Science.gov

Sample records for dimensionless numbers expressed

  1. Dimensionless Numbers Expressed in Terms of Common CVD Process Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of dimensionless numbers related to momentum and heat transfer are useful in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) analysis. These numbers are not traditionally calculated by directly using reactor operating parameters, such as temperature and pressure. In this paper, these numbers have been expressed in a form that explicitly shows their dependence upon the carrier gas, reactor geometry, and reactor operation conditions. These expressions were derived for both monatomic and diatomic gases using estimation techniques for viscosity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. Values calculated from these expressions compared well to previously published values. These expressions provide a relatively quick method for predicting changes in the flow patterns resulting from changes in the reactor operating conditions.

  2. Dirac cosmology. [large dimensionless numbers relation to universe age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Lodenquai, J.

    1977-01-01

    The large numbers hypothesis (LNH) linking the magnitude of large dimensionless ratios in physics (on the order of 10 to the 40th power) to cosmic time is examined. The LNH is checked against evidence on 3K background radiation of the universe and the (log N, log S)-relation for radio galaxies. Earlier criticisms of LNH by Gamow and Teller are examined, and alternative hypotheses put forth by Dicke and Carter (1974) are discussed. The discussion covers: continuous (additive or multiplicative) creation of matter, the Einstein metric and the atomic metric, and general cosmological and local astronomical implications of LNH. LNH is also viewed in relation to solar evolution and pulsar physics.

  3. Walking dynamic similarity induced by a combination of Froude and Strouhal dimensionless numbers: Modela-w.

    PubMed

    Villeger, David; Costes, Antony; Watier, Bruno; Moretto, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a new dimensionless number associating Froude (Nfr) and Strouhal (Str) called Modela-w to induce walking dynamic similarity among humans of different sizes. Nineteen subjects walked in three experimental conditions: (i) constant speed, (ii) similar speed (Nfr) and (iii) similar speed and similar step frequency (Modela-w). The dynamic similarity was evaluated from scale factors computed with anthropometric, temporal, kinematic and kinetic data and from the decrease of the variability of the parameters expressed in their dimensionless form. Over a total of 36 dynamic parameters, dynamic similarity from scale factors was met for 11 (mean r = 0.51), 22 (mean r = 0.52) and 30 (mean r = 0.69) parameters in the first, the second and the third experimental conditions, respectively. Modela-w also reduced the variability of the dimensionless preceding parameters compared to the other experimental conditions. This study shows that the combination of Nfr and Str called Modela-w ensures dynamic similarity between different-sized subjects and allows scientists to impose similar experimental conditions removing all anthropometric effects. PMID:25455435

  4. A new dimensionless number highlighted from mechanical energy exchange during running.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Nicolas; Moretto, Pierre

    2008-09-18

    This study aimed to highlight a new dimensionless number from mechanical energy transfer occurring at the centre of gravity (Cg) during running. We built two different-sized spring-mass models (SMM #1 and SMM #2). SMM #1 was built from the previously published data, and SMM #2 was built to be dynamically similar to SMM #1. The potential gravitational energy (E(P)), kinetic energy (E(K)), and potential elastic energy (E(E)) were taken into account to test our hypothesis. For both SMM #1 and SMM #2, N(Mo-Dela)=(E(P)+E(K))/E(E) reached the same mean value and was constant (4.1+/-0.7) between 30% and 70% of contact time. Values of N(Mo-Dela) obtained out of this time interval were due to the absence of E(E) at initial and final times of the simulation. This phenomenon does not occur during in vivo running because a leg muscle's pre-activation enables potential elastic energy storage prior to ground contact. Our findings also revealed that two different-sized spring-mass models bouncing with equal N(Mo-Dela) values moved in a dynamically similar fashion. N(Mo-Dela), which can be expressed by the combination of Strouhal and Froude numbers, could be of great interest in order to study animal and human locomotion under Earth's gravity or to induce dynamic similarity between different-sized individuals during bouncing gaits. PMID:18706563

  5. The landscape Reynolds number and other dimensionless measures of Earth surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2007-11-01

    An analogy between turbulent fluid systems and landscape drainage systems [Parker, G., Haff, P.K., Murray, A.B., 2001, EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 82, pp. F564.] is suggested by the observation that transport in both systems can be approximated by diffusion with size-proportional effective diffusivities, with a cross-over at small scales to Fickian diffusion. The "landscape" Reynolds number of a typical fluvial landscape is estimated to be of order Re L ˜ 10 6 to 10 9, these large values reflecting the relative efficiency of fluvial transport compared to creep. Re L is the ratio of the large-scale effective diffusivity of rivers to the small-scale diffusivity of creep processes on hillslopes. The spatial dependence of the effective diffusivity produces rivers with logarithmic long-profiles, similar to the profiles of many rivers in nature, and analogous to the logarithmic dependence of mean fluid velocity on distance from a wall in turbulent flow. The landscape example suggests how other generalized "Reynolds numbers" can be constructed as ratios of large-scale to small-scale diffusivities to measure the efficiencies of complex processes that affect the surface. As an example, the global airline transportation network is estimated to have an efficacy relative to that of direct human mechanisms for transport of similar goods and materials of about 10 8 as measured by a corresponding "technology" Reynolds number. The appearance of such large dimensionless numbers, pertaining to the consequences of human invention and design, reflects the emergence of the technosphere as an increasingly efficient overlay on the historical domain of biology and surficial geology.

  6. Dimensionless cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, Ali; Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    Although it is well known that any consideration of the variations of fundamental constants should be restricted to their dimensionless combinations, the literature on variations of the gravitational constant G is entirely dimensionfull. To illustrate applications of this to cosmology, we explicitly give a dimensionless version of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and describe the physics of both Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and recombination in a dimensionless manner. Rigorously determining how to talk about the model in a way which avoids physical dimensions is a requirement for proceeding with a calculation to constrain time-varying fundamental constants. The issue that appears to have been missed in many studies is that in cosmology the strength of gravity is bound up in the cosmological equations, and the epoch at which we live is a crucial part of the model. We argue that it is useful to consider the hypothetical situation of communicating with another civilization (with entirely different units), comparing only dimensionless constants, in order to decide if we live in a Universe governed by precisely the same physical laws. In this thought experiment, we would also have to compare epochs, which can be defined by giving the value of any one of the evolving cosmological parameters. By setting things up carefully in this way one can avoid inconsistent results when considering variable constants, caused by effectively fixing more than one parameter today. We show examples of this effect by considering microwave background anisotropies, being careful to maintain dimensionlessness throughout. We present Fisher matrix calculations to estimate how well the fine structure constants for electromagnetism and gravity can be determined with future microwave background experiments. We highlight how one can be misled by simply adding G to the usual cosmological parameter set.

  7. Flow paths and chemical reactivity of CO2 in carbonates using Mercury-Intrusion Capillary Pressure data and dimensionless numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialle, S.; Dvorkin, J. P.; Mavko, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Experiments performed earlier by Vialle and Vanorio (2011) [1] have showed that the injection of CO2-rich water (pH=3.2) in various calcite limestones lead to heterogeneous dissolution of the pore structure, inducing secondary porosity and changing the rock stiffness. The presence of oil in the pore space affects the magnitude of these changes by lowering the reactive surface area. We present here a semi-quantitative analysis at the mesoscale to investigate how different initial pore microgeometries and heterogeneities in pore microgeometry affect the fluid-rock interactions. In particular, we aim at quantitatively explaining (1) why, in clean samples, higher-porosity micrite with rounded grains appears to be more affected by dissolution than tight micrite and spar cement and (2) why, for the same number of pore volumes of fluid injected, the magnitude of the changes in porosity (and subsequently elastic properties) differs among the studied rock samples. Rock microgeometry is studied by classical rock-physics methods, He-pycnometry and Mercury-Intrusion Capillary Pressure (MICP) tests, as well as by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging. Experiments were performed on subsamples (~0.5cm3) extracted from core plugs (~12cm3): two Fontainebleau sandstones, to serve as benchmarks, and two calcite carbonates from two different geological formations. In order to relate pore microgeometry to flow paths and chemical reactivity of CO2 in carbonate rocks, we chose to work at a scale that lies between the pore scale and the core scale. The method consists of physically subdividing the core plugs under examination into subsets based on the pore-throat sizes; these subsets correspond to three types of microstructure: "macropores", "microporous rounded micrite", and "spar cement"/"tight micrite". The dimensionless Péclet (Pe) and Damkhöler (Da) numbers, defined as the ratio between the advection rate and the diffusion rate, and as the ratio between the reaction rate and

  8. Scaling up adsorption media reactors for copper removal with the aid of dimensionless numbers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption media may be used to sorb copper in an aquatic environment for pollution control. Effective design of adsorption media reactors is highly dependent on selection of the hydraulic residence time when scaling up a pilot-scale reactor to a field-scale reactor. This paper seeks to improve scaling-up technique of the reactor design process through the use of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers via a dimensional analysis. A new scaling-up theory is developed in this study through a joint consideration of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers for a constant media particle size such that a balance between transport control and reaction control can be harmonized. A series of column breakthrough tests at varying hydraulic residence times revealed a clear peak adsorption capacity at a Damköhler number of 2.74. The Péclet numbers for the column breakthrough tests indicated that mechanical dispersion is an important effect that requires further consideration in the scaling-up process. However, perfect similitude of the Damköhler number cannot be maintained for a constant media particle size, and relaxation of hydrodynamic similitude through variation of the Péclet number must occur. PMID:26454119

  9. Dynamic similarity during human running: about Froude and Strouhal dimensionless numbers.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Nicolas; Lafortune, Mario A; Moretto, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Dynamic similarity is a widely used concept in the fluid mechanics field, and consists in placing two different-sized systems in equivalent experimental conditions. This enables removal of the effects of size and prediction of the behavior of a full size system from a scale model. The aim of this study was to test whether the Froude number (Nfr) or the Strouhal number (Str) could be used as a criterion for dynamic similarity during running. Fifteen male subjects ran barefoot on a runway in three experimental conditions (i) all subjects ran at the same speed V=3.5ms(-1); (ii) the speed was determined from Nfr; (iii) the stride frequency was determined from Str. Antero-posterior (Fy) and vertical (Fz) ground reaction force components were assessed. The similarity between the subjects was analysed from scale factor sets computed from anthropometric and kinetic data. The use of Str implied strong inter-subject similarity for temporal parameters (mean r=0.96, time to Fz peak, time to Fy braking peak, Fy zero fore-aft shear, time to Fy propulsive peak) while Nfr induced fewer and lower similarities (mean r=0.75, Fy zero fore-aft shear, time to Fy propulsive peak, Fy braking impulse) that only concerned antero-posterior parameters. This study brought experimental evidence that neither Nfr nor Str were sufficient for dynamic similarity during running, but that each of them made its own contribution. These findings suggested that the concomitant use of Nfr and Str should be assessed to induce inter-subject dynamic similarity during running. PMID:19121831

  10. A New Dimensionless Number for Redox Conditions within the Hyporheic Zone: Morphological and Biogeochemical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a new Damköhler number, Da, to quantify the biogeochemical status of the hyporheic zone and to upscale local hyporheic processes to reach scale. Da is defined as the ratio between the median hyporheic residence time, τup,50, which is a representative time scale of the hyporheic flow, and a representative time scale of biogeochemical reactions, which we define as the time τlim needed to consume dissolved oxygen to a prescribed threshold concentration below which reducing reactions are activated: Da = τup,50/τlim. This approach accounts for streambed topography and surface hydraulics via the hyporheic residence time and biogeochemical reaction via the time limit τlim. Da can readily evaluate the redox status of the hyporheic zone. Values of Da larger than 1 indicate prevailing anaerobic conditions, whereas values smaller than 1 prevailing aerobic conditions. This new Damköhler number can quantify the efficiency of hyporheic zone in transforming dissolved inorganic nitrogen species such as ammonium and nitrate, whose transformation depends on the redox condition of the hyporheic zone. We define a particular value of Da, Das, that indicates when the hyporheic zone is a source or a sink of nitrate. This index depends only on the relative abundance of ammonium and nitrate. The approach can be applied to any hyporheic zone of which the median hyporheic residence time is known. Application to streams with pool-riffle morphology shows that Da increases passing from small to large streams implying that the fraction of the hyporheic zone in anaerobic conditions increases with stream size.

  11. Dimensionless Numbers For Morphological, Thermal And Biogeochemical Controls Of Hyporheic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, Alberto; Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    Transport of solutes and heat within the hyporheic zone are interface processes that gained growing attention in the last decade, when several modelling strategies have been proposed, mainly at the local or reach scale. We propose to upscale local hyporheic biogeochemical processes to reach and network scales by means of a Lagrangian modelling framework, which allows to consider the impact of the flow structure on the processes modelled. This analysis shows that geochemical processes can be parametrized through two new Damköhler numbers, DaO, and DaT. DaO = ?up,50-?lim is defined as the ratio between the median hyporheic residence time, ?up,50 and the time of consuming dissolved oxygen to a prescribed threshold concentration, ?lim, below which reductive reactions are activated. It quantifies the biogeochemical status of the hyporheic zone and could be a metric for upscaling local hyporheic biogeochemical processes to reach and river-network scale processes. In addition, ?up,50 is the time scale of hyporheic advection; while ?lim is the representative time scale of biogeochemical reactions and indicates the distance along the streamline, measured as the time needed to travel that distance, that a particle of water travels before the dissolved oxygen concentration declines to [DO]lim, the value at which denitrification is activated. We show that DaO is representative of the redox status and indicates whether the hyporheic zone is a source or a sink of nitrate. Values of DaO larger than 1 indicate prevailing anaerobic conditions, whereas values smaller than 1 prevailing aerobic conditions. Similarly, DaT quantifies the importance of the temperature daily oscillations of the stream water on the hyporheic environment. It is defined as the ratio between ?up,50, and the time limit at which the ratio between the amplitude of the temperature oscillation within the hyporheic zone (evaluated along the streamline) and in the stream water is smaller than e-1. We show that

  12. Advanced control of liquid water region in diffusion media of polymer electrolyte fuel cells through a dimensionless number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Chen, Ken S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, a three-dimension (3-D) model of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is employed to investigate the complex, non-isothermal, two-phase flow in the gas diffusion layer (GDL). Phase change in gas flow channels is explained, and a simplified approach accounting for phase change is incorporated into the fuel cell model. It is found that the liquid water contours in the GDL are similar along flow channels when the channels are subject to two-phase flow. Analysis is performed on a dimensionless parameter Da0 introduced in our previous paper [Y. Wang and K. S. Chen, Chemical Engineering Science 66 (2011) 3557-3567] and the parameter is further evaluated in a realistic fuel cell. We found that the GDL's liquid water (or liquid-free) region is determined by the Da0 number which lumps several parameters, including the thermal conductivity and operating temperature. By adjusting these factors, a liquid-free GDL zone can be created even though the channel stream is two-phase flow. Such a liquid-free zone is adjacent to the two-phase region, benefiting local water management, namely avoiding both severe flooding and dryness.

  13. An empirical/theoretical model with dimensionless numbers to predict the performance of electrodialysis systems on the basis of operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Leila; Ghassemi, Abbas

    2016-07-01

    Among the different technologies developed for desalination, the electrodialysis/electrodialysis reversal (ED/EDR) process is one of the most promising for treating brackish water with low salinity when there is high risk of scaling. Multiple researchers have investigated ED/EDR to optimize the process, determine the effects of operating parameters, and develop theoretical/empirical models. Previously published empirical/theoretical models have evaluated the effect of the hydraulic conditions of the ED/EDR on the limiting current density using dimensionless numbers. The reason for previous studies' emphasis on limiting current density is twofold: 1) to maximize ion removal, most ED/EDR systems are operated close to limiting current conditions if there is not a scaling potential in the concentrate chamber due to a high concentration of less-soluble salts; and 2) for modeling the ED/EDR system with dimensionless numbers, it is more accurate and convenient to use limiting current density, where the boundary layer's characteristics are known at constant electrical conditions. To improve knowledge of ED/EDR systems, ED/EDR models should be also developed for the Ohmic region, where operation reduces energy consumption, facilitates targeted ion removal, and prolongs membrane life compared to limiting current conditions. In this paper, theoretical/empirical models were developed for ED/EDR performance in a wide range of operating conditions. The presented ion removal and selectivity models were developed for the removal of monovalent ions and divalent ions utilizing the dominant dimensionless numbers obtained from laboratory scale electrodialysis experiments. At any system scale, these models can predict ED/EDR performance in terms of monovalent and divalent ion removal. PMID:27108213

  14. Revealing a quantum feature of dimensionless uncertainty in linear and quadratic potentials by changing potential intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheiri, R.

    2016-09-01

    As an undergraduate exercise, in an article (2012 Am. J. Phys. 80 780–14), quantum and classical uncertainties for dimensionless variables of position and momentum were evaluated in three potentials: infinite well, bouncing ball, and harmonic oscillator. While original quantum uncertainty products depend on {{\\hslash }} and the number of states (n), a dimensionless approach makes the comparison between quantum uncertainty and classical dispersion possible by excluding {{\\hslash }}. But the question is whether the uncertainty still remains dependent on quantum number n. In the above-mentioned article, there lies this contrast; on the one hand, the dimensionless quantum uncertainty of the potential box approaches classical dispersion only in the limit of large quantum numbers (n\\to ∞ )—consistent with the correspondence principle. On the other hand, similar evaluations for bouncing ball and harmonic oscillator potentials are equal to their classical counterparts independent of n. This equality may hide the quantum feature of low energy levels. In the current study, we change the potential intervals in order to make them symmetric for the linear potential and non-symmetric for the quadratic potential. As a result, it is shown in this paper that the dimensionless quantum uncertainty of these potentials in the new potential intervals is expressed in terms of quantum number n. In other words, the uncertainty requires the correspondence principle in order to approach the classical limit. Therefore, it can be concluded that the dimensionless analysis, as a useful pedagogical method, does not take away the quantum feature of the n-dependence of quantum uncertainty in general. Moreover, our numerical calculations include the higher powers of the position for the potentials.

  15. The excitation and propagation of dimensionless magnetostatic waves and oscillations in rectangular YIG rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurilenko, B. E.

    1983-04-01

    The spectrum of bulk magnetostatic waves (BMW) and oscillations (BMO) is studied in a rectangular YIG rod during excitation by different antenna systems. Theoretical and experimental results show that, besides the modes whose wave numbers depend on the specimen size, it is possible to excite BMW and BMO modes with various wave field structures. Dependencies and expressions are obtained for these dimensionless modes and oscillations which describe the structure of the wave field both inside and outside the specimen.

  16. Meniscus height as a function of dimensionless variables for drop-on-demand applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Choi Kyung; Mehdi, Syed Murtuza

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports experimental correlations for the dimensionless meniscus height ( h/D) as a function of the dimensionless variables that govern the physics of meniscus generation for drop-on-demand applications. Two liquids were considered in this study: namely, ethylene glycol and ethanol. These liquids were selected because of their wide applicability in drop-on-demand applications. The dimensionless governing variables were found by performing a dimensional analysis of the system under consideration. The dimensionless meniscus height ( h/D) was found to depend on two dimensionless numbers: the S number ( S = σ/ρD 2 g) and the P number ( P = p abs / ρDg). The behaviors of h/D for both the liquids were found to increase with increasing variables of interest and are discussed in terms of correlations.

  17. Critical Dimensionless Shields Values for Bankfull Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2009-12-01

    The critical dimensionless shear stress τ*c (depicted in the Shields curve as a function of the Reynolds particle number Rep) quantifies the slope - flow depth product at which particles from a relatively well-sorted bed with a mean particle size Dm visually start to move. Contrary to many applications of the Shields curve, τ*c was not designed to predict the bed particle size becoming mobile at bankfull flow. This study sketches a bankfull and a critical bankfull Shields-type curve needed to predict the bankfull mobile particle size. Most studies on bedmaterial entrainment are performed in streams that are wadeable at low flow, but exceed wadeability around bankfull flow. Within the bounds of these stream dimensions, the study drafts a relationship of τ*bf versus Rep (bankfull Shields curve) for a sequence of stream types (in sensu Montgomery and Buffington 1997) ranging from steep cobble headwater streams to plane-bed and pool-riffle gravel-beds to low gradient valley streams with sand and silt beds. Probable values of stream gradient, bed D50 size, and a (roughness corrected) hydraulic radius can be assigned to each stream type. The resulting bankfull curve takes values of τ*bf near 10 for silt and 1 for sand-bedded streams, drops to around 0.05 - 0.02 for mobile gravel-bed streams and then increases towards 0.1 and 0.2 for the steepest streams. Transforming τ*bf into the critical bankfull curve τ*cbf from which to predict the bankfull entrainable particle size requires information on the bedload particle size that becomes mobile at bankfull flow. To estimate τ*cbf over a variety of coarse gravel- and cobble-bed mountain streams, the authors used flow competence curves measured with bedload traps at 10 sites. Bedload traps have a 0.3 m by 0.2 m opening, and 1-1.6 m long trailing net with a 4 mm mesh; mounting traps onto ground plates anchored to the stream bottom permits 1-hr sampling times; 4 to 6 traps are typically installed across the stream width

  18. Dimensionless Equation of State to Predict Microemulsion Phase Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumyadeep; Johns, Russell T

    2016-09-01

    Prediction of microemulsion phase behavior for changing state variables is critical to formulation design of surfactant-oil-brine (SOB) systems. SOB systems find applications in various chemical and petroleum processes, including enhanced oil recovery. A dimensional equation-of-state (EoS) was recently presented by Ghosh and Johns1 that relied on estimation of the surfactant tail length and surface area. We give an algorithm for flash calculations for estimation of three-phase Winsor regions that is more robust, simpler, and noniterative by making the equations dimensionless so that estimates of tail length and surface area are no longer needed. We predict phase behavior as a function temperature, pressure, volume, salinity, oil type, oil-water ratio, and surfactant/alcohol concentration. The dimensionless EoS is based on coupling the HLD-NAC (Hydrophilic Lipophilic Difference-Net Average Curvature) equations with new relationships between optimum salinity and solubility. An updated HLD expression that includes pressure is also used to complete the state description. A significant advantage of the dimensionless form of the EoS over the dimensional version is that salinity scans are tuned based only on one parameter, the interfacial volume ratio. Further, stability conditions are developed in a simplified way to predict whether an overall compositions lies within the single, two-, or three-phase regions. Important new microemulsion relationships are also found, the most important of which is that optimum solubilization ratio is equal to the harmonic mean of the oil and water solubilization ratios in the type III region. Thus, only one experimental measurement is needed in the three-phase zone to estimate the optimum solubilization ratio, a result which can aid experimental design and improve estimates of optimum from noisy data. Predictions with changing state variables are illustrated by comparison to experimental data using standard diagrams including a new type

  19. Comment on ‘Dimensionless units in the SI’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    2015-08-01

    In their paper, Mohr and Phillips demonstrate that the SI’s representation of ‘plane angle’ as dimensionless rather than as an independent dimensional quantity continues to create confusion. The authors also address perceived problems in terminology regarding numbers of items, such as discrete events or particles. However, their general philosophy of equating the dimensionlessnumber of items’ to ‘(number of items)  ×  (item name)’ leads to false conclusions, such as that the hertz is equal to 2π radians per second, and therefore not a coherent SI unit. In attempting to specify kinds of entities, the authors introduce descriptive labels into their supposed ‘units,’ resulting in confusion between number of entities and amount of substance. And, in discussing the mole and related fundamental constants, they incorrectly portray the Avogadro constant as a conversion factor, identically equal to 1, thereby corrupting the relationships between the Boltzmann constant and the universal gas constant, and between the elementary charge and the Faraday constant. In my comment, I explain and correct these and related errors.

  20. Similarity Theory and Dimensionless Numbers in Heat Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, E.; Calderon, A.; Delgado-Vasallo, O.

    2009-01-01

    We present basic concepts underlying the so-called similarity theory that in our opinion should be explained in basic undergraduate general physics courses when dealing with heat transport problems, in particular with those involving natural or free convection. A simple example is described that can be useful in showing a criterion for neglecting…

  1. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Effects of dimensionless coolant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, M. A.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to mode the film cooling performance for a turbine vane leading edge using the stagnation region of a cylinder in cross flow. Experiments were conducted with a single row of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio and dimensionless coolant temperature with free stream-to-wall temperature ratio approximately 1.7 and Re sub D = 90000. the cylindrical test surface was instrumented with miniature heat flux gages and wall thermocouples to determine the percentage reduction in the Stanton number as a function of the distance downstream from injection (x/d sub 0) and the location between adjacent holes (z/S). Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d = 5. The film coolant was injected with T sub c T sub w with a dimensionless coolant temperature in the range 1.18 or equal to theta sub c or equal to 1.56. The data for local Stanton Number Reduction (SNR) showed a significant increase in SNR as theta sub c was increased above 1.0.

  2. Dimensionless constants, cosmology, and other dark matters

    SciTech Connect

    Tegmark, Max; Aguirre, Anthony; Rees, Martin J.; Wilczek, Frank

    2006-01-15

    We identify 31 dimensionless physical constants required by particle physics and cosmology, and emphasize that both microphysical constraints and selection effects might help elucidate their origin. Axion cosmology provides an instructive example, in which these two kinds of arguments must both be taken into account, and work well together. If a Peccei-Quinn phase transition occurred before or during inflation, then the axion dark matter density will vary from place to place with a probability distribution. By calculating the net dark matter halo formation rate as a function of all four relevant cosmological parameters and assessing other constraints, we find that this probability distribution, computed at stable solar systems, is arguably peaked near the observed dark matter density. If cosmologically relevant weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter is discovered, then one naturally expects comparable densities of WIMPs and axions, making it important to follow up with precision measurements to determine whether WIMPs account for all of the dark matter or merely part of it.

  3. Flexibility, stroke, and dimensionless parameters: the importance of telling the whole story for swimming micro-organisms in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomases, Becca; Guy, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The question of how fluid elasticity affects the swimming performance of micro-organisms is complicated and has been the subject of many recent experimental and theoretical studies. The Deborah number, De = λω , is typically used to characterize the strength of the fluid elasticity in these studies, and for swimmers is expressed as the product of the elastic relaxation time and the frequency of the swimmer stroke. In simulations of undulatory flexible swimmers in an Oldroyd-B-type fluid, we find that varying the frequency of the stroke and varying the relaxation time separately results in a significantly different dependence of swimming speed for the same De . Thus the elastic effects on swimming cannot be characterized by a single dimensionless number. The Weissenberg number, defined as the product of elastic relaxation time and characteristic strain rate (Wi = λγ˙), is another dimensionless parameter useful for describing complex fluids. For a fixed swimmer frequency, varying the relaxation time will also vary the Weissenberg number. We conjecture that the different behavior is a consequence of a Weissenberg-number transition in the fluid, which additionally depends on the amplitude of the swimmer stroke.

