentists. Anatomic regions not shown on conventional intraoral dental films were displayed due to the extraoral sensor. Diagnostic images of high value were mainly achieved within the scope of lateral views and transverse views in the frontal region. Even small structures such as the periodontal ligament could be shown in several planes, resulting in superposition-free representation. The elimination of metal artefacts caused by dental restorations was facilitated. However, improvements can be made in definition and resolution. Views in the sagittal plane and incomplete blurring of the contralateral jaw are difficulties that remain. The tomosynthesis process combined with a planned 3D representation is likely to be well suited for dental radiology. The use of such a device could be much less expensive than computed tomography (CT). Furthermore, it offers higher spatial resolution, exposes patients to less radiation, and could be easily used in daily practice, even chairside. PMID:12673437

  2. Design and evaluation of a grid reciprocation scheme for use in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Tushita; Sporkin, Helen; Peppard, Heather; Williams, Mark B.

    2016-03-01

    This work describes a methodology for efficient removal of scatter radiation during digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The goal of this approach is to enable grid image obscuration without a large increase in radiation dose by minimizing misalignment of the grid focal point (GFP) and x-ray focal spot (XFS) during grid reciprocation. Hardware for the motion scheme was built and tested on the dual modality breast tomosynthesis (DMT) scanner, which combines DBT and molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) on a single gantry. The DMT scanner uses fully isocentric rotation of tube and x-ray detector for maintaining a fixed tube-detector alignment during DBT imaging. A cellular focused copper prototype grid with 80 cm focal length, 3.85 mm height, 0.1 mm thick lamellae, and 1.1 mm hole pitch was tested. Primary transmission of the grid at 28 kV tube voltage was on average 74% with the grid stationary and aligned for maximum transmission. It fell to 72% during grid reciprocation by the proposed method. Residual grid line artifacts (GLAs) in projection views and reconstructed DBT images are characterized and methods for reducing the visibility of GLAs in the reconstructed volume through projection image flat-field correction and spatial frequency-based filtering of the DBT slices are described and evaluated. The software correction methods reduce the visibility of these artifacts in the reconstructed volume, making them imperceptible both in the reconstructed DBT images and their Fourier transforms.

  3. Digital Mammography with a Mosaic of CCD Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); McAdoo, James A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A digital mammography device uses a mosaic of electronic digital imaging arrays to scan an x-ray image is discussed. The mosaic of arrays is repositioned several times to expose different portions of the image, until the entire image is scanned. The data generated by the arrays during each exposure is stored in a computer. After the final exposure, the computer combines data of the several partial images to produce a composite of the original x-ray image. An aperture plate is used to reduce scatter and the overall exposure of the patient to x-rays.

  4. Optimization of exposure parameters in digital tomosynthesis considering effective dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seungyeon; Choi, Sunghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Jang, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis system (DTS), which scans an object in a limited angle, has been considered as an innovative imaging modality which can present lower patient dose than computed tomography and solve the problem of poor depth resolution in conventional digital radiography. Although it has many powerful advantages, only breast tomosynthesis system has been adopted in many hospitals. In order to reduce the patient dose while maintaining image quality, the acquisition conditions need to be studied. In this study, we analyzed effective dose and image qualities of chest phantom using commercialized universal chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system to study the optimized exposure parameters. We set 10 different acquisition conditions including the default acquisition condition by user manual of Shimadzu (100 kVp with 0.5 mAs). The effective dose was calculated from PCXMC software version 1.5.1 by utilizing the total X-ray exposure measured by ion chamber. The image quality was evaluated by signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) in the regions of interest (ROIs) pulmonary arteries at different axial in-plane. We analyzed a figure of merit (FOM) which considers both the effective dose and the SDNR in order to determine the optimal acquisition condition. The results indicated that the most suitable acquisition parameters among 10 conditions were condition 7 and 8 (120 kVp with 0.04 mAs and 0.1 mAs, respectively), which indicated lower effective dose while maintaining reasonable SDNRs and FOMs for three specified regions. Further studies are needed to be conducted for detailed outcomes in CDT acquisition conditions.

  5. Design and characterization of a spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray source for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Xin; Rajaram, Ramya; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Yang Guang; Phan, Tuyen; Lalush, David S.; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2009-10-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited angle computed tomography technique that can distinguish tumors from its overlying breast tissues and has potentials for detection of cancers at a smaller size and earlier stage. Current prototype DBT scanners are based on the regular full-field digital mammography systems and require partial isocentric motion of an x-ray tube over certain angular range to record the projection views. This prolongs the scanning time and, in turn, degrades the imaging quality due to motion blur. To mitigate the above limitations, the concept of a stationary DBT (s-DBT) scanner has been recently proposed based on the newly developed spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technique using the carbon nanotube. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the performance of the 25-beam MBFEX source array that has been designed and fabricated for the s-DBT system. The s-DBT system records all the projection images by electronically activating the multiple x-ray beams from different viewing angles without any mechanical motion. The configuration of the MBFEX source is close to the published values from the Siemens Mammomat system. The key issues including the x-ray flux, focal spot size, spatial resolution, scanning time, beam-to-beam consistency, and reliability are evaluated using the standard procedures. In this article, the authors describe the design and performance of a distributed x-ray source array specifically designed for the s-DBT system. They evaluate the emission current, current variation, lifetime, and focal spot sizes of the source array. An emission current of up to 18 mA was obtained at 0.5x0.3 mm effective focal spot size. The experimentally measured focal spot sizes are comparable to that of a typical commercial mammography tube without motion blurring. Trade-off between the system spatial resolution, x-ray flux, and scanning time are also discussed. Projection images of a breast phantom were

  6. Design and characterization of a spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray source for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Rajaram, Ramya; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Yang, Guang; Phan, Tuyen; Lalush, David S.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2009-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited angle computed tomography technique that can distinguish tumors from its overlying breast tissues and has potentials for detection of cancers at a smaller size and earlier stage. Current prototype DBT scanners are based on the regular full-field digital mammography systems and require partial isocentric motion of an x-ray tube over certain angular range to record the projection views. This prolongs the scanning time and, in turn, degrades the imaging quality due to motion blur. To mitigate the above limitations, the concept of a stationary DBT (s-DBT) scanner has been recently proposed based on the newly developed spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technique using the carbon nanotube. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the performance of the 25-beam MBFEX source array that has been designed and fabricated for the s-DBT system. The s-DBT system records all the projection images by electronically activating the multiple x-ray beams from different viewing angles without any mechanical motion. The configuration of the MBFEX source is close to the published values from the Siemens Mammomat system. The key issues including the x-ray flux, focal spot size, spatial resolution, scanning time, beam-to-beam consistency, and reliability are evaluated using the standard procedures. In this article, the authors describe the design and performance of a distributed x-ray source array specifically designed for the s-DBT system. They evaluate the emission current, current variation, lifetime, and focal spot sizes of the source array. An emission current of up to 18 mA was obtained at 0.5×0.3 mm effective focal spot size. The experimentally measured focal spot sizes are comparable to that of a typical commercial mammography tube without motion blurring. Trade-off between the system spatial resolution, x-ray flux, and scanning time are also discussed. Projection images of a breast phantom were

  7. A comparison of the performance of digital mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Gutierrez, D; Bulling, S; Guntern, D; Verdun, F R

    2007-03-01

    An objective analysis of image quality parameters was performed for six digital mammography systems. The presampled modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for the systems were determined at different doses, for 28 kVp with a Mo/Mo or W/Al target/filter combination and 2 mm of additional aluminium filtration. The flat-panel units have higher MTF and DQE in the mid to high frequency range than standard CR systems. The highest DQE, over the whole dose range, is for the slit-scanning direct photon counting system. Dual-side read CR can overcome the inherent x-ray absorption and signal collection limitations of standard CR mammography, improving the low-frequency DQE by 40%, to the same level as full-field systems, but it does not improve the poor spatial resolution of phosphor. PMID:17441236

  8. A comparison of the performance of digital mammography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Monnin, P.; Gutierrez, D.; Bulling, S.; Guntern, D.; Verdun, F. R.

    2007-03-15

    An objective analysis of image quality parameters was performed for six digital mammography systems. The presampled modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for the systems were determined at different doses, for 28 kVp with a Mo/Mo or W/Al target/filter combination and 2 mm of additional aluminium filtration. The flat-panel units have higher MTF and DQE in the mid to high frequency range than standard CR systems. The highest DQE, over the whole dose range, is for the slit-scanning direct photon counting system. Dual-side read CR can overcome the inherent x-ray absorption and signal collection limitations of standard CR mammography, improving the low-frequency DQE by 40%, to the same level as full-field systems, but it does not improve the poor spatial resolution of phosphor.

