Sample records for dilute sulfuric acid

  1. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  2. Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic%, and 10% wt.% of dry biomass were also tested at 180 °C for 10 min. Sugar yields were tracked for pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis to identify conditions for the highest total sugar yields

  3. The impact of dilute sulfuric acid on the selectivity of xylooligomer depolymerization to monomers

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    The impact of dilute sulfuric acid on the selectivity of xylooligomer depolymerization to monomers of polymerization (DP) ranging from 2 to 5 was followed at 160 °C with sulfuric acid added to adjust the pH from. Numerous studies of hemicellulose hydrolysis using just water or with sulfuric and other acids give some

  4. Initial design of a dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment process for aspen wood chips

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Torget; M. Himmel; J. D. Wright; K. Grohmann

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary process design for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of aspen wood chips in order to obtain fermentable sugars\\u000a has been prepared and subjected to an economic evaluation. The process design was prepared according to experimental data\\u000a on the kinetics of dilute sulfuric acid prehydrolysis and particle size effects obtained in this study and our previous work.\\u000a The initial economic

  5. The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from Corn Stover

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from identical conditions. Staged countercurrent operation with very dilute sulfuric acid has been shown effects of flow and very low concentrations of sulfuric acid (0.05-0.1 wt %) on hemicellulose hydrolysis

  6. Combined sugar yields for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    Combined sugar yields for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover followed by enzymatic emphasis was on identifying conditions to realize the highest yields of both sugars from both stages. Thus, individual xylose and glucose yields are reported as a percentage of the total potential yield of both sugars

  7. Modeling and optimization of the dilute-sulfuric-acid pretreatment of corn stover, poplar and switchgrass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alireza Esteghlalian; Andrew G. Hashimoto; John J. Fenske; Michael H. Penner

    1997-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass may be used as a potential renewable feedstock for biochemical production of ethanol as an alternative transportation fuel. However, cellulose, which is the major source of fermentable sugars in these materials, is protected by a network of lignin and hemicellulose. The dilute-sulfuric-acid pretreatment removes this protecting shield and makes the cellulose more susceptible to enzymatic digestion. In this

  8. Modeling Sucrose Hydrolysis in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions at Pretreatment Conditions for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, S.; Wickramasinghe, R.; Nagle, N. J.; Schell, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25 g/l sucrose with 0.1-2.0% (w/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160-200 C for 3-12 min. Sucrose was observed to completely hydrolyze at all treatment conditions. However, appreciable concentrations of fructose and glucose were detected and glucose was found to be significantly more stable than fructose. Different mathematical approaches were used to fit the kinetic parameters for acid-catalyzed thermal degradation of these sugars. Since both sugars may survive dilute acid pretreatment, they could provide an additional carbon source for production of ethanol and other bio-based products.

  9. A study on the pretreatment of a sugarcane bagasse sample with dilute sulfuric acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larissa Canilha; Victor T. O. Santos; George J. M. Rocha; João B. Almeida e Silva; Marco Giulietti; Silvio S. Silva; Maria G. A. Felipe; André Ferraz; Adriane M. F. Milagres; Walter Carvalho

    Experiments based on a 23 central composite full factorial design were carried out in 200-ml stainless-steel containers to study the pretreatment,\\u000a with dilute sulfuric acid, of a sugarcane bagasse sample obtained from a local sugar–alcohol mill. The independent variables\\u000a selected for study were temperature, varied from 112.5°C to 157.5°C, residence time, varied from 5.0 to 35.0 min, and sulfuric\\u000a acid

  10. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover in pilot-scale reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Schell; Jody Farmer; Millie Newman; James D. McMillan

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is a domestic feedstock that has potential to produce significant quantities of fuel ethanol and other bioenergy\\u000a and biobased products. However, comprehensive yield and carbon mass balance information and validated kinetic models for dilute-sulfuric\\u000a acid (H2SO4) pretreatment of corn stover have not been available. This has hindered the estimation of process economics and also limited\\u000a the ability to

  11. A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid stover Dilute sulfuric acid Hydrothermal pretreatment Kinetic model Xylose a b s t r a c t Pretreatment of corn stover in 0.5% sulfuric acid at 160 °C for 40 min realized a maximum monomeric plus oligomeric

  12. Pretreatment of rice straw with combined process using dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of lignocellulosic biomass has received attention lately because it can be converted into various versatile chemical compounds by biological processes. In this study, a two-step pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia was performed efficiently on rice straw to obtain fermentable sugar. The soaking in aqueous ammonia process was also optimized by a statistical method. Results Response surface methodology was employed. The determination coefficient (R2) value was found to be 0.9607 and the coefficient of variance was 6.77. The optimal pretreatment conditions were a temperature of 42.75°C, an aqueous ammonia concentration of 20.93%, and a reaction time of 48 h. The optimal enzyme concentration for saccharification was 30 filter paper units. The crystallinity index was approximately 60.23% and the Fourier transform infrared results showed the distinct peaks of glucan. Ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae K35 was performed to verify whether the glucose saccharified from rice straw was fermentable. Conclusions The combined pretreatment using dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia on rice straw efficiently yielded fermentable sugar and achieved almost the same crystallinity index as that of ?-cellulose. PMID:23898802

  13. A novel diffusion-biphasic hydrolysis coupled kinetic model for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Han, Lujia

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic experiments on the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover were performed. A high xylan removal and a low inhibitor concentration were achieved by acid pretreatment. A novel diffusion-hydrolysis coupled kinetic model was proposed. The contribution to the xylose yield was analyzed by the kinetic model. Compared with the inhibitor furfural negatively affecting xylose yield, the fast and slow-hydrolyzing xylan significantly contributed to the xylose yield, however, their dominant roles were dependent on reaction temperature and time. The impact of particle size and acid concentration on the xylose yield were also investigated. The diffusion process may significantly influence the hydrolysis of large particles. Increasing the acid concentration from 0.15 M to 0.30 M significantly improved the xylose yield, whereas the extent of improvement decreased to near-quantitative when further increasing acid loading. These findings shed some light on the mechanism for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn stover. PMID:25479388

  14. Optimization of dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of corn stover for efficient ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Corn stover (supplied by a local farmer) used in this study contained 37.0±0.4% cellulose, 31.3±0.6% hemicelluloses, and 17.8±0.2% lignin. Generation of fermentable sugars from ...

  15. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H. (LaJolla, CA)

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  16. An AFM and XPS study of corrosion caused by micro-liquid of dilute sulfuric acid on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongguang

    2004-04-01

    Micro-liquid of dilute sulfuric acid deposited on SUS304 steel surface were observed with the ac non-contact mode of an atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the detail of the corrosion process caused by them was investigated with the contact mode of the AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDXS). As a result, even not applying bias voltages between the tip of the cantilever and the specimen, micro-liquid of sulfuric acid can be successfully imaged using the ac non-contact mode of AFM. Two shapes of micro-acid, i.e., micro-droplets and micro-films, were found to co-exist on the specimen surface. On areas covered by micro-films of acid, only small corrosion product particles appeared and no corrosion pits were found. Beneath micro-droplets, corrosion reaction continue to produce pits until they were all consumed to form a corrosion product (mainly iron oxides) with almost the same shape with the droplet. The total corrosion reaction time was speculated to be between 690 and 1500 ks. The corrosion product formed from micro-droplets was believed to be a process of accumulating small corrosion product particles from the liquid/substrate interface to the surface of the formerly produced corrosion product. The XPS and WDXS analysis also supports the above results.

  17. High yield production of sugars from deproteinated palm kernel cake under microwave irradiation via dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Suet-Pin; Jiang, Li-Qun; Chia, Chin-Hua; Fang, Zhen; Zakaria, Sarani; Chee, Kah-Leong

    2014-02-01

    Recent years, great interest has been devoted to the conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrate into sugars, such as glucose, mannose and fructose. These are important versatile intermediate products that are easily processed into high value-added biofuels. In this work, microwave-assisted dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of deproteinated palm kernel cake (DPKC) was systematically studied using Response Surface Methodology. The highest mannose yield (92.11%) was achieved at the optimized condition of 148°C, 0.75N H2SO4, 10min 31s and substrate to solvent (SS) ratio (w/v) of 1:49.69. Besides that, total fermentable sugars yield (77.11%), was obtained at 170°C, 0.181N H2SO4, 6min 6s and SS ratio (w/v) of 1:40. Ridge analysis was employed to further verify the optimum conditions. Thus, this work provides fundamental data of the practical use of DPKC as low cost, high yield and environmental-friendly material for the production of mannose and other sugars. PMID:24342947

  18. Feasibility of filamentous fungi for biofuel production using hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipids produced from filamentous fungi show great promise for biofuel production, but a major limiting factor is the high production cost attributed to feedstock. Lignocellulosic biomass is a suitable feedstock for biofuel production due to its abundance and low value. However, very limited study has been performed on lipid production by culturing oleaginous fungi with lignocellulosic materials. Thus, identification of filamentous fungal strains capable of utilizing lignocellulosic hydrolysates for lipid accumulation is critical to improve the process and reduce the production cost. Results The growth performances of eleven filamentous fungi were investigated when cultured on glucose and xylose. Their dry cell weights, lipid contents and fatty acid profiles were determined. Six fungal strains with high lipid contents were selected to culture with the hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw. The results showed that all the selected fungal strains were able to grow on both detoxified liquid hydrolysate (DLH) and non-detoxified liquid hydrolysate (NDLH). The highest lipid content of 39.4% was obtained by Mortierella isabellina on NDLH. In addition, NDLH with some precipitate could help M. isabellina form pellets with an average diameter of 0.11?mm. Conclusion This study demonstrated the possibility of fungal lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass. M. isabellina was the best lipid producer grown on lignocellulosic hydrolysates among the tested filamentous fungi, because it could not only accumulate oils with a high content by directly utilizing NDLH to simplify the fermentation process, but also form proper pellets to benefit the downstream harvesting. Considering the yield and cost, fungal lipids from lignocellulosic biomass are promising alternative sources for biodiesel production. PMID:22824058

  19. Combined sugar yields for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd A. Lloyd; Charles E. Wyman

    2005-01-01

    A number of previous studies determined dilute acid pretreatment conditions that maximize xylose yields from pretreatment or glucose yields from subsequent digestion of the pretreated cellulose, but our emphasis was on identifying conditions to realize the highest yields of both sugars from both stages. Thus, individual xylose and glucose yields are reported as a percentage of the total potential yield

  20. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This is for information only and not for ...

  1. Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

  2. Optimization of dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment to maximize combined sugar yield from sugarcane bagasse for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Y; Cheng, H; Görgens, J F

    2014-01-01

    Increasing fermentable sugar yields per gram of biomass depends strongly on optimal selection of varieties and optimization of pretreatment conditions. In this study, dilute acid pretreatment of bagasse from six varieties of sugarcane was investigated in connection with enzymatic hydrolysis for maximum combined sugar yield (CSY). The CSY from the varieties were also compared with the results from industrial bagasse. The results revealed considerable differences in CSY between the varieties. Up to 22.7 % differences in CSY at the optimal conditions was observed. The combined sugar yield difference between the best performing variety and the industrial bagasse was 34.1 %. High ratio of carbohydrates to lignin and low ash content favored the release of sugar from the substrates. At mild pretreatment conditions, the differences in bioconversion efficiency between varieties were greater than at severe condition. This observation suggests that under less severe conditions the glucose recovery was largely determined by chemical composition of biomass. The results from this study support the possibility of increasing sugar yields or improving the conversion efficiency when pretreatment optimization is performed on varieties with improved properties. PMID:24104688

  3. Dilute Acid and Autohydrolysis Pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    Exposure of cellulosic biomass to temperatures of about 120-210°C can remove most of the hemicellulose and produce cellulose-rich solids from which high glucose yields are possible with cellulase enzymes. Furthermore, the use of dilute sulfuric acid in this pretreatment operation can increase recovery of hemicellulose sugars substantially to about 85-95% of the maximum possible versus only about 65% if no acid is employed. The use of small-diameter tubes makes it possible to employ high solids concentrations similar to those preferred for commercial operations, with rapid heat-up, good temperature control, and accurate closure of material balances. Mixed reactors can be employed to pretreat larger amounts of biomass than possible in such small-diameter tubes, but solids concentrations are limited to about 15% or less to provide uniform temperatures. Pretreatment of large amounts of biomass at high solids concentrations is best carried out using direct steam injection and rapid pressure release, but closure of material balances in such “steam gun” devices is more difficult. Although flow of water alone or containing dilute acid is not practical commercially, such flow-through configurations provide valuable insight into biomass deconstruction kinetics not possible in the batch tubes, mixed reactors, or steam gun systems.

  4. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  5. Dilute Acid and Autohydrolysis Pretreatment Bin Yang and Charles E. Wyman

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    . Furthermore, the use of dilute sulfuric acid in this pretreatment operation can increase recovery possible, while adding dilute sulfuric and other acids can recover up to about 90% of the theoretical maximum. As early as 1898, sulfuric acid was employed to catalyze the hydrolysis of cellulose

  6. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  7. RESEARCH Open Access Co-hydrolysis of hydrothermal and dilute acid

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    fell short of those from hydrolysis of washed solids after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment even, sulfuric acid, ammonia) and the severity used (that is, the combination of pretreatment temperaturRESEARCH Open Access Co-hydrolysis of hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated Populus slurries

  8. Process for decolorizing oil. [treatment with sulfuric acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1935-01-01

    A process for decolorizing oils includes continuously passing a stream of cracked hydrocarbon distillate upwardly in succession through a plurality of zones containing pools of dilute sulfuric acid of a strength sufficient to remove the basic impurities in the distillate but insufficient to remove unsaturated hydrocarbons and until the dilute acid is substantially exhausted successively in each zone. The stream

  9. Molecular Structure of Sulfuric Acid

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-08-15

    H2SO4 was discovered by alchemists and made from heating a compound of iron sulfate. In 1740, sulfuric acid was produced for commercial sale. Sulfuric acid is a very strong acid which is used in car batteries. The acid disassociates in water to give two protons and sulfate. This acid can destroy flesh and cause blindness. It was discovered in the 19th century that adding sulfuric acid to soil produces phosphorus, which is beneficial to plants; hence, sulfuric acid is used as a fertilizer in the form of super phosphate and ammonium sulfate. Sulfuric acid is also used to refine petroleum and process metals, and is found in paints and car batteries.

  10. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P. (Upper St. Clair, PA)

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  11. Two-stage dilute-acid pretreatment of softwoods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Quang A. Nguyen; Melvin P. Tucker; Fred A. Keller; Fannie P. Eddy

    2000-01-01

    Whole treechips obtained from softwood forest thinnings were pretreated via single-and two-stage dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment.\\u000a Whole-tree chips were impregnated with dilute sulfuric acid and steam treated in a 4-L steam explosion reactor. In single-stage\\u000a pretreatment, wood chips were treated using a wide range of severity. In two-stage pretreatment, the first stage was carried\\u000a out at low severity tomaximize hemicellulose recovery.

  12. Characterization of dilute acid pretreatment of silvergrass for ethanol production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gia-Luen Guo; Wei-Hsi Chen; Wen-Heng Chen; Lee-Chung Men; Wen-Song Hwang

    2008-01-01

    Pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid of silvergrass was compared with the pretreatment’s effect on other commonly used lignocellulosic materials, namely rice straw and bagasse, in order to evaluate the potential of this feedstock for ethanol production. The highest yield of xylose from silvergrass was between 70% and 75%, which was similar to bagasse. However, silvergrass gave a higher level of

  13. Science Notes: Dilution of a Weak Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Wai, Chooi Khee

    2014-01-01

    This "Science note" arose out of practical work involving the dilution of ethanoic acid, the measurement of the pH of the diluted solutions and calculation of the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], for each diluted solution. The students expected the calculated values of K[subscript a] to be constant but they found that the…

  14. Sulfuric Acid in the Venus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine, produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  15. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Sulfur and Sulfur Diluted with Hydrogen Sulfide Flowing Through Circular Tubes

    E-print Network

    Stone, Porter Walwyn

    1960-01-01

    of temperature may be found in Fig. 8 through 10. Since H' is not dimensionless, the equation is valid ~onl for geo- metrical factors expressed in the following units of measurement: v = velocity in feet per second d tube diameter in inches x = tube length...HEAT TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF SULFUR AND OF SULFUR DILUTED WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE FLOWING THROUGH CIRCULAR TUBES A Thesis By Porter Walwyn Stone Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas...

  16. Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover for enzymatic hydrolysis and efficient ethanol production by recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5 without detoxification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pretreatment strategy for dilute H2SO4 pretreatment of corn stover was developed for the purpose of reducing the generation of inhibitory substances during pretreatment so that a detoxification step is not required prior to fermentation while maximizing the sugar yield. We have optimized dilute su...

  17. The generation of fermentation inhibitors during dilute acid hydrolysis of softwood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simona Larsson; Eva Palmqvist; Bärbel Hahn-Hägerdal; Charlotte Tengborg; Kerstin Stenberg; Guido Zacchi; Nils-Olof Nilvebrant

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the severity of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of spruce (softwood) on sugar yield and on the fermentability of the hydrolysate by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) was investigated. Fermentability was assessed as the ethanol yield on fermentable sugars (mannose and glucose) and the mean volumetric productivity (4 h). The hydrolysis conditions, residence time, temperature, and sulfuric acid concentration

  18. Effect of dilute acid on the accelerated weathering of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.S.

    1988-02-01

    Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) specimens were soaked in acid solutions to determine the effect of acid conditions (such as low pH fog) on the weathering of wood. Daily 1-hour soaking in dilute sulfurous, sulfuric, or nitric acid (pH 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, or 4.0) increased the rate of accelerated (xenon arc) weathering of the specimens compared to controls soaked in distilled/deionized water. Weathering was manifested as the erosion rate of the wood surface and was determined gravimetrically be fitting the weight loss over time to a linear model. This method detected significant differences between acid-treated specimens and untreated controls within 300 hours of accelerated weathering. The erosion rate was dependent on the acid type and pH. Sulfurous acid treatment caused the fastest rate of erosion, followed by sulfuric then nitric acid. None of the acids affected the erosion rate at pH 3.5 or above. Below this threshold, the rate of erosion increased as the hydrogen ion concentration increased. Sugar analysis of residues from the acids and the distilled water used to soak the wood indicated acid-dependent degradation of polysaccharides.

  19. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046...SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations...Procedures § 153.1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy...

  20. Sulfuric acid leaching of Turkish chromite concentrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Geveci; Y. Topkaya; E. Ayhan

    2002-01-01

    In this work a high grade chromite concentrate obtained from Pinarbasi–Kayseri district of Turkey was reacted with a solution of sulfuric acid and perchloric acid. The effect of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, duration, and perchloric acid addition on leach recovery was studied. At the end of leach reaction chromium appeared in the solution as Cr3+ and it did not change

  1. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  2. Determination of sulfur in fossil fuels by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, W.R.; Paulsen, P.J.; Murphy, K.E.; Vocke, R.D. Jr.; Chen, L.T. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Total sulfur has been measured in 13 petroleum and 14 coal Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry. These materials are suitable as primary and quality control standards for determining the sulfur content of oils and coals by X-ray fluorescence and high-temperature combustion instrumentation. Samples were spiked with enriched stable [sup 34]S and combusted in sealed Carius tubes using nitric and hydrochloric acids. The oxidized sulfur was reduced to H[sub 2]S, precipitated as As[sub 2]S[sub 3], and then dissolved in an ammoniacal solution of As[sub 2]O[sub 3]. A portion of this solution, equivalent to 1.5 [mu]g of sulfur, was added to a single Re filament coated with silica gel. The amount of sulfur in the samples was determined from the [sup 32]S/[sup 34]S ratio by measuring the [sup 75]As[sup 32]S[sup +]/[sup 75]As[sup 34]S[sup +] molecular ions in a Faraday detector. A total of 158 sulfur procedural blanks covering a 10-year period show an approximate log-normal distribution with a grand mean of 0.26 [mu]g of sulfur. This is a negligible correction for most of the data reported here. The total uncertainty (95% confidence interval) for homogeneous materials such as oils is about 0.5%, and for less homogeneous materials such as coals is 1-4%. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Comparative Study of SPORL and Dilute Acid Pretreatments of Spruce for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of two pretreatment methods, Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocellulose (SPORL) and Dilute Acid (DA), was compared in pretreating softwood (spruce) for fuel ethanol production under the same conditions of temperature (180°C), time (30 min), sulfuric acid loading...

  4. CFD modeling of a vehicle exhaust laboratory sampling system: sulfur driven nucleation and growth in diluting diesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olin, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Dal Maso, M.

    2015-01-01

    A new exhaust aerosol model CFD-TUTEAM (Tampere University of Technology Exhaust Aerosol Model for Computational Fluid Dynamics) was developed. The model can be used to simulate particle formation and evolution in diesel exhaust. The model has an Eulerian sub-model that provides spatial information within the computational domain, and a computationally less expensive Lagrangian sub-model that can be used to examine particle formation in a high temporal resolution. Particle formation in a laboratory sampling system that includes a porous tube type diluter and an aging chamber was modeled with CFD-TUTEAM. The simulation results imply that over 99% of new particles are formed in the aging chamber region, because nucleation rate remains at high level in the aging chamber due to low dilution ratio and low nucleation exponents. The nucleation exponents for sulfuric acid in sulfuric acid-water nucleation ranging from 0.25 to 1 appeared to fit best with measurement data, which are the same values as the slopes of volatile nucleation mode number concentration vs. raw exhaust sulfuric acid concentration obtained from the measurement data. These nucleation exponents are very low compared to the nucleation exponents obtained from the classical nucleation theory of binary sulfuric acid-water nucleation. The values of nucleation exponent lower than unity suggest that other compounds, such as hydrocarbons, might have a significant role in the nucleation process.

  5. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Friction and wear experiment were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  6. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  7. Are the clouds of Venus sulfuric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that strong aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have the right refractive index and freeze at Venusian cloud temperature, explain the dryness of the Venusian stratosphere, are consistent with some features of the Venusian IR spectrum, and do not absorb in highly reflecting areas of Venus. It is also indicated that such solutions should be produced by reactions between known atmospheric constituents and most sulfur-bearing rock at the Venusian surface temperature, and require only small amounts of sulfur consistent with its cosmic abundance and with the amounts of other volatile elements present in the atmosphere. It is believed therefore that the clouds of Venus consist of sulfuric acid solutions.

  8. Friction and wear of iron in sulfuric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.000007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid) was studied. Load and reciprocating sliding speeds were kept constant. With the most dilute acid of 0.7 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent, the high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid, and decreased somewhat at 50 percent in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It is apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established which rapidly attached to the wear area.

  9. Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

    2005-10-01

    Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt-based commercial alloys. The corrosion rates in these tests are reported and how they may or may not relate to the corrosion behavior in an operating thermochemical cycle is discussed.

  10. Sulfur Dioxide Crossover during the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer

    E-print Network

    Weidner, John W.

    Sulfur Dioxide Crossover during the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer in the thermochemical conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfuric acid for the large-scale production of hydrogen. Unfortunately, during operation, sulfur dioxide can diffuse from the anode to the cathode. This has several

  11. Dilute acid pretreatment of rye straw and bermudagrass for ethanol production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ye Sun; Jay J. Cheng

    2005-01-01

    Ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials provides an alternative energy production system. Rye and bermudagrass that are used in hog farms for nutrient uptake from swine wastewater have the potential for fuel ethanol production because they have a relative high cellulose and hemicellulose content. Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of rye straw and bermudagrass before enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was investigated in

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping...CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping...CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid...

  14. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping...CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid...

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping...CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid...

  16. DYNAMIC DILUTION SYSTEM FOR AUDITING AMBIENT SULFUR DIOXIDE ANALYZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the development, evaluation, and field performance of a device designed to provide accurate sulfur dioxide concentration standards suitable for auditing the accuracy of continuous, ambient SO2 monitors. This compact, lightweight, device has been subjected to ...

  17. CONSTRUCTION OF A PROTOTYPE SULFURIC ACID MIST MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype sulfuric acid mist monitor has been constructed for the purpose of detecting sulfuric acid-sulfur trioxide. The monitor utilized the selective condensation method with subsequent determination of sulfuric acid by measuring the conductivity of an aqueous isopropanol so...

  18. Friction and wear of nickel in sulfuric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with elemental nickel sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid in concentrations ranging from very dilute (10 -4 N, i.e., 5 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent) acid. Load and reciprocating sliding speeds were kept constant. With the most dilute concentration (10 -4 N) no observable corrosion occurred in or outside the wear area. This was used as the base condition to determine the high contribution of corrosion to total wear loss at acid concentrations between 0.5 percent (0.1 N) and 75 percent. Corrosion reached a maximum rate of 100 millimeters per year at 30 percent acid. At the same time, general corrosion outside the wear area was very low, in agreement with published information. It is clear that friction and wear greatly accelerated corrosion in the wear area. At dilute concentrations of 0.001 and 0.01 N, corrosion in the wear area was low, and general corrosion outside was also low, but local outside regions in the direction of the wear motion experienced some enhanced corrosion, apparently due to fluid motion of the acid.

  19. Sulfuric acid in the Venus clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The extremely dry nature of the Venus upper atmosphere appears to demand the presence of an efficient desiccating agent as the chief constituent of the clouds of Venus. On the basis of polarization measures it is to be expected that this substance is present as spherical droplets, 1 to 2 microns in diameter, with a refractive index n of 1.46 plus or minus 0.02 at 3500A in the observed region of the atmosphere, with T about equal to 235 K. This substance must have ultraviolet, visible, and infrared reflection properties not inconsistent with the observed spectrum of Venus. Sulfuric acid, of about 86% by weight composition, roughly fulfills the first of these properties. The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  20. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  1. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    SciTech Connect

    Iraci, L.T.; Middlebrook, A.M.; Wilson, M.A.; Tolbert, M.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1994-05-15

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] Torr H[sub 2]O and 1-2.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] Torr HNO[sub 3]) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. FTIR spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO[sub 3]/H[sub 2]O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  2. 40 CFR 721.7770 - Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt...Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt...alkyl phenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine...

  3. 40 CFR 721.7770 - Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt...Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt...alkyl phenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine...

  4. 40 CFR 721.7770 - Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt...Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt...alkyl phenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine...

  5. Comparing the performance of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in sulfuric acid based pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, M A; Iqbal, Y; Lewandowski, I; Senn, T

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the suitability of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in dilute acid catalyzed pretreatment. Miscanthus and wheat straw were treated in a dilute sulfuric acid/steam explosion pretreatment. As a result of combining dilute sulfuric acid- and steam explosion pretreatment the hemicellulose hydrolysis yields (96% in wheat straw and 90% in miscanthus) in both substrates were higher than reported in literature. The combined severity factor (=CSF) for optimal hemicellulose hydrolysis was 1.9 and 1.5 in for miscanthus and wheat straw respectively. Because of the higher CSF value more furfural, furfuryl alcohol, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid was formed in miscanthus than in wheat straw pretreatment. PMID:25613555

  6. Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2002-01-01

    A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

  7. Boric/sulfuric acid anodize - Alternative to chromic acid anodize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, Rodney; Moji, Yukimori

    1992-04-01

    The suitability of boric acid/sulfuric acid anodizing (BSAA) solution as a more environmentally acceptable replacement of the chromic acid anodizing (CAA) solution was investigated. Results include data on the BSAA process optimization, the corrosion protection performance, and the compatibility with aircraft finishing. It is shown that the BSSA implementation as a substitude for CAA was successful.

  8. Heterogeneous Interaction of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate on Liquid Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces has been investigated using a fast-flow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. PAN was observed to be reversibly adsorbed on sulfuric acid.

  9. Sulfuric acid thermoelectrochemical system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A thermoelectrochemical system in which an electrical current is generated between a cathode immersed in a concentrated sulfuric acid solution and an anode immersed in an aqueous buffer solution of sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate. Reactants consumed at the electrodes during the electrochemical reaction are thermochemically regenerated and recycled to the electrodes to provide continuous operation of the system.

  10. High-Sulfur Coal and Acidic Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-12-10

    In this video, a geologist measures the pH of water after high-sulfur coal from a Kentucky coal mine has been added to it. This test demonstrates that the sulfate salts found on the coal’s surface cause the water to become much more acidic.

  11. Charles H. Winston and Confederate Sulfuric Acid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riethmiller, Steven

    1995-01-01

    Describes the invention and use of a sulfuric acid chamber by Charles Henry Winston during the Civil War. This invention helped supply munitions for the South. Winston, who was President of the Richmond Female Institute in Virginia, constructed the chamber at his farm and was granted a patent by the Confederate Patent Office in 1863. (PVD)

  12. Topsoe`s Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process: An alternative technology for recovering refinery sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W. [Haldor Topsoe, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Topsoe Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process is a catalytic process which produces concentrated sulfuric acid from refinery streams containing sulfur compounds such as H{sub 2}S (Claus plant feed), Claus plant tail gas, SO{sub 2} (FCC off-gas, power plants), and spent sulfuric acid (alkylation acid). The WSA process recovers up to 99.97% of the sulfur value in the stream as concentrated sulfuric acid (93--98.5 wt%). No solid waste products or waste water is produced and no chemicals are consumed in the process. The simple process layout provides low capital cost and attractive operating economy. Twenty four commercial WSA plants have been licensed. The WSA process is explained in detail and comparisons with alternative sulfur management technology are presented. Environmental regulations applying to SO{sub x} abatement and sulfuric acid production plants are explained in the context of WSA plant operation.

  13. Involvement of Intermediate Sulfur Species in Biological Reduction of Elemental Sulfur under Acidic, Hydrothermal Conditions

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Involvement of Intermediate Sulfur Species in Biological Reduction of Elemental Sulfur under Acidic-Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAb The thermoacidophile and obligate elemental sulfur (S8-phase sulfur during S8 0 -dependent batch culture growth. Cyclic voltammetry indicated the production

  14. A comparison of chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Because of federal and state mandates restricting the use of hexavalent chromium, it was deemed worthwhile to compare the corrosion protection afforded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy by both Type I chromic acid and Type II sulfuric acid anodizing per MIL-A-8625. Corrosion measurements were made on large, flat 2219-T87 aluminum alloy sheet material with an area of 1 cm(exp 2) exposed to a corrosive medium of 3.5-percent sodium chloride at pH 5.5. Both ac electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the dc polarization resistance techniques were employed. The results clearly indicate that the corrosion protection obtained by Type II sulfuric acid anodizing is superior, and no problems should result by substituting Type II sulfuric acid anodizing for Type I chromic acid anodizing.

  15. Characterization and fermentation of dilute-acid hydrolyzates from wood

    SciTech Connect

    Taherzadeh, M.J.; Niklasson, C.; Liden, G. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Reaction Engineering] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Reaction Engineering; Eklund, R. [Mid Sweden Univ., Oernskoeldsvik (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Technology] [Mid Sweden Univ., Oernskoeldsvik (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Technology; Gustafsson, L. [Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology] [Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology

    1997-11-01

    Dilute-acid hydrolyzates from alder, aspen, birch, willow, pine, and spruce were fermented without prior detoxification. The hydrolyzates were prepared by a one-stage hydrolysis process using sulfuric acid (5 g/L) at temperatures between 188 and 234 C and with a holding time of 7 min. The fermentations were carried out anaerobically by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (10 g of d.w./L) at a temperature of 30 C and an initial pH of 5.5. The fermentabilities were quite different for the different wood species, and only hydrolyzates of spruce produced at 188 and 198 C, hydrolyzates of pine produced at 188 C, and hydrolyzates of willow produced at 198 C could be completely fermented within 24 h. From the sum of the concentrations of the known inhibitors furfural and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), a good prediction of the maximum ethanol production rate could be obtained, regardless of the origin of the hydrolyzate. Furthermore, in hydrolyzates that fermented well, furfural and HMF were found to be taken up and converted by the yeast, concomitant with the uptake of glucose.

  16. Electrolytic nature of aqueous sulfuric acid. 2. Acidity.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2012-09-27

    In part 1 of this study, I reported that the Debye-Hückel limiting law and the smaller-ion shell (SiS) model of strong electrolyte solutions fit nicely with the experimental mean ionic activity coefficient (?(±)) of aqueous sulfuric acid as a function of concentration and of temperature when the acid is assumed to be a strong 1-3 electrolyte. Here, I report that the SiS-derived activity coefficient of H(+), ?(H(+)), of the 1-3 acid is comparable to that of aqueous HCl. This agrees with titration curves showing, as well-known, that sulfuric acid in water is parallel in strength to aqueous HCl. The calculated pH is in good accord with the Hammett acidity function, H(0), of aqueous sulfuric acid at low concentration, and differences between the two functions at high concentration are discussed and explained. This pH-H(0) relation is consistent with the literature showing that the H(0) of sulfuric acid (in the 1-9 M range) is similar to those of HCl and the other strong mineral monoprotic acids. The titration of aqueous sulfuric acid with NaOH does not agree with the known second dissociation constant of 0.010 23; rather, the constant is found to be ~0.32 and the acid behaves upon neutralization as a strong diprotic acid practically dissociating in one step. A plausible reaction pathway is offered to explain how the acid may transform, upon base neutralization, from a dissociated H(4)SO(5) (as 3H(+) and HSO(5)(3-)) to a dissociated H(2)SO(4) even though the equilibrium constant of the reaction H(+) + HSO(5)(3-) ? SO(4)(2-) + H(2)O, at 25 °C, is 10(-37) (part 1). PMID:22924595

  17. Uptake of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor in Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, M.

    2002-12-01

    The uptake of ethyl alcohol vapor in liquid sulfuric acid has been investigated over the composition range of 40 - 80 wt % H2SO4 and between the temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies were performed using a flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and possible reaction products, ethyl hydrogen sulfate and diethyl sulfate. The uptake coefficients (gamma) have been measured and found to vary from 0.018 to 0.065, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. For example, at concentrated acids greater than 70 wt % and dilute solutions (<70 wt %) colder than 210 K, the gamma values are approaching ~ 0.06. Under other conditions, the gamma values are smaller. The adsorption and thermal desorption measurements have been used to distinguish the possible uptake mechanisms, either solubility or reactive uptake. The results suggest that reactive uptakes are greater than 50 % under all conditions. For dilute acids, we also determine the effective Henry's law constants (H*). We will compare the results with the uptake of gaseous methyl alcohol and acetone in H2SO4 determined previously in our laboratory. The potential implications to the budget of ethyl alcohol in the global troposphere will also be discussed.

  18. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  19. Thin-film sulfuric acid anodizing as a replacement for chromic acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallenborn, K. J.; Emmons, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Chromic acid has long been used to produce a thin, corrosion resistant (Type I) coating on aluminum. Following anodizing, the hardware was sealed using a sodium dichromate solution. Sealing closes up pores inherent in the anodized coating, thus improving corrosion resistance. The thinness of the brittle coating is desirable from a fatigue standpoint, and chromium was absorbed by the coating during the sealing process, further improving corrosion resistance. Unfortunately, both chromic acid and sodium dichromate contain carcinogenic hexavalent chromium. Sulfuric acid is being considered as a replacement for chromic acid. Sulfuric acid of 10-20 percent concentration has traditionally been used to produce relatively thick (Types II and III) or abrasion resistant (Type III) coatings. A more dilute, that is five weight percent, sulfuric acid anodizing process, which produces a thinner coating than Type II or III, with nickel acetate as the sealant has been developed. The process was evaluated in regard to corrosion resistance, throwing power, fatigue life, and processing variable sensitivity, and shows promise as a replacement for the chromic acid process.

  20. 40 CFR 417.140 - Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids subcategory...SOURCE CATEGORY Neutralization of Sulfuric Acid Esters and Sulfonic Acids Subcategory...description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

  1. 40 CFR 417.140 - Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids subcategory...SOURCE CATEGORY Neutralization of Sulfuric Acid Esters and Sulfonic Acids Subcategory...description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

  2. Thermodynamics of electrolytes. 7. Sulfuric acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth S. Pitzer; Rabindra N. Roy; Leonard F. Silvester

    1977-01-01

    Although the thermodynamic properties of sulfuric acid above 0.1 M and near 25°C are well established numerically, they have not been represented accurately by equations which are based upon the ionic species present, H\\/sup +\\/, HSOâ⁻, and SOâ\\/sup 2 -\\/. We have developed and fitted such equations over the range from 0 to 6 M in a system compatible with

  3. Neutralization of sulfuric acid aerosol by ammonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Huntzicker; Robert A. Cary; Chaur-Sun. Ling

    1980-01-01

    The rate of neutralization of sulfuric acid aerosol by ammonia gas has been measured in a laboratory flow reactor for particle diameters between 0.3 and 1.4 micrometers and for relative humidities between 8 and 80%. The rates were between 21 and 70% of the rates expected if diffusion of NHâ to the aerosol droplets was the rate-determining factor, and the

  4. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Sulfurous Acid in an Aqueous Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Alicia; Hernandez, Willie; Suarez, Marco F.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of some parameters on sulfurous acid and sulfur oxidation kinetics such as initial concentration of sulfurous acid, oxygen, TiO[2] crystalline concentration, the power of black light, and quantity of TiO[2] is investigated. The experiments can be performed in an undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory with an inexpensive…

  5. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section 153...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as prescribed...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated sulfuric...

  6. Two-stage dilute acid prehydrolysis of biomass

    DOEpatents

    Grohmann, Karel (Winter Haven, FL); Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO)

    1992-01-01

    A two-stage dilute acid prehydrolysis process on xylan containing hemicellulose in biomass is effected by: treating feedstock of hemicellulosic material comprising xylan that is slow hydrolyzable and xylan that is fast hydrolyzable under predetermined low temperature conditions with a dilute acid for a residence time sufficient to hydrolyze the fast hydrolyzable xylan to xylose; removing said xylose from said fast hydrolyzable xylan and leaving a residue; and treating said residue having a slow hydrolyzable xylan with a dilute acid under predetermined high temperature conditions for a residence time required to hydrolyze said slow hydrolyzable xylan to xylose.

  7. Production of gypsum hemihydrate with waste heat, aqueous H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and sulfuric acid salts

    SciTech Connect

    Quante, H.

    1984-02-21

    Alpha gypsum hemihydrate is obtained by calcining calcium sulfate dihydrate, generated with flue-gas desulfurization of power plants or by chemical process, e.g. in the production of phosphoric acid. The calcining process comprises producing initially a dispersion from calcium sulfate dihydrate and diluted, sulfuric acid solution and heating same at a predetermined rate to about 373 K with industrial dust-free waste heat, whereupon the solid components are separated from the aqueous sulfuric acid and are dried. An alpha gypsum hemihydrate practically free from anhydrite II is obtained from a solution of sulfuric salts in the diluted sulfuric acid. An addition of magnesium oxide yields a hemihydrate with a high degree of fineness and avoids blooming effects.

  8. Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols

    E-print Network

    Robock, Alan

    aerosols can potentially result in an increase in acid deposition. [4] Acid rain has been studiedSulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols Ben Kravitz,1 Alan limit of hydration of all sulfate aerosols into sulfuric acid. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2

  9. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol\\/condensable emissions,

  10. FTIR studies of low temperature sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, S. E.; Tisdale, R. T.; Disselkamp, R. S.; Tolbert, M. A.; Wilson, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Sub-micrometer sized sulfuric acid H2SO4 particles were generated using a constant output atomizer source. The particles were then exposed to water vapor before being injected into a low temperature cell. Multipass transmission Fourier Transformation Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the phase and composition of the aerosols as a function of time for periods of up to five hours. Binary H2SO4H2O aerosols with compositions from 35 to 95 wt % H2SO4 remained liquid for over 3 hours at room temperatures ranging from 189-240 K. These results suggest that it is very difficut to freeze SSAs via homogeneous nucleation. Attempts to form aerosols more dilute than 35 wt % H2SO4 resulted in ice formation.

  11. Infrared titration of aqueous sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Max, J.J.; Menichelli, C.; Chapados, C.

    2000-03-30

    This paper presents the infrared (IR) titration of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions (0.50 M) obtained by the attenuated total reflection (ATR) sampling technique. After subtracting the water spectra, the spectra of the ionic species of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the 0--14 pH range were separated by factor analysis (FA) which also gave their abundance. The results were in agreement with the theoretical calculation of the distribution of the species. Three sulfate species were found: HSO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and HSO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}/HCl. The latter stands for the bisulfate--hydronium complex formed by the addition of HCl to obtain measurements in the 0--0.47 pH range. For 0.50 M sulfuric acid, the comparison between the experimentally IR-determined quantities and the theoretical values gave a mean activity coefficient of 0.12 {+-} 0.04, a value comparable to that from electrochemical measurements. Three types of water were quantitatively determined in the solutions: acidic water, basic water, and neutral water. The latter is always present while the two others are present in the low and high pH range, respectively. Another type of water strongly associated with the sulfates is also present. Moreover, knowledge of the behavior of the different types of water as the titration proceeded permitted us to give the details of the neutralization reactions of aqueous sulfuric acid by sodium hydroxide.

  12. Determination of trace sulfur in biodiesel and diesel standard reference materials by isotope dilution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amais, Renata S; Long, Stephen E; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Christopher, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    A method is described for quantification of sulfur at low concentrations on the order of mgkg(-1) in biodiesel and diesel fuels using isotope dilution and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-SF-ICP-MS). Closed vessel microwave-assisted digestion was employed using a diluted nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide decomposition medium to reduce sample dilution volumes. Medium resolution mode was employed to eliminate isobaric interferences at (32)S and (34)S related to polyatomic phosphorus and oxygen species, and sulfur hydride species. The method outlined yielded respective limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.7 mg kg(-1) S and 2.5 mg kg(-1) S (in the sample). The LOD was constrained by instrument background counts at (32)S but was sufficient to facilitate value assignment of total S mass fraction in NIST SRM 2723b Sulfur in Diesel Fuel Oil at 9.06±0.13 mg kg(-1). No statistically significant difference at a 95% confidence level was observed between the measured and certified values for certified reference materials NIST SRM 2773 B100 Biodiesel (Animal-Based), CENAM DRM 272b and NIST SRM 2723a Sulfur in Diesel Fuel Oil, validating method accuracy. PMID:24331043

  13. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura T. Iraci; Ann M. Middlebrook; Margaret A. Wilson; Margaret A. Tolbert

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] Torr H[sub 2]O and 1-2.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] Torr HNO[sub 3]) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. FTIR spectroscopy was used to

  14. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) with oxygen and mixing the resultant sulfur trioxide (SO3 ) with water, or by reacting nitric oxide (NO) with sulfur dioxide and water. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food...

  15. SULFURIC ACID RAIN EFFECTS ON CROP YIELD AND FOLIAR INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to determine the relative sensitivity of major U.S. crops to sulfuric acid rain. Plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions and exposed to simulated acid rain of three sulfuric acid concentrations (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.0) or to a control rain (pH...

  16. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 68636878 Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles

    E-print Network

    Elrod, Matthew J.

    Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 6863­6878 Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid the uptake of gas- phase hexanal into ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols. While both deliquesced condensation product was formed only at initial concentrations of 75­96 wt% sulfuric acid in water

  17. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  18. High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

  19. A sulfuric-lactic acid process for efficient purification of fungal chitosan with intact molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Naghdi, Mitra; Zamani, Akram; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2014-02-01

    The most recent method of fungal chitosan purification, i.e., two steps of dilute sulfuric acid treatment, pretreatment of cell wall at room temperature for phosphate removal and extraction of chitosan from the phosphate free cell wall at high temperature, significantly reduces the chitosan molecular weight. This study was aimed at improvement of this method. In the pretreatment step, to choose the best conditions, cell wall of Rhizopus oryzae, containing 9% phosphate, 10% glucosamine, and 21% N-acetyl glucosamine, was treated with sulfuric, lactic, acetic, nitric, or hydrochloric acid, at room temperature. Sulfuric acid showed the best performance in phosphate removal (90%) and cell wall recovery (89%). To avoid depolymerisation of chitosan, hot sulfuric acid extraction was replaced with lactic acid treatment at room temperature, and a pure fungal chitosan was obtained (0.12 g/g cell wall). Similar pretreatment and extraction processes were conducted on pure shrimp chitosan and resulted in a chitosan recovery of higher than 87% while the reduction of chitosan viscosity was less than 15%. Therefore, the sulfuric-lactic acid method purified the fungal chitosan without significant molecular weight manipulation. PMID:24211428

  20. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Maarten J Kootstra; H.H. Beeftink; Elinor L Scott; Johan PM Sanders

    2009-01-01

    Background - In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glucose benefits from improved enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw solids; (2) xylose benefits from

  1. GENERATION OF SULFURIC ACID AEROSOLS FOR HEALTH EFFECT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A generator has been developed and constructed for producing sulfuric acid aerosols at 330 liters per minute to an animal exposure chamber of 330 liters internal volume. Sulfuric acid concentrations in the chamber range from 0.13 to 1.3 mg/cu m. Geometrical mean volume diameters ...

  2. Sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin McGouldrick; Owen B. Toon; David H. Grinspoon

    2011-01-01

    Clouds and hazes composed of sulfuric acid are observed to exist or postulated to have once existed on each of the terrestrial planets with atmospheres in our solar system. Venus today maintains a global cover of clouds composed of a sulfuric acid\\/water solution that extends in altitude from roughly 50 km to roughly 80 km. Terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs)

  3. Sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin McGouldrick; Owen B. Toon; David H. Grinspoon

    2011-01-01

    Clouds and hazes composed of sulfuric acid are observed to exist or postulated to have once existed on each of the terrestrial planets with atmospheres in our solar system. Venus today maintains a global cover of clouds composed of a sulfuric acid\\/water solution that extends in altitude from roughly 50km to roughly 80km. Terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form on

  4. NUTRITIONAL AND FUNCTIONAL IMPORTANCE OF INTESTINAL SULFUR AMINO ACID METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of sulfur amino acids, methionine and cysteine, has been linked to several key aspects of human health and cellular function. In addition, the metabolism of dietary amino acids by the gastrointestinal tract is nutritionally important for normal function. In the case of sulfur amino ac...

  5. Solubility of HCL in sulfuric acid at stratospheric temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.; Golden, D.M.

    1993-10-22

    The solubility of HCl in sulfuric acid was measured using a Knudsen cell technique. Effective Henry's law constants are reported for sulfuric acid concentrations between 50 and 60 weight percent and for temperatures between 220 and 230 K. The measured values indicate that very little HCl will be dissolved in the stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles.

  6. Solubility of HCL in sulfuric acid at stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Leah R.; Golden, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The solubility of HCl in sulfuric acid was measured using a Knudsen cell technique. Effective Henry's law constants are reported for sulfuric acid concentrations between 50 and 60 weight percent and for temperatures between 220 and 230 K. The measured values indicate that very little HCl will be dissolved in the stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles.

  7. 40 CFR 721.7770 - Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt. 721.7770 Section 721.7770 ...sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt (PMN P-92-396) is subject to...

  8. 40 CFR 721.7770 - Alkylphenoxypoly(oxyethylene) sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt. 721.7770 Section 721.7770 ...sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...sulfuric acid ester, substituted amine salt (PMN P-92-396) is subject to...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement...From Tolerances § 180.1019 Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement...tolerance. (a) Residues of sulfuric acid are exempted from the...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement...From Tolerances § 180.1019 Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement...tolerance. (a) Residues of sulfuric acid are exempted from the...

  11. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated...

  12. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement...From Tolerances § 180.1019 Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement...tolerance. (a) Residues of sulfuric acid are exempted from the...

  14. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated...

  15. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated...

  16. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  17. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R. [Matheson Gas Products, Montgomeryville, PA (United States); Dunn, C. [Environics, Inc., Tolland, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  18. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  19. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  20. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-08-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  1. Temperature dependency of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Moshaii, A; Tajik-Nezhad, S; Faraji, M

    2011-10-01

    Using a hydrochemical simulation, temperature dependency of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SL) in a concentrated solution of sulfuric acid has theoretically been studied. With calculating the phase diagrams of an SL bubble in the solution of 85% acid, maximum acquirable SL emissions at different ambient temperatures were calculated. The results show that the SL emission in sulfuric acid increases with increment in the ambient temperature. This temperature dependency is in opposition to that observed in experiments for SL in water. The difference originates from different instability mechanisms determining the ultimate phase parameters of SL in water and sulfuric acid. In water, due to the smallness of viscosity, the ultimate phase parameters are determined by the shape instability. However, in sulfuric acid the phase parameters are restricted by positional instability due to the largeness of the liquid viscosity. PMID:22181255

  2. Temperature dependency of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshaii, A.; Tajik-Nezhad, S.; Faraji, M.

    2011-10-01

    Using a hydrochemical simulation, temperature dependency of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SL) in a concentrated solution of sulfuric acid has theoretically been studied. With calculating the phase diagrams of an SL bubble in the solution of 85% acid, maximum acquirable SL emissions at different ambient temperatures were calculated. The results show that the SL emission in sulfuric acid increases with increment in the ambient temperature. This temperature dependency is in opposition to that observed in experiments for SL in water. The difference originates from different instability mechanisms determining the ultimate phase parameters of SL in water and sulfuric acid. In water, due to the smallness of viscosity, the ultimate phase parameters are determined by the shape instability. However, in sulfuric acid the phase parameters are restricted by positional instability due to the largeness of the liquid viscosity.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A PORTABLE DEVICE TO COLLECT SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative, interference-free method for collecting sulfuric acid aerosol on a filter was developed and field tested. Since previous research found that severe losses of sulfuric aicd were caused by ammonia, ambient particulate material, and other interferents, a method was n...

  4. Integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer for sulfuric acid decomposition

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert (Edgewood, NM); Pickard, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Parma, Jr., Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Gelbard, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Lenard, Roger X. (Edgewood, NM)

    2010-01-12

    A method and apparatus, constructed of ceramics and other corrosion resistant materials, for decomposing sulfuric acid into sulfur dioxide, oxygen and water using an integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer unit comprising a bayonet-type, dual-tube, counter-flow heat exchanger with a catalytic insert and a central baffle to increase recuperation efficiency.

  5. Monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass: modeling of dilute acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Juan G; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Roberto, Inês C; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-12-01

    Statistical modeling and optimization of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass has been performed using response surface methodology. Central composite rotatable design was applied to assess the effect of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature on efficiency and selectivity of hemicellulosic monomeric carbohydrates to d-xylose. Second-order polynomial model was fitted to experimental data to find the optimum reaction conditions by multiple regression analysis. The monomeric d-xylose recovery 85% (as predicted by the model) was achieved under optimized hydrolysis conditions (1.27% acid concentration, 96.5°C and 138 min), confirming the high validity of the developed model. The content of d-glucose (8.3%) and monosaccharide degradation products (0.1% furfural and 0.04% 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) provided a high quality subtract, ready for subsequent biochemical conversion to value-added products. PMID:24096282

  6. Compact regenerable sulfur scrubber for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giner, Jose; Cropley, Cecelia C.

    1987-11-01

    Technology for the direct desulfurization of unprocessed diesel fuel using regenerable copper-based mixed metal oxide sorbents was developed for incorporation in modular phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) generators. Removal of greater than 60 percent of the sulfur in diesel fuel was demonstrated, and sorbent sulfur loadings of approximately 1 wt percent were attained. Preliminary studies indicated that the sorbents are regenerable, with up to 70 percent of the sorbed sulfur removed during regeneration. Incorporation of this technology into a PAFC power plant should reduce the weight of the sulfur removal unit by a minimum of 25 percent.

  7. Sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGouldrick, Kevin; Toon, Owen B.; Grinspoon, David H.

    2011-08-01

    Clouds and hazes composed of sulfuric acid are observed to exist or postulated to have once existed on each of the terrestrial planets with atmospheres in our solar system. Venus today maintains a global cover of clouds composed of a sulfuric acid/water solution that extends in altitude from roughly 50 km to roughly 80 km. Terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form on stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols, and both PSCs and stratospheric aerosols play a critical role in the formation of the ozone hole. Stratospheric aerosols can modify the climate when they are enhanced following volcanic eruptions, and are a current focus for geoengineering studies. Rain is made more acidic by sulfuric acid originating from sulfur dioxide generated by industry on Earth. Analysis of the sulfur content of Martian rocks has led to the hypothesis that an early Martian atmosphere, rich in SO 2 and H 2O, could support a sulfur-infused hydrological cycle. Here we consider the plausibility of frozen sulfuric acid in the upper clouds of Venus, which could lead to lightning generation, with implications for observations by the European Space Agency's Venus Express and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Venus Climate Orbiter (also known as Akatsuki). We also present simulations of a sulfur-rich early Martian atmosphere. We find that about 40 cm/yr of precipitation having a pH of about 2.0 could fall in an early Martian atmosphere, assuming a surface temperature of 273 K, and SO 2 generation rates consistent with the formation of Tharsis. This modeled acid rain is a powerful sink for SO 2, quickly removing it and preventing it from having a significant greenhouse effect.

  8. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  9. Interaction of two oscillating sonoluminescence bubbles in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa; Mirheydari, Mona

    2010-07-01

    The mutual interaction of two oscillating gas bubbles in different concentrations of sulfuric acid is numerically investigated. A nonlinear oscillation for spherical symmetric bubbles with equilibrium radii smaller than 10 ?m at a frequency of 37 kHz in a strong driving acoustical field P(a)=1.8 bar is assumed. The calculations are based on the investigation of the secondary Bjerknes force with regard to adiabatic model for the bubble interior which appears as repulsion or attraction interaction force. In this work the influence of the various concentrations of sulfuric acid in uncoupled and coupled distances between bubbles has been investigated. It is found that the sign and value of the secondary Bjerknes force depend on the sulfuric acid viscosity and its amount would be decreased by liquid viscosity enhancement. The results show that big change in the parameters of produced bubbles occurs in the sulfuric acid with concentrations from 65% to 85%. PMID:20866734

  10. Pressure leaching of metals from waste printed circuit boards using sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Manis K.; Lee, Jae-Chun; Kumari, Archana; Choubey, Pankaj K.; Kumar, Vinay; Jeong, Jinki

    2011-08-01

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are essential components of electronic equipments which contain various metallic values. This paper reports a hydrometallurgical recycling process for waste PCBs, which consists of the novel pretreatment consisting of organic swelling of PCBs followed by sulfuric acid leaching of metals from waste PCBs. To recycle the waste PCBs, experiments were carried out for the recovery of copper from the crushed and organic swelled materials of waste PCBs using sulfuric acid leaching in presence of hydrogen peroxide under atmospheric and pressure condition. The leaching of PCBs at 90°C, pulp density 100 g/L under atmospheric condition, using 6M sulfuric acid resulted in the dissolution of a minor amount of copper due to the presence of plastic coating on the surface of metallic layers. On the other hand, when the liberated metal sheets from organic swelled PCBs were treated with dilute sulfuric acid of concentration 2M along with hydrogen peroxide in an autoclave under oxygen atmosphere, the percentage recovery of copper was found to increase from 59.63% to 97.01% with an increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration from 5 to 15% (v/v) keeping constant pulp density 30 g/L.

  11. Tested Demonstrations: Color Oscillations in the Formic Acid-Nitric Acid-Sulfuric Acid System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raw, C. J. G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presented are procedures for demonstrating the production of color oscillations when nitric acid is added to a formic acid/concentrated sulfuric acid mixture. Because of safety considerations, "Super-8" home movie of the color changes was found to be satisfactory for demonstration purposes. (JN)

  12. 40 CFR 417.140 - Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids subcategory. 417.140 Section 417.140 Protection...POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Neutralization of Sulfuric Acid Esters and Sulfonic Acids Subcategory §...

  13. PROJECTION OF 1985 MARKET POTENTIAL FOR FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) BYPRODUCT SULFUR AND SULFURIC ACID IN THE U.S

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report projects the 1985 market potential for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproduct sulfur and sulfuric acid in the U.S. The projection is 165,000 tons of sulfur from 11 power plants and 554,000 tons of acid from 6 power plants, with a combined benefit to the affected indu...

  14. Molecular interaction of pinic acid with sulfuric acid: exploring the thermodynamic landscape of cluster growth.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Kurtén, Theo; Bilde, Merete; Mikkelsen, Kurt V

    2014-09-11

    We investigate the molecular interactions between the semivolatile ?-pinene oxidation product pinic acid and sulfuric acid using computational methods. The stepwise Gibbs free energies of formation have been calculated utilizing the M06-2X functional, and the stability of the clusters is evaluated from the corresponding ?G values. The first two additions of sulfuric acid to pinic acid are found to be favorable with ?G values of -9.06 and -10.41 kcal/mol. Addition of a third sulfuric acid molecule is less favorable and leads to a structural rearrangement forming a bridged sulfuric acid-pinic acid cluster. The involvement of more than one pinic acid molecule in a single cluster is observed to lead to the formation of favorable (pinic acid)2(H2SO4) and (pinic acid)2(H2SO4)2 clusters. The identified most favorable growth paths starting from a single pinic acid molecule lead to closed structures without the further possibility for attachment of either sulfuric acid or pinic acid. This suggests that pinic acid cannot be a key species in the first steps in nucleation, but the favorable interactions between sulfuric acid and pinic acid imply that pinic acid can contribute to the subsequent growth of an existing nucleus by condensation. PMID:24988284

  15. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glucose benefits from improved enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw solids; (2) xylose benefits from the solubilization of xylan to the liquid phase during the pretreatment; (3) maleic acid replenishment costs; (4) neutralization costs of pretreated material; (5) costs due to furfural production; and (6) heating costs of the input materials. For each response factor, experimental data were fitted mathematically. After data translation to €/Mg dry straw, determining the relative contribution of each response factor, an economic optimization was calculated within the limits of the design variables. Results When costs are disregarded, an almost complete glucan conversion to glucose can be reached (90% from solids, 7%-10% in liquid), after enzymatic hydrolysis. During the pretreatment, up to 90% of all xylan is converted to monomeric xylose. Taking cost factors into account, the optimal process conditions are: 50 min at 170°C, with 46 mM maleic acid, resulting in a yield of 65 €/Mg (megagram = metric ton) dry straw, consisting of 68 €/Mg glucose benefits (from solids: 85% of all glucan), 17 €/Mg xylose benefits (from liquid: 80% of all xylan), 17 €/Mg maleic acid costs, 2.0 €/Mg heating costs and 0.68 €/Mg NaOH costs. In all but the most severe of the studied conditions, furfural formation was so limited that associated costs are considered negligible. Conclusions After the dilute maleic acid pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, almost complete conversion of wheat straw glucan and xylan is possible. Taking maleic acid replenishment, heating, neutralization and furfural formation into account, the optimum in the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw in this study is 65 €/Mg dry feedstock. This is reached when process conditions are: 50 min at 170°C, with a maleic acid concentration of 46 mM. Maleic acid replenishment is the most important of the studied cost factors. PMID:20025730

  16. Bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated sorghum bagasse to ethanol by Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Dogaris, Ioannis; Gkounta, Olga; Mamma, Diomi; Kekos, Dimitris

    2012-07-01

    Bioethanol production from sweet sorghum bagasse (SB), the lignocellulosic solid residue obtained after extraction of sugars from sorghum stalks, can further improve the energy yield of the crop. The aim of the present work was to evaluate a cost-efficient bioconversion of SB to ethanol at high solids loadings (16 % at pretreatment and 8 % at fermentation), low cellulase activities (1-7 FPU/g SB) and co-fermentation of hexoses and pentoses. The fungus Neurospora crassa DSM 1129 was used, which exhibits both depolymerase and co-fermentative ability, as well as mixed cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2541. A dilute-acid pretreatment (sulfuric acid 2 g/100 g SB; 210 °C; 10 min) was implemented, with high hemicellulose decomposition and low inhibitor formation. The bioconversion efficiency of N. crassa was superior to S. cerevisiae, while their mixed cultures had negative effect on ethanol production. Supplementing the in situ produced N. crassa cellulolytic system (1.0 FPU/g SB) with commercial cellulase and ?-glucosidase mixture at low activity (6.0 FPU/g SB) increased ethanol production to 27.6 g/l or 84.7 % of theoretical yield (based on SB cellulose and hemicellulose sugar content). The combined dilute-acid pretreatment and bioconversion led to maximum cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis 73.3 % and 89.6 %, respectively. PMID:22573272

  17. Sulfuric Acid Influence on the Nitrocompounds Detonation Reactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Gamezo; S. M. Khoroshev; B. N. Kondrikov; G. D. Kozak

    1995-01-01

    The detonation failure diameter df and detonation velocity D of mixtures of nitromethane, trinitrotoluene, dinitrotoluene, and trinitrobenzene with sulfiric acid and oleum have been measured in the wide range of concentrations It was shown that the detonation ability of the nitrocompounds depends significantly on the sulfuric acid content The minimum value of df for the mixture TNTIoleum is about 2

  18. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    A series of perhalocarbons are proposed as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production that involve direct contact of the fluid with sulfuric acid and vaporization of the acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids are described and the results of some preliminary high temperature test data are presented.

  19. INTESTINAL SULFUR AMINO ACID METABOLISM IN NEONATAL PIGLETS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Methionine (Met) is an essential sulfur amino acid that functions as a key precursor for the synthesis of homocysteine and cysteine, via transmethylation (TM) and transsulfuration (TS), respectively. Cysteine is a semi-essential amino acid in neonates.We previously showed that significan...

  20. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar bark by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Jae Taek; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Kim, Ung-Jin; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Gon Wi, Seung; Cho, Jae-Young

    2012-08-01

    Pretreatment of poplar bark with a combination of sulfuric acid (3%, w/w, H2SO4) and gamma irradiation (0-1000 kGy) was performed in an attempt to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The yields of reducing sugar were slightly increased with an increasing irradiation dose, ranging from 35.4% to 51.5%, with a 56.1% reducing sugar yield observed after dilute acid pretreatment. These results clearly showed that soluble sugars were released faster and to a greater extent in dilute acid-pretreated poplar bark than in gamma irradiation-pretreated bark. When combined pretreatment was carried out, a drastic increase in reducing sugar yield (83.1%) was found compared with individual pretreatment, indicating the possibility of increasing the convertibility of poplar bark following combined pretreatment. These findings are likely associated with cellulose crystallinity, lignin modification, and removal of hemicelluloses.

  1. CAPSULE REPORT: RECOVERY OF SPENT SULFURIC ACID FROM STEEL PICKLING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides small manufacturers using sulfuric acid pickling with the technical and economic information necessary to select the most appropriate treatment technologies for recovering or treating their sulfuric acid. reatment alternatives include recovery of the acid, ne...

  2. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Hong, Sung; Taek Lee, Jae; Lee, Sungbeom; Gon Wi, Seung; Ju Cho, Eun; Singh, Sudhir; Sik Lee, Seung; Yeoup Chung, Byung

    2014-01-01

    Pretreating wheat straw with a combination of dilute acid and gamma irradiation was performed in an attempt to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The glucose yield was significantly affected by combined pretreatment (3% sulfuric acid-gamma irradiation), compared with untreated wheat straw and individual pretreatment. The increasing enzymatic hydrolysis after combined pretreatment is resulting from decrease in crystallinity of cellulose, loss of hemicelluloses, and removal or modification of lignin. Therefore, combined pretreatment is one of the most effective methods for enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw biomass.

  3. Air pollution and asthma: clinical studies with sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Frampton, M.W.; Morrow, P.E. (University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Until recently, acid deposition has been widely considered a serious ecological problem but not a threat to human health. The controlled clinical study is an important approach in linking acidic aerosol inhalation with respiratory effects. Asthmatic patients represent a subpopulation most responsive to sulfuric acid aerosols. In a series of studies with asthmatic volunteers, several factors have been identified that may modulate the intensity of the bronchoconstrictor response to inhaled acidic aerosols. We found (1) enhancement of the bronchoconstrictor response during exercise, (2) the more acidic aerosols provoke the greatest changes in lung function, and (3) mitigation of airway responses during sulfuric acid aerosol inhalation caused by high respiratory ammonia concentrations. Additional factors influencing responsiveness await identification.

  4. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  5. Stagewise dilute-acid pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis of distillers' grains and corn fiber.

    PubMed

    Noureddini, Hossein; Byun, Jongwon; Yu, Ta-Jen

    2009-11-01

    Distillers' grains and corn fiber are the coproducts of the corn dry grind and wet milling industries, respectively. Availability of distillers' grains and corn fiber at the ethanol plant and their high levels of lignocellulosic material make these coproducts attractive feedstocks for conversion to ethanol. In this study, dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of these coproducts was investigated in a multistage scheme. After the completion of each pretreatment stage, the liquid substrate was separated and reused in the succeeding pretreatment stage with a fresh substrate. The substrate from each stage was also subjected to enzyme hydrolysis in a separate experiment. The sulfuric acid concentration and the substrate loading were maintained at 1.0 vol% and 15.0 wt.%, respectively, and the temperature was maintained at 120 degrees C in all the experiments. Experiments were also performed to study the effect of removing oil from the samples prior to the pretreatment. The highest concentration of monomeric sugars (MS) was observed when three stages of pretreatment were followed by the enzyme reaction. The enzyme hydrolysis of the three-stage pretreated dried distillers' grains and corn fiber yielded 122.6 +/- 5.8 and 184.5 +/- 4.1 mg/mL of MS, respectively. The formation of inhibitory products was also monitored. PMID:19247589

  6. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    This document summarizes progress on the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2000 through September 30, 2000. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid will also be determined, as will the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NOX selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), First Energy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the second reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, the first of four short-term sorbent injection tests were conducted at the First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant. This test determined the effectiveness of dolomite injection through out-of-service burners as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from this unit. The tests showed that dolomite injection could achieve up to 95% sulfuric acid removal. Balance of plant impacts on furnace slagging and fouling, air heater fouling, ash loss-on-ignition, and the flue gas desulfurization system were also determined. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

  7. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 23. SULFUR, SULFUR OXIDES AND SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The sulfur indus...

  8. Multivariate analysis of homogeneous nucleation rate measurements. Nucleation in the p-toluic acid/sulfuric acid/water system

    E-print Network

    Multivariate analysis of homogeneous nucleation rate measurements. Nucleation in the p-toluic acid/sulfuric is applied to recent measurements by Zhang et al. Science 304, 1487 2004 on the p-toluic acid/sulfuric acid exclusively to binary sulfuric acid-water nucle- ation. More recent studies support the binary mechanism

  9. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  10. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  11. A TUNABLE DIODE LASER STACK MONITOR FOR SULFURIC ACID VAPOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field prototype instrument for continuous in-situ monitoring of sulfuric acid vapor in industrial smoke stacks has been developed. The method of detection is dual wavelength differential absorption in the infrared. Two tunable diode lasers are locked to two specific frequencies...

  12. Heat-Exchange Fluids for Sulfuric Acid Vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Some fluorine-substituted organic materials meet criteria for heat-exchange fluids in contact with sulfuric acid. Most promising of these are perfluoropropylene oxide polymers with degree of polymerization (DP) between 10 and 50. It is desirable to have DP in high range because vapor pressure of material decreases as DP increases, and high-DP liquids have lower loss due to vaporization.

  13. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of liquids have been screened as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles that involve the vaporization of sulfuric acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids is described with the results of some preliminary high temperature test data presented.

  14. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  15. Parameterizations for sulfuric acid\\/water nucleation rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markku Kulmala; Ari Laaksonen; Liisa Pirjola

    1998-01-01

    We present parametrized equations for calculation of sulfuric acid\\/water critical nucleus compositions and homogeneous nucleation rates. The parameterizations are in agreement with the thermodynamically consistent version of classical binary homogeneous nucleation theory [Wilemski, 1984] incorporating the hydration effect. The new parameterizations produce nucleation rates that differ by several orders of magnitude from the rates predicted by other parameterizations available in

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...concentration of 77.5 percent (1.7019 specific gravity) (59.8° Baumé) or greater concentrations...sulfuric acid, may be transported in unlined gravity type cargo tanks or unlined pressure vessel...concentration of 65.25 percent (1.559 specific gravity) (52° Baumé) or greater...

  17. EPA'S CATALYST RESEARCH PROGRAM: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF SULFURIC ACID EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sulfuric acid review conference sponsored by EPA's automotive Catalyst Research Program was held recently at Hendersonville, NC, for researchers whose work is funded by EPA. Emissions characterization research indicated that in-use catalyst-equipped vehicles emit low levels of ...

  18. Dissolution, speciation, and reaction of acetaldehyde in cold sulfuric acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca R. Michelsen; Samantha F. M. Ashbourn; Laura T. Iraci

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of gas-phase acetaldehyde [CH3CHO, ethanal] by aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was studied under upper tropospheric\\/lower stratospheric (UT\\/LS) conditions. The solubility of acetaldehyde was found to be low, between 2 × 102 M atm?1 and 1.5 × 105 M atm?1 under the ranges of temperature (211–241 K) and acid composition (39–76 weight percent, wt%, H2SO4) studied. Under most conditions,

  19. Dissolution, speciation, and reaction of acetaldehyde in cold sulfuric acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca R. Michelsen; Samantha F. M. Ashbourn; Laura T. Iraci

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of gas-phase acetaldehyde [CH3CHO, ethanal] by aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was studied under upper tropospheric\\/lower stratospheric (UT\\/LS) conditions. The solubility of acetaldehyde was found to be low, between 2 × 102 M atm-1 and 1.5 × 105 M atm-1 under the ranges of temperature (211-241 K) and acid composition (39-76 weight percent, wt%, H2SO4) studied. Under most conditions,

  20. Refining of oxidation product without alkali and sulfuric acid in the manufacture of synthetic fatty acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Moshkin; N. B. Rapoport; M. A. Soskin

    1965-01-01

    In the existing technology, the free and esterified fatty acids are saponified and converted into the sodium salts by treating them first with calcined and then with caustic soda. After the primary and secondary nonsaponifiable substances have been removed, the sodium salts in the soap paste are decomposed with sulfuric acid, so that the acids are liberated. The free acids

  1. Correction to "Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols"

    E-print Network

    Robock, Alan

    Correction to "Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols (2010), Correction to "Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols," J. Geophys. Res., 115, D16119, doi:10.1029/2010JD014579. [1] In the paper "Sulfuric acid deposition

  2. Effective Diffusion Coefficients for Methanol in Sulfuric Acid Solutions Measured by Raman Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Effective Diffusion Coefficients for Methanol in Sulfuric Acid Solutions Measured by Raman % sulfuric acid solutions was followed using Raman spectroscopy. Because methanol reacts to form protonated that the speciation of both methanol and sulfuric acid may be important in determining these transport coefficients

  3. The role of cluster energy nonaccommodation in atmospheric sulfuric acid Theo Kurtn,1,a

    E-print Network

    The role of cluster energy nonaccommodation in atmospheric sulfuric acid nucleation Theo Kurtén,1,a formation due to liberated excess energy in atmospheric nucleation processes involving sulfuric acid for small sulfuric acid-- containing clusters. We find that energy nonaccommodation effects may, at most

  4. UPTAKE OF SHORT-CHAIN ALCOHOLS BY SULFURIC ACID SOLUTIONS USING RAMAN AND VIBRATIONAL SUM FREQUENCY

    E-print Network

    UPTAKE OF SHORT-CHAIN ALCOHOLS BY SULFURIC ACID SOLUTIONS USING RAMAN AND VIBRATIONAL SUM FREQUENCY-liquid interface of 0 to 96.5 wt% sulfuric acid (SA) solutions has been observed directly using vibrational sum in either the neat methanol or concentrated sulfuric acid spectra. This peak is attributed to the singly

  5. Modeling of Water-rock interaction in the Mackenzie Basin: competition between sulfuric and carbonic acids

    E-print Network

    sulfuric and carbonic acids E. Beaulieu, Y. Godd´eris, D. Labat, C. Roelandt, D. Calmels, J. Gail- lardet in the Mackenzie Basin: competition between sulfuric and carbonic acids. E. Beaulieu1 , Y. Goddéris1 , D. Labat1, a simulation is performed removing the contribution of sulfuric acid to the weathering system. The main

  6. SEMI-BATCH PRECIPITATION OF CALCIUM SULFATE DIHYDRATE FROM CALCITE AND SULFURIC ACID

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SEMI-BATCH PRECIPITATION OF CALCIUM SULFATE DIHYDRATE FROM CALCITE AND SULFURIC ACID Frédéric BARD1 a calcite suspension to a sulfuric acid solution from industrial waste. The morphology of the precipitated, sulfuric acid, industrial waste. 1. INTRODUCTION Gypsum is a mineral compound of first importance

  7. The East Penn process for recycling sulfuric acid from lead-acid batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Leiby, R.; Bricker, M. [East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc., Lyon Station, PA (United States); Spitz, R. [Spitz (R.), Holbrook, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Prior to March 1992, the only component of the lead-acid battery that was not recycled by East Penn Manufacturing Company was the sulfuric acid electrolyte. This acid was unusable in new batteries because the iron level was found to exceed new product specifications. The development of a liquid ion exchange process to remove the iron from the acid allows East Penn to currently recover over three million gallons of sulfuric acid annually. The process is based upon the use of an iron selective liquid ion exchange material or solvent to extract iron from the sulfuric acid electrolyte followed by regeneration of the solvent. Equilibrium and kinetic data for the extraction and regeneration steps were collected in order to scale up the process to commercial scale. An electrochemical process for the treatment of the acid used in the regeneration step was also developed which significantly reduces the volume of strip acid required in the process.

  8. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    A test program is being sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPRI, FirstEnergy, and TVA to investigate furnace injection of alkaline sorbents as a means of reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in the flue gas from coal-fired boilers. This test program is being conducted at the FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP), although later testing will be conducted at a TVA plant. A sorbent injection test was conducted the week of April 18, 2000. The test was the first of several short-term (one- to two-week duration) tests to investigate the effectiveness of various alkaline sorbents for sulfuric acid control and the effects of these sorbents on boiler equipment performance. This first short-term test investigated the effect of injecting dry dolomite powder (CaCO{sub 3} {center_dot} MgCO{sub 3}), a mineral similar to limestone, into the furnace of Unit 2. During the test program, various analytical techniques were used to assess the effects of sorbent injection. These primarily included sampling with the controlled condensation system (CCS) for determining flue gas SO{sub 3} content and an acid dew-point (ADP) meter for determining the sulfuric acid dew point (and, indirectly, the concentration of sulfuric acid) of the flue gas. EPA Reference Method 26a was used for determining hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), as well and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and fluorine (F{sub 2}) concentrations in the flue gas. Fly ash resistivity was measured using a Southern Research Institute (SRI) point-to-plane resistivity probe, and unburned carbon in fly ash was determined by loss on ignition (LOI). Coal samples were also collected and analyzed for a variety of parameters. Finally, visual observations were made of boiler furnace and convective pass surfaces prior to and during sorbent injection.

  9. Sulfuric acid aerosols and HCl release in coastal atmospheres: evidence of rapid formation of sulfuric acid particulates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Hitchcock; L. L. Spiller; W. E. Wilson

    1980-01-01

    Research report:Bacteriogenic sulfide sources may contribute to atmospheric loads of particulate sulfate in coastal locations where bacteriogenic hydrogen sulfide is released to the atmosphere. Studies were conducted along the North Carolina coast to determine the origins and chemical properties of such sulfates and to observe sulfuric acid volatization. Excess sulfate was found in all samples and strongly associated with loss

  10. Characterization of pilot-scale dilute acid pretreatment performance using deacetylated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising process technology for the deconstruction of low-lignin lignocellulosic biomass, capable of producing high yields of hemicellulosic sugars and enhancing enzymatic yields of glucose as part of a biomass-to-biofuels process. However, while it has been extensively studied, most work has historically been conducted at relatively high acid concentrations of 1 - 4% (weight/weight). Reducing the effective acid loading in pretreatment has the potential to reduce chemical costs both for pretreatment and subsequent neutralization. Additionally, if acid loadings are sufficiently low, capital requirements associated with reactor construction may be significantly reduced due to the relaxation of requirements for exotic alloys. Despite these benefits, past efforts have had difficulty obtaining high process yields at low acid loadings without supplementation of additional unit operations, such as mechanical refining. Results Recently, we optimized the dilute acid pretreatment of deacetylated corn stover at low acid loadings in a 1-ton per day horizontal pretreatment reactor. This effort included more than 25 pilot-scale pretreatment experiments executed at reactor temperatures ranging from 150 – 170°C, residence times of 10 – 20 minutes and hydrolyzer sulfuric acid concentrations between 0.15 – 0.30% (weight/weight). In addition to characterizing the process yields achieved across the reaction space, the optimization identified a pretreatment reaction condition that achieved total xylose yields from pretreatment of 73.5%?±?1.5% with greater than 97% xylan component balance closure across a series of five runs at the same condition. Feedstock reactivity at this reaction condition after bench-scale high solids enzymatic hydrolysis was 77%, prior to the inclusion of any additional conversion that may occur during subsequent fermentation. Conclusions This study effectively characterized a range of pretreatment reaction conditions using deacetylated corn stover at low acid loadings and identified an optimum reaction condition was selected and used in a series of integrated pilot scale cellulosic ethanol production campaigns. Additionally, several issues exist to be considered in future pretreatment experiments in continuous reactor systems, including the formation of char within the reactor, as well as practical issues with feeding herbaceous feedstock into pressurized systems. PMID:24548527

  11. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases, the transcription activation function of Met4 is prevented by Met30p, which binds to the Met4 inhibitory region. In addition to the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex, transcriptional regulation involves two zinc finger-containing proteins, Met31p and Met32p. The AdoMet-mediated control of the sulfur amino acid pathway illustrates the molecular strategies used by eucaryotic cells to couple gene expression to metabolic changes. PMID:9409150

  12. Ammonia recycled percolation as a complementary pretreatment to the dilute-acid process

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhangwen, Lee, Y.Y. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A two-stage dilute-acid percolation (DA) was investigated as a pre-treatment method for switchgrass. With use of extremely low acid (0.078 wt% sulfuric acid) under moderate temperature (145-170{degrees}C), hemicellulose in switchgrass was completely solubilized showing no sugar decomposition. The treated switchgrass contained about 70% glucan and 30% lignin. The high lignin content in the treated feedstock raises a concern that it may cause a high enzyme consumption because of irreversible adsorption of cellulose enzymes to lignin. This problem may be amplified in the SSF operation since it is usually run in fed-batch mode and the residual lignin is accumulated. The DA pretreatment was, therefore, combined with the ammonia recycled percolation (ARP) process that has been proven to be effective in delignification. The combined pretreatment essentially fractionated the switchgrass into three major components. The treated feedstock contained about 90% glucan and 10% lignin. The digestibility of these samples was consistently higher than that of DA treated samples. Further study on the interaction of cellulase with xylan and that with lignin has shown that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is inhibited by lignin as well as xylan. The external xylan was found to be a noncompetitive inhibitor to cellulose hydrolysis. The cellulose used in this study was proven to have the xylanase activity. 23 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Freedman, A.; Robinson, G.N. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1995-12-01

    The sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of smooth (2 nm average roughness) aluminum surfaces has been studied in real times using an in situ Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectrometer and a quartz crystal microbalance. Submicron thick, 35 to 55 weight percent (5 to 12 molal), sulfuric acid films were formed on room temperature metal surfaces by the reaction of gas-phase SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O vapor in a flowing gas system at a total pressure of {approximately}200 Torr. The deposition of the acid films and subsequent changes in their chemical composition resulting from corrosion of the aluminum substrate could be monitored using characteristic infrared absorption features. The corrosion process always significantly perturbed the spectral signature of the films from that which was observed on inert gold surfaces. Using changes in spectral features that are linked to the production of Al{sup 3+} as indicators of corrosion, the authors conclude the rate of corrosion of the metal is strongly enhanced by both higher relative humidities and increased rates of sulfuric acid deposition.

  14. Uptake and Dissolution of Gaseous Ethanol in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Staton, Sarah J. R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of gas-phase ethanol (ethyl alcohol, CH3CH2OH, EtOH) in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was measured in a Knudsen cell reactor over ranges of temperature (209-237 K) and acid composition (39-76 wt % H2SO4). Ethanol is very soluble under these conditions: effective Henry's law coefficients, H*, range from 4 x 10(exp 4) M/atm in the 227 K, 39 wt % acid to greater than 10(exp 7) M/atm in the 76 wt % acid. In 76 wt % sulfuric acid, ethanol solubility exceeds that which can be precisely determined using the Knudsen cell technique but falls in the range of 10(exp 7)-10(exp 10) M/atm. The equilibrium concentration of ethanol in upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UT/LS) sulfate particles is calculated from these measurements and compared to other small oxygenated organic compounds. Even if ethanol is a minor component in the gas phase, it may be a major constituent of the organic fraction in the particle phase. No evidence for the formation of ethyl hydrogen sulfate was found under our experimental conditions. While the protonation of ethanol does augment solubility at higher acidity, the primary reason H* increases with acidity is an increase in the solubility of molecular (i.e., neutral) ethanol.

  15. The effect of confinement on dynamics and rheology of dilute deoxyribose nucleic acid solutions. II. Effective

    E-print Network

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    The effect of confinement on dynamics and rheology of dilute deoxyribose nucleic acid solutions. II the effect of confinement on deoxyribose nucleic acid rheology and chain dynamics. We present results these findings to microchannel flows to study the rhe- ology and chain dynamics of dilute deoxyribose nucleic

  16. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2001-11-06

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. Balance of plant impacts, primarily on the ESP particulate control device, were also determined during both tests. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

  17. Thermal Regeneration of Sulfuric Acid Hydrates after Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to more completely understand the surface chemistry of the jovian icy satellites, we have investigated the effect of heating on two irradiated crystalline sulfuric acid hydrates, H2SO4 4H2O and H2SO4 H2O. At temperatures relevant to Europa and the warmer jovian satellites, post-irradiation heating recrystallized the amorphized samples and increased the intensities of the remaining hydrate's infrared absorptions. This thermal regeneration of the original hydrates was nearly 100% efficient, indicating that over geological times, thermally-induced phase transitions enhanced by temperature fluctuations will reform a large fraction of crystalline hydrated sulfuric acid that is destroyed by radiation processing. The work described is the first demonstration of the competition between radiation-induced amorphization and thermally-induced recrystallization in icy ionic solids relevant to the outer Solar System.

  18. INCREASED INFECTIVITY WITH EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the combined action of ozone (O3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol on host susceptibility to an aerosol of viable microorganisms were studied. Exposure to O3 (0.196 mg/cu m) was for 3 h, while exposure to H2SO4 (0.9 mg/cu m) lasted 2 h. Neither pollutant alone cau...

  19. EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID MIST EXPOSURE ON PULMONARY FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 2-hr exposure to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) on pulmonary functions in male nonsmokers were examined. Subjects were exposed to air and 233, 418 and 939 micrograms/cu m H2SO4 at 22C DB/55% RH or air and 314, 600 and 1107 micrograms/cu m H2SO4 at 35C DB/85% RH. Mass media diam...

  20. COS in the stratosphere. [sulfuric acid aerosol precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Tyson, B. J.; Ohara, D.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been detected in the stratosphere, and mixing ratio measurements are reported for altitudes of 15.2 to 31.2 km. A large volume, cryogenic sampling system mounted on board a U-2 aircraft has been used for lower stratosphere measurements and a balloon platform for measurement at 31.2 km. These observations and measurements strongly support the concept that stratospheric COS is an important precursor in the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  1. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A. [Mendeleev Russian University of Chemical Engineering Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  2. Phenol-Sulfuric Acid Method for Total Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The phenol-sulfuric acid method is a simple and rapid colorimetric method to determine total carbohydrates in a sample. The method detects virtually all classes of carbohydrates, including mono-, di-, oligo-, and polysaccharides. Although the method detects almost all carbohydrates, the absorptivity of the different carbohydrates varies. Thus, unless a sample is known to contain only one carbohydrate, the results must be expressed arbitrarily in terms of one carbohydrate.

  3. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: LONG-TERM RESULTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corp., the Tennessee Valley Authority,

  4. Possible Roles of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids in a Chemoautotrophic Bacterium-Mollusc Symbiosis

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Possible Roles of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids in a Chemoautotrophic Bacterium-Mollusc Symbiosis avoiding its toxic effects. The sulfur-containing free amino acids taurine and thiotaurine may function in sulfide detoxification by serving as sulfur storage compounds or as transport compounds between symbiont

  5. DIURNAL AND SEASONAL PATTERNS OF PARTICULATE SULFUR AND SULFURIC ACID IN ST. LOUIS, JULY 1977-JUNE 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous measurements of particulate sulfur and sulfuric acid were taken in St. Louis over a one year period using the in-situ thermal analysis-flame photometric method. These measurements were used to calculate average diurnal patterns for each quarter of the year, and also th...

  6. Laryngeal cancer and occupational exposure to sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Soskolne, C.L.; Zeighami, E.A.; Hanis, N.M.; Kupper, L.L.; Herrmann, N.; Amsel, J.; Mausner, J.S.; Stellman, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Workers on an ethanol unit which used sulfuric acid in strong concentrations at a large refinery and chemical plant in Baton Rouge, Louisiana were reported in 1979, at excess risk for upper respiratory cancer. The carcinogen implicated by indirect evidence was diethyl sulfate. However, with the continued use of sulfuric acid in the same plant, and with additional cases not attributable to the ethanol process, the hypothesis of an association between sulfuric acid exposure and upper respiratory cancer was tested. Each of 50 confirmed cases of upper respiratory cancer diagnosed between 1944 and 1980, was matched to at least three controls on sex, race, age, date of initial employment, and duration of employment. Thrity-four of the 50 cases were laryngeal cancers. Data were obtained from existing plant records. Retrospective estimates of exposure were made without regard to case or control status. Findings from conditional logistic regression techniques were supported by other statistical methods. Among workers classified as potentially highly exposed, four-fold relative risks for all upper respiratory cancer sites combined were exceeded by the relative risk for laryngeal cancer specifically. Exposure-response and consistency across various comparisons after controlling statistically for tobacco-use, alcoholism and other previously implicated risk factors, suggest increased cancer risk with higher exposure.

  7. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-12-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 ?m after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable.

  8. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07??m after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable. PMID:24310650

  9. The pH and titratable acidity of a range of diluting drinks and their potential effect on dental erosion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Cairns; M. Watson; S. L. Creanor; R. H. Foye

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate, in vitro, the potential dental effects of diluting juices by measuring their acidity levels and to examine the effect dilution has on the potential erosive properties of the drinks.Methods. Four commonly available diluting drinks were assessed for both pH and titratable acidity at a variety of dilutions, reflecting the range of concentrations over which such drinks may

  10. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO2) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO2 gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  11. Effects of sulfur dioxide on lichen lipids and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bychek-Guschina, I A; Kotlova, E R; Heipieper, H

    1999-01-01

    Lipids and fatty acids were studied in some lichen species after exposure to 1 ppm of aqueous sulfur dioxide. The changes in lipid composition are specific to the lichen species tested. The exposure of lichens to SO2 resulted in a slight reduction of the total phospholipid content. The amount of betaine lipid diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine was increased in Stereocaulon paschale, but the level of this lipid was not changed in Peltigera aphthosa. An increase in fatty acid unsaturation in lichens in response to the effect of SO2 probably has adaptive significance. PMID:9986914

  12. Sonoluminescence radiation from different concentrations of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Moshaii, A; Imani, Kh; Silatani, M

    2009-10-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL) radiation from an argon bubble in water and in different concentrations of sulfuric acid has numerically been studied to quantify the effects of vapor pressure and viscosity of the liquid on cavitation luminescence in a liquid with controllable vapor pressure and viscosity. For the solutions containing the noble gas with low partial pressure (about 4 Torr), it is shown that there exists an optimum acid solution in which both the temperature and the intensity of SL radiation become maximum. The calculations show that the maximum SL radiation is achieved from the solution of around 65% (wt.) H2SO4, which is in agreement with available experimental results. PMID:19905454

  13. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M. (Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States)); Sherwood, S.I. (National Park Service, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO[sub 2] gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  14. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721.9220...secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). (a)...