  4. A dimensionless parameter for classifying hemodynamics in intracranial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a disease with high rates of mortality. Given the risk associated with the aneurysm surgery, quantifying the likelihood of aneurysm rupture is essential. There are many risk factors that could be implicated in the rupture of an aneurysm. However, the most important factors correlated to the IA rupture are hemodynamic factors such as wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) which are affected by the IA flows. Here, we carry out three-dimensional high resolution simulations on representative IA models with simple geometries to test a dimensionless number (first proposed by Le et al., ASME J Biomech Eng, 2010), denoted as An number, to classify the flow mode. An number is defined as the ratio of the time takes the parent artery flow transports across the IA neck to the time required for vortex ring formation. Based on the definition, the flow mode is vortex if An>1 and it is cavity if An<1. We show that the specific definition of Le et al. works for sidewall but needs to be modified for bifurcation aneurysms. In addition, we show that this classification works on three-dimensional geometries reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography of human subjects. Furthermore, we verify the correlation of IA flow mode and WSS/OSI on the human subject IA. This work was supported partly by the NIH grant R03EB014860, and the computational resources were partly provided by CCR at UB. We thank Prof. Hui Meng and Dr. Jianping Xiang for providing us the database of aneurysms and helpful discussions.

  5. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  6. A dimensionless model of impact piezoelectric energy harvesting with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinlei; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2016-04-01

    Impact excitation is common in the environment. Impact piezoelectric energy harvesting could realize frequency up-conversion. However, the dissipation mechanism in impact piezoelectric energy harvesting has not been investigated so far. There is no comprehensive model to be able to analyze the impact piezoelectric energy harvesting thoroughly. This paper is aimed to develop a generalized model that considers dissipation mechanism of impact piezoelectric energy harvesting. In this electromechanical model, Hertzian contact theory and impact dissipation mechanism are identified as constitutive mechanisms. The impact force is compared and the energy distribution is analyzed so that input energy corresponds to impact dissipated energy, structural damping dissipated energy and harvested electrical energy. We then nondimensionalize the developed model and define five dimensionless parameters with attributed physical meanings, including dimensionless parameters of impact dissipation, mass ratio, structural damping, electromechanical coupling, and electrical load. We conclude it is more accurate to consider impact dissipation mechanism to predict impact force and harvested energy. The guideline for improving harvested energy based on parametric studies of dimensionless model is to increase mass ratio, to minimize structural damping, to maximize electromechanical coupling, to use optimal load resistance for impedance matching, and to choose proper impact velocity .

  7. Estimating Mass of Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators Using Dimensionless Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for estimating mass for inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. The technique uses dimensional analysis to identify a set of dimensionless parameters for inflation pressure, mass of inflation gas, and mass of flexible material. The dimensionless parameters enable scaling of an inflatable concept with geometry parameters (e.g., diameter), environmental conditions (e.g., dynamic pressure), inflation gas properties (e.g., molecular mass), and mass growth allowance. This technique is applicable for attached (e.g., tension cone, hypercone, and stacked toroid) and trailing inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. The technique uses simple engineering approximations that were developed by NASA in the 1960s and 1970s, as well as some recent important developments. The NASA Mars Entry and Descent Landing System Analysis (EDL-SA) project used this technique to estimate the masses of the inflatable concepts that were used in the analysis. The EDL-SA results compared well with two independent sets of high-fidelity finite element analyses.

  8. Dimensionless Analysis and Numerical Modeling of Rebalancing Phenomena During Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Shi, Zhe; Li, Donghui; McLean, Alexander; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic levitation (EML) has proved to be a powerful tool for research activities in areas pertaining to materials physics and engineering. The customized EML setups in various fields, ranging from solidification to nanomaterial manufacturing, require the designing of stable levitation systems. Since the elevated droplet is opaque, the most effective way to research on EML is mathematical modeling. In the present study, a 3D model was built to investigate the rebalancing phenomenon causing instabilities during droplet melting. A mathematical model modified based on Hooke's law (spring) was proposed to describe the levitation system. This was combined with dimensionless analysis to investigate the generation of levitation forces as it will significantly affect the behavior of the spring model.

  9. Correctly Expressing Atomic Weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, Moreno; Cercignani, Giovanni; Bauer, Carlo

    2000-11-01

    Very often, atomic or molecular weights are expressed as dimensionless quantities, but although the historical importance of their definition as "pure numbers" is acknowledged, it is inconsistent with experimental formulas and with the theory of measure in general. Here, we propose on the basis of clear-cut formulas that, contrary to customary statements, atomic and molecular weights should be expressed as dimensional quantities (masses) in which the Dalton (= 1.663 x 10-24 g) is taken as the unit.

  10. Dimensionless size scaling of intrinsic rotation in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deGrassie, J. S.; Solomon, W. M.; Rice, J. E.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2016-08-01

    A dimensionless empirical scaling for intrinsic toroidal rotation is given: MA˜βNρ* , where MA is the toroidal velocity divided by the Alfvén velocity, βN is the usual normalized β value, and ρ* is the ion gyroradius divided by the minor radius. This scaling describes well experimental data from DIII-D and also some published data from C-Mod and JET. The velocity used in this scaling is in an outer location in minor radius, outside of the interior core and inside of the large gradient edge region in H-mode conditions. This scaling establishes the basic magnitude of the intrinsic toroidal rotation, and its relation to the rich variety of rotation profiles that can be realized for intrinsic conditions is discussed. This scaling has some similarities to existing dimensioned scalings, both the Rice scaling [J. E. Rice et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1825 (2000)] and the scaling of Parra et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 095001 (2012)]. These relationships are described.

  11. Experimental constraints on transport from dimensionless parameter scaling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Baker, D.R.

    1998-02-01

    The scalings of heat transport with safety factor (q), normalized collisionality (v), plasma beta ({beta}), and relative gyroradius ({rho}*) have been measured on the DIII-D tokamak. The measured {rho}* {beta} and v scalings of heat transport indicate that E x B transport from drive wave turbulence is a plausible basis for anomalous transport. For high confinement (H) mode plasmas where the safety factor was varied at fixed magnetic shear, the effective (or one-fluid) thermal diffusivity was found to scale like {chi}{sub eff} {proportional_to} q{sup 2.3{+-}0.64}, with the ion and electron fluids having the same q scaling to within the experimental errors except near the plasma edge. The scaling of the thermal confinement time with safety factor was in good agreement with this local transport dependence, {tau}{sub th} {proportional_to} q{sup {minus}2.42{+-}0.31}; however, when the magnetic shear was allowed to vary to keep q{sub 0} fixed during the (edge) safety factor scan, a weaker global dependence was observed, {tau}{sub th} {proportional_to} q{sub 95}{sup {minus}1.43{+-}0.23}. This weaker dependence was mainly due to the change in the local value of q between the two types of scans. The combined {rho}*, {beta}, v and q scalings of heat transport for H-mode plasmas on DIII-D reproduce the empirical confinement scaling using physical (dimensionless) parameters with the exception of weaker power degradation.

  12. Dimensionless critical shear stress in gravel-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, François; Houbrechts, Geoffrey; Peeters, Alexandre; Hallot, Eric; Van Campenhout, Jean; Denis, Anne-Cécile

    2015-12-01

    This paper first compiles critical shear stress values from 26 studies of gravel-bed rivers (GBRs) worldwide. The most frequently proposed value of the Shields criterion (θc) is 0.045, but three major groups with θc values ranging from < 0.030 to > 0.100 were identified. Second, dimensionless critical shear stresses (the Shields criterion) were evaluated for 14 GBRs (18 sites) with watershed areas ranging from 12 to 3000 km2. Different approaches were used to identify the initial movement of the bed material: painted and PIT-tag pebbles, sediment traps, and bedload samplers. The Shields criterion (θc) was estimated using the total shear stress (τ) and the grain shear stress (τ‧). Several shear stresses were also estimated using shear velocities. For bedload transport, we obtained an average Shields criterion (θc) of 0.040. The values were higher in small rivers (> 0.050) than larger rivers (< 0.030) because of more significant bedform shear stresses. The Shields criterion (θ‧c) was lower when the grain shear stress (τ‧) was used and only reached 0.019. Different values are also proposed in relation to the type of mobilization: the θc value for partial transport was ~ 0.025 and exceeded 0.040 for full transport (usually reached in association with discharges with a 10-year return period). The values based on the results of sediment traps and a bedload sampler were greater than those obtained using tracers, but these differences are smaller than those usually reported in the literature.

  13. The Erosive Potential of the Horseshoe Vortex System and its Relation to Dimensional and Dimensionless Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saffar, M. S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The turbulent flow of air or water around an object can result in scour and erosion of the underlying substrate. The fluid mechanics of this process is explained the dynamics of the Horseshoe Vortex (HV) system that forms as a result of the flow separation induced by the object. In this work, the characteristics of the HV system in front of a wall-mounted circular cylinder have been studied experimentally to improve understanding of these complex dynamics as a function of relevant dimensionless parameters. The flow velocity field within the plane of symmetry, upstream of the cylinder, was measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and vorticity fields were obtained from this. A range of natural flow conditions were obtained when Froude number (Fr) was varied from subcritical to supercritical conditions over the range 0.015 to 2.46, and the influence of other governing parameters such as the cylinder-based and depth-based Reynolds numbers was also investigated systematically. The results of a Quadrant analysis show the variation in turbulent stress contributions from positions underneath and upstream of the HV system. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) was used to elucidate the size and nature of the observed flow structure. The results show that the flow depth (h) has the primary control on the location of the HV system, while the magnitude of the peak wall stresses is controlled by cylinder diameter, Fr, and flow depth. That the controls include a mixture of dimensionless and dimensional factors highlights some of the complexity of translating laboratory results into practical recommendations for the study of natural systems, or for effective modelling with eddy-resolving numeric.

  14. Application of symbolic regression to the derivation of scaling laws for tokamak energy confinement time in terms of dimensionless quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Lungaroni, M.; Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.

    2016-02-01

    In many scientific applications, it is important to investigate how certain properties scale with the parameters of the systems. The experimental studies of scalings have traditionally been addressed with log regression, which limits the results to power laws and to theoretical and not data-driven dimensionless quantities. This has also been the case in nuclear fusion, in which the scaling of the energy confinement time is a crucial aspect in understanding the physics of transport and in the design of future devices. Traditionally two main assumptions are at the basis of the most widely accepted empirical scaling laws for the confinement time: (a) the dimensionless variables used are the ones derived from the symmetries of the Vlasov equation; (b) the final scalings have the mathematical form of power laws. In this paper, it is shown how symbolic regression (SR), implemented with genetic programming (GP) techniques, can be used to test these hypotheses. Neither assumption is confirmed by the available data of the multi-machine International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) of validated tokamak discharges. The statistically soundest expressions are not power laws and cannot be formulated in terms of the traditional dimensionless quantities. The consequences of the data-driven scaling laws obtained are both practical and theoretical: the confinement time for the ITER can be significantly shorter than foreseen by power laws and different dimensionless variables should be considered for theoretical investigations. On the other hand, higher quality databases should be built to reduce the uncertainties in the extrapolations. It is also worth emphasising that the proposed methodology is fully general and therefore can be applied to any field of science.

  15. Testing the mean magnetization approximation, dimensionless and scaling numbers in magnetorheology.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, José Antonio; Fernández-Toledano, Juan Carlos; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque; de Vicente, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The mean magnetization (MM) approximation is undoubtedly the most widely used approximation in magnetorheology both from theoretical and simulation perspectives. According to this, spherical magnetizable particles under field can be replaced by effective dipole moments m placed at their center with strength m = V(p)⟨M(p)⟩. Here V(p) and ⟨M(p)⟩ are the volume and mean (average) magnetization of the particles, respectively. In spite of being extensively used, there is not a mathematical justification to do so in most cases. In this manuscript, we test this approximation using experiments, theories and simulations, for a wide range of magnetic field strengths and particle loadings, in both conventional magnetorheological fluids (CMRFs) and inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Results demonstrate that the MM approximation is applicable in IFFs for a very wide range of field strengths (up to external fields of 265 kA m(-1)) and particle loadings (up to 20 vol%). For CMRFs, the MM approximation is only applicable in two particular circumstances; in magnetic saturation or in infinite dilution. PMID:26647041

  16. Relationship between mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and SIRT1 Expression in Porcine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Daichi; Itami, Nobuhiko; Tasaki, Hidetaka; Takeo, Shun; Kuwayama, Takehito; Iwata, Hisataka

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of resveratrol on the expression of SIRT1 and mitochondrial quality and quantity in porcine oocytes. Supplementing the maturation medium with 20 µM resveratrol increased the expression of SIRT1, and enhanced mitochondrial functions, as observed from the increased ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential. Addition of resveratrol also improved the ability of oocytes to develop into the blastocyst stage following activation. The effects of resveratrol on mitochondrial number were examined by comparing the mitochondrial DNA copy number (Mt number) between group of oocytes collected from the same donor gilt ovaries. Supplementing the maturation medium with only resveratrol did not affect the Mt number in the oocytes. However, supplementing the maturation medium with 10 µM MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, significantly increased the amount of ubiquitinated proteins and Mt number by 12 and 14%, respectively. In addition, when resveratrol was added to the medium containing MG132, the Mt number increased significantly by 39%, this effect was diminished by the addition of the SIRT1 inhibitor EX527. Furthermore, supplementing the medium with MG132 and EX527 did not affect Mt number. The mean SIRT1 expression in 20 oocytes was significantly and positively correlated with the Mt number in oocytes collected from the same donor. This study suggests that the expression of SIRT1 is associated with the Mt number in oocytes. In addition, activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol enhances the biosynthesis and degradation of mitochondria in oocytes, thereby replenishing and improving mitochondrial function and the developmental ability of oocytes. PMID:24747689

  17. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A; Woodman, Scott E; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:26787600

  18. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  19. Interactions between copy number and expression level of genes involved in fluconazole resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Abbes, Salma; Mary, Charles; Sellami, Hayet; Michel-Nguyen, Annie; Ayadi, Ali; Ranque, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to elucidate the relative involvement of drug resistance gene copy number and overexpression in fluconazole resistance in clinical C. glabrata isolates using a population-based approach. Methods: Fluconazole resistance levels were quantified using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) via Etest method. Both gene expression levels and gene copy number of CgCDR1, CgPDH1, CgERG11, and CgSNQ2 were assessed via quantitative real-time PCR. The influence of the main effects and first-level interactions of both the expression level and copy number of these genes on fluconazole resistance levels were analyzed using a multivariate statistical model. Results: Forty-three C. glabrata isolates were collected from 30 patients during in a hospital survey. In the multivariate analysis, C. glabrata fluconazole MICs were independently increased by CgSNQ2 overexpression (p < 10−4) and the interaction between CgPDH1 gene copy number and CgPDH1 expression level (p = 0.038). In contrast, both CgPDH1 overexpression (p = 0.049) and the interaction between CgSNQ2 and CgERG11 expression (p = 0.003) led to a significant decrease in fluconazole MICs. Conclusion: Fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata involves complex interactions between drug resistance gene expression and/or copy number. The population-based multivariate analysis highlighted the involvement of the CgSNQ2 gene in fluconazole resistance and the complex effect of the other genes such as PDH1 for which overexpression was associated with reduced fluconazole resistance levels, while the interaction between PDH1 overexpression and copy number was associated with increased resistance levels. PMID:24273749

  20. Dimensionless coordinates for simulations and theory of hyperfine interactions in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, William E.; Zacate, Matthew O.

    2010-04-01

    For problems involving simulations or theory of hyperfine interactions in materials, it is convenient to work in dimensionless coordinates of reasonable magnitude. Such a system is described here that constitutes a consistent and useful "natural" dimensionless unit system that simplifies point-charge approximations, scaling between different crystal structures, scaling charges of various defects in materials, and other computations involving hyperfine interactions. We present the proposed system with examples of its use for data analysis as well as for simulations and theory.

  1. Number-theoretic expressions obtained through analogy between prime factorization and optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiden, Gabriel

    2012-04-01

    Prime factorization is an outstanding problem in arithmetic with important consequences in a variety of fields, most notably cryptography. Here I employ the intriguing analogy between prime factorization and optical interferometry in order to obtain analytic expressions for closely related functions, including the number of distinct prime factors.

  2. Common Spatial Organization of Number and Emotional Expression: A Mental Magnitude Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Kevin J.; Lourenco, Stella F.

    2011-01-01

    Converging behavioral and neural evidence suggests that numerical representations are mentally organized in left-to-right orientation. Here we show that this format of spatial organization extends to emotional expression. In Experiment 1, right-side responses became increasingly faster as number (represented by Arabic numerals) or happiness…

  3. Effect of passage number on cellular response DNA-damaging agents: cell survival and gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Wolschak, G.E.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of different passage numbers on plating efficiency, doubling time, cell growth, and radiation sensitivity was assessed in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Changes in gene expression after UV or {gamma}-ray irradiation at different passage numbers were also examined. The SHE cells were maintained in culture medium for up to 64 passages. Cells were exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 254-m UV radiation. Differential display of cDNAs and Northern blots were used for the study of gene expression. With increasing passage number, SHE cells demonstrated decreased doubling time, increased plating efficiency, and a decreased yield in the number of cells per plate. Between passages 41 and 48 a ``crisis`` period was evident during which time cell growth in high serum (20%) was no longer optimal, and serum concentrations were reduced (to 10%) to maintain cell growth. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was no different between early- and intermediate-passage cells. However, after UV exposure at low passages (passage 3), confluent cells were more sensitive to the killing effects of UV than were log-phase cells. At intermediate passages (passages 43, 48), confluent cells were slightly more radioresistant- than were log-phase cells. By passage 64, however, both confluent and log-phase cells showed similar patterns of UV sensitivity. Expression of {gamma}-actin, PCNA, and p53 transcripts did not change following UV exposure. p53 mRNA was induced following {gamma}-ray exposure of the intermediate (passage 45) epithelial cells. Differential display, however, revealed changes in expression of several transcripts following exposure to ionizing and ultraviolet radiations. The observed differences in radiation sensitivity associated with increasing passage number may be influenced by radiation-induced gene expression. We are conducting experiments to identify these genes.

  4. Functional profiling and gene expression analysis of chromosomal copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucía; Montaner, David; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Tárraga, Joaquín; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Contrarily to the traditional view in which only one or a few key genes were supposed to be the causative factors of diseases, we discuss the importance of considering groups of functionally related genes in the study of pathologies characterised by chromosomal copy number alterations. Recent observations have reported the existence of regions in higher eukaryotic chromosomes (including humans) containing genes of related function that show a high degree of coregulation. Copy number alterations will consequently affect to clusters of functionally related genes, which will be the final causative agents of the diseased phenotype, in many cases. Therefore, we propose that the functional profiling of the regions affected by copy number alterations must be an important aspect to take into account in the understanding of this type of pathologies. To illustrate this, we present an integrated study of DNA copy number variations, gene expression along with the functional profiling of chromosomal regions in a case of multiple myeloma. PMID:17597935

  5. Exact expression for the number of energy states in lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2014-02-01

    We derive a closed-form combinatorial expression for the number of energy states in canonical systems with discrete energy levels. The expression results from the exact low-temperature power series expansion of the partition function. The approach provides interesting insights into basis of statistical mechanics. In particular, it is shown that in some cases the logarithm of the partition function may be considered the generating function for the number of internal states of energy clusters, which characterize system's microscopic configurations. Insights provided by the method allow one to understand the circumstances under which the widespread distributions for the energy, such as the Poisson and exponential distributions, arise. Apart from elementary examples, the framework is validated against the one-dimensional Ising model in zero field.

  6. Algebraic expression of the IBM3 hamiltonian in terms of various quantum numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, M.

    1991-04-01

    The properties of the IBM3 hamiltonian are algebraically studied. The IBM3 hamiltonian determined microscopically has as characteristic that the isospin T, rmrather than the spin J, is essential to classifying the energy spectra. The T-dependence of the two-body boson interactions is expressed in terms of the Casimir operators or quantum numbers of various groups. This algebraic approach makes preparations for phenomenological understanding of light nuclei with definite isospin.

  7. Identification of genes with a correlation between copy number and expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To elucidate gene expression associated with copy number changes, we performed a genome-wide copy number and expression microarray analysis of 25 pairs of gastric tissues. Methods We applied laser capture microdissection (LCM) to obtain samples for microarray experiments and profiled DNA copy number and gene expression using 244K CGH Microarray and Human Exon 1.0 ST Microarray. Results Obviously, gain at 8q was detected at the highest frequency (70%) and 20q at the second (63%). We also identified molecular genetic divergences for different TNM-stages or histological subtypes of gastric cancers. Interestingly, the C20orf11 amplification and gain at 20q13.33 almost separated moderately differentiated (MD) gastric cancers from poorly differentiated (PD) type. A set of 163 genes showing the correlations between gene copy number and expression was selected and the identified genes were able to discriminate matched adjacent noncancerous samples from gastric cancer samples in an unsupervised two-way hierarchical clustering. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 4 genes (C20orf11, XPO5, PUF60, and PLOD3) of the 163 genes validated the microarray results. Notably, some candidate genes (MCM4 and YWHAZ) and its adjacent genes such as PRKDC, UBE2V2, ANKRD46, ZNF706, and GRHL2, were concordantly deregulated by genomic aberrations. Conclusions Taken together, our results reveal diverse chromosomal region alterations for different TNM-stages or histological subtypes of gastric cancers, which is helpful in researching clinicopathological classification, and highlight several interesting genes as potential biomarkers for gastric cancer. PMID:22559327

  8. Dimensionless correlations for forced convection in liquid metals: Part I. single-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulos, Stavros A.; Mikrovas, Anthony C.; Doutre, Don A.

    2001-04-01

    well as equations developed for fluids with a Prandtl number greater than 0.7 exhibit a very large error. As such, these equations are unsuitable for liquid metals. A considerably smaller error is exhibited by equations derived experimentally, specifically for liquid metals, thereby attesting to the careful consideration that must be exercised in the choice of correlations that are employed. This study also provides a critical assessment of various exponents used in dimensionless equations for convective heat transfer in liquid metals. While there is a general consensus that the exponent of the Reynolds number is around 0.5, the exponent for the Prandtl number varies considerably.

  9. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  10. Dimensionless Analysis and Mathematical Modeling of Electromagnetic Levitation (EML) of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Shi, Zhe; Li, Donghui; Yang, Yindong; Zhang, Guifang; McLean, Alexander; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic levitation (EML), a contactless metal melting method, can be used to produce ultra-pure metals and alloys. In the EML process, the levitation force exerted on the droplet is of paramount importance and is affected by many parameters. In this paper, the relationship between levitation force and parameters affecting the levitation process were investigated by dimensionless analysis. The general formula developed by dimensionless analysis was tested and evaluated by numerical modeling. This technique can be employed to design levitation systems for a variety of materials.

  11. Hybrid piezoelectric-inductive flow energy harvesting and dimensionless electroaeroelastic analysis for scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, J. A. C.; De Marqui, C.; Erturk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric and electromagnetic transduction techniques have peculiar advantages to leverage in the growing field of flow energy harvesting from aeroelastic vibrations. This letter presents the concept of hybrid piezoelectric-inductive power generation with electroaeroelastic modeling and simulations. Dimensionless analysis of the coupled system dynamics is indispensable to proper geometric scaling and optimization of aeroelastic energy harvesters. The governing electroaeroelastic equations are given in dimensionless form, and the effects of aeroelastic and electrical properties are investigated in detail toward understanding the dependence of the cut-in speed (flutter speed) and the maximum power output of the harvester on the system parameters.