  9. Use of the Hotelling observer to optimize image reconstruction in digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Adrian A; Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose an implementation of the Hotelling observer that can be applied to the optimization of linear image reconstruction algorithms in digital breast tomosynthesis. The method is based on considering information within a specific region of interest, and it is applied to the optimization of algorithms for detectability of microcalcifications. Several linear algorithms are considered: simple back-projection, filtered back-projection, back-projection filtration, and [Formula: see text]-tomography. The optimized algorithms are then evaluated through the reconstruction of phantom data. The method appears robust across algorithms and parameters and leads to the generation of algorithm implementations which subjectively appear optimized for the task of interest. PMID:26702408

  10. Optimization of peak kilovoltage and spectral shape for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrig, Rebecca; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    1992-06-01

    X-ray mammography is one of the most demanding radiological techniques, simultaneously requiring excellent image quality and low dose to the breast. In current mammographic practice, both image quality and dose are found to vary over a wide range of values. Previous attempts to define the optimum operating parameters for mammography systems have been limited due to the lack of realistic attenuation coefficients and absorbed dose data. These data are now available, and have been incorporated into an energy transport model which describes the image acquisition process. The model includes measured x-ray spectra and considers beam filtration, breast thickness and composition, lesion size and composition, scatter, grid transmission, and the production and propagation of light in a phosphor-based image receptor. The applied kilovoltage for molybdenum and tungsten target x-ray sources with various spectral filters and average breast composition (50% adipose, 50% fibroglandular) has been optimized with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and absorbed dose and was found to vary between 19 and 29 kVp as breast thickness increased from 4 to 8 cm. Preliminary results for various breast compositions and lesions, and experimental verification of the model are presented. The model may be extended to include either mammographic film or new detector designs for digital mammography.

  11. [New mammography technologies and their impact on radiation dose].

    PubMed

    Chevalier del Rio, M

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews new mammography technologies resulting from advances in digital detectors and processing techniques. Most are just starting to be commercialized or are in the clinical trial phase. The results of clinical trials with the new 2D techniques (contrast-enhanced techniques or stereotactic techniques) show they are useful for diagnosing cancer. However, the greater complexity of the image acquisition process suggests that their use will be limited to particular cases such as inconclusive lesions or women with high risk for developing breast cancer. Among the 3D technologies (breast tomography and breast tomosynthesis), only breast tomosynthesis has been implemented in clinical practice, so it is the only technique for which it is possible to know the sensitivity, specificity, and radiation dose delivered. This article describes the principles underlying the way breast tomosynthesis works and the techniques used for image acquisition and reconstruction. It also summarizes the main results obtained in clinical studies, which generally show that breast tomosynthesis increases the breast cancer detection rate while decreasing the recall rate and number of biopsies taken. The protocol for breast tomosynthesis approved by the Food and Drug Administration (USA) consists of two conventional mammography projections for each breast and two tomosynthesis projections for each breast. This means multiplying the risks of inducing cancer and death associated with 2D mammography by a factor between 2 and 3 (2.6-3.3 and 0.7-0.9 per 100,000 women exposed when 50 years old, respectively). The protocol for breast tomosynthesis examinations is one of the aspects that is essential to determine when including tomosynthesis in screening programs and routine breast imaging. PMID:24246883

  12. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-15

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process.

  13. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process. PMID:23298126

  14. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process.

    PubMed

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process. PMID:23298126

  15. CCD mosaic technique for large-field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Jalink, A.; McAdoo, J.; Halama, G.; Liu, H.

    1996-06-01

    The authors present a novel technique for large-field digital mammography. The instrument uses a mosaic of electronic digital imaging [charge coupled device (CCD)] arrays, novel area scanning, and a radiation exposure and scatter reducing mechanism. The imaging arrays are mounted on a carrier platform in a checker-board pattern mosaic. To fill in the gaps between array-active areas the platform is repositioned three times and four X-ray exposures are made. The multiple image areas are then recombined by a digital computer to produce a composite image of the entire region. To reduce X-ray scatter and exposure, a lead aperture plate is interposed between X-ray source and patient. The aperture plate has a mosaic of square holes in alignment with the imaging array pattern and the plate is repositioned in synchronism with the carrier platform. The authors discuss proof-of-concept testing demonstrating technical feasibility of their approach. The instrument should be suitable for incorporation into standard mammography units. Unique features of the new technique are: large field coverage (18 x 24 cm); high spatial resolution (14--17 lp/mm); scatter rejection; and excellent contrast characteristics and lesion detectability under clinical conditions.

  16. Calibration of x-ray digital tomosynthesis system including the compensation for image distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Young Jun; Koh, Kuk Won; Cho, Hyungsuck; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyung C.; Byun, Jong-Eun

    1998-10-01

    X-ray laminography and DT (digital tomosynthesis) are promising technologies to form a cross-section image of 3D objects and can be a good solution for inspection interior defects of industrial products. It has been known that digital tomosynthesis method has several advantages over laminography method in that it can overcome the problems such as blurring effect or artifact. The DT system consists of a scanning x-ray tube, an image intensifier as an x-ray image detector, and a CCD camera. To acquire an x-ray image of an arbitrary plane of objects, a set of images (8 images or more) should be synthesized by averaging or minimally calculating point by point. The images, however are distorted according to the configurations of the image intensifier and the x-ray source position. To get a clear and accurate synthesized image, the corresponding points in the distorted images should be accurately determined, and therefore, precise calibration of the DT system is needed to map the corresponding points correctly. In this work, a series of calibration methods for the DT system are presented including the correction of the center offset between the x-ray and the image intensifer, the x-ray steering calibration, and the correction of the distortion of the image. The calibration models are implemented to the DT system and the experiment results are presented and discussed in detail.

  17. Evaluation of back projection methods for breast tomosynthesis image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chen, Ying

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the USA. Compared to mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis is a new imaging technique that may improve the diagnostic accuracy by removing the ambiguities of overlapped tissues and providing 3D information of the breast. Tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms generate 3D reconstructed slices from a few limited angle projection images. Among different reconstruction algorithms, back projection (BP) is considered an important foundation of quite a few reconstruction techniques with deblurring algorithms such as filtered back projection. In this paper, two BP variants, including α-trimmed BP and principal component analysis-based BP, were proposed to improve the image quality against that of traditional BP. Computer simulations and phantom studies demonstrated that the α-trimmed BP may improve signal response performance and suppress noise in breast tomosynthesis image reconstruction. PMID:25384538

  18. Initial application of digital tomosynthesis with on-board imaging in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Godfrey, Devon J.; Oldham, Mark; Dobbins, James T., III

    2005-04-01

    We present preliminary investigations that examine the feasibility of incorporating digital tomosynthesis into radiation oncology practice with the use of kilovoltage on-board imagers (OBI). Modern radiation oncology linear accelerators now include hardware options for the addition of OBI for on-line patient setup verification. These systems include an x-ray tube and detector mounted directly on the accelerator gantry that rotate with the same isocenter. Applications include cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), fluoroscopy, and radiographs to examine daily patient positioning to determine if the patient is in the same location as the treatment plan. While CBCT provides the greatest anatomical detail, this approach is limited by long acquisition and reconstruction times and higher patient dose. We propose to examine the use of tomosynthesis reconstructed volumetric data from limited angle projection images for short imaging time and reduced patient dose. Initial data uses 61 projection images acquired over an isocentric arc of twenty degrees with the detector approximately fifty-four centimeters from isocenter. A modified filtered back projection technique, which included a mathematical correction for isocentric motion, was used to reconstruct volume images. These images will be visually and mathematically compared to volumetric computed tomography images to determine efficacy of this system for daily patient positioning verification. Initial images using the tomosynthesis reconstruction technique show much promise and bode well for effective daily patient positioning verification with reduced patient dose and imaging time. Additionally, the fast image acquisition may allow for a single breath hold imaging sequence, which will have no breath motion.

  19. Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Taube H.

    1992-01-01

    The combination of mammography and clinical examination provides the best means available to detect breast cancer. This article attempts to familiarize the family physician with mammographic terms and to clarify the role of mammography in detecting breast cancer. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figures 3-4Figure 5Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21229125

  20. Parallel hardware architecture for CCD-mosaic digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott T.; Kim, Hyunkeun; Swarnakar, Vivek; Jeong, Myoungki; Wobschall, Darold C.

    1998-06-01

    The development of an efficient parallel hardware architecture suitable for CCD-mosaic digital mammography has been accomplished. This paper presents this architecture including both the analog and digital portions of the imaging hardware. A two dimensional array of CCD sensors are used to capture the mammographic image synchronously and simultaneously. Each CCD's analog signal is converted to a 12 bits/pixel digital value through an array of high speed analog-to-digital converters. A parallel array of mesh connected TMS320C40 DSP processors then takes in the digital image data simultaneously. The DSP's are used to precisely register the mosaic of individual images to form the final large format digital mammogram. Also, they are used to control CCD characteristics and parallel data transport to the viewing workstation. One master DSP is located on the workstation's PCI bus which controls the parallel DSP array and collects compressed image data through a 60MB/s port. Since all computations are performed in parallel using local memory on each DSP, the overall acquisition, image registration, and transmission to display of the final mammogram is performed in less than 30 seconds. This allows the physician to perform a preliminary observation of the patient's mammogram.