  15. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4sulfur (gas) to H2SO4 (particle) conversion efficiency is between 10% and 25%.

  16. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HONO on Liquid Sulfuric Acid: A New Mechanism of Chlorine Activation on Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrous acid (HONO) on liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4) Was investigated at conditions that prevail in the stratosphere. The measured uptake coefficient (gamma) of HONO on H2SO4 increased with increasing acid content, ranging from 0.03 for 65 wt % to about 0.1 for 74 wt %. In the aqueous phase, HONO underwent irreversible reaction with H2SO4 to form nitrosylsulfuric acid (NO(+)HSO4(-). At temperatures below 230 K, NO(+)HSO4(-) was observed to be stable and accumulated in concentrated solutions (less than 70 wt % H2SO4) but was unstable and quickly regenerated HONO in dilute solutions (less than 70 wt %). HCl reacted with HONO dissolved in sulfuric acid, releasing gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). The reaction probability between HCl and HONO varied from 0.01 to 0.02 for 60-72 wt % H2SO4. In the stratosphere, ClNO photodissociates rapidly to yield atomic chlorine, which catalytically destroys ozone. Analysis of the laboratory data reveals that the reaction of HCl with HONO on sulfate aerosols can affect stratospheric ozone balance during elevated sulfuric acid loadings after volcanic eruptions or due to emissions from the projected high-speed civil transport (HSCT). The present results may have important implications on the assessment of environmental acceptability of HSCT.

  17. A Development of Ceramics Cylinder Type Sulfuric Acid Decomposer for Thermo-Chemical Iodine-Sulfur Process Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Fukui; Isao Minatsuki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD. (Japan); Kazuo Ishino [Pacific Rundum Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    The hydrogen production method applying thermo-chemical Iodine-Sulfur process (IS process) which uses a nuclear high temperature gas cooled reactor is world widely greatly concerned from the view point of a combination as a clean method, free carbon dioxide in essence. In this process, it is essential a using ceramic material, especially SiC because a operation condition of this process is very corrosive due to a sulfuric acid atmosphere with high temperature and high pressure. In the IS process, a sulfuric acid decomposer is the key component which performs evaporating of sulfuric acid from liquid to gas and disassembling to SO{sub 2} gas. SiC was selected as ceramic material to apply for the sulfuric acid decomposer and a new type of binding material was also developed for SiC junction. This technology is expected to wide application not only for a sulfuric acid decomposer but also for various type components in this process. Process parameters were provided as design condition for the decomposer. The configuration of the sulfuric acid decomposer was studied, and a cylindrical tubes assembling type was selected. The advantage of this type is applicable for various type of components in the IS process due to manufacturing with using only simple shape part. A sulfuric acid decomposer was divided into two regions of the liquid and the gaseous phase of sulfuric acid. The thermal structural integrity analysis was studied for the liquid phase part. From the result of this analysis, it was investigated that the stress was below the strength of the breakdown probability 1/100,000 at any position, base material or junction part. The prototype model was manufactured, which was a ceramic portion in the liquid phase part, comparatively complicated configuration, of a sulfuric acid decomposer. The size of model was about 1.9 m in height, 1.0 m in width. Thirty-six cylinders including inlet and outlet nozzles were combined and each part article was joined using the new binder (slurry binder) and calcinated. Final polishing of the flange faces established in the entrance nozzles was also satisfactory. Many parts were joinable using new technology (new binder). For this reason, new technology is applicable to manufacture of not only a sulfuric acid decomposer but the instruments in the IS process, or other chemical processes. (authors)

  18. A Development of Ceramics Cylinder Type Sulfuric Acid Decomposer for Thermo-Chemical Iodine-Sulfur Process Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Fukui, Hiroshi; Ishino, Kazuo

    The hydrogen production method applying thermo-chemical Iodine-Sulfur process (IS process) which uses a nuclear high temperature gas cooled reactor is world widely greatly concerned from the view point of a combination as a clean method, free carbon dioxide in essence. In this process, it is essential a using ceramic material, especially SiC because a operation condition of this process is very corrosive due to a sulfuric acid atmosphere with high temperature and high pressure. In the IS process, a sulfuric acid decomposer is the key component which performs evaporating of sulfuric acid from liquid to gas and disassembling to SO2 gas. SiC was selected as ceramic material to apply for the sulfuric acid decomposer and a new type of binding material was also developed for SiC junction. This technology is expected to wide application not only for a sulfuric acid decomposer but also for various type components in this process. Process parameters were provided as design condition for the decomposer. The configuration of the sulfuric acid decomposer was studied, and a cylindrical tubes assembling type was selected. The advantage of this type is applicable for various type of components in the IS process due to manufacturing with using only simple shape part. A sulfuric acid decomposer was divided into two regions of the liquid and the gaseous phase of sulfuric acid. The thermal structural integrity analysis was studied for the liquid phase part. From the result of this analysis, it was investigated that the stress was below the strength of the breakdown probability 1/100,000 at any position, base material or junction part. The prototype model was manufactured, which was a ceramic portion in the liquid phase part, comparatively complicated configuration, of a sulfuric acid decomposer. The size of model was about 1.9m in height, 1.0m in width. Thirty-six cylinders including inlet and outlet nozzles were combined and each part article was joined using the new binder (slurry binder) and calcinated. Final polishing of the flange faces established in the entrance nozzles was also satisfactory. Many parts were joinable using new technology (new binder). For this reason, new technology is applicable to manufacture of not only a sulfuric acid decomposer but the instruments in the IS process, or other chemical processes.

  19. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

  20. Uptake of HCl molecules by aqueous sulfuric acid droplets as a function of acid concentration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyn R. Watson; Jane M. Van Doren; Paul Davidovits; Douglas R. Worsnop; Mark S. Zahniser; Charles E. Kolb

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of Hci molecules by acqueous sulfuric acid droplets was measured at 283 K as a function of acid mole fraction. In the apparatus a controllable stream of monodispersed droplets is produced by a vibrating orifice jet. The droplets enter a flow system containing HCl(g). The droplets are switched on and off while the density of the species is

  1. A Dilute Standard for pH, Conductivity, and Acid Neutralizing Capacity Measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard C. Metcalf; David V. Peck

    1993-01-01

    A quality control standard suitable for assessing measurement errors of pH, conductivity, and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC, also known as titration alkalinity) of dilute, neutral pH waters has been developed and tested for field and laboratory use in ecological studies. A dilute phosphate standard is prepared as a 100-fold dilution (by mass) of 0.025 mol kg (of solvent) KH2PO4 and

  2. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-02-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

  3. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-03-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NOX control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

  4. Materials study supporting thermochemical hydrogen cycle sulfuric acid decomposer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Michael S.

    Increasing global climate change has been driven by greenhouse gases emissions originating from the combustion of fossil fuels. Clean burning hydrogen has the potential to replace much of the fossil fuels used today reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The sulfur iodine and hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles coupled with high temperature heat from advanced nuclear reactors have shown promise for economical large-scale hydrogen fuel stock production. Both of these cycles employ a step to decompose sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide. This decomposition step occurs at high temperatures in the range of 825°C to 926°C dependent on the catalysis used. Successful commercial implementation of these technologies is dependent upon the development of suitable materials for use in the highly corrosive environments created by the decomposition products. Boron treated diamond film was a potential candidate for use in decomposer process equipment based on earlier studies concluding good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. However, little information was available relating the interactions of diamond and diamond films with sulfuric acid at temperatures greater than 350°C. A laboratory scale sulfuric acid decomposer simulator was constructed at the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The simulator was capable of producing the temperatures and corrosive environments that process equipment would be exposed to for industrialization of the sulfur iodide or hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles. A series of boron treated synthetic diamonds were tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances and suitability for use in thermochemical process equipment. These studies were performed at twenty four hour durations at temperatures between 600°C to 926°C. Other materials, including natural diamond, synthetic diamond treated with titanium, silicon carbide, quartz, aluminum nitride, and Inconel were also tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances. The study concluded that boron treated diamonds were not suitable for use in decomposer process equipment. Unacceptable corrosion rates were observed at 600°C and increased linearly with temperature up to 700°C. The boron treated diamonds completely disassociated at temperatures above 700°C. The researcher postulated that the high corrosion rates resulted from diamond carbon having a higher preference for oxygen free radicals formed during the decomposition process. Oxygen free radical concentration also increased as a function of increasing temperature. The study also concluded that natural diamond and synthetic titanium treated diamond were unsuitable for use in decomposer process equipment. The corrosion results were similar to that of the boron treated diamonds. Silicon carbide may have potential for used in decomposer process equipment. No appreciable silicon carbide corrosion was observed and more study is warranted. Small amounts of quartz and aluminum nitride corrosion was observed. Inconel corrosion rates were very high at all temperatures tested.

  5. Tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Z. mobilis to inhibitors produced during dilute acid hydrolysis of soybean meal.

    PubMed

    Lujan-Rhenals, Deivis E; Morawicki, Rubén O; Ricke, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, furfural, and acetic acid on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NRRL Y-2233) and Zymomonas mobilis subspecies mobilis (NRRL B-4286) in both detoxified hydrolyzed soybean meal and synthetic YM broth spiked with the three compounds. Soybean meal was hydrolyzed with dilute sulfuric acid (0.0, 0.5, 1.25, and 2.0% wt v(-1)) at three temperatures (105, 120, and 135°C) and three durations (15, 30, and 45 min) followed by detoxification with activated carbon. Of all the combinations, only the treatments obtained at 135°C, 2.0% H2SO4, and 45 min and the one at 135°C, 1.25% H2SO4, and 45 min showed inhibition in the growth of the tested microorganisms. Spiked YM broths showed inhibition for the highest levels of inhibitors, either applied individually or in combination. PMID:24502218

  6. Obtaining fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqun; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin; Liu, Weiguo

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to get fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose from sugarcane bagasse. Hemicellulose could be easily hydrolyzed by dilute acid as sugars. The remained solid residue of acid hydrolysis was utilized to get levoglucosan by fast pyrolysis economically. Levoglucosan yield from crystalline cellulose could be as high as 61.47%. Dilute acid hydrolysis was also a promising pretreatment for levoglucosan production from lignocellulose. The dilute acid pretreated sugarcane bagasse resulted in higher levoglucosan yield (40.50%) in fast pyrolysis by micropyrolyzer, which was more effective than water washed (29.10%) and un-pretreated (12.84%). It was mainly ascribed to the effective removal of alkali and alkaline earth metals and the accumulation of crystalline cellulose. This strategy seems a promising route to achieve inexpensive fermentable sugars from lignocellulose for biorefinery. PMID:25690683

  7. Sulfuric Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Photoperiod Sensitvie Sorghum for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    F Xu; Y Shi; X Wu

    2011-12-31

    Photoperiod sensitive (PS) sorghum, with high soluble sugar content, high mass yield and high drought tolerance in dryland environments, has great potential for bioethanol production. The effect of diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. Hydrolysis efficiency increased from 78.9 to 94.4% as the acid concentration increased from 0.5 to 1.5%. However, the highest total glucose yield (80.3%) occurred at the 1.0% acid condition because of the significant cellulose degradation at the 1.5% concentration. Synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study changes of the degree of crystallinity. With comparison of cellulosic crystallinity and adjusted cellulosic crystallinity, the crystalline cellulose decreased after low acidic concentration (0.5%) applied, but did not change significantly, as the acid concentration increased. Scanning electron microscopy was also employed to understand how the morphological structure of PS sorghum changed after pretreatment. Under current processing conditions, the total ethanol yield is 74.5% (about 0.2 g ethanol from 1 g PS sorghum). A detail mass balance was also provided.

  8. J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1997 821 Mechanism of the Beckmann rearrangement in sulfuric acid solution

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1997 821 Mechanism of the Beckmann rearrangement in sulfuric acid the mechanism of the Beckmann rearrangement of formaldehyde oxime in concentrated sulfuric acid or in oleum hydrogen chloride, an oleum solution contains sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide (H2SO4 SO3). An aqueous

  9. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: LONG-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-07-03

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corp., the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Dravo Lime, Inc. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to power generators with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on many coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project previously tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium-and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide byproduct slurry produced from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization system. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP, Unit 3, and the second test was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant testing provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. This report presents the results from those long-term tests. The tests determined the effectiveness of injecting commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP) for sulfuric acid control. The results show that injecting either slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, this overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NOX control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The long-term tests also determined balance-of-plant impacts from slurry injection during the two tests. These include impacts on boiler back-end temperatures and pressure drops, SCR catalyst properties, ESP performance, removal of other flue gas species, and flue gas opacity. For the most part the balance-of-plant impacts were neutral to positive, although adverse effects on ESP performance became an issue during the BMP test.

  10. Differences in Median Ultraviolet Light Transmissions of Serial Homeopathic Dilutions of Copper Sulfate, Hypericum perforatum, and Sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sabine D.; Sandig, Annegret; Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Homeopathic remedies are produced by potentising, that is, the serial logarithmic dilution and succussion of a mother tincture. Techniques like ultraviolet spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, calorimetry, or thermoluminescence have been used to investigate their physical properties. In this study, homeopathic centesimal (c) potencies (6c to 30c) of copper sulfate, Hypericum perforatum, and sulfur as well as succussed water controls were prepared. Samples of these preparations were exposed to external physical factors like heat, pressure, ultraviolet radiation, or electromagnetic fields to mimic possible everyday storage conditions. The median transmissions from 190?nm to 340?nm and 220?nm to 340?nm were determined by ultraviolet light spectroscopy on five measurement days distributed over several months. Transmissions of controls and potencies of sulfur differed significantly on two of five measurement days and after exposure to physical factors. Transmissions of potencies exposed to ultraviolet light and unexposed potencies of copper sulfate and Hypericum perforatum differed significantly. Potency levels 6c to 30c were also compared, and wavelike patterns of higher and lower transmissions were found. The Kruskal-Wallis test yielded significant differences for the potency levels of all three substances. Aiming at understanding the physical properties of homeopathic preparations, this study confirmed and expanded the findings of previous studies. PMID:23401712

  11. Differences in Median Ultraviolet Light Transmissions of Serial Homeopathic Dilutions of Copper Sulfate, Hypericum perforatum, and Sulfur.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabine D; Sandig, Annegret; Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Homeopathic remedies are produced by potentising, that is, the serial logarithmic dilution and succussion of a mother tincture. Techniques like ultraviolet spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, calorimetry, or thermoluminescence have been used to investigate their physical properties. In this study, homeopathic centesimal (c) potencies (6c to 30c) of copper sulfate, Hypericum perforatum, and sulfur as well as succussed water controls were prepared. Samples of these preparations were exposed to external physical factors like heat, pressure, ultraviolet radiation, or electromagnetic fields to mimic possible everyday storage conditions. The median transmissions from 190?nm to 340?nm and 220?nm to 340?nm were determined by ultraviolet light spectroscopy on five measurement days distributed over several months. Transmissions of controls and potencies of sulfur differed significantly on two of five measurement days and after exposure to physical factors. Transmissions of potencies exposed to ultraviolet light and unexposed potencies of copper sulfate and Hypericum perforatum differed significantly. Potency levels 6c to 30c were also compared, and wavelike patterns of higher and lower transmissions were found. The Kruskal-Wallis test yielded significant differences for the potency levels of all three substances. Aiming at understanding the physical properties of homeopathic preparations, this study confirmed and expanded the findings of previous studies. PMID:23401712

  12. Sulfuric acid cloud interpretation of the infrared spectrum of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martonchik, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Sulfuric acid single-cloud models are compared with the Venus spectrum in the 8-14 micron region. The results indicate that a cloud composed of a 75 percent H2SO4 solution and with a particle density of 100 per cu cm is in good agreement with observations. In addition to explaining the 11.2 micron absorption, this model also predicts an absorption feature at 16.7 microns which should be detectable if the observation is made from an aircraft.

  13. A rotamer energy level study of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Partanen, Lauri; Pesonen, Janne; Sjöholm, Elina; Halonen, Lauri

    2013-10-14

    It is a common approach in quantum chemical calculations for polyatomic molecules to rigidly constrain some of the degrees of freedom in order to make the calculations computationally feasible. However, the presence of the rigid constraints also affects the kinetic energy operator resulting in the frozen mode correction, originally derived by Pesonen [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144310 (2013)]. In this study, we compare the effects of this correction to several different approximations to the kinetic energy operator used in the literature, in the specific case of the rotamer energy levels of sulfuric acid. The two stable conformers of sulfuric acid are connected by the rotations of the O-S-O-H dihedral angles and possess C2 and Cs symmetry in the order of increasing energy. Our results show that of the models tested, the largest differences with the frozen mode corrected values were obtained by simply omitting the passive degrees of freedom. For the lowest 17 excited states, this inappropriate treatment introduces an increase of 9.6 cm(-1) on average, with an increase of 8.7 cm(-1) in the zero-point energies. With our two-dimensional potential energy surface calculated at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level, we observe a radical shift in the density of states compared to the harmonic picture, combined with an increase in zero point energy. Thus, we conclude that the quantum mechanical inclusion of the different conformers of sulfuric acid have a significant effect on its vibrational partition function, suggesting that it will also have an impact on the computational values of the thermodynamic properties of any reactions where sulfuric acid plays a role. Finally, we also considered the effect of the anharmonicities for the other vibrational degrees of freedom with a VSCF-calculation at the DF-MP2-F12/VTZ-F12 level of theory but found that the inclusion of the other conformer had the more important effect on the vibrational partition function. PMID:24116623

  14. A rotamer energy level study of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Lauri; Pesonen, Janne; Sjöholm, Elina; Halonen, Lauri

    2013-10-01

    It is a common approach in quantum chemical calculations for polyatomic molecules to rigidly constrain some of the degrees of freedom in order to make the calculations computationally feasible. However, the presence of the rigid constraints also affects the kinetic energy operator resulting in the frozen mode correction, originally derived by Pesonen [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144310 (2013)]. In this study, we compare the effects of this correction to several different approximations to the kinetic energy operator used in the literature, in the specific case of the rotamer energy levels of sulfuric acid. The two stable conformers of sulfuric acid are connected by the rotations of the O-S-O-H dihedral angles and possess C2 and Cs symmetry in the order of increasing energy. Our results show that of the models tested, the largest differences with the frozen mode corrected values were obtained by simply omitting the passive degrees of freedom. For the lowest 17 excited states, this inappropriate treatment introduces an increase of 9.6 cm-1 on average, with an increase of 8.7 cm-1 in the zero-point energies. With our two-dimensional potential energy surface calculated at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level, we observe a radical shift in the density of states compared to the harmonic picture, combined with an increase in zero point energy. Thus, we conclude that the quantum mechanical inclusion of the different conformers of sulfuric acid have a significant effect on its vibrational partition function, suggesting that it will also have an impact on the computational values of the thermodynamic properties of any reactions where sulfuric acid plays a role. Finally, we also considered the effect of the anharmonicities for the other vibrational degrees of freedom with a VSCF-calculation at the DF-MP2-F12/VTZ-F12 level of theory but found that the inclusion of the other conformer had the more important effect on the vibrational partition function.

  15. H2SO4 vapor pressure of sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Marti; Anne Jefferson; Xiao Ping Cai; Chad Richert; Peter H. McMurry; Fred Eisele

    1997-01-01

    Few measurements of H2SO4 vapor pressure have been made for sulfuric acid in the temperature and concentration ranges of atmospheric interest because of the very low pressures involved (below 10-4Pa, or 10-6torr); no such measurements appear to have been made for sulfuric acid solutions neutralized with ammonia. This work presents measurements of H2SO4 vapor pressure for aqueous sulfuric acid solutions

  16. NMR Analyses of Order and Dynamics in Poly(p-Benzamide)/ Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    NMR Analyses of Order and Dynamics in Poly(p-Benzamide)/ Sulfuric Acid Solutions Min Zhou, Veronica sulfuric acid. Quantitative determinations of order in the liquid crystal phases arising in these systems liquid crystalline dopes when dissolved in strong mineral acids at ap- propriate concentrations.10

  17. POTENTIAL ABATEMENT PRODUCTION AND MARKETING OF BYPRODUCT SULFURIC ACID IN THE U.S

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the market potential for sulfur and sulfuric acid byproducts of combustion in power plant boilers. (Air quality regulations require control of SOx emissions from power plant boilers. Recovery of sulfur in useful form would avoid waste ...

  18. Development of a species-unspecific isotope dilution GC-ICPMS method for possible routine quantification of sulfur species in petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Jens; Heumann, Klaus G

    2008-03-15

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) hyphenated with capillary gas chromatography was applied for sulfur multispecies determination in petroleum products by species-unspecific isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). To guarantee a stable and continuous addition of the spike into the GC-ICPMS system, a special dosing unit was designed and synthesis of a (34)S-labeled dimethyldisulfide spike from (34)S-enriched elemental sulfur in the milligram range was developed. The sample was mixed with an internal standard for spike mass flow calibration. From the mass flow chromatogram obtained by species-unspecific GC-ICP-IDMS, determination of all separated sulfur species and of the total sulfur content was possible without any matrix influence by coeluting hydrocarbons. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by determining reference material SRM-2296 certified for three sulfur species and by comparison of results obtained by species-specific GC-ICP-IDMS. The total sulfur concentration determined for all separated species agreed well with the sulfur content in the original samples which demonstrated that all sulfur species have been covered. Structural characterization of sulfur species was carried out by corresponding sulfur standards and by applying electron ionization ion trap mass spectrometry. The low detection limit of 9 ng sulfur per gram sample, independent of results on coeluting hydrocarbons, and the robust instrumental design of the continuous spike flow dosing unit qualifies this species-unspecific GC-ICP-IDMS method for accurate and sensitive sulfur multispecies determinations also on a routine basis. PMID:18284218

  19. sup 15 N NMR spectroscopic investigation of nitrous and nitric acids in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acidities

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, G.K.S.; Heiliger, L.; Olah, G.A. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-11-28

    Both nitrous and nitric acids were studied in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acid strengths by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. The study gives new insights into the nature of intermediates present at different acid strengths. Furthermore, we have also discovered a novel redox reaction between NO{sub 2}{sup +} and NO{sup +} ions involving the intermediacy of their respective acids. A mechanism is proposed to explain the observed results. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Fuel ethanol production from corn stover under optimized dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Generation of fermentable sugars from corn stover involves pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment is crucial as nat...

  1. HIGH TEMPERATURE DILUTE ACID HYDROLYSIS OF WASTE CELLULOSE: BATCH AND CONTINUOUS PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 5-year investigation on the dilute acid hydrolysis of waste cellulose to glucose has emphasized the crucial step of continuously converting cellulose to glucose. Initial batch studies emphasized pretreatments to improve accessibility of the cellulose, and established suitable...

  2. A generator for the production of sulfuric acid-coated diesel soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Robert B.; Nordenstam, Brenda J.; Phalen, Robert F.

    Diluted diesel engine exhaust was mixed with sulfur trioxide and the resulting acid-soot aerosol characterized. The generation system, which is suitable for inhalation toxicology studies, was characterized at a soot concentration of approximately 0.5 mg m -3 and H 2SO 4 coating levels from 0 to 5 mg m -3. Aerosol characterization included measurement of particle size (cascade impactor + electrical aerosol analyzer tandem sampler) and acid-soot association (electron microscopy of BaCl 2-coated sample grids). The mass distribution of both acid-coated and uncoated diesel soot was unimodal and approximately lognormal. The acid coating increased both the size and monodispersity of the soot aerosol. The mass median Stokes equivalent diameter and geometric standard deviation were 0.12 ?m and 2.4 for the uncoated soot, and 0.28 ?m and 1.9 at 5.0 mg m -3 H 2SO 4. Approximately 95% of the soot particles were coated with H 2SO 4; the remainder appeared uncoated. Some H 2SO 4 droplets without a visible nucleus were also observed.

  3. Study of bioconversion of dilute acid hydrolyzates of hardwood to ethanol. [Pachysolen tannophilus, Saccharomyces uvarum, S. cerevisiae, S. carlsbergenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The production of ethanol from sugars derived through a two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis of hardwood was investigated. Pachysolen tannophilus was employed for its ability to convert both xylose and glucose to ethanol. Saccharomyces uvarum, S. cerevisiae and S. carlsbergenesis were employed for their ability to convert hexoses to ethanol. Sugar composition and concentration of the substrate, ethanol concentration, pH and yeast cell density were monitored. First-stage hydrolyzates were converted to ethanol by P. tannophilus with greatest yields at pH 5.5. Addition of calcium hydroxide in excess of that needed to reach pH 5.5 followed by pH adjustment to 5.5 with hydrochloric or sulfuric acid and the addition of sulfite was identified as the hydrolyzate treatment producing the best yield of ethanol after bioconversion. Urea, with potassium phosphate, was shown to enhance ethanol production in comparison to other nitrogen sources. Furfural was shown to inhibit xylose utilization, ethanol production, and growth of P. tannophilus. As the sugar composition of first-stage hydrolyzates increased, less xylose was converted to ethanol by P. tannophilus. Conditions of dilute acid hydrolysis producing a first-stage hydrolyzate which resulted in the greatest ethanol yield when P. tannophilus was inoculated were identified. Conditions of dilute acid hydrolysis which resulted in the greatest ethanol yield from S. uvarum in a second-stage hydrolyzate were identified. The optimum pH for ethanol production in second-stage hydrolyzate was determined. A yield of 14 gallons of ethanol per ton of dry wood from a first-stage hydrolyzate and 33 gallons of ethanol per ton of dry wood from a second-stage hydrolyzate was achieved.

  4. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous reactions on sulfuric acid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Leah R.; Manion, Jeffrey A.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Increasing evidence from field, modeling, and laboratory studies suggests that heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles may contribute to global ozone depletion. Using a Knudsen cell reactor technique, the authors have studied the uptake, reactivity, and solubility of several trace atmospheric species on cold sulfuric acid surfaces representative of stratospheric aerosol particles. The results suggest that the heterogeneous conversion of N2O5 to HNO3 is fast enough to significantly affect the partitioning of nitrogen species in the global stratosphere and thus contribute to global ozone depletion. The hydrolysis of ClONO2 is slower and unlikely to be important under normal conditions at midlatitudes. The solubilities of HCl and HNO3 in sulfuric acid down to 200 K were found to be quite low. For HCl, this means that little HCl is available for reaction on the surfaces of stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles. The low solubility of HNO3 means that this product of heterogeneous reactions will enter the gas phase, and the denitrification observed in polar regions is unlikely to occur in the global stratosphere.

  5. Heterogeneous atmospheric reactions - Sulfuric acid aerosols as tropospheric sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, A. C.; Golden, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction probabilities of various atmospheric species incident on a bulk sulfuric acid surface are measured in order to determine the role of sulfuric acid aerosols as pollutant sinks. Reaction products and unreacted starting materials leaving a Knudsen cell flow reactor after collision at 300 K with a H2SO4 surface or a soot surface were detected by mass spectrometry. Significant collision reaction probabilities are observed on a H2SO4 surface for H2O2, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, N2O5, H2O and NH3, and on soot for NH3. Estimates of the contribution of heterogeneous reactions to pollutant removal under atmospheric conditions indicate that while aerosol removal in the stratosphere is insignificant (loss rate constants approximately 10 to the -10th/sec), heterogeneous reactions may be the dominant loss process for several tropospheric species (loss rate constant approximately 10 to the -5th/sec, comparable to photolysis rate constants).

  6. Gaseous sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide measurements in the Arctic troposphere and lower stratosphere - Implications for hydroxyl radical abundances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Moehler; F. Arnold

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of gaseous sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide were made in the winter Arctic troposphere and lower stratosphere using aircraft-borne mass spectrometers. The measurements, covering altitudes between 3.5 and 11.4 km, took place on 14 and 18 February, 1987 in northern Scandinavia. The abundance of H2SO4 was around 0.01 to 0.06 pptv (parts per trillion by volume), and the measured

  7. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

  8. Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate: Formation and Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated some thermodynamic properties (i.e., freezing/melting points) and heterogeneous chemistry of sulfuric acid monohydrate (SAM, H2SO4.H2O), using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The freezing point observations of thin liquid sulfuric acid films show that for acid contents between 75 and 85 wt % the monohydrate crystallizes readily at temperatures between 220 and 240 K on a glass substrate. Once formed, SAM can be thermodynamically stable in the H2O partial pressure range of (1-4) x 10(exp -4) torr and in the temperature range of 220-240 K. For a constant H2O partial pressure, lowering the temperature causes SAM to melt when the temperature and water partial pressure conditions are out of its stability regime. The reaction probability measurements indicate that the hydrolysis of N2O5 is significantly suppressed owing to the formation of crystalline SAM: The reaction probability on water-rich SAM (with higher relative humidity, or RH) is of the order of 10(exp -3) at 210 K and decreases by more than an order of magnitude for the acid-rich form (with lower RH). The hydrolysis rate of ClONO2 on water-rich SAM is even smaller, of the order of 10(exp -4) at 195 K. These reported values on crystalline SAM are much smaller than those on liquid solutions. No enhancement of these reactions is observed in the presence of HCl vapor at the stratospheric concentrations. In addition, Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller analysis of gas adsorption isotherms and photomicrography have been performed to characterize the surface roughness and porosities of the SAM substrate. The results suggest the possible formation of SAM in some regions of the middle- or low-latitude stratosphere and, consequently, much slower heterogeneous reactions on the frozen aerosols.

  9. Ambient temperature effect on single-bubble sonoluminescence in different concentrations of sulfuric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Imani, Kh; Bemani, F; Silatani, M; Sadighi-Bonabi, R

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ambient temperature on the parameters of the single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid (SA) diluted in water is studied. Using a hydrochemical model, three dominant instabilities of shape, Bjerknes, and diffusion are considered. The phase diagrams of the bubble in the (R0 - Pa) space are presented, and the parametric dependence of the light intensity is discussed. In contrast to water, the calculated thermal-bremsstrahlung mechanism of light emission at the fixed degassing condition of high SA concentrations shows that, with increasing the temperature of aqueous SA solutions, the light intensity increases. However, at diluted SA solutions similar to water, the light intensity decreases with increasing the ambient temperature. For 50 wt % SA, it was observed that the emitted light was almost temperature independent. Furthermore, it is found that, at the fixed temperatures of 20?°C, 10?°C, and 0?°C, the aqueous solutions of 65 wt %, 50 wt %, and 45 wt % SA, respectively, have the maximum light emission. PMID:22400679

  10. Ambient temperature effect on single-bubble sonoluminescence in different concentrations of sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani, Kh.; Bemani, F.; Silatani, M.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ambient temperature on the parameters of the single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid (SA) diluted in water is studied. Using a hydrochemical model, three dominant instabilities of shape, Bjerknes, and diffusion are considered. The phase diagrams of the bubble in the (R0 - Pa) space are presented, and the parametric dependence of the light intensity is discussed. In contrast to water, the calculated thermal-bremsstrahlung mechanism of light emission at the fixed degassing condition of high SA concentrations shows that, with increasing the temperature of aqueous SA solutions, the light intensity increases. However, at diluted SA solutions similar to water, the light intensity decreases with increasing the ambient temperature. For 50 wt % SA, it was observed that the emitted light was almost temperature independent. Furthermore, it is found that, at the fixed temperatures of 20 °C, 10 °C, and 0 °C, the aqueous solutions of 65 wt %, 50 wt %, and 45 wt % SA, respectively, have the maximum light emission.

  11. Involvement of Intermediate Sulfur Species in Biological Reduction of Elemental Sulfur under Acidic, Hydrothermal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Druschel, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    The thermoacidophile and obligate elemental sulfur (S80)-reducing anaerobe Acidilobus sulfurireducens 18D70 does not associate with bulk solid-phase sulfur during S80-dependent batch culture growth. Cyclic voltammetry indicated the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as well as polysulfides after 1 day of batch growth of the organism at pH 3.0 and 81°C. The production of polysulfide is likely due to the abiotic reaction between S80 and the biologically produced H2S, as evinced by a rapid cessation of polysulfide formation when the growth temperature was decreased, inhibiting the biological production of sulfide. After an additional 5 days of growth, nanoparticulate S80 was detected in the cultivation medium, a result of the hydrolysis of polysulfides in acidic medium. To examine whether soluble polysulfides and/or nanoparticulate S80 can serve as terminal electron acceptors (TEA) supporting the growth of A. sulfurireducens, total sulfide concentration and cell density were monitored in batch cultures with S80 provided as a solid phase in the medium or with S80 sequestered in dialysis tubing. The rates of sulfide production in 7-day-old cultures with S80 sequestered in dialysis tubing with pore sizes of 12 to 14 kDa and 6 to 8 kDa were 55% and 22%, respectively, of that of cultures with S80 provided as a solid phase in the medium. These results indicate that the TEA existed in a range of particle sizes that affected its ability to diffuse through dialysis tubing of different pore sizes. Dynamic light scattering revealed that S80 particles generated through polysulfide rapidly grew in size, a rate which was influenced by the pH of the medium and the presence of organic carbon. Thus, S80 particles formed through abiological hydrolysis of polysulfide under acidic conditions appeared to serve as a growth-promoting TEA for A. sulfurireducens. PMID:23335768

  12. EFFECTS OF ENDOGENOUS AMMONIA ON NEUTRALIZATION OF INHALED SULFURIC ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine male beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to 0, 6 and 10.5 mg/cu.m sulfuric acid aerosols with normal ammonia, increased blood ammonia, and increased inhaled ammonia to determine whether the addition of ammonia affected the toxicity of sulfuric acid aerosols. Exhaled conce...

  13. A method for identifying sulfuric acid in single cloud and fog droplets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eliezer Ganor

    1999-01-01

    We describe herein a novel method for identifying sulfuric acid in single droplets of mist, fog or cloud. The method is based on a microchemical reaction displayed by the droplets upon a shiny cleavage plane [1011? ] of Iceland spar – the rhombohedral variety of calcite. Thus, single droplets containing sulfuric acid respond by a typical microchemical reaction wherein they

  14. EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID RAIN ON DECOMPOSITION RATE AND CHEMICAL ELEMENT CONTENT OF HARDWOOD LEAF LITTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, or 4.0) or control rain (pH 5.6) was applied to decomposing leaf packs of 10 hardwood species. Changes in weight and chemical element concentrations were followed for 408 days. There was no apparent relationship between sulfuric acid rai...

  15. Laboratory measurements of the homogeneous freezing of aqueous sulfuric acid and ammonium

    E-print Network

    Swanson, Brian D.

    Laboratory measurements of the homogeneous freezing of aqueous sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate: brian@ess.washington.edu. #12;Abstract Other recent laboratory measurements for aqueous ammonium sulfate containing two common upper-tropospheric solutions ­ ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid. Mea- surements were

  16. Optical constants of sulfuric acid - Application to the clouds of Venus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. F. Palmer; Dudley Williams

    1975-01-01

    Young (1973) and Sill (1972) have independently suggested that the clouds of Venus may well consist of particles composed of sulfuric acid molecules with attached water molecules. For a further study of this hypothesis an investigation has been conducted with the objective to supply the needed laboratory data for a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations. Optical constants have been

  17. BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID MIST INHALATION BY HUMAN SUBJECTS WHILE AT REST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the effect of sulfuric acid aerosol exposure for 2 consecutive days on seven human biochemical blood parameters. A total of 20 human subjects were exposed to 100 micrograms per cu. m. sulfuric acid aerosol for 4 hr/day for 2 consecutive days. A total of 17 hum...

  18. What Is the Boiling Point and Heat of Vaporization of Sulfuric Acid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, R. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the values presented in various handbooks for the boiling point and heat of vaporization of sulfuric acid, noting discrepencies. Analyzes various approaches to data presentation, discussing the data on sulfuric acid in light of the Trouton constant. Points out the need for a more critical use of tables. (JM)

  19. An improved parameterization for sulfuric acid-water nucleation rates for tropospheric and stratospheric conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Vehkamäki; M. Kulmala; I. Napari; K. E. J. Lehtinen; C. Timmreck; M. Noppel; A. Laaksonen

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present parameterized equations for calculation of sulfuric acid-water critical nucleus compositions, critical cluster radii and homogeneous nucleation rates for tropospheric and stratospheric conditions. The parameterizations are based on a classical nucleation model. We used an improved model for the hydrate formation relying on ab initio calculations of small sulfuric acid clusters and on experimental data for

  20. COMBINED EFFECT OF OZONE AND SULFURIC ACID ON PULMONARY FUNCTION IN MAN (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A potential synergistic effect of ozone and sulfuric acid mist (H2SO4) on respiratory function has been postulated for humans exposed to these two pollutants simultaneously. Nine young men were exposed to 0.25 ppm ozone (03), 1200-1600 mcg/cu m sulfuric acid aerosol (H2SO4), and ...

  1. ANALYSIS SYSTEM FOR TOTAL SULFURIC ACID IN AMBIENT AIR. DEVELOPMENT AND PRELIMINARY EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total sulfuric acid analysis (TSAA) system was developed and shown to provide quantitative determinations of sulfuric acid in air at concentrations as low as 0.26 micrograms/cu m. Quantitation at lower concentrations appears to be possible. The general approach in the design an...

  2. A Demonstration of Acid Rain and Lake Acidification: Wet Deposition of Sulfur Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a science demonstration on the dissolution of sulfuric oxide emphasizing the concept of acid rain which is an environmental problem. Demonstrates the acidification from acid rain on two lake environments, limestone and granite. Includes safety information. (YDS)

  3. 40 CFR 417.140 - Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Section 417.140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Neutralization of Sulfuric Acid Esters and Sulfonic Acids Subcategory...

  4. 40 CFR 417.140 - Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Section 417.140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Neutralization of Sulfuric Acid Esters and Sulfonic Acids Subcategory...

  5. Health effects of air pollutants: Sulfuric acid, the old and the new

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, M.O. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Data from exposure of experimental animals and human subjects to sulfuric acid presents a consistent picture of its toxicology. Effects on airway resistance in asthmatic subjects were well predicted by data obtained on guinea pigs. Sulfuric acid increases the irritant response to ozone in both rats and man. In donkeys, rabbits, and human subjects, sulfuric acid alters clearance of particles from the lung in a similar manner. These changes resemble those produced by cigarette smoke and could well lead to chronic bronchitis. Data obtained on guinea pigs indicate that very small amounts of sulfuric acid on the surface of ultrafine metal oxide aerosols produce functional, morphological, and biochemical pulmonary effects. Such particles are typical of those emitted from coal combustion and smelting operations. Sulfate is an unsatisfactory surrogate in existing epidemiology studies. Sulfuric acid measurement is a critical need in such studies. 31 references.

  6. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HO2NO2 on Liquid Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of HO2NO2 (peroxynitric acid, PNA) vapor with liquid sulfuric acid surfaces was investigated for the acid contents ranging from 50 to 70 wt % and over a temperature range from 205 to 230 K, using a fast flow-reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. PNA was observed to be physically taken up by liquid sulfuric acid, without undergoing irreversible aqueous phase reactions.

  7. Sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Liu, Cheng-jun; Shi, Pei-yang; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Mao-fa; Zhang, Qing-song; Zevenhoven, Ron; Saxén, Henrik

    2015-03-01

    The sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite was investigated. The negative influence of a solid product layer constituted of a silicon-rich phase and chromium-rich sulfate was eliminated by crushing the chromite and by selecting proper leaching conditions. The dimensionless change in specific surface area and the conversion rate of the chromite were observed to exhibit a proportional relationship. A modified shrinking particle model was developed to account for the change in reactive surface area, and the model was fitted to experimental data. The resulting model was observed to describe experimental findings very well. Kinetics analysis revealed that the leaching process is controlled by a chemical reaction under the employed experimental conditions and the activation energy of the reaction is 48 kJ·mol-1.

  8. Kinetics of xylose in hydrolysate using dilute sulphuric acid as catalyst

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Qi; Suping Zhang; Qingli Xu; Zhenxing Zhu; Yongjie Yan Zhengwei Ren; Yongjie Yan

    2009-01-01

    In the technology of manufacturing fuel alcohol from biomass as feedstock, hydrolysis using dilute acid as catalyst is one way to produce fermentable saccharide. In this process, the yield of xylose is always low because of the degrading during the acid environment. In this paper, the degrading kinetics of xylose in the hydrolysate was investigated under the conventional process conditions

  9. Buffer capacities of podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils to sulfuric and nitric acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, N. B.; Alekseeva, S. A.; Shashkova, G. V.; Dronova, T. Ya.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2007-04-01

    Soil samples from the main genetic horizons of pale podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils from the Central Forest Reserve were subjected to a continuous potentiometric titration by sulfuric and nitric acids. The sulfate sorption capacity was determined in soil mineral horizons. The buffer capacity of mineral horizons of both soils to sulfuric acid was found to be higher than that to the nitric acid. This is explained by the sorption of sulfates via the mechanism of ligand exchange with the release of hydroxyl groups from the surfaces of Fe and Al hydroxide particles and edge faces of clay crystallites. The buffer capacity of organic horizons of the pale podzolic soil to sulfuric acid proved to be higher than that to nitric acid; in organic horizons of the peat gleyic podzolic soil, the buffer capacity to sulfuric acid was lower than that to nitric acid. The reasons for this phenomenon have yet to be investigated.

  10. Acid Rain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gene E. Likens; Richard F. Wright; James N. Galloway; Thomas J. Butler

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the acidity of rain and snow reveal that in parts of the eastern U.S. and of western Europe precipitation has changed from a nearly neutral solution 200 years ago to a dilute solution of sulfuric and nitric acids today. The trend is a result of the emission of sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere accompanying the rise

  11. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters...Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11 -alkyl esters...chemical substance identified as sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters...Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9- 11-alkyl esters...chemical substance identified as sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11...

  13. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Bisulfate/Sulfuric Acid/Water Clusters: Structure, Stability, and Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation

    E-print Network

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Vibrational Spectroscopy of Bisulfate/Sulfuric Acid/Water Clusters: Structure, Stability of mass-selected bisulfate, sulfuric acid, and water cluster anions, HSO4 - (H2SO4)m(H2O)n, are studied clusters of sulfuric acid and water are abundant in the atmosphere, with HSO4 - (H2SO4)m, m = 1

  14. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters...Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11 -alkyl esters...chemical substance identified as sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11...

  15. Direct Sulfonation of Methane to Methanesulfonic Acid by Sulfur Trioxide Catalyzed by Cerium(IV) Sulfate in the Presence

    E-print Network

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Direct Sulfonation of Methane to Methanesulfonic Acid by Sulfur Trioxide Catalyzed by Cerium activation; metal catalyst; methane; methanesulfonic acid; molecular oxygen; sulfona- tion; sulfur trioxide- ing MSA than those produced using sulfuric or para-tol- uenesulfonic acid as the catalyst. Anhydrous

  16. Effect of atmospheric sulfur pollutants derived from acid precipitation on the benthic dynamics of lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.J.