  12. Subtypes of familial breast tumours revealed by expression and copy number profiling.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Nic; Arnold, Jeremy; Cocciardi, Sibylle; da Silva, Leonard; Marsh, Anna; Riley, Joan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Orloff, Mohammed; Assie, Guillaume; Eng, Charis; Reid, Lynne; Keith, Patricia; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Devilee, Peter; Godwin, Andrew K; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Couch, Fergus; Grimmond, Sean; Flanagan, James M; Khanna, Kumkum; Simpson, Peter T; Lakhani, Sunil R; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-10-01

    Extensive expression profiling studies have shown that sporadic breast cancer is composed of five clinically relevant molecular subtypes. However, although BRCA1-related tumours are known to be predominantly basal-like, there are few published data on other classes of familial breast tumours. We analysed a cohort of 75 BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 breast tumours by gene expression profiling and found that 74% BRCA1 tumours were basal-like, 73% of BRCA2 tumours were luminal A or B, and 52% non-BRCA1/2 tumours were luminal A. Thirty-four tumours were also analysed by single nucleotide polymorphism-comparative genomic hybridization (SNP-CGH) arrays. Copy number data could predict whether a tumour was basal-like or luminal with high accuracy, but could not predict its mutation class. Basal-like BRCA1 and basal-like non-BRCA1 tumours were very similar, and contained the highest number of chromosome aberrations. We identified regions of frequent gain containing potential driver genes in the basal (8q and 12p) and luminal A tumours (1q and 17q). Regions of homozygous loss associated with decreased expression of potential tumour suppressor genes were also detected, including in basal tumours (5q and 9p), and basal and luminal tumours (10q). This study highlights the heterogeneity of familial tumours and the clinical consequences for treatment and prognosis. PMID:19960244

  13. Relationships between cell cycle regulator gene copy numbers and protein expression levels in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Chino, Ayako; Makanae, Koji; Moriya, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    We previously determined the copy number limits of overexpression for cell division cycle (cdc) regulatory genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the "genetic tug-of-war" (gTOW) method. In this study, we measured the levels of tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged target proteins when their copy numbers are increased in gTOW. Twenty analyzed genes showed roughly linear correlations between increased protein levels and gene copy numbers, which suggested a general lack of compensation for gene dosage in S. pombe. Cdc16 and Sid2 protein levels but not their mRNA levels were much lower than that expected by their copy numbers, which suggested the existence of a post-transcriptional down regulation of these genes. The cyclin Cig1 protein level and its mRNA level were much higher than that expected by its copy numbers, which suggested a positive feedback mechanism for its expression. A higher Cdc10 protein level and its mRNA level, probably due to cloning its gene into a plasmid, indicated that Cdc10 regulation was more robust than that previously predicted. PMID:24019917

  14. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  15. MYC, FBXW7 and TP53 copy number variation and expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MYC deregulation is a common event in gastric carcinogenesis, usually as a consequence of gene amplification, chromosomal translocations, or posttranslational mechanisms. FBXW7 is a p53-controlled tumor-suppressor that plays a role in the regulation of cell cycle exit and reentry via MYC degradation. Methods We evaluated MYC, FBXW7, and TP53 copy number, mRNA levels, and protein expression in gastric cancer and paired non-neoplastic specimens from 33 patients and also in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. We also determined the invasion potential of the gastric cancer cell lines. Results MYC amplification was observed in 51.5% of gastric tumor samples. Deletion of one copy of FBXW7 and TP53 was observed in 45.5% and 21.2% of gastric tumors, respectively. MYC mRNA expression was significantly higher in tumors than in non-neoplastic samples. FBXW7 and TP53 mRNA expression was markedly lower in tumors than in paired non-neoplastic specimens. Moreover, deregulated MYC and FBXW7 mRNA expression was associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and tumor stage III-IV. Additionally, MYC immunostaining was more frequently observed in intestinal-type than diffuse-type gastric cancers and was associated with MYC mRNA expression. In vitro studies showed that increased MYC and reduced FBXW7 expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype in gastric cancer cell lines. This result encouraged us to investigate the activity of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in both cell lines. Both gelatinases are synthesized predominantly by stromal cells rather than cancer cells, and it has been proposed that both contribute to cancer progression. We observed a significant increase in MMP-9 activity in ACP02 compared with ACP03 cells. These results confirmed that ACP02 cells have greater invasion capability than ACP03 cells. Conclusion In conclusion, FBXW7 and MYC mRNA may play a role in aggressive biologic behavior of gastric cancer cells and may be a useful

  16. Host Genetic Variants and Gene Expression Patterns Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus Copy Number in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Petrova, Velislava; Liu, Jimmy Z.; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Carl A.; Gall, Astrid; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) are commonly used in molecular genetics, supplying DNA for the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Projects, used to test chemotherapeutic agents, and informing the basis of a number of population genetics studies of gene expression. The process of transforming human B cells into LCLs requires the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a double-stranded DNA virus which through B-cell immortalisation maintains an episomal virus genome in every cell of an LCL at variable copy numbers. Previous studies have reported that EBV alters host-gene expression and EBV copy number may be under host genetic control. We performed a genome-wide association study of EBV genome copy number in LCLs and found the phenotype to be highly heritable, although no individual SNPs achieved a significant association with EBV copy number. The expression of two host genes (CXCL16 and AGL) was positively correlated and expression of ADARB2 was negatively correlated with EBV copy number in a genotype-independent manner. This study shows an association between EBV copy number and the gene expression profile of LCLs, and suggests that EBV copy number should be considered as a covariate in future studies of host gene expression in LCLs. PMID:25290448

  17. Epileptiform stimulus increases Homer 1a expression to modulate synapse number and activity in hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Popko, Jonathan; Krogh, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons adapt to seizure activity structurally and functionally to attenuate hyperactive neural circuits. Homer proteins provide a scaffold in the postsynaptic density (PSD) by binding to ligands through an EVH1 domain and to other Homer proteins by a coiled-coil domain. The short Homer isoform 1a (H1a) has a ligand-binding domain but lacks a coiled-coil domain and thus acts in a dominant-negative manner to uncouple Homer scaffolds. Here, we show that treating rat hippocampal cultures with bicuculline and 4-aminopyridine (Bic+4-AP) evoked epileptiform activity and synchronized Ca2+ spiking, measured with whole cell current-clamp and fura-2-based digital imaging; Bic+4-AP increased H1a mRNA through the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Treatment with Bic+4-AP for 4 h attenuated burst firing and induced synapse loss. Synaptic changes were measured using a confocal imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of PSD-95 fused to green fluorescent protein. Treatment with an mGluR5 antagonist blocked H1a expression, synapse loss, and burst attenuation. Overexpression of H1a inhibited burst firing similar to Bic+4-AP treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of H1a using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) strategy reduced synapse loss and burst attenuation induced by Bic+4-AP treatment. Thus an epileptiform stimulus applied to hippocampal neurons in culture induced burst firing and H1a expression through the activation of mGluR5; a 4-h exposure to this stimulus resulted in synapse loss and burst attenuation. These results suggest that H1a expression functions in a negative-feedback manner to reduce network excitability by regulating the number of synapses. PMID:23274309

  18. The copy number of rice CACTA DNA transposons carrying MIR820 does not correlate with MIR820 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nosaka, Misuzu; Ishiwata, Aiko; Shimizu-Sato, Sae; Ono, Akemi; Ishimoto, Kiyoe; Noda, Yusaku; Sato, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    miR820 is a small RNA species (22 and 24 nucleotides), produced from transcripts originated from a region inside CACTA DNA transposons in rice. Because MIR820 is a transposon gene, its expression may depend on the transposon copy number. Here, we investigated the copy number of MIR820 and its expression levels in various cultivars and wild species of rice. We found no correlation between copy number and expression level, suggesting that MIR820 transcription is regulated not by the copy dosage but by the epigenetic state of each copy. PMID:23733074

  19. Molecular cloning, tissue expression pattern, and copy number variation of porcine SCUBE3.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, L G; Zhang, L C; Yan, H; Zhao, K B; Liang, J; Li, N; Pu, L; Zhang, T; Wang, L X

    2016-01-01

    The signal peptide CUB EGF-like domain-containing protein 3 (SCUBE3) gene is a member of SCUBE gene family and plays important roles in bone cell biology and the determination of limb bone length. In this study, the full-length transcript of porcine SCUBE3 was cloned using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length sequence of porcine SCUBE3 cDNA was 4131 base pairs and included 21 exons. The SCUBE3 gene contained a 2895-base pair open reading frame that encoded a peptide of 965 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of porcine SCUBE3 with those of human, mouse, zebrafish, and rat showed 96, 95, 73, and 95% identities, respectively. Porcine SCUBE3 mRNA expression levels were highest in the backfat, bone marrow, and cartilage tissues. Copy number variation was detected in porcine SCUBE3 and validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Different copy number variations were present in randomly selected individuals and may, therefore, be a good marker for identifying phenotypic traits. Our findings provide a basis for further investigation of the functions and regulatory mechanisms of SCUBE3 in pigs. PMID:26909946

  20. A triangular model of dimensionless runoff producing rainfall hyetographs in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, W.H.; Bumgarner, J.R.; Fahlquist, L.S.

    2003-01-01

    A synthetic triangular hyetograph for a large data base of Texas rainfall and runoff is needed. A hyetograph represents the temporal distribution of rainfall intensity at a point or over a watershed during a storm. Synthetic hyetographs are estimates of the expected time distribution for a design storm and principally are used in small watershed hydraulic structure design. A data base of more than 1,600 observed cumulative hyetographs that produced runoff from 91 small watersheds (generally less than about 50 km2) was used to provide statistical parameters for a simple triangular shaped hyetograph model. The model provides an estimate of the average hyetograph in dimensionless form for storm durations of 0 to 24 hours and 24 to 72 hours. As a result of this study, the authors concluded that the expected dimensionless cumulative hyetographs of 0 to 12 hour and 12 to 24 hour durations were sufficiently similar to be combined with minimal information loss. The analysis also suggests that dimensionless cumulative hyetographs are independent of the frequency level or return period of total storm depth and thus are readily used for many design applications. The two triangular hyetographs presented are intended to enhance small watershed design practice in applicable parts of Texas.

  1. Genes and small RNA transcripts exhibit dosage-dependent expression pattern in maize copy-number alterations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes that tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplica...

  2. Constraints on the dimensionless age of the Universe from Pan-STARRS supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, Arturo; Kirshner, Robert P.; Scolnic, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    We present the constraints on the dimensionless age of the universe H_o t_o determined from the latest compilation of Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, combined with low-z supernovae from the CfA, Carnegie, and other sources.The cosmological fit to these SN Ia, assuming a spatially flat universe as suggested by Planck, yields a value of H_o t_o = 1.039 +0.04 -0.05.In this talk we briefly discuss the procedure and implications of this result.

  3. Evaluation of dendrite morphology using fractal dimension and dimensionless perimeter in unidirectionally solidified Al-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsasa, K.; Natsume, Y.; Sekiya, T.; Hatayama, T.

    2015-06-01

    The dendrite morphology of unidirectionally solidified Al-Si alloys was evaluated by measuring the fractal dimension and dimensionless perimeter of dendrites. In an unidirectional solidification experiment, columnar crystals grew from a bottom chill and columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) occurred at the upper part of an ingot. Then, equiaxed crystals were formed at the top of the ingot. Different dendrite morphology was observed in longitudinal, transverse and oblique sections, however, the fractal dimension or dimensionless perimiter of the dendrites in the sections with same local solidification time showed same values, and continuously decreased with increase in the local solidification time through columnar, CET and equiaxed regions. It can be considered that the fractal dimension and dimensionless perimiter of dendrites are controlled by local solidification time and irrespective of dendrite morphology. This result demonstrated the potential of the fractal dimension and dimensionless perimiter as a parameter for estimating local solidification time of an ingot in which the measurement of SDAS is difficult.

  4. Rain event properties and dimensionless rain event hyetographs at the source of the Blue Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haile, A. T.; Rientjes, T.; Habib, E.; Jetten, V.

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, the spatial and temporal patterns of the rain event properties are analysed. The event properties are rain event depth, event duration, mean event intensity, peak intensity and the time span between two consecutive rain events which is referred to as inter-event time (IET). Dimensionless event hyetographs are established by relating fractions of event intensities to the corresponding fractions of event durations. The spatial variation of the characteristics of the hyetographs is also evaluated. A model in the form of the beta distribution function is applied to reproduce the dimensionless hyetographs. Rainfall data is obtained from a field campaign in two wet seasons of June-August (JJA) of 2007 and 2008 in the Gilgel Abbay watershed that is situated at the source basin of the upper Blue Nile River in Ethiopia. The rainfall data was recorded at eight stations. The results reveal that rain event depth is more related to peak intensity than to event duration. At the start and towards the end of the wet season, the rain events have larger depth with longer duration and longer IET than the rain events in the mid-season. Mean event intensity and IET are strongly related to terrain elevation. Sekela which is on a mountain area has the shortest IET while Bahir Dar which is at the south shore of the lake has the longest IET.

  5. Introducing economic parameters in industrial flotation dimensionless models used for intra-factory technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Dimitris; Ifanti, Konstantina

    2012-12-01

    In this work, intra-factory technology transfer is realized by means of scale-up procedures, including the formation of a representative original set of dimensionless groups, when know-how obtained in the laboratory is transferred progressively (in successive steps) into industrial scale. For saving resources (highly skilled manpower, time, materials, energy) a Knowledge Base (KB) is designed/developed to maintain experience in flotation and select relevant information from other Data/Information/Knowledge Bases. Of significant importance is the introduction of economic parameters referring to investment and operation of the industrial unit, thus taking into account the capital and operating cost of output, respectively. We have proved that this introduction causes several problems since new technological dimensions should be also introduced (so that the economic parameters become meaningful) resulting by dimensional analysis to a new solution set that is incompatible to the original one. We solved this problem by keeping the original set and incorporating into it only the new dimensionless groups (eliminating all additional technological dimensions introduced ad hoc).

  6. Dimensionless, Scale Invariant, Edge Weight Metric for the Study of Complex Structural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Perez, Luis M.; Spindler, Caitlin; Goicochea, Shelby; Triplett, William; Parekh, Mansi; Montie, Eric; Carney, Paul R.; Price, Catherine; Mareci, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    High spatial and angular resolution diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) with network analysis provides a unique framework for the study of brain structure in vivo. DWI-derived brain connectivity patterns are best characterized with graph theory using an edge weight to quantify the strength of white matter connections between gray matter nodes. Here a dimensionless, scale-invariant edge weight is introduced to measure node connectivity. This edge weight metric provides reasonable and consistent values over any size scale (e.g. rodents to humans) used to quantify the strength of connection. Firstly, simulations were used to assess the effects of tractography seed point density and random errors in the estimated fiber orientations; with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), edge weight estimates improve as the seed density increases. Secondly to evaluate the application of the edge weight in the human brain, ten repeated measures of DWI in the same healthy human subject were analyzed. Mean edge weight values within the cingulum and corpus callosum were consistent and showed low variability. Thirdly, using excised rat brains to study the effects of spatial resolution, the weight of edges connecting major structures in the temporal lobe were used to characterize connectivity in this local network. The results indicate that with adequate resolution and SNR, connections between network nodes are characterized well by this edge weight metric. Therefore this new dimensionless, scale-invariant edge weight metric provides a robust measure of network connectivity that can be applied in any size regime. PMID:26173147

  7. Integration of mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels in breast cancer to improve grade definition.

    PubMed

    Cava, Claudia; Bertoli, Gloria; Ripamonti, Marilena; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zoppis, Italo; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Defining the aggressiveness and growth rate of a malignant cell population is a key step in the clinical approach to treating tumor disease. The correct grading of breast cancer (BC) is a fundamental part in determining the appropriate treatment. Biological variables can make it difficult to elucidate the mechanisms underlying BC development. To identify potential markers that can be used for BC classification, we analyzed mRNAs expression profiles, gene copy numbers, microRNAs expression and their association with tumor grade in BC microarray-derived datasets. From mRNA expression results, we found that grade 2 BC is most likely a mixture of grade 1 and grade 3 that have been misclassified, being described by the gene signature of either grade 1 or grade 3. We assessed the potential of the new approach of integrating mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels to select a limited number of genomic BC biomarkers. The combination of mRNA profile analysis and copy number data with microRNA expression levels led to the identification of two gene signatures of 42 and 4 altered genes (FOXM1, KPNA4, H2AFV and DDX19A) respectively, the latter obtained through a meta-analytical procedure. The 42-based gene signature identifies 4 classes of up- or down-regulated microRNAs (17 microRNAs) and of their 17 target mRNA, and the 4-based genes signature identified 4 microRNAs (Hsa-miR-320d, Hsa-miR-139-5p, Hsa-miR-567 and Hsa-let-7c). These results are discussed from a biological point of view with respect to pathological features of BC. Our identified mRNAs and microRNAs were validated as prognostic factors of BC disease progression, and could potentially facilitate the implementation of assays for laboratory validation, due to their reduced number. PMID:24866763

  8. Individual and combined effects of DNA methylation and copy number alterations on miRNA expression in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The global effect of copy number and epigenetic alterations on miRNA expression in cancer is poorly understood. In the present study, we integrate genome-wide DNA methylation, copy number and miRNA expression and identify genetic mechanisms underlying miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. Results We identify 70 miRNAs whose expression was associated with alterations in copy number or methylation, or both. Among these, five miRNA families are represented. Interestingly, the members of these families are encoded on different chromosomes and are complementarily altered by gain or hypomethylation across the patients. In an independent breast cancer cohort of 123 patients, 41 of the 70 miRNAs were confirmed with respect to aberration pattern and association to expression. In vitro functional experiments were performed in breast cancer cell lines with miRNA mimics to evaluate the phenotype of the replicated miRNAs. let-7e-3p, which in tumors is found associated with hypermethylation, is shown to induce apoptosis and reduce cell viability, and low let-7e-3p expression is associated with poorer prognosis. The overexpression of three other miRNAs associated with copy number gain, miR-21-3p, miR-148b-3p and miR-151a-5p, increases proliferation of breast cancer cell lines. In addition, miR-151a-5p enhances the levels of phosphorylated AKT protein. Conclusions Our data provide novel evidence of the mechanisms behind miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. The study contributes to the understanding of how methylation and copy number alterations influence miRNA expression, emphasizing miRNA functionality through redundant encoding, and suggests novel miRNAs important in breast cancer. PMID:24257477

  9. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: Dimensionless coupling of bulk scalars at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, P.-H.; Azuelos, G.; Burgess, C. P.

    2004-10-01

    We identify the lowest-dimension interaction which is possible between standard model brane fields and bulk scalars in six dimensions. The lowest-dimension interaction is unique and involves a trilinear coupling between the standard model Higgs boson and the bulk scalar. Because this interaction has a dimensionless coupling, it depends only logarithmically on ultraviolet mass scales and heavy physics need not decouple from it. We compute its influence on Higgs physics at ATLAS and identify how large a coupling can be detected at the LHC. Besides providing a potentially interesting signal in Higgs-boson searches, such couplings provide a major observational constraint on 6D large-extra-dimensional models with scalars in the bulk.

  10. Dimensionless heat transfer model to compress and analyze pulsed thermography data for NDT of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Granados, Juan C.; Paez, G.; Strojnik, M.

    2008-03-01

    We develop a dimensionless heat transfer model to analyze pulsed thermography data for non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials. Simulated thermographic sequences are used in order to evaluate the performance of the inspection technique. Also, we inspect organic and inorganic samples, including a layered plate and two dental pieces, in search of internal defects and structural inhomogeneities. We detect cavities and the inner structure of the samples by means of reconstructed thermograms and a modified version of the differential absolute contrast (DAC). Moreover, we develop an effective data compression method that reduces a thermographic video with m frames of p × q pixels to two matrices of p × q elements. In this data reconstruction process, precision and compression ratio are independent parameters. Finally, we find that partial translucency of dental enamel, in infrared, permits imaging of the internal structure of a tooth. This inspection technique does not require a priori knowledge about a reference defect-free area.

  11. Mode tuning of a simplified string instrument using time-dimensionless state-derivative control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacchio, Simon; Chomette, Baptiste; Mamou-Mani, Adrien; Finel, Victor

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in smart structures, particularly in the field of musical acoustics. Control methods, initially developed to reduce vibration and damage, can be a good way to shift modal parameters of a structure in order to modify its dynamic response. This study focuses on smart musical instruments and aims to modify their radiated sound. This is achieved by controlling the modal parameters of the soundboard of a simplified string instrument. A method combining a pole placement algorithm and a time-dimensionless state-derivative control is used and quickly compared to a usual state control method. Then the effect of the mode tuning on the coupling between the string and the soundboard is experimentally studied. Controlling two vibration modes of the soundboard, its acoustic response and the damping of the third partial of the sound are modified. Finally these effects are listened in the radiated sound.

  12. Laboratory longitudinal diffusion tests: 1. Dimensionless formulations and validity of simplified solutions.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Nakajima, H; Zhang, M; Hiratsuka, T

    2008-04-28

    To obtain reliable diffusion parameters for diffusion testing, multiple experiments should not only be cross-checked but the internal consistency of each experiment should also be verified. In the through- and in-diffusion tests with solution reservoirs, test interpretation of different phases often makes use of simplified analytical solutions. This study explores the feasibility of steady, quasi-steady, equilibrium and transient-state analyses using simplified analytical solutions with respect to (i) valid conditions for each analytical solution, (ii) potential error, and (iii) experimental time. For increased generality, a series of numerical analyses are performed using unified dimensionless parameters and the results are all related to dimensionless reservoir volume (DRV) which includes only the sorptive parameter as an unknown. This means the above factors can be investigated on the basis of the sorption properties of the testing material and/or tracer. The main findings are that steady, quasi-steady and equilibrium-state analyses are applicable when the tracer is not highly sorptive. However, quasi-steady and equilibrium-state analyses become inefficient or impractical compared to steady state analysis when the tracer is non-sorbing and material porosity is significantly low. Systematic and comprehensive reformulation of analytical models enables the comparison of experimental times between different test methods. The applicability and potential error of each test interpretation can also be studied. These can be applied in designing, performing, and interpreting diffusion experiments by deducing DRV from the available information for the target material and tracer, combined with the results of this study. PMID:18355940

  13. Genes and Small RNA Transcripts Exhibit Dosage-Dependent Expression Pattern in Maize Copy-Number Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Lithio, Andrew; Dash, Sudhansu; Weber, David F; Wise, Roger; Nettleton, Dan; Peterson, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes which tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplications (<100 kb) often exhibit dosage-dependent expression, whereas large duplications (>50 Mb) are more often dosage compensated. However, little or nothing is known about expression in moderately-sized (1-50 Mb) segmental duplications, and about the response of small RNAs to dosage change. Here, we compared maize (Zea mays) plants with two, three, and four doses of a 14.6-Mb segment of chromosome 1 that contains ∼300 genes. Plants containing the duplicated segment exhibit dosage-dependent effects on ear length and flowering time. Transcriptome analyses using GeneChip and RNA-sequencing methods indicate that most expressed genes and unique small RNAs within the duplicated segments exhibit dosage-dependent transcript levels. We conclude that dosage effect is the predominant regulatory response for both genes and unique small RNA transcripts in the segmental dosage series we tested. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of small RNA expression in plant gene dosage variants. Because segmental duplications comprise a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, these findings provide important new insight into the regulation of genes and small RNAs in response to dosage changes. PMID:27129738

  14. Combined analysis of genome-wide expression and copy number profiles to identify key altered genomic regions in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of DNA copy number alterations and gene expression changes in human samples have been used to find potential target genes in complex diseases. Recent studies have combined these two types of data using different strategies, but focusing on finding gene-based relationships. However, it has been proposed that these data can be used to identify key genomic regions, which may enclose causal genes under the assumption that disease-associated gene expression changes are caused by genomic alterations. Results Following this proposal, we undertake a new integrative analysis of genome-wide expression and copy number datasets. The analysis is based on the combined location of both types of signals along the genome. Our approach takes into account the genomic location in the copy number (CN) analysis and also in the gene expression (GE) analysis. To achieve this we apply a segmentation algorithm to both types of data using paired samples. Then, we perform a correlation analysis and a frequency analysis of the gene loci in the segmented CN regions and the segmented GE regions; selecting in both cases the statistically significant loci. In this way, we find CN alterations that show strong correspondence with GE changes. We applied our method to a human dataset of 64 Glioblastoma Multiforme samples finding key loci and hotspots that correspond to major alterations previously described for this type of tumors. Conclusions Identification of key altered genomic loci constitutes a first step to find the genes that drive the alteration in a malignant state. These driver genes can be found in regions that show high correlation in copy number alterations and expression changes. PMID:23095915

  15. The number of preproghrelin mRNA expressing cells is increased in mice with activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    François, Marie; Barde, Swapnali; Achamrah, Najate; Breton, Jonathan; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Coëffier, Moïse; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2015-06-01

    Plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, are increased during conditions of chronic starvation, such as in patients with anorexia nervosa. However, it is not known whether such increase can be related to the number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach, and if chronic starvation may activate a tentative central ghrelin production. In this work, in situ hybridization technique was used to analyze the presence and number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach and the hypothalamus of mice with activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by the combination of running wheel activity with progressive, during 10 days, feeding-time restriction (FTR) and compared with sedentary FTR, ABA pair-fed (PF) and ad libitum-fed control mice. All food-restricted mice lost more than 20% of body weight. Body weight loss was similar in ABA and PF mice, but it was more pronounced than in FTR mice. Food intake was also lower in ABA than in FTR mice. Preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach were increased proportionally to the body weight loss in all food-restricted groups with the highest number in ABA mice. No preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells were detectable in the hypothalamus of either control or food-restricted mice. Thus, the increased number of gastric preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells during chronic starvation proportionally to the body weight loss and reduced food intake may underlie increased plasma ghrelin. Hyperactivity-induced anorexia appears to further increase the number of preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells in the stomach. No evidence was found for ghrelin expression in the hypothalamus, not even in any of the present experimental models. PMID:25963530

  16. Effect of passage number on cellular response to DNA-damaging agents: Cell survival and gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Liu, C.M.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    The effect of different passage numbers on plating efficiency, doubling time, cell growth, and radiation sensitivity was assessed in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Changes in gene expression after UV or {gamma}-ray irradiation at different passage numbers were also examined. The SHE cells were maintained in culture medium for up to 64 passages. Cells were exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 254-nm UV radiation. Differential display of cDNAs and northern blots were used for the study of gene expression. With increasing passage number, SHE cells demonstrated decreased doubling time, increased plating efficiency, and a decreased yield in the number of cells per plate. Between passages 41 and 48 a crisis period was evident during which time cell growth in high serum was no longer optimal, and serum concentrations were reduced to maintain cell growth. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was no different between early- and intermediate-passage cells. However, after UV exposure at low passages (passage 3), confluent cells were more sensitive to the killing effects of UV than were log-phase cells. At intermediate passages (passages 43, 48), confluent cells were slightly more radioresistant than were log-phase cells. By passage 64, however, both confluent and log-phase cells showed similar patterns of UV sensitivity. Expression of {gamma}-actin, PCNA, and p53 transcripts did not change following UV exposure. p53 mRNA was induced following {gamma}-ray exposure of the intermediate (passage 45) epithelial cells. The observed differences in radiation sensitivity associated with increasing passage number may be influenced by radiation-induced gene expression. The authors are conducted experiments to identify these genes.