  1. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, Mariana Di Maria, Salvatore; Barros, Sílvia; Vaz, Pedro; Figueira, Catarina; Sarmento, Marta; Orvalho, Lurdes

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens{sup ®}) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  2. Physical characteristics of GE Senographe Essential and DS digital mammography detectors.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, Caterina; Borrini, Adriano; Ortenzia, Ornella; Rossi, Raffaella; Ordóñez, Pedro L

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate physical characteristics of two full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems (GE Senographe Essential and DS). Both are indirect conversion (x ray to light) alpha-Si flat panels coupled with a CsI(Tl) scintillator. The examined systems have the same pixel size (100 microm) but a different field of view: a conventional size 23 x 19.2 cm2 and a large field 24 X 30.7 cm2, specifically designed to image large breasts. In the GE Senographe Essential model relevant improvements in flat panel design were implemented and new deposition tools for metal, alpha-Si, and CsI(Tl) were introduced by GE. These changes in detector design are expected to be beneficial for advanced applications such as breast tomosynthesis. The presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured for a wide range of exposure (25-240 microGy) with a RQA-M2 technique (28 kVp with a Mo/Mo target/filter combination and 2 mm of additional aluminum filtration). At 1, 2, and at 4 lp/mm MTF is equal to 0.9, 0.76, and 0.46 for the conventional field detector and to 0.85, 0.59, and 0.24 for the large field detector. The latter detector exhibits an improved NNPS due to a lower electronic noise and a better DQE that reaches 60%. In addition a contrast-detail analysis was performed with CDMAM 3.4 phantom and CDCOM software: GE Senographe DS showed statistically significant poorer detection ability in comparison with the GE Senographe Essential. These results could have been expected, at least qualitatively, considering the relative DQE of the two systems. PMID:18383665

  3. Physical characteristics of GE Senographe Essential and DS digital mammography detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghetti, Caterina; Borrini, Adriano; Ortenzia, Ornella; Rossi, Raffaella; Ordonez, Pedro L.

    2008-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate physical characteristics of two full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems (GE Senographe Essential and DS). Both are indirect conversion (x ray to light) a-Si flat panels coupled with a CsI(Tl) scintillator. The examined systems have the same pixel size (100 {mu}m) but a different field of view: a conventional size 23x19.2 cm{sup 2} and a large field 24x30.7 cm{sup 2}, specifically designed to image large breasts. In the GE Senographe Essential model relevant improvements in flat panel design were implemented and new deposition tools for metal, a-Si, and CsI(Tl) were introduced by GE. These changes in detector design are expected to be beneficial for advanced applications such as breast tomosynthesis. The presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured for a wide range of exposure (25-240 {mu}Gy) with a RQA-M2 technique (28 kVp with a Mo/Mo target/filter combination and 2 mm of additional aluminum filtration). At 1, 2, and at 4 lp/mm MTF is equal to 0.9, 0.76, and 0.46 for the conventional field detector and to 0.85, 0.59, and 0.24 for the large field detector. The latter detector exhibits an improved NNPS due to a lower electronic noise and a better DQE that reaches 60%. In addition a contrast-detail analysis was performed with CDMAM 3.4 phantom and CDCOM software: GE Senographe DS showed statistically significant poorer detection ability in comparison with the GE Senographe Essential. These results could have been expected, at least qualitatively, considering the relative DQE of the two systems.

  4. Primary Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Breast: Ultrasonography, Elastography, Digital Mammography, Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography, and Pathology Findings.

    PubMed

    Gkali, Christina An; Chalazonitis, Athanasios N; Feida, Eleni; Giannos, Aris; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Loutradis, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    Lymphomas constitute approximately 0.15% of malignant mammary neoplasms. Less than 0.5% of all malignant lymphomas involve the breast primarily. Primary non-Hodgkin breast lymphoma is usually right sided. The combined therapy approach, with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is the most successful treatment. Mastectomy offers no benefit in the treatment of primary non-Hodgkin breast lymphoma. To the author's knowledge, this is the first published case of primary non-Hodgkin breast lymphoma reported with conventional ultrasonography, elastography (both freehand and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging), digital mammography, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, and pathology findings. A 45-year-old woman presented with a lump in the right breast for 2 months. There was no evidence of systemic lymphoma or leukemia when the breast lesion was detected. Imaging findings were negative for lymphoma. Ipsilateral lymph nodes were not palpable. The mass was resected, and histopathology findings were diagnostic of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunohistochemistry was confirmatory of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large cell type of B-cell lineage. Although primary and secondary lymphomas of the breast are rare entities, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of breast malignancies. PMID:25831151

  5. SU-E-J-56: Static Gantry Digital Tomosynthesis From the Beam’s-Eye-View

    SciTech Connect

    Partain, L; Kwon, J; Boyd, D; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R; Zentai, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose We have designed a novel TumoTrak™ x-ray system that delivers 19 distinct kV views with the linac gantry stationary. It images MV treatment beam above and below the patient with a kV tomosysthesis slice image from the therapy beam’s-eye-view. Results will be high quality images without MLC shadowing for notable improvements relative to conventional fluoroscopic MV imaging and fluoroscopic kV imaging. Methods A complete design has a kV electron beam multisource X-ray tube that fits around the MV treatment beam path, with little interference with normal radiotherapy and unblocked by the multi-leaf-collimator. To simulate digital tomosynthesis, we used cone-beam CT projection data from a lung SBRT patient. These data were acquired at 125 kVp and 11 fps (0.4 mAs per projection). We chose 19 projections evenly spaced over 27° around one of the treatment angles (240°). Digital tomosynthesis reconstruction of a slice through the tumor was performed using iterative reconstruction. The visibility of the lesion was assessed for the reconstructed digital tomosynthesis (DTS), using fluoroscopy MV images acquired during radiation therapy, and a kV single projection image acquired at the same angle as the treatment field (240°). Results The fluoroscopic DTS images provide the best tumor contrast, surpassing the conventional radiographic and the in-treatment MV portal images. The electron beam multisource X-ray tube design has been completed and the tube is being fabricated. The estimated time to cycle through all 19 projections is 700 ms, enabling high frame-rate imaging. While the initial proposed use case is for image guided and gated treatment delivery, the enhanced imaging will also deliver superior radiographic images for patient setup. Conclusion The proposed device will deliver high quality planar images from the beam’s-eye-view without MLC obstruction. The prototype has been designed and is being assembled with first imaging scheduled for May 2015. L

  6. Computer-aided detection system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis using joint information from volumetric and planar projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel approach for the detection of microcalcification clusters (MCs) using joint information from digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume and planar projection (PPJ) image. A data set of 307 DBT views was collected with IRB approval using a prototype DBT system. The system acquires 21 projection views (PVs) from a wide tomographic angle of 60° (60°-21PV) at about twice the dose of a digital mammography (DM) system, which allows us the flexibility of simulating other DBT acquisition geometries using a subset of the PVs. In this study, we simulated a 30° DBT geometry using the central 11 PVs (30°-11PV). The narrower tomographic angle is closer to DBT geometries commercially available or under development and the dose is matched approximately to that of a DM. We developed a new joint-CAD system for detection of clustered microcalcifications. The DBT volume was reconstructed with a multiscale bilateral filtering regularized method and a PPJ image was generated from the reconstructed volume. Task-specific detection strategies were designed to combine information from the DBT volume and the PPJ image. The data set was divided into a training set (127 views with MCs) and an independent test set (104 views with MCs and 76 views without MCs). The joint-CAD system outperformed the individual CAD systems for DBT volume or PPJ image alone; the differences in the test performances were statistically significant (p  <  0.05) using JAFROC analysis.

  7. The Utility of Digital Linear Tomosynthesis Imaging of Total Hip Joint Arthroplasty with Suspicion of Loosening: A Prospective Study in 40 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Göthlin, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The clinical utility of digital linear tomosynthesis in musculoskeletal applications has been validated in only a few reports. Technical performance and utility in hip prosthesis imaging have been discussed in technical reports, but no clinical evaluation has been reported. The purpose of the current study was to assess the added clinical utility of digital linear tomosynthesis compared to radiography in loosening of total hip joint arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. In a prospective study, radiography and digital tomosynthesis were performed in 40 consecutive patients with total hip arthroplasty referred for suspect prosthesis loosening. Tomosynthesis images were compared to anterior-posterior (AP) and cross-table lateral radiographs regarding demarcation and extent of demineralization and osteolysis. Further noted were skeletal fractures, cement fractures, fragmentation, and artifacts interfering with the diagnosis. Results. Tomosynthesis was superior to radiography with sharper delineation of demineralization and osteolysis in the AP projection. A limitation was the inability to generate lateral tomosynthesis images, with inferior assessment of the area anterior and posterior to the acetabular cup compared to cross-table radiographs. Artifacts interfering with diagnosis were found in one hip. Conclusion. Tomosynthesis improved evaluation of total hip arthroplasty in the AP projection but was limited by the lack of lateral projections. PMID:24078921

  8. Applicability of ACR breast dosimetry methodology to a digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomon, John J.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Swenson, Kristin N.; Schauer, David A.

    2006-03-15

    Determination of mean glandular dose (MGD) to breast tissue is an essential aspect of mammography equipment evaluations and exposure controls. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Quality Control Manual outlines the procedure for MGD determination in screen-film mammography based upon conversions of entrance skin exposures (ESEs) measured with an ionization chamber (IC). The development of digital mammography has increased with the demand for improved object resolution and tissue contrast. This change in image receptor from screen-film to a solid-state detector has led to questions about the applicability of the ACR MGD methodology to digital mammography. This research has validated the applicability of the ACR MGD methodology to digital mammography in the GE digital mammography system Senographe 2000D[reg]. MGD was determined using light output measurements from thermoluminescent dosimeters (MGD{sub TL}), exposure measurements from an IC (MGD{sub IC}) and conversion factors from the ACR Mammography Quality Control Manual. MGD{sub TL} and MGD{sub IC} data indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the two measurements with the Senographe 2000D[reg]. However, the applicability of the ACR's methodology was validated by calculating MGD at various depths in a 50/50 breast phantom. Additionally, the results of backscatter measurements from the image receptors of both mammography modalities indicate there is a difference (all P values <0.001) in the radiation backscattered from each image receptor.