    1982-11-01

    Sulfuric acid is a major contributor to acid precipitation in the United States. The relationship of acid precipitation to the sulfur dynamics of three lakes in New York was studied. For South Lake, which has probably been acidified, the sulfur profile in the sediment corresponded to historical changes in anthropogenic sulfur inputs. In all three study lakes, the organic sulfur constituents, which generally have been ignored in limnological investigations, played a major role in sulfur dynamics. The transformations and fluxes of inorganic and organic sulfur differed among the lakes and reflected characteristic abiotic and biotic properties, including productivity parameters. The community structure and secondary production of the invertebrate benthos were ascertained and, for South Lake, were similar to other acidified lakes. The importance of benthic insects on sulfur dynamics was demonstrated. Further studies on sulfur in lakes will enhance the understanding of the role of these anthropogenic inputs on lake systems and permit a more accurate appraisal of the present and future impacts of acidic deposition on water quality. 10 references.

  17. Use of Empty Fruit Bunches from the oil palm for bioethanol production: a thorough comparison between dilute acid and dilute alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, S; Gnansounou, E

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, two pretreatment techniques using either dilute acid (H2SO4) or dilute alkali (NaOH) have been compared for producing bioethanol from Empty Fruit Bunches (EFBs) from oil palm tree, a relevant feedstock for tropical countries. Treatments' performances under different conditions have been assessed and statistically optimized with respect to the response upon standardized enzymatic saccharification. The dilute acid treatment performed at optimal conditions (161.5°C, 9.44 min and 1.51% acid loading) gave 85.5% glucose yield, comparable to those of other commonly investigated feedstocks. Besides, the possibility of using fibers instead of finely ground biomass may be of economic interest. Oppositely, treatment with dilute alkali has shown lower performances under the conditions explored, most likely given the relatively significant lignin content, suggesting that the use of stronger alkali regime (with the associated drawbacks) is unavoidable to improve the performance of this treatment. PMID:24662312

  18. Pt/TiO2 (Rutile) Catalysts for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition in Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic; D. M. Ginosar; H. W. Rollins; K. C. Burch; P. J. Pinhero; H. H. Farrell

    2008-04-01

    Thermochemical cycles consist of a series of chemical reactions to produce hydrogen from water at lower temperatures than by direct thermal decomposition. All the sulfur-based cycles for water splitting employ the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. This work reports the studies performed on platinum supported on titania (rutile) catalysts to investigate the causes of catalyst deactivation under sulfuric acid decomposition reaction conditions. Samples of 1 wt% Pt/TiO2 (rutile) catalysts were submitted to flowing concentrated sulfuric acid at 1123 K and atmospheric pressure for different times on stream (TOS) between 0 and 548 h. Post-operation analyses of the spent catalyst samples showed that Pt oxidation and sintering occurred under reaction conditions and some Pt was lost by volatilization. Pt loss rate was higher at initial times but total loss appeared to be independent of the gaseous environment. Catalyst activity showed an initial decrease that lasted for about 66 h, followed by a slight recovery of activity between 66 and 102 h TOS, and a period of slower deactivation after 102 h TOS. Catalyst sulfation did not seem to be detrimental to catalyst activity and the activity profile suggested that a complex dynamical situation involving platinum sintering, volatilization, and oxidation, along with TiO2 morphological changes affected catalyst activity in a non-monotonic way.

  19. Sulfuric acid aerosol exposure in humans assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage

    SciTech Connect

    Frampton, M.W.; Voter, K.Z.; Morrow, P.E.; Roberts, N.J. Jr.; Culp, D.J.; Cox, C.; Utell, M.J. (Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that exposure to acidic aerosols may affect human health. Brief exposures to acidic aerosols alter mucociliary clearance and increase airway responsiveness, but effects on host defense mechanisms at the alveolar level have not been studied in humans. Twelve healthy, nonsmoking volunteers between 20 and 39 yr of age were exposed for 2 h to aerosols of approximately 1,000 micrograms/m3 sulfuric acid (H2SO4) or sodium chloride (NaCl (control)), with intermittent exercise, in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Each subject received both exposures, separated by at least 2 wk. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 18 h after exposure in order to detect evidence of an inflammatory response, changes in alveolar cell subpopulations, or changes in alveolar macrophage (AM) function, which is important in host defense. When compared with NaCl, exposure to H2SO4 did not increase polymorphonuclear leukocytes in BAL fluid. The percentage of T lymphocytes decreased in association with H2SO4 exposure, but the difference was not statistically significant (14.9% after NaCl, 11.5% after H2SO4; p = 0.14). Antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of AM increased in association with H2SO4 exposure (percent lysis 19.1 after NaCl, 23.6 after H2SO4; p = 0.16). No significant change was seen in release of superoxide anion or inactivation of influenza virus in vitro. Brief exposures to H2SO4 aerosol at 1,000 micrograms/m3 do not cause an influx of inflammatory cells into the alveolar space, and no evidence was found for alteration in antimicrobial defense 18 h after exposure.

  20. Ion Irradiation of Sulfuric Acid: Implications for its Stability on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) detected regions on Europa's surface containing distorted H2O bands. This distortion likely indicates that there are other molecules mixed with the water ice. Based on spectral comparison, some of the leading possibilities are sulfuric acid, salts. or possibly H3O(+). Previous laboratory studies have shown that sulfuric acid can be created by irradiation of H2OSO2 mixtures, and both molecules are present on Europa. In this project, we were interested in investigating the radiation stability of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and determining its lifetime on the surface of Europa.

  1. Laboratory studies of nitric acid hydrate and sulfuric acid aerosols: Implications for polar stratospheric cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.E. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols are important in a number of modeling and remote sensing applications. We have devised a new approach for determining the frequency dependent real and imaginary refractive indices directly from the observation of the infrared spectra of the aerosols. We have applied this method to the study of water ice aerosols and comparisons with previous measurements confirm that the method is sound and accurate. The temperature dependence of the refractive index of ice has also been measured over the range 130 K to 210 K, which includes the region of interest for the study of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC`s). The method has also been applied to the study of nitric acid dehydrate (NAD) and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). Sulfuric acid/nitric acid/water ternary systems are also being studied with the aim of determining the nature of the phases formed and the associated freezing points as a function of the concentrations of the acids.

  2. Sulfuric acid-methanol electrolytes as an alternative to sulfuric-hydrofluoric acid mixtures for electropolishing of niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Corcoran, Sean G. [Virginia Tech; Kelley, Michael J. [W& amp; M, JLAB

    2011-06-01

    Attainment of the greatest possible interior surface smoothness is critical to meeting the performance demands placed upon niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities by next generation projects. Electropolishing with HF-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolytes yields cavities that meet SRF performance goals, but a less-hazardous, more environmentally-friendly process is desirable. Reported studies of EP on chemically-similar tantalum describe the use of sulfuric acid-methanol electrolytes as an HF-free alternative. Reported here are the results of experiments on niobium samples with this electrolyte. Voltammetry experiments indicate a current plateau whose voltage range expands with increasing acid concentration and decreasing temperature. Impedance spectroscopy indicates that a compact salt film is responsible for the current plateau. Equivalent findings in electropolishing chemically-similar tantalum with this electrolyte were interpreted due to as mass transfer limitation by diffusion of Ta ions away from the anode surface. We infer that a similar mechanism is at work here. Conditions were found that yield leveling and brightening comparable to that obtained with HF-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixtures.

  3. Np(V) reduction by humic acid: contribution of reduced sulfur functionalities to the redox behavior of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Schmeide, K; Sachs, S; Bernhard, G

    2012-03-01

    The role of sulfur-containing functional groups in humic acids for the Np(V) reduction in aqueous solution has been studied with the objective to specify individual processes contributing to the overall redox activity of humic substances. For this, humic acid model substances type M1-S containing different amounts of sulfur (1.9, 3.9, 6.9 wt.%) were applied. The sulfur functionalities in these humic acids are dominated by reduced-sulfur species, such as thiols, dialkylsulfides and/or disulfides. The Np(V) reduction behavior of these humic acids has been studied in comparison to that of the sulfur-free humic acid type M1 at pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 under anaerobic conditions by means of batch experiments. For Np redox speciation in solution, solvent extraction and ultrafiltration were applied. In addition, redox potentials of the sample solutions were monitored. At pH 5.0, both rate and extent of Np(V) to Np(IV) reduction were found to increase with increasing sulfur content of the humic acids. At pH 7.0 and 9.0, sulfur functional groups had only a slight influence on the reduction behavior of humic acid toward Np(V). Thus, in addition to quinoid moieties and non-quinoid phenolic OH groups, generally acknowledged as main redox-active sites in humic substances, sulfur functional groups have been identified as further redox-active moieties of humic substances being active especially in the slightly acidic pH range as shown for Np(V). Due to the low sulfur content of up to 2 wt.% in natural humic substances, their contribution to the total reducing capacity is smaller than that of the other redox-active functional groups. PMID:22285088

  4. Temperature and intensity of sonoluminescence radiation in sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshaii, A.; Hoseini, M. A.; Gharibzadeh, S.; Tavakoli-Anaraki, A.

    2012-07-01

    The spectral radiation of sonoluminescence (SL) from sulfuric acid doped with various Xe concentrations has been studied in a hydrochemical simulation, including radiation effects of both continuum and line emissions. The simulation considers the same temperature for both continuum and line parts of the SL spectrum and gives results in agreement with the experiment. Also, it can properly show period-doubling dynamics for a 50 torr bubble. For most of the allowable driving pressures, it is shown that both the temperature and the intensity of SL for a 4 torr bubble are greater than those of a 50 torr bubble. However, for the range of pressures near the maximum driving conditions of the 50 torr bubble, the SL intensity of this bubble can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the 4 torr bubble. This case, which is in agreement with the experiment, is obtained when the light-emitting region of the 50 torr bubble is about three orders of magnitude greater than the 4 torr bubble.

  5. Temperature and intensity of sonoluminescence radiation in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Moshaii, A; Hoseini, M A; Gharibzadeh, S; Tavakoli-Anaraki, A

    2012-07-01

    The spectral radiation of sonoluminescence (SL) from sulfuric acid doped with various Xe concentrations has been studied in a hydrochemical simulation, including radiation effects of both continuum and line emissions. The simulation considers the same temperature for both continuum and line parts of the SL spectrum and gives results in agreement with the experiment. Also, it can properly show period-doubling dynamics for a 50 torr bubble. For most of the allowable driving pressures, it is shown that both the temperature and the intensity of SL for a 4 torr bubble are greater than those of a 50 torr bubble. However, for the range of pressures near the maximum driving conditions of the 50 torr bubble, the SL intensity of this bubble can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the 4 torr bubble. This case, which is in agreement with the experiment, is obtained when the light-emitting region of the 50 torr bubble is about three orders of magnitude greater than the 4 torr bubble. PMID:23005534

  6. Elucidating the role of ferrous ion cocatalyst in enhancing dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechanisms that result in this enhancement. Results During dilute acid and ferrous ion cocatalyst pretreatments, we observed concomitant increases in solubilized sugars in the hydrolysate and reducing sugars in the (insoluble) biomass residues. We also observed enhancements in sugar release during subsequent enzymatic saccharification of iron cocatalyst-pretreated biomass. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy showed that major peaks representing the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose are significantly attenuated by iron cocatalyst pretreatment. Imaging using Prussian blue staining indicated that Fe2+ ions associate with both cellulose/xylan and lignin in untreated as well as dilute acid/Fe2+ ion-pretreated corn stover samples. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed structural details of biomass after dilute acid/Fe2+ ion pretreatment, in which delamination and fibrillation of the cell wall were observed. Conclusions By using this multimodal approach, we have revealed that (1) acid-ferrous ion-assisted pretreatment increases solubilization and enzymatic digestion of both cellulose and xylan to monomers and (2) this pretreatment likely targets multiple chemistries in plant cell wall polymer networks, including those represented by the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose. PMID:22074910

  7. Autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing actinobacteria in acidic environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R. Norris; Carol S. Davis-Belmar; Carly F. Brown; Leonides A. Calvo-Bado

    2011-01-01

    Some novel actinobacteria from geothermal environments were shown to grow autotrophically with sulfur as an energy source.\\u000a These bacteria have not been formally named and are referred to here as “Acidithiomicrobium” species, as the first of the acidophilic actinobacteria observed to grow on sulfur. They are related to Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans with which they share a capacity for ferrous iron oxidation.

  8. Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben Kravitz; Alan Robock; Luke Oman; Georgiy Stenchikov; Allison B. Marquardt

    2009-01-01

    We used a general circulation model of Earth's climate to conduct geoengineering experiments involving stratospheric injection of sulfur dioxide and analyzed the resulting deposition of sulfate. When sulfur dioxide is injected into the tropical or Arctic stratosphere, the main additional surface deposition of sulfate occurs in midlatitude bands, because of strong cross-tropopause flux in the jet stream regions. We used

  9. Dilution and removal of dissolved metals from acid mine drainage along Imgok Creek, Korea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jae-Young Yu; Bong Heo

    2001-01-01

    The dilution factors (Di) and removal fractions (Ri) of pollutants from acid mine drainage (AMD) were quantitatively estimated using two different methods, the conservative component and mass balance method, along Imgok Creek in Korea. The conservative component method assumes that SO4 is a perfectly conservative component and calculates Di and Ri from the concentration ratios of SO4. The mass balance

  10. Methanol Reaction with Sulfuric Acid: A Vibrational Spectroscopic Study Lisa L. Van Loon and Heather C. Allen*

    E-print Network

    Methanol Reaction with Sulfuric Acid: A Vibrational Spectroscopic Study Lisa L. Van Loon 43210 ReceiVed: May 27, 2004; In Final Form: August 19, 2004 The reaction between methanol and sulfuric peak in the 800 cm-1 region, not present in either the neat methanol or concentrated sulfuric acid

  11. Anodic Treatment of Titanium Alloys in Fluoride-Containing Sulfuric Acid Electrolytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Fedorova

    2002-01-01

    The properties of anodic oxide films obtained on titanium alloys in fluoride-sulfuric acid electrolytes are studied. On this basis, the additives providing a required quality of metal article surface prior to the titanium nitride sputtering are chosen.

  12. Silica sulfuric acid a novel and heterogeneous catalyst for the synthesis of some new oxindole derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javad Azizian; Ali A. Mohammadi; Narges Karimi; Mohammad R. Mohammadizadeh; Ali R. Karimi

    2006-01-01

    Silica sulfuric acid catalyzed efficiently the electrophilic substitution reaction of an indoles with various isatins in dicholoro methane to afford the corresponding oxindoles derivatives in high yields under r.t. The catalyst exhibited remarkable reusable activity.

  13. Effect Of A Simulated Space Environment On Sulfuric Acid Anodized Aluminum For Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huong G.; Smith, Charles A.; O'Brien, Dudley L.

    1989-10-01

    The severe environmental conditions in low Earth orbit (LEO) have a detrimental effect on the performance and longevity of some thermal control coatings. Commonly used thermal control materials such as silver-Teflon, Kapton, and organic paints have shown significant mass loss and changes in optical properties after exposure in LEO. Sulfuric acid anodized aluminum has been evaluated as a thermal control coating for the radiators of the Space Station Freedom. The evaluation included: study of processing parameters necessary to achieve suitable solar absorptance (a) and thermal emittance (c) properties; study of temperature effects on the stability of the aluminum oxide produced by sulfuric acid anodizing; ultraviolet radiation, and electron radiation testing of sulfuric acid anodized aluminum; and characterization of surface chemistry and morphology before and after environmental testing to determine the cause of degradation. Results show that sulfuric acid anodized aluminum may be a satisfactory thermal control coating for the radiators of the Space Station Freedom.

  14. Buffer capacities of podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils to sulfuric and nitric acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. B. Kuznetsov; S. A. Alekseeva; G. V. Shashkova; T. Ya. Dronova; T. A. Sokolova

    2007-01-01

    Soil samples from the main genetic horizons of pale podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils from the Central Forest Reserve\\u000a were subjected to a continuous potentiometric titration by sulfuric and nitric acids. The sulfate sorption capacity was determined\\u000a in soil mineral horizons. The buffer capacity of mineral horizons of both soils to sulfuric acid was found to be higher than

  15. Biochemical changes in humans upon exposure to sulfuric acid aerosol and exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Chaney; W. Blomquist; K. Muller; G. Goldstein

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a single exposure to sulfuric acid aerosol on six human biochemical blood parameters was evaluated. A total of 18 human subjects were exposed to ambient air for 4 hr on the first day of exposure and to 100 ..mu..g\\/m³ (0.033 ..mu..M) sulfuric acid aerosol (0.5 ..mu..m mean mass diameter) for 4 hr on the second day. A

  16. Optical constants of sulfuric acid - Application to the clouds of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, K. F.; Williams, D.

    1975-01-01

    Young (1973) and Sill (1972) have independently suggested that the clouds of Venus may well consist of particles composed of sulfuric acid molecules with attached water molecules. For a further study of this hypothesis an investigation has been conducted with the objective to supply the needed laboratory data for a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations. Optical constants have been determined for the visible, near infrared, and intermediate infrared wavelength regions.

  17. Microbial contributions to cave formation: New insights into sulfuric acid speleogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Summers Engel; Libby A. Stern; Philip C. Bennett

    2004-01-01

    The sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) model was introduced in the early 1970s from observations of Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, and was proposed as a cave-enlargement process due to primarily H2S autoxidation to sulfuric acid and subaerial replacement of carbonate by gypsum. Here we present a reexamination of the SAS type locality in which we make use of uniquely applied geochemical

  18. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies that the oxidation rate of amines by OH and possibly other oxidants may be decreased by clustering, thus prolonging the chemical lifetime of amines in the air.

  19. Alteration of the Midpoint Potential and Catalytic Activity of the Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein by Changes of Amino Acids Forming

    E-print Network

    Trumpower, Bernard L.

    Alteration of the Midpoint Potential and Catalytic Activity of the Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein by Changes of Amino Acids Forming Hydrogen Bonds to the Iron-Sulfur Cluster* (Received for publication, July iron-sulfur protein indicates a sulfur atom (S-1) of the iron-sulfur cluster and the sulfur atom (S

  20. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  1. Effects of sulfuric acid and nitrogen deposition on mineral nutrition of Picea abies (L.) Karst.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ecosystems, saplings have been sprayed with artificial acid rain, structured soil samples have been extractedEffects of sulfuric acid and nitrogen deposition on mineral nutrition of Picea abies (L.) Karst. B sites in the Fichtel- gebirge, and low fogwater pH (Trautner, 1989) of 2.2 indicate a high acid stress

  2. Photon and Water Mediated Sulfur Oxide and Acid Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur compounds have been observed in the atmospheres of a number of planetary bodies in our solar system including Venus, Earth, Mars, Io, Europa, and Callisto. The global cloud cover on Venus located at an altitude between 50 and 80 kilometers is composed primarily of sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) and water. Planetary photochemical models have attempted to explain observations of sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides with significant discrepancies remaining between models and observation. In particular, high SO_2 mixing ratios are observed above 90 km which exceed model predictions by orders of magnitude. Work recently done in the Vaida lab has shown red light can drive photochemistry through overtone pumping for acids like H_2SO_4 and has been successful in explaining much of the sulfur chemistry in Earth's atmosphere. Water can have a number of interesting effects such as catalysis, suppression, and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical processes. We investigate the role of water complexes in the hydration of sulfur oxides and dehydration of sulfur acids and present spectroscopic studies to document such effects. We investigate these reactions using FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and will report on our findings.

  3. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  4. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  5. Determination of Key Intermediates in Cholesterol and Bile Acid Biosynthesis by Stable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Honda, Akira; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    For more than a decade, we have developed stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry methods to quantify key intermediates in cholesterol and bile acid biosynthesis, mevalonate and oxysterols, respectively. The methods are more sensitive and reproducible than conventional radioisotope (RI), gas-chromatography (GC) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, so that they are applicable not only to samples from experimental animals but also to small amounts of human specimens. In this paper, we review the development of stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry for quantifying mevalonate and oxysterols in biological materials, and demonstrate the usefulness of this technique. PMID:19609389

  6. One-step synthesis of novel sulfuric acid groups' functionalized carbon via hydrothermal carbonization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuezheng Liang; Huiquan Xiao; Yongmiao Shen; Chenze Qi

    2010-01-01

    The novel sulfuric acid groups' functionalized carbon has been synthesized via one-step hydrothermal carbonization of polyvinyl alcohol and hydroxyethylsulfuric acid. The novel carbon exhibited high acidity and comparable activities to sulfonic acid for the traditional acid-catalyzed reactions, which indicated that it has great potential for the environmental-friendly processes. The copolymerization method provides an efficient procedure for the synthesis of various

  7. Sequential dilute acid and alkali pretreatment of corn stover: Sugar recovery efficiency and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Ji Young; Jang, Hyun Min; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Jong Moon

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the feasibility of applying sequential dilute acid and alkali pretreatment into the hydrolysis of corn stover and to elucidate the effects of structural changes in the biomass on its enzymatic digestibility. H2SO4 used in the first step selectively hydrolyzed 74.6-77.3% of xylan and NaOH used in the second step removed 85.9-89.4% of lignin, from the raw corn stover. Compared to single dilute acid pretreatment, the proposed combined pretreatment minimized the generation of byproducts such as acetic acid, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural in the hydrolysates, and enhanced the enzymatic hydrolysis of the solid residue. The changes in the structural features (porosity, morphology, and crystallinity) of the solid residue were strongly correlated with the enhancement of enzymatic digestibility. The overall glucose and xylose yields finally obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis reached 89.1-97.9% and 71.0-75.9%, respectively. PMID:25706555

  8. Comparison of sulfuric and oxalic acid anodizing for preparation of thermal control coatings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong G.; Watcher, John M.; Smith, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of thermal control surfaces, which maintain stable solar absorptivity and infrared emissivity over long periods, is challenging due to severe conditions in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Some candidate coatings are second-surface silver-coated Teflon; second-surface, silvered optical solar reflectors made of glass or quartz; and anodized aluminum. Sulfuric acid anodized and oxalic acid anodized aluminum was evaluated under simulated LEO conditions. Oxalic acid anodizing shows promise of greater stability in LEO over long missions, such as the 30 years planned for the Space Station. However, sulfuric acid anodizing shows lower solar absorptivity.

  9. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  10. Efficient hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride hydrolysis using silica sulfuric acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Joydev; Roy, Binayak; Sharma, Pratibha

    2015-02-01

    A heterogeneous acid catalyst, silica sulfuric acid, was prepared from silica gel (SiO2) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Addition of SO3H functional group to SiO2 has been confirmed through various characterization techniques. The effect of this heterogeneous acid catalyst on hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction was studied for different ratios of catalyst to NaBH4 and at different temperatures. The catalyst exhibited high catalytic activity towards sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction. The activation energy of the NaBH4 hydrolysis reaction in the presence of silica sulfuric acid was calculated to be the lowest (17 kJ mol-1) among reported heterogeneous catalysts till date.

  11. Observation of neutral sulfuric acid-amine containing clusters in laboratory and ambient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang C.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J. N.; Eisele, F. L.; Chen, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-11-02

    Recent ab initio calculations showed that amines can enhance atmospheric sulfuric acid-water nucleation more effectively than ammonia, and this prediction has been substantiated in laboratory measurements. Laboratory studies have also shown that amines can effectively displace ammonia in several types of ammonium clusters. However, the roles of amines in cluster formation and growth at a microscopic molecular scale (from molecular sizes up to 2 nm) have not yet been well understood. Processes that must be understood include the incorporation of amines into sulfuric acid clusters and the formation of organic salts in freshly nucleated particles, which contributes significantly to particle growth rates. We report the first laboratory and ambient measurements of neutral sulfuric acid-amine clusters using the Cluster CIMS, a recently-developed mass spectrometer designed for measuring neutral clusters formed in the atmosphere during nucleation. An experimental technique, which we refer to as Semi-Ambient Signal Amplification (SASA), was employed. Sulfuric acid was added to ambient air, and the concentrations and composition of clusters in this mixture were analyzed by the Cluster CIMS. This experimental approach led to significantly higher cluster concentrations than are normally found in ambient air, thereby increasing signal-to-noise levels and allowing us to study reactions between gas phase species in ambient air and sulfuric acid containing clusters. Mass peaks corresponding to clusters containing four H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} molecules and one amine molecule were clearly observed, with the most abundant sulfuric acid-amine clusters being those containing a C2- or C4-amine (i.e. amines with masses of 45 and 73 amu). Evidence for C3- and C5-amines (i.e. amines with masses of 59 and 87 amu) was also found, but their correlation with sulfuric acid tetramer was not as strong as was observed for the C2- and C4-amines. The formation mechanisms for those sulfuric acid-amine clusters were investigated by varying the residence time in the inlet. It was concluded that the amines react directly with neutral clusters and that ion-induced clustering of sulfuric acid cluster ions with amines was not a dominant process. Results from ambient measurements using the Cluster CIMS without addition of sulfuric acid have shown that the sulfuric acid-amine clusters were reasonably well correlated with sulfuric acid tetramer and consistent with the SASA experiments at the same Boulder sampling site. Also, clusters that contain C2- or C4-amines were more abundant and better correlated with sulfuric acid tetramer than other types of amine containing clusters. However, ambient measurements of sulfuric acid-amine clusters remain difficult and highly uncertain because their concentrations are only slightly above background levels, even during nucleation events.

  12. Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.

    2014-09-23

    The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 ± 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 ± 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 ± 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 ± 0.20 and averaged 1.18 ± 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

  13. Hot Filtration: A Way to Enhance the Recovery of Chromite in Sulfuric Acid Leaching, with or without the Addition of Perchloric Acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emre USTAO; Ahmet GEVECI

    Ahigh grade chromite concentrate obtained from the Pinarbasi region of Kayseri province in Turkey was reacted with a solution of sulfuric acid and perchloric acid at atmospheric pressure. The effects of tempera- ture, duration, sulfuric acid concentration and perchloric acid addition on leach recovery were determined in several experiments. Hexavalent chromium contents of the final solutions were also analyzed after

  14. Stabilization of sulfuric acid dimers by ammonia, methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2014-06-01

    This study experimentally explores how ammonia (NH3), methylamine (MA), dimethylamine (DMA), and trimethylamine (TMA) affect the chemical formation mechanisms of electrically neutral clusters that contain two sulfuric acid molecules (dimers). Dimers may also contain undetectable compounds, such as water or bases, that evaporate upon ionization and sampling. Measurements were conducted using a glass flow reactor which contained a steady flow of humidified nitrogen with sulfuric acid concentrations of 107 to 109 cm-3. A known molar flow rate of a basic gas was injected into the flow reactor. The University of Minnesota Cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer was used to measure the resulting sulfuric acid vapor and cluster concentrations. It was found that, for a given concentration of sulfuric acid vapor, the dimer concentration increases with increasing concentration of the basic gas, eventually reaching a plateau. The base concentrations at which the dimer concentrations saturate suggest NH3 < MA < TMA ? DMA in forming stabilized sulfuric acid dimers. Two heuristic models for cluster formation by acid-base reactions are developed to interpret the data. The models provide ranges of evaporation rate constants that are consistent with observations and leads to an analytic expression for nucleation rates that is consistent with atmospheric observations.

  15. Pretreatment of corn stover for sugar production using dilute hydrochloric acid followed by lime.

    PubMed

    Zu, Shuai; Li, Wen-zhi; Zhang, Mingjian; Li, Zihong; Wang, Ziyu; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a two stage process was evaluated to increase the sugar recovery. Firstly, corn stover was treated with diluted hydrochloric acid to maximize the xylose yield, and then the residue was treated with lime to alter the lignin structure and swell the cellulose surface. The optimal condition was 120 °C and 40 min for diluted hydrochloric acid pretreatment followed by lime pretreatment at 60 °C for 12h with lime loading at 0.1 g/g of substrate. The glucose and xylose yield was 78.0% and 97.0%, respectively, with cellulase dosage at 5 FPU/g of substrate. The total glucose yield increased to 85.9% when the cellulase loading was increased to 10 FPU/g of substrate. This two stage process was effective due to the swelling of the internal surface, an increase in the porosity and a decrease in the degree of polymerization. PMID:24316479

  16. Removal of transition metals from dilute aqueous solution by carboxylic acid group containing absorbent polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new carboxylic acid group containing resin with cation exchange capacity, 12.67 meq/g has been used to remove Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from dilute aqueous solution. The resin has Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ removal capacity, 216 mg/g, 154 mg/g and 180 mg/g, respectively. The selectivity of the resin to ...

  17. Distribution of Hydrogen Peroxide, Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfuric Acid in Europa's Icy Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) detected hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide and a hydrated material on Europa's surface, the latter interpreted as hydrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4*nH2O) or hydrated salts. Related compounds are molecular oxygen, sulfur dioxide, and two chromophores, one that is dark in the ultraviolet(UV) and concentrated on the trailing side, the other brighter in the UV and preferentially distributed in the leading hemisphere. The UV-dark material has been suggested to be sulfur.

  18. Monte Carlo Simulations of Small Sulfuric Acid-Water Clusters S. M. Kathmann,* and B. N. Hale,*

    E-print Network

    Hale, Barbara N.

    -to-liquid nucleation1-5 to acid rain formation6-8 and ozone depletion mechanisms.9-11 Doyle's early work2 predictedMonte Carlo Simulations of Small Sulfuric Acid-Water Clusters S. M. Kathmann,* and B. N. Hale§,* En Form: August 7, 2001 Effective atom-atom potentials are developed for binary sulfuric acid

  19. Nafion membranes modified with silica sulfuric acid for the elevated temperature and lower humidity operation of PEMFC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Gnana Kumar; A. R. Kim; Kee Suk Nahm; R. Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Nafion membranes modified with silica and silica sulfuric acid are fabricated for the elevated temperature and lower humidity operation of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. An incorporation of silica sulfuric acid promotes the amorphous phase which in turn influences the segmental motion of polymeric chains. By the endeavor of sulfonic acid moieties, ion channels are extended and facilitate the high ionic

  20. Heterogeneous freezing of single sulfuric acid solution droplets: laboratory experiments utilizing an acoustic levitator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ettner; S. K. Mitra; S. Borrmann

    2004-01-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of single binary sulfuric acid solution droplets were measured in dependency of acid concentration down to temperatures as low as -50°C. In order to avoid influence of supporting substrates on the freezing characteristics, a new technique has been developed to suspend the droplet by means of an acoustic levitator. The droplets contained immersed particles of graphite,

  1. New insights into sulfur amino acids function in gut health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAAs) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable amino acid and is...

  2. APPLICATION OF AN ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR FOR INSTRUMENTAL SAMPLING OF SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A means of separating gaseous sulfuric acid from flue gas particles has been evaluated. Previous attempts to achieve separation by filtration resulted in retention of the acid by the particulate buildup on the filter surface. A laboratory study of a prototype electrostatic precip...

  3. Exogenic controls on sulfuric acid hydrate production at the surface of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Cassidy, T.; Paranicas, C.; Shirley, J. H.; Prockter, L. M.; Kamp, L. W.

    2013-03-01

    External agents have heavily weathered the visible surface of Europa. Internal and external drivers competing to produce the surface we see include, but are not limited to: aqueous alteration of materials within the icy shell, initial emplacement of endogenic material by geologic activity, implantation of exogenic ions and neutrals from Jupiter's magnetosphere, alteration of surface chemistry by radiolysis and photolysis, impact gardening of upper surface layers, and redeposition of sputtered volatiles. Separating the influences of these processes is critical to understanding the surface and subsurface compositions at Europa. Recent investigations have applied cryogenic reflectance spectroscopy to Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observations to derive abundances of surface materials including water ice, hydrated sulfuric acid, and hydrated sulfate salts. Here we compare derived sulfuric acid hydrate (H2SO4·nH2O) abundance with weathering patterns and intensities associated with charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere. We present models of electron energy, ion energy, and sulfur ion number flux as well as the total combined electron and ion energy flux at the surface to estimate the influence of these processes on surface concentrations, as a function of location. We found that correlations exist linking both electron energy flux (r?0.75) and sulfur ion flux (r=0.93) with the observed abundance of sulfuric acid hydrate on Europa. Sulfuric acid hydrate production on Europa appears to be limited in some regions by a reduced availability of sulfur ions, and in others by insufficient levels of electron energy. The energy delivered by sulfur and other ions has a much less significant role. Surface deposits in regions of limited exogenic processing are likely to bear closest resemblance to oceanic composition. These results will assist future efforts to separate the relative influence of endogenic and exogenic sources in establishing the surface composition.

  4. Solid acids as substitutes for sulfuric acid in the liquid phase nitration of toluene to nitrotoluene and dinitrotoluene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Kogelbauer; Diego Vassena; Roel Prins; John N Armor

    2000-01-01

    Our results demonstrate that sulfuric acid supported on preshaped silica is a good catalyst for the nitration of toluene to dinitrotoluene using 65wt.% nitric acid with respect to catalyst performance (activity, selectivity, regenerability) and catalyst handling (storage, stirring, separation). It is imperative to carefully control the water content of the catalyst prior to reaction in order to obtain high activity.

  5. Genetic and environmental factors involved in increased resistance of brook trout to sulfuric acid solutions and mine acid polluted waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FREDERICK A. SWARTS; WILLIAM A. DUNSON; JAMES E. WRIGHT

    1978-01-01

    Several strains of hatchery-reared brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill), were exposed to low pH in the laboratory (sulfuric acid solutions) and in the field (mine acid polluted waters). Wild brook trout were also used in some field tests. Tests were both acute and chronic (up to 2 mo). Pronounced strain differences in survival ability were detected among embryonic, juvenile, and

  6. Helically agitated mixing in dry dilute acid pretreatment enhances the bioconversion of corn stover into ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry dilute acid pretreatment at extremely high solids loading of lignocellulose materials demonstrated promising advantages of no waste water generation, less sugar loss, and low steam consumption while maintaining high hydrolysis yield. However, the routine pretreatment reactor without mixing apparatus was found not suitable for dry pretreatment operation because of poor mixing and mass transfer. In this study, helically agitated mixing was introduced into the dry dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover and its effect on pretreatment efficiency, inhibitor generation, sugar production, and bioconversion efficiency through simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation (SSF) were evaluated. Results The overall cellulose conversion taking account of cellulose loss in pretreatment was used to evaluate the efficiency of pretreatment. The two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model on dry pretreatment was established and applied to analyze the mixing mechanism. The results showed that the pretreatment efficiency was significantly improved and the inhibitor generation was reduced by the helically agitated mixing, compared to the dry pretreatment without mixing: the ethanol titer and yield from cellulose in the SSF reached 56.20 g/L and 69.43% at the 30% solids loading and 15 FPU/DM cellulase dosage, respectively, corresponding to a 26.5% increase in ethanol titer and 17.2% increase in ethanol yield at the same fermentation conditions. Conclusions The advantage of helically agitated mixing may provide a prototype of dry dilute acid pretreatment processing for future commercial-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:24387051

  7. Hot water and dilute acid pretreatment of high and low specific gravity Populus deltoides clones.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Bunnell, Kris A; Lau, Ching-Shuan; Pelkki, Matthew H; Patterson, David W; Clausen, Edgar C; Smith, James A; Carrier, Danielle Julie

    2011-02-01

    Populus sp. are hardwood feedstocks that grow in forest management areas that are logged for softwoods; however, they are also being considered as an energy-destined feedstock. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of xylose yield from dilute acid and hot water pretreatments performed in unstirred batch stainless steel reactors at temperatures ranging from 140 to 200°C. Populus deltoides clones S13C20 and S7C15 used in this study originated from Eastern Texas and were cultivated for 14 years in Pine Tree, AR. P. deltoides clones S13C20 and S7C15 had specific gravities of 0.48 and 0.40, respectively. Bark and wood were examined separately. As expected, hot water pretreatments, in the tested temperature range, resulted in very little direct xylose recovery. However, the 140°C dilute acid pretreatment of the lower specific gravity clone, S7C15, wood yielded the highest average xylose recovery of 56%. This condition also yielded the highest concentration of furfural, 9 mg/g sample, which can be inhibitory to the fermentation step. The highest xylose recovery from bark samples, 31%, was obtained with clone S7C15, using the 160°C dilute acid pretreatment for 60 min. PMID:20652357

  8. Kinetic Study and Mathematical Model of Hemimorphite Dissolution in Low Sulfuric Acid Solution at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongsheng; Wei, Chang; Li, Cunxiong; Deng, Zhigan; Li, Minting; Li, Xingbin

    2014-10-01

    The dissolution kinetics of hemimorphite with low sulfuric acid solution was investigated at high temperature. The dissolution rate of zinc was obtained as a function of dissolution time under the experimental conditions where the effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, and particle size were studied. The results showed that zinc extraction increased with an increase in temperature and sulfuric acid concentration and with a decrease in particle size. A mathematical model able to describe the process kinetics was developed from the shrinking core model, considering the change of the sulfuric acid concentration during dissolution. It was found that the dissolution process followed a shrinking core model with "ash" layer diffusion as the main rate-controlling step. This finding was supported with a linear relationship between the apparent rate constant and the reciprocal of squared particle radius. The reaction order with respect to sulfuric acid concentration was determined to be 0.7993. The apparent activation energy for the dissolution process was determined to be 44.9 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 373 K to 413 K (100 °C to 140 °C). Based on the shrinking core model, the following equation was established:

  9. Recent FRP applications in gas cleaning section of sulfuric acid plants

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, S.C. [Enviro-Chem Systems, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Sulfur dioxide gas is required to produce sulfuric acid. Sulfur dioxide can be obtained from burning sulfur, from roasting of sulfide ores in a smelter or decomposition of spent acid. Gas from smelters or spent acid are contaminated with heavy metal fumes and particulates, and can not be processed further without cleaning and cooling as dirty gas will produce poor quality acid, foul up filters and catalyst beds and will increase corrosion of the various equipment. The gas cleaning process includes humidification, cooling and the removal of acid mist. The conventional equipment for humidification and gas cooling is fabricated from steel, lined with lead and acid-proof bricks. If fluorides are present, acid-proof brick lining is protected by carbon brick lining. The electrostatic mist precipitators are normally fabricated from lead-lined steel. In the installation of gas cleaning equipment, the materials of construction used are found to be marginal, at best; installation is very labor intensive, requiring a wide variety of materials, high quality field workmanship and longer construction schedule. Maintenance of this equipment is frequent, expensive and very time consuming. Also, lead burning in the field is a serious health hazard. Application of newer technology, innovative design, capability of field fabrication of large Fiberglass Reinforced Plastics (FRP) vessels and the new ASME RTP-1 standard allows the use of FRP vessels, which results in a most cost-effective design and reduces the construction schedule.

  10. Bimodal distribution of sulfuric acid aerosols in the upper haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Zhang, Xi; Crisp, David; Bardeen, Charles G.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2014-03-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express have revealed that the upper haze (UH) of Venus, between 70 and 90 km, is variable on the order of days and that it is populated by two particle modes. We use a one-dimensional microphysics and vertical transport model based on the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres to evaluate whether interaction of upwelled cloud particles and sulfuric acid particles nucleated in situ on meteoric dust are able to generate the two observed modes, and whether their observed variability are due in part to the action of vertical transient winds at the cloud tops. Nucleation of photochemically produced sulfuric acid onto polysulfur condensation nuclei generates mode 1 cloud droplets, which then diffuse upwards into the UH. Droplets generated in the UH from nucleation of sulfuric acid onto meteoric dust coagulate with the upwelled cloud particles and therefore cannot reproduce the observed bimodal size distribution. By comparison, the mass transport enabled by transient winds at the cloud tops, possibly caused by sustained subsolar cloud top convection, are able to generate a bimodal size distribution in a time scale consistent with Venus Express observations. Below the altitude where the cloud particles are generated, sedimentation and vigorous convection causes the formation of large mode 2 and mode 3 particles in the middle and lower clouds. Evaporation of the particles below the clouds causes a local sulfuric acid vapor maximum that results in upwelling of sulfuric acid back into the clouds. In the case where the polysulfur condensation nuclei are small and their production rate is high, coagulation of small droplets onto larger droplets in the middle cloud may set up an oscillation in the size modes of the particles such that precipitation of sulfuric acid “rain” may be possible immediately below the clouds once every few Earth months. Reduction of the polysulfur condensation nuclei production rate destroys this oscillation and reduces the mode 1 particle abundance in the middle cloud by two orders of magnitude. However, it better reproduces the sulfur-to-sulfuric-acid mass ratio in the cloud and haze droplets as constrained by fits to UV reflectivity data. In general we find satisfactory agreement between our nominal and transient wind results and observations from Pioneer Venus, Venus Express, and Magellan, though improvements could be made by incorporating sulfur microphysics.

  11. A method for identifying sulfuric acid in single cloud and fog droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganor, Eliezer

    We describe herein a novel method for identifying sulfuric acid in single droplets of mist, fog or cloud. The method is based on a microchemical reaction displayed by the droplets upon a shiny cleavage plane [ 1 0 1 1¯ ] of Iceland spar - the rhombohedral variety of calcite. Thus, single droplets containing sulfuric acid respond by a typical microchemical reaction wherein they create prismatic, hemi-bipyramidal or lenticular twinned gypsum crystals on the calcite surface. For acid identification, droplets were collected on the four stages of a cascade impactor. The method was tested both in the laboratory and in the field in cloudy and foggy conditions. The sulfur mass in single droplets varied between 10 -12 and 10 -13 g and the pH ranged from 2.0 to 4.0.

  12. Uptake of Small Organic Compounds by Sulfuric Acid Aerosols: Dissolution and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    To assess the role of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the interactions of a series of small organic compounds with low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid will be evaluated. The total amount of organic material which may be taken up from the gas phase by dissolution, surface layer formation, and reaction during the particle lifetime will be quantified. Our current results for acetaldehyde uptake on 40 - 80 wt% sulfuric acid solutions will be compared to those of methanol, formaldehyde, and acetone to investigate the relationships between chemical functionality and heterogeneous activity. Where possible, equilibrium uptake will be ascribed to component pathways (hydration, protonation, etc.) to facilitate evaluation of other species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  13. Bimodal Distribution of Sulfuric Acid Aerosols in the Upper Haze of Venus

    E-print Network

    Gao, Peter; Crisp, David; Bardeen, Charles G; Yung, Yuk L

    2013-01-01

    The upper haze (UH) of Venus is variable on the order of days and it is populated by two particle modes. We use a 1D microphysics and vertical transport model based on the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres to evaluate whether interaction of upwelled cloud particles and sulfuric acid particles nucleated in situ on meteoric dust are able to generate the two size modes and whether their observed variability are due to cloud top vertical transient winds. Nucleation of photochemically produced sulfuric acid onto polysulfur condensation nuclei generates mode 1 cloud droplets that then diffuse upwards into the UH. Droplets generated in the UH from nucleation of sulfuric acid onto meteoric dust coagulate with the upwelled cloud particles and cannot reproduce the observed bimodal size distribution. The mass transport enabled by cloud top transient winds are able to generate a bimodal size distribution in a time scale consistent with observations. Sedimentation and convection in the middle and lower...

  14. Microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in acid mine water at sulfur and iron-sulfide mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norio Wakao; Yonekichi Sakurai; Hideo Shiota

    1977-01-01

    The microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in the acid mine water from the abandoned Matsuo sulfur and iron-sulfide mine area was investigated. The acid mine water had an extremely low pH value and contained a high concentration of ferrous iron (about 1,000 ppm). The ferrous iron was oxidized rapidly to the ferric form in the acid mine water. The oxidation

  15. Process for recovery of sulfur from acid gases

    DOEpatents

    Towler, Gavin P. (Kirkbymoorside, GB2); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Elemental sulfur is recovered from the H.sub.2 S present in gases derived from fossil fuels by heating the H.sub.2 S with CO.sub.2 in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of a catalyst selected as one which enhances the thermal dissociation of H.sub.2 S to H.sub.2 and S.sub.2. The equilibrium of the thermal decomposition of H.sub.2 S is shifted by the equilibration of the water-gas-shift reaction so as to favor elemental sulfur formation. The primary products of the overall reaction are S.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. Small amounts of COS, SO.sub.2 and CS.sub.2 may also form. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture results in a substantial increase in the efficiency of the conversion of H.sub.2 S to elemental sulfur. Plant economy is further advanced by treating the product gases to remove byproduct carbonyl sulfide by hydrolysis, which converts the COS back to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S. Unreacted CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H.sub.2 and CO, which has value either as a fuel or as a chemical feedstock and recovers the hydrogen value from the H.sub.2 S.