  17. Leptin receptor gene expression and number in the brain are regulated by leptin level and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon E; Nogueiras, Ruben; Morris, Amanda; Tovar, Sulay; Grant, Christine; Cruickshank, Morven; Rayner, D Vernon; Dieguez, Carlos; Williams, Lynda M

    2009-07-15

    Hormone potency depends on receptor availability, regulated via gene expression and receptor trafficking. To ascertain how central leptin receptors are regulated, the effects of leptin challenge, high-fat diet, fasting and refeeding were measured on leptin receptor number and gene expression. These were measured using quantitative (125)I-labelled leptin in vitro autoradiography and in situ hybridisation, respectively. Ob-R (all forms of leptin receptor) expression in the choroid plexus (CP) was unchanged by high-fat diet or leptin challenge, whereas fasting increased but refeeding failed to decrease expression. (125)I-labelled leptin binding to the CP was increased by fasting and returned to basal levels on refeeding. (125)I-Labelled leptin was reduced by leptin challenge and increased by high-fat feeding. Ob-Rb (signalling form) in the arcuate (ARC) and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei was increased after fasting and decreased by refeeding. Leptin challenge increased Ob-Rb expression in the ARC, but not after high-fat feeding. In general, changes in gene expression in the ARC and VMH appeared to be largely due to changes in area rather than density of labelling, indicating that the number of cells expressing Ob-Rb was the parameter that contributed most to these changes. Leptin stimulation of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3), a marker of stimulation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) pathway, was unchanged after high-fat diet. Thus, early loss of leptin sensitivity after high-fat feeding is unrelated to down-regulation of leptin receptor expression or number and does not involve the JAK/STAT pathway. The effect of leptin to decrease (125)I-labelled leptin binding and the loss of ability of leptin to up-regulate Ob-Rb expression in the ARC after high-fat feeding offer potential mechanisms for the development of leptin insensitivity in response to both hyperleptinaemia and high-fat diet. PMID:19491239

  18. Expanded Numbers of Circulating Myeloid Dendritic Cells in Patent Human Filarial Infection Reflect Lower CCR1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Dembele, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Metenou, Simon; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Michel E.; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Siaka Y.; Sanogo, Dramane; Doumbia, Salif Seriba; Diallo, Abdallah A.; Traoré, Sekou F.; Klion, Amy; Nutman, Thomas B.; Mahanty, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    APC dysfunction has been postulated to mediate some of the parasite-specific T cell unresponsiveness seen in patent filarial infection. We have shown that live microfilariae of Brugia malayi induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. This study addresses whether apoptosis observed in vitro extends to patent filarial infections in humans and is reflected in the number of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs; CD11c−CD123lo) in peripheral blood of infected microfilaremic individuals. Utilizing flow cytometry to identify DC subpopulations (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs [pDCs]) based on expression of CD11c and CD123, we found a significant increase in numbers of circulating mDCs (CD11c+CD123lo) in filaria-infected individuals compared with uninfected controls from the same filaria-endemic region of Mali. Total numbers of pDCs, monocytes, and lymphocytes did not differ between the two groups. To investigate potential causes of differences in mDC numbers between the two groups, we assessed chemokine receptor expression on mDCs. Our data indicate that filaria-infected individuals had a lower percentage of circulating CCR1+ mDCs and a higher percentage of circulating CCR5+ mDCs and pDCs. Finally, live microfilariae of B. malayi were able to downregulate cell-surface expression of CCR1 on monocyte-derived DCs and diminish their calcium flux in response to stimulation by a CCR1 ligand. These findings suggest that microfilaria are capable of altering mDC migration through downregulation of expression of some chemokine receptors and their signaling functions. These observations have major implications for regulation of immune responses to these long-lived parasites. PMID:20956349

  19. Expanded numbers of circulating myeloid dendritic cells in patent human filarial infection reflect lower CCR1 expression.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Dembele, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Metenou, Simon; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Michel E; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Siaka Y; Sanogo, Dramane; Seriba Doumbia, Salif; Diallo, Abdallah A; Traoré, Sekou F; Klion, Amy; Nutman, Thomas B; Mahanty, Siddhartha

    2010-11-15

    APC dysfunction has been postulated to mediate some of the parasite-specific T cell unresponsiveness seen in patent filarial infection. We have shown that live microfilariae of Brugia malayi induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. This study addresses whether apoptosis observed in vitro extends to patent filarial infections in humans and is reflected in the number of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs; CD11c(-)CD123(lo)) in peripheral blood of infected microfilaremic individuals. Utilizing flow cytometry to identify DC subpopulations (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs [pDCs]) based on expression of CD11c and CD123, we found a significant increase in numbers of circulating mDCs (CD11c(+)CD123(lo)) in filaria-infected individuals compared with uninfected controls from the same filaria-endemic region of Mali. Total numbers of pDCs, monocytes, and lymphocytes did not differ between the two groups. To investigate potential causes of differences in mDC numbers between the two groups, we assessed chemokine receptor expression on mDCs. Our data indicate that filaria-infected individuals had a lower percentage of circulating CCR1(+) mDCs and a higher percentage of circulating CCR5(+) mDCs and pDCs. Finally, live microfilariae of B. malayi were able to downregulate cell-surface expression of CCR1 on monocyte-derived DCs and diminish their calcium flux in response to stimulation by a CCR1 ligand. These findings suggest that microfilaria are capable of altering mDC migration through downregulation of expression of some chemokine receptors and their signaling functions. These observations have major implications for regulation of immune responses to these long-lived parasites. PMID:20956349

  20. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes increases with copy number in multiple cancer types.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Qu, Hong

    2016-04-26

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process through which epithelial cells transform into mesenchymal cells. EMT-implicated genes initiate and promote cancer metastasis because mesenchymal cells have greater invasive and migration capacities than epithelial cells. In this pan-cancer analysis, we explored the relationship between gene expression changes and copy number variations (CNVs) for EMT-implicated genes. Based on curated 377 EMT-implicated genes from the literature, we identified 212 EMT-implicated genes associated with more frequent copy number gains (CNGs) than copy number losses (CNLs) using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Then by correlating these CNV data with TCGA gene expression data, we identified 71 EMT-implicated genes with concordant CNGs and gene up-regulation in 20 or more tumor samples. Of those, 14 exhibited such concordance in over 110 tumor samples. These 14 genes were predominantly apoptosis regulators, which may implies that apoptosis is critical during EMT. Moreover, the 71 genes with concordant CNG and up-regulation were largely involved in cellular functions such as phosphorylation cascade signaling. This is the first observation of concordance between CNG and up-regulation of specific genes in hundreds of samples, which may indicate that somatic CNGs activate gene expression by increasing the gene dosage. PMID:27029057

  1. SURFACE FISSURE FORMATION ABOVE UNDERGROUND COALSEAM FIRES: DIMENSIONLESS RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SURFACE FISSURES AND SUBSURFACE SUBSIDENCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, T. S.; Pollard, D. D.; Orr, F. M.

    2009-12-01

    that relationships exist between the surface displacement magnitudes and directions, and the subsurface subsidence due to coal combustion. Subsidence variables include the length, magnitude, depth and location of subsidence, as well as the weight of the overburden. Each of the four types of surface features was related to these subsurface subsidence variables using a set of dimensionless curves. The simulation results were validated with field measurements from a nearby outcrop and borehole drilling. The possibility of using InSAR data to further constrain these model results is being investigated. The simulated dimensionless curves establish a useful rules of thumb to aid the interpretation and mitigation of coal fires, since these curves can be used to relate a surface fissures aperture, an easily measurable parameter, to variables such as the magnitude of subsurface subsidence that are harder to observe

  2. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M = 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plume's axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 4/3. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path. Keywords: column number density, plume flows, outgassing, free molecule flow.

  3. On hydrologic similarity: A dimensionless flood frequency model using a generalized geomorphologic unit hydrograph and partial area runoff generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Wood, Eric F.; Beven, Keith J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the shortcomings of the original theory of the geomorphologic unit hydrograph (GUH) is that it assumes that runoff is generated uniformly from the entire catchment area. It is now recognized that in many catchments much of the runoff during storm events is produced on partial areas which usually form on narrow bands along the stream network. A storm response model that includes runoff generation on partial areas by both Hortonian and Dunne mechanisms was recently developed by the authors. In this paper a methodology for integrating this partial area runoff generation model with the GUH-based runoff routing model is presented; this leads to a generalized GUH. The generalized GUH and the storm response model are then used to estimate physically based flood frequency distributions. In most previous work the initial moisture state of the catchment had been assumed to be constant for all the storms. In this paper we relax this assumption and allow the initial moisture conditions to vary between storms. The resulting flood frequency distributions are cast in a scaled dimensionless framework where issues such as catchment scale and similarity can be conveniently addressed. A number of experiments are performed to study the sensitivity of the flood frequency response to some of the 'similarity' parameters identified in this formulation. The results indicate that one of the most important components of the derived flood frequency model relates to the specification of processes within the runoff generation model; specifically the inclusion of both saturation excess and Horton infiltration excess runoff production mechanisms. The dominance of these mechanisms over different return periods of the flood frequency distribution can significantly affect the distributional shape and confidence limits about the distribution. Comparisons with observed flood distributions seem to indicate that such mixed runoff production mechanisms influence flood distribution shape. The

  4. A dimensionless analysis of a 2DOF piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Han; Wang, Xu; John, Sabu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a dimensionless analysis method is proposed to predict the output voltage and harvested power for a 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system. This method allows us to compare the harvesting power and efficiency of the 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system and to evaluate the harvesting system performance regardless the sizes or scales. The analysis method is a hybrid of time domain simulation and frequency response analysis approaches, which would be a useful tool for parametric study, design and optimisation of a 2DOF piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. In a case study, a quarter car suspension model with a piezoelectric material insert is chosen to be studied. The 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system could potentially be applied in a vehicle to convert waste or harmful ambient vibration energy into electrical energy for charging the battery. Especially for its application in a hybrid vehicle or an electrical vehicle, the 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system could improve charge mileage, comfort and reliability.

  5. The Dimensionless Age of the Universe: A Riddle for Our Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, Arturo; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the interesting coincidence of cosmology and astrophysics that points toward a dimensionless age of the Universe H 0 t 0 that is close to one. Despite cosmic deceleration for 9 Gyr and acceleration since then, we find H 0 t 0 = 0.96 ± 0.01 for the ΛCDM model that fits SN Ia data from Pan-STARRS, CMB power spectra, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Similarly, astrophysical measures of stellar ages and the Hubble constant derived from redshifts and distances point to H 0 t ˜ 1.0 ± 0.1. The wide range of possible values for H 0 t 0 realized during cosmic evolution means that we live at what appears to be a special time. This “synchronicity problem” is not precisely the same as the usual coincidence problem, because there are combinations of ΩM and ΩΛ for which the usual coincidence problem holds but for which H 0 t 0 is not close to 1.

  6. The Speed of Cooling Fronts and the Functional Form of the Dimensionless Viscosity in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    1996-11-01

    We examine the speed of inward-traveling cooling fronts in accretion disks. We show that their speed is determined by the rarefaction wave that precedes them and is approximately αFCF(H/r)q, where αF is the dimensionless viscosity, CF is the sound speed, r is the radial coordinate, H is the disk thickness, and all quantities are evaluated at the cooling front. The scaling exponent q lies in the interval [0, 1], depending on the slope of the (T, Σ) relation in the hot state. For a Kramer's law opacity and α∝(H/r)n, where n is of order unity, we find that q ˜ 1/2. This supports the numerical work of Cannizzo, Chen, & Livio and their conclusion that n ≍ 3/2 is necessary to reproduce the exponential decay of luminosity in black hole X-ray binary systems. Our results are insensitive to the structure of the disk outside of the radius where rapid cooling sets in. In particular, the width of the rapid cooling zone is a consequence of the cooling front speed rather than its cause. We conclude that the exponential luminosity decay of cooling disks is probably compatible with the wave-driven dynamo model. It is not compatible with models with separate, constant values of α for the hot and cold states.

  7. Impulse excitation of piezoelectric bimorphs for energy harvesting: a dimensionless model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Michele

    2014-04-01

    Energy harvesting (EH) is a multidisciplinary research area, involving physics, materials science and engineering, with the objective of providing renewable sources of power sufficient to operate targeted low-power applications. Piezoelectric transducers are often used for inertial vibrational as well as direct excitation EH. However, due to the stiffness of the most common material (PZT), compact and light-weight harvesters have high resonant frequencies, making them inefficient at extracting low-frequency power from the environment. The technique of frequency up-conversion, in the form of either plucking or impulse excitation, aims to bridge this frequency gap. In this paper, the technique is modelled analytically with focus on impulse excitation via impact or shock. An analytical model is developed in a standard way starting from the Euler-Bernoulli beam equations adapted to a piezoelectric bimorph. A set of dimensionless variables and parameters is defined and a system of differential equations derived. Here the system is solved numerically for a wide range of the two group parameters present, covering piezoelectric coupling strength between PVDF and PMN-PT. One major result is that the strength of the coupling strongly affects the timescale of the process, but has only a minor effect on the total energy converted. The model can be readily adapted to different excitation profiles.

  8. The Dimensionless Age of the Universe: A Riddle for Our Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, Arturo; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the interesting coincidence of cosmology and astrophysics that points toward a dimensionless age of the Universe H 0 t 0 that is close to one. Despite cosmic deceleration for 9 Gyr and acceleration since then, we find H 0 t 0 = 0.96 ± 0.01 for the ΛCDM model that fits SN Ia data from Pan-STARRS, CMB power spectra, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Similarly, astrophysical measures of stellar ages and the Hubble constant derived from redshifts and distances point to H 0 t ∼ 1.0 ± 0.1. The wide range of possible values for H 0 t 0 realized during cosmic evolution means that we live at what appears to be a special time. This “synchronicity problem” is not precisely the same as the usual coincidence problem, because there are combinations of ΩM and ΩΛ for which the usual coincidence problem holds but for which H 0 t 0 is not close to 1.

  9. Flower-enhanced expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial respiratory protein is associated with changes in mitochondrion number.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Struck, F; Matzinger, D F; Levings, C S

    1994-01-01

    The mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein is an obligatory component of the respiratory electron transport chain that is encoded by a single-copy gene in mammals and fungi. In contrast, this protein is encoded by a small gene family in dicotyledonous tobacco and monocotyledonous maize. We cloned four cDNAs from tobacco that encode the mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein. These clones, along with a previously isolated cDNA, represent five independent members of the gene family that can be divided into three subfamilies. All of these genes were derived from the two progenitor species and were expressed in amphidiploid tobacco. The proteins encoded by these five genes are probably functional because they all contain the universally conserved hexyl peptides necessary for the 2Fe-2S cluster formation. The expression of the Rieske protein gene family is differentially regulated; a 6- to 11-fold higher level of steady state transcripts was found in flowers than in leaves, stems, and roots. Members of at least two subfamilies were preferentially expressed in flowers, indicating that they share a common cis-regulatory element(s), which can respond to a flower-specific signal(s). Although approximately 10 times more transcripts occurred in flowers than in leaves, flower and leaf mitochondria contained a similar amount of the Rieske protein. Flowers, however, contained seven times more Rieske proteins than leaves. These results indicated an increase in mitochondrion number in flowers. High-energy demands during anther development might bring about an increase in mitochondrion numbers in flowers and the flower-enhanced expression of the Rieske protein gene family. Our results suggested that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory proteins could sense and respond to changes in energy metabolism and/or changes in mitochondrion numbers. PMID:8180500

  10. Tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) nuclear transgenics with high copy number can express NPTII driven by the chloroplast psbA promoter.

    PubMed

    Ye, G N; Pang, S Z; Sanford, J C

    1996-03-01

    A chloroplast expression vector containing the NPTII gene under the control of apsbA promoter (psbA-NPTII) was constructed, and was biolistically delivered into both suspension cells and leaf strips of tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum). Analyses of subsequently recovered kanamycin-resistant transgenic plants indicate that the psbA-NPTII gene was not located in the chloroplast, but was in the nucleus in very high copy number. This conclusion was based upon results from: (1) Southern hybridization analyses of chloroplast and nuclear DNAs using NPTII, chloroplast-marker, and nuclear-marker probes; (2) pulse-field gel electrophoresis; and (3) kanamycin screening of sexual progenies. This study suggests that the nuclear expression of the NPTII gene may have been associated with many copies of the psbA-NPTII construction. Very high copy number in the nucleus might either allow NPTII expression from the otherwise inadequate psbA promoter, or might increase the chance of recombining with upstream tobacco regulatory sequences. PMID:24178457

  11. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plumes axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 43. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path.

  12. Multiplex titration RT-PCR: rapid determination of gene expression patterns for a large number of genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nebenfuhr, A.; Lomax, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an improved method for determination of gene expression levels with RT-PCR. The procedure is rapid and does not require extensive optimization or densitometric analysis. Since the detection of individual transcripts is PCR-based, small amounts of tissue samples are sufficient for the analysis of expression patterns in large gene families. Using this method, we were able to rapidly screen nine members of the Aux/IAA family of auxin-responsive genes and identify those genes which vary in message abundance in a tissue- and light-specific manner. While not offering the accuracy of conventional semi-quantitative or competitive RT-PCR, our method allows quick screening of large numbers of genes in a wide range of RNA samples with just a thermal cycler and standard gel analysis equipment.

  13. Parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y expressing hippocampal GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuron numbers decline in a model of Gulf War illness

    PubMed Central

    Megahed, Tarick; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 (PGW-1) are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS) in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for 4 weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI. PMID:25620912

  14. A parametric study of wind chill equivalent temperatures by a dimensionless steady-state analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    A first order analytical approximation of steady-state heat conduction in a hollow cylinder exchanging heat at its external surface by convection with a cold and windy environment is presented. The model depicts the thermal behavior of certain body elements, e.g., head/face, when exposed to such environments. The results are presented by dimensionless parameters and facilitate the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs). The effects of several variables on determining WCETs were studied using specific examples, leading to the following generalizations: (1) the conditions assumed for "calm" wind speed appear to be a dominant factor in determining WCET; (2) the effects, on both (skin) surface temperature and on WCET, of a 1°C change in environmental temperature appear to be more pronounced than those of a 1 m/s change in wind speed; (3) similarly, predicted WCETs are more sensitive to the geometrical dimensions assumed for the modeled entity than they are to wind speeds; and (4) tissue thermal conductivity, the angle at which the convective heat transfer coefficient is measured relative to wind direction, and the factor used to establish "effective" wind speeds in the domain occupied by humans relative to reported values, all seem to have relatively small effects on the determination of WCET. These conclusions strongly suggest, among other things, that for any given combination of environmental conditions, wind chill indices may best be presented as ranges rather than as single values. This seems to apply even when worst-case scenarios are considered. Also emphasized is the need for careful and realistic selection of all the parameter values used in the determination of WCETs.

  15. Measurement of the dimensionless extinction coefficient of soot within laminar diffusion flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Jensen, Kirk A.

    2005-01-01

    The dimensionless extinction coefficient (K{sub e}) of soot must be known to quantify laser extinction measurements of soot concentration and to predict optical attenuation through smoke clouds. Previous investigations have measured K{sub e} for post-flame soot emitted from laminar and turbulent diffusion flames and smoking laminar premixed flames. This paper presents the first measurements of soot K{sub e} from within laminar diffusion flames, using a small extractive probe to withdraw the soot from the flame. To measure K{sub e}, two laser sources (635 nm and 1310 nm) were coupled to a transmission cell, followed by gravimetric sampling. Coannular diffusion flames of methane, ethylene and nitrogen-diluted kerosene burning in air were studied, together with slot flames of methane and ethylene. K{sub e} was measured at the radial location of maximum soot volume fraction at several heights for each flame. Results for K{sub e} at both 635 nm and 1310 nm for ethylene and kerosene coannular flames were in the range of 9-10, consistent with the results from previous studies of post-flame soot. The ethylene slot flame and the methane flames have lower K{sub e} values, in some cases as low as 2.0. These lower values of K{sub e} are found to result from the contributions of (a) the condensation of PAH species during the sampling of soot, (b) the wavelength-dependent absorptivity of soot precursor particles, and, in the case of methane, (c) the negligible contribution of soot scattering to the extinction coefficient. RDG calculations of soot scattering, in combination with the measured K{sub e} values, imply that the soot refractive index is in the vicinity of 1.75-1.03i at 635 nm.

  16. The effect of visitor number and spice provisioning in pacing expression by jaguars evaluated through a case study.

    PubMed

    Vidal, L S; Guilherme, F R; Silva, V F; Faccio, M C S R; Martins, M M; Briani, D C

    2016-06-01

    Captive animals exhibit stereotypic pacing in response to multiple causes, including the inability to escape from human contact. Environmental enrichment techniques can minimize pacing expression. By using an individual-based approach, we addressed whether the amount of time two males and a female jaguar (Panthera onca) devote to pacing varied with the number of visitors and tested the effectiveness of cinnamon and black pepper in reducing pacing. The amount of time that all jaguars engaged in pacing increased significantly with the number of visitors. Despite the difference between the males regarding age and housing conditions, both devoted significantly less time to pacing following the addition of both spices, which indicates their suitability as enrichment techniques. Mean time devoted to pacing among the treatments did not differ for the female. Our findings pointed out to the validity of individual-based approaches, as they can reveal how suitable olfactory stimuli are to minimizing stereotypies irrespective of particular traits. PMID:26959957

  17. Chronic Hypoxemia in Late Gestation Decreases Cardiomyocyte Number but Does Not Change Expression of Hypoxia‐Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Botting, Kimberley J.; McMillen, I. Caroline; Forbes, Heather; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placental insufficiency is the leading cause of intrauterine growth restriction in the developed world and results in chronic hypoxemia in the fetus. Oxygen is essential for fetal heart development, but a hypoxemic environment in utero can permanently alter development of cardiomyocytes. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of placental restriction and chronic hypoxemia on total number of cardiomyocytes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, total length of coronary capillaries, and expression of genes regulated by hypoxia. Methods and Results We induced experimental placental restriction from conception, which resulted in fetal growth restriction and chronic hypoxemia. Fetal hearts in the placental restriction group had fewer cardiomyocytes, but interestingly, there was no difference in the percentage of apoptotic cardiomyocytes; the abundance of the transcription factor that mediates hypoxia‐induced apoptosis, p53; or expression of apoptotic genes Bax and Bcl2. Likewise, there was no difference in the abundance of autophagy regulator beclin 1 or expression of autophagic genes BECN1, BNIP3, LAMP1, and MAP1LC3B. Furthermore, fetuses exposed to normoxemia (control) or chronic hypoxemia (placental restriction) had similar mRNA expression of a suite of hypoxia‐inducible factor target genes, which are essential for angiogenesis (VEGF, Flt1, Ang1, Ang2, and Tie2), vasodilation (iNOS and Adm), and glycolysis (GLUT1 and GLUT3). In addition, there was no change in the expression of PKC‐ε, a cardioprotective gene with transcription regulated by hypoxia in a manner independent of hypoxia‐inducible factors. There was an increased capillary length density but no difference in the total length of capillaries in the hearts of the chronically hypoxemic fetuses. Conclusion The lack of upregulation of hypoxia target genes in response to chronic hypoxemia in the fetal heart in late gestation may be due to a decrease in the number of cardiomyocytes (decreased

  18. CYP2C9 Promoter Variable Number Tandem Repeat Polymorphism Regulates mRNA Expression in Human Livers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaochun; Gong, Yan; Gawronski, Brian E.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Shahin, Mohamed Hossam A.; Khalifa, Sherief I.; Johnson, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    CYP2C9 is involved in metabolism of nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Coding region polymorphisms CYP2C9*2 and *3 contribute to interperson variability in drug dosage and clinical outcomes, whereas the role of a regulatory polymorphism remains uncertain. Measuring allelic RNA expression in 87 human liver samples, combined with genotyping, sequencing, and reporter gene assays, we identified a promoter variable number tandem repeat polymorphism (pVNTR) that fully accounted for allelic CYP2C9 mRNA expression differences. Present in three different variant forms [short (pVNTR-S), medium (pVNTR-M), and long (pVNTR-L)], only the pVNTR-S allele reduced the CYP2C9 mRNA level compared with the pVNTR-M (reference) allele. pVNTR-S is in linkage disequilibrium with *3, with linkage disequilibrium r2 of 0.53 to 0.75 in different populations. In patients who were taking a maintenance dose of warfarin, the mean warfarin dose was associated with the copies of pVNTR-S (p = 0.0001). However, in multivariate regression models that included the CYP2C9*3, pVNTR-S was no longer a significant predictor of the warfarin dose (p = 0.60). These results indicate that although pVNTR-S reduced CYP2C9 mRNA expression, the in vivo effects of pVNTR-S on warfarin metabolism cannot be separated from the effects of *3. Therefore, it is not necessary to consider pVNTR-S as an additional biomarker for warfarin dosing. Larger clinical studies are needed to define whether the pVNTR-S has a minimal effect in vivo, or whether the effect attributed to *3 is really a combination of effects on expression by the pVNTR-S along with effects on catalytic activity from the nonsynonymous *3 variant. PMID:22289258

  19. Two problems for the Solar Orbiter investigations of coronal transients: dimensionless scaling and topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, I.

    Two unsolved problems are addressed in this paper. 1)Simultaneous stereoscopic observations using the Solar Orbiter in combination with other vantage points from Earth and space would give an opportunity to clarify the origins of "problem storms", i.e. strong coronal mass ejections and sufficiently powerful geomagnetic perturbations without appreciable solar flares. At present time, it is not clear if "problem storms" arise because we do not see the opposite side of the Sun or because of specific physical properties of the energy releases in these cases when the available free energy in the solar atmosphere was erupted mostly with the ejection of mass from the solar corona without noticeable electromagnetic emissions in the white light, UV and X-rays ("dark" ejection). Theoretically, both cases are delimited by the dimensionless Ve parameter (kinetic energy/electromagnetic emission ratio), but this important quantity is not well known. What is the value of this governing parameter? 2)There are two different types of plasma motions during transients: flows along the magnetic field and electric drifts across this field. It is often assumed (but not proven) by many authors after T.G.Cowling, that electric fields are negligible and plasma can flow only along magnetic field lines. According to this view, the "opening" of the magnetic configuration ("reconnection") is a necessary ingredient of the coronal mass ejection (and flare) initiation process. On the other hand, laboratory plasma experiments, observations of the solar wind, manetospheric plasma motions and other astrophysical flows, pioneering works by H. Alfven and other theoretical investigations demonstrate the principal role of electric fields in the cosmic plasma dynamics both in open and closed magnetic field configurations. Non-potential inductive electric fields should be especially strong during the fast increase of the magnetic flux in the rapidly developing active regions and coronal holes. These

  20. Structure and Expression of Class II Defective Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes Encoding Infected Cell Polypeptide Number 8

    PubMed Central

    Locker, Hilla; Frenkel, Niza; Halliburton, Ian

    1982-01-01

    Defective genomes present in serially passaged virus stocks derived from the tsLB2 mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 were found to consist of repeat units in which sequences from the UL region, within map coordinates 0.356 and 0.429 of standard herpes simplex virus DNA, were covalently linked to sequences from the end of the S component. The major defective genome species consisted of repeat units which were 4.9 × 106 in molecular weight and contained a specific deletion within the UL segment. These tsLB2 defective genomes were stable through more than 35 sequential virus passages. The ratios of defective virus genomes to helper virus genomes present in different passages fluctuated in synchrony with the capacity of the passages to interfere with standard virus replication. Cells infected with passages enriched for defective genomes overproduced the infected cell polypeptide number 8, which had previously been mapped within the UL sequences present in the tsLB2 defective genomes. In contrast, the synthesis of most other infected cell polypeptides was delayed and reduced. The abundant synthesis of infected cell polypeptide number 8 followed the β regulatory pattern, as evident from kinetic studies and from experiments in which cycloheximide, canavanine, and phosphonoacetate were used. However, in contrast to many β (early) and γ (late) viral polypeptides, the synthesis of infected cell polypeptide number 8 was only minimally reduced when cells infected with serially passaged tsLB2 were incubated at 39°C. The tsLB2 mutation had previously been mapped within the domains of the gene encoding infected cell polypeptide number 4, the function of which was shown to be required for β and γ viral gene expression. It is thus possible that the tsLB2 mutation affects the synthesis of only a subset of the β and γ viral polypeptides. An additional polypeptide, 74.5 × 103 in molecular weight, was abundantly produced in cells infected with a number of tsLB2 passages