  9. Digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction using spatially weighted non-convex regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiabei; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Regularization is an effective strategy for reducing noise in tomographic reconstruction. This paper proposes a spatially weighted non-convex (SWNC) regularization method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) image reconstruction. With a non-convex cost function, this method can suppress noise without blurring microcalcifications (MC) and spiculations of masses. To minimize the non-convex cost function, we apply a majorize-minimize separable quadratic surrogate algorithm (MM-SQS) that is further accelerated by ordered subsets (OS). We applied the new method to a heterogeneous breast phantom and to human subject DBT data, and observed improved image quality in both situations. A quantitative study also showed that the SWNC method can significantly enhance the contrast-to-noise ratio of MCs. By properly selecting its parameters, the SWNC regularizer can preserve the appearance of the mass margins and breast parenchyma.

  10. Calibration and optimization of 3D digital breast tomosynthesis guided near infrared spectral tomography.

    PubMed

    Michaelsen, Kelly E; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Poplack, Steven P; Karellas, Andrew; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2015-12-01

    Calibration of a three-dimensional multimodal digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) x-ray and non-fiber based near infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system is challenging but essential for clinical studies. Phantom imaging results yielded linear contrast recovery of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration for cylindrical inclusions of 15 mm, 10 mm and 7 mm with a 3.5% decrease in the HbT estimate for each 1 cm increase in inclusion depth. A clinical exam of a patient's breast containing both benign and malignant lesions was successfully imaged, with greater HbT was found in the malignancy relative to the benign abnormality and fibroglandular regions (11 μM vs. 9.5 μM). Tools developed improved imaging system characterization and optimization of signal quality, which will ultimately improve patient selection and subsequent clinical trial results. PMID:26713210

  11. A second pass correction method for calcification artifacts in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Klaus; Grass, Michael; Nielsen, Tim

    2011-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) allows a quasi-3D reconstruction of the breast with high in-plane and poor depth resolution by the principles of limited angle tomography. The limited angular range and the coarse angular sampling result in prominent streak artifacts arising from high-contrast structures such as calcifications. These artifacts do not only degrade the image quality but also hold the risk of overlaying suspicious tissue structure in neighbouring slices, which might therefore be overlooked. This work presents a second pass method for correcting these kinds of high-contrast streak artifacts. In a first pass reconstruction the candidate highcontrast calcifications are segmented and subtracted from the original projection data to generate a subsequent artifact-free second pass reconstruction. The method is demonstrated in a simulation study using software breast phantoms, which have been derived from segmented MRI data.

  12. IMAGE FUSION OF RECONSTRUCTED DIGITAL TOMOSYNTHESIS VOLUMES FROM A FRONTAL AND A LATERAL ACQUISITION.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Jonathan; Söderman, Christina; Allansdotter Johnsson, Åse; Bernhardt, Peter; Starck, Göran; Kahl, Fredrik; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) has been used in chest imaging as a low radiation dose alternative to computed tomography (CT). Traditional DTS shows limitations in the spatial resolution in the out-of-plane dimension. As a first indication of whether a dual-plane dual-view (DPDV) DTS data acquisition can yield a fair resolution in all three spatial dimensions, a manual registration between a frontal and a lateral image volume was performed. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was scanned frontally and laterally using a linear DTS acquisition, at 120 kVp. The reconstructed image volumes were resampled and manually co-registered. Expert radiologist delineations of the mediastinal soft tissues enabled calculation of similarity metrics in regard to delineations in a reference CT volume. The fused volume produced the highest total overlap, implying that the fused volume was a more isotropic 3D representation of the examined object than the traditional chest DTS volumes. PMID:26683464

  13. Effects of angular range on image quality of chest digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haenghwa; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a new 3D imaging technique that can be expected to improve clinical diagnosis over conventional chest radiography. We investigated the effect of the angular range of data acquisition on the image quality using newly developed CDT system. The four different acquisition sets were studied using +/-15°, +/-20°, +/-30°, and +/-35° angular ranges with 21 projection views (PVs). The point spread function (PSF), modulation transfer function (MTF), artifact spread function (ASF), and normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were used to evaluate the image quality. We found that increasing angular ranges improved vertical resolution. The results indicated that there was the opposite relationship of the CNR with angular range for the two tissue types. While CNR for heart tissue increased with increasing angular range, CNR for spine bone decreased. The results showed that the angular range is an important parameter for the CDT exam.

  14. Improving depth resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis by iterative image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Erin G.; Kraemer, David N.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is currently enjoying tremendous growth in its application to screening for breast cancer. This is because it addresses a major weakness of mammographic projection imaging; namely, a cancer can be hidden by overlapping fibroglandular tissue structures or the same normal structures can mimic a malignant mass. DBT addresses these issues by acquiring few projections over a limited angle scanning arc that provides some depth resolution. As DBT is a relatively new device, there is potential to improve its performance significantly with improved image reconstruction algorithms. Previously, we reported a variation of adaptive steepest descent - projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS) for DBT, which employed a finite differencing filter to enhance edges for improving visibility of tissue structures and to allow for volume-of-interest reconstruction. In the present work we present a singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the gain in depth resolution for DBT afforded by use of the finite differencing filter.

  15. OVERVIEW OF A DIGITAL TOMOSYNTHESIS DEVELOPMENT: NEW APPROACHES FOR LOW-DOSE CHEST IMAGING.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Ákos; Wolf, Péter; Nagy, János; Kelemen, Attila; Horváth, Gábor; Hadházi, Dániel; Horváth, Áron; Czétényi, Benjámin; Süttő, Zoltán; Szondy, Klára

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate among all cancer types, and it has especially high occurrence in Hungary. Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) has been proved to be a beneficial screening method for lung cancer, decreasing the mortality rate by 20 %. Because of the intensifying fears from X-ray radiation, there is a need to develop other modalities that might work with less radiation and have similar sensitivity in lung nodule finding. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) may be such a modality that can be a real alternative to LDCT. The goal of this article is to summarise the first results of a Hungarian project for developing a DTS system extended with a computer-aided detection system. It describes the main approaches applied and the main benefits of using DTS based on the first clinical examinations. PMID:26564865

  16. Calibration and optimization of 3D digital breast tomosynthesis guided near infrared spectral tomography

    PubMed Central

    Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Poplack, Steven P.; Karellas, Andrew; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a three-dimensional multimodal digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) x-ray and non-fiber based near infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system is challenging but essential for clinical studies. Phantom imaging results yielded linear contrast recovery of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration for cylindrical inclusions of 15 mm, 10 mm and 7 mm with a 3.5% decrease in the HbT estimate for each 1 cm increase in inclusion depth. A clinical exam of a patient’s breast containing both benign and malignant lesions was successfully imaged, with greater HbT was found in the malignancy relative to the benign abnormality and fibroglandular regions (11 μM vs. 9.5 μM). Tools developed improved imaging system characterization and optimization of signal quality, which will ultimately improve patient selection and subsequent clinical trial results. PMID:26713210

  17. Comparison of algorithms for out-of-plane artifacts removal in digital tomosynthesis reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Bliznakova, K; Bliznakov, Z; Buliev, I

    2012-07-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a method of limited angle reconstruction of tomographic images produced at variable heights, on the basis of a set of angular projections taken in an arc around human anatomy. Reconstructed tomograms from unprocessed original projection images, however, are invariably affected by tomographic noise such as blurred images of objects lying outside the plane of interest and superimposed on the focused image of the fulcrum plane. The present work investigates the performance of two approaches for generation of tomograms with a reduced noise: a generalised post-processing method, based on constructing a noise mask from all planes in the reconstructed volume, and its subsequent subtraction from the in-focus plane and a filtered Multiple Projection Algorithm. The comparison between the two algorithms shows that the first method provides reconstructions with very good quality in case of high contrast features, especially for those embedded into a heterogeneous background. PMID:22056810

  18. 3D digital breast tomosynthesis image reconstruction using anisotropic total variation minimization.