  16. On the prolonged lifetime of the El Chichon sulfuric acid aerosol cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The observed decay of the aerosol mixing ratio following the eruption of El Chichon appears to have been 20-30 percent slower than that following the eruption of Fuego in 1974, even though the sulfuric acid droplets were observed to grow to considerably larger sizes after El Chichon. This suggests the possible presence of a condensation nuclei and sulfuric acid vapor source and continued growth phenomena occurring well after the El Chichon eruption. It is proposed that the source of these nuclei and the associated vapor may be derived from annual evaporation and condensation of aerosol in the high polar regions during stratospheric warming events, with subsequent spreading to lower latitudes.

  17. Electrical charging changes the composition of sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I. K.; Olenius, T.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Loukonen, V.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfuric acid clusters stabilized by base molecules are likely to have a significant role in atmospheric new particle formation. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have permitted the detection of electrically charged clusters. However, direct measurement of electrically neutral clusters is not possible. Mass spectrometry instruments can be combined with a charger, but the possible effect of charging on the composition of neutral clusters must be addressed before the measured data can be linked to properties of neutral clusters. In the present work we have used formation free energies from quantum chemical methods to calculate the evaporation rates of electrically charged (both positive and negative) sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters. To understand how charging will affect the composition of these clusters, we have compared the evaporation rates of charged clusters with those of the corresponding neutral clusters. We found that the only cluster studied in this paper which will retain its composition is H2SO4 · NH3 when charged positively; all other clusters will be altered by both positive and negative charging. In the case of charging clusters negatively, base molecules will completely evaporate from clusters with 1 to 3 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of ammonia, and from clusters with 1 or 2 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of dimethylamine. Larger clusters will maintain some base molecules, but the H2SO4 : base ratio will increase. In the case of positive charging, some of the acid molecules will evaporate, decreasing the H2SO4 : base ratio.

  18. Multiple-acid equilibria in adsorption of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Husson, S.M.; King, C.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Equilibria were measured for adsorption of carboxylic acids from aqueous, binary-acid mixtures of lactic and succinic acids and acetic and formic acids onto basic polymeric sorbents. The experimentally determined adsorption isotherms compared well with model predictions, confirming that simple extensions from adsorption of individual acids apply. Fixed-bed studies were carried out that establish the efficacy of chromatographic fractionation of lactic and succinic acids using basic polymeric sorbents. Finally, sequential thermal and solvent regeneration of lactic and acetic acid-laden sorbents was investigated as a method to fractionate among coadsorbed volatile and nonvolatile acids. Essentially complete removal of the acetic acid from the acid-laden sorbent was achieved by vaporization under the conditions used; a small amount of loss of lactic acid (about 11%) was observed.

  19. A sulfur amino acid deficiency changes the amino acid composition of body protein in piglets.

    PubMed

    Conde-Aguilera, J A; Barea, R; Le Floc'h, N; Lefaucheur, L; van Milgen, J

    2010-08-01

    Experiments carried out to determine the amino acid requirement in growing animals are often based on the premise that the amino acid composition of body protein is constant. However, there are indications that this assumption may not be correct. The objective of this study was to test the effect of feeding piglets a diet deficient or not in total sulfur amino acids (TSAA; Met + Cys) on nitrogen retention and amino acid composition of proteins in different body compartments. Six blocks of three pigs each were used in a combined comparative slaughter and nitrogen balance study. One piglet in each block was slaughtered at 42 days of age, whereas the other piglets received a diet deficient or not in TSAA for 19 days and were slaughtered thereafter. Two diets were formulated to provide either 0.20% Met and 0.45% TSAA (on a standardized ileal digestible basis) or 0.46% Met and 0.70% TSAA. Diets were offered approximately 25% below ad libitum intake. At slaughter, the whole animal was divided into carcass, blood, intestines, liver, and the combined head, tail, feet and other organs (HFTO), which were analyzed for nitrogen and amino acid contents. Samples of the longissimus muscle (LM) were analyzed for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and actin contents. Nitrogen retention was 20% lower in piglets receiving the TSAA-deficient diet (P < 0.01). In these piglets, the nitrogen content in tissue gain was lower in the empty body, carcass, LM and blood (P < 0.05) or tended to be lower in HFTO (P < 0.10), but was not different in the intestines and liver. The Met content in retained protein was lower in the empty body, LM and blood (P < 0.05), and tended to be lower in the carcass (P < 0.10). The Cys content was lower in LM, but higher in blood of piglets receiving the TSAA-deficient diet (P < 0.05). Skeletal muscle appeared to be affected most by the TSAA deficiency. In LM, the Met content in retained protein was reduced by 12% and total Met retention by more than 60%. The MyHC and actin contents in LM were not affected by the TSAA content of the diet. These results show that a deficient TSAA supply affects the amino acid composition of different body proteins. This questions the use of a constant ideal amino acid profile to express dietary amino acid requirements, but also illustrates the plasticity of the animal to cope with nutritional challenges. PMID:22444655

  20. Kinetic and Modeling Investigation to Provide Design Guidelines for the NREL Dilute-Acid Process Aimed at Total Hydrolysis/Fractionation of Lignocellulosic Biomass: July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. Y.; Iyer, P.; Xiang, Q.; Hayes, J.

    2004-08-01

    Following up on previous work, subcontractor investigated three aspects of using NREL ''pretreatment'' technology for total hydrolysis (cellulose as well as hemicellulose) of biomass. Whereas historic hydrolysis of biomass used either dilute acid or concentrated acid technology for hydrolysis of both hemicellulose and cellulose, NREL has been pursuing very dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. NREL's countercurrent shrinking-bed reactor design for hemicellulose hydrolysis (pretreatment) has, however, shown promise for total hydrolysis. For the first task, subcontractor developed a mathematical model of the countercurrent shrinking bed reactor operation and, using yellow poplar sawdust as a feedstock, analyzed the effect of: initial solid feeding rate, temperature, acid concentration, acid flow rate, Peclet number (a measure of backmixing in liquid flow), and bed shrinking. For the second task, subcontractor used laboratory trials, with yellow poplar sawdust and 0.07 wt% sulfuric acid at various temperatures, to verify the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose (desired) and decomposition of glucose (undesired) and determine appropriate parameters for use in kinetic models. Unlike cellulose and hemicellulose, lignins, the third major component of biomass, are not carbohydrates that can be broken down into component sugars. They are, however, aromatic complex amorphous phenolic polymers that can likely be converted into low-molecular weight compounds suitable for production of fuels and chemicals. Oxidative degradation is one pathway for such conversion and hydrogen peroxide would be an attractive reagent for this, as it would leave no residuals. For the third task, subcontractor reacted lignin with hydrogen peroxide under various conditions and analyzed the resulting product mix.

  1. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Driedger, Arthur R., III

    1993-01-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  2. Atmospheric Evolution of Sulfur Emissions from K??lauea: Real-Time Measurements of Oxidation, Dilution, and Neutralization within a Volcanic Plume.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jesse H; Cross, Eben S; Hunter, James F; Pai, Sidhant; Wallace, Lisa M M; Croteau, Philip L; Jayne, John T; Worsnop, Douglas R; Heald, Colette L; Murphy, Jennifer G; Frankel, Sheila L

    2015-04-01

    The high atmospheric concentrations of toxic gases, particulate matter, and acids in the areas immediately surrounding volcanoes can have negative impacts on human and ecological health. To better understand the atmospheric fate of volcanogenic emissions in the near field (in the first few hours after emission), we have carried out real-time measurements of key chemical components of the volcanic plume from K??lauea on the Island of Hawai'i. Measurements were made at two locations, one ?3 km north-northeast of the vent and the other 31 km to the southwest, with sampling at each site spanning a range of meteorological conditions and volcanic influence. Instrumentation included a sulfur dioxide monitor and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor, allowing for a measurement of the partitioning between the two major sulfur species (gas-phase SO2 and particulate sulfate) every 5 min. During trade wind conditions, which sent the plume toward the southwest site, sulfur partitioning exhibited a clear diurnal pattern, indicating photochemical oxidation of SO2 to sulfate; this enabled the quantitative determination of plume age (5 h) and instantaneous SO2 oxidation rate (2.4 × 10(-6) s(-1) at solar noon). Under stagnant conditions near the crater, the extent of SO2 oxidation was substantially higher, suggesting faster oxidation. The particles within the plume were extremely acidic, with pH values (controlled largely by ambient relative humidity) as low as -0.8 and strong acidity (controlled largely by absolute sulfate levels) up to 2200 nmol/m(3). The high variability of sulfur partitioning and particle composition underscores the chemically dynamic nature of volcanic plumes, which may have important implications for human and ecological health. PMID:25734883

  3. GEOPHYSICALRESEARCHLETTERS,VOL. 25,NO.16,PAGES3143-3146,AUGUST 15, 1998 Hydrates in binary sulfuric acid-water vapor

    E-print Network

    . We reportcalculationsof the distributionof sulfuric acidGEOPHYSICALRESEARCHLETTERS,VOL. 25,NO.16,PAGES3143-3146,AUGUST 15, 1998 Hydrates in binary sulfuric acid-water vapor: Comparison of CIMS measurementswith the liquid-drop model Robert

  4. An enhanced throughput method for quantification of sulfur mustard adducts to human serum albumin via isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andacht, Tracy M; Pantazides, Brooke G; Crow, Brian S; Fidder, Alex; Noort, Daan; Thomas, Jerry D; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report an enhanced throughput method for the diagnosis of human exposure to sulfur mustard. A hydroxyethylthioethyl (HETE) ester-adducted tripeptide, produced by pronase digestion of human serum albumin, was selected as the quantitative exposure biomarker. Cibacron Blue enrichment was developed from an established cartridge method into a 96-well plate format, increasing throughput and ruggedness. This new method decreased sample volume 2.5-fold. Addition of a precipitation and solid-phase extraction concentration step increased the sensitivity of the method. With the conversion to a 96-well plate and optimization of chromatography, the method resulted in a 3-fold decrease in analysis time. Inclusion of a confirmation ion has increased specificity. The method was found to be linear between 0.050 and 50 µM sulfur mustard exposure with a precision for both quality control samples of ?6.5% relative standard deviation and an accuracy of >96%. The limit of detection (3So) was calculated to be ?0.0048 µM, an exposure value similar to that of the HETE-albumin adduct method first described by Noort and co-workers (Noort et al., 1999; Noort el al., 2004) which used protein precipitation to isolate albumin. A convenience set of 124 plasma samples from healthy unexposed individuals was analyzed using this method to assess background levels of exposure to sulfur mustard; no positive results were detected. PMID:24201816

  5. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...in accordance with good agricultural practice when used as a herbicide in the production of garlic and onions, and as a potato vine dessicant in the production of potatoes. (b) Residues of sulfuric acid are exempted from the requirement of a...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...in accordance with good agricultural practice when used as a herbicide in the production of garlic and onions, and as a potato vine dessicant in the production of potatoes. (b) Residues of sulfuric acid are exempted from the requirement of a...

  7. PULMONARY HOST DEFENSE RESPONSES TO INHALATION OF SULFURIC ACID AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of simultaneous exposure to ozone (O3) and sulfuric acid H2SO, 0.23 m volume median diameter (VMD) and a single exposure to ultrafine H2SO4 under various conditions were studied using the infectivity mortality and the ciliary beating frequency model systems....

  8. EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID RAIN ON TWO MODEL HARDWOOD FORESTS: THROUGHFALL, LITTER LEACHATE, AND SOIL SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.6) was applied to model forests containing either sugar maple (Acer saccharum) or red alder (Alnus rubra). Water samples were collected above and below the canopy, below the litter, and from 20 cm and 1 m below the surface of ...

  9. Sulfuric acid-ammonium sulfate aerosol: optical detection in the St. Louis region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Charlson; A. H. Vanderpol; A. P. Waggoner; N. C. Ahlquist

    1974-01-01

    Nephelometric sensing of the deliquescence of ammonium sulfate produced by the reaction of sulfuric acid or ammonium bisulfate aerosol with ammonia provides a means for detecting these substances in air. Field experiments show them to be the dominant substances in the submicrometer, light-scattering aerosol in the St. Louis region.

  10. BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN HUMANS UPON EXPOSURE TO SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL AND EXERCISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 18 human subjects were exposed to ambient air for four hours on the first day of exposure and to four hours of 100 micrograms/cu. m. (0.033 micromole) sulfuric acid aerosol exposed to four hours of ambient air on both exposure days. Six biochemical blood parameters wer...

  11. Mechanism of alkylation of isobutane by olefins in the presence of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baiburskii, V.L.; Khadzhiev, S.N.; Ovsyannikov, V.P.

    1992-05-10

    The authors attempted here to examine the mechanism of alkylation of isobutane by olefins in the presence of sulfuric acid in terms of an initial stage of activation of isoparaffin. The version of formation of tert-alkyl cations and the role of the catalyst in this stage were analyzed. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF INHALATION OF SULFURIC ACID MIST BY HUMAN SUBJECTS WHILE AT REST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 20 human subjects were exposed to 100 micrograms/cu m (0.033 uM) sulfuric acid aerosol (0.5 micrometers mean mass diameter) for four hours per day for two consecutive days. A total of 17 human subjects were exposed to four hours of ambient air on both exposure days. Th...

  13. MORPHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PROLONGED EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL ON THE RAT LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary effects of a combination of ozone (0.5 ppm) and sulfuric acid aerosol (1 mg/cu. m.) and to assess the possibility of interactive effects. Groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were continously exposed to the pollutants, either indi...

  14. New insights into sulfur amino acid function in gut health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAA) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable AA and is transmet...

  15. EFFECTS OF LARGE (0.9 MICROMETER) SULFURIC ACID AEROSOLS ON HUMAN PULMONARY FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of sulfuric acid particle concentration (mass/volume) and ambient temperatures on pulmonary function of young male nonsmokers were examined. Subjects (n=11) thrice repeated a sequence of 20-min exercise (ventilation approximately 30 liters/min) and 20-min sitting rest...

  16. Relationships between extinction, absorption, backscattering, and mass content of sulfuric acid aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Pinnick; S. G. Jennings; P. Chylek

    1980-01-01

    Linear relationships between aerosol extinction, absorption, backscatter, and mass content are derived for polydispersions of sulfuric acid aerosols. These relationships are independent of the form of the size distribution and are a consequence of approximating the corresponding Mie efficiency factors (the extinction efficiency Q\\/sub e\\/, the absorption efficiency Q\\/sub a\\/, and the backscatter gain G) by linear functions of the

  17. The role of cluster energy nonaccommodation in atmospheric sulfuric acid nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurten, T.; Kuang, C.; Gomez, P.; McMurry, P. H.; Vehkamaki, H.; Ortega, I.; Noppel, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-01-11

    We discuss the possible role of energy nonaccommodation (monomer-cluster collisions that do not result in stable product formation due to liberated excess energy) in atmospheric nucleation processes involving sulfuric acid. Qualitative estimates of the role of nonaccommodation are computed using quantum Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel theory together with quantum chemically calculated vibrational frequencies and anharmonic coupling constants for small sulfuric acid-containing clusters. We find that energy nonaccommodation effects may, at most, decrease the net formation rate of sulfuric acid dimers by up to a factor of 10 with respect to the hard-sphere collision rate. A decrease in energy nonaccommodation due to an increasing number of internal degrees of freedom may kinetically slightly favor the participation of amines rather than ammonia as stabilizing agents in sulfuric acid nucleation, though the kinetic enhancement factor is likely to be less than three. However, hydration of the clusters (which always occurs in ambient conditions) is likely to increase the energy accommodation factor, reducing the role that energy nonaccommodation plays in atmospheric nucleation.

  18. Optimum Ratio to Lysine of Threonine, Tryptophan, and Sulfur Amino Acids for Finishing Swine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph D. Hahn; David H. Bake

    2010-01-01

    Forty-eight crossbred (PIC line 26 x periods were designed to be slightly deficient in lysine Camborough 15) pigs were used in two finishing trials and to contain digestible Thr (65%), Trp (18%), and to compare the ideal ratios of threonine (Thr), SAA ( 60% 1 at the ideal ratio to digestible Lys tryptophan (Trp 1, and sulfur amino acids (SAA)

  19. DIGESTIBLE SULFUR AMINO ACID REQUIREMENTS FOR MALE TURKEYS TO FIVE WEEKS OF AGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. T. MOORE; K. BAKER; J. D. FIRMAN

    SUMMARY Previous research with batteries has been conducted to determine the digestible sulfur amino acid (SAA) requirements of hen turkeys. These trials were conducted under floor pen conditions to determine the digestible SAA requirement of male turkeys for the production period to 5 wk. The first experiment used 48 pens with eight treatments of six replicate pens using a randomized

  20. Self-ordering of cell arrangement of anodic porous alumina formed in sulfuric acid solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideki Masuda; Fumio Hasegwa; Sachiko Ono

    1997-01-01

    Self-ordering of the cell arrangement of the porous structure of anodic alumina has been studied in a sulfuric acid solution. Ordering of the cell arrangement was dependent on the applied potential, and a highly ordered structure was obtained under anodization at a constant potential of 25 to 27 V. Self-ordering of the porous structure proceeded with the growth of the

  1. Heterogeneous reactions in sulfuric acid aerosols: A framework for model calculations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Hanson; A. R. Ravishankara; Susan Solomon

    1994-01-01

    A framework for applying rates of heterogeneous chemical reactions measured in the laboratory to small sulfuric acid aerosols found in the stratosphere is presented. The procedure for calculating the applicable reactive uptake coefficients using laboratory-measured parameters is developed, the necessary laboratory-measured quantities are discussed, and a set of equations for use in models are presented. This approach is demonstrated to

  2. Sulfuric acid and hot water treatments enhance ex vitro and in vitro germination of Hibiscus seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds of Hibiscus dasycalyx S. F. Blake & Shiller, a federally listed candidate endangered species and native to North America, and two variants of Hibiscus acetosella Welw. ex. Hiern were scarified using sulfuric acid and hot water. The effects of the scarification methods on in vitro and ex vitro ...

  3. Response of DOC in acid-sensitive Maine lakes to decreasing sulfur deposition (1993 - 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, sulfur deposition has decreased across the northeastern United States. As a result, sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams have also decreased and many surface waters have become less acidic. Over the same time period, th...

  4. OPERATION OF A SULFURIC ACID PLANT USING BLENDED COPPER SMELTER GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high degree of control of SOx emissions at copper smelters can be obtained by blending reverberatory furnace gases with gases from roasters and converters and using the combined stream as feed to a sulfuric acid plant. The Bor Copper Smelter in Bor, Yugoslavia, experimented wit...

  5. VAPOR PRESSURE AND MELTING BEHAVIOR OF SULFURIC ACID-WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to use high vacuum and mass spectrometric techniques to determine total and partial vapor pressures above bulk liquid samples in the temperature range between -65C and 25C. Observations on the sulfuric acid-water system revea...

  6. Effect of Sulfuric Acid on Swelling Behavior of an Expansive Soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. Sivapullaiah; B. Guru Prasad; M. M. Allam

    2009-01-01

    Soil often becomes contaminated with a variety of chemicals due to leakage of under\\/aboveground chemical storage tanks, improper discharge of waste, or improper design of waste containment facilities. Contaminated soil water can influence the soil's behavior seriously. Mineralogical alterations play a vital role in such circumstances. This paper describes the impact of varying concentrations of sulfuric acid solutions on the

  7. Sulfuric acid recovery from rare earth sulphate solutions by diffusion dialysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian-jun TANG; Kang-gen ZHOU; Qi-xiu ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Sulfuric acid recovery from rare earth sulphate solutions by diffusion dialysis was studied. The mass transfer model of diffusion dialysis was established, the comparison between the experimental results and mathematical results was carried out, and the numerical analysis on the effects of operational parameters was studied. The results indicate that the derived mathematical model shows good quantitative relation between sulphuric

  8. Methane sulfonic acid-enhanced formation of molecular clusters of sulfuric acid and dimethyl amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, N.; Elm, J.; Olenius, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-11-01

    Over oceans and in coastal regions, methane sulfonic acid (MSA) is present in substantial concentrations in aerosols and in the gas phase. We present an investigation into the effect of MSA on sulfuric acid- and dimethyl amine (DMA)-based cluster formation rates. From systematic conformational scans and well-tested ab initio methods, we optimise the structures of all MSAx (H2SO4)yDMAz clusters where x + y ≤ 3 and z ≤ 2. The resulting thermodynamic data are used in the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code, and the effect of MSA is evaluated by comparing ternary MSA-H2SO4-DMA cluster formation rates to binary H2SO4-DMA cluster formation rates. Within the range of atmospherically relevant MSA concentrations, we find that MSA may increase cluster formation rates by up to 1 order of magnitude, although typically, the increase will be less than 300 % at 258 K, less than 100 % at 278 K and less than 15 % at 298 K. The results are rationalised by a detailed analysis of the main growth paths of the clusters. We find that MSA-enhanced clustering involves clusters containing one MSA molecule, while clusters containing more than one MSA molecule do not contribute significantly to the growth.

  9. Methane sulfonic acid enhanced formation of molecular clusters of sulfuric acid and dimethyl amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, N.; Elm, J.; Olenius, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-07-01

    Over oceans and in coastal regions methane sulfonic acid (MSA) is present in substantial concentrations in aerosols and in the gas phase. We present an investigation of the effect of MSA on sulfuric acid and dimethyl amine (DMA) based cluster formation rates. From systematic conformational scans and well tested ab initio methods, we optimize structures of all MSAx (H2SO4)yDMAz clusters where x + y ≤ 3 and z ≤ 2. The resulting thermodynamic data is used in the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code and the effect of MSA is evaluated by comparing ternary MSA-H2SO4-DMA cluster formation rates to binary H2SO4-DMA cluster formation rates. Within the range of atmospherically relevant MSA concentrations, we find that MSA may increase cluster formation rates by up to one order of magnitude, although typically, the increase will be less than 300% at 258 K, less than 100% at 278 K and less than 15% at 298 K. The results are rationalized by a detailed analysis of the the main growth paths of the clusters. We find that MSA enhanced clustering involves clusters containing one MSA molecule, while clusters containing more than one MSA molecule do not contribute significantly to the growth.

  10. Study of insoluble crystals derived from solutions of Kevlar 49 in sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, N.L.

    1984-05-21

    The object of the study was to isolate and obtain x-ray diffraction analysis of the insoluble crystals which have been observed in Kevlar 49/H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ dope. These insoluble crystals had previously been reported to be Kevlar single crystals after analysis by optical microscopy. A more detailed analysis does not support this conclusion. Additional optical microscopy coupled with FTIR and elemental analysis for C, H and N, has shown that these insoluble crystals are in fact terephthalic acid which is a decomposition product of the acid hydrolysis of Kevlar. A model compound study of sulfuric-acid hydrolysis of aromatic amide was carried out in order to better understand the sulfuric-acid-hydrolysis of Kevlar.

  11. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Lee, Kye Sook [College of Pharmacy and RCTCP, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook [BK21 Project Team and Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy,Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ki Ho; Kim, Hwan Mook [Bio-Evaluation Center, KRIBB, Ochang, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Jin Yeul [Center for Herbal Medicine Improvement Research, Korea Institute of Oriental medicine, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Kyum, E-mail: sangkim@cnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and RCTCP, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Although methionine dependency is a phenotypic characteristic of tumor cells, it remains to be determined whether changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism occur in cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutic medications. We compared expression/activity of sulfur amino acid metabolizing enzymes and cellular levels of sulfur amino acids and their metabolites between normal MCF-7 cells and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Adr) cells. The S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, an index of transmethylation potential, in MCF-7/Adr cells decreased to {approx} 10% relative to that in MCF-7 cells, which may have resulted from down-regulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Expression of homocysteine-clearing enzymes, such as cystathionine beta-synthase, methionine synthase/methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, was up-regulated in MCF-7/Adr cells, suggesting that acquiring doxorubicin resistance attenuated methionine-dependence and activated transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine. Homocysteine was similar, which is associated with a balance between the increased expressions of homocysteine-clearing enzymes and decreased extracellular homocysteine. Despite an elevation in cysteine, cellular GSH decreased in MCF-7/Adr cells, which was attributed to over-efflux of GSH into the medium and down-regulation of the GSH synthesis enzyme. Consequently, MCF-7/Adr cells were more sensitive to the oxidative stress induced by bleomycin and menadione than MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that regulating sulfur amino acid metabolism may be a possible therapeutic target for chemoresistant cancer cells. These results warrant further investigations to determine the role of sulfur amino acid metabolism in acquiring anticancer drug resistance in cancer cells using chemical and biological regulators involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. - Research Highlights: > MCF-7/Adr cells showed decreases in cellular GSH, which were attributed to increase efflux of GSH. > MCF-7/Adr was more sensitive to oxidative stress induced by bleomycin and menadione. > Hcy-clearing enzymes involved in were up-regulated in MCF-7/Adr cells. > Doxorubicin-resistance attenuated Met-dependence and activated transsulfuration. > Regulating sulfur amino acid metabolism may be a possible therapeutic target.

  12. Kinetics of sulfuric acid leaching of low-grade zinc silicate ore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A Abdel-Aal

    2000-01-01

    The results of a leaching kinetics study of low-grade zinc silicate ore with sulfuric acid are presented. Effect of ore particle size, reaction temperature, and acid concentration on zinc dissolution rate were determined. The results obtained show that leaching of about 94% of zinc is achieved using ?200+270 mesh ore particle size at a reaction temperature of 70°C for 180

  13. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  14. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  15. MEASUREMENT OF SULFURIC ACID AND HCL IN STATIONARY SOURCE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the increasing interest in urban particle and other modeling and in acid precipitation, the need for stationary source measurement methods for such non-criteria acid pollutants as H2SO4 and HCl has also increased. The paper describes several methods for each of these p...

  16. Thermodynamics of aqueous sodium sulfate from the temperatures 273 K to 373 K and mixtures of aqueous sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hovey, J.K.; Pitzer, K.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Rard, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-07-01

    New isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements on the aqueous system {l_brace}(1{minus}y)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+yNA{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r_brace} along with earlier experimental investigations that span the range from y=0 to y=1 and infinitely dilute to supersaturated molalities have been analyzed in terms of the Pitzer ion-interaction model. Refined ion-interaction parameters for aqueous sodium sulfate valid over the temperature range 273 K to 373 K have been calculated and used for analyzing results for mixtures containing sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate at 298.15 K. Analysis of experimental results for these aqueous mixtures required explicit consideration of the dissociation reaction of bisulfate ion. Previous treatments of aqueous sulfuric acid and subsequently the bisulfate dissociation equilibrium valid in the range 273 K to 343 K were employed as a first approximation in representing the mixed solutions. Two sets of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters are presented for (sodium sulfate + sulfuric acid). The validity of the first set is limited in ionic strength and molality to saturated solutions of pure aqueous sodium sulfate (4 mol{center_dot}kg{sup {minus}1}). The second set of parameters corresponds to a slightly less precise representation but is valid over the entire range of experimental results considered. Both sets of parameters provide a more complete description of pure sulfuric acid solutions because of the removal of various redundancies of ion-interaction parameters. The specific ion-interaction terms used and the overall fitting procedure are described as well as selected examples of relevant thermodynamic calculations in the mixed system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O. 33 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Thermodynamics of aqueous sodium sulfate from the temperatures 273 K to 373 K and mixtures of aqueous sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid at 298. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hovey, J.K.; Pitzer, K.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Rard, J.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-07-01

    New isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements on the aqueous system {l brace}(1{minus}y)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+yNA{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r brace} along with earlier experimental investigations that span the range from y=0 to y=1 and infinitely dilute to supersaturated molalities have been analyzed in terms of the Pitzer ion-interaction model. Refined ion-interaction parameters for aqueous sodium sulfate valid over the temperature range 273 K to 373 K have been calculated and used for analyzing results for mixtures containing sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate at 298.15 K. Analysis of experimental results for these aqueous mixtures required explicit consideration of the dissociation reaction of bisulfate ion. Previous treatments of aqueous sulfuric acid and subsequently the bisulfate dissociation equilibrium valid in the range 273 K to 343 K were employed as a first approximation in representing the mixed solutions. Two sets of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters are presented for (sodium sulfate + sulfuric acid). The validity of the first set is limited in ionic strength and molality to saturated solutions of pure aqueous sodium sulfate (4 mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}). The second set of parameters corresponds to a slightly less precise representation but is valid over the entire range of experimental results considered. Both sets of parameters provide a more complete description of pure sulfuric acid solutions because of the removal of various redundancies of ion-interaction parameters. The specific ion-interaction terms used and the overall fitting procedure are described as well as selected examples of relevant thermodynamic calculations in the mixed system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O. 33 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. THE EFFECT OF ANOLYTE PRODUCT ACID CONCENTRATION ON HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.

    2010-03-24

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle (Fig. 1) is one of the simplest, all-fluids thermochemical cycles that has been devised for splitting water with a high-temperature nuclear or solar heat source. It was originally patented by Brecher and Wu in 1975 and extensively developed by Westinghouse in the late 1970s and early 1980s. As its name suggests, the only element used besides hydrogen and oxygen is sulfur, which is cycled between the +4 and +6 oxidation states. HyS comprises two steps. One is the thermochemical (>800 C) decomposition of sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxygen (O{sub 2}), and water. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} = SO{sub 2} + 1/2 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O. The other is the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis of water to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and hydrogen (H{sub 2}), SO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O = H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, E{sup o} = -0.156 V, explaining the 'hybrid' designation. These two steps taken together split water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} using heat and electricity. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the University of South Carolina (USC) have successfully demonstrated the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers (Fig. 2) for the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis (sulfur oxidation) step, while Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully demonstrated the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition (sulfur reduction) step using a bayonet-type reactor (Fig. 3). This latter work was performed as part of the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration at General Atomics (GA). The combination of these two operations results in a simple process that will be more efficient and cost-effective for the massive production of hydrogen than alkaline electrolysis. Recent developments suggest that the use of PEMs other than Nafion will allow sulfuric acid to be produced at higher concentrations (>60 wt%), offering the possibility of net thermal efficiencies around 50% (HHV basis). The effect of operation at higher anolyte concentrations on the flowsheet, and on the net thermal efficiency for a nuclear-heated HyS process, is examined and quantified.

  19. Response of laying hens to choline when fed practical diets devoid of supplemental sulfur amino acids.

    PubMed

    Miles, R D; Ruiz, N; Harms, R H

    1986-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted with White Leghorn laying hens. In both experiments, a corn-soybean meal basal diet was used, and hens were housed individually in cages in open-type houses. In Experiment 1, the basal diet contained no supplemental choline, inorganic sulfate, or sulfur amino acids and was supplemented with 0 or 660 mg choline/kg, and 0 and .1% K2SO4, or K2Mg(SO4)2. In Experiment 2, the basal diet contained .1% reagent grade K2SO4. Four diets were formulated to contain 0, 110, 220, and 440 mg choline/kg, respectively. A fifth diet was formulated to contain 440 mg choline/kg and .15% DL-methionine. In Experiment 1, a significant increase in egg production resulted from supplementing the diet with 660 mg choline/kg in the absence of supplemental inorganic sulfate and sulfur amino acids. Only a numerical increase in egg production resulted from adding inorganic sulfate alone or in combination with choline. Addition of choline and inorganic sulfate in combination resulted in an increase in egg weight. In Experiment 2, 220 mg of supplemental choline/kg, or 114 mg choline intake/bird/day, resulted in maximum egg production and feed efficiency. However, maximum egg size was obtained only when supplemental DL-methionine and choline were present. The results obtained in this study indicate that laying hens will respond to supplemental choline in practical situations when diets are deficient in total sulfur amino acids, and daily sulfur amino acid intake is insufficient to meet the animal's requirement. For maximum egg size, adequate sulfur amino acids must be present in the diet, because supplementing choline alone will not maximize egg size. PMID:3774741

  20. Effect of ions on the measurement of sulfuric acid in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Kürten, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2014-11-01

    Ternary aerosol nucleation experiments were conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN in order to investigate the influence of ions on new particle formation. Neutral and ion-induced nucleation experiments, i.e. without and with the presence of ions, respectively, were carried out under precisely controlled conditions. The sulfuric acid concentration was measured with a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the new particle formation experiments. The added ternary trace gases were ammonia (NH3), dimethylamine (DMA, C2H7N) or oxidised products of pinanediol (PD, C10H18O2). When pinanediol was introduced into the chamber, an increase in the mass spectrometric signal used to determine the sulfuric acid concentration (m/z 97, i.e. HSO4-) was observed due to ions from the CLOUD chamber. The enhancement was only observed during ion-induced nucleation measurements by using either galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) or the proton synchrotron (PS) pion beam for the ion generation, respectively. The ion effect typically involved an increase in the apparent sulfuric acid concentration by a factor of ~ 2 to 3 and was qualitatively verified by the ion measurements with an atmospheric-pressure interface-time of flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. By applying a high-voltage (HV) clearing field inside the CLOUD chamber, the ion effect on the CIMS measurement was completely eliminated since, under these conditions, small ions are swept from the chamber in about 1 s. In order to exclude the ion effect and to provide corrected sulfuric acid concentrations during the GCR and PS beam nucleation experiments, a parameterisation was derived that utilises the trace gas concentrations and the UV light intensity as input parameters. Atmospheric sulfuric acid measurements with a CIMS showed an insignificant ion effect.

  1. Iron dissolution of dust source materials during simulated acidic processing: the effect of sulfuric, acetic, and oxalic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric organic acids potentially display different capacities in iron (Fe) mobilization from atmospheric dust compared with inorganic acids, but few measurements have been made on this comparison. We report here a laboratory investigation of Fe mobilization of coal fly ash, a representative Fe-containing anthropogenic aerosol, and Arizona test dust, a reference source material for mineral dust, in pH 2 sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid, respectively. The effects of pH and solar radiation on Fe dissolution have also been explored. The relative capacities of these three acids in Fe dissolution are in the order of oxalic acid > sulfuric acid > acetic acid. Oxalate forms mononuclear bidentate ligand with surface Fe and promotes Fe dissolution to the greatest extent. Photolysis of Fe-oxalate complexes further enhances Fe dissolution with the concomitant degradation of oxalate. These results suggest that ligand-promoted dissolution of Fe may play a more significant role in mobilizing Fe from atmospheric dust compared with proton-assisted processing. The role of atmospheric organic acids should be taken into account in global-biogeochemical modeling to better access dissolved atmospheric Fe deposition flux at the ocean surface. PMID:23883276

  2. Assessing the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance during dilute acid and hydrothermal pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol from biomass is considered a promising alternative to reliance on diminishing supplies of fossil fuels, providing a sustainable option for fuels production in an environmentally compatible manner. The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels through a biological route usually suffers from the intrinsic recalcitrance of biomass owing to the complicated structure of plant cell walls. Currently, a pretreatment step that can effectively reduce biomass recalcitrance is generally required to make the polysaccharide fractions locked in the intricacy of plant cell walls to become more accessible and amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid and hydrothermal pretreatments are attractive and among the most promising pretreatment technologies that enhance sugar release performance. This review highlights our recent understanding on molecular structure basis for recalcitrance, with emphasis on structural transformation of major biomass biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) related to the reduction of recalcitrance during dilute acid and hydrothermal pretreatments. The effects of these two pretreatments on biomass porosity as well as its contribution on reduced recalcitrance are also discussed. PMID:23356640

  3. Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

  4. Separation of glycols from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with boronic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Randel, L.A.; King, C.J.

    1991-07-01

    This work examines methods of separating low molecular weight glycols from dilute aqueous solution. Extraction into conventional solvents is generally not economical, since, in the literature reviewed, distribution ratios for the two- to four-carbon glycols are all less than one. Distribution ratios can be increased, however, by incorporating into the organic phase an extracting agent that will complex with the solute of interest. The extracting agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA). NPBA, a boric acid derivative, reversibly complexes with many glycols. The literature on complexation of borate and related compounds with glycols, including mechanistic data, measurement techniques, and applications to separation processes, provides information valuable for designing experiments with NPBA and is reviewed herein. 88 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. High-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition over complex metal oxide catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Lucia M. Petkovic; Kyle C. Burch; Michael J. Rush

    2009-01-01

    Activity and stability of FeTiO3, MnTiO3, NiFe2O4, CuFe2O4, NiCr2O4, 2CuO·Cr2O3, CuO and Fe2O3 for the atmospheric decomposition of concentrated sulfuric acid in sulfur-based thermochemical water splitting cycles are presented. Catalyst activity was determined at temperatures from 725 to 900°C. Catalytic stability was examined at 850°C for up to 1 week of continuous operation. The results were compared to a 1.0wt%

  6. Delayed production of sulfuric acid condensation nuclei in the polar stratosphere from El Chichon volcanic vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Gringel, W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that measurements of the vertical profiles of atmospheric condensation nuclei (CN) have been conducted since 1973. Studies with a new instrument revealed that the CN concentration undergoes a remarkable annual variation in the 30-km region characterized by a large increase in the late winter/early spring period with a subsequent decay during the remainder of the year. The event particles are observed to be volatile at 150 C, suggesting a sulfuric acid-water composition similar to that found in the normal 20 km aerosol layer. The development of about 10 to the 7th metric tons of sulfuric acid aerosol following the injection of sulfurous gases by El Chichon in April 1982, prompted Hofmann and Rosen (1983) to predict a very large CN event for 1983. The present investigation is concerned with the actual observation of the predicted event. Attention is given to the observation of a very large increase of what appear to be small sulfuric acid droplets at 30-km altitude in January 1983 over Laramie, WY, in January 1983.

  7. Microbial contributions to cave formation: New insights into sulfuric acid speleogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers Engel, Annette; Stern, Libby A.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2004-05-01

    The sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) model was introduced in the early 1970s from observations of Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, and was proposed as a cave-enlargement process due to primarily H2S autoxidation to sulfuric acid and subaerial replacement of carbonate by gypsum. Here we present a reexamination of the SAS type locality in which we make use of uniquely applied geochemical and microbiological methods. Little H2S escapes to the cave atmosphere, or is lost by abiotic autoxidation, and instead the primary H2S loss mechanism is by subaqueous sulfur-oxidizing bacterial communities that consume H2S. Filamentous “Epsilonproteobacteria” and Gammaproteobacteria, characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization, colonize carbonate surfaces and generate sulfuric acid as a metabolic byproduct. The bacteria focus carbonate dissolution by locally depressing pH, compared to bulk cave waters near equilibrium or slightly supersaturated with calcite. These findings show that SAS occurs in subaqueous environments and potentially at much greater phreatic depths in carbonate aquifers, thereby offering new insights into the microbial roles in subsurface karstification.

  8. Quantitative assessment of the sulfuric acid contribution to new particle growth.

    PubMed

    Bzdek, Bryan R; Zordan, Christopher A; Pennington, M Ross; Luther, George W; Johnston, Murray V

    2012-04-17

    The Nano Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (NAMS) was deployed to rural/coastal and urban sites to measure the composition of 20-25 nm diameter nanoparticles during new particle formation (NPF). NAMS provides a quantitative measure of the elemental composition of individual, size-selected nanoparticles. In both environments, particles analyzed during NPF were found to be enhanced in elements associated with inorganic species (nitrogen, sulfur) relative to that associated with organic species (carbon). A molecular apportionment algorithm was applied to the elemental data in order to place the elemental composition into a molecular context. These measurements show that sulfate constitutes a substantial fraction of total particle mass in both environments. The contribution of sulfuric acid to new particle growth was quantitatively determined and the gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration required to incorporate the measured sulfate fraction was calculated. The calculated values were compared to those calculated by a sulfuric acid proxy that considers solar radiation and SO(2) levels. The two values agree within experimental uncertainty. Sulfate accounts for 29-46% of the total mass growth of particles. Other species contributing to growth include ammonium, nitrate, and organics. For each location, the relative amounts of these species do not change significantly with growth rate. However, for the coastal location, sulfate contribution increases with increasing temperature whereas nitrate contribution decreases with increasing temperature. PMID:22435616

  9. Chemolithotrophic Bacteria in Copper Ores Leached at High Sulfuric Acid Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, M.; Espejo, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive bacterial growth was observed when copper sulfide ores were leached with 0.6 N sulfuric acid. The bacterial population developed in this condition was examined by characterization of the spacer regions between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci obtained after PCR amplification of the DNA extracted from the leached ore. The spacers observed had the sizes found in strains of "Leptospirillum ferrooxidans" and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, except for a larger one, approximately 560 bp long, that was not observed in any of the strains examined, including those of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The bacteria with this last spacer were selected after culturing in mineral and elemental sulfur media containing 0.7 N sulfuric acid. The spacer and the 16S ribosomal DNA of this isolate were sequenced and compared with those in species commonly found in bioleaching processes. Though the nucleotide sequence of the spacer showed an extensive heterologous region with T. thiooxidans, the sequence of its 16S rDNA gene indicated a close relationship (99.85%) with this species. These results indicate that a population comprised of bacterial strains closely related to T. thiooxidans and of another strain, possibly related to "L. ferrooxidans," can develop during leaching at high sulfuric acid concentration. Iron oxidation in this condition is attributable to "L. ferrooxidans" and not T. ferrooxidans, based on the presence of spacers with the "L. ferrooxidans" size range and the absence of spacers characteristic of T. ferrooxidans. PMID:16535497

  10. Kinetic and Modeling Investigation on Dilute Sulfuric Acid and Hot Water Fractionation of Selected Biomass Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. Y.; Chen, R. B.; Wu, Z.; Hayes, J.

    2004-09-01

    Subcontractor developed a processing model to evaluate and optimize an NREL-developed biomass pretreatment technology. The technology, taking advantage of the biphasic nature of hemicellulose in pretreatment, is a two-stage, reverse-flow, shrinking-bed system. The contract simulation found that this system could increase sugar yield by about 5%, with bed shrinkage of 27% and sugar yield of 95% at optimum conditions.