  1. Transcription attenuation-mediated control of leu operon expression: influence of the number of Leu control codons.

    PubMed Central

    Bartkus, J M; Tyler, B; Calvo, J M

    1991-01-01

    Four adjacent Leu codons within the leu leader RNA are critically important in transcription attenuation-mediated control of leu operon expression in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli (P. W. Carter, D. L. Weiss, H. L. Weith, and J. M. Calvo, J. Bacteriol. 162:943-949, 1985). The leader region from S. typhimurium was altered by site-directed mutagenesis to produce constructs having between one and seven adjacent Leu codons, all CUA. leu operon expression was measured in strains containing six of these constructs, each integrated into the chromosome in a single copy. Operon expression was sufficiently high that all strains grew in minimal medium unsupplemented by leucine. Expression of the operon was measured in strains cultured in such a way that their growth was limited by the intracellular concentration of either leucine or of leucyl-tRNA. In general, the leu operon for each construct responded similarly to the parent construct in terms of the degree of expression as a function of the degree of limitation. However, a strain containing (CUA)1 and, to a certain extent, a strain having (CUA)2 responded somewhat more sluggishly and strains containing (CUA)6 and (CUA)7 responded more sensitively to limitations than did the parent construct. In addition, DNA fragments containing the leu promoter and leader region were used as templates in in vitro transcription reactions employing purified RNA polymerase. With nucleoside triphosphate concentrations of 200 microM, RNA polymerase paused during transcription of the leu leader region at a site about 95 bp downstream from the site of transcription initiation. The halftimes of the pause were 1 min at 37 degrees C and 3 min at 22 degrees C. The pause was lengthened substantially when the GTP concentration was lowered to 20 micromoles. Our results are interpreted most easily in terms of an all-or-none model. Given two Leu control codons, the operon responds with nearly maximum output over a wide range of leucine

  2. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Nicholas J.; Smirnov, Ivan; Yu, Mamie; Hariono, Sujatmi; Silber, Joachim; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors, genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  3. Reassessment of the number of auxiliary genes essential for expression of high-level methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    de Lencastre, H; Tomasz, A

    1994-01-01

    A new transposon library constructed in the background of the highly and homogeneously methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain COL yielded 70 independent insertional mutants with reduced levels of antibiotic resistance. Restriction analysis with HindIII, EcoRV, EcoRI, and PstI and then Southern hybridization with probes for the transposon and for the femA-femB gene demonstrated that 41 of the 70 Tn551 mutants carried distinct and novel, as yet undescribed insertion sites, all of which were outside of the mecA gene and were also outside the already-characterized auxiliary genes femA, femB, femC, and femD. All previously described Tn551 mutations of this type were in genes located either on SmaI fragment A or SmaI fragment I. In contrast, inserts of the new library were located in 7 of the 16 SmaI chromosomal fragments, fragments A, B, C, D, E, F, and I. In all of the mutants, expression of methicillin resistance became heterogeneous, and the MIC for the majority of cells was reduced (1.5 to 200 micrograms ml-1) from the homogeneous methicillin MIC (1,600 micrograms ml-1) of the parental cells. Although identification of the exact number of genes inactivated through the new set of transposon inserts will require cloning and sequencing, a rough estimate of this number from mapping data suggests a minimum of at least 10 to 12 new genetic determinants, all of which are needed together with femA, femB, femC, and femD for the optimal expression of methicillin resistance. Images PMID:7872753

  4. A Common and Unstable Copy Number Variant Is Associated with Differences in Glo1 Expression and Anxiety-Like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard; Lim, Jackie E.; Harr, Bettina; Wing, Claudia; Walters, Ryan; Distler, Margaret G.; Teschke, Meike; Wu, Chunlei; Wiltshire, Tim; Su, Andrew I.; Sokoloff, Greta; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Borevitz, Justin O.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2009-01-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) has been implicated in anxiety-like behavior in mice and in multiple psychiatric diseases in humans. We used mouse Affymetrix exon arrays to detect copy number variants (CNV) among inbred mouse strains and thereby identified a ∼475 kb tandem duplication on chromosome 17 that includes Glo1 (30,174,390–30,651,226 Mb; mouse genome build 36). We developed a PCR-based strategy and used it to detect this duplication in 23 of 71 inbred strains tested, and in various outbred and wild-caught mice. Presence of the duplication is associated with a cis-acting expression QTL for Glo1 (LOD>30) in BXD recombinant inbred strains. However, evidence for an eQTL for Glo1 was not obtained when we analyzed single SNPs or 3-SNP haplotypes in a panel of 27 inbred strains. We conclude that association analysis in the inbred strain panel failed to detect an eQTL because the duplication was present on multiple highly divergent haplotypes. Furthermore, we suggest that non-allelic homologous recombination has led to multiple reversions to the non-duplicated state among inbred strains. We show associations between multiple duplication-containing haplotypes, Glo1 expression and anxiety-like behavior in both inbred strain panels and outbred CD-1 mice. Our findings provide a molecular basis for differential expression of Glo1 and further implicate Glo1 in anxiety-like behavior. More broadly, these results identify problems with commonly employed tests for association in inbred strains when CNVs are present. Finally, these data provide an example of biologically significant phenotypic variability in model organisms that can be attributed to CNVs. PMID:19266052

  5. Differential viral levels and immune gene expression in three stocks of Apis mellifera induced by different numbers of Varroa destructor.

    PubMed

    Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; de Guzman, Lilia I; Tarver, Matthew R; Rinderer, Thomas E; Chen, Yanping; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2015-01-01

    The viral levels and immune responses of Italian honey bees (IHB), Russian honey bees (RHB) and an outcross of Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees (POL) deliberately infested with one or two foundress Varroa were compared. We found that the Deformed wing virus (DWV) level in IHB inoculated with one or two foundress Varroa increased to about 10(3) or 10(5) fold the levels of their uninfested brood. In contrast, POL (10(2) or 10(4) fold) and RHB (10(2) or l0(4) fold) supported a lower increase in DWV levels. The feeding of different stages of Varroa nymphs did not increase DWV levels of their pupal hosts. Analyses of their corresponding Varroa mites showed the same trends: two foundress Varroa yielded higher DWV levels than one foundress, and the addition of nymphs did not increase viral levels. Using the same pupae examined for the presence of viruses, 16 out of 24 genes evaluated showed significant differential mRNA expression levels among the three honey bee stocks. However, only four genes (Defensin, Dscam, PPOact and spaetzle), which were expressed at similar levels in uninfested pupae, were altered by the number of feeding foundress Varroa and levels of DWV regardless of stocks. This research provides the first evidence that immune response profiles of different honey bee stocks are induced by Varroa parasitism. PMID:25456452

  6. Human GPR42 is a transcribed multisite variant that exhibits copy number polymorphism and is functional when heterologously expressed

    PubMed Central

    Puhl III, Henry L.; Won, Yu-Jin; Lu, Van B.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    FFAR3 (GPR41) is a G-protein coupled receptor for which short-chain fatty acids serve as endogenous ligands. The receptor is found on gut enteroendocrine L-cells, pancreatic β-cells, and sympathetic neurons, and is implicated in obesity, diabetes, allergic airway disease, and altered immune function. In primates, FFAR3 is segmentally duplicated resulting in GPR42, a gene currently classified as a suspected pseudogene. In this study, we sequenced FFAR3 and GPR42 open reading frames from 56 individuals and found an unexpectedly high frequency of polymorphisms contributing to several complex haplotypes. We also identified a frequent (18.8%) structural variation that results in GPR42 copy number polymorphism. Finally, sequencing revealed that 50.6% of GPR42 haplotypes differed from FFAR3 by only a single non-synonymous substitution and that the GPR42 reference sequence matched only 4.4% of the alleles. Sequencing of cDNA from human sympathetic ganglia and colon revealed processed transcripts matching the GPR42 genotype. Expression of several GPR42 haplotypes in rat sympathetic neurons revealed diverse pharmacological phenotypes that differed in potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that GPR42 be reclassified as a functioning gene and that recognition of sequence and copy number polymorphism of the FFAR3/GPR42 complex be considered during genetic and pharmacological investigation of these receptors. PMID:26260360

  7. Human GPR42 is a transcribed multisite variant that exhibits copy number polymorphism and is functional when heterologously expressed.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Henry L; Won, Yu-Jin; Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    FFAR3 (GPR41) is a G-protein coupled receptor for which short-chain fatty acids serve as endogenous ligands. The receptor is found on gut enteroendocrine L-cells, pancreatic β-cells, and sympathetic neurons, and is implicated in obesity, diabetes, allergic airway disease, and altered immune function. In primates, FFAR3 is segmentally duplicated resulting in GPR42, a gene currently classified as a suspected pseudogene. In this study, we sequenced FFAR3 and GPR42 open reading frames from 56 individuals and found an unexpectedly high frequency of polymorphisms contributing to several complex haplotypes. We also identified a frequent (18.8%) structural variation that results in GPR42 copy number polymorphism. Finally, sequencing revealed that 50.6% of GPR42 haplotypes differed from FFAR3 by only a single non-synonymous substitution and that the GPR42 reference sequence matched only 4.4% of the alleles. Sequencing of cDNA from human sympathetic ganglia and colon revealed processed transcripts matching the GPR42 genotype. Expression of several GPR42 haplotypes in rat sympathetic neurons revealed diverse pharmacological phenotypes that differed in potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that GPR42 be reclassified as a functioning gene and that recognition of sequence and copy number polymorphism of the FFAR3/GPR42 complex be considered during genetic and pharmacological investigation of these receptors. PMID:26260360

  8. Angiotensin-(1-7) suppresses the number and function of the circulating fibrocytes by upregulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kan; Hu, Xiaosheng; Du, Changqing; Tu, Shike; Zhang, Furong; Xie, Xudong

    2012-06-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting that circulating fibrocytes (CFs) play a pivotal role in tissue repair and fibrosis. In contrast, in recent studies, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] has been shown to antagonize fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to examine the direct effect of Ang-(1-7) on CFs. Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from peripheral blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy, CFs were identified as adherent cells that stained positive for both CD34 and collagen-I. After 14 days of culture, CFs were stimulated with Ang-(1-7) at concentrations of 10 nM, 100 nM, 1 μM or 10 μM, in the absence and presence of pretreatment with A-779, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or both, for 24, 48 or 72 h. The number of cells, cellular proliferation, and level of apoptosis were determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8) assay and the annexin V/propidium iodide binding assay, respectively. The collagen content of CFs was measured by the concentration of hydroxyproline, which was detected using the enzymatic digestion method. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was assayed by western Blot analysis, while nitric oxide (NO) generation was detected using the Griess method. We found that Ang-(1-7) increases apoptosis and eNOS/NO production in CFs. In addition, Ang-(1-7) decreases the number, proliferative capacity and collagen-secretion of CFs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These data suggest that Ang-(1-7) suppresses the both the number and function of CFs possibly by increasing eNOS/NO production in the CFs. PMID:22456996

  9. Identifying a Superfluid Reynolds Number via Dynamical Similarity.

    PubMed

    Reeves, M T; Billam, T P; Anderson, B P; Bradley, A S

    2015-04-17

    The Reynolds number provides a characterization of the transition to turbulent flow, with wide application in classical fluid dynamics. Identifying such a parameter in superfluid systems is challenging due to their fundamentally inviscid nature. Performing a systematic study of superfluid cylinder wakes in two dimensions, we observe dynamical similarity of the frequency of vortex shedding by a cylindrical obstacle. The universality of the turbulent wake dynamics is revealed by expressing shedding frequencies in terms of an appropriately defined superfluid Reynolds number, Re(s), that accounts for the breakdown of superfluid flow through quantum vortex shedding. For large obstacles, the dimensionless shedding frequency exhibits a universal form that is well-fitted by a classical empirical relation. In this regime the transition to turbulence occurs at Re(s)≈0.7, irrespective of obstacle width. PMID:25933320

  10. A Coursewriter II Function (FCALC) For the Manipulation of Numerical and Algebraic Expressions. Systems Memo Number One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Authella; And Others

    Documentation of the Coursewriter II Function FCALC is provided. The function is designed for use on the IBM 1500 instructional system and has three major applications: 1) comparison of a numeric expression in buffer 5 with a numeric expression in buffer 0; 2) comparison of an algebraic expression in buffer 5 with an algebraic expression in buffer…

  11. Summary of dimensionless Texas hyetographs and distribution of storm depth developed for Texas Department of Transportation research project 0–4194

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Thompson, David B.; Cleveland, Theodore G.; Fang, Xing

    2005-01-01

    Hyetographs and storm depth distributions are important elements of hydraulic design by Texas Department of Transportation engineers. Design hyetographs are used in conjunction with unit hydrographs to obtain peak discharge and hydrograph shape for hydraulic design. Storm-depth distributions can be used to assess the probability of a total rainfall depth for a storm. A research project from 2000–2004 has been conducted to (1) determine if existing Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) dimensionless hyetographs are representative of storms in Texas, (2) provide new procedures for dimensionless hyetograph estimation if the NRCS hyetographs are not representative, and (3) provide a procedure to estimate the distribution of storm depth for Texas. This report summarizes the research activities and results of the research project. The report documents several functional models of dimensionless hyetographs and provides curves and tabulated ordinates of empirical (nonfunctional) dimensionless hyetographs for a database of runoff-producing storms in Texas. The dimensionless hyetographs are compared to the NRCS dimensionless hyetographs. The distribution of storm depth is documented for seven values of minimum interevent time through dimensionless frequency curves and tables of mean storm depth for each county in Texas. Conclusions regarding application of the research results are included in the report.

  12. Risk stratification of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia patients based on gene expression, mutations and copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Mirji, Gauri; Bhat, Jaydeep; Kode, Jyoti; Banavali, Shripad; Sengar, Manju; Khadke, Prashant; Sait, Osama; Chiplunkar, Shubhada

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression, copy number variations (CNV), mutations and survival were studied to delineate TCRγδ+T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a distinct subgroup from TCRαβ+T-ALL. Gene Ontology analysis showed that differential regulation of genes involved in pathways for leukemogenesis, apoptosis, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and antigen processing/presentation may offer a survival benefit to TCRγδ+T-ALL patients. Genes involved in disease biology and having equal expression in both the subgroups, were further analysed for mutations and CNV using droplet digital PCR. TCRγδ+T-ALL patients exhibited differential level of mutations for NOTCH1 and IKZF3; however BRAF mutations were detected at equal levels in both the subgroups. Although TCRγδ+T-ALL patients with these mutations demonstrated improved disease-free survival (DFS) as compared TCRαβ+T-ALL patients, it was not statistically significant. Patients with homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/CDKN2B showed poor DFS in each subgroup. TCRγδ+T-ALL patients with wild type/heterozygous deletion of CDKN2A/CDKN2B possess significantly better DFS over TCRαβ+T-ALL patients (p=0.017 and 0.045, respectively). Thus, the present study has for the first time demonstrated TCRγδ clonality and CDKN2A/CDKN2B CNV together as potential prognostic markers in management of T-ALL. Further understanding the functional significance of differentially regulated genes in T-ALL patients would aid in designing risk based treatment strategies in subset specific manner. PMID:27070758

  13. Prohibitin Expression Deregulation in Gastric Cancer Is Associated with the 3′ Untranslated Region 1630 C>T Polymorphism and Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Mazzotti, Tatiane Katsue Furuya; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Demachki, Samia; Martinez, Margarita Cortes; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Chammas, Roger; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    PHB is a reported oncogene and tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. Here, we evaluated whether the PHB copy number and the rs6917 polymorphism affect its expression in gastric cancer. Down-regulation and up-regulation of PHB were observed in the evaluated tumors. Reduced expression was associated with tumor dedifferentiation and cancer initiation. The T allele of the rs6917 polymorphism was associated with reduced PHB mRNA levels. Moreover, the up-regulation of PHB appeared to be regulated by the gain of additional gene copies. Thus, PHB copy number variation and differential expression of the rs6917 polymorphism may play a role in PHB transcriptional regulation. PMID:24879411

  14. Prohibitin expression deregulation in gastric cancer is associated with the 3' untranslated region 1630 C>T polymorphism and copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Mazzotti, Tatiane Katsue Furuya; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Demachki, Samia; Martinez, Margarita Cortes; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Chammas, Roger; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    PHB is a reported oncogene and tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. Here, we evaluated whether the PHB copy number and the rs6917 polymorphism affect its expression in gastric cancer. Down-regulation and up-regulation of PHB were observed in the evaluated tumors. Reduced expression was associated with tumor dedifferentiation and cancer initiation. The T allele of the rs6917 polymorphism was associated with reduced PHB mRNA levels. Moreover, the up-regulation of PHB appeared to be regulated by the gain of additional gene copies. Thus, PHB copy number variation and differential expression of the rs6917 polymorphism may play a role in PHB transcriptional regulation. PMID:24879411

  15. Improving bulk C n2 models for over-ocean applications through new determinations of the dimensionless temperature structure parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Paul A.; Hammel, Stephen; Tsintikidis, Dimitri

    2007-09-01

    The performance of imaging and laser systems can be severely degraded by atmospheric turbulence, especially for near-horizon propagation paths. Having the ability to predict turbulence effects from relatively easily obtained measurements can be useful for system design and feasibility studies, and for real-time optimization of optical systems for the current environment. For this reason, so-called 'bulk' models have been developed that can estimate turbulence effects through the refractive index structure parameter (C n2) from mean near-surface meteorological and sea surface temperature measurements. Bulk C n2 models are directly dependent upon empirically determined dimensionless functions, known as the dimensionless structure parameter functions for temperature and humidity. In this paper we attempt to improve bulk optical turbulence model performance by determining new over-ocean forms for the dimensionless temperature structure parameter (ƒ T). During 2005-2006 atmospheric propagation experiments were conducted in the Zuniga Shoals area near San Diego to examine the impact of environmental conditions on low-altitude electro-optical propagation above the ocean surface. As part of this experiment the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) deployed its flux research buoy along the propagation path. The measurements obtained on the NPS buoy enabled ƒ T values to be obtained and new functions to be determined. These new functions differ greatly from those presented in the past, in that the new ƒ T values asymptote towards very high values as the stability approaches neutrality. The dependence of the new ƒ T function on the stability parameter in stable conditions was also different from that previously proposed. When these new functions were inserted into the NPS bulk C n2 model, the resulting values agreed much better with directly measured turbulent C n2 values in unstable conditions, but in stable conditions the new function actually made the agreement worse.

  16. Detailed gene copy number and RNA expression analysis of the 17q12-23 region in primary breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Willis, Simon; Hutchins, Anne-Marie; Hammet, Fleur; Ciciulla, John; Soo, Wee-Kheng; White, David; van der Spek, Peter; Henderson, Michael A; Gish, Kurt; Venter, Deon J; Armes, Jane E

    2003-04-01

    Chromosome region 17q12-23 commonly shows an increase in DNA copy number in breast cancers, suggesting that several oncogenes are located at this site. We performed a high-resolution expression array and comparative genomic hybridization analysis of genes mapped to the entire 17q12-23 region, to identify novel candidate oncogenes. We identified 24 genes that showed significant overexpression in breast cancers with gain of 17q12-23, compared to cancers without gain. These genes included previously identified oncogenes, together with several novel candidate oncogenes. FISH analysis using specific gene probes hybridized to tissue arrays confirmed the underlying amplification of overexpressed genes. This high-resolution analysis of the 17q12-23 region indicates that several established and novel candidate oncogenes, including a Wnt-signaling pathway member, are amplified and overexpressed within individual primary breast cancer samples. We were also able to confirm the presence of two apparently separate and reciprocally amplified groups of genes within this region. Investigation of these genes and their functional interactions will facilitate our understanding of breast oncogenesis and optimal management of this disease. PMID:12619162

  17. Flavonoid genes in petunia: addition of a limited number of gene copies may lead to a suppression of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    van der Krol, A R; Mur, L A; Beld, M; Mol, J N; Stuitje, A R

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of increased expression of genes involved in flower pigmentation, additional dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) or chalcone synthase (CHS) genes were transferred to petunia. In most transformants, the increased expression had no measurable effect on floral pigmentation. Surprisingly, however, in up to 25% of the transformants, a reduced floral pigmentation, accompanied by a dramatic reduction of DFR or CHS gene expression, respectively, was observed. This phenomenon was obtained with both chimeric gene constructs and intact CHS genomic clones. The reduction in gene expression was independent of the promoter driving transcription of the transgene and involved both the endogenous gene and the homologous transgene. The gene-specific collapse in expression was obtained even after introduction of only a single gene copy. The similarity between the sense transformants and regulatory CHS mutants suggests that this mechanism of gene silencing may operate in naturally occurring regulatory circuits. PMID:2152117

  18. De-methylation of displacement loop of mitochondrial DNA is associated with increased mitochondrial copy number and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide subunit 2 expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinhang; Wen, Shilei; Zhou, Hongying; Feng, Shi

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation occurs in the displacement loop (D-loop) region of mammals; however, D-loop regions of certain tumor tissue types were found to be de‑methylated. Whether hypomethylation of the D‑loop region is involved in the regulation of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide subunit 2 (ND‑2) expressions in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. In the present study, the association between methylation status of the D‑loop region, mtDNA copy number and ND‑2 expression was investigated in 65 colorectal cancer specimens and their corresponding non‑cancerous tissues. In addition, a de‑methylation experiment was performed on the Caco‑2 colorectal cancer cell line by using 5‑aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5‑Aza). The methylation rate of the D‑loop region in all 65 colorectal cancer tissues was markedly reduced when compared with that of their corresponding non‑cancerous tissues (13.8 vs. 81.5%; P<0.05). Furthermore, the methylation rate of the D‑loop region in colorectal cancer tissues was markedly decreased in clinicopathological stages III and IV compared with that in clinicopathological stages I and II (7.1 and 0% vs. 25 and 16%; P<0.05). In addition, the mean relative mtDNA copy number and ND‑2 expression in colorectal cancer tissues were increased compared with those in the corresponding non‑cancerous tissues. De‑methylation of the D‑loop region was associated with an elevated mtDNA copy number and an increased ND‑2 expression. Furthermore, the mtDNA copy number and ND‑2 expression in Caco‑2 cells were significantly increased after 5‑Aza treatment. In conclusion, de‑methylation of the D‑loop region is likely to be involved in the regulation of the mtDNA copy number and ND-2 expression. PMID:26323487

  19. Development of Dimensionless Surge Response Functions for Hazard Assessment at Panama City, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. R.; Irish, J. L.; Hagen, S. C.; Kaihatu, J. M.; McLaughlin, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    Reliable and robust methods of extreme value analysis in hurricane surge forecasting are of high importance in the coastal engineering profession. The Joint Probability Method (JPM) has become the preferred statistical method over the Historical Surge Population (HSP) method, due to its ability to give more accurate surge predictions, as demonstrated by Irish et. al in 2011 (J. Geophys. Res.). One disadvantage to this method is its high computational cost; a single location can require hundreds of simulated storms, each needing one thousand computational hours or more to complete. One way of overcoming this issue is to use an interpolating function, called a surge response function, to reduce the required number of simulations to a manageable number. These sampling methods, which use physical scaling laws, have been shown to significantly reduce the number of simulated storms needed for application of the JPM method. In 2008, Irish et. al. (J. Phys. Oceanogr.) demonstrated that hurricane surge scales primarily as a function of storm size and intensity. Additionally, Song et. al. in 2012 (Nat. Hazards) has shown that surge response functions incorporating bathymetric variations yield highly accurate surge estimates along the Texas coastline. This study applies the Song. et. al. model to 73 stations along the open coast, and 273 stations within the bays, in Panama City, Florida. The model performs well for the open coast and bay areas; surge levels at most stations along the open coast were predicted with RMS errors below 0.40 meters, and R2 values at or above 0.80. The R2 values for surge response functions within bays were consistently at or above 0.75. Surge levels at most stations within the North Bay and East Bay were predicted with RMS errors below 0.40 meters; within the West Bay, surge was predicted with RMS errors below 0.52 meters. Accurately interpolating surge values along the Panama City coast and bays enables efficient use of the JPM model in order to

  20. A dimensionless relative trajectory estimation algorithm for autonomous imaging of a small astronomical body in a close distance flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariu, Kaito; Inamori, Takaya; Funase, Ryu; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    The world's first micro-spacecraft, "Proximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation" (PROCYON) has the advanced mission to approach an asteroid in dozen km (a one-order closer imaging distance compared with previous probes). In such a close distance encounter, the estimation of the relative trajectory of the target is necessary to perform autonomous imaging. However, the estimation is difficult owing to rapid changes of the line-of-sight direction of the target body. To overcome this problem, a novel dimensionless or direction only relative trajectory estimation algorithm, which uses a least square method, is proposed. The evaluation function for the least square method coincides with the error property of picture information to enable all of its calculations to be recursive and linear. It is suited for the implementation on the limited on-board computer. Numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm should enable the one-order closer flyby observation.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of the effects of location and number of stress response elements on gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Furusawa, Chikara; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    We analyzed the effects of the location and number of stress response elements (STREs) on gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genes containing STRE between 51 and 300 bp upstream from translational start codon tended to be up-regulated and genes with multiple STREs exhibited higher up-regulation under stress conditions. PMID:19111649

  2. Numerical calculation of the drag force induced by natural convection of spheres at low Grashof numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, D.; Fletcher, T.H.

    1987-02-01

    When a heated solid sphere is introduced into an ambient fluid, a natural convective flow occurs which results in a drag force on the sphere. This study involves the numerical calculation of both the steady-state and the transient natural convective drag force around spheres at low Grashof numbers. Numerical techniques are taken from Geoola and Cornish. An empirical expression is suggested for the total drag coefficient for Grashof numbers ranging from 4 x 10/sup -4/ to 0.5 and Prandtl number = 0.72: log C/sub DT/ = 1.25 + 0.31 log Gr - 0.097(log Gr)/sup 2/. The dimensionless time required to reach 90% of the steady-state drag force can be approximated by the second-order polynomial: log t/sub 90%/ = 1.32 - log Gr - 0.11(Gr)/sup 2/.

  3. Switches in gene expression including microRNA and a large number of distinct mRNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2008-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the kinetics of gene expression depends on the interplay of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), proteins, and nonprotein coding RNAs, or, more specifically, microRNAs. Some microRNAs may target hundreds of mRNAs. To describe this case, the author proposes a kinetic model implying that the microRNA synthesis is suppressed by the protein produced via the translation of one of the target mRNAs. With physically reasonable model parameters, the model predicts bistability or, in other words, switches in the expression of hundreds of genes.