    PubMed

    Seyyedi, Saeed; Yildirim, Isa

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compressed sensing based reconstruction method for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging. Algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) has been in use in DBT imaging by minimizing the isotropic total variation (TV) of the reconstructed image. The resolution in DBT differs in sagittal and axial directions which should be encountered during the TV minimization. In this study we develop a 3D anisotropic TV (ATV) minimization by considering the different resolutions in different directions. A customized 3D Shepp-logan phantom was generated to mimic a real DBT image by considering the overlapping tissue and directional resolution issues. Results of the ART, ART+3D TV and ART+3D ATV are compared using structural similarity (SSIM) diagram. PMID:25571377

  19. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from physical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Stephanie M. Wagner, Louis K.; Brateman, Libby F.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: That scattered radiation negatively impacts the quality of medical radiographic imaging is well known. In mammography, even slight amounts of scatter reduce the high contrast required for subtle soft-tissue imaging. In current clinical mammography, image contrast is partially improved by use of an antiscatter grid. This form of scatter rejection comes with a sizeable dose penalty related to the concomitant elimination of valuable primary radiation. Digital mammography allows the use of image processing as a method of scatter correction that might avoid effects that negatively impact primary radiation, while potentially providing more contrast improvement than is currently possible with a grid. For this approach to be feasible, a detailed characterization of the scatter is needed. Previous research has modeled scatter as a constant background that serves as a DC bias across the imaging surface. The goal of this study was to provide a more substantive data set for characterizing the spatially-variant features of scatter radiation at the image detector of modern mammography units. Methods: This data set was acquired from a model of the radiation beam as a matrix of very narrow rays or pencil beams. As each pencil beam penetrates tissue, the pencil widens in a predictable manner due to the production of scatter. The resultant spreading of the pencil beam at the detector surface can be characterized by two parameters: mean radial extent (MRE) and scatter fraction (SF). The SF and MRE were calculated from measurements obtained using the beam stop method. Two digital mammography units were utilized, and the SF and MRE were found as functions of target, filter, tube potential, phantom thickness, and presence or absence of a grid. These values were then used to generate general equations allowing the SF and MRE to be calculated for any combination of the above parameters. Results: With a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of about 0.05 to a maximum of about 0

  20. Normalized Noise Power Spectrum of Full Field Digital Mammography System

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, Norriza Mohd; Wan Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan

    2010-01-05

    A method to measure noise power spectrum of a full field digital mammography system is presented. The effect of X-ray radiation dose, size and configuration of region of interest on normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) was investigated. Flat field images were acquired using RQA-M2 beam quality technique (Mo/Mo anode-filter, 28 kV, 2 mm Al) with different clinical radiation doses. The images were cropped at about 4 cm from the edge of the breast wall and then divided into different size of non-overlapping or overlapping segments. NNPS was determined through detrending, 2-D fast Fourier transformation and normalization. Our measurement shows that high radiation dose gave lower NNPS at a specific beam quality.

  1. Optimization of exposure parameters in full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark B.; Raghunathan, Priya; More, Mitali J.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Kwan, Alexander; Lo, Joseph Y.; Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Fajardo, Laurie L.; McGruder, Allen; McGruder, Sandra M.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Bloomquist, Aili; Mawdsley, Gordon E.

    2008-06-15

    Optimization of exposure parameters (target, filter, and kVp) in digital mammography necessitates maximization of the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), while simultaneously minimizing patient dose. The goal of this study is to compare, for each of the major commercially available full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems, the impact of the selection of technique factors on image SNR and radiation dose for a range of breast thickness and tissue types. This phantom study is an update of a previous investigation and includes measurements on recent versions of two of the FFDM systems discussed in that article, as well as on three FFDM systems not available at that time. The five commercial FFDM systems tested, the Senographe 2000D from GE Healthcare, the Mammomat Novation DR from Siemens, the Selenia from Hologic, the Fischer Senoscan, and Fuji's 5000MA used with a Lorad M-IV mammography unit, are located at five different university test sites. Performance was assessed using all available x-ray target and filter combinations and nine different phantom types (three compressed thicknesses and three tissue composition types). Each phantom type was also imaged using the automatic exposure control (AEC) of each system to identify the exposure parameters used under automated image acquisition. The figure of merit (FOM) used to compare technique factors is the ratio of the square of the image SNR to the mean glandular dose. The results show that, for a given target/filter combination, in general FOM is a slowly changing function of kVp, with stronger dependence on the choice of target/filter combination. In all cases the FOM was a decreasing function of kVp at the top of the available range of kVp settings, indicating that higher tube voltages would produce no further performance improvement. For a given phantom type, the exposure parameter set resulting in the highest FOM value was system specific, depending on both the set of available target/filter combinations, and

  2. Preoperative digital mammography imaging in conservative mastectomy and immediate reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Hammond, Dennis; Nava, Maurizio; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rostagno, Roman; Gercovich, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital mammography clearly distinguishes gland tissue density from the overlying non-glandular breast tissue coverage, which corresponds to the existing tissue between the skin and the Cooper’s ligaments surrounding the gland (i.e., dermis and subcutaneous fat). Preoperative digital imaging can determine the thickness of this breast tissue coverage, thus facilitating planning of the most adequate surgical techniques and reconstructive procedures for each case. Methods This study aimed to describe the results of a retrospective study of 352 digital mammograms in 176 patients with different breast volumes who underwent preoperative conservative mastectomies. The breast tissue coverage thickness and its relationship with the breast volume were evaluated. Results The breast tissue coverage thickness ranged from 0.233 to 4.423 cm, with a mean value of 1.952 cm. A comparison of tissue coverage and breast volume revealed a non-direct relationship between these factors. Conclusions Preoperative planning should not depend only on breast volume. Flap evaluations based on preoperative imaging measurements might be helpful when planning a conservative mastectomy. Accordingly, we propose a breast tissue coverage classification (BTCC). PMID:26855903

  3. Dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using a penalized maximum likelihood reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard; O'Connor, Michael; Glick, Stephen J.

    2009-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging modality with limited angle projection data. The ability of tomosynthesis systems to accurately detect smaller microcalcifications is debatable. This is because of the higher noise in the projection data (lower average dose per projection), which is then propagated through the reconstructed image . Reconstruction methods that minimize the propagation of quantum noise have potential to improve microcalcification detectability using DBT. In this paper we show that penalized maximum likelihood (PML) reconstruction in DBT yields images with an improved resolution/noise tradeoff as compared to conventional filtered backprojection (FBP). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) using PML was observed to be higher than that obtained using the standard FBP algorithm. Our results indicate that for microcalcifications, using the PML algorithm, reconstructions obtained with a mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.5 mGy yielded better SNR than that those obtained with FBP using a 4mGy total dose. Thus perhaps total dose could be reduced to one-third or lower with same microcalcification detectability, if PML reconstruction is used instead of FBP. Visibility of low contrast masses with various contrast levels were studied using a contrast-detail phantom in a breast shape structure with an average breast density. Images generated using various dose levels indicate that visibility of low contrast masses generated using PML reconstructions are significantly better than those generated using FBP. SNR measurements in the low-contrast study did not appear to correlate with the visual subjective analysis of the reconstruction indicating that SNR is not a good figure of merit to be used.

  4. A feasibility study for anatomical noise reduction in dual-energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Thus, early diagnosis is of considerable importance. For early screening of lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as the gold standard. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced modality for lung cancer screening with a relatively low radiation dose compared to CT. The dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules by means of reducing anatomical noise. In this study, the possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by both a simulation study and an experimental study using a CDT prototype. The Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v6 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for the simulation study to create simulated phantom shapes consisting of five inner cylinders filled with different densities of bone and airequivalent materials. Furthermore, the CDT prototype system and human phantom chest were used for the experimental study. CDT scan in both the simulation and experimental studies was performed with linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over a 30 degree angular range with a 1.5 degree angular interval. To obtain materialselective images, a projectionbased energy subtraction technique was applied to high and low energy images. The resultant simulation images showed that dual-energy reconstruction could achieve an approximately 32% higher contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in images and the difference in CNR value according to bone density was significant compared to single energy CDT. Additionally, image artifacts were effectively corrected in dual energy CDT simulation studies. Likewise the experimental study with dual energy produced clear images of lung fields and bone structure by removing unnecessary anatomical structures. Dual energy tomosynthesis is a new technique; therefore, there is little guidance regarding its

  5. Applying a 2D based CAD scheme for detecting micro-calcification clusters using digital breast tomosynthesis images: an assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has emerged as a promising imaging modality for screening mammography. However, visually detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on DBT images is a difficult task. Computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes for detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on mammograms can achieve high performance and the use of CAD results can assist radiologists in detecting subtle micro-calcification clusters. In this study, we compared the performance of an available 2D based CAD scheme with one that includes a new grouping and scoring method when applied to both projection and reconstructed DBT images. We selected a dataset involving 96 DBT examinations acquired on 45 women. Each DBT image set included 11 low dose projection images and a varying number of reconstructed image slices ranging from 18 to 87. In this dataset 20 true-positive micro-calcification clusters were visually detected on the projection images and 40 were visually detected on the reconstructed images, respectively. We first applied the CAD scheme that was previously developed in our laboratory to the DBT dataset. We then tested a new grouping method that defines an independent cluster by grouping the same cluster detected on different projection or reconstructed images. We then compared four scoring methods to assess the CAD performance. The maximum sensitivity level observed for the different grouping and scoring methods were 70% and 88% for the projection and reconstructed images with a maximum false-positive rate of 4.0 and 15.9 per examination, respectively. This preliminary study demonstrates that (1) among the maximum, the minimum or the average CAD generated scores, using the maximum score of the grouped cluster regions achieved the highest performance level, (2) the histogram based scoring method is reasonably effective in reducing false-positive detections on the projection images but the overall CAD sensitivity is lower due to lower signal-to-noise ratio

  6. Digital information management: a progress report on the National Digital Mammography Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Barbara G.; Schnall, Mitchell D.