  11. A combined proteomic and transcriptomic analysis on sulfur metabolism pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana under simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Chen, Juan A; Wang, Wenhua; Simon, Martin; Wu, Feihua; Hu, Wenjun; Chen, Juan B; Zheng, Hailei

    2014-01-01

    With rapid economic development, most regions in southern China have suffered acid rain (AR) pollution. In our study, we analyzed the changes in sulfur metabolism in Arabidopsis under simulated AR stress which provide one of the first case studies, in which the systematic responses in sulfur metabolism were characterized by high-throughput methods at different levels including proteomic, genomic and physiological approaches. Generally, we found that all of the processes related to sulfur metabolism responded to AR stress, including sulfur uptake, activation and also synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acid and other secondary metabolites. Finally, we provided a catalogue of the detected sulfur metabolic changes and reconstructed the coordinating network of their mutual influences. This study can help us to understand the mechanisms of plants to adapt to AR stress. PMID:24595051

  12. A Combined Proteomic and Transcriptomic Analysis on Sulfur Metabolism Pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana under Simulated Acid Rain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenhua; Simon, Martin; Wu, Feihua; Hu, Wenjun; Chen, Juan B.; Zheng, Hailei

    2014-01-01

    With rapid economic development, most regions in southern China have suffered acid rain (AR) pollution. In our study, we analyzed the changes in sulfur metabolism in Arabidopsis under simulated AR stress which provide one of the first case studies, in which the systematic responses in sulfur metabolism were characterized by high-throughput methods at different levels including proteomic, genomic and physiological approaches. Generally, we found that all of the processes related to sulfur metabolism responded to AR stress, including sulfur uptake, activation and also synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acid and other secondary metabolites. Finally, we provided a catalogue of the detected sulfur metabolic changes and reconstructed the coordinating network of their mutual influences. This study can help us to understand the mechanisms of plants to adapt to AR stress. PMID:24595051

  13. Effect of Mineral Admixtures on Resistance to Sulfuric Acid Solution of Mortars with Quaternary Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhloufi, Zoubir; Bederina, Madani; Bouhicha, Mohamed; Kadri, El-Hadj

    This research consists to study the synergistic action of three mineral additions simultaneously added to the cement. This synergistic effect has a positive effect on the sustainability of limestone mortars. Tests were performed on mortars based on crushed limestone sand and manufactured by five quaternary binders (ordinary Portland cement and CPO mixed simultaneously with filler limestone, blast-furnace and natural pozzolan). The purpose of this research was to identify the resistance of five different mortars to the solution of sulfuric acid. Changes in weight loss and compressive strength measured at 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 days for each acid solution were studied. We followed up on the change in pH of the sulfuric acid solution at the end of each month up to 180 days.

  14. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  15. Decoupling the Impacts of Heterotrophy and Autotrophy on Sulfuric Acid Speleogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P.

    2013-12-01

    Within caves such as Movile Caves (Romania), the Frasassi Caves (Italy), and Lower Kane Cave (LKC, Wyoming, USA) the combination of abiotic autoxidation and microbiological oxidation of H2S produces SO42- and H+ that promotes limestone dissolution through sulfuric-acid speleogenesis (SAS). Microbial sulfide oxidation by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been shown recently to be the dominant process leading to speleogenesis in these caves. However, due to the inherently large diversity of microbial communities within these environments, there are a variety of metabolic pathways that can impact limestone dissolution and carbon cycling to varying degrees. In order to investigate these variations we outfitted a continuous flow bioreactor with a Picarro Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) that continuously monitored and logged 12CO2 and 13CO2 at ppmv sensitivity and isotope ratios at <0.3‰ precision in simulated cave atmospheres. Bioreactors containing Madison Limestone were inoculated with either a monoculture of the mixotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Thiothrix unzii or a mixed environmental (LKC) sulfur-metabolizing community. Ca2+ and pH were also continuously logged in order to quantify the impact of microbial metabolism on limestone dissolution rate. We found an order of magnitude of variability in limestone dissolution rates that were closely tied to microbial metabolism. In monocultures, limestone dissolution was inhibited by excessive reduced sulfur as T. unzii prefers to store sulfur internally as So under these conditions, generating no acidity. The headspace was depleted in 13C when sulfur was being stored as So and enriched in 13C when sulfur was being converted to SO42-. This suggests a preference for a heterotrophy during periods of high sulfur input and autotrophy when sulfur input is low. This was corroborated by an increase in SO42- during low sulfide input and microscope images showed loss of internal sulfur within the filaments during these periods. In both monoculture and LKC environmental cultures, dissolution rates were highest when sulfur-substrate was limited and CO2 was supplied with no organic carbon. Under these conditions ?13C values were as much as 20‰ higher than abiotic conditions and signifies autotrophic carbon fixation which discriminates against 13C. 16S rRNA sequences confirm that autotrophic SOB dominate within this reactor. In contrast, when acetate was supplied with no supplied CO2, ?13C was relatively constant, maintaining values between -31‰ and as low as -37‰. This signifies heterotrophic metabolism where lighter 12C is preferentially consumed resulting in lighter CO2 in the headspace. 16S rRNA sequences confirm that heterotrophic sulfur-reducing bacteria dominate the community within this reactor. When both acetate and CO2 were supplied the heterotrophic behavior appeared to dominate the system which resulted in a significant drop (15‰) in ?13C and a correlative drop in limestone dissolution rate. These results suggest that chemoautotrophy increases the rate of SAS and CO2 flux within the cave environment while heterotrophy leads to slower SAS or even calcite precipitation. Furthermore, changes in carbon substrate (CO2 vs. Acetate) or sulfur substrate concentrations caused an immediate microbial response that could be observed in all measured chemical variables.

  16. Kinetics of gypsum formation and growth during the dissolution of colemanite in sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, E.; Ero?lu, ?.; Özkar, S.

    2001-11-01

    One of the most important boron minerals, colemanite, is dissolved in aqueous sulfuric acid to produce boric acid whereby gypsum is formed as byproduct. Filtration of gypsum has an important role in boric acid production because gypsum affects the efficiency, purity and crystallization of boric acid. The formation and growth kinetics of gypsum during the dissolution of colemanite in aqueous sulfuric acid were studied in a batch reactor by varying the temperature (60-90°C), stirring rate (150-400 rpm), and initial concentrations of the reactants. The initial CaO/H 2SO 4 molar ratio was varied between 0.21-0.85 by keeping the initial concentration of sulfate ion at [SO 42-] o=0.623 mol/l, and 0.85-3.41 by keeping the initial concentration of colemanite at [B 2O 3] o=0.777 mol/l. The crystallization of gypsum from the solution was followed by monitoring the calcium ion concentration in the solution as it is decreased by the formation of calcium sulfate precipitate. The calcium ion concentration in the liquid phase first undergoes a rapid exponential decay and then slowly approaches an asymptotic value of the saturation concentration at the respective temperature. The saturation concentration decreases with the increasing temperature from 5.2 mmol/l at 60°C to 3.1 mmol/l at 80°C, however, further increase in the temperature up to 90°C causes an increase in the saturation concentration to 5.1 mmol/l. The stirring rate was found to have no significant effect on dissolution in the range of 150-400 rpm. The minimum saturation concentration of the calcium ion was obtained at 80°C when the initial CaO/H 2SO 4 molar ratio is 0.85. The boric acid concentration in the solution decreases with the decreasing initial concentration of sulfuric acid. After the fast dissolution reaction of colemanite in aqueous sulfuric acid, the nucleation of the gypsum crystals first occurs from the supersaturated solution and then the crystals grow on these nuclei. The needle like crystals become wider and taller on prolong crystallization. The rate of gypsum crystallization reaction was second order with respect to saturation level. The evaluation of the kinetic data in an Arhenius plot gives an activation energy of 34±2 kJ/mol for the crystal growth of gypsum from the supersaturated solution obtained by dissolution of colemanite in aqueous sulfuric acid.

  17. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  18. Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Anne W. Glenn; Kyle C. Burch

    2007-03-01

    The activity and stability of several metal oxide supported platinum catalysts were explored for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. The acid decomposition reaction is common to several sulfur based thermochemical water splitting cycles. Reactions were carried out using a feed of concentrated liquid sulfuric acid (96 wt%) at atmospheric pressure at temperatures between 800 and 850 °C and a weight hour space velocity of 52 g acid/g catalyst/hr. Reactions were run at these high space velocities such that variations in kinetics were not masked by surplus catalyst. The influence of exposure to reaction conditions was explored for three catalysts; 0.1-0.2 wt% Pt supported on alumina, zirconia and titania. The higher surface area Pt/Al2O3 and Pt/ZrO2 catalysts were found to have the highest activity but deactivated rapidly. A low surface area Pt/TiO2 catalyst was found to have good stability in short term tests, but slowly lost activity for over 200 hours of continuous operation.

  19. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5? biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ? 30 ?m before acidification to ? 60 ?m after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5? biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5? biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  20. Photoluminescent properties of anodic aluminum oxide films formed in a mixture of malonic and sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shou-Yi; Wang, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xu-Qiang; Wang, Gang; Wang, Cheng-Wei

    2014-11-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films with ordered nanopore arrays were fabricated electrochemically in the mixture electrolytes of malonic and sulfuric acids. Their photoluminescent (PL) properties have been investigated. There is no obvious PL band for the AAO films prepared in pure sulfuric acid, however, with the increase of the concentration of malonic acid in the mixture electrolytes, a PL band in the range from 300 to 500 nm appears, and its intensity is enhanced gradually. Obviously, the PL band is mainly attributed to the malonic impurities incorporated into AAO films, which corresponds to the excitation center at about 270 nm. Meantime, the increase of the sulfuric acid concentration results in a blueshift of the PL band. Further, the effect of annealing process on the PL properties is also investigated. As annealing temperature increases, the malonic impurities incorporated into AAO films are gradually decomposed, the PL intensity corresponding to excitation center at about 270 nm gradually becomes weak. But interestingly, with the decomposition of malonic impurities, the defects in AAO films mainly caused by a lattice mismatch and the difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion between alumina and incorporated malonic impurities are gradually produced, which form a new excitation center at about 250 nm, and its PL is firstly enhanced to maximum at 400 °C and then decreases with the further increase of annealing temperature.

  1. Electrical charging changes the composition of sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I. K.; Olenius, T.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Loukonen, V.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-08-01

    Sulfuric acid clusters stabilized by base molecules are likely to have a significant role in atmospheric new-particle formation. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have permitted the detection of electrically charged clusters. However, direct measurement of electrically neutral clusters is not possible. Mass spectrometry instruments can be combined with a charger, but the possible effect of charging on the composition of neutral clusters must be addressed in order to interpret and understand the measured data. In the present work we have used formation free energies from quantum chemical methods to calculate the evaporation rates of electrically charged (both positive and negative) sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters. To understand how charging will affect the composition of electrically neutral clusters, we have compared the evaporation rates of the most stable neutral clusters with those of the corresponding charged clusters. Based on the evaporation rates of different molecules from the charged clusters, we determined the most likely resulting cluster composition when a stable neutral cluster is charged and the molecules with the highest evaporation rates are lost from it. We found that all of the most stable neutral clusters will be altered by both positive and negative charging. In the case of charging clusters negatively, base molecules will completely evaporate from clusters with 1 to 3 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of ammonia, and from clusters with 1 or 2 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of dimethylamine. Larger clusters will maintain some base molecules, but the H2SO4 : base ratio will increase. In the case of positive charging, some of the acid molecules will evaporate, decreasing the H2SO4 : base ratio.

  2. Bond energies and structures of ammonia-sulfuric acid positive cluster ions.

    PubMed

    Froyd, Karl D; Lovejoy, Edward R

    2012-06-21

    New particle formation in the atmosphere is initiated by nucleation of gas-phase species. The small molecular clusters that act as seeds for new particles are stabilized by the incorporation of an ion. Ion-induced nucleation of molecular cluster ions containing sulfuric acid generates new particles in the background troposphere. The addition of a proton-accepting species to sulfuric acid cluster ions can further stabilize them and may promote nucleation under a wider range of conditions. To understand and accurately predict atmospheric nucleation, the stabilities of each molecular cluster within a chemical family must be known. We present the first comprehensive measurements of the ammonia-sulfuric acid positive ion cluster system NH(4)(+)(NH(3))(n)(H(2)SO(4))(s). Enthalpies and entropies of individual growth steps within this system were measured using either an ion flow reactor-mass spectrometer system under equilibrium conditions or by thermal decomposition of clusters in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Low level ab initio structural calculations provided inputs to a master equation model to determine bond energies from thermal decomposition measurements. Optimized ab initio structures for clusters up through n = 3, s = 3 are reported. Upon addition of ammonia and sulfuric acid pairs, internal proton transfer generates multiple NH(4)(+) and HSO(4)(-) ions within the clusters. These multiple-ion structures are up to 50 kcal mol(-1) more stable than corresponding isomers that retain neutral NH(3) and H(2)SO(4) species. The lowest energy n = s clusters are composed entirely of ions. The addition of acid-base pairs to the core NH(4)(+) ion generates nanocrystals that begin to resemble the ammonium bisulfate bulk crystal starting with the smallest n = s cluster, NH(4)(+)(NH(3))(1)(H(2)SO(4))(1). In the absence of water, this cluster ion system nucleates spontaneously for conditions that encompass most of the free troposphere. PMID:22103290

  3. Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation and Raman Spectroscopies

    E-print Network

    Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational SumVised Manuscript ReceiVed: June 4, 2008 The uptake of methanol at the air-liquid interface of 0-96.5 wt % sulfuric methanol and H2SO4 to form methyl hydrogen sulfate. The surface is saturated with the methyl species after

  4. Ethanol production from cotton gin trash using optimised dilute acid pretreatment and whole slurry fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, S; Vancov, T; Palmer, J; Morris, S

    2014-12-01

    Cotton ginning trash (CGT) collected from Australian cotton gins was evaluated for bioethanol production. CGT composition varied between ginning operations and contained high levels of extractives (26-28%), acid-insoluble material (17-22%) and holocellulose (42-50%). Pretreatment conditions of time (4-20 min), temperature (160-220 °C) and sulfuric acid concentration (0-2%) were optimised using a central composite design. Response surface modelling revealed that CGT fibre pretreated at 180 °C in 0.8% H2SO4 for 12 min was optimal for maximising enzymatic glucose recoveries and achieved yields of 89% theoretical, whilst the total accumulated levels of furans and acetic acid remained relatively low at <1 and 2 g/L respectively. Response surface modelling also estimated maximum xylose recovery in pretreated liquors (87% theoretical) under the set conditions of 150 °C in 1.9% H2SO4 for 23.8 min. Yeast fermentations yielded high ethanol titres of 85%, 88% and 70% theoretical from glucose generated from: (a) enzymatic hydrolysis of washed pretreated fibres, (b) enzymatic hydrolysis of whole pretreated slurries and (c) simultaneous saccharification fermentations, respectively. PMID:25280112

  5. Mineralogical Controls on Microbial Diversity in a Sulfuric Acid Karst System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P.

    2011-12-01

    The role mineralogy plays on microbial community distribution, composition, niche differentiation, and accumulation is a complex and nebulous association. Microbial phylogenetic diversity and bacterial composition of communities obtained from Lower Kane Cave (LKC), WY, USA, were studied using next generation bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing techniques. The microbial consortium found within LKC was found to be primarily composed of neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizing members of the gamma- and epsilon-proteobacteria . The microbial population within LKC has been instigated in previous studies to have a significant role in the processes of sulfuric acid speleogenesis. Using a LKC biomat as the inoculant in a series of 3 nutrient limited laboratory reactor experiments, and a pure culture of Thiothrix unzii (ATCC type strain 49747) in a parallel experiment, we found that both limestone and dolostone substratum consistently had higher biomass accumulation than silicate minerals in the same reactor. At the Class level, the carbonate substratum (Calcite, Limestone, and Dolostone) had ~84% - 88.7% of phylotypes in common. Aside from Basalt (Simpson's Index, D of 0.53), the carbonate substratum produced the least diverse phylotype distributions. Feldspar and quartz were colonized by the most diverse communities with Simpson's Index values of 0.16 and 0.31. Evaluation of metabolic guild distribution shows that potential neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizers have an affinity for acid neutralizing carbonate substrata over silicate substrata. These potential sulfur-oxidizing guilds compose ~28%-38% of the total microbial community. For feldspar and chert substratum, potential sulfur-oxidizing metabolic guilds composed merely ~5% of the total microbial community. The quartz substratum, in contrast, was uniquely populated by potential acidophilic sulfur-oxidizers Acidithiobacillus and Acidithiomicrobium; composing ~19% of the total community. A quartz substratum may offer these acidophiles a competitive advantage over other microbial communities that do not tolerate an acidic habitat, while optimizing the local microenvironment to better facilitate their metabolic pathway. The basalt substratum community was ~67% Thiothrix spp., a sulfur-oxidizing genus commonly associated with Deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This dominance of Thiothrix spp. on basalt may be due to an advantageous ability to extract, and take advantage of, mineral bound nutrients (P, Fe) in basalt. These results provide substantial evidence to support the hypothesis that mineralogy influences microbial distribution, composition, niche differentiation, and accumulation in a nutrient limited system. Specific microbial populations which have evolved to take advantage of specific mineral substrata and exert highly localized control of biogeochemical conditions. Mineralogy, therefore, plays an active part in the development of subsurface microbial ecology and diversity by exerting selective pressures on the subsurface microbial environment.

  6. Comparison of aqueous ammonia and dilute acid pretreatment of bamboo fractions: Structure properties and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Donglin; Yang, Zhong; Liu, Feng; Xu, Xueru; Zhang, Junhua

    2014-11-01

    The effect of two pretreatments methods, aqueous ammonia (SAA) and dilute acid (DA), on the chemical compositions, cellulose crystallinity, morphologic change, and enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo fractions (bamboo yellow, timber, green, and knot) was compared. Bamboo fractions with SAA pretreatment had better hydrolysability than those with DA pretreatment. High crystallinity index resulted in low hydrolysis yield in the conversion of SAA pretreated bamboo fractions, not DA pretreated fractions. The increase of cellulase loading had modestly positive effect in the hydrolysis of both SAA and DA pretreated bamboo fractions, while supplement of xylanase significantly increased the hydrolysis of the pretreated bamboo fractions, especially after SAA pretreatment. The results indicated that SAA pretreatment was more effective than DA pretreatment in conversion of bamboo fractions, and supplementation of xylanase was necessary in effective conversion of the SAA pretreated fractions into fermentable sugars. PMID:25459864

  7. Uptake of formaldehyde by sulfuric acid solutions - Impact on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Pfaff, Jeanne; Jayaweera, Indira; Prather, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates the uptake of CH2O by low temperature sulfuric acid solutions representative of global stratospheric particulate. It is argued that if similar uptake occurs under stratospheric pressures of CH2O, i.e., 1000 times lower than used in the present study, then the removal of CH2O from the gas phase can take away a significant source of odd hydrogen in the mid- and high-latitude lower stratosphere. It is shown that with the inclusion of this reaction, concentrations of OH and H2O are reduced by as much as 4 percent under background levels of aerosols and more than 15 percent under elevated (volcanic) conditions. The accumulation of CH2O in stratospheric aerosols over a season, reaching about 1 M solutions, will alter the composition and may even change the reactivity of these sulfuric acid-water mixtures.

  8. Heterogeneous interactions of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and nitric acid with sulfuric acid surfaces at stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Golden, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The heterogeneous interactions of ClONO2, HCl, and HNO3 with sulfuric acid surfaces were studied using a Knudsen cell flow reactor. The surfaces studied, chosen to simulate global stratospheric particulate, were composed of 65-75 percent H2SO4 solutions at temperatures in the range -63 to -43 C. Heterogeneous loss, but not reaction, of HNO3 and HCl occurred on these surfaces; the measured sticking coefficients are reported. Chlorine nitrate reacted on the cold sulfuric acid surfaces, producing gas-phase HOCl and condensed HNO3. CLONO2 also reacted with HCl dissolved in the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C, forming gaseous Cl2. In all cases studied, the sticking and/or reaction coefficients were much larger for the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C than for the 75-percent solution at -43 C.

  9. The impacts of deacetylation prior to dilute acid pretreatment on the bioethanol process

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for the biochemical production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. During dilute acid pretreatment, xylan depolymerizes to form soluble xylose monomers and oligomers. Because the xylan found in nature is highly acetylated, the formation of xylose monomers requires two steps: 1) cleavage of the xylosidic bonds, and 2) cleavage of covalently bonded acetyl ester groups. Results In this study, we show that the latter may be the rate limiting step for xylose monomer formation. Furthermore, acetyl groups are also found to be a cause of biomass recalcitrance and hydrolyzate toxicity. While the removal of acetyl groups from native corn stover by alkaline de-esterification prior to pretreatment improves overall process yields, the exact impact is highly dependent on the corn stover variety in use. Xylose monomer yields in pretreatment generally increases by greater than 10%. Compared to pretreated corn stover controls, the deacetylated corn stover feedstock is approximately 20% more digestible after pretreatment. Finally, by lowering hydrolyzate toxicity, xylose utilization and ethanol yields are further improved during fermentation by roughly 10% and 7%, respectively. In this study, several varieties of corn stover lots were investigated to test the robustness of the deacetylation-pretreatment-saccharification-fermentation process. Conclusions Deacetylation shows significant improvement on glucose and xylose yields during pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, but it also reduces hydrolyzate toxicity during fermentation, thereby improving ethanol yields and titer. The magnitude of effect is dependent on the selected corn stover variety, with several varieties achieving improvements of greater than 10% xylose yield in pretreatment, 20% glucose yield in low solids enzymatic hydrolysis and 7% overall ethanol yield. PMID:22369467

  10. Impacts of Deacetylation Prior to Dilute Acid Pretreatment on the Bioethanol Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Shekiro, J.; Franden, M. A.; Wang, W.; Johnson, D. K.; Zhang, M.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for the biochemical production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. During dilute acid pretreatment, xylan depolymerizes to form soluble xylose monomers and oligomers. Because the xylan found in nature is highly acetylated, the formation of xylose monomers requires two steps: (1) cleavage of the xylosidic bonds, and (2) cleavage of covalently bonded acetyl ester groups. Results: In this study, we show that the latter may be the rate limiting step for xylose monomer formation. Furthermore, acetyl groups are also found to be a cause of biomass recalcitrance and hydrolyzate toxicity. While the removal of acetyl groups from native corn stover by alkaline de-esterification prior to pretreatment improves overall process yields, the exact impact is highly dependent on the corn stover variety in use. Xylose monomer yields in pretreatment generally increases by greater than 10%. Compared to pretreated corn stover controls, the deacetylated corn stover feedstock is approximately 20% more digestible after pretreatment. Finally, by lowering hydrolyzate toxicity, xylose utilization and ethanol yields are further improved during fermentation by roughly 10% and 7%, respectively. In this study, several varieties of corn stover lots were investigated to test the robustness of the deacetylation-pretreatment-saccharification-fermentation process. Conclusions: Deacetylation shows significant improvement on glucose and xylose yields during pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, but it also reduces hydrolyzate toxicity during fermentation, thereby improving ethanol yields and titer. The magnitude of effect is dependent on the selected corn stover variety, with several varieties achieving improvements of greater than 10% xylose yield in pretreatment, 20% glucose yield in low solids enzymatic hydrolysis and 7% overall ethanol yield.

  11. Design bases: Bauxite-sulfuric acid feed facilities 100-K Area

    SciTech Connect

    Etheridge, E.L.

    1993-06-10

    This document defines the objective, bases, and functional requirements governing the preparation of detail design of the bauxite-sulfuric acid feed facilities to be installed in the 183-KE and KW buildings. These facilities will produce the chemical coagulant used in the treatment of Columbia River water in the water plants; they will replace existing liquid alum feed systems. The treated water will be used as reactor coolant.

  12. A global three-dimensional model of the stratospheric sulfuric acid layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Amram; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D model which encompasses SO2 production from OCS, followed by its oxidation to gaseous H2SO4, the condensation-evaporation equilibrium of gaseous and particulate H2SO4, and finally particle condensation and rainout, is presently used to study processes maintaining the nonvolcanically-perturbed stratosphere's sulfuric acid layer. A comparison of the results thus obtained with remotely sensed stratospheric aerosol extinction data shows the model to simulate the general behavior of stratospheric aerosol extinction.

  13. Mechanistic study on the atmospheric formation of acid rain base on the sulfur dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Morteza Vahedpour; Fatemeh Zolfaghari

    The reaction pathways of acid rain formation from reaction of sulfur dioxide vapor and water vapor on the singlet potential\\u000a energy surface have been investigated theoretically. The calculated results show that the reactants are initially associated\\u000a with the adduct SO2–H2O through a barrier less process. Subsequently, via a variety of transformations of isomer SO2–H2O, three kinds of products H2SO3, SO3 + H2,

  14. Determination of Water Activity in Ammonium Sulfate and Sulfuric Acid Mixtures Using Levitated Single Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong Pyo Kim; Betty K.-L. Pun; Chak K. Chan; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld

    1994-01-01

    Water activities of ammonium sulfate-sulfuric acid mixtures with ammonium to sulfate molar ratios between 0 and 2 were measured by a spherical void electrodynamic levitator at relative humidities (RH) of 0.18–0.90. Since the composition of the solid particles is subject to uncertainty, solution properties were determined relative to the known properties at RH about 0.75–0.90. The data were compared with

  15. Rotating disc electrode study of the electropolishing mechanism of NiTi in methanolic sulfuric acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lakshman Neelakantan; Achim Walter Hassel

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism during electropolishing of NiTi in methanolic 3M sulfuric acid is elucidated based on the investigations carried out using a rotating disc electrode (RDE). The influence of the rotation rate, temperature and the addition of Ni and Ti ions in solution on the dissolution kinetics are investigated and analysed. The dissolution of NiTi during electropolishing exhibits Levich behaviour confirming

  16. Microbial Diversity and Population Structure of Extremely Acidic Sulfur-Oxidizing Biofilms From Sulfidic Caves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Jones; T. Stoffer; E. H. Lyon; J. L. Macalady

    2005-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH 0-1) microbial biofilms called snottites form on the walls of sulfidic caves where gypsum replacement crusts isolate sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms from the buffering action of limestone host rock. We investigated the phylogeny and population structure of snottites from sulfidic caves in central Italy using full cycle rRNA methods. A small subunit rRNA bacterial clone library from a Frasassi

  17. Nutrition and health relevant regulation of intestinal sulfur amino acid metabolism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhengfeng FangKang; Kang Yao; Xiaoling Zhang; Shengjun Zhao; Zhihong Sun; Gang Tian; Bing Yu; Yan Lin; Biquan Zhu; Gang Jia; Keying Zhang; Daiwen Chen; De Wu

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur amino acids (SAA), particularly methionine and cysteine, are critical for the gut to maintain its functions including\\u000a the digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients, the immune surveillance of the intestinal epithelial layer and regulation\\u000a of the mucosal response to foreign antigens. However, the metabolism of SAA in the gut, specifically the transmethylation\\u000a of methionine, will result in a net

  18. Sulfuric Acid Alkylation of Isobutane by Olefins. Experience in Operation of a Jet Mixing Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Sh. Gershuni; M. I. Belkin; A. A. Nikitin; A. A. Romanov; S. B. Yukhtin; S. V. Rumyantsev; E. A. Esipko

    2003-01-01

    Experience in operating a sulfuric–acid alkylation jet reactor of new design — with no mixers and heat–exchange bank and a process scheme that includes this reactor, a hydrocyclone, three–phase separator, and circulating centrifugal pumps are described. An additional quantity of feedstock is added to the jet reactor operating in tandem with a cascade reactor without addition of circulating isobutane. The

  19. Carbohydrate analysis by a phenol–sulfuric acid method in microplate format

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatsuya Masuko; Akio Minami; Norimasa Iwasaki; Tokifumi Majima; Shin-Ichiro Nishimura; Yuan C. Lee

    2005-01-01

    Among many colorimetric methods for carbohydrate analysis, the phenol–sulfuric acid method is the easiest and most reliable method. It has been used for measuring neutral sugars in oligosaccharides, proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids. This method is used widely because of its sensitivity and simplicity. In its original form, it required 50–450nmol of monosaccharides or equivalent for analysis and thus is inadequate

  20. Electrochemical impedance of passive iron in sulfuric acid water-organic solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Safonov; S. Haruyama

    2000-01-01

    The passive state of iron in sulfuric acid solutions in dimethylformamide and dimethyl sulfoxide containing different amounts\\u000a of water is studied by the impedance method in a wide range of ac frequencies and also by the methods of polarization curves\\u000a and open-circuit potential transients. In the studied systems, the metal passivation potential is shown to shift in the positive\\u000a direction

  1. Increase in the stratospheric background sulfuric acid aerosol mass in the past 10 years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Hofmann

    1990-01-01

    Data obtained from measurements of the stratospheric aerosol at Laramie, Wyoming (41°N), indicate that the background or nonvolcanic stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosol mass at northern mid-latitudes has increased by about 5 {plus minus} 2% per year during the past 10 years. Whether this increase is natural or anthropogenic could not be determined at this time because of inadequate information on

  2. Refined understanding of sulfur amino acid nutrition in hybrid striped bass, Morone chrysops (male symbol) x M. saxatilis (female symbol)

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Mark Christopher

    2005-08-29

    Previous studies have indicated the level of total sulfur amino acids (TSAA) (methionine + cystine) is most limiting in practical diet formulations for hybrid striped bass (HSB), especially if animal feedstuffs are replaced with plant feedstuffs...

  3. EVALUATING EFFECTS OF NEPTUNIUM ON THE SRS METHOD FOR CONTROLLED POTENTIAL COULOMETRIC ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM IN SULFURIC ACID SUPPORTING ELECTROLYTE

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M; Sheldon Nichols, S

    2008-05-09

    A study of the impact of neptunium on the coulometric assay of plutonium in dilute sulfuric acid was performed. Weight aliquots of plutonium standard solutions were spiked with purified neptunium solution to evaluate plutonium measurement performance for aliquots with Pu:Np ratios of 50:1, 30:1, 20:1, 15:1, and 10:1. Weight aliquots of the pure plutonium standard solution were measured as controls. Routine plutonium instrument control standards were also measured. The presence of neptunium in plutonium aliquots significantly increases the random uncertainty associated with the plutonium coulometric measurement performed in accordance with ISO12183:2005.7 However, the presence of neptunium does not appear to degrade electrode performance and conditioning as aliquots of pure plutonium that were interspersed during the measurement of the mixed Pu:Np aliquots continued to achieve the historical short-term random uncertainty for the method. Lack of adequate control of the neptunium oxidation state is suspected to be the primary cause of the elevated measurement uncertainty and will be pursued in a future study.

  4. Activation barriers in the growth of molecular clusters derived from sulfuric acid and ammonia.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Joseph W; Bzdek, Bryan R; Ridge, Douglas P; Johnston, Murray V

    2014-12-11

    Unraveling the chemical mechanism of atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) has important implications for the broader understanding of the role of aerosols in global climate. We present computational results of the transition states and activation barriers for growth of atmospherically relevant positively charged molecular clusters containing ammonia and sulfuric acid. Sulfuric acid uptake onto the investigated clusters has a small activation free-energy barrier, consistent with nearly collision-limited uptake. Ammonia uptake requires significant reorganization of ions in the preexisting cluster, which yields an activation barrier on the order of 29-53 kJ/mol for the investigated clusters. For this reason, ammonia uptake onto positively charged clusters may be too slow for cluster growth to proceed by the currently accepted mechanism of stepwise addition of sulfuric acid followed by ammonia. The results presented here may have important implications for modeling atmospheric NPF and nanoparticle growth, which typically does not consider an activation barrier along the growth pathway and usually assumes collision-limited molecular uptake. PMID:25394285

  5. Leaching of Chalcopyrite Concentrate with Hydrogen Peroxide and Sulfuric Acid in an Autoclave System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turan, M. Deniz; Altundo?an, H. Soner

    2013-08-01

    In this study, leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate was investigated in an autoclave system using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid. By decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, the active oxygen formed can provide both high oxidation potential and high pressure in a closed vessel for leaching. Preliminary studies showed that hydrogen peroxide can be used as an oxidant instead of oxygen gas in the autoclave. Central composite design (CCD) was used to examine the effects of the experimental parameters on the copper and iron extraction as a response. The proposed model equation using CCD showed good agreement with experimental data, the correlation coefficients R 2 for copper and iron being 0.84 and 0.86, respectively. The optimum conditions to obtain the main goal of maximum copper and minimum iron extraction from chalcopyrite were determined as to be sulfuric acid concentration of 2.5 M, hydrogen peroxide concentration of 2.3 M, leaching time of 24 minutes, chalcopyrite amount of 3.17 g (in 50-mL solution), stirring speed of 630 rpm, and leaching temperature of 351 K (78 °C). Under the optimum condition, 76 pct of copper and 9 pct of iron were extracted from chalcopyrite concentrate. Extraction yield results of metals indicate that selective leaching of chalcopyrite can be achieved using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid in an autoclave system.

  6. Charge transfer and optical phonon mixing in few-layer graphene chemically doped with sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weijie; Tan, Pingheng; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jian

    2010-12-01

    Chemical doping is expected to substantially increase the density of free charge carriers by charge transfer and modify the Fermi level and screening effect of doped materials. Here, along with Raman identification of 3 and 4 graphene layers by a 633-nm laser excitation, we investigated charge transfer and optical phonon mixing in few layer graphenes in detail by utilizing sulfuric acid as an electron-acceptor dopant. Sulfuric acid molecules are found to be only physically adsorbed on the surface layers of graphenes without intercalations. The top and bottom layers of bilayer graphene can be intentionally doped differently by concentrated sulfuric acid. The difference of the hole doping between the top and bottom layers results in phonon mixing of symmetric and antisymmetric modes in bilayer graphene. The Raman frequency evolution with the doping level is in agreement with recent ab initio density-functional theory calculations [P. Gava, M. Lazzeri, A. M. Saitta, and F. Mauri, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155422 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevB.80.155422]. Chemical doping by adsorption-induced charge transfer offers a way to study the electronic and vibrational behaviors of few layer graphenes at high-carrier concentration.

  7. Pilot-scale On-farm Pretreatment of Perennial Grasses with Dilute Acid and Alkali for Fuel Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) were pretreated with sulfuric acid or calcium hydroxide 50 g/kg DM at both the laboratory (250 g DM) and pilot-scale (250 kg DM) and anaerobically stored for two durations, 60 and 180 days. Pretreated and untreated samp...

  8. Full-scale on-farm pretreatment of perennial grasses with dilute acid for fuel ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers utilizing sulfuric acid to pretreat biomass on-farm will need a safe and cost-effective method for application that does not negatively impact the ensiling process or harvesting capacity. To that end, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) were pre...

  9. Sulphur Speciation and Turnover in Soils: Evidence from Sulfur K-Edge XANES Spectroscopy and Isotope Dilution Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao,F.; Lehmann, J.; Solomon, D.; Fox, M.; McGrath, S.

    2006-01-01

    Sulphur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to quantify S species in humic substance extracts from ten soils from the UK, China and New Zealand, which differ in land use and agricultural management. XANES spectroscopy showed the presence of most reduced (sulphides, disulphides, thiols and thiophenes), intermediate (sulphoxides and sulphonates) and highly oxidised S (ester sulphates) forms, with the three groups representing 14-32%, 33-50% and 22-53% of the organic S in the humic substance extracts, respectively. Land use had a profound influence on the relative proportions of S species. Well-drained arable soils generally had a higher proportion of organic S present in the most oxidised form than the grassland soils collected nearby, whereas paddy soils showed a more reduced profile due to episodic flooding. In the Broadbalk Classical Experiment at Rothamsted, reversion of an arable system to grassland or woodland in the 1880s resulted in an increase of the most reduced and intermediate S species at the expense of the most oxidised S species. Long-term applications of farmyard manure to an arable plot also shifted S species from the most oxidised to the intermediate and the most reduced species. Sulphur immobilisation and gross mineralisation were determined in seven soils using the {sup 35}S isotope dilution method. Gross mineralisation during a 53-day incubation correlated more closely with the amounts of the most reduced and intermediate S species than with the most oxidised S species, suggesting that the former (C-bonded S) were the main source of organic S for mineralisation in the short-term.

  10. Formaldehyde instrument development and boundary layer sulfuric acid: Implications for photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case Hanks, Anne Theresa

    This work presents the development of a laser-induced fluorescence technique to measure atmospheric formaldehyde. In conjunction with the technique, the design of a compact, narrow linewidth, etalon-tuned titanium: sapphire laser cavity which is pumped by the second harmonic of a kilohertz Nd:YAG laser is also presented. The fundamental tunable range is from 690-1100 nm depending on mirror reflectivities and optics kit used. The conversion efficiency is at least 25% for the fundamental, and 2-3% for intracavity frequency doubling from 3.5-4W 532 nm pump power. The linewidth is <0.1 cm-1, and the pulsewidth is 18 nsec. Applications of this cavity include the measurement of trace gas species by laser-induced fluorescence, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and micropulse lidar in the UV-visible region. Also presented are observations of gas-phase sulfuric acid from the NEAQS-ITCT 2K4 (New England Air Quality Study--- Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation) field campaign in July and August 2004. Sulfuric acid values are reported for a polluted environment and possible nucleation events as well as particle growth within the boundary layer are explored. Sulfate production rates via gas phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide are also reported. This analysis allows an important test of our ability to predict sulfuric acid concentration and probe its use as a fast time response photochemical tracer for the hydroxyl radical, OH. In comparison, the NASA time-dependent photochemical box model is used to calculate OH concentration. Nighttime H2SO4 values are examined to test our understanding of nocturnal OH levels and oxidation processes. In comparison, sulfuric acid from a large ground based mission in Tecamac, Mexico (near the northern boundary of Mexico City) during MIRAGE-Mex field campaign (March 2006) is presented. This and other measurements are used to characterize atmospheric oxidation and predict sulfuric acid and OH concentrations at the site. The observations in conjunction with the NASA LARc Photochemical box model are used to explore ozone production, nitrate and sulfate formation, and radical levels and radical production rates during the day. The one minute observations of sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol surface area were again used to calculate OH levels assuming steady state, and are in good agreement with observations of OH (R2 = 0.7). Photochemical activity is found to be a maximum during the morning hours, as seen in ozone and nitrate formation. Although the model predictions capture the observed diurnal profile, the model underpredicts RO2 concentrations in the morning hours and overpredicts in the afternoon (HO 2 + RO2 radical Model/observed (M/O) ˜ 1.15 and OH M/O ˜ 1.2).

  11. Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

    2006-11-01

    One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as 134 degrees Celsius. Transmembrane fluxes of water are commercially competitive (~5000 g/m2h) and separation factors have been measured as high as 8000, depending on the membrane and the water content. For the Nafion-117 experiments, the common trade off in membrane performance is observed in that as flux is increased, separation factor decreases. Nafion-112, a thinner membrane, exhibited much higher fluxes than the Nafion-117; however without the expected loss in separation factor indicating that the permeability of iodine and HI through Nafion materials is low. Preliminary data for the sulfuric acid concentration suggests performance similar to the HI experiments. All membranes studied for the HI, HI/iodine and sulfuric acid feeds exhibited no degradation in membrane performance during use.

  12. A novel approach for high sensitive determination of sulfur mustard by derivatization and isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zong, Cheng; Nie, Zhiyong; Guo, Lei; Xie, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    A new isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for determination of sulfur mustard (SM) has been developed using a direct chemical derivatization method by nucleophile potassium thioacetate (PTA) in aqueous solution. The reaction conditions for derivatization, such as reaction temperature, time, solvent and concentration of PTA, were optimized for high performance. Reversed phase liquid chromatography was suitable for analysis of such a PTA derivatized SM in complex environmental samples. Compared with other conventional gas chromatography or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for direct detection on SM, better sensitivity and selectivity were achieved by this direct derivatization and LC-MS/MS method, where SM can be detected as low as 0.05 ng/mL in acetonitrile. The linear range was from 0.1 to 1000 ng/mL. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the intra-day precision was less than 11.8%, and RSD of the inter-day precision was less than 12.3%. The whole procedure for both derivatization and analysis was quick and simple, and the total time was less than 1h. This established method has been successfully employed for determination of spiking samples both in water and soil. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL was achieved for river water, while the SM in soil sample could be detected at 0.1 ng/g. PMID:25476305

  13. From gas-phase oxidation of SO2 by SO4- to the formation of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsona, Narcisse; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    One of the difficulties to predict atmospheric nucleation is related to inaccurate measure of the total sulfuric acid concentration. We present a density functional theory investigation of the SO2 gas phase oxidation by SO4-. In the immediate product, SO2.SO4- cluster, SO2 is subsequently oxidized and SO3SO3- is formed at 1.7 × 10-7 s-1 reaction rate. SO3SO3- interacts with O2 molecule to form SO3 and SO5-, which are important species in the gas phase chemistry of sulfur and in the formation mechanism of sulfuric acid.

  14. INFLUENCE OF DILUTE ACETIC ACID TREATMENTS ON SURVIVAL OF AMERICAN PONDWEED WINTER BUDS IN THE NEVADA IRRIGATION DISTRICT, CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    American pondweed (Potamogeton nodosus Poir.) is commonly found in northern California irrigation canals. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exposure of American pondweed winter buds to dilute acetic acid under field conditions would result in reduced survivorship and subsequ...

  15. Response surface optimization of corn stover pretreatment using dilute phosphoric acid for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dilute H3PO4 (0.0 - 2.0%, v/v) was used to pretreat corn stover (10%, w/w) for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment conditions were optimized for temperature, acid loading, and time using a central composite design. Optimal pretreatment conditions were chosen to promote sugar yields following enzym...

  16. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-10-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying nitrogen, respectively argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings lead to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume, that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  17. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-05-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying either nitrogen or argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed at a supersaturation of 1%, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings led to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  18. Minimizing sulfur contamination and rinse water volume required following a sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide clean by performing a chemically basic rinse

    SciTech Connect

    Clews, P.J.; Nelson, G.C.; Resnick, P.J.; Matlock, C.A.; Adkins, C.L.J.

    1997-08-01

    Sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixtures (SPM) are commonly used in the semiconductor industry to remove organic contaminants from wafer surfaces. This viscous solution is very difficult to rinse off wafer surfaces. Various rinsing conditions were tested and the resulting residual contamination on the wafer surface was measured. The addition of small amounts of a chemical base such as ammonium hydroxide to the rinse water has been found to be effective in reducing the surface concentration of sulfur and also mitigates the particle growth that occurs on SPM cleaned wafers. The volume of room temperature water required to rinse these wafers is also significantly reduced.

  19. Examination of the Dilution and Neutralization of Acid Droplets by Tree Leaves Using a pH-Imaging Microscope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katsuhiro KIKUCHI; Yoshiaki SASAKI; Wakako SASAGAKI; Satoshi NOMURA

    2006-01-01

    To clarify the actual conditions necessary for the neutralization of acid rain by tree leaves, an examination of the neutralization effects of artificially-made acid droplets on several kinds of tree leaves, was conducted using a newly-developed pH-imaging microscope. Through these examinations, it was clarified that broad-leaved tree species such as beech, horse chestnut, Japanese zelkova and oak trees could dilute

  20. Sulfuric acid vapor and other cloud-related gases in the Venus atmosphere - Abundances inferred from observed radio opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that the absorbing characteristics of sulfuric acid vapor appear to reconcile what had been thought to be an inconsistency among measurements and deductions regarding the constituents of the Venus atmosphere and radio occultation, radar reflection, and radio emission measurements of its opacity. Laboratory measurements of sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are used to model relative contributions to opacity as a function of height in a way that is consistent with observations of the constituents and absorbing properties of the atmosphere. It is concluded that sulfuric acid vapor is likely to be the principal microwave absorber in the 30-50 km altitude range of the middle atmosphere of Venus.

  1. The infrared optical constants of sulfuric acid at 250 K. [spectral reflectance measurement of aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkley, L. W.; Williams, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of the IR spectral reflectance at near-normal incidence of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of 75% and 95.6% by weight. Kramers-Kronig analyses of the reflectance data are employed to obtain values of the optical constants n(nu) and k(nu) in the spectral range from 400 to 6000 cm to the -1 power. The optical constants of these solutions at 250 K and 300 K are compared. It is found that in spectral regions remote from strong absorption bands, the values of the n(nu) indices obtained at 250 K agree with the values given by Lorentz-Lorenz correction of the same indices at 300 K. All absorption bands observed at 300 K are found to be present at 250 K with slight shifts in frequency and with significant differences in the k(nu) indices at the band maxima. Based on these results, it is concluded that the clouds of Venus probably consist of droplets of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of about 75% by weight.

  2. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic digestions; when these are accounted for, a reactivity order of cysteine > methionine {approx} tryptophan > cystine is observed.