  4. Number Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  5. Assessment of Tumor Heterogeneity, as Evidenced by Gene Expression Profiles, Pathway Activation, and Gene Copy Number, in Patients with Multifocal Invasive Lobular Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Nadine; Advani, Pooja P.; Serie, Daniel J.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Necela, Brian M.; Axenfeld, Bianca C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Feathers, Ryan W.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Crook, Julia E.; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) comprises approximately ~10–20% of breast cancers. In general, multifocal/multicentric (MF/MC) breast cancer has been associated with an increased rate of regional lymph node metastases. Tumor heterogeneity between foci represents a largely unstudied source of genomic variation in those rare patients with MF/MC ILC. Methods We characterized gene expression and copy number in 2 or more foci from 11 patients with MF/MC ILC (all ER+, HER2-) and adjacent normal tissue. RNA and DNA were extracted from 3x1.5mm cores from all foci. Gene expression (730 genes) and copy number (80 genes) were measured using Nanostring PanCancer and Cancer CNV panels. Linear mixed models were employed to compare expression in tumor versus normal samples from the same patient, and to assess heterogeneity (variability) in expression among multiple ILC within an individual. Results 35 and 34 genes were upregulated (FC>2) and down-regulated (FC<0.5) respectively in ILC tumor relative to adjacent normal tissue, q<0.05. 9/34 down-regulated genes (FIGF, RELN, PROM1, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2, KIT) had changes larger than CDH1, a hallmark of ILC. Copy number changes in these patients were relatively few but consistent across foci within each patient. Amplification of three genes (CCND1, FADD, ORAOV1) at 11q13.3 was present in 2/11 patients in both foci. We observed significant evidence of within-patient between-foci variability (heterogeneity) in gene expression for 466 genes (p<0.05 with FDR 8%), including CDH1, FIGF, RELN, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2 and KIT. Conclusions There was substantial variation in gene expression between ILC foci within patients, including known markers of ILC, suggesting an additional level of complexity that should be addressed. PMID:27078887

  6. Cathepsin-L influences the expression of extracellular matrix in lymphoid organs and plays a role in the regulation of thymic output and of peripheral T cell number.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Gabriela; Burzyn, Dalia; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Costa, Hector; Castillo, Lilian Fedra; Goldman, Alejandra; Meiss, Roberto; Piazzon, Isabel; Nepomnaschy, Irene

    2005-06-01

    Nackt mice, which are deficient in cathepsin-L (CTSL), show an early impairment during positive selection in the context of class II MHC molecules and as a consequence, the percentage and absolute number of CD4(+) thymocytes are significantly decreased. In this study, we show that lymph nodes from nackt mice are hypertrophied, showing normal absolute numbers of CD4(+) T cells and marked increases in the number of CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Basal proliferative levels are increased in the CD4(+) but not in the CD8(+) population. Lymph node T cells show increases in the expression of alpha(5), alpha(6), and beta(1) integrin chains. These alterations correlate with increases in the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in lymph nodes. Interestingly, laminin, fibronectin, and collagen I and IV are markedly decreased in nackt thymus which shows an augmented output of CD8(+) cells. These results demonstrate that a mutation in the Ctsl gene influences the levels of ECM components in lymphoid organs, the thymic output, and the number of T cells in the periphery. They further raise the possibility that, by regulating the level of expression of ECM components in lymphoid organs, CTSL is able to broadly affect the immune system. PMID:15905545

  7. Empirical, dimensionless, cumulative-rainfall hyetographs developed from 1959-86 storm data for selected small watersheds in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Sether, Tara; Asquith, William H.; Thompson, David B.; Cleveland, Theodore G.; Fang, Xing

    2004-01-01

    A database of incremental cumulative-rainfall values for storms that occurred in small urban and rural watersheds in north and south central Texas during the period from 1959 to 1986 was used to develop empirical, dimensionless, cumulative-rainfall hyetographs. Storm-quartile classifications were determined from the cumulative-rainfall values, which were divided into data groups on the basis of storm-quartile classification (first, second, third, fourth, and first through fourth combined), storm duration (0 to 6, 6 to 12, 12 to 24, 24 to 72, and 0 to 72 hours), and rainfall amount (1 inch or more). Removal of long leading tails, in effect, shortened the storm duration and, in some cases, affected the storm-quartile classification. Therefore, two storm groups, untrimmed and trimmed, were used for analysis. The trimmed storms generally are preferred for interpretation. For a 12-hour or less trimmed storm duration, approximately 49 percent of the storms are first quartile. For trimmed storm durations of 12 to 24 and 24 to 72 hours, 47 and 38 percent, respectively, of the storms are first quartile. For a trimmed storm duration of 0 to 72 hours, the first-, second-, third-, and fourth-quartile storms accounted for 46, 21, 20, and 13 percent of all storms, respectively. The 90th-percentile curve for first-quartile storms indicated about 90 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. The 10th-percentile curve for first-quartile storms indicated about 30 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. The 90th-percentile curve for fourth-quartile storms indicated about 33 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. The 10th-percentile curve for fourth-quartile storms indicated less than 5 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. Statistics for the empirical, dimensionless

  8. Influence of the number of vehicles in the emergence of sound events on the annoyance expressed - experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallet, M.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustical index leg was studied to determine its accuracy in predicting annoyance from traffic noise. Annoyance was tested in experimental situations where the frequency of the number of heavy vehicles varied from 3 to 30 HV/30 min for different classes of the Leg level at 50, 55, 60 dB(A) of traffic noise. The results showed that: (1) for a constant Leg level the annoyance increases as a function of the number of HV up to a certain threshold at which the annoyance is stabilized; (2) for a constant frequency of passage of HV, the annoyance increases with the Leg level; (3) composite indexes of the type Leg + Log NHV, L1 + EMER or L1 + L10 give a predictive value greater than that of the Leg pr Log nHV taken alone.

  9. Over-expression of OsPIN2 leads to increased tiller numbers, angle and shorter plant height through suppression of OsLAZY1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingnan; Fan, Xiaorong; Song, Wenjing; Zhang, Yali; Xu, Guohua

    2012-02-01

    Crop architecture parameters such as tiller number, angle and plant height are important agronomic traits that have been considered for breeding programmes. Auxin distribution within the plant has long been recognized to alter architecture. The rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome contains 12 putative PIN genes encoding auxin efflux transporters, including four PIN1 and one PIN2 genes. Here, we report that over-expression of OsPIN2 through a transgenic approach in rice (Japonica cv. Nipponbare) led to a shorter plant height, more tillers and a larger tiller angle when compared with wild type (WT). The expression patterns of the auxin reporter DR5::GUS and quantification of auxin distribution showed that OsPIN2 over-expression increased auxin transport from the shoot to the root-shoot junction, resulting in a non-tissue-specific accumulation of more free auxin at the root-shoot junction relative to WT. Over-expression of OsPIN2 enhanced auxin transport from shoots to roots, but did not alter the polar auxin pattern in the roots. Transgenic plants were less sensitive to N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, than WT in their root growth. OsPIN2-over-expressing plants had suppressed the expression of a gravitropism-related gene OsLazy1 in the shoots, but unaltered expression of OsPIN1b and OsTAC1, which were reported as tiller angle controllers in rice. The data suggest that OsPIN2 has a distinct auxin-dependent regulation pathway together with OsPIN1b and OsTAC1 controlling rice shoot architecture. Altering OsPIN2 expression by genetic transformation can be directly used for modifying rice architecture. PMID:21777365

  10. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor protein expression and gene copy number alterations in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Tsuta, Koji; Mimae, Takahiro; Nitta, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Maeshima, Akiko M; Asamura, Hisao; Grogan, Thomas M; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies and is potentially an attractive target for anticancer treatment. In this study, we included 379 patients who underwent surgical resection (179 diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma [ADC]; 150, squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]; 41, sarcomatoid carcinoma and 9, large cell carcinoma). IGF-1R expression and gene copy number were assessed by immunohistochemistry and bright-field in situ hybridization (BISH), respectively. IGF-1R expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma was observed in 41.4% of samples and was more prevalent in SCC (69.3%) than in ADC (25.1%), large cell carcinoma (33.3%), and sarcomatoid carcinoma (12.2%) (P < .001). Among ADCs, most mucinous ADCs (75%) showed strong membranous staining with the IGF-1R antibody. Compared with protein expression, IGF-1R gene alteration was rare (8.4%). A statistically significant correlation between IGF-1R expression and positive IGF-1R BISH was observed (γ = 0.762, P < .001). IGF-1R-positive tumors were more common in smokers (P = .004), and these tumors were larger (P = .006) than the IGF-1R-negative tumors. IGF-1R BISH positivity was not correlated with any clinicopathologic factor. IGF-1R expression and IGF-1R BISH positivity were not correlated with overall survival. IGF-1R is highly expressed in SCC and mucinous ADC, although copy number alterations in the IGF-1R gene were rare. These findings may have important implications for future anti-IGF-1R therapeutic approaches. PMID:23266446

  12. Effects of a petunia scaffold/matrix attachment region on copy number dependency and stability of transgene expression in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dietz-Pfeilstetter, Antje; Arndt, Nicola; Manske, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Transgenes in genetically modified plants are often not reliably expressed during development or in subsequent generations. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) as well as post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) have been shown to occur in transgenic plants depending on integration pattern, copy number and integration site. In an effort to reduce position effects, to prevent read-through transcription and to provide a more accessible chromatin structure, a P35S-ß-glucuronidase (P35S-gus) transgene flanked by a scaffold/matrix attachment region from petunia (Petun-SAR), was introduced in Nicotiana tabacum plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation. It was found that Petun-SAR mediates enhanced expression and copy number dependency up to 2 gene copies, but did not prevent gene silencing in transformants with multiple and rearranged gene copies. However, in contrast to the non-SAR transformants where silencing was irreversible and proceeded during long-term vegetative propagation and in progeny plants, gus expression in Petun-SAR plants was re-established in the course of development. Gene silencing was not necessarily accompanied by DNA methylation, while the gus transgene could still be expressed despite considerable CG methylation within the coding region. PMID:26732611

  13. A cell-specific enhancer far upstream of the mouse tyrosinase gene confers high level and copy number-related expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ganss, R; Montoliu, L; Monaghan, A P; Schütz, G

    1994-01-01

    The tyrosinase gene encodes the key enzyme of melanin production and is tightly regulated during development. A yeast artificial chromosome covering the mouse tyrosinase gene has been shown to rescue completely the albino phenotype of recipient mouse strains, conferring copy number-dependent, position-independent expression. To investigate the presence of cis-acting regulatory elements responsible for the appropriate expression of the tyrosinase gene, DNase I hypersensitive site mapping was performed. A melanoma cell-specific DNase I hypersensitive site was identified at -12 kb upstream of the tyrosinase gene. Functional analysis of the corresponding cis-acting element in transgenic mice and transient transfection assays revealed properties of a strong cell-specific enhancer. RNA expression levels of the transgene correlate with copy number, which is reflected in coat colour and eye pigmentation of transgenic mice. Full enhancer activity in transient transfections is obtained with a minimal sequence of 200 bp. Protein binding analysis reveals the presence of a melanoma cell-specific complex which might contribute to the faithful expression of the tyrosinase gene. Images PMID:8039502

  14. Glioblastomas with copy number gains in EGFR and RNF139 show increased expressions of carbonic anhydrase genes transformed by ENO1

    PubMed Central

    Beckner, Marie E.; Pollack, Ian F.; Nordberg, Mary L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prominence of glycolysis in glioblastomas may be non-specific or a feature of oncogene-related subgroups (i.e. amplified EGFR, etc.). Relationships between amplified oncogenes and expressions of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis, directly or indirectly via pH, were therefore investigated. Methods Using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, copy numbers (CN) of 78 oncogenes were quantified in 24 glioblastomas. Related expressions of metabolic genes encoding lactate dehydrogenases (LDHA, LDHC), carbonic anhydrases (CA3, CA12), monocarboxylate transporters (SLC16A3 or MCT4, SLC16A4 or MCT5), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY), glycogen synthase1 (GYS1), hypoxia inducible factor-1A (HIF1A), and enolase1 (ENO1) were determined in 22 by RT-qPCR. To obtain supra-glycolytic levels and adjust for heterogeneity, concurrent ENO1 expression was used to mathematically transform the expression levels of metabolic genes already normalized with delta-delta crossing threshold methodology. Results Positive correlations with EGFR occurred for all metabolic genes. Significant differences (Wilcoxon Rank Sum) for oncogene CN gains in tumors of at least 2.00-fold versus less than 2.00-fold occurred for EGFR with CA3's expression (p < 0.03) and for RNF139 with CA12 (p < 0.004). Increased CN of XIAP associated negatively. Tumors with less than 2.00-fold CN gains differed from those with gains for XIAP with CA12 (p < 0.05). Male gender associated with CA12 (p < 0.05). Conclusions Glioblastomas with CN increases in EGFR had elevated CA3 expression. Similarly, tumors with RNF149 CN gains had elevated CA12 expression. General significance In larger studies, subgroups of glioblastomas may emerge according to oncogene-related effects on glycolysis, such as control of pH via effects on carbonic anhydrases, with prognostic and treatment implications. PMID:27051584

  15. Prognostic Value of MET Gene Copy Number and Protein Expression in Patients with Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Published Literatures

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baoping; Cen, Hong; Tan, Xiaohong; Liu, Wenjian; Ke, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of the copy number (GCN) and protein expression of the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) gene for survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. This study aims to comprehensively and quantitatively asses the suitability of MET GCN and protein expression to predict patients' survival. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched for articles comparing overall survival in patients with high MET GCN or protein expression with those with low level. Pooled hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the random and the fixed-effects models. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also performed. Results Eighteen eligible studies enrolling 5,516 patients were identified. Pooled analyses revealed that high MET GCN or protein expression was associated with poor overall survival (OS) (GCN: HR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.35–2.68, p<0.001; protein expression: HR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.017). In Asian populations (GCN: HR = 2.22, 95% CI 1.46–3.38, p<0.001; protein expression: HR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.34–2.68, p<0.001), but not in the non-Asian subset. For adenocarcinoma, high MET GCN or protein expression indicated decreased OS (GCN: HR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.05–2.10, p = 0.025; protein expression: HR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.31–2.19, p<0.001). Results were similar for multivariate analysis (GCN: HR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.15–2.25, p = 0.005; protein expression: HR = 2.18, 95% CI 1.60–2.97, p<0.001). The results of the sensitivity analysis were not materially altered and did not draw different conclusions. Conclusions Increased MET GCN or protein expression was significantly associated with poorer survival in patients with surgically resected NSCLC; this information could potentially further stratify patients in clinical treatment. PMID:24922520

  16. Copy number variations are not modifiers of phenotypic expression in a pair of identical twins carrying a BRCA1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Lasa, A; Ramón y Cajal, T; Llort, G; Suela, J; Cigudosa, J C; Cornet, M; Alonso, C; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer but the incomplete penetrance of these mutations suggests that other genetic and/or environmental factors may modify this risk. We present a family where all affected members carried a mutation in the BRCA1 gene and the index case had suffered from cancer twice in the last 27 years, whereas her monozygotic twin sister, also a carrier of the mutation, remained healthy. As copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to phenotypic diversity, a comparative genomic hybridization array (CGH) was performed to see whether the differences in the CNV profile were a modifier factor of the phenotype in our monozygotic twins. Our results show that differences in the CNVs profile were not the cause of the extremely variable penetrance observed in our MZ twin. The search for an explanation should not therefore be limited to genetic changes at the level of the DNA sequence. PMID:20369283

  17. The Trend of CEACAM3 Blood Expression as Number Index of the CTCs in the Colorectal Cancer Perioperative Course

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, A.; Castiglione, F.; Ringressi, M. N.; Niccolai, E.; Tofani, L.; Boni, L.; Bechi, P.; Amedei, A.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological stage seems to be the major determinant of postoperative prognosis of solid tumors, but additional prognostic determinants need to be better investigated. The most important tumor marker for colorectal cancer (CRC) is the cell-surface antigen, Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA), and its assessment is considered a valuable index of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). In this paper, CEACAM3 evaluation was applied given its great specificity in the CRC. Whole blood from the basilic vein of 38 CRC patients was collected before and at various time intervals after the curative resection. Also, from 20 of them, we have obtained two additional intraoperative samples. CEACAM3 expression was evaluated in all the samples by RT-PCR. CEACAM3 duct values showed a decreasing trend from preoperative through early and later postoperative to 6th-month samples (p < 0.001). The average values of CEACAM3 were related to the cancer size (T stage) (p = 0.034) and WHO stage (p = 0.035). A significant effect of the baseline value of CEACAM3 dCt on the temporal trend has been observed (p < 0.001). In this study, we have demonstrated the CEACAM3 specificity and a perioperative trend of CTCs which is coherent with the clinical/pathological considerations and with previous experimental findings in different cancer types. PMID:26556959

  18. Age-Dependent Brain Gene Expression and Copy Number Anomalies in Autism Suggest Distinct Pathological Processes at Young Versus Mature Ages

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Mary E.; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J.; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  19. Mesodermal Gene Expression in the Acoel Isodiametra pulchra Indicates a Low Number of Mesodermal Cell Types and the Endomesodermal Origin of the Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Chiodin, Marta; Børve, Aina; Berezikov, Eugene; Ladurner, Peter; Martinez, Pedro; Hejnol, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Acoelomorphs are bilaterally symmetric small marine worms that lack a coelom and possess a digestive system with a single opening. Two alternative phylogenetic positions of this group within the animal tree are currently debated. In one view, Acoelomorpha is the sister group to all remaining Bilateria and as such, is a morphologically simple stepping stone in bilaterian evolution. In the other, the group is a lineage within the Deuterostomia, and therefore, has derived a simple morphology from a more complex ancestor. Acoels and the closely related Nemertodermatida and Xenoturbellida, which together form the Acoelomorpha, possess a very limited number of cell types. To further investigate the diversity and origin of mesodermal cell types we describe the expression pattern of 12 orthologs of bilaterian mesodermal markers including Six1/2, Twist, FoxC, GATA4/5/6, in the acoel Isodiametra pulchra. All the genes are expressed in stem cells (neoblasts), gonads, and at least subsets of the acoel musculature. Most are expressed in endomesodermal compartments of I. pulchra developing embryos similar to what has been described in cnidarians. Our molecular evidence indicates a very limited number of mesodermal cell types and suggests an endomesodermal origin of the gonads and the stem cell system. We discuss our results in light of the two prevailing phylogenetic positions of Acoelomorpha. PMID:23405161

  20. Bcrp1 gene expression is required for normal numbers of side population stem cells in mice, and confers relative protection to mitoxantrone in hematopoietic cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Morris, John J.; Barnes, Yuxiao; Lan, Lubin; Schuetz, John D.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be identified by a “side population” (SP) phenotype. Previous studies have implicated the ATP binding cassette transporter genes Mdr1a/1b and/or Bcrp1 in the SP phenotype. To define the relative role of these transporters, we generated Bcrp1 null mice and evaluated HSCs both functionally and phenotypically. Loss of Bcrp1 gene expression, but not Mdr1a/1b, led to a significant reduction in the number of SP cells in the bone marrow and in skeletal muscle. In the bone marrow, there was a nearly absolute loss of lineage negative, c-Kit-positive, Sca-1-positive SP cells, and the residual SP cells were depleted of repopulating cells in a transplant assay, demonstrating that Bcrp1 expression is necessary for the SP phenotype in HSCs. Furthermore, Bcrp1 null hematopoietic cells were significantly more sensitive to mitoxantrone in drug-treated transplanted mice. These results show that Bcrp1 gene expression alone defines the SP stem cell phenotype, and suggest that the physiological function of Bcrp1 expression in HSCs is to provide protection from cytotoxic substrates. PMID:12218177

  1. Decreased number of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells that express the interleukin-7 receptor in blood and tissues of SIV-infected macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Moniuszko, Marcin; Edghill-Smith, Yvette; Stevceva, Liljana; Tsai, Wen-Po . E-mail: franchig@mail.nih.gov

    2006-12-20

    Acute HIV/SIV (human/simian immunodeficiency virus) infection results in severe CD4{sup +} T cell depletion in lymphoid compartments. During the chronic phase of infection, CD4{sup +} T cell numbers rebound in blood but remain low in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), even when viral replication is suppressed by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thus, strategies to repopulate lymphoid compartments may ameliorate the clinical outcome of HIV/SIV infection. Interleukin (IL)-7 is a key cytokine for the maintenance of homeostatic proliferation of T cells. In HIV/SIV infection, IL-7 expression is increased, likely to compensate for T cell loss, suggesting that supraphysiological administration of IL-7 could provide additional benefit. However, the ability of T cells to respond to IL-7 is dependent on the level of expression of the IL-7 receptor (IL-7R) in T cells in various body compartments. In here, we investigated the proportion of IL-7R{sup +} T cells in blood, spleen, gut, and genitourinary tract of healthy and SIV-infected macaques with various degrees of CD4{sup +} T cell depletion. We found that the percentage of T cells expressing IL-7R was significantly lower in both CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subsets in SIV-infected macaques than in healthy animals and this decrease directly correlated with the CD4{sup +} T cell number. Importantly, the proportion of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells expressing IL-7R in blood paralleled that found in tissues. IL-7R{sup +} T cells within the SIV-specific CD8{sup +} T cells varied and were lowest in most tissues of viremic macaques, likely reflecting continuous antigen stimulation of effector cells.

  2. Probiotic Treatment Decreases the Number of CD14-Expressing Cells in Porcine Milk Which Correlates with Several Intestinal Immune Parameters in the Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Kreuzer-Redmer, Susanne; Twardziok, Sven Olaf; Siepert, Bianca; Klopfleisch, Robert; Tedin, Karsten; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modulating the mucosal immune system of neonates by probiotic treatment of their mothers is a promising approach which can only be investigated through the use of animal models. Here, we used sows and their piglets to investigate the impact of a bacterial treatment on the sow’s milk and on the neonate piglet intestinal immune system. In previous experiments, feed supplementation of sows with the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 during pregnancy and lactation had been shown to affect intestinal microbiota and cytokine expression of the offspring during the suckling and weaning periods. We therefore investigated the composition of the milk from treated sows in comparison to samples from a control group. In treated sows, the amount of lactose increased, and the somatic cell numbers were reduced. In all milk samples, the percentage of cells expressing membranous CD14 (mCD14) was greater than the fractions of immune cells, indicating expression of mCD14 on mammary epithelial cells. However, in the milk of E. faecium-treated sows, mCD14+ cells were reduced. Furthermore, the number of CD14+ milk cells was positively correlated with the percentages of B cells and activated T cells in the ileal MLN of the piglets. This study provides evidence for the expression of mCD14 by the porcine mammary epithelium, and suggests an immunological effect of mCD14+ milk cells on the piglets’ intestinal immune system. Our study further suggests that mCD14+ mammary epithelial cell populations can be modulated by probiotic feed supplementation of the sow. PMID:25806034

  3. Pan-cancer analysis of copy number changes in programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, CD274) - associations with gene expression, mutational load, and survival.

    PubMed

    Budczies, Jan; Bockmayr, Michael; Denkert, Carsten; Klauschen, Frederick; Gröschel, Stefan; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Pfarr, Nicole; Leichsenring, Jonas; Onozato, Maristela L; Lennerz, Jochen K; Dietel, Manfred; Fröhling, Stefan; Schirmacher, Peter; Iafrate, A John; Weichert, Wilko; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of the PD-L1 (CD274) - PD-1 axis has emerged as a powerful cancer therapy that prevents evasion of tumor cells from the immune system. While immunohistochemical detection of PD-L1 was introduced as a predictive biomarker with variable power, much less is known about copy number alterations (CNA) affecting PD-L1 and their associations with expression levels, mutational load, and survival. To gain insight, we employed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets to comprehensively analyze 22 major cancer types for PD-L1 CNAs. We observed a diverse landscape of PD-L1 CNAs, which affected focal regions, chromosome 9p or the entire chromosome 9. Deletions of PD-L1 were more frequent than gains (31% vs. 12%) with deletions being most prevalent in melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. Copy number gains most frequently occurred in ovarian cancer, head and neck cancer, bladder cancer, cervical and endocervical cancer, sarcomas, and colorectal cancers. Fine-mapping of the genetic architecture revealed specific recurrently amplified and deleted core regions across cancers with putative biological and clinical consequences. PD-L1 CNAs correlated significantly with PD-L1 mRNA expression changes in many cancer types, and tumors with PD-L1 gains harbored significantly higher mutational load compared to non-amplified cases (median: 78 non-synonymous mutations vs. 40, P = 7.1e-69). Moreover, we observed that, in general, both PD-L1 amplifications and deletions were associated with dismal prognosis. In conclusion, PD-L1 CNAs, in particular PD-L1 copy number gains, represent frequent genetic alterations across many cancers, which influence PD-L1 expression levels, are associated with higher mutational loads, and may be exploitable as predictive biomarker for immunotherapy regimens. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27106868

  4. Ectopic expression of the Brassica SHOOTMERISTEMLESS attenuates the deleterious effects of the auxin transport inhibitor TIBA on somatic embryo number and morphology.