    2002-05-01

    Digital mammography creates very large images, which require new approaches to storage, retrieval, management, and security. The National Digital Mammography Archive (NDMA) project, funded by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), is developing a limited testbed that demonstrates the feasibility of a national breast imaging archive, with access to prior exams; patient information; computer aids for image processing, teaching, and testing tools; and security components to ensure confidentiality of patient information. There will be significant benefits to patients and clinicians in terms of accessible data with which to make a diagnosis and to researchers performing studies on breast cancer. Mammography was chosen for the project, because standards were already available for digital images, report formats, and structures. New standards have been created for communications protocols between devices, front- end portal and archive. NDMA is a distributed computing concept that provides for sharing and access across corporate entities. Privacy, auditing, and patient consent are all integrated into the system. Five sites, Universities of Pennsylvania, Chicago, North Carolina and Toronto, and BWXT Y12, are connected through high-speed networks to demonstrate functionality. We will review progress, including technical challenges, innovative research and development activities, standards and protocols being implemented, and potential benefits to healthcare systems.

  7. A comprehensive model for quantum noise characterization in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Bosmans, H; Verdun, F R; Marshall, N W

    2016-03-01

    A version of cascaded systems analysis was developed specifically with the aim of studying quantum noise propagation in x-ray detectors. Signal and quantum noise propagation was then modelled in four types of x-ray detectors used for digital mammography: four flat panel systems, one computed radiography and one slot-scan silicon wafer based photon counting device. As required inputs to the model, the two dimensional (2D) modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured for six mammography systems that utilized these different detectors. A new method to reconstruct anisotropic 2D presampling MTF matrices from 1D radial MTFs measured along different angular directions across the detector is described; an image of a sharp, circular disc was used for this purpose. The effective pixel fill factor for the FP systems was determined from the axial 1D presampling MTFs measured with a square sharp edge along the two orthogonal directions of the pixel lattice. Expectation MTFs were then calculated by averaging the radial MTFs over all possible phases and the 2D EMTF formed with the same reconstruction technique used for the 2D presampling MTF. The quantum NPS was then established by noise decomposition from homogenous images acquired as a function of detector air kerma. This was further decomposed into the correlated and uncorrelated quantum components by fitting the radially averaged quantum NPS with the radially averaged EMTF(2). This whole procedure allowed a detailed analysis of the influence of aliasing, signal and noise decorrelation, x-ray capture efficiency and global secondary gain on NPS and detector DQE. The influence of noise statistics, pixel fill factor and additional electronic and fixed pattern noises on the DQE was also studied. The 2D cascaded model and decompositions performed on the acquired images also enlightened the observed quantum NPS and DQE anisotropy. PMID:26895467

  8. A comprehensive model for quantum noise characterization in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Bosmans, H.; Verdun, F. R.; Marshall, N. W.

    2016-03-01

    A version of cascaded systems analysis was developed specifically with the aim of studying quantum noise propagation in x-ray detectors. Signal and quantum noise propagation was then modelled in four types of x-ray detectors used for digital mammography: four flat panel systems, one computed radiography and one slot-scan silicon wafer based photon counting device. As required inputs to the model, the two dimensional (2D) modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured for six mammography systems that utilized these different detectors. A new method to reconstruct anisotropic 2D presampling MTF matrices from 1D radial MTFs measured along different angular directions across the detector is described; an image of a sharp, circular disc was used for this purpose. The effective pixel fill factor for the FP systems was determined from the axial 1D presampling MTFs measured with a square sharp edge along the two orthogonal directions of the pixel lattice. Expectation MTFs were then calculated by averaging the radial MTFs over all possible phases and the 2D EMTF formed with the same reconstruction technique used for the 2D presampling MTF. The quantum NPS was then established by noise decomposition from homogenous images acquired as a function of detector air kerma. This was further decomposed into the correlated and uncorrelated quantum components by fitting the radially averaged quantum NPS with the radially averaged EMTF2. This whole procedure allowed a detailed analysis of the influence of aliasing, signal and noise decorrelation, x-ray capture efficiency and global secondary gain on NPS and detector DQE. The influence of noise statistics, pixel fill factor and additional electronic and fixed pattern noises on the DQE was also studied. The 2D cascaded model and decompositions performed on the acquired images also enlightened the observed quantum NPS and DQE anisotropy.

  9. Physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, B; Belli, G; Gori, C; Rosselli Del Turco, M

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography (GE Senographe 2000D, Lorad Selenia M-IV, Fischer Senoscan, Agfa DM 1000, and IMS Giotto) currently in clinical use. The basic performances of the mammography systems tested were assessed on the basis of response curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, noise equivalent quanta (NEQ), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in an experimental setting closely resembling the clinical one. As expected, all the full field digital mammography systems show a linear response curve over a dynamic range from 3.5 to 500 microGy (0.998digital system, the presampling MTF was calculated within a range up to the Nyquist frequency (5 lp/mm for GE Senographe 2000D, 7.1 lp/mm for Lorad Selenia, 9.3 lp/mm for Fischer Senoscan, and 5.88 lp/mm for IMS Giotto detector). The NEQ becomes related to the exposure in a linear behavior starting from about 40.3 microGy for GE Senographe 2000D, 42.9 microGy for Lorad Selenia, 41.2 microGy for Agfa DM1000, <87.6 microGy for Fischer Senoscan, and 61.3 microGy for the IMS Giotto. Above those values, the systems can be considered "quantum noise limited," that is the electronic noise is negligible if compared to the quantum noise. The DQE, for several emitted x-ray spectra for each system, i.e., 28 kV p Mo-Mo, Mo-Rh, Rh-Rh, W-Al anode-filter combination, hardened by 40 mm poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) was evaluated. For the five different systems, the DQE at close to zero spatial frequency ranges between 0.25 and 0.63 at 131 microGy entrance surface air kerma to the detectors. The results of

  10. Physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzari, B.; Belli, G.; Gori, C.; Rosselli Del Turco, M.

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography (GE Senographe 2000D, Lorad Selenia M-IV, Fischer Senoscan, Agfa DM 1000, and IMS Giotto) currently in clinical use. The basic performances of the mammography systems tested were assessed on the basis of response curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, noise equivalent quanta (NEQ), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in an experimental setting closely resembling the clinical one. As expected, all the full field digital mammography systems show a linear response curve over a dynamic range from 3.5 to 500 {mu}Gy (0.998digital system, the presampling MTF was calculated within a range up to the Nyquist frequency (5 lp/mm for GE Senographe 2000D, 7.1 lp/mm for Lorad Selenia, 9.3 lp/mm for Fischer Senoscan, and 5.88 lp/mm for IMS Giotto detector). The NEQ becomes related to the exposure in a linear behavior starting from about 40.3 {mu}Gy for GE Senographe 2000D, 42.9 {mu}Gy for Lorad Selenia, 41.2 {mu}Gy for Agfa DM1000, <87.6 {mu}Gy for Fischer Senoscan, and 61.3 {mu}Gy for the IMS Giotto. Above those values, the systems can be considered ''quantum noise limited,'' that is the electronic noise is negligible if compared to the quantum noise. The DQE, for several emitted x-ray spectra for each system, i.e., 28 kV p Mo-Mo, Mo-Rh, Rh-Rh, W-Al anode-filter combination, hardened by 40 mm poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) was evaluated. For the five different systems, the DQE at close to zero spatial frequency ranges between 0.25 and 0.63 at 131 {mu}Gy entrance surface air kerma to the detectors. The results of

  11. 21 CFR 892.1715 - Full-field digital mammography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography acquisition software, full-field digital image receptor, acquisition workstation, automatic exposure control, image processing and reconstruction programs, patient and equipment supports,...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1715 - Full-field digital mammography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography acquisition software, full-field digital image receptor, acquisition workstation, automatic exposure control, image processing and reconstruction programs, patient and equipment supports,...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1715 - Full-field digital mammography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography acquisition software, full-field digital image receptor, acquisition workstation, automatic exposure control, image processing and reconstruction programs, patient and equipment supports,...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1715 - Full-field digital mammography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography acquisition software, full-field digital image receptor, acquisition workstation, automatic exposure control, image processing and reconstruction programs, patient and equipment supports,...

  15. Digital tomosynthesis for verifying spine position during radiotherapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J.; Dahele, Max; Mostafavi, Hassan; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring the stability of patient position is essential during high-precision radiotherapy such as spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We evaluated the combination of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and triangulation for spine position detection, using non-clinical DTS software and an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom that includes a bone-like spine structure. Kilovoltage cone beam CT projection images over 2-16° gantry rotation were used to generate single slice DTS images. Each DTS slice was registered to a digitally reconstructed DTS derived from the planning CT scan to determine 2D shifts between actual phantom and treatment plan position. Two or more DTS registrations, central axes 4-22° apart, were triangulated to determine the 3D phantom position. Using sequentially generated DTS images, the phantom position can be updated every degree with a small latency of DTS and triangulation angle. The precision of position determination was investigated as function of DTS and triangulation angle. To mimic the scenario of spine SBRT, the effect on the standard deviation of megavoltage radiation delivery during kV image acquisition was tested. In addition, the ability of the system to detect different types of movement was investigated for a variety of small sudden and gradual movements during kV image acquisition.