  3. Effects of sulfuric acid rain on two model hardwood forests: throughfall, litter leachate, and soil solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Weber, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    Simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.6) was applied to model forests containing either sugar maple (Acer saccharum) or red alder (Alnus rubra). Water samples were collected above and below the canopy, below the litter, and from 20 cm and 1 m below the surface of the soil. While throughfall chemistry was not very different from rain chemistry, the litter leachate (the actual input to the soil) had consistently higher concentrations of calcium and magnesium, and higher pH than the acid rain. For the first 6 months, sulfate absorption by the soil prevented any apparent differences in sulfate, calcium, or magnesium concentrations in the 20-cm soil solution among plots receiving acid or control rain treatments. Sulfate concentrations on plots receiving the most acid rain (pH 3.0) then became increasingly higher than on the other plots until after 3 years, they were approximately equal to sulfate concentrations in the rain. Twenty-cm soil solutions corresponding to the pH 3.5 and 4.0 treatments responded similarly starting respectively 1 year and 2 years after initiation of exposure to acid rain. Increased calcium and magnesium concentrations and lowered pH in 20-cm soil solution occurred simultaneously with increased sulfate concentrations. No acid rain related effects were evident in the 1-m soil solution even after 3.5 years exposure to pH 3.0 sulfuric acid rain. Cation responses to increased anion concentrations followed those predicted by a computer-simulation model. However, sulfate concentrations in 20-cm soil solutions increased considerably faster than predicted by a Langmuir formulation of sulfate absorption.

  4. Dissolution of PZT 52/48 in aqueous sulfuric acid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Steven

    With the recent interest for PZT use as a self-powered nanonsensor in extreme environments, such as an oil well, it is important to ensure the stability of the material under these conditions. Oil wells are known for being extremely caustic, with high temperature, low pH and high pressures. It has been shown that in the presence of sulfuric acid PZT is subject to chemical attack. This study attempts to identify the effects that pH and temperature have on the rate of the reaction. Sulfuric acid was used as a proxy for the H2S environment found in oil wells. Exposure of bulk PZT and thin film specimens to H2S was studied. PZT 52/48 thin films were fabricated via the sol gel process. PZT was exposed to both single drops of aqueous sulfuric acid and submerged in a bath of solution. During bath exposure potential on the substrate surface of thin film samples was recorded using a voltmeter vs. and Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Thin Film samples were exposed to a single drop of 0.1 N and 1 N aqueous sulfuric acid solutions at temperatures between 25° C and 92° C. It was optically observed that a white filmed appeared on the surface as a reaction product. At both concentrations, increases in temperature lead to an increase in reaction rate for droplet exposed samples. These reactions were found to follow Arrhenius behavior. The 1 N solution activation energy of film appearance was found to be 69100 J, and for 0.1 N solution was found to be 48300 J. It was expected that an increase in concentration would lead to an increase in reaction rate as well. However for single droplet exposure it was found that lower concentrations resulted in increased reaction rate. This may be due to the difference in interfacial energy between the solution and PZT surface as a result of the concentration of sulfuric acid. The potential on the substrate during bath exposure was between -0.22 V and 0.1 V. As a ferroelectric, PZT is expected to spontaneously polarize and variations in potential are expected. The value of -0.22 V corresponds to the potential of a normal hydrogen electrode, the conditions that would be found if the platinum layer were exposed, which could occur due to pinholes in the sample. The potential on the substrate and time of exposure were not found to correspond to dissolution depth using XPS depth profiling. A proposed reason is that attack was not found to be uniform across the surface, most likely as a result of high energy regions such as pinholes in the PZT film. Using XPS and XRD characterization techniques, PbSO4 was found to be one reaction product of both the PZT bulk sample exposed to a bath of solution, and thin film samples exposed to a single droplet of solution. Other reaction products were not able to be identified using the analysis techniques in this study, because the reaction products of zirconium and titanium are believed to take the form of ions in solution. While XPS confirmed their elemental presence in solution after evaporation, analysis of the solution itself was never conducted. Suggested future work and analytical techniques are also proposed to fully characterize the dissolution kinetics of PZT in aqueous sulfuric acid. These include the characterization of the interfacial energy between solution droplets and PZT surface, potentiostatic bath exposure of thin films in which the potential on the substrate is fixed, solution analysis via ICP-MS or other alternative, and the comparison of dissolution rate between bulk PZT and thin film PZT to determine the effect pinholes may have on the reaction. Various temperatures and acid concentrations are also proposed in order to fully characterize the Arrhenius behavior of reaction rate.

  5. Sulfur cycling in forests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Johnson

    1984-01-01

    Sulfur is essential for the production of certain amino acids in plants. As amino acid sulfur is the major form of sulfur in trees, there is a strong relationship between organic S and organic N in tree tissue. Sulfur deficiencies occur in parts of southeastern Australia and northwestern North America, remote from pollutant inputs. Since bilogical S requirements of forests

  6. Pervaporation of Water from Aqueous Sulfuric Acid at Elevated Temperatures Using Nafion® Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The concentration of sulfuric acid by pervaporation has been studied using Nafion-112® and Nafion-117® membranes, which have been characterized in terms of flux, permeability, and selectivity at 100 ºC and 120 ºC. Feed concentrations investigated ranged from 40 to over 80 weight percent. In general, water fluxes ranged from 100-8000 g/m2h, depending on feed acid concentration and separations factors as high as 104 were observed. Membrane stability was probed using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis that revealed some embrittlement of the membranes during use. Further studies showed that the embrittlement was due to an interaction with the acid and was not induced by the operating temperature.

  7. Column chromatographic boron isotope separation at 5 and 17 MPa with diluted boric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Musashi, Masaaki; Oi, Takao; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Nomura, Masao

    2008-08-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation factor (S) between boron taken up in strongly basic anion exchange resin and boron in aqueous solution was determined by breakthrough column chromatography at 5 and 17 MPa at 25 degrees C, using 0.1 mM boric acid solution as feed solution. The S values obtained were 1.018 and 1.012, respectively, which were smaller than the value reported by using the same chromatographic method at the atmospheric pressure at 25 degrees C with the boron concentration of 10mM, but were larger than the values under the same condition with much higher concentration of 100 and 501 mM. Calculations based on the theory of isotope distribution between two phases estimated that 21% (5 MPa) and 47% (17 MPa) of boron taken up in the resin phase was in the three-coordinated B(OH)(3)-form, instead of in the four-coordinated B(OH)(4)-form, at high pressures even with a very diluted boric acid solution. We discussed the present results by introducing (1) hydration and (2) a partial molar volume difference between isotopic molecules. Borate may have been partially dehydrated upon transfer from the solution phase to the resin phase at high pressures, which resulted in smaller S values compared with those at the atmospheric pressure. Instead, it may be possible that the difference in the isotopic partial molar volume difference between B(OH)(3) and B(OH)(4)(-) caused the S value to decrease with increasing pressure. PMID:18585727

  8. Simultaneous determination of four sulfur mustard-DNA adducts in rabbit urine after dermal exposure by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajiao; Yue, Lijun; Nie, Zhiyong; Chen, Jia; Guo, Lei; Wu, Bidong; Feng, Jianlin; Liu, Qin; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-06-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a classic vesicant agent, which has been greatly employed in several wars or military conflicts. The most lesion mechanism is its strong alkylation of DNAs in vivo. Until now there are four specific DNA adducts of SM identified for further retrospective detection, i.e., N(7)-(2-hydroxyethylthioethyl)-2'-guanine (N(7)-HETEG), bis(2-ethyl-N(7)-guanine)thioether (Bis-G), N(3)-(2-hydroxyethylthioethyl)-2'-adenine (N(3)-HETEA) and O(6)-(2-hydroxyethylthioethyl)-2'-guanine (O(6)-HETEG), respectively. Here, a novel and sensitive method of isotope-dilution ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) combining with solid phase extraction was reported for the simultaneous determination of four SM-DNA adducts. A lower limit of detection of 2-5ngL(-1), and a lower limit of quantitation of 5-10ngL(-1) were achieved, respectively, and the recoveries ranged from 87% to 116%. We applied this method in the determination of four SM-DNA adducts in rabbit urine after dermal exposure by SM in three dose levels (2, 5, 15mgkg(-1)), so as to investigate the related metabolic behavior in vivo. For the first time, in SM exposed rabbit urine, our results revealed the relative accumulation abundance of four SM-DNA adducts, i.e., 67.4% for N(7)-HETEG, 22.7% for Bis-G, 9.8% for N(3)-HETEA, 0.1% for O(6)-HETEG, and significant dose and time dependent responses of these SM-DNA adducts. The four adducts were detectable after 8h, afterwards, their contents continuously increased, achieved maximum in the first two or three days and then gradually decreased till the end of one month. Meanwhile, the amounts of SM-DNA adducts were positively correlated with the exposure doses. PMID:24858262

  9. Dependence of nucleation rates on sulfuric acid vapor concentration in PoValley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Amar; Plaß-Dülmer, Christian; Elste, Thomas; Stange, Georg; Decesari, Stefano; Carbone, Claudio; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Laaksonen, Ari

    2010-05-01

    A field campaign was conducted at the polluted rural site, San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) in PoValley, Italy, from June 26th to July 12th 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI (European integrated project on aerosol, cloud, climate, and air interactions) project. The gas-phase sulfuric acid concentrations were measured for the first time at SPC station during this campaign. Here we examine the dependence of nucleation rate on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations in SPC. The apparent nucleation rate - i.e. formation rate of 3 nm particles - was directly determined from differential mobility particle sizer data. The nucleation rate at 1 nm (J1) was then calculated by accounting for the coagulation of the sub-3 nm clusters with large particles during their growth from 1 to 3 nm. The dependence of J1 on [H2SO4] was studied for each nucleation day individually and for all nucleation days as a whole. It is usually assumed that the dependence of nucleation rate on sulfuric acid concentration follows a simple power law model J1 = P [H2SO4]^n; where P is the prefactor containing chemical and physical information of the nucleation process, and n is the nucleation exponent. With the so called activation and kinetic nucleation mechanisms, n takes the values 1 and 2, respectively, and most field studies show n to fall between these two values. For the SPC data, the nucleation exponent was higher than 2 for both individual days and for all nucleation days as a whole. In the light of the obtained results we will discuss the nucleation mechanism, composition of the nucleation mode particles, and the role of other gases (such as ammonia and water vapor) in the formation of new particles in SPC in more detail.

  10. Mercury Adsorption on Sulfuric Acid-Impregnated Carbonaceous Surface: Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Wu, Jiang; Jiang, Xiumin; Pan, Weiguo; Ren, Jianxing

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations are performed to provide a molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of mercury adsorption on sulfuric acid-impregnated carbonaceous surface. The carbonaceous surface is modeled by a nine-fused benzene ring in which its edge carbon atoms on the upper side are unsaturated to simulate the active sites for reaction. SO4 clusters with and without charge are examined to act as the representative species to model the sulfuric acid absorbed on the carbonaceous surface. All of the possible approaches of SO4 clusters with and without charge on the carbonaceous surface are conduced to study their effects on mercury adsorption. The results suggest that sulfuric acid effect on the mercury adsorption capacity of the carbonaceous surface is very complicated, and it depends on a combination of concentration and charge of SO4 cluster. SO4 cluster presents a positive effect on mercury adsorption on the carbonaceous surface, but higher concentration of SO4 cluster decreases the adsorption capacity of the carbonaceous surface for mercury removal because there is considerable competition for active sites between Hg and SO4 cluster. Since all of the possible approaches of mercury on the carbonaceous surface with SO42- cluster, excluding one that mercury is adsorbed at bridge active site, can lead to the decrease in the adsorption energies of mercury on the carbonaceous surface, SO42- cluster presents a negative effect on the capacity of the carbonaceous surface for mercury adsorption regardless of the concentration of SO42- cluster. The results also indicate that SO2 cluster and surface oxygen complex can be formed from SO4 cluster with or without charge if mercury is adsorbed at bridge active site, which facilitates the mercury removal for the carbonaceous surface.

  11. Sulfuric acid-induced changes in the physiology and structure of the tracheobronchial airways.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, J M; Schlesinger, R B

    1989-02-01

    Sulfuric acid aerosols occur in the ambient particulate mode due to atmospheric conversion from sulfur dioxide (SO2). This paper describes the response of the rabbit tracheobronchial tree to daily exposures to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol, relating physiological and morphological parameters. Rabbits were exposed to filtered air (sham control) or to submicrometer-sized H2SO4 at 250 micrograms/m3 H2SO4, for 1 hr/day, 5 days/week, with sacrifices after 4, 8, and 12 months of acid (or sham) exposure; some rabbits were allowed a 3-month recovery after all exposures ended. H2SO4 produced a slowing of tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance during the first weeks of exposure; this change became significantly greater with continued exposures and did not improve after exposures ended. Airway hyperresponsiveness was evident by 4 months of acid exposure; the condition worsened by 8 months of exposure and appeared to stabilize after this time. Standard pulmonary mechanics parameters showed no significant trends with repeated acid exposure, except for a decline in dynamic lung compliance in animals exposed to acid for 12 months. Lung tissue samples obtained from exposed animals showed a shift toward a greater frequency of smaller airways compared to control, an increase in epithelial secretory cell density in smaller airways, and a shift from neutral to acidic glycoproteins in the secretory cells. The effect on airway diameter resolved after the exposures ceased, but the secretory cell response did not return to normal within the recovery period. No evidence of inflammatory cell infiltration was found due to H2SO4 exposure. Thus, significant alterations in the physiology of the tracheobronchial tree have been demonstrated due to repeated 1-hr exposures to a concentration of H2SO4 that is one-fourth the current 8-hr threshold limit value for exposure in the work environment. The cumulative dose inhaled by the rabbits is similar to current peak daily doses from ambient exposure in North America. The results obtained in the rabbit model provide insight into early changes in the tracheobronchial tree due to repeated irritant exposure and may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic airway disease. PMID:2707192

  12. Preparation and characterization of silver loaded montmorillonite modified with sulfur amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian; Lin, Oulian; Lu, Zhiyuan; He, Liuimei; Wang, Xiaosheng

    2014-06-01

    The Na+ montmorillonite (MMT) was modified with sulfur containing amino acid (L-cystine, L-cysteine or L-methionine) and characterized by energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR). The results showed the modification was smooth and the surface condition of MMT was changed with sulfur containing groups. Then silver was loaded on the modified MMTs via ion-exchange reaction under microwave irradiation, the spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), EDS and FT-IR confirmed the successful loading of massive silver and the strong interaction between sulfur and silver, the silver loaded L-cystine modified MMT (Ag@AA-MMT-3) with a silver content of 10.93 wt% was the highest of all. Further more, the Ag@AA-MMT-3 was under the irradiation of a UV lamp to turn silver ions to silver nano particles (Ag NPs). The XPS, specific surface area (SSA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), XRD patterns and UV-vis spectra proved the existence of uniform nano scaled metallic Ag NPs. By contrast, the UV irradiated Ag@AA-MMT-3 (Ag@AA-MMT-UV) showed a much better slow release property than Ag@AA-MMT-3 or Ag@MMT. The Ag@AA-MMT-UV showing a large inhibition zone and high inhibition ratio presented very good antibacterial property.

  13. The development of nickel silicide based alloy for sulfuric acid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sanhong

    2000-10-01

    The present project has been supported by Chas S. Lewis Co. Inc. to try to develop a cast alloy that has acceptable mechanical properties and excellent resistance to corrosion by sulfuric acid over the entire concentration range (especially for the concentrations between 60 and 80 wt%) at their boiling temperatures. Also, the alloy should have good machinability and weldability, and be economically viable. It is known that Ni3Si-based alloys have good corrosion resistance in concentrated sulfuric acids, but they are very brittle. In the present study, Ni3Si-based alloys with Ti, Nb, Cu, Cr, and Mo additions have been cast and studied with SEM, DTA, AES, and optical microscopy. Their mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in boiling sulfuric acids with different heat treatments have been investigated. It has been found that alloys NiSi20Nb3B0.5, NiSi20.4Nb 2B0.5. and NiSi20.2Nb2.5B0.5 have acceptable mechanical properties, machinability, and weldability, and have better corrosion resistance in boiling 60%, 70%, and 80% sulfuric acid than any other existing alloys. The effects of Ti, Nb, Cu, Cr, and Mo additions on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of the alloys have been studied. It was found that Ti additions encouraged the formation of the Ni3Si beta phase, but the beta phase with Ti addition had very poor corrosion resistance. Nb addition increased the ductility and the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Cu, Cr, and Mo additions encouraged the formation of the alpha and gamma phases (the former phase usually decreased the corrosion resistance, the latter hurt mechanical properties). An investigation of the weldability of the alloys showed that the as-cast NiSi20Nb3B0.5 alloy could be successfully welded using 600°C preheat and NiSi20Nb3B0.5 welding rods produced by centrifugal casting. Effects of the G phase (Ni16Si7Nb6) on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties, corrosion resistance mechanism, and polarization behavior of the alloys were also investigated.

  14. Structure of Butanol and Hexanol at Aqueous, Ammonium Bisulfate, and Sulfuric Acid Solution Surfaces Investigated by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    acid and ammonium sulfate salts have also long been known to be the predominant fractionStructure of Butanol and Hexanol at Aqueous, Ammonium Bisulfate, and Sulfuric Acid Solution at the air-liquid interface of aqueous, aqueous ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid solutions

  15. Why is sulfuric acid a much stronger acid than ethanol? Determination of the contributions by inductive/field effects and electron-delocalization effects.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kevin; Maloney, Adam; Sowell, Austin; Wang, Changwei; Mo, Yirong; Karty, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Two different and complementary computational methods were used to determine the contributions by inductive/field effects and by electron-delocalization effects toward the enhancement of the gas-phase deprotonation enthalpy of sulfuric acid over ethanol. Our alkylogue extrapolation method employed density functional theory calculations to determine the deprotonation enthalpy of the alkylogues of sulfuric acid, HOSO2-(CH2CH2)n-OH, and of ethanol, CH3CH2-(CH2CH2)n-OH. The inductive/field effect imparted by the HOSO2 group for a given alkylogue of sulfuric acid was taken to be the difference in deprotonation enthalpy between corresponding (i.e., same n) alkylogues of sulfuric acid and ethanol. Extrapolating the inductive/field effect values for the n = 1-6 alkylogues, we obtained a value of 51.0 ± 6.4 kcal mol(-1) for the inductive/field effect for n = 0, sulfuric acid, leaving 15.4 kcal mol(-1) as the contribution by electron-delocalization effects. Our block-localized wavefunction method was employed to calculate the deprotonation enthalpies of sulfuric acid and ethanol using the electron-localized acid and anion species, which were compared to the values calculated using the electron-delocalized species. The contribution from electron delocalization was thus determined to be 18.2 kcal mol(-1), which is similar to the value obtained from the alkylogue extrapolation method. The two methods, therefore, unambiguously agree that both inductive/field effects and electron-delocalization effects have significant contributions to the enhancement of the deprotonation enthalpy of sulfuric acid compared with ethanol, and that the inductive/field effects are the dominant contributor. PMID:25316069

  16. Sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide surface passivation effects on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Z. H.; Lee, K. B.; Guiney, I.; Qian, H.; Jiang, S.; Wallis, D. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Houston, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we have compared SiNx passivation, hydrogen peroxide, and sulfuric acid treatment on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs surface after full device fabrication on Si substrate. Both the chemical treatments resulted in the suppression of device pinch-off gate leakage current below 1 ?A/mm, which is much lower than that for SiNx passivation. The greatest suppression over the range of devices is observed with the sulfuric acid treatment. The device on/off current ratio is improved (from 104-105 to 107) and a reduction in the device sub-threshold (S.S.) slope (from ˜215 to 90 mV/decade) is achieved. The sulfuric acid is believed to work by oxidizing the surface which has a strong passivating effect on the gate leakage current. The interface trap charge density (Dit) is reduced (from 4.86 to 0.90 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1), calculated from the change in the device S.S. The gate surface leakage current mechanism is explained by combined Mott hopping conduction and Poole Frenkel models for both untreated and sulfuric acid treated devices. Combining the sulfuric acid treatment underneath the gate with the SiNx passivation after full device fabrication results in the reduction of Dit and improves the surface related current collapse.

  17. Ice Nucleation of Bare and Sulfuric Acid-coated Mineral Dust Particles and Implication for Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sanders, Cassandra N.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-27

    Ice nucleation properties of different dust species coated with soluble material are not well understood. We determined the ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35 deg C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw). Five different mineral dust species: Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite were dry dispersed and size-selected at 150 nm and exposed to sulfuric acid vapors in the coating apparatus. The condensed sulfuric acid soluble mass fraction per particle was estimated from the cloud condensation nuclei activated fraction measurements. The fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw was determined using a compact ice chamber. In water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that only coated ATD particles showed suppression of ice nucleation ability while other four dust species did not showed the effect of coating on the fraction of particles nucleating ice. The results suggest that interactions between the dust surface and sulfuric acid vapor are important, such that interactions may or may not modify the surface via chemical reactions with sulfuric acid. At water-supersaturated conditions we did not observed the effect of coating, i.e. the bare and coated dust particles had similar ice nucleation behavior.

  18. Respiratory responses of young asthmatic volunteers in controlled exposures to sulfuric acid aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Avol, E.L.; Linn, W.S.; Shamoo, D.A.; Anderson, K.R.; Peng, R.C.; Hackney, J.D. (Environmental Health Service, Downey, CA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Thirty-two asthmatic volunteers 8 to 16 yr of age, recruited through local schools and private physicians, were exposed in a chamber to clean air (control condition) and to sulfuric acid aerosol at a low concentration (46 +/- 11 micrograms/m3; mean +/- SD) and at a high concentration (127 +/- 21 micrograms/m3). Acid aerosols had mass median aerodynamic diameters near 0.5 microns with geometric standard deviations near 1.9. Temperature was 21 degrees C, and relative humidity was near 50%. Subjects were exposed with unencumbered oronasal breathing for 30 min at rest plus 10 min at moderate exercise (ventilation rate approximately 20 L/min/m2 of body surface). A subgroup (21 subjects) were exposed similarly to clean air and to high acid (134 +/- 20 micrograms/m3) with 100% oral breathing. Increased symptoms and bronchoconstriction were found after exercise under all exposure conditions. For the group, symptom and lung function responses were not statistically different during control and during acid exposures with unencumbered breathing or with oral breathing. By contrast, other investigators have reported statistically significant lung function disturbances in groups of young asthmatics exposed similarly with oral breathing. A minority of our subjects showed possibly meaningful excess bronchoconstriction with high acid exposure relative to control with both routes of breathing. This could be the result of chance, or it could suggest the existence of an acid-sensitive subpopulation of young asthmatics.

  19. Structural changes of Salix miyabeana cellulose fibres during dilute-acid steam explosion: impact of reaction temperature and retention time.

    PubMed

    Diop, Chérif Ibrahima Khalil; Lavoie, Jean-Michel; Huneault, Michel A

    2015-03-30

    Dilute-acid steam explosion of Salix miyabeana has been carried out to understand the effect of processing conditions, expressed through a severity factors (SFT), on the changes in cellulose fibre structures in a perspective of using these in polymer composites. This thermo-chemico-mechanical extraction leads to the isolation of cellulose fibres as observed by SEM images. Fibre length as well as length to diameter aspect ratios decreased with the severity of the treatment. Likewise, fibre whiteness diminished with an increasing severity factor, which could be a tangible effect of physical degradation. Variations in crystallinity seemed to be dependent upon the reaction temperature, generally decreasing with regards to retention time. Above a severity threshold, a structural disorganization was observed. Overall, dilute-acid steam explosion was shown to be a valuable cellulose extraction process that can provide a variety of fibre structures. PMID:25563939

  20. Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

    2013-01-01

    A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

  1. Structural features of dilute acid, steam exploded, and alkali pretreated mustard stalk and their impact on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Manali; Raj, Tirath; Vijayaraj, M; Chopra, Anju; Gupta, Ravi P; Tuli, Deepak K; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-06-25

    To overcome the recalcitrant nature of biomass several pretreatment methodologies have been explored to make it amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. These methodologies alter cell wall structure primarily by removing/altering hemicelluloses and lignin. In this work, alkali, dilute acid, steam explosion pretreatment are systematically studied for mustard stalk. To assess the structural variability after pretreatment, chemical analysis, surface area, crystallinity index, accessibility of cellulose, FT-IR and thermal analysis are conducted. Although the extent of enzymatic hydrolysis varies upon the methodologies used, nevertheless, cellulose conversion increases from <10% to 81% after pretreatment. Glucose yield at 2 and 72h are well correlated with surface area and maximum adsorption capacity. However, no such relationship is observed for xylose yield. Mass balance of the process is also studied. Dilute acid pretreatment is the best methodology in terms of maximum sugar yield at lower enzyme loading. PMID:25839820

  2. Exploring Jupiter's icy moons with old techniques and big facilities - new insights on sulfuric acid hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Avdeev, M.; Brand, H.; Wallwork, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfuric acid hydrates have been proposed to be abundant on the surface of Europa [1], and hence would be important planetary forming materials for this moon and its companions Ganymede and Callisto. Understanding of the surface features and subsurface of these moons could be advanced by firmer knowledge of the icy materials that comprise them [2], insight into which can be drawn from firmer knowledge of physical properties and phase behaviour of the candidate materials. We wish to present results from a study that started with the question ';What form of sulfuric acid hydrate would form on the surface of Europa'. The intrinsic hydrogen-domination of planetary ices, makes studying these materials with laboratory powder diffraction very challenging. Insights into their crystalline phase behavior and the extraction of a number of thermal and mechanical properties is often only accessible with high-flux synchrotron x-ray diffraction and utilization of the large scattering cross section with neutron diffraction. We have used the Powder Diffraction beamline at Australian synchrotron [4] and the Echidna (High-resolution neutron powder diffraction) instrument of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, [5] to obtain an number of new insights into the crystalline phases formed from sulfruic acid and water mixtures. These instruments have enabled the discovery a new water-rich sulfuric acid hydrate form [6], improved structural characterisation of existing forms [7] and a charting the phase diagram of this fundamental binary system [8]. This has revealed exciting potential for understanding more about the surface of Europa from space, perhaps even providing a window into its past. [1] Carlson, R.W., R.E. Johnson, and M.S. Anderson, Science, 1999. 286(5437): p. 97-99. [2] Fortes, A.D. and M. Choukroun. Space Sci Rev, 2010. 153(1-4): p. 185-218. [3] Blake, D., et al., Space Sci Rev,, 2012. 170(1-4): p. 341-399. [4] Wallwork, K.S., Kennedy B. J. and Wang, D., AIP Conf Proc, 2007. 879: p. 879-882. [5] Liss, K.D., et al., Phys B-Cond Mat, 2006. 385-86: p. 1010-1012. [6] Maynard-Casely, H.E., K.S. Wallwork, and M. Avdeev, (In review). [7] Maynard-Casely, H.E., H.E.A. Brand, and K.S. Wallwork, J.of App.Cryst, 2012. 45: p.1198-1207. [8] Maynard-Casely, H.E., K.S. Wallwork, and H.E.A. Brand, (In Preparation). Stages of the crystal structure determination of sulfruic acid octahydrate a) the oxygen and sulfur postions were determined from the synchrotron x-ray data b) Once neutron diffraction data was collected Fourier difference methods were used to locate hydrogen positions to determine c) the full structure of sulfuric acid octahydrate.

  3. Catalytic Activity of Supported Metal Particles for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Helen H. Farrell

    2007-08-01

    Production of hydrogen by splitting water in thermochemical water-splitting cycles, such as the sulfur-based group that employs the catalytic decomposition of sulfuric acid into SO2 and O2 is of considerable interest. Most of these processes occur at high temperatures (T = 1,000 K) and exposes catalysts to the extreme conditions such as steam, oxygen, and acid vapor that severely damage these catalysts within a short time. To develop an understanding of the factors that cause catalyst deactivation, we performed density-functional-theory (DFT)-based first-principles calculations and computer simulations for transition metal (TM) particles positioned on the two types of substrate (?-alumina and TiO2-rutile). The catalytic activity of the considered systems is defined by several factors, namely: (i) The efficiency of detaching oxygen atoms from the sulfur-containing species SOn (n = 1,2,3). The breaking of the S-O bonds may occur at both the substrate and the transition metal cluster. However, the bond-breaking at the substrate is endothermic (and takes about 1.5 eV per bond) while at low-coordinated metal atom of a cluster it is exothermic (with energy gain of about 0.5 eV per bond). This explains why the presence of transition metal clusters is necessary for catalytic activity; (ii) The ability of the cluster to “clean” itself, i.e., to eliminate oxygen from its surface, in order to regain the catalytically active sites and to continue the process. We found that the clusters of Pd and Pt with the size = 2-3 nm are more efficient in this process (at T = 1,000 K) than the clusters of other TM’s considered (Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os); (iii) The ability of the cluster to keep its size to avoid sintering (that reduces the number of low-coordinated catalytically active sites at the surface of the cluster). We found that the sintering of Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os clusters is significantly suppressed in comparison with the sintering of Pd and Pt clusters of the same size (the individual atoms at the surface of Rh and Ir clusters have a tendency to have higher coordination number, i.e., the detachment of individual atoms from the surface is less likely). Therefore, the activity of TM nanoparticles is mainly defined by the competing factors (ii) and (iii). At the present, we try to find (experimentally and theoretically) the most optimal combination of the structure, size, and composition of TM nanoparticles, for which the catalytic activity of sulfuric acid decomposition will be the highest.

  4. Microbial contributions to coupled arsenic and sulfur cycling in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Hug, Katrin; Maher, William A.; Stott, Matthew B.; Krikowa, Frank; Foster, Simon; Moreau, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sulfide hot springs are analogs of early Earth geothermal systems where microbial metal(loid) resistance likely first evolved. Arsenic is a metalloid enriched in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool (Waiotapu, New Zealand). Arsenic speciation in Champagne Pool follows reaction paths not yet fully understood with respect to biotic contributions and coupling to biogeochemical sulfur cycling. Here we present quantitative arsenic speciation from Champagne Pool, finding arsenite dominant in the pool, rim and outflow channel (55–75% total arsenic), and dithio- and trithioarsenates ubiquitously present as 18–25% total arsenic. In the outflow channel, dimethylmonothioarsenate comprised ?9% total arsenic, while on the outflow terrace thioarsenates were present at 55% total arsenic. We also quantified sulfide, thiosulfate, sulfate and elemental sulfur, finding sulfide and sulfate as major species in the pool and outflow terrace, respectively. Elemental sulfur concentration reached a maximum at the terrace. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic sequencing revealed the dominance of Sulfurihydrogenibium at all sites and an increased archaeal population at the rim and outflow channel. Several phylotypes were found closely related to known sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizers, as well as sulfur- and sulfate-reducers. Bioinformatic analysis revealed genes underpinning sulfur redox transformations, consistent with sulfur speciation data, and illustrating a microbial role in sulfur-dependent transformation of arsenite to thioarsenate. Metagenomic analysis also revealed genes encoding for arsenate reductase at all sites, reflecting the ubiquity of thioarsenate and a need for microbial arsenate resistance despite anoxic conditions. Absence of the arsenite oxidase gene, aio, at all sites suggests prioritization of arsenite detoxification over coupling to energy conservation. Finally, detection of methyl arsenic in the outflow channel, in conjunction with increased sequences from Aquificaceae, supports a role for methyltransferase in thermophilic arsenic resistance. Our study highlights microbial contributions to coupled arsenic and sulfur cycling at Champagne Pool, with implications for understanding the evolution of microbial arsenic resistance in sulfidic geothermal systems. PMID:25414696

  5. Microbial contributions to coupled arsenic and sulfur cycling in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hug, Katrin; Maher, William A; Stott, Matthew B; Krikowa, Frank; Foster, Simon; Moreau, John W

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sulfide hot springs are analogs of early Earth geothermal systems where microbial metal(loid) resistance likely first evolved. Arsenic is a metalloid enriched in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool (Waiotapu, New Zealand). Arsenic speciation in Champagne Pool follows reaction paths not yet fully understood with respect to biotic contributions and coupling to biogeochemical sulfur cycling. Here we present quantitative arsenic speciation from Champagne Pool, finding arsenite dominant in the pool, rim and outflow channel (55-75% total arsenic), and dithio- and trithioarsenates ubiquitously present as 18-25% total arsenic. In the outflow channel, dimethylmonothioarsenate comprised ?9% total arsenic, while on the outflow terrace thioarsenates were present at 55% total arsenic. We also quantified sulfide, thiosulfate, sulfate and elemental sulfur, finding sulfide and sulfate as major species in the pool and outflow terrace, respectively. Elemental sulfur concentration reached a maximum at the terrace. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic sequencing revealed the dominance of Sulfurihydrogenibium at all sites and an increased archaeal population at the rim and outflow channel. Several phylotypes were found closely related to known sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizers, as well as sulfur- and sulfate-reducers. Bioinformatic analysis revealed genes underpinning sulfur redox transformations, consistent with sulfur speciation data, and illustrating a microbial role in sulfur-dependent transformation of arsenite to thioarsenate. Metagenomic analysis also revealed genes encoding for arsenate reductase at all sites, reflecting the ubiquity of thioarsenate and a need for microbial arsenate resistance despite anoxic conditions. Absence of the arsenite oxidase gene, aio, at all sites suggests prioritization of arsenite detoxification over coupling to energy conservation. Finally, detection of methyl arsenic in the outflow channel, in conjunction with increased sequences from Aquificaceae, supports a role for methyltransferase in thermophilic arsenic resistance. Our study highlights microbial contributions to coupled arsenic and sulfur cycling at Champagne Pool, with implications for understanding the evolution of microbial arsenic resistance in sulfidic geothermal systems. PMID:25414696

  6. Mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes during thermochemical reduction of native sulfur, sulfite and sulfate by amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Watanabe; H. Naraoka; H. Ohmoto

    2006-01-01

    Mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (MIF-S) is recognized when the Delta33S value (= delta33S-0.515xdelta34S) of a sample falls outside the range of 0±0.2 permil and the 33-34theta value (= ln33alpha\\/ ln34alpha) lies outside the range of 0.515±.005 (Farquhar and Wing, 2003). Previous investigators have concluded that the only mechanisms to create MIF-S are photochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases (SO2,

  7. Photolimitation and photoinhibition as factors determining optimal dilution rate to produce eicosapentaenoic acid from cultures of the microalga Isochrysis galbana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Fernández Sevilla; E. Molina Grima; F. García Camacho; F. G. Acién Fernández; J. A. Sánchez Pérez

    1998-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) productivity from continuous cultures of the marine microalga Isochrysis galbana was studied, taking into account the irradiance on the reactor surface, that is, the photolimitation\\/photoinhibition regime\\u000a to which the cells are exposed. Experiments were conducted under a wide variety of operating conditions. The dilution rate\\u000a ranged from 0.005?h?1 to 0.040?h?1 at five external irradiances (820, 1620, 2050,

  8. Pantothenic acid quantification by a stable isotope dilution assay based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Michael

    2003-07-01

    A stable isotope dilution assay for the quantification of free and total pantothenic acid has been developed by using [13C3,15N]-pantothenic acid as the internal standard. The three-dimensional specificity of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry enabled unequivocal determination of the vitamin. Due to the very simple extraction and clean-up procedure, free pantothenic acid could be analysed within 2 h, which is much faster than by microbiological or gas chromatographic assays. For quantification of total pantothenic acid, the vitamin was liberated from its conjugates by an overnight incubation with pigeon liver pantetheinase and alkaline phosphatase. In analyses of corn flour, the intra-assay coefficient of variation was 8.5% (n = 5) and 15.3% (n = 4) for free and total pantothenic acid, respectively. When pantothenic acid was added to corn starch at a level of 6 mg kg(-1), a recovery of 97.5% was found. Application of the stable isotope dilution assay to whole egg powder, hazel nuts and corn revealed similar data compared to those listed in nutrition data bases, whereas the content in mushrooms and porcine liver determined by the newly developed assay appeared to be lower and that of cocoa higher than reported in the literature. PMID:12894818

  9. Enhanced acid rain and atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, sulfur and heavy metals in Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is known to be important mechanism reducing air pollution. In response to the growing concern on the potential effects of the deposited material entering terrestrial and aquatic environments as well as their subsequent health effects, since 2007 we have established a 10-site monitoring network in Northern China, where particularly susceptible to severe air pollution. Wet and dry deposition was collected using an automatic wet-dry sampler. The presentation will focus on the new results of atmospheric deposition flux for a number of chemical species, such as nutrients (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus), acidic matters (e.g. sulfur and proton), heavy metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, etc. This is to our knowledge the first detailed element budget study in the atmosphere across Northern China. We find that: (1) Over the 3 year period, 26% of precipitation events in the target area were more acid than pH 5.60 and these acidic events occurred in summer and autumn. The annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH value of precipitation was lower than 5.60 at most sites, which indicated the acidification of precipitation was not optimistic. The primary ions in precipitation were NH4+, Ca2+, SO42- and NO3-, with 10-sites-average concentrations of 221, 216, 216 and 80 ?eq L-1, respectively. The ratio of SO42- to NO3- was 2.7; suggesting SO42- was the dominant acid component. (2) The deposited particles were neutral in general and the pH value increased from rural area to industrial and coastal sites. It is not surprising to note that the annual VWM pH value of precipitation was higher than 5.60 at three urban sites (Beijing and Tianjin mega cities) and one coastal site near the Bohai Bay, considering the fact that high buffer capacity of alkaline component, gas NH3 and mineral aerosols, at these sites compared to other places. (3) The 10-sites annual total deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds were 60 and 65 kg N/S ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Total deposition amounts of sulfur and nitrogen in North China were 5-10 times higher than those in CASTNet and EMEP, as well as EANET sites in Japan, which indicated that the increasing emissions of air pollutants in North China resulted in high atmospheric depositions. Integrated assessment of acidic and toxic deposition and potential environmental consequences in North China are highly needed.

  10. Hydrometallurgical recovery of metal values from sulfuric acid leaching liquor of spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Chen, Yongbin; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Depei; Hu, Hang; Fan, Shaoyun

    2015-04-01

    Environmentally hazardous substances contained in spent Li-ion batteries, such as heavy metals and nocuous organics, will pose a threat to the environment and human health. On the other hand, the sustainable recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries may bring about environmental and economic benefits. In this study, a hydrometallurgical process was adopted for the comprehensive recovery of nickel, manganese, cobalt and lithium from sulfuric acid leaching liquor from waste cathode materials of spent lithium-ion batteries. First, nickel ions were selectively precipitated and recovered using dimethylglyoxime reagent. Recycled dimethylglyoxime could be re-used as precipitant for nickel and revealed similar precipitation performance compared with fresh dimethylglyoxime. Then the separation of manganese and cobalt was conducted by solvent extraction method using cobalt loaded D2EHPA. And McCabe-Thiele isotherm was employed for the prediction of the degree of separation and the number of extraction stages needed at specific experimental conditions. Finally, cobalt and lithium were sequentially precipitated and recovered as CoC2O4?2H2O and Li2CO3 using ammonium oxalate solution and saturated sodium carbonate solution, respectively. Recovery efficiencies could be attained as follows: 98.7% for Ni; 97.1% for Mn, 98.2% for Co and 81.0% for Li under optimized experimental conditions. This hydrometallurgical process may promise a candidate for the effective separation and recovery of metal values from the sulfuric acid leaching liquor. PMID:25619126

  11. Studies on the protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with purified diets to examine the influence of protein level and to estimate the sulfur amino acid (S.A.A.) requirement of young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). These studies demonstrated (I) that 26% protein was sufficient for rapid growth when the diet was supplemented with methionine; (2) that diets containing higher levels of protein (29.3% and 31.3%) failed to support satisfactory growth unless they contained supplemental methionine; and (3) that young Bobwhite quail require no more than 1.0% sulfur-containing amino acids for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization. A fifth experiment was conducted to examine the protein and S.A.A. requirements of young Bobwhite quail using practical rations and to compare results with those obtained with purified diets. Diets containing 24%, 26% and 28% protein were supplied with and without supplemental methionine in a five week study. Results showed significant growth responses to protein and supplemental methionine. Responses showed that Bobwhite quail require no more than 26% protein for maximum growth and efficiency of feed utilization when the S.A.A. level of the diet was approximately 1.0%. The results were in close agreement with those obtained with purified diets. These findings define more precisely than had been known the quantitative requirements of young Bobwhite quail for protein and for the S.A.A. necessary for optimal growth.

  12. Multiple inputs control sulfur-containing amino acid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sadhu, Meru J.; Moresco, James J.; Zimmer, Anjali D.; Yates, John R.; Rine, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of the MET regulon, which encodes the proteins involved in the synthesis of the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cysteine, is repressed by the presence of either methionine or cysteine in the environment. This repression is accomplished by ubiquitination of the transcription factor Met4, which is carried out by the SCF(Met30) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Mutants defective in MET regulon repression reveal that loss of Cho2, which is required for the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine to produce phosphatidylcholine, leads to induction of the MET regulon. This induction is due to reduced cysteine synthesis caused by the Cho2 defects, uncovering an important link between phospholipid synthesis and cysteine synthesis. Antimorphic mutants in S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) synthetase genes also induce the MET regulon. This effect is due, at least in part, to SAM deficiency controlling the MET regulon independently of SAM's contribution to cysteine synthesis. Finally, the Met30 protein is found in two distinct forms whose relative abundance is controlled by the availability of sulfur-containing amino acids. This modification could be involved in the nutritional control of SCF(Met30) activity toward Met4. PMID:24648496

  13. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovi?, Radmila; Stevanovi?, Jasmina; Avramovi?, Ljiljana; Nedeljkovi?, Dragutin; Jugovi?, Branimir; Staji?-Troši?, Jasna; Gvozdenovi?, Milica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipitated at the bottom of the electrolytic cell. By this procedure, the content of copper could be reduced to the 20 mass pct of the initial value. Chemical characterization of the sludge has shown that it contains about 90 mass pct of copper. During the decopperization process, the very strong poison, arsine, can be formed, and the process is in that case terminated. The copper leaching degree of 82 mass pct is obtained using H2SO4 aqueous solution with the oxygen addition during the cathode sludge chemical treatment at 80 °C ± 5 °C. Obtained copper salt satisfies the requirements of the Serbian Standard for Pesticide, SRPS H.P1. 058. Therefore, the treatment of waste sulfuric acid solutions is of great economic and environmental interest.

  14. Glucose content in the liquid hydrolysate after dilute acid pretreatment is affected by the starch content in rice straw.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Hiroshi; Oshima, Tomoko; Matsuda, Fumio; Sasaki, Kengo; Ogino, Chiaki; Yamasaki, Masanori; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, such as rice straw, is often utilized as a bioresource after being hydrolyzed using dilute acid and separated into liquid hydrolysate and acid-insoluble residue. However, the biomass component that determines the distribution between liquid hydrolysate and acid-insoluble residue has not yet been clarified. In this study, the glucose content in the liquid hydrolysate and weight of acid-insoluble residue of 13 rice cultivars were analyzed. Starch content was positively correlated with glucose content in the liquid hydrolysate, and negatively correlated with acid-insoluble residue weight. These results indicate that the glucose in the liquid hydrolysate is mainly liberated from starch rather than cellulose in the rice straw. These observations suggest that starch content is a good indicator of the glucose distribution between the liquid hydrolysate and insoluble residue. PMID:24140898

  15. Homogeneous freezing of single sulfuric and nitric acid solution drops levitated in an acoustic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Ettner-Mahl, Matthias; Hannemann, Anke; Mitra, Subir K.