    PubMed

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Stasolla, Claudio

    2011-02-01

    The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) is a useful compound for investigating the role of auxin flow during plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis lines, applications of TIBA during the induction phase of somatic embryogenesis inhibit embryo development and induce the differentiation of the meristematic cells of the shoot apical meristem (SAM), leading to the fusion of the cotyledons. These abnormalities were associated to changes in the expression levels of auxin transporter genes (PINs) and endogenous distribution of IAA. Treatments of TIBA caused a rapid accumulation of IAA within the epidermal and cortical root cells of the explants (bent-cotyledon zygotic embryos), as well as in the apical and sub-apical cells of the callus generated by the surface of the cotyledons of the explants. Within the callus only a few cells acquired meristematic characteristics, and this was associated to low expression levels of genes involved in embryogenic cell fate acquisition, such as WUSCHEL (WUS), LEAFY COTYLEDON 1 and 2. All these deleterious effects were attenuated when TIBA was administered to lines over-expressing SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) isolated from Brassica oleracea (Bo), B. napus (Bn), and B. rapa (Br). Of interest, TIBA-treated explants of Arabidopsis lines over-expressing the Brassica STM were able to produce a large number of embryogenic cells and somatic embryos which exhibited a normal morphology and two distinct cotyledons. A proposed reason for this behaviour was ascribed to the ability of the transformed tissue to retain a normal distribution of auxin in the presence of TIBA. Proper localization of auxin might be required for the normal expression of several genes needed for the acquisition of embryogenic competence and formation of somatic embryos. PMID:21421384

  5. FGFR1 mRNA and Protein Expression, not Gene Copy Number, Predict FGFR TKI Sensitivity Across All Lung Cancer Histologies

    PubMed Central

    Wynes, Murry W.; Hinz, Trista K.; Gao, Dexiang; Martini, Michael; Marek, Lindsay A.; Ware, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Böhm, Diana; Perner, Sven; Helfrich, Barbara A.; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek; Wojtylak, Szymon; Sejda, Aleksandra; Gozgit, Joseph M.; Bunn, Paul A.; Camidge, D. Ross; Tan, Aik-Choon; Hirsch, Fred R.; Heasley, Lynn E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose FGFR1 gene copy number (GCN) is being evaluated as a biomarker for FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) response in squamous-cell lung cancers (SCC). The exclusive use of FGFR1 GCN for predicting FGFR TKI sensitivity assumes increased GCN is the only mechanism for biologically-relevant increases in FGFR1 signaling. Herein, we tested whether FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression may serve as better biomarkers of FGFR TKI sensitivity in lung cancer. Experimental Design Histologically diverse lung cancer cell lines were submitted to assays for ponatinib sensitivity, a potent FGFR TKI. A tissue microarray comprised of resected lung tumors was submitted to FGFR1 GCN and mRNA analyses and the results were validated with TCGA lung cancer data. Results 14/58 cell lines exhibited ponatinib sensitivity (IC50 values ≤ 50 nM) that correlated with FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression, but not with FGFR1 GCN or histology. Moreover, ponatinib sensitivity associated with mRNA expression of the ligands, FGF2 and FGF9. In resected tumors, 22% of adenocarcinomas and 28% of SCCs expressed high FGFR1 mRNA. Importantly, only 46% of SCCs with increased FGFR1 GCN expressed high mRNA. Lung cancer TCGA data validated these findings and unveiled overlap of FGFR1 mRNA positivity with KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Conclusions FGFR1 dependency is frequent across various lung cancer histologies and FGFR1 mRNA may serve as a better biomarker of FGFR TKI response in lung cancer than FGFR1 GCN. The study provides important and timely insight into clinical testing of FGFR TKIs in lung cancer and other solid tumor types. PMID:24771645

  6. A Worldwide Analysis of Beta-Defensin Copy Number Variation Suggests Recent Selection of a High-Expressing DEFB103 Gene Copy in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Robert J; Machado, Lee R; Zuccherato, Luciana W; Antolinos, Suzanne; Xue, Yali; Shawa, Nyambura; Gilman, Robert H; Cabrera, Lilia; Berg, Douglas E; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Kelly, Paul; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Hollox, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    Beta-defensins are a family of multifunctional genes with roles in defense against pathogens, reproduction, and pigmentation. In humans, six beta-defensin genes are clustered in a repeated region which is copy-number variable (CNV) as a block, with a diploid copy number between 1 and 12. The role in host defense makes the evolutionary history of this CNV particularly interesting, because morbidity due to infectious disease is likely to have been an important selective force in human evolution, and to have varied between geographical locations. Here, we show CNV of the beta-defensin region in chimpanzees, and identify a beta-defensin block in the human lineage that contains rapidly evolving noncoding regulatory sequences. We also show that variation at one of these rapidly evolving sequences affects expression levels and cytokine responsiveness of DEFB103, a key inhibitor of influenza virus fusion at the cell surface. A worldwide analysis of beta-defensin CNV in 67 populations shows an unusually high frequency of high-DEFB103-expressing copies in East Asia, the geographical origin of historical and modern influenza epidemics, possibly as a result of selection for increased resistance to influenza in this region. Hum Mutat 32:743–750, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21387465

  7. Porcine MAP3K5 analysis: molecular cloning, characterization, tissue expression pattern, and copy number variations associated with residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Pu, L; Zhang, L C; Zhang, J S; Song, X; Wang, L G; Liang, J; Zhang, Y B; Liu, X; Yan, H; Zhang, T; Yue, J W; Li, N; Wu, Q Q; Wang, L X

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (MAP3K5) is essential for apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses, and is a candidate marker for residual feed intake (RFI) in pig. We cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of porcine MAP3K5 by rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The 5451-bp gene contains a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) (718 bp), a coding region (3738 bp), and a 3'-UTR (995 bp), and encodes a peptide of 1245 amino acids, which shares 97, 99, 97, 93, 91, and 84% sequence identity with cattle, sheep, human, mouse, chicken, and zebrafish MAP3K5, respectively. The deduced MAP3K5 protein sequence contains two conserved domains: a DUF4071 domain and a protein kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that porcine MAP3K5 forms a separate branch to vicugna and camel MAP3K5. Tissue expression analysis using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that MAP3K5 was expressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, muscle, fat, pancrea, ileum, and stomach tissues. Copy number variation was detected for porcine MAP3K5 and validated by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, a significant increase in average copy number was detected in the low RFI group when compared to the high RFI group in a Duroc pig population. These results provide useful information regarding the influence of MAP3K5 on RFI in pigs. PMID:27525933

  8. Integrated copy number and gene expression profiling analysis of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Heejei; Park, Sanghui; Ju, Hyunjeong; Ha, Sang Yun; Sohn, InSuk; Jo, Jisuk; Do, In-Gu; Min, Sookee; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Yoo, Hae Yong; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2015-06-01

    Viral oncogenes and host immunosenescence have been suggested as causes of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV + DLBCL) of the elderly. To investigate the molecular genetic basis of immune evasion and tumor outgrowth, we analyzed copy number alterations (CNAs) and gene expression profiles in EBV + DLBCL samples compared with EBV - DLBCL. There were relatively few genomic alterations in EBV + DLBCL compared with those detected in EBV-negative DLBCL. The most frequent CNAs (>30%) in EBV + DLBCLs were gains at 1q23.2-23.3, 1q23.3, 1q32.1, 5p15.3, 8q22.3, 8q24.1-24.2, and 9p24.1; losses at 6q27, 7q11.2, and 7q36.2-36.3 were also recurrent. A gene expression profile analysis identified the host immune response as a key molecular signature in EBV + DLBCL. Antiviral response genes, proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines associated with the innate immune response were overexpressed, indicating the presence of a virusinduced inflammatory microenvironment. Genes associated with the B-cell receptor signaling pathway were downregulated. An integrated analysis indicated that SLAMF1 and PDL2 were key targets of the gains detected at 1q23.2-23.3 and 9p24.1. The chromosomal gain at 9p24.1 was associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, our results led to the identification of recurrent copy number alterations and distinct gene expression associated with the host immune response in EBV + DLBCL. We suggest that the upregulation of PDL2 on 9p24.1 promotes immune evasion and is associated with poor prognosis in EBV + DLBCL. PMID:25832818

  9. Quality improvement of transgenic cloned bovine embryos using an aggregation method: Effects on cell number, cell ratio, embryo perimeter, mitochondrial distribution, and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Bang, J I; Jin, J I; Ghanem, N; Choi, B H; Fakruzzaman, M; Ha, A N; Lee, K L; Uhm, S J; Ko, D H; Koo, B C; Lee, J G; Kong, I K

    2015-09-01

    The production of cloned embryos using conventional methods has extremely low success rates owing to low embryo quality. To improve the quality of cloned bovine embryos expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), we applied an aggregation culture method. The EGFP gene was transfected into bovine fetal fibroblasts using a retroviral vector system. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was performed using these cells, and the resulting embryos were cultured in aggregates or individually. Gene expression was analyzed by a microarray, and differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The total number of cells per blastocyst and the ratio of inner cell mass cells to trophectoderm cells were higher in aggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (agBL; 368.7 ± 109.6 and 1:4.8, respectively) than in in vitro-fertilized blastocysts (ivfBL; 189.8 ± 65.8 and 1:2.6, respectively) and nonaggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (sBL; 113.1 ± 36.3 and 1:1.5, respectively; P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, the blastocyst perimeter was larger in the agBL group than in the ivfBL and sBL groups (1168.8 ± 200.23 vs. 887.33 ± 187.62 and 678 ± 226.1 μm; P < 0.05). In addition, mitochondrial fluorescence intensity was higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL and sBL groups (P < 0.05). The number of apoptotic cells per blastocyst was lower in the ivfBL and agBL groups than in the sBL group (3.7 ± 2.2 and 3.4 ± 2.1 vs. 6.7 ± 6.8; P < 0.05). The genes identified in the microarray belonged to 18 categories. Expression of the Krüppel-like factor 4 gene, which is associated with cell proliferation, development, and transcription, was 7.2-fold higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL group (P < 0.05) but did not differ between the sBL and ivfBL groups (P > 0.05). Expression of the heat shock 70-kDa protein 1A gene, which is associated with apoptosis, was 12-fold higher in the s

  10. Quark number holonomy and confinement-deconfinement transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Ohnishi, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new quantity which describes the confinement-deconfinement transition based on topological properties of QCD. The quantity which we call the quark number holonomy is defined as the integral of the quark number susceptibility along the closed loop of θ where θ is the dimensionless imaginary chemical potential. The expected behavior of the quark number holonomy at finite temperature is discussed, and its asymptotic behaviors are shown.

  11. Integrated Copy Number and Expression Analysis Identifies Profiles of Whole-Arm Chromosomal Alterations and Subgroups with Favorable Outcome in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Yuriko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Koso, Takahiro; Tsuji, Shingo; Yamamoto, Shogo; Asada, Kayo; Sone, Kenbun; Kurikawa, Reiko; Makii, Chinami; Hagiwara, Otoe; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Maeda, Daichi; Hasegawa, Kosei; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Kawana, Kei; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Yano, Tetsu; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is generally associated with chemoresistance and poor clinical outcome, even with early diagnosis; whereas high-grade serous carcinomas (SCs) and endometrioid carcinomas (ECs) are commonly chemosensitive at advanced stages. Although an integrated genomic analysis of SC has been performed, conclusive views on copy number and expression profiles for CCC are still limited. In this study, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism analysis with 57 epithelial ovarian cancers (31 CCCs, 14 SCs, and 12 ECs) and microarray expression analysis with 55 cancers (25 CCCs, 16 SCs, and 14 ECs). We then evaluated PIK3CA mutations and ARID1A expression in CCCs. SNP array analysis classified 13% of CCCs into a cluster with high frequency and focal range of copy number alterations (CNAs), significantly lower than for SCs (93%, P < 0.01) and ECs (50%, P = 0.017). The ratio of whole-arm to all CNAs was higher in CCCs (46.9%) than SCs (21.7%; P < 0.0001). SCs with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of BRCA1 (85%) also had LOH of NF1 and TP53, and LOH of BRCA2 (62%) coexisted with LOH of RB1 and TP53. Microarray analysis classified CCCs into three clusters. One cluster (CCC-2, n = 10) showed more favorable prognosis than the CCC-1 and CCC-3 clusters (P = 0.041). Coexistent alterations of PIK3CA and ARID1A were more common in CCC-1 and CCC-3 (7/11, 64%) than in CCC-2 (0/10, 0%; P < 0.01). Being in cluster CCC-2 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in CCC. In conclusion, CCC was characterized by a high ratio of whole-arm CNAs; whereas CNAs in SC were mainly focal, but preferentially caused LOH of well-known tumor suppressor genes. As such, expression profiles might be useful for sub-classification of CCC, and might provide useful information on prognosis. PMID:26043110

  12. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene‐targeted strains of the OR‐IRES‐marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, “count every cell” strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain‐specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17‐fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene‐targeted strains. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:199–209, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26100963

  13. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona; Mombaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene-targeted strains of the OR-IRES-marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, "count every cell" strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain-specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17-fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene-targeted strains. PMID:26100963

  14. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  15. Dimensionless parameterization of lidar for laser remote sensing of the atmosphere and its application to systems with SiPM and PMT detectors.

    PubMed

    Agishev, Ravil; Comerón, Adolfo; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Sicard, Michaël

    2014-05-20

    In this paper, we show a renewed approach to the generalized methodology for atmospheric lidar assessment, which uses the dimensionless parameterization as a core component. It is based on a series of our previous works where the problem of universal parameterization over many lidar technologies were described and analyzed from different points of view. The modernized dimensionless parameterization concept applied to relatively new silicon photomultiplier detectors (SiPMs) and traditional photomultiplier (PMT) detectors for remote-sensing instruments allowed predicting the lidar receiver performance with sky background available. The renewed approach can be widely used to evaluate a broad range of lidar system capabilities for a variety of lidar remote-sensing applications as well as to serve as a basis for selection of appropriate lidar system parameters for a specific application. Such a modernized methodology provides a generalized, uniform, and objective approach for evaluation of a broad range of lidar types and systems (aerosol, Raman, DIAL) operating on different targets (backscatter or topographic) and under intense sky background conditions. It can be used within the lidar community to compare different lidar instruments. PMID:24922200

  16. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Binnington, Taylor; Poisson, Eric

    2009-10-15

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  17. Direct sequencing and expression analysis of a large number of miRNAs in Aedes aegypti and a multi-species survey of novel mosquito miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of gene regulators whose biogenesis involves hairpin structures called precursor miRNAs, or pre-miRNAs. A pre-miRNA is processed to make a miRNA:miRNA* duplex, which is then separated to generate a mature miRNA and a miRNA*. The mature miRNAs play key regulatory roles during embryonic development as well as other cellular processes. They are also implicated in control of viral infection as well as innate immunity. Direct experimental evidence for mosquito miRNAs has been recently reported in anopheline mosquitoes based on small-scale cloning efforts. Results We obtained approximately 130, 000 small RNA sequences from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, by 454 sequencing of samples that were isolated from mixed-age embryos and midguts from sugar-fed and blood-fed females, respectively. We also performed bioinformatics analysis on the Ae. aegypti genome assembly to identify evidence for additional miRNAs. The combination of these approaches uncovered 98 different pre-miRNAs in Ae. aegypti which could produce 86 distinct miRNAs. Thirteen miRNAs, including eight novel miRNAs identified in this study, are currently only found in mosquitoes. We also identified five potential revisions to previously annotated miRNAs at the miRNA termini, two cases of highly abundant miRNA* sequences, 14 miRNA clusters, and 17 cases where more than one pre-miRNA hairpin produces the same or highly similar mature miRNAs. A number of miRNAs showed higher levels in midgut from blood-fed female than that from sugar-fed female, which was confirmed by northern blots on two of these miRNAs. Northern blots also revealed several miRNAs that showed stage-specific expression. Detailed expression analysis of eight of the 13 mosquito-specific miRNAs in four divergent mosquito genera identified cases of clearly conserved expression patterns and obvious differences. Four of the 13 miRNAs are specific to certain lineage(s) within mosquitoes. Conclusion

  18. Story Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swafford, Jane; McGinty, Robert

    1978-01-01

    A concrete approach to prime numbers is presented using rectangles and triangles to construct a building for each number so that each story represents a pair of factors and the triangular-shaped roof represents the number. (MP)

  19. Series of Reciprocal Triangular Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckman, Paul; Dence, Joseph B.; Dence, Thomas P.; Young, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal triangular numbers have appeared in series since the very first infinite series were summed. Here we attack a number of subseries of the reciprocal triangular numbers by methodically expressing them as integrals.

  20. Number relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Philip

    Number relativity 1.Every equation of the relativity is just the way to understand through to solve one question of the math problem. We just add the hypothesis into the number. 2. Sequence of number is the machine physics for software(computer) as the number order is program equation as calculator. 3. When zero is denominator, it is not existing as it is doing something by nothing. So nothing means time as we put zero denominator into time. My personal physics imagine.

  1. Leftist Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The leftist number system consists of numbers with decimal digits arranged in strings to the left, instead of to the right. This system fails to be a field only because it contains zerodivisors. The same construction with prime base yields the p-adic numbers.

  2. Superharmonic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Graeme L.

    2009-03-01

    Let tau(n) denote the number of positive divisors of a natural number n>1 and let sigma(n) denote their sum. Then n is superharmonic if sigma(n)mid n^ktau(n) for some positive integer k . We deduce numerous properties of superharmonic numbers and show in particular that the set of all superharmonic numbers is the first nontrivial example that has been given of an infinite set that contains all perfect numbers but for which it is difficult to determine whether there is an odd member.

  3. Optimal Strouhal number for swimming animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, Christophe

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the swimming performances of aquatic animals, an important dimensionless quantity is the Strouhal number, St=fA/U, with f the tail-beat frequency, A the peak-to-peak tail amplitude, and U the swimming velocity. Experiments with flapping foils have exhibited maximum propulsive efficiency in the interval 0.25number increases from 0.15 to 0.8 for animals spanning from the largest cetaceans to the smallest tadpoles. To assess the validity of this model, the swimming kinematics of 53 different species of aquatic animals have been compiled from the literature and it shows that their Strouhal numbers are consistently near the predicted optimum.

  4. Genome-wide Copy Number Variation and Temporal Genes Expression Analysis in Marek's Disease-Resistant or -Susceptible Inbred Lines of Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viruses that cause cancers are a great threat to human and animal health. Marek’s disease (MD) in chickens is a lymphoproliferative disease caused by Marek’s disease virus (MDV). The over-expression of Hodgkin’s disease antigen in MD makes it an ideal model to study the progression mechanism of Hodg...

  5. EFFECTS OF A LIGNIN PEROXIDASE-EXPRESSING RECOMBINANT STREPTOMYCES LIVIDANS TK23.1 ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND THE NUMBERS AND ACTIVITIES OF MICROORGANISMS IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recombinant actinomycete, Streptomyces lividans TK23.1, expressing a pIJ702-encoded extracellular lignin peroxidase gene cloned from the chromosome of Streptomyces virodosporus T7A, was released into soil in flask- and microcosm-scale studies to determine its effects on humific...

  6. Number Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Terese A.

    2004-01-01

    This article features Number Time, a site developed by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for young mathematics learners, located at www.bbc.co.uk/schools/numbertime. The site uses interactive animation to help children in pre-K through grade 2 understand and practice number basics. Users will find online games, videos that tell number…

  7. Influence of the Prandtl number on the heat transport enhancement in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-11-01

    We present new Nusselt-number (Nu) measurements for slowly rotating turbulent thermal convection in cylinders with aspect ratio Γ = 1 . By using compressed gasses and various liquids, we now have data in the Prandtl number (Pr) range 0 . 74 < Pr < 35 . 5 and for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) in the range 4 ×108 < Ra < 2 ×1011 . With these data we investigate in detail the effect of Pr and Ra on the heat-transport enhancement close to its onset. This enhancement takes place for rotation rates larger than a critical value, as expressed by the dimensionless inverse Rossby number (1 / Ro), since only then vortices form, in which due to Ekman pumping fluid is transported from the thermal boundary layers into the turbulent bulk. We found that the critical inverse Rossby number (1 / Roc) decreases with increasing Pr, following a power law with exponent α = - 0 . 40 +/- 0 . 02 . For larger rotation rates, the relative heat transport enhancement (Nur) increases first linearly with a slope S = ∂Nur / ∂ (1 / Ro) . We show that also the slope S follows a power law S ~ Prβ Raγ with β = - 0 . 10 +/- 0 . 06 and γ = - 0 . 14 +/- 0 . 04 . We found that the maximum heat transport enhancement (up to 40%) increases with increasing Pr and decreasing Ra. This work was supported by NSF-Grant DMR11-58514. SW thanks the Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft for financial support.

  8. Enhanced expression of trim14 gene suppressed Sindbis virus reproduction and modulated the transcription of a large number of genes of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Nenasheva, V V; Kovaleva, G V; Uryvaev, L V; Ionova, K S; Dedova, A V; Vorkunova, G K; Chernyshenko, S V; Khaidarova, N V; Tarantul, V Z

    2015-07-01

    In the present research, we have studied an influence of enhanced expression TRIM14 on alphavirus Sindbis (SINV, Togaviridae family) infection. In the HEK293 cells transfected with human trim14 gene (HEK-trim14), SINV yield after infection was decreased 1000-10,000 times (3-4 lg of TCD50/ml) at 24 h p.i. and considerably less (1-2 lg of TCD50/ml) at 48 h p.i. Analysis of the expression of 43 genes directly or indirectly involved in innate immune machine in HEK-trim14 non-infected cells comparing with the control (non-transfected) HEK293 cells revealed that stable trim14 transfection in HEK293 cells caused increased transcription of 18 genes (ifna, il6 (ifnβ2), isg15, raf-1, NF-kB (nf-kb1, rela, nf-kb2, relb), grb2, grb3-3, traf3ip2, junB, c-myb, pu.1, akt1, tyk2, erk2, mek2) and lowered transcription of 3 genes (ifnγ, gata1, il-17a). The similar patterns of genes expression observe in SINV-infected non-transfected HEK293 cells. However, SINV infection of HEK-trim14 cells caused inhibition of the most interferon cascade genes as well as subunits of transcription factor NF-κB. Thus, stable enhanced expression of trim14 gene in cells activates the transcription of many immunity genes and suppresses the SINV reproduction, but SINV infection of HEK-trim14 cells promotes inhibition of some genes involved in innate immune system. PMID:25948474

  9. Transcriptome and Expression Profiling Analysis of the Hemocytes Reveals a Large Number of Immune-Related Genes in Mud Crab Scylla paramamosain during Vibrio parahaemolyticus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuping; Chen, Yaping; Sun, Wanwei; Ding, Jun; Zhou, Lizhen; Wang, Shasha; Wang, Shuqi; Zhang, Yueling; Zhu, Dashi; Wen, Xiaobo; Hu, Songnian; Li, Shengkang

    2014-01-01

    Background Mud crab Scylla paramamosain is an economically important marine species in China. However, frequent outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by marine bacteria, such as Vibrio parahaemolyticus, result in great economic losses. Methodology/Principal Findings Comparative de novo transcriptome analysis of S. paramamosain infected with V. parahaemolyticus was carried out to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune response to pathogenic bacteria by using the Illumina paired-end sequencing platform. A total of 52,934,042 clean reads from the hemocytes of V. parahaemolyticus-infected mud crabs and controls were obtained and assembled into 186,193 contigs. 59,120 unigenes were identified from 81,709 consensus sequences of mud crabs and 48,934 unigenes were matched proteins in the Nr or Swissprot databases. Among these, 10,566 unigenes belong to 3 categories of Gene Ontology, 25,349 to 30 categories of KEGG, and 15,191 to 25 categories of COG database, covering almost all functional categories. By using the Solexa/Illumina's DGE platform, 1213 differentially expressed genes (P<0.05), including 538 significantly up-regulated and 675 down-regulated, were detected in V. parahaemolyticus-infected crabs as compared to that in the controls. Transcript levels of randomly-chosen genes were further measured by quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the expression profiles. Many differentially expressed genes are involved in various immune processes, including stimulation of the Toll pathway, Immune Deficiency (IMD) pathway, Ras-regulated endocytosis, and proPO-activating system. Conclusions/Significance Analysis of the expression profile of crabs under infection provides invaluable new data for biological research in S. paramamosain, such as the identification of novel genes in the hemocytes during V. parahaemolyticus infection. These results will facilitate our comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response to bacterial

  10. RhoE deficiency alters postnatal subventricular zone development and the number of calbindin-expressing neurons in the olfactory bulb of mouse.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; González-Granero, Susana; Mocholí, Enric; Poch, Enric; García-Manzanares, María; Dierssen, Mara; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio; García-Verdugo, José M; Guasch, Rosa M; Terrado, José

    2015-11-01

    The subventricular zone represents an important reservoir of progenitor cells in the adult brain. Cells from the subventricular zone migrate along the rostral migratory stream and reach the olfactory bulb, where they originate different types of interneurons. In this work, we have analyzed the role of the small GTPase RhoE/Rnd3 in subventricular zone cell development using mice-lacking RhoE expression. Our results show that RhoE null mice display a remarkable postnatal broadening of the subventricular zone and caudal rostral migratory stream. This broadening was caused by an increase in progenitor proliferation, observed in the second postnatal week but not before, and by an altered migration of the cells, which appeared in disorganized cell arrangements that impaired the appropriate contact between cells in the rostral migratory stream. In addition, the thickness of the granule cell layer in the olfactory bulb was reduced, although the density of granule cells did not differ between wild-type and RhoE null mice. Finally, the lack of RhoE expression affected the olfactory glomeruli inducing a severe reduction of calbindin-expressing interneurons in the periglomerular layer. This was already evident in the newborns and even more pronounced 15 days later when RhoE null mice displayed 89% less cells than control mice. Our results indicate that RhoE has pleiotropic functions on subventricular cells because of its role in proliferation and tangential migration, affecting mainly the development of calbindin-expressing cells in the olfactory bulb. PMID:25009316

  11. Tandem repeats, high copy number and remarkable diel expression rhythm of form II RuBisCO in Prorocentrum donghaiense (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinguo; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2013-01-01

    Gene structure and expression regulation of form II RuBisCO (rbcII) in dinoflagellates are still poorly understood. Here we isolated this gene (Pdrbc) and investigated its diel expression pattern in a harmful algal bloom forming dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense. We obtained cDNA sequences with triple tandem repeats of the coding unit (CU); the 5' region has the sequence of a typical dinoflagellate plastid gene, encoding an N-terminus with two transmembrane regions separated by a plastid transit peptide. The CUs (1,455 bp except 1464 bp in last CU) are connected through a 63 bp spacer. Phylogenetic analysis showed that rbcII CUs within species formed monophyletic clusters, indicative of intraspecific gene duplication or purifying evolution. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) we estimated 117±40 CUs of Pdrbc in the P. donghaiense genome. Although it is commonly believed that most dinoflagellate genes lack transcriptional regulation, our RT-qPCR analysis on synchronized cultures revealed remarkable diel rhythm of Pdrbc expression, showing significant correlations of transcript abundance with the timing of the dark-to-light transition and cell cycle G2M-phase. When the cultures were shifted to continuous light, Pdrbc expression remained significantly correlated with the G2M-phase. Under continuous darkness the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase, and the rhythm of Pdrbc transcription disappeared. Our results suggest that dinoflagellate rbcII 1) undergoes duplication or sequence purification within species, 2) is organized in tandem arrays in most species probably to facilitate efficient translation and import of the encoded enzyme, and 3) is regulated transcriptionally in a cell cycle-dependent fashion at least in some dinoflagellates. PMID:23976999

  12. Systematic Review of Micro-RNA Expression in Pre-Eclampsia Identifies a Number of Common Pathways Associated with the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Adam M.; Currie, Gemma; Delles, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a complex, multi-systemic condition of pregnancy which greatly impacts maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRs) are differentially expressed in PE and may be important in helping to understand the condition and its pathogenesis. Methods Case-control studies investigating expression of miRs in PE were collected through a systematic literature search. Data was extracted and compared from 58 studies to identify the most promising miRs associated with PE pathogenesis and identify areas of methodology which could account for often conflicting results. Results Some of the most frequently differentially expressed miRs in PE include miR-210, miR-223 and miR-126/126* which associate strongly with the etiological domains of hypoxia, immunology and angiogenesis. Members of the miR-515 family belonging to the imprinted chromosome 19 miR cluster with putative roles in trophoblast invasion were also found to be differentially expressed. Certain miRs appear to associate with more severe forms of PE such as miR-210 and the immune-related miR-181a and miR-15 families. Patterns of miR expression may help pinpoint key pathways (e.g. IL-6/miR-223/STAT3) and aid in untangling the heterogeneous nature of PE. The detectable presence of many PE-associated miRs in antenatal circulatory samples suggests their usefulness as predictive biomarkers. Further progress in ascertaining the clinical value of miRs and in understanding how they might contribute to pathogenesis is predicated upon resolving current methodological challenges in studies. These include differences in diagnostic criteria, cohort characteristics, sampling technique, RNA isolation and platform-dependent variation in miR profiling. Conclusion Reviewing studies of PE-associated miRs has revealed their potential as informants of underlying target genes and pathways relating to PE pathogenesis. However, the incongruity in results across current studies hampers their

  13. Developing Meaning for Algebraic Procedures: An Exploration of the Connections Undergraduate Students Make between Algebraic Rational Expressions and Basic Number Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yantz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The attainment and retention of later algebra skills in high school has been identified as a factor significantly impacting the postsecondary success of students majoring in STEM fields. Researchers maintain that learners develop meaning for algebraic procedures by forming connections to the basic number system properties. The present study…

  14. Opposite Regulation of the Copy Number and the Expression of Plastid and Mitochondrial Genes by Light and Acetate in the Green Flagellate Chlorogonium.