  16. X-ray digital intra-oral tomosynthesis for quasi-three-dimensional imaging: system, reconstruction algorithm, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ziran; Wu, Dufan

    2013-01-01

    At present, there are mainly three x-ray imaging modalities for dental clinical diagnosis: radiography, panorama and computed tomography (CT). We develop a new x-ray digital intra-oral tomosynthesis (IDT) system for quasi-three-dimensional dental imaging which can be seen as an intermediate modality between traditional radiography and CT. In addition to normal x-ray tube and digital sensor used in intra-oral radiography, IDT has a specially designed mechanical device to complete the tomosynthesis data acquisition. During the scanning, the measurement geometry is such that the sensor is stationary inside the patient's mouth and the x-ray tube moves along an arc trajectory with respect to the intra-oral sensor. Therefore, the projection geometry can be obtained without any other reference objects, which makes it be easily accepted in clinical applications. We also present a compressed sensing-based iterative reconstruction algorithm for this kind of intra-oral tomosynthesis. Finally, simulation and experiment were both carried out to evaluate this intra-oral imaging modality and algorithm. The results show that IDT has its potentiality to become a new tool for dental clinical diagnosis.

  17. Algorithmic scatter correction in dual-energy digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Mou, Xuanqin; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Lau, Beverly A.; Chan, Suk-tak; Zhang, Lei

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Small calcifications are often the earliest and the main indicator of breast cancer. Dual-energy digital mammography (DEDM) has been considered as a promising technique to improve the detectability of calcifications since it can be used to suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues of the breast. X-ray scatter leads to erroneous calculations of the DEDM image. Although the pinhole-array interpolation method can estimate scattered radiations, it requires extra exposures to measure the scatter and apply the correction. The purpose of this work is to design an algorithmic method for scatter correction in DEDM without extra exposures.Methods: In this paper, a scatter correction method for DEDM was developed based on the knowledge that scattered radiation has small spatial variation and that the majority of pixels in a mammogram are noncalcification pixels. The scatter fraction was estimated in the DEDM calculation and the measured scatter fraction was used to remove scatter from the image. The scatter correction method was implemented on a commercial full-field digital mammography system with breast tissue equivalent phantom and calcification phantom. The authors also implemented the pinhole-array interpolation scatter correction method on the system. Phantom results for both methods are presented and discussed. The authors compared the background DE calcification signals and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of calcifications in the three DE calcification images: image without scatter correction, image with scatter correction using pinhole-array interpolation method, and image with scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method.Results: The authors' results show that the resultant background DE calcification signal can be reduced. The root-mean-square of background DE calcification signal of 1962 μm with scatter-uncorrected data was reduced to 194 μm after scatter correction using the authors' algorithmic method. The range of

  18. SU-E-P-31: Quantifying the Amount of Missing Tissue in a Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goodenough, D; Olafsdottir, H; Olafsson, I; Fredriksson, J; Kristinsson, S; Oskarsdottir, G; Kristbjornsson, A; Mallozzi, R; Healy, A; Levy, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To automatically quantify the amount of missing tissue in a digital breast tomosynthesis system using four stair-stepped chest wall missing tissue gauges in the Tomophan™ from the Phantom Laboratory and image processing from Image Owl. Methods: The Tomophan™ phantom incorporates four stair-stepped missing tissue gauges by the chest wall, allowing measurement of missing chest wall in two different locations along the chest wall at two different heights. Each of the four gauges has 12 steps in 0.5 mm increments rising from the chest wall. An image processing algorithm was developed by Image Owl that first finds the two slices containing the steps then finds the signal through the highest step in all four gauges. Using the signal drop at the beginning of each gauge the distance to the end of the image gives the length of the missing tissue gauge in millimeters. Results: The Tomophan™ was imaged in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems from various vendors resulting in 46 cases used for testing. The results showed that on average 1.9 mm of 6 mm of the gauges are visible. A small focus group was asked to count the number of visible steps for each case which resulted in a good agreement between observer counts and computed data. Conclusion: First, the results indicate that the amount of missing chest wall can differ between vendors. Secondly it was shown that an automated method to estimate the amount of missing chest wall gauges agreed well with observer assessments. This finding indicates that consistency testing may be simplified using the Tomophan™ phantom and analysis by an automated image processing named Tomo QA. In general the reason for missing chest wall may be due to a function of the beam profile at the chest wall as DBT projects through the angular sampling. Research supported by Image Owl, Inc., The Phantom Laboratory, Inc. and Raforninn ehf; Mallozzi and Healy employed by The Phantom Laboratory, Inc.; Goodenough is a consultant to The

  19. Sensitivity of Thoracic Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS) for the Identification of Lung Nodules.

    PubMed

    Langer, Steve G; Graner, Brian D; Schueler, Beth A; Fetterly, Kenneth A; Kofler, James M; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Bartholmai, Brian J

    2016-02-01

    Thoracic computed tomography (CT) is considered the gold standard for detection lung pathology, yet its efficacy as a screening tool in regards to cost and radiation dose continues to evolve. Chest radiography (CXR) remains a useful and ubiquitous tool for detection and characterization of pulmonary pathology, but reduced sensitivity and specificity compared to CT. This prospective, blinded study compares the sensitivity of digital tomosynthesis (DTS), to that of CT and CXR for the identification and characterization of lung nodules. Ninety-five outpatients received a posteroanterior (PA) and lateral CXR, DTS, and chest CT at one care episode. The CXR and DTS studies were independently interpreted by three thoracic radiologists. The CT studies were used as the gold standard and read by a fourth thoracic radiologist. Nodules were characterized by presence, location, size, and composition. The agreement between observers and the effective radiation dose for each modality was objectively calculated. One hundred forty-five nodules of greatest diameter larger than 4 mm and 215 nodules less than 4 mm were identified by CT. DTS identified significantly more >4 mm nodules than CXR (DTS 32 % vs. CXR 17 %). CXR and DTS showed no significant difference in the ability to identify the smaller nodules or central nodules within 3 cm of the hilum. DTS outperformed CXR in identifying pleural nodules and those nodules located greater than 3 cm from the hilum. Average radiation dose for CXR, DTS, and CT were 0.10, 0.21, and 6.8 mSv, respectively. Thoracic digital tomosynthesis requires significantly less radiation dose than CT and nearly doubles the sensitivity of that of CXR for the identification of lung nodules greater than 4 mm. However, sensitivity and specificity for detection and characterization of lung nodules remains substantially less than CT. The apparent benefits over CXR, low cost, rapid acquisition, and minimal radiation dose of thoracic DTS suggest that it may be a

  20. Which Phantom Is Better for Assessing the Image Quality in Full-Field Digital Mammography?: American College of Radiology Accreditation Phantom versus Digital Mammography Accreditation Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung Eun; Yie, An; Ku, Bon Kyung; Kim, Hee-Young; Cho, Kyu Ran; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwa; Hwang, Kyu-Won

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare between the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and digital mammography accreditation phantom in assessing the image quality in full-field digital mammography (FFDM). Materials and Methods In each week throughout the 42-week study, we obtained phantom images using both the ACR accreditation phantom and the digital mammography accreditation phantom, and a total of 42 pairs of images were included in this study. We assessed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in each phantom image. A radiologist drew a square-shaped region of interest on the phantom and then the mean value of the SNR and the standard deviation were automatically provided on a monitor. SNR was calculated by an equation, measured mean value of SNR-constant coefficient of FFDM/standard deviation. Two breast radiologists scored visible objects (fibers, specks, and masses) with soft-copy images and calculated the visible rate (number of visible objects/total number of objects). We compared SNR and the visible rate of objects between the two phantoms and calculated the k-coefficient for interobserver agreement. Results The SNR of the ACR accreditation phantom ranged from 42.0 to 52.9 (Mean, 47.3 ± 2.79) and that of Digital Phantom ranged from 24.8 to 54.0 (Mean, 44.1 ± 9.93) (p = 0.028). The visible rates of all three types of objects were much higher in the ACR accreditation phantom than those in the digital mammography accreditation phantom (p < 0.05). Interobserver agreement for visible rates of objects on phantom images was fair to moderate agreement (k-coefficients: 0.34-0.57). Conclusion The ACR accreditation phantom is superior to the digital mammography accreditation phantom in terms of SNR and visibility of phantom objects. Thus, ACR accreditation phantom appears to be satisfactory for assessing the image quality in FFDM. PMID:23118577

  1. On imaging with or without grid in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Cederström, Björn

    2014-03-01

    The grids used in digital mammography to reduce scattered radiation from the breast are not perfect and lead to partial absorption of primary radiation at the same time as not all of the scattered radiation is absorbed. It has therefore lately been suggested to remove the grids and correct for effects of scattered radiation by post- processing the images. In this paper, we investigated the dose reduction that might be achieved if the gird were to be removed. Dose reduction is determined as a function of PMMA thickness by comparing the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of images acquired with and without grid at a constant exposure. We used a theoretical model validated with Monte Carlo simulations and phantom studies. To evaluate the CNR, we applied aluminum filters of two different sizes, 4x8 cm2 and 1x1 cm2. When the large Al filter was used, the resulting CNR value for the grid-less images was overestimated as a result of a difference in amount of scattered radiation in the background region and of the region covered by the filter, a difference that could be eliminated by selecting a region of interest close to the edge of the filter. The optimal CNR when the PMMA thickness was above about 4 cm was obtained with a grid, whereas removing the grid leaded to a dose saving in thinner PMMAs. The results suggest not removing grids in breast cancer screening.

  2. Comparative Study Of Image Enhancement Algorithms For Digital And Film Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Gonzalez, A.

    2008-08-11

    Here we discuss the application of edge enhancement algorithms on images obtained with a Mammography System which has a Selenium Detector and on the other hand, on images obtained from digitized film mammography. Comparative analysis of such images includes the study of technical aspects of image acquisition, storage, compression and display. A protocol for a local database has been created as a result of this study.