    2009-10-01

    The freezing temperatures of single supercooled drops of binary and ternary sulfuric and nitric acid solutions were measured while varying the acid concentration. An acoustic levitator was used which allows to freely suspend single solution drops in air without electrical charges thereby avoiding any electrical influences which may affect the freezing process. The drops of typically 500 µm in radius were monitored by a video camera during cooling cycles down to - 85 °C to simulate the upper tropospheric and stratospheric temperature range. The present data confirm that liquid solution droplets can be supercooled far below the equilibrium melting point by approximately 35 °C. They follow the general trend of the expected freezing temperatures for homogeneous ice nucleation.

  16. Self-distance inhibitors for chemical current sources with sulfuric acid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pogrebova, I.S.; Antropov, L.I.; Babich, A.A.; Dremova, G.I.; Vrzhosek, G.G.

    1985-11-01

    The presence of inhibitors in chemical current sources (CCS) can reduce self-discharge of the electrodes, increase the storage and service lives of the sources, and improve their electrical characteristics. To reduce the corrosion of zinc anodes in CCS, they are amalgamated with 2-10% of metallic mercury relative to the mass of the zinc. As inhibitors for lead-zinc cells with sulfuric acid electrolyte, combination additives have been devised on the basis of mixtures of organic compounds and salts of heavy metals (Cd, Sn, Ti) which have protective properties as good as those of mercury salts. These mixtures are efficient inhibitors of acid corrosion of zinc, giving a degree of protection of over 99%.

  17. Kinetics of Ni3S2 sulfide dissolution in solutions of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palant, A. A.; Bryukvin, V. A.; Vinetskaya, T. N.; Makarenkova, T. A.

    2008-02-01

    The kinetics of Ni3S2 sulfide (heazlewoodite) dissolution in solutions of hydrochloric and sulfuric acids is studied. The process under study in the temperature range of 30 90°C is found to occur in a kinetic regime and is controlled by the corresponding chemical reactions of the Ni3S2 decomposition by solutions of inorganic acids ( E a = 67 92 kJ/mol, or 16 22 kcal/mol). The only exception is the Ni3S2-HCl system at elevated temperatures (60 90°C). In this case, the apparent activation energy decreases sharply to 8.8 kJ/mol (2.1 kcal/mol), which is explained by the catalytic effect of gaseous chlorine formed under these conditions. The studies performed are related to the physicochemical substantiation of the hydrometallurgical processing of the copper-nickel converter mattes produced in the industrial cycle of the Norilsk Mining Company.

  18. Elemental Sulfur Reactions at Low Ph and Their Implication for Microbial Activity in Acid Mine Drainage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G. K.; Borda, M. J.; Luther, G. W.; Robert, H. J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Elemental sulfur oxidation in low pH, oxic conditions is a key intermediate process governing the oxidation and acid generating potential of metal sulfide minerals. Nucleophilic reactions with aqueous sulfur intermediates, reactions with intermediate oxygen species, and oxidation reactions with ferric iron and/or oxygen are all important in considering how microorganisms utilize elemental sulfur for energy. A series of experiments investigating the kinetics of these reactions illustrates some of the requirements for sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms to utilize elemental sulfur in low pH environments. Surface area-normalized rates for the oxidation of elemental sulfur with molecular oxygen are on the order of 5 x 10-10 mol m-2 sec-1 at pH 1.5 and 1 x 10-8 mol m-2 sec-1 at pH 0.5. Ferric iron accelerates the rate by approximately a factor of 2, but this rate is independent of the ferric iron concentration over 2 orders of magnitude, within experimental error. Reactivity of elemental sulfur is not markedly different whether the sulfur is in the mineral structure or as a free S8 ring. Flocculation of small particles of elemental sulfur may severely limit the reactivity of this mineral in inorganic experiments. Surface infrared spectroscopy measurements did not show the development of any resolvable sulfur-oxygen bonds in 20 hours of reaction with 1 mM Fe3+, H2O2, or OH* (as Fenton's reagent) at pH 2. Observations of rate dependences from this study suggest that microbial utilization of elemental sulfur may be limited by a reaction involving the S8 ring, and not single S0 atoms in solution. The extremely low solubility of elemental sulfur in water and the tendency of small elemental sulfur grains to flocculate illustrate the potential importance of extracellular material as either a surfactant to import an S8 ring inside the cell or to facilitate a reaction to transform S8 into a more soluble and easily transported species. Changes in nucleophilicity of previously identified enzymes at low pH indicate that they would not function at low pH and therefore extracellular utilization of elemental sulfur must proceed by a different mechanism under these conditions. We will present some of the geochemical requirements for enzymatic function in low pH environments and report on current work towards identifying and characterizing enzymatic compounds that facilitate microbial functions in these environments.

  19. POTENTIAL PRODUCTION AND MARKETING OF FGD BYPRODUCT SULFUR AND SULFURIC ACID IN THE U.S. (1983 PROJECTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report updates to 1983 a 1978-base, computerized marketing evaluation of sulfur and H2SO4 as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts from U.S. coal-burning power plants. Least-costs of compliance were calculated using comparisons of clean fuel with 50 cents and 70 cents/mil...

  20. Co-hydrolysis of hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated populus slurries to support development of a high-throughput pretreatment system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) developed a high-throughput screening method to rapidly identify low-recalcitrance biomass variants. Because the customary separation and analysis of liquid and solids between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis used in conventional analyses is slow, labor-intensive and very difficult to automate, a streamlined approach we term 'co-hydrolysis' was developed. In this method, the solids and liquid in the pretreated biomass slurry are not separated, but instead hydrolysis is performed by adding enzymes to the whole pretreated slurry. The effects of pretreatment method, severity and solids loading on co-hydrolysis performance were investigated. Results For hydrothermal pretreatment at solids concentrations of 0.5 to 2%, high enzyme protein loadings of about 100 mg/g of substrate (glucan plus xylan) in the original poplar wood achieved glucose and xylose yields for co-hydrolysis that were comparable with those for washed solids. In addition, although poplar wood sugar yields from co-hydrolysis at 2% solids concentrations fell short of those from hydrolysis of washed solids after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment even at high enzyme loadings, pretreatment at 0.5% solids concentrations resulted in similar yields for all but the lowest enzyme loading. Conclusions Overall, the influence of severity on susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic hydrolysis was clearly discernable, showing co-hydrolysis to be a viable approach for identifying plant-pretreatment-enzyme combinations with substantial advantages for sugar production. PMID:21749707

  1. l'acide sulfureux gazeux donnerait une rotation le sulfure de carbone liquide donnant fine rotation 1.

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    280 l'acide sulfureux gazeux donnerait une rotation o,ooo293, le sulfure de carbone liquide donnant fine rotation 1. L'indice de réfraction de l'acide sulfureux gazeux étant 1 ,000665, le rapport de la de l'acide sulfureux li- quide et son indice de réfraction x, on devrait avoir, d'après cette loi, J

  2. Enhancement of total sugar and lignin yields through dissolution of poplar wood by hot water and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is a vital but expensive step in biomass biofuel production. Overall, most of this past effort has been directed at maximizing sugar yields from hemicellulose and cellulose through trials with different chemicals, operating conditions, and equipment configurations. Flowthrough pretreatment provides a promising platform to dissolution of lignocellulosic biomass to generate high yields of fermentable sugars and lignin for biofuels productions. Results Dissolution of xylan, lignin, and cellulose from poplar wood were significantly enhanced by water-only and dilute acid (0.05% w/w, H2SO4) flowthrough pretreatment when the temperature was raised from 200°C to 280°C over a range of flow rates 10-62.5 mL/min, resulting in more than 98% solid removal. Up to 40% of original xylan was converted to xylose in the hydrolyzate and the rest xylan was solubilized into xylooligomers with negligible furfural formation. Up to 100% cellulose was removed into hydrolyzate with the highest glucose yield of 60% and low 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) formation. The maximal recovered insoluble lignin and soluble lignin were 98% and 15% of original lignin, respectively. In addition, enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated whole slurries was characterized under various enzyme loadings with or without Bovine serum albumin (BSA) treatment. More than 90% glucose yield and 95% xylose yield were obtained from enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute acid pretreated whole slurries with 10 mg protein Ctec 2 with 2 mg Htec2/g glucan?+?xylan. Conclusions Nearly complete dissolution of whole biomass was realized through water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment under tested conditions. Temperature was considered as the most significant factor for cellulose degradation. The cellulose removal significantly increased as temperature reached 240°C for water-only and 220°C for dilute acid. Dilute acid pretreatment resulted in higher yields of recovered xylan and cellulose as monomeric sugars in the hydrolyzate than that for water-only pretreatment. Enzymes readily hydrolyzed the degraded cellulose and xylooligomers in pretreatment hydrolysate. Results suggested that kinetics controlled the flowthrough pretreatment of biomass dissolution, which was also affected by flow rate to certain extent. PMID:24936209

  3. Graft polymerization of acrylic acid and methacrylic acid onto poly(vinylidene fluoride) powder in presence of metallic salt and sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bo; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Bowu; Yang, Xuanxuan; Li, Linfan; Yu, Ming; Li, Jingye

    2011-02-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) powder was grafted with acrylic acid (AAc) or methacrylic acid (MAA) by the pre-irradiation induced graft polymerization technique. The presence of graft chains was proven by FT-IR spectroscopy. The degree of grafting (DG) was calculated by the acid-base back titration method. The synergistic effect of acid and Mohr's salt on the grafting kinetics was examined. The results indicated that adding sulfuric acid and Mohr's salt simultaneously in AAc or MAA solutions led to a strong enhancement in the degree of grafting. The grafted PVDF powder was cast into microfiltration (MF) membranes using the phase inversion method and some properties of the obtained MF membranes were characterized.

  4. Monitoring urinary metabolites resulting from sulfur mustard exposure in rabbits, using highly sensitive isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yajiao; Chen, Jia; Lin, Ying; Wu, Bidong; Dong, Yuan; Feng, Jianlin; Liu, Qin; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-08-01

    A highly sensitive method for the determination of sulfur mustard (SM) metabolites thiodiglycol (TDG) and thiodiglycol sulfoxide (TDGO) in urine was established and validated using isotope-dilution negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). TDGO in the samples was reduced with TiCl3, and then determined together with TDG as a single analyte. The sample preparation procedures, including two solid-phase-extraction (SPE) clean-up steps, were optimized to improve the sensitivity of the method. The limits of detection (LOD) for both TDG and TDG plus TDGO (TDG + TDGO) were 0.1 ng mL(-1), and the limits of quantitation (LOQ) for both were 0.3 ng mL(-1). The method was used in a rabbit cutaneous SM exposure model. Domestic rabbits were exposed to neat liquid SM at three dosage levels (0.02, 0.05, and 0.15 LD50), and the urinary excretion of four species of hydrolysis metabolites, namely free TDG, free plus conjugated TDG (total TDG), free TDG + TDGO, and free plus conjugated TDG + TDGO (total TDG + TDGO), was evaluated to investigate the metabolic processes. The total urinary excretion profiles of the metabolites, including the peak time, time window, and dose-response and time-response relationships, were clarified. The results revealed that the concentrations of TDG and TDG + TDGO in the urine increased quickly and then decreased rapidly in the first two days after SM exposure. The cumulative amount of total TDG + TDGO excreted in urine during the first five days accounted for 0.5-1% of the applied dose of SM. It is also concluded that TDG and TDGO in urine existed mainly in free form, the levels of glucuronide and of sulfate conjugates of TDG or TDGO were very low, and most hydrolysis metabolites were present in the oxidized form (TDGO). The study indicates that the abnormal increase of TDG and TDGO excretion levels can be used as a diagnostic indicator and establishes a reference time-window for retrospective analysis and sampling after SM exposure. PMID:24924210

  5. Combined Sulfur K-edge XANES Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Analysis of Fulvic Acids and Groundwater Sulfate Identify Sulfur Cycling in a Karstic Catchment Area

    SciTech Connect

    Einsiedl,F.; Schafer, T.; Northrup, P.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical and isotope analyses on groundwater sulfate, atmospheric deposition sulfate and fulvic acids (FAs) associated sulfur were used to determine the S cycling in a karstic catchment area of the Franconian Alb, Southern Germany. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy provided information on the oxidation state and the mechanism of the incorporation of sulfur in FAs. During base flow {delta}{sup 34}S values of groundwater sulfate were slightly depleted to those of recent atmospheric sulfate deposition with mean amount-weighted {delta}{sup 34}S values of around + 3{per_thousand}. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of groundwater sulfate shifted to lower values compared to those of atmospheric deposition and indicated steadiness from base flow to peak flow. The reduced sulfur species (S{sub -1}/thiol; S{sub 0}/thiophene, disulfide, S{sub +2}2/sulfoxide) of soil FAs averaged around 49% of the total sulfur and {delta}{sup 34}S value in FAs was found to be 0.5{per_thousand}. The formation of polysulfides and thiols in FAs in concert with a decreasing isotope value of {delta}{sup 34}S in FAs with respect to those of atmospheric deposition sulfate suggests oxidation of H{sub 2}S, enriched in the {sup 32}S isotope, with organic material. The depletion of {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} by several per mil in groundwater sulfate with respect to those of atmospheric deposition is, therefore, consistent with the hypothesis that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} has been cycled through the organic S pool as well as that groundwater sulfate is formed by oxidation of H{sub 2}S with organic matter in the mineral soil of the catchment area.

  6. Effect of sulfuric acid, oxygen, and hydrogen in high-temperature water on stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ruther, W.E.; Soppet, W.K.; Ayrault, G.; Kassner, T.F.

    1983-06-01

    The influence of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen and dilute sulfuric acid in 289/sup 0/C water on the stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of lightly and moderately sensitized Type 304 stainless steel was determined in constant-extension-rate tensile (CERT) tests. The CERT parameters and the fracture surface morphologies were correlated with the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and sulfate, and the electrochemical potentials of platinum and Type 304 stainless steel electrodes in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) environments. A particularly high susceptibility to intergranular cracking was found for the steel in the lightly sensitized condition at oxygen concentrations between approx. 0.05 and 0.2 ppM under slightly acidic conditions (pH approx. 6.0 at 25/sup 0/C), which may, in part, account for the pervasive nature of intergranular cracking in BWR piping systems. Scanning-transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed significant differences between samples in the lightly and the moderately sensitized condition with respect to the width, but not the depth, of the chromium-depleted region at the grain boundaries. The addition of 0.5 ppM hydrogen to the water had only a small mitigating effect on intergranular cracking in water containing oxygen and sulfuric acid at low concentrations; however, oxygen suppression to less than or equal to 0.05 ppM in the reactor-coolant water, by means of hydrogen additions to the feedwater, would be quite beneficial provided impurities are also maintained at very low levels.

  7. Lewis Acid-Base Interactions between Polysulfides and Metal Organic Framework in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Tian, Jian; Wu, Dangxin; Gu, Meng; Xu, Wu; Wang, Chong M.; Gao, Fei; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-04-04

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is one of the most promising energy storage systems because of its high specific capacity of 1675 mAh g-1 based on sulfur. However, the rapid capacity degradation, mainly caused by polysulfide dissolution, remains a significant challenge prior to practical applications. Here, we report a novel Ni-based metal organic framework (Ni-MOF), Ni6(BTB)4(BP)3 (BTB = benzene-1,3,5-tribenzoate and BP = 4,4?-bipridyl), that can remarkably immobilize polysulfides within the cathode structure through physical and chemical interactions at the molecular level. The capacity retention achieves up to 89% after 100 cycles at 0.1 C. The interwoven mesopores (~2.8 nm) and micropores (~1.4 nm) of Ni-MOF firstly provide an ideal matrix to confine polysulfides. Additionally, the strong interactions between Lewis acidic Ni(II) center and the polysulfides base significantly slow down the migration of soluble polysulfides out of the pores, which leads to the excellent cycling performance of Ni-MOF/S composite.

  8. A comparative study of ethanol production using dilute acid, ionic liquid and AFEX™ pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a biorefinery producing cellulosic biofuels, biomass pretreatment will significantly influence the efficacy of enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation. Comparison of different biomass pretreatment techniques by studying the impact of pretreatment on downstream operations at industrially relevant conditions and performing comprehensive mass balances will help focus attention on necessary process improvements, and thereby help reduce the cost of biofuel production. Results An on-going collaboration between the three US Department of Energy (DOE) funded bioenergy research centers (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)) has given us a unique opportunity to compare the performance of three pretreatment processes, notably dilute acid (DA), ionic liquid (IL) and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEXTM), using the same source of corn stover. Separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) was carried out using various combinations of commercially available enzymes and engineered yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A) strain. The optimal commercial enzyme combination (Ctec2: Htec2: Multifect Pectinase, percentage total protein loading basis) was evaluated for each pretreatment with a microplate-based assay using milled pretreated solids at 0.2% glucan loading and 15 mg total protein loading/g of glucan. The best enzyme combinations were 67:33:0 for DA, 39:33:28 for IL and 67:17:17 for AFEX. The amounts of sugar (kg) (glucose: xylose: total gluco- and xylo-oligomers) per 100 kg of untreated corn stover produced after 72 hours of 6% glucan loading enzymatic hydrolysis were: DA (25:2:2), IL (31:15:2) and AFEX (26:13:7). Additionally, the amounts of ethanol (kg) produced per 100 kg of untreated corn stover and the respective ethanol metabolic yield (%) achieved with exogenous nutrient supplemented fermentations were: DA (14.0, 92.0%), IL (21.2, 93.0%) and AFEX (20.5, 95.0%), respectively. The reason for lower ethanol yield for DA is because most of the xylose produced during the pretreatment was removed and not converted to ethanol during fermentation. Conclusions Compositional analysis of the pretreated biomass solids showed no significant change in composition for AFEX treated corn stover, while about 85% of hemicellulose was solubilized after DA pretreatment, and about 90% of lignin was removed after IL pretreatment. As expected, the optimal commercial enzyme combination was different for the solids prepared by different pretreatment technologies. Due to loss of nutrients during the pretreatment and washing steps, DA and IL pretreated hydrolysates required exogenous nutrient supplementation to ferment glucose and xylose efficiently, while AFEX pretreated hydrolysate did not require nutrient supplementation. PMID:24917886

  9. Characterization of acid river dilution and associated trace element behavior through hydrogeochemical modeling: A case study of the Banyu Pahit River

    E-print Network

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    and Matschullat, 2006). A combination of these processes is at work in the case of acid mine drainage, whereCharacterization of acid river dilution and associated trace element behavior through-(oxy)hydroxide upon entering the acid water. Subsequent satu- ration in Fe-(oxy)hydroxide after mixing

  10. Amino acid nutrition of the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus): development of an improved test diet and determination of the total sulfur amino acid requirement

    E-print Network

    Moon, Hae Young

    1990-01-01

    AMINO ACID NUTRITION OF THE RED DRUM (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS): DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TEST DIET AND DETERMINATION OF THE TOTAL SULFUR AMINO ACID REQUIREMENT A Thesis by HAE YOUNG MOON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences AMINO ACID NUTRITION OF THE RED DRUM (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS): DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TEST DIET...

  11. Detection of dilute organic acids in water by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarlatos, Y.; Barker, R. C.; Haller, G. L.; Yelon, A.

    1974-01-01

    Study of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) spectra obtained from junctions exposed to dilute solutions of organic molecules in both liquid and vapor phases. The results indicate that it is possible in principle to detect the presence and to measure the concentration of at least some organic molecules in dilute aqueous solution by means of the IETS technique. Some fine points pertaining to the application of this technique are discussed, and it is pointed out that through appropriate refinements IETS may become a valuable tool for analytical water chemistry.

  12. Time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid with a streak camera.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Yue; Gao, Xianxian; Cui, Weicheng

    2008-09-01

    The time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in sulfuric acid have been observed with a streak camera after a spectrograph. The spectral center evolves from infrared to ultraviolet gradually within a SBSL duration, which corresponds to an increase of temperature. The peak temperature within one sonoluminescence (SL) duration is 5-9 times higher than the average temperature based on the average spectrum in our experiment. Furthermore, the ratio of the peak temperature to average temperature increases with the increase of driving pressure. The SBSL flash dies out after a dramatic heating-up, and there is no cooling procedure observed at the time resolution of 110 SL duration, which is incompatible with the radius-related adiabatic heating model as the mechanism of SBSL. PMID:18851095

  13. The Mechanism of Electropolishing of Niobium in Hydrofluoric-Sulfuric Acid Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hui; Corcoran, Sean; Reece, Charles; Kelley, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Niobium surfaces are commonly electropolished in an effort to obtain optimal smoothness for high-field superconducting radio-frequency cavity applications. We report the use of controlled electrochemical analysis techniques to characterize electropolishing of Nb in a sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. Through the use of a reference electrode, we are able to clearly distinguish the anode and cathode polarization potentials as well as the electrolyte voltage drop, which together sum to the applied power supply voltage. We then identify the temperature and HF concentration dependence of each potential. We also report the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on this system. EIS results are consistent with the compact salt film mechanism for niobium electropolishing (EP) in this electrolyte and are not consistent with either the porous salt film or the absorbate-acceptor mechanism. Microscopic understanding of the basic Nb EP mechanism is expected to provide an appro

  14. Upscaling energy concentration in multifrequency single-bubble sonoluminescence with strongly degassed sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Dellavale, Damián; Rechiman, Ludmila; Rosselló, Juan Manuel; Bonetto, Fabián

    2012-07-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) was explored under a variety of multifrequency excitations. In particular, biharmonic excitation was used to produce SBSL for unprecedented low dissolved noble gas concentrations in a sulfuric acid solution. Reducing the amount of dissolved noble gas makes it possible to reach higher acoustic pressures on the SL bubble, which otherwise are not attainable because of the Bjerknes instability. By using biharmonic excitation, we were able to experimentally trap and to spatially stabilize SL bubbles for xenon pressure overhead as low as 1 mbar. As a result, we have access to regions in phase space where the plasma temperatures are higher than the ones reached before for bubbles driven at ?30 kHz. PMID:23005538

  15. Upscaling energy concentration in multifrequency single-bubble sonoluminescence with strongly degassed sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellavale, Damián; Rechiman, Ludmila; Rosselló, Juan Manuel; Bonetto, Fabián

    2012-07-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) was explored under a variety of multifrequency excitations. In particular, biharmonic excitation was used to produce SBSL for unprecedented low dissolved noble gas concentrations in a sulfuric acid solution. Reducing the amount of dissolved noble gas makes it possible to reach higher acoustic pressures on the SL bubble, which otherwise are not attainable because of the Bjerknes instability. By using biharmonic excitation, we were able to experimentally trap and to spatially stabilize SL bubbles for xenon pressure overhead as low as 1mbar. As a result, we have access to regions in phase space where the plasma temperatures are higher than the ones reached before for bubbles driven at ?30kHz.

  16. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  17. Galvanic interaction between chalcopyrite and manganese dioxide in sulfuric acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantayat, B. P.; Rath, P. C.; Paramguru, R. K.; Rao, S. B.

    2000-02-01

    Dissolution of chalcopyrite and managanese dioxide minerals in the presence of each other in sulfuric acid medium was studied using compact disc electrodes of the minerals under various H2SO4 concentrations (0.05 to 0.5 M). [H+] had a positive effect on the reaction rate. Strong galvanic interaction was observed to take place between chalcopyrite and manganese dioxide, the galvanic interaction predominating over the individual dissolution (self-corrosion) rates. Evans diagrams constructed from polarization curves of the two minerals were helpful in interpreting the leaching data. The electrochemical nature of the dissolution reaction was analyzed through application of the Butler-Volmer equation and was confirmed from polarization measurements conducted with the respective mineral electrodes.

  18. Speciation of Heptavalent Technetium in Sulfuric Acid: Structural and Spectroscopic Studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Poineau, Frederic; Weck, Philippe F.; German, Konstantin; Maruk, Alesya; Kirakosyan, Gayane; Lukens, Wayne; Rego, Daniel B.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2010-06-10

    The speciation of Tc(VII) in 12 M sulfuric acid was studied by NMR, UV-visible and XAFS spectroscopy, experimental results were supported by DFT calculation and were in agreement with the formation of TcO{sub 3}OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. In summary, the speciation of heptvalent technetium has been investigated in sulfuric acid. In 12 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, a yellow solution is observed, and its {sup 99}Tc NMR spectrum is consistent with a heptavalent complex. The yellow solution was further characterized by EXAFS spectroscopy, and results are consistent with the formation of TcO{sub 3}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. No technetium heptoxide or sulfato- complexes were detected in these conditions. The molecular structure of TcO{sub 3}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} has been optimized by DFT techniques, and the structural parameters are well in accordance with those found by XAFS spectroscopy. The experimental electronic spectra exhibit ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions that have been assigned using TDDFT methods. Calculations demonstrate the theoretical electronic spectrum of TcO{sub 3}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Recent experiments in 12 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} show the yellow solution to be very reactive in presence of reducing agents presumably forming low valent Tc species. Current spectroscopic works focus on the speciation of these species.

  19. Corrosion inhibition and adsorption behavior of methionine on mild steel in sulfuric acid and synergistic effect of iodide ion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. E. Oguzie; Y. Li; F. H. Wang

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in sulfuric acid by methionine (MTI) was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The effect of KI additives on corrosion inhibition efficiency was also studied. The results reveal that MTI inhibited the corrosion reaction by adsorption onto the metal\\/solution interface. Inhibition efficiency increased with MTI concentration and synergistically increased in the presence of KI, with an

  20. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND BRONCHIAL REACTIVITY IN HUMAN SUBJECTS WITH EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND RESPIRABLE SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year research study was conducted investigating the effects of individual and sequential exposures to ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects. PHASE I: In healthy smokers and nonsmokers exposed for 4 hours to 98 mic...

  1. PRECISION ESTIMATES FOR EPA TEST METHOD 8 - SO2 AND H2SO4 EMISSIONS FROM SULFURIC ACID PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from a collaborative test of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Test Method 8 are presented. In the collaborative test six laboratories simultaneously sampled the same stack at a sulfuric acid plant using two Method 8 sampling trains per laboratory. The collabor...

  2. Sulfuric acid immobilized on silica: an efficient promoter for one-pot acetalation–acetylation of sugar derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Balaram Mukhopadhyay

    2006-01-01

    Sulfuric acid immobilized on silica gel has been used as an efficient and safe alternative promoter for acetalation and subsequent acetylation of sugar glycosides using stoichiometric reagents without work-up. The synthesis of different types of per-O-acetylated acetals\\/ketals has been achieved from various types of O- and S-glycosides in excellent yields.

  3. Nonspecific bronchial responsiveness assessed in vitro following acute inhalation exposure to ozone and ozone/sulfuric acid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fawal, H.A.N.; McGovern, T.; Schlesinger, R.B. [New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Air pollution may play some role in the recent increase in severity and prevalence of asthma, but the specific chemical components with the ambient pollutant mix that may be responsible have not been delineated. Since ambient exposures involve mixtures, it is essential to examine airway responses to realistic pollutant mixtures. This study examined the ability of single (3-h) inhalation exposures to ozone and to mixtures of ozone plus sulfuric acid to induce nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness in healthy rabbits. Airway responsiveness was assessed using an in vitro assay involving administration of increasing doses of acetylcholine to bronchial rings obtained from animals exposed to 0.1-0.6 ppm ozone or to mixtures of ozone and 50-125 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol; results were compared to those reported previously for sulfuric acid alone. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in healthy animals and suggest that interaction with sulfuric acid may reduce the effectiveness of both pollutants. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The Effect of Incorporation of HNO(sub 3) Into Liquid Sulfuric Acid on Heterogeneous Reaction Probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Leu, M-T.; Keyser, L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fast-flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, the heterogeneous reactions of C1ONO2 + HCl and HOCl + HCl as well as hydrolysis of N2O5 and C1ONO2 were investigated on liquid sulfuric acid, with particular emphasis on the effect of incorporation of HNO3 on the reaction probabilities.

  5. AN EFFICIENT AND CHEMOSELECTIVE CBZ-PROTECTION OF AMINES USING SILICA-SULFURIC ACID AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, facile, and chemoselective N-benzyloxycarbonylation of amines using silica-sulfuric acid that proceeds under solvent-free conditions at room temperature has been achieved. These reactions are applicable to a wide variety of primary (aliphatic, cyclic) secondary amines, ...

  6. Air Sampling Methodologies for Sulfuric Acid Mist in Copper Electrowinning: Field Evaluation and Development of a New Method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas A. Hethmon; Shawn K. Ludlow

    1997-01-01

    Assessment of the options for the sampling and analysis of sulfuric acid mist in the copper electrowinning tankhouse environments suggests a new method that addresses the sulfate interference problem inherent in these operations. Currently available analytical methods such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Analytical Method ID-113 and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Analytical Method 7903 produce

  7. Evidence linking large reductions in acid rain to sulfur emissions cuts in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, V.C. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.; Lynch, J.A.; Grimm, J.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Concentrations of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and free acidity (H{sup +}) in precipitation decreased by 10 to 25 percent over large areas of the eastern US in 1995. These decreases were extraordinary in magnitude and spatial extent, compared to the 1983--1994 record of observations from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). In contrast, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium concentrations generally increased in 1995. What`s more, the H+ and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} declines were highly correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.72), indicating a reduction of acid rain. The largest concentration decreases in both ions occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley. This is the same area where the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) set limits on SO{sub 2} emissions from 110 affected sources, 63 in states bordering the Ohio River Valley. Phase 1 of the CAAA required these limits be met by January 1, 1995. Indeed, sulfur dioxide emissions from Phase 1 sources dropped 40% in 1995 compared to 1994. This was a nearly 19% reduction in overall emissions in the 21 states with Phase 1 sources. Based on their analysis of emissions and NADP/NTN precipitation chemistry data, they infer that the substantial declines in acid rain in the eastern US in 1995 occurred because of large reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions in the same region.

  8. Highly Selective Liquid–Liquid Extraction from Sulfuric Acid Medium and Spectrophotometric Determination of Palladium(II) with ?-Benzilmonoxime

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali A. Ensafi; H. Eskandari

    1999-01-01

    A selective method for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination of palladium with ?-benzilmonoxime (BZ) is described. BZ–Pd(II) complex was extracted from acidic aqueous solution (1.5 M sulfuric acid) into a chloroform layer. Absorbance was measured at 434 nm and molar absorptivity was found to be about 1.0 × 104 cm?1 mol?1 liter?1. Beer's law is obeyed over the range 0.300

  9. Optimization of reverse-flow, two-temperature, dilute-acid pretreatment to enhance biomass conversion to ethanol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Torget; Christos Hatzis; Tammy Kay Hayward; Teh-An Hsu; George P. Philippidis

    1996-01-01

    A reverse-flow, two-temperature dilute-acid prehydrolysis process of commercial yellow poplar sawdust using two percolation\\u000a reactors was designed to simulate countercurrent flow of the biomass solids and prehydrolysis liquor, and to exploit the xylan\\u000a biphasic kinetics. Lower temperatures (150–174°C) are initially applied to hydrolyze the easily hydrolyzable xylan, and higher\\u000a temperatures (180–204°C) are applied to hydrolyze the remaining xylan. Two reactors

  10. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. (Univ. of Southern California, Downey (United States))

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  11. Influence of dilute acid and alkali pretreatment on reducing sugar production from corncobs by crude enzymatic method: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Baadhe, Rama Raju; Potumarthi, Ravichandra; Mekala, Naveen Kumar

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, two commonly used catalysts in chemical pretreatment, sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide, were tested to evaluate the effect of solid-to-liquid ratio on pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Solid to liquid ratio (S/L) was influential on sugars released with an increase in the S/L ratio between 0.03 and 0.2. Enzymatic digestibility of 0.25 M H2SO4 pretreated corncobs were released more sugars (415.12 mg/mL); whereas, corncobs pretreated with NaOH released 350.12 mg/mL of reducing sugars at S/L 0.05. Further, in comparison with NaOH pretreated corncobs, acid treated material substantially increased the accessibility and digestibility of cellulose during crude enzymatic hydrolysis (28.96 FPU) and released 398.95 mg/mL reducing sugars. PMID:24755319

  12. Optimising sulfuric acid hard coat anodising for an Al-Mg-Si wrought aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, N.; Sinagra, E.; Mallia, B.

    2014-06-01

    This research evaluates the effects of sulfuric acid hard coat anodising parameters, such as acid concentration, electrolyte temperature, current density and time, on the hardness and thickness of the resultant anodised layers. A small scale anodising facility was designed and set up to enable experimental investigation of the anodising parameters. An experimental design using the Taguchi method to optimise the parameters within an established operating window was performed. Qualitative and quantitative methods of characterisation of the resultant anodised layers were carried out. The anodised layer's thickness, and morphology were determined using a light optical microscope (LOM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Hardness measurements were carried out using a nano hardness tester. Correlations between the various anodising parameters and their effect on the hardness and thickness of the anodised layers were established. Careful evaluation of these effects enabled optimum parameters to be determined using the Taguchi method, which were verified experimentally. Anodised layers having hardness varying between 2.4-5.2 GPa and a thickness of between 20-80 ?m were produced. The Taguchi method was shown to be applicable to anodising. This finding could facilitate on-going and future research and development of anodising, which is attracting remarkable academic and industrial interest.

  13. Surface Chemical Compositions and Dispersity of Starch Nanocrystals Formed by Sulfuric and Hydrochloric Acid Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were ?23.1 and ?5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to ?32.3 and ?10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to ?24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample. PMID:24586246

  14. Impact of Corn Stover Composition on Hemicellulose Conversion during Dilute Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Cellulose Digestibility of the Pretreated Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, N. D.; Farmer, J. D.; Schell, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of corn stover compositional variability on xylose conversion yields during dilute acid pretreatment and on enzymatic cellulose digestibility of the resulting pretreated solids. Seven compositionally-different stovers obtained from various locations throughout the United States were pretreated at three different conditions in triplicate in a pilot-scale continuous reactor. At the same pretreatment severity, a 2-fold increase in monomeric xylose yield and a 1.5-fold increase in enzymatic cellulose digestibility from their lowest values were found. Similar results were observed at the other pretreatment conditions. It was found that xylose conversion yields decreased with increasing acid neutralization capacity or soil content of the corn stover. Xylose yields also increased with increasing xylan content. No other significant correlations between corn stover's component concentrations and conversion yields were found.

  15. Response of DOC in Acid-Sensitive Maine Lakes to Decreasing Sulfur Deposition (1993 - 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelsner, G. P.; Sanclements, M.; McKnight, D. M.; Stoddard, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, sulfur deposition has decreased across the northeastern United States. As a result, sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams have also decreased and many surface waters have become less acidic. Over the same time period, there has been a concurrent increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in many lakes and streams which has been difficult to interpret. To assess the biogeochemical processes driving increasing DOC concentrations we analyzed archived samples from 9 acid-sensitive lakes in Maine collected between 1993 and 2009 using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence index (FI) was calculated for all samples. The FI represents the ratio of the emission intensity at 450 nm to 550 nm at an excitation wavelength of 370 nm and provides information regarding the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM). This index has a value of approximately 1.9 for microbially derived fluvic acids and a value of approximately 1.4 for terrestrially (higher-plant) derived fluvic acids. All four lakes with increasing DOC trends had concomitant decreases in the FI index. Two of five lakes with no significant DOC trend also demonstrated no trend in FI values over time, while three lakes revealed a decrease in FI values. To confirm that the FI measured in whole water was primarily reflective of fulvic acids (FA), XAD-resin was used to isolate FA from a subset of samples. Analysis of the FA indicates that the FI values for the humic substances are slightly higher, yet well correlated with whole water samples. This suggests that despite prolonged storage in plastic, the FI trends are meaningful. The FI trends suggest a terrestrial source for the increasing DOC and may be driven by increased DOM production from soils experiencing decreased acid loading. Decreases in sulfate deposition can increase soil pH and soil organic matter solubility, as well as decrease the ionic strength of the soil solution, and increase DOC flux. This abstract does not necessarily reflect EPA policy. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid/vapor interface of sulfuric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Hammerich, Audrey Dell; Buch, Victoria

    2012-06-14

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid-vapor interface are presented for thin slabs of 72 water molecules containing a single molecule of sulfuric acid. Trajectories in the 306-330 K range are calculated for two functionals with double- and triple-? quality basis sets. Comparisons are made between BLYP and HCTH/120 results for the slab simulations and for bulk simulations of one H(2)SO(4) in a periodic box with 63 waters. Good agreement is found with the available experimental data and the results of other relevant AIMD studies with respect to ionization of the acid, size of the coordination shells, partitioning of the ions with the hydronium exhibiting a surface preference and the anions in the interior, and the orientational distributions for the hydronium ions and for the surface/subsurface water molecules. The major differences in the performance of the two functionals are attributable to the greater basicity of the anion oxygen atoms with the HCTH functional and the more structured aqueous solution with BLYP. The enhanced basicity results in larger aqueous coordination shells for the anion oxygens. The structuring of the BLYP aqueous solution is observed in the corrugation of the water density profile, the higher first peak in g(OO)(r), and a smaller water self-diffusion constant. This structuring with the BLYP functional yields anion hydrogen bonds that endure longer and where the dissociated ions more rapidly and directly segregate in the slab. The simulations indicate that aqueous surfaces containing ionizable diprotic acids can be modeled with rather modest sized systems and be informative. PMID:22554023

  17. UV-visible Absorption Properties of Colored Species Formed by Organics in Sulfuric Acid at Concentrations Typical of Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K. T.; Perez Montano, S.; Iraci, L. T.; Van Wyngarden, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) aerosols consist mostly of sulfuric acid (40-80 wt%) and water which are highly reflective towards UV and visible radiation. However, recent airborne measurements have shown that mixed organic/sulfuric acid aerosols are common in the UT/LS (Murphy, 2007). We have shown that mixtures of organic compounds (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, propanal) with UT/LS concentrations of sulfuric acid produce highly colored solutions, surface films, and or/precipitates. Here, we present measurements of the UV-vis absorption properties of these species in order to assess their possible impact on the radiative properties of UT/LS aerosols.

  18. Heterogeneous Reactions of ClONO2, HCl, and HOCl on Liquid Sulfuric Acid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of ClONO2 + H2O yields HNO3 + HOCl (1), ClONO2 + HCl yields C12 + HNO3 (2), and HOCl + HCl yields Cl2 + H2O (3) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces have been studied using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The main objectives of the study are to investigate: (a) the temperature dependence of these reactions at a fixed H2O partial pressure typical of the lower stratosphere (that is, by changing temperature at a constant water partial pressure, the H2SO4 content of the surfaces is also changed), (b) the relative importance or competition between reactions 1 and 2, and (c) the effect of HNO3 on the reaction probabilities due to the formation of a H2SO4/HNO3/H2O ternary system. The measurements show that all the reactions depend markedly on temperature at a fixed H2O partial pressure: they proceed efficiently at temperatures near 200 K and much slower at temperatures near 220 K. The reaction probability (gamma(sub 1)) for ClONO2 hydrolysis approaches 0.01 at temperatures below 200 K, whereas the values for gamma(sub 2) and gamma(sub 3) are on the order of a few tenths at 200 K. Although detailed mechanisms for these reactions are still unknown, the present data indicate that the competition between ClONO2 hydrolysis and ClONO2 reaction with HCl may depend on temperature (or H2SO4 Wt %): in the presence of gaseous HCl at stratospheric concentrations, reaction 2 is dominant at lower temperatures (less than 200 K), but reaction 1 becomes important at temperatures above 210 K. Furthermore, reaction probability measurements performed on the H2SO4/HNO3/ H2O ternary solutions do not exhibit noticeable deviation from those performed on the H2SO4/H2O binary system, suggesting little effect of HNO3 in sulfate aerosols on the ClONO2 and HOCl reactions with HCl. The results reveal that significant reductions in the chlorine-containing reservoir species (such as ClONO2 and HCl) can take place on stratospheric sulfate aerosols at high latitudes in winter and early spring, even at temperatures too warm for Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) to form or in regions where nucleation of PSCs is sparse. This is particularly true under elevated sulfuric acid loading, such as that after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Comparisons between our results and those presently available have also been made.

  19. High-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition over complex metal oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Lucia M. Petkovic; Kyle C. Burch; Michael J. Rush

    2009-05-01

    Activity and stability of FeTiO3, MnTiO3, NiFe2O4, CuFe2O4, NiCr2O4, 2CuO•Cr2O3, CuO and Fe2O3 for the atmospheric decomposition of concentrated sulfuric acid in sulfur-based thermochemical water splitting cycles are presented. Catalyst activity was determined at temperatures from 725 to 900 °C. Catalytic stability was examined at 850 °C for up to one week of continuous operation. The results were compared to a 1.0 wt% Pt/TiO2 catalyst. Surface area by nitrogen physisorption, X-ray diffraction analyses, and temperature programmed desorption and oxidation were used to characterize fresh and spent catalyst samples. Over the temperature range, the catalyst activity of the complex oxides followed the general trend: 2CuO•Cr2O3 > CuFe2O4 > NiCr2O4 ˜ NiFe2O4 > MnTiO3 ˜ FeTiO3. At temperatures less than 800 °C, the 1.0 wt% Pt/TiO2 catalyst had higher activity than the complex oxides, but at temperatures above 850 °C, the 2CuO•Cr2O3 and CuFe2O4 samples had the highest activity. Surface area was found to decrease for all of the metal oxides after exposure to reaction conditions. In addition, the two complex metal oxides that contained chromium were not stable in the reaction environment; both leached chromium into the acid stream and decomposed into their individual oxides. The FeTiO3 sample also produced a discoloration of the reactor due to minor leaching and converted to Fe2TiO5. Fe2O3, MnTiO3 and NiFe2O4 were relatively stable in the reaction environment. In addition, CuFe2O4 catalyst appeared promising due to its high activity and lack of any leaching issues.

  20. Structure and Energetics of Nanometer Size Clusters of Sulfuric Acid with Ammonia and Dimethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Depalma, Joseph W.; Bzdek, Bryan R.; Doren, Doug J.; Johnston, Murray V.

    2012-01-26

    The structures of positively and negatively charged clusters of sulfuric acid with ammonia and/or dimethylamine ((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}NH or DMA) are investigated using a combination of Monte Carlo configuration sampling, semiempirical calculations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Positively charged clusters of the formula [(NH{sub 4}{sup +}){sub x}(HSO{sub 4}{sup -}){sub y}]{sup +}, where x = y + 1, are studied for 1 {le} y {le} 10. These clusters exhibit strong cation-anion interactions, with no contribution to the hydrogen-bonding network from the bisulfate ion protons. A similar hydrogen-bonding network is found for the [(DMAH{sup +}){sub 5}(HSO{sub 4}{sup -}){sub 4}]{sup -} cluster. Negatively charged clusters derived from the reaction of DMA with [(H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}(NH{sub 4}{sup +})(HSO{sub 4}{sup -}){sub 2}]{sup -} are also studied, up to the fully reacted cluster [(DMAH{sup +}){sub 4}(HSO{sub 4}{sup -}){sub 5}]{sup -}. These clusters exhibit anion-anion and ion-molecule interactions in addition to cation-anion interactions. While the hydrogen-bonding network is extensive for both positively and negatively charged clusters, the binding energies of ions and molecules in these clusters are determined mostly by electrostatic interactions. The thermodynamics of amine substitution is explored and compared to experimental thermodynamic and kinetic data. Ammonia binds more strongly than DMA to sulfuric acid due to its greater participation in hydrogen bonding and its ability to form a more compact structure that increases electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions. However, the greater gas-phase basicity of DMA is sufficient to overcome the stronger binding of ammonia, making substitution of DMA for ammonia thermodynamically favorable. For small clusters of both polarities, substitutions of surface ammonium ions are facile. As the cluster size increases, an ammonium ion becomes encapsulated in the center of the cluster, making it inaccessible to substitution.