  3. Initial experience with computer aided detection for microcalcification in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, E. F.; Lim, Y. Y.; Wilson, M. W.; Haq, R.; Zhou, J.; Tate, C.; Maxwell, A. J.; Astley, S. M.; Gilbert, F. J.

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) addresses limitations of 2-D projection imaging for detection of masses. Microcalcification clusters may be more difficult to appreciate in DBT as individual calcifications within clusters may appear on different slices. This research aims to evaluate the performance of ImageChecker 3D Calc CAD v1.0. Women were recruited as part of the TOMMY trial. From the trial, 169 were included in this study. The DBT images were processed with the computer aided detection (CAD) algorithm. Three consultant radiologists reviewed the images and recorded whether CAD prompts were on or off target. 79/80 (98.8%) malignant cases had a prompt on the area of microcalcification. In these cases, there were 1-15 marks (median 5) with the majority of false prompts (n=326/431) due to benign (68%) and vascular (24%) calcifications. Of 89 normal/benign cases, there were 1-13 prompts (median 3), 27 (30%) had no prompts and the majority of false prompts (n=238) were benign (77%) calcifications. CAD is effective in prompting malignant microcalcification clusters and may overcome the difficulty of detecting clusters in slice images. Although there was a high rate of false prompts, further advances in the software may improve specificity.

  4. Three-Dimensional Computer-Aided Detection of Microcalcification Clusters in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-Wook; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Young-Wook; Lee, Sooyeul

    2016-01-01

    We propose computer-aided detection (CADe) algorithm for microcalcification (MC) clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images. The algorithm consists of prescreening, MC detection, clustering, and false-positive (FP) reduction steps. The DBT images containing the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale Hessian-based three-dimensional (3D) objectness response function and a connected-component segmentation method was applied to extract the cluster seed objects as potential clustering centers of MCs. Secondly, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhanced image was also generated to detect the individual MC candidates and prescreen the MC-like objects. Each cluster seed candidate was prescreened by counting neighboring individual MC candidates nearby the cluster seed object according to several microcalcification clustering criteria. As a second step, we introduced bounding boxes for the accepted seed candidate, clustered all the overlapping cubes, and examined. After the FP reduction step, the average number of FPs per case was estimated to be 2.47 per DBT volume with a sensitivity of 83.3%. PMID:27274993

  5. Evaluation of effective dose with chest digital tomosynthesis system using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system has recently been introduced and studied. This system offers the potential to be a substantial improvement over conventional chest radiography for the lung nodule detection and reduces the radiation dose with limited angles. PC-based Monte Carlo program (PCXMC) simulation toolkit (STUK, Helsinki, Finland) is widely used to evaluate radiation dose in CDT system. However, this toolkit has two significant limits. Although PCXMC is not possible to describe a model for every individual patient and does not describe the accurate X-ray beam spectrum, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation describes the various size of phantom for individual patient and proper X-ray spectrum. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate effective dose in CDT system with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit using GATE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effective dose in virtual infant chest phantom of posterior-anterior (PA) view in CDT system using GATE simulation. We obtained the effective dose at different tube angles by applying dose actor function in GATE simulation which was commonly used to obtain the medical radiation dosimetry. The results indicated that GATE simulation was useful to estimate distribution of absorbed dose. Consequently, we obtained the acceptable distribution of effective dose at each projection. These results indicated that GATE simulation can be alternative method of calculating effective dose in CDT applications.

  6. Evaluation and optimization of the maximum-likelihood approach for image reconstruction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerebko, Anna K.; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) suffers from incomplete data and poor quantum statistics limited by the total dose absorbed in the breast. Hence, statistical reconstruction assuming the photon statistics to follow a Poisson distribution may have some advantages. This study investigates state-of-art iterative maximum likelihood (ML) statistical reconstruction algorithms for DBT and compares the results with simple backprojection (BP), filtered backprojection (FBP), and iFBP (FBP with filter derived from iterative reconstruction). The gradient-ascent and convex optimization variants of the transmission ML algorithm are evaluated with phantom and clinical data. Convergence speed is very similar for both iterative statistical algorithms and after approximately 5 iterations all significant details are well displayed, although we notice increasing noise. We found empirically that a relaxation factor between 0.25 and 0.5 provides the optimal trade-off between noise and contrast. The ML-convex algorithm gives smoother results than the ML-gradient algorithm. The low-contrast CNR of the ML algorithms is between CNR for simple backprojection (highest) and FBP (lowest). Spatial resolution of iterative statistical and iFBP algorithms is similar to that of FBP but the quantitative density representation better resembles conventional mammograms. The iFBP algorithm provides the benefits of statistical iterative reconstruction techniques and requires much shorter computation time.

  7. Statistical iterative reconstruction using fast optimization transfer algorithm with successively increasing factor in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction exhibits particularly promising since it provides the flexibility of accurate physical noise modeling and geometric system description in transmission tomography system. However, to solve the objective function is computationally intensive compared to analytical reconstruction methods due to multiple iterations needed for convergence and each iteration involving forward/back-projections by using a complex geometric system model. Optimization transfer (OT) is a general algorithm converting a high dimensional optimization to a parallel 1-D update. OT-based algorithm provides a monotonic convergence and a parallel computing framework but slower convergence rate especially around the global optimal. Based on an indirect estimation on the spectrum of the OT convergence rate matrix, we proposed a successively increasing factor- scaled optimization transfer (OT) algorithm to seek an optimal step size for a faster rate. Compared to a representative OT based method such as separable parabolic surrogate with pre-computed curvature (PC-SPS), our algorithm provides comparable image quality (IQ) with fewer iterations. Each iteration retains a similar computational cost to PC-SPS. The initial experiment with a simulated Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) system shows that a total 40% computing time is saved by the proposed algorithm. In general, the successively increasing factor-scaled OT exhibits a tremendous potential to be a iterative method with a parallel computation, a monotonic and global convergence with fast rate.

  8. Three-Dimensional Computer-Aided Detection of Microcalcification Clusters in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-wook; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Young-Wook; Lee, Sooyeul

    2016-01-01

    We propose computer-aided detection (CADe) algorithm for microcalcification (MC) clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images. The algorithm consists of prescreening, MC detection, clustering, and false-positive (FP) reduction steps. The DBT images containing the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale Hessian-based three-dimensional (3D) objectness response function and a connected-component segmentation method was applied to extract the cluster seed objects as potential clustering centers of MCs. Secondly, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhanced image was also generated to detect the individual MC candidates and prescreen the MC-like objects. Each cluster seed candidate was prescreened by counting neighboring individual MC candidates nearby the cluster seed object according to several microcalcification clustering criteria. As a second step, we introduced bounding boxes for the accepted seed candidate, clustered all the overlapping cubes, and examined. After the FP reduction step, the average number of FPs per case was estimated to be 2.47 per DBT volume with a sensitivity of 83.3%. PMID:27274993

  9. Segmentation methods for breast vasculature in dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kristen C.; Lee, Hyo Min; Singh, Tanushriya; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (DE CE-DBT) uses an iodinated contrast agent to image the three-dimensional breast vasculature. The University of Pennsylvania has an ongoing DE CE-DBT clinical study in patients with known breast cancers. The breast is compressed continuously and imaged at four time points (1 pre-contrast; 3 post-contrast). DE images are obtained by a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) image pairs. Temporal subtraction of the post-contrast DE images from the pre-contrast DE image is performed to analyze iodine uptake. Our previous work investigated image registration methods to correct for patient motion, enhancing the evaluation of vascular kinetics. In this project we investigate a segmentation algorithm which identifies blood vessels in the breast from our temporal DE subtraction images. Anisotropic diffusion filtering, Gabor filtering, and morphological filtering are used for the enhancement of vessel features. Vessel labeling methods are then used to distinguish vessel and background features successfully. Statistical and clinical evaluations of segmentation accuracy in DE-CBT images are ongoing.

  10. Investigation on location-dependent detectability of a small mass for digital breast tomosynthesis evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changwoo; Baek, Jongduk; Park, Subok

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality for improved breast cancer detection and diagnosis [1-5]. Numerous efforts have been made to find quantitative metrics associated with mammographic image quality assessment, such as the exponent β of anatomical noise power spectrum, glandularity, contrast noise ratio, etc. [6-8]. In addition, with the use of Fourier-domain detectability for a task-based assessment of DBT, a stationarity assumption on reconstructed image statistics was often made [9-11], resulting in the use of multiple regions-of-interest (ROIs) from different locations in order to increase sample size. While all these metrics provide some information on mammographic image characteristics and signal detection, the relationship between these metrics and detectability in DBT evaluation has not been fully understood. In this work, we investigated spatial-domain detectability trends and levels as a function of the number of slices Ns at three different ROI locations on the same image slice, where background statistics differ in terms of the aforementioned metrics. Detectabilities for the three ROI locations were calculated using multi-slice channelized Hotelling observers with 2D/3D Laguerre-Gauss channels. Our simulation results show that detectability levels and trends as a function of Ns vary across these three ROI locations. They also show that the exponent β, mean glandularity, and mean attenuation coefficient vary across the three ROI locations but they do not necessarily predict the ranking of detectability levels and trends across these ROI locations.