    PubMed Central

    Kroymann, J.; Schneider, W.; Zetsche, K.

    1995-01-01

    In the unicellular green alga Chlorogonium elongatum (Chlamydomonadaceae), the formation of both the photosynthetic and the respiratory apparatus is under the control of light and acetate. Autotrophically cultured cells possess a 3-fold higher copy number of the plastid genes rbcL and psbA than cells cultivated in the dark with acetate (heterotrophic cells). Under mixotrophic conditions (light and acetate), both genes are present at an intermediate level. This pattern is repeated at the mRNA level. The amounts of rbcL and psbA mRNAs are approximately 3-fold higher in autotrophic cells than in heterotrophic ones and are intermediate in mixotrophic cells. As expected, the copy number of the nuclear-encoded rbcS gene is constant irrespective of the applied culture conditions. RbcS mRNA, however, is 7-fold more frequent in autotrophic than in heterotrophic cells. Again, mixotrophic cells show an intermediate level. In contrast to genes encoding plastid proteins, the copy number and transcript level of the mitochondrial cob gene are approximately 5-fold higher in heterotrophic cells than in autotrophic ones. As before, mixotrophic cells take an intermediate position. Therefore, light and acetate control the genes involved in the formation of either the photosynthetic or the respiratory apparatus in a coordinated but opposite manner. PMID:12228568

  15. Numbers, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelin, John R.

    2013-01-01

    What topic would you choose if you had the luxury of writing forever? In this article, John Thelin provides his response: He would opt to write about the history of higher education in a way that relies on quantitative data. "Numbers, please!" is his research request in taking on a longitudinal study of colleges and universities over…

  16. Numbers Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathotia, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on work undertaken by schools as part of Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's (QCA's) "Engaging mathematics for all learners" project. The goal was to use in the classroom, materials and approaches from a Royal Institution (Ri) Year 10 master-class, "Number Sense", which was inspired by examples from Michael Blastland and…

  17. Expression of ipt gene controlled by an ethylene and auxin responsive fragment of the LEACO1 promoter increases flower number in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Khodakovskaya, Mariya; Zhao, Degang; Smith, William; Li, Yi; McAvoy, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Cytokinins play important roles in regulating plant growth and development. A new genetic construct for regulating cytokinin content in plant cells was cloned and tested. The gene coding for isopentenyl transferase (ipt) was placed under the control of a 0.821 kb fragment of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene promoter from Lycopersicon esculentum (LEACO1) and introduced into Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Havana). Some LEACO1(0.821) (kb)-ipt transgenic plant lines displayed normal shoot morphology but with a dramatic increase in the number of flower buds compared to nontransgenic plants. Other transgenic lines produced excessive lateral branch development but no change in flower bud number. Isolated leaves of transgenic tobacco plants showed a significantly prolonged retention of chlorophyll under dark incubation (25 degrees C for 20 days). Leaves of nontransformed plants senesced gradually under the same conditions. Experiments with LEACO1(0.821) (kb)-gus transgenic tobacco plants suggested auxin and ethylene involvement in induction of LEACO1(0.821) (kb) promoter activity. Multiple copies of nucleotide base sequences associated with either ethylene or auxin response elements were identified in the LEACO1(0.821) (kb) promoter fragment. The LEACO1(0.821) (kb)-ipt fusion gene appears to have potential utility for improving certain ornamental and agricultural crop species by increasing flower bud initiation and altering branching habit. PMID:16786314

  18. Aspergillus niger genome-wide analysis reveals a large number of novel alpha-glucan acting enzymes with unexpected expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Lian; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Punt, Peter J; van der Maarel, Marc J E C; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Ram, Arthur F J

    2008-06-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to produce a large variety of enzymes for the degradation of plant polysaccharide material. A major carbon and energy source for this soil fungus is starch, which can be degraded by the concerted action of alpha-amylase, glucoamylase and alpha-glucosidase enzymes, members of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 13, 15 and 31, respectively. In this study we have combined analysis of the genome sequence of A. niger CBS 513.88 with microarray experiments to identify novel enzymes from these families and to predict their physiological functions. We have identified 17 previously unknown family GH13, 15 and 31 enzymes in the A. niger genome, all of which have orthologues in other aspergilli. Only two of the newly identified enzymes, a putative alpha-glucosidase (AgdB) and an alpha-amylase (AmyC), were predicted to play a role in starch degradation. The expression of the majority of the genes identified was not induced by maltose as carbon source, and not dependent on the presence of AmyR, the transcriptional regulator for starch degrading enzymes. The possible physiological functions of the other predicted family GH13, GH15 and GH31 enzymes, including intracellular enzymes and cell wall associated proteins, in alternative alpha-glucan modifying processes are discussed. PMID:18320228

  19. Effects of Zidovudine Treatment on Heart mRNA Expression and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Associated with Alterations in Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Composition in a Neonatal Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Snowdin, Jacob W.; Hsiung, Chia-Heng; Kesterson, Daniel G.; Kamath, Vasudeva G.

    2015-01-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a crucial component in HIV therapy. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), primarily 3′-azido-3′-thymidine (AZT [zidovudine]), have been used to treat both mothers and neonates. While AZT is being replaced with less toxic drugs in treating mothers in MTCT prevention, it is still commonly used to treat neonates. Problems related to mitochondrial toxicity and potential mutagenesis associated with AZT treatment have been reported in treated cohorts. Yet little is known concerning the metabolism and potential toxicity of AZT on embryonic and neonatal tissues, especially considering that the enzymes of nucleoside metabolism change dramatically as many tissues convert from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth during this period. AZT is known to inhibit thymidine phosphorylation and potentially alter deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools in adults. This study examines the effects of AZT on dNTP pools, mRNA expression of deoxynucleoside/deoxynucleotide metabolic enzymes, and mitochondrial DNA levels in a neonatal rat model. Results show that AZT treatment dramatically altered dNTP pools in the first 7 days of life after birth, which normalized to age-matched controls in the second and third weeks. Additionally, AZT treatment dramatically increased the mRNA levels of many enzymes involved in deoxynucleotide synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis during the first week of life, which normalized to age-matched controls by the third week. These results were correlated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA noted in the second week. Taken together, results demonstrated that AZT treatment has a powerful effect on the deoxynucleotide synthesis pathways that may be associated with toxicity and mutagenesis. PMID:26248377

  20. Early Ovariectomy Results in Reduced Numbers of CD11c+/CD11b+ Spleen Cells and Impacts Disease Expression in Murine Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Melissa A.; Wirth, Jena R.; Scott, Jennifer L.; Eudaly, Jackie; Collins, Erin L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ninety percent of those diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus are female, with peak incidence between the ages of 15 and 45, when women are most hormonally active. Despite significant research effort, the mechanisms underlying this sex bias remain unclear. We previously showed that a functional knockout of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) resulted in significantly reduced renal disease and increased survival in murine lupus. Dendritic cell (DC) development, which requires both estrogen and ERα, is impacted, as is activation status and cytokine production. Since both estrogen and testosterone levels have immunomodulating effects, we presently studied the phenotype of NZM2410 lupus-prone mice following post- and prepubertal ovariectomy (OVX) ± estradiol (E2) replacement to determine the impact of hormonal status on disease expression and DC development in these mice. We observed a trend toward survival benefit in addition to decreased proteinuria and improved renal histology in the early OVX, but not late OVX- or E2-repleted WT mice. Interestingly, there was also a significant difference in splenic DC subsets by flow cytometry. Spleens from NZM mice OVX’d early had a significant decrease in proinflammatory CD11c+CD11b+ DCs (vs. unmanipulated WTs, late OVX- and E2-repleted mice). These early OVX’d animals also had a significant increase in tolerogenic CD11c+CD8a+ DCs vs. WT. These data join a growing body of evidence that supports a role for hormone modulation of DCs that likely impacts the penetrance and severity of autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. PMID:26913030

  1. Association and prognostic significance of BRCA1/2-mutation status with neoantigen load, number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and expression of PD-1/PD-L1 in high grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kyle C.; Howitt, Brooke E.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Rodig, Scott; Ritterhouse, Lauren L.; Liu, Joyce F.; Garber, Judy E.; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Wu, Catherine J.; D'Andrea, Alan D.; Matulonis, Ursula A.; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (e.g., anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies) have demonstrated remarkable efficacy against hypermutated cancers such as melanomas and lung carcinomas. One explanation for this effect is that hypermutated lesions harbor more tumor-specific neoantigens that stimulate recruitment of an increased number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), which is counterbalanced by overexpression of immune checkpoints such as PD-1 or PD-L1. Given that BRCA1/2-mutated high grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) exhibit a higher mutational load and a unique mutational signature with an elevated number of larger indels up to 50 bp, we hypothesized that they may also harbor more tumor-specific neoantigens, and, therefore, exhibit increased TILs and PD-1/PD-L1 expression. Here, we report significantly higher predicted neoantigens in BRCA1/2-mutated tumors compared to tumors without alterations in homologous recombination (HR) genes (HR-proficient tumors). Tumors with higher neoantigen load were associated with improved overall survival and higher expression of immune genes associated with tumor cytotoxicity such as genes of the TCR, the IFN-gamma and the TNFR pathways. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that BRCA1/2-mutated tumors exhibited significantly increased CD3+ and CD8+ TILs, as well as elevated expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in tumor-associated immune cells compared to HR-proficient tumors. Survival analysis showed that both BRCA1/2-mutation status and number of TILs were independently associated with outcome. Of note, two distinct groups of HGSOCs, one with very poor prognosis (HR proficient with low number of TILs) and one with very good prognosis (BRCA1/2-mutated tumors with high number of TILs) were defined. These findings support a link between BRCA1/2-mutation status, immunogenicity and survival, and suggesting that BRCA1/2-mutated HGSOCs may be more sensitive to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors compared to HR-proficient HGSOCs. PMID

  2. Grid-generated isotropic homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to an empirical formula for the longitudinal correlation function for grid-generated incompressible fluid turbulence at Reynolds numbers above 12,800. The formula, which relates the longitudinal correlation function to the inverse cube of a dimensionless geometrical ratio, is shown to minimize the global correlation integrals into which the two-point velocity correlation tensor has been substituted subject to a global constraint on the Sobolev concomitent of the longitudinal correlation function. Furthermore, the energy spectrum function associated with the empirical formula is shown to satisfy a tertiary Helmholtz-type linear condition throughout the initial period of decay.

  3. Study of Nonlinear MHD Tribological Squeeze Film at Generalized Magnetic Reynolds Numbers Using DTM.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Mohammad Mehdi; Freidoonimehr, Navid; Momoniat, Ebrahim; Rostami, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    In the current article, a combination of the differential transform method (DTM) and Padé approximation method are implemented to solve a system of nonlinear differential equations modelling the flow of a Newtonian magnetic lubricant squeeze film with magnetic induction effects incorporated. Solutions for the transformed radial and tangential momentum as well as solutions for the radial and tangential induced magnetic field conservation equations are determined. The DTM-Padé combined method is observed to demonstrate excellent convergence, stability and versatility in simulating the magnetic squeeze film problem. The effects of involved parameters, i.e. squeeze Reynolds number (N1), dimensionless axial magnetic force strength parameter (N2), dimensionless tangential magnetic force strength parameter (N3), and magnetic Reynolds number (Rem) are illustrated graphically and discussed in detail. Applications of the study include automotive magneto-rheological shock absorbers, novel aircraft landing gear systems and biological prosthetics. PMID:26267247

  4. Study of Nonlinear MHD Tribological Squeeze Film at Generalized Magnetic Reynolds Numbers Using DTM

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohammad Mehdi; Freidoonimehr, Navid; Momoniat, Ebrahim; Rostami, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    In the current article, a combination of the differential transform method (DTM) and Padé approximation method are implemented to solve a system of nonlinear differential equations modelling the flow of a Newtonian magnetic lubricant squeeze film with magnetic induction effects incorporated. Solutions for the transformed radial and tangential momentum as well as solutions for the radial and tangential induced magnetic field conservation equations are determined. The DTM-Padé combined method is observed to demonstrate excellent convergence, stability and versatility in simulating the magnetic squeeze film problem. The effects of involved parameters, i.e. squeeze Reynolds number (N1), dimensionless axial magnetic force strength parameter (N2), dimensionless tangential magnetic force strength parameter (N3), and magnetic Reynolds number (Rem) are illustrated graphically and discussed in detail. Applications of the study include automotive magneto-rheological shock absorbers, novel aircraft landing gear systems and biological prosthetics. PMID:26267247

  5. A new Reynolds-number-dependent scaling law for turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, M.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2002-11-01

    There has been considerable controversy during the past few years concerning the validity of the universal logarithmic law that describes the mean velocity profile in the overlap region of a turbulent wall-bounded flow. New ideas follow from Lie-group analysis that considers linear, algebraic, logarithmic and exponential laws for the mean velocity of a stationary, parallel turbulent shear flow. The objective of the present work is to find a compact expression for the mean velocity profile of a canonical turbulent boundary layer, including parts of the buffer layer, the classical overlap region and parts of the wake region. Based on Afzal's extension of the two-layer approach, we propose herein a higher-order solution for the mean velocity profile. The new law depends on the Kármán number (ratio of outer to inner length scale) and the dimensionless wall-normal coordinate. The result is a profile that consists of a logarithmic term plus an exponential one. The logarithmic term includes an additional constant in the log that extends the profile toward the buffer layer. The exponential term is an expression for the wake component. Both terms represent a blending of two results that were derived from first principles by applying the Lie-group theory. For infinite Kármán number, the exponential term becomes constant and a law similar to the classical log law is found. In this case, the only difference between the new law and the classical log law is an additional constant inside the log. Therefore, no straight line will appear in the usual semi-log plot of the mean velocity profile. A comparison with experimental data and DNS results shows that the new law provides a superior fit.

  6. Decreased beige adipocyte number and mitochondrial respiration coincide with increased histone methyl transferase (G9a) and reduced FGF21 gene expression in Sprague-Dawley rats fed prenatal low protein and postnatal high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Claycombe, Kate J; Vomhof-DeKrey, Emilie E; Garcia, Rolando; Johnson, William Thomas; Uthus, Eric; Roemmich, James N

    2016-05-01

    We have shown that prenatal low-protein (LP) followed by postnatal high-fat (HF) diets result in a rapid increase in subcutaneous adipose tissue (subc-AT) mass in the offspring, contributing to development of obesity and insulin resistance. Studies have shown that a key transcription factor, PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16), and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) are involved in conversion of precursor cells into mitochondria (mt)-enriched beige adipocytes (BA). Our hypothesis is that a maternal LP and postnatal HF diets increase the risk of obesity and insulin resistance in offspring, in part, by reducing the conversion of precursor cell into BA in the subc-AT of offspring. Using obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats fed 8% LP or 20% normal-protein (NP) diets for 3 weeks prior to conception and throughout pregnancy and lactation followed by 12 weeks of 10% normal-fat (NF) or 45% HF diet feeding, we investigated whether prenatal LP and postnatal HF diets affect BA number and oxidative respiratory function in subc-AT. Results showed that subc-AT and liver FGF21, PRDM16 and BA marker CD137 mRNA increase with postnatal HF diet in maternal NP group rats. In contrast, rats fed maternal LP and postnatal HF diets showed no increase in subc-AT mt copy number, oxygen consumption rate, FGF21, PRDM16 and CD137 mRNA, whereas protein expression of an inhibitor for FGF21 transcription (histone methyltransferase, G9a) increased. These findings suggest that LPHF diets cause offspring metabolic alterations by reduced BA and FGF21 mRNA and increased G9a protein expression in subc-AT. PMID:27133430

  7. Down-Regulation of KCC2 Expression and Phosphorylation in Motoneurons, and Increases the Number of in Primary Afferent Projections to Motoneurons in Mice with Post-Stroke Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Takuya; Ishida, Kazuto; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide; Lee, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Spasticity obstructs motor function recovery post-stroke, and has been reported to occur in spinal cord injury and electrophysiological studies. The purpose of the present study was to assess spinal cord circuit spasticity in post-stroke mice. At 3, 7, 21, and 42 d after photothrombotic ischemic cortical injury in C57BL/6J mice, we observed decreased rate-dependent depression (RDD) of the Hoffmann reflex (H reflex) in the affected forelimb of mice compared with the limbs of sham mice and the non-affected forelimb. This finding suggests a hyper-excitable stretch reflex in the affected forelimb. We then performed immunohistochemical and western blot analyses to examine the expression of the potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) and phosphorylation of the KCC2 serine residue, 940 (S940), since this is the main chloride extruder that affects neuronal excitability. We also performed immunohistochemical analyses on the number of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGluT1)-positive boutons to count the number of Ia afferent fibers that connect to motoneurons. Western bolts revealed that, compared with sham mice, experimental mice had significantly reduced KCC2 expression at 7 d post-stroke, and dephosphorylated S940 at 3 and 7 d post-stroke in motoneuron plasma membranes. We also observed a lower density of KCC2-positive areas in the plasma membrane of motoneurons at 3 and 7 d post-stroke. However, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that there were no differences between groups 21 and 42 d post-stroke, respectively. In addition, at 7 and 42 d post-stroke, experimental mice exhibited a significant increase in vGluT1 boutons compared with sham mice. Our findings suggest that both the down-regulation of KCC2 and increases in Ia afferent fibers are involved in post-stroke spasticity. PMID:25546454

  8. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    PubMed

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  9. Topics in Number Theory: The Number Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batra, Laj, Ed.; And Others

    This teacher's guide contains nine topics in number theory. Suggested questions for the teacher, short investigations, and possible exercises for the student are included. Chapter 1 is an introduction to sequences and series using geoboard activities involving triangular numbers, square numbers, rectangular numbers, and pentagonal numbers. The…

  10. Experimental study of cold plume instability in large Prandtl number Czochralski melt: Parametric dependences and scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, E.; Kit, E.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A parametric experimental study of the cold plume instability that appears in the large-Prandtl-number Czochralski melt flows is reported. The critical temperature difference (the critical Grashof number) and the frequency of appearing oscillations were measured for varying Prandtl numbers, aspect ratios of the melt, and crystal/crucible radii ratio. The measurements were carried out by two independent and fully non-intrusive experimental techniques. The results are reported as dimensional and dimensionless parametric dependences, and then are joined into relatively simple empirical relations showing how the critical Grashof number and the frequency of emerging oscillations depend on other parameters.

  11. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 2; Acquire TM Date for Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 2 Satellite for the Period of March 12, 2000 to and Including June 15, 2000, Task 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  12. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 8; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express A" Number 3 Satellite for the Period of January 1, 2001 to and Including March 31, 2001, Task 27C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  13. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 4; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 3 Satellite, Task 27A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E., and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  14. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 10; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 3 Satellite for the Period of July 1, 2001 to and Including September 30, 2001, Task 27D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  15. Number Concepts with "Number Worlds": Thickening Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Peter; Sinclair, Nathalie; Zazkis, Rina

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the nature of preservice elementary school teachers' understandings of several concepts in elementary number theory that are evoked by a computer-based microworld called "Number Worlds". In particular, the focus is on the concepts of factor, multiple and prime number. The notion of "thickness" is examined with respect to…

  16. Press Law and Press Freedom for High School Publications: Court Cases and Related Decisions Discussing Free Expression Guarantees and Limitations for High School Students and Journalists. Contributions to the Study of Mass Media and Communications, Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingelhart, Louis E.

    According to this reference manual, the nation's courts offer public high school journalists the same constitutional protection for expression, free speech, and free press as adults. Part 1 traces the development of the First and Fourth Amendments and explains how these provisions apply to high school publications. Part 2 examines expression that…

  17. High Reynolds Number and Turbulence Effects on Turbine Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; vanFossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1994-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.0 x 10(exp 6) and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15%. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range or Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine turbopump turbines. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can generally be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparisons of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  18. Star Numbers and Constellations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A number for which the number of digits categorizes the number is called a star number. A set of star numbers having a designated property is called a constellation. Discusses nature and cardinality of constellations made up of star square, star prime, star abundant, and star deficient numbers. Presents five related problems for exploration. (MDH)

  19. Promote Number Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurganus, Susan

    2004-01-01

    "Number sense" is "an intuition about numbers that is drawn from all varied meanings of number" (NCTM, 1989, p. 39). Students with number sense understand that numbers are representative of objects, magnitudes, relationships, and other attributes; that numbers can be operated on, compared, and used for communication. It is fundamental knowledge…

  20. All Square Chiliagonal Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A?iru, Muniru A.

    2016-01-01

    A square chiliagonal number is a number which is simultaneously a chiliagonal number and a perfect square (just as the well-known square triangular number is both triangular and square). In this work, we determine which of the chiliagonal numbers are perfect squares and provide the indices of the corresponding chiliagonal numbers and square…

  1. A new approach to the formulation and validation of scaling expressions for plasma confinement in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Gelfusa, M.; Lupelli, I.; Gaudio, P.

    2015-07-01

    The extrapolation of the energy confinement time to the next generation of devices has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for several decades in the tokamak community. Various scaling expressions have been proposed using dimensional and dimensionless quantities. They are all based on the assumption that the scalings are in power law form. In this paper, an innovative methodology is proposed to extract the scaling expressions for the energy confinement time in tokamaks directly from experimental databases, without any previous assumption about the mathematical form of the scalings. The approach to obtain the scaling expressions is based on genetic programming and symbolic regression. These techniques have been applied to the ITPA database of H-mode discharges and the results have been validated with a series of established statistical tools. The soundest results, using dimensional variables, are not in the form of power laws but contain a multiplicative saturation term. Also the scalings, expressed in terms of the traditional dimensionless quantities, are not in power law form and contain additive saturation terms. The extrapolation to ITER of both dimensional and dimensionless quantities indicate that the saturation effects are quite significant and could imply a non-negligible reduction in the confinement time to be expected in the next generation of devices. The results obtained with the proposed techniques therefore motivate a systematic revisiting of the scaling expressions for plasma confinement in tokamaks.

  2. Flow instabilities behind rotating bluff bodies for moderate Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujon-Durand, Sophie; Gibi?Ski, Kornel; Skarysz, Maciej; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We present experiments to study the flow behind 3D bodies (spheres, disks and propellers) rotating about an axis aligned with the streamwise direction. The experiments has been performed in a water channel using LIF visualizations and PIV measurements. We study the flow evolution and the different flow regimes as a function of two control parameters: the Reynolds number Re and the dimensionless rotation or swirl rate Ω which is the ratio of the maximum azimuthal velocity of the body to the free stream velocity. In the present investigation, we covers the range of Re smaller than 400 and Ω from 0 to 4 in some cases. Different wakes regimes such as an axisymmetric base flow (or n-symmetric in the case of propellers), low frequency helicoidal states and higher frequency state are observed. The transitions between states are studied measuring the amplitude of the azimuthal modes components of the streamwise vorticity obtained by Fourier decomposition.

  3. 32 CFR 1602.19 - Numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Numbers. 1602.19 Section 1602.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.19 Numbers. Cardinal numbers may be expressed by Arabic or Roman symbols....

  4. 32 CFR 1602.19 - Numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Numbers. 1602.19 Section 1602.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.19 Numbers. Cardinal numbers may be expressed by Arabic or Roman symbols....

  5. 32 CFR 1602.19 - Numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Numbers. 1602.19 Section 1602.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.19 Numbers. Cardinal numbers may be expressed by Arabic or Roman symbols....

  6. 32 CFR 1602.19 - Numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Numbers. 1602.19 Section 1602.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.19 Numbers. Cardinal numbers may be expressed by Arabic or Roman symbols....

  7. 32 CFR 1602.19 - Numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Numbers. 1602.19 Section 1602.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.19 Numbers. Cardinal numbers may be expressed by Arabic or Roman symbols....

  8. Numbers Defy the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Lann, Avital Lavie

    2015-01-01

    As the number of independent tosses of a fair coin grows, the rates of heads and tails tend to equality. This is misinterpreted by many students as being true also for the absolute numbers of the two outcomes, which, conversely, depart unboundedly from each other in the process. Eradicating that misconception, as by coin-tossing experiments,…

  9. Novel methods for evaluation of the Reynolds number of synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordík, J.; Broučková, Z.; Vít, T.; Pavelka, M.; Trávníček, Z.

    2014-06-01

    The paper proposes four novel methods of evaluation of synthetic jet velocity amplitude (Reynolds number in dimensionless form). The methods are based on the measurement of synthetic jet actuator electrical input (alternating current and voltage) and are applicable for loudspeaker-based actuators with air as the working fluid. Experimental validations are performed by means of hot-wire anemometry and laser Doppler vibrometry. Uncertainty and limitation of the methods are discussed, including a proposal of an adequate incompressibility criterion. Ranges of applicability are specified. Additionally, the results are compared with available literature, namely with another method based on cavity pressure measurements, a good consistency is found.

  10. Factorialsum Number Chains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, John, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several phenomena in which interesting properties of numbers are demonstrated. Includes discussions of amicable, perfect, and sociable numbers. Presents computer programs for conducting a number chain search. (RT)

  11. Numbers and Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Eugene; Ginsburg, Jekuthiel

    Counting, naming numbers, numerals, computation, and fractions are the topics covered in this pamphlet. Number lore and interesting number properties are noted; the derivation of some arithmetic terms is briefly discussed. (DT)

  12. A universal number for wave reflection optimization of the mammalian cardiovascular system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying the optimum arterial wave reflection and systemic arterial function is essential to the evaluation of optimal cardiovascular system (CVS) operation. The CVS function depends on both the dynamics of the heart and wave dynamics of the arterial network. Here, we are introducing a universal dimensionless number, called wave condition number (α) that quantifies the arterial wave reflection. An in-vitro experimental approach, utilizing a unique hydraulic model was used to quantify α in human aortas with a wide range of aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that the optimum value of the wave condition number is 0.1 at each level of aortic rigidity. Looking into mammals of various size (from mice to elephant), our results show that the optimum wave condition number remains 0.1 and is universal among all mammals. Clinical applications and the relevancy of the wave condition number will also be discussed.

  13. IMPACT OF CAPILLARY AND BOND NUMBERS ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2002-09-30

    Recovery and recovery rate of oil, gas and condensates depend crucially on their relative permeability. Relative permeability in turn depends on the pore structure, wettability and flooding conditions, which can be represented by a set of dimensionless groups including capillary and bond numbers. The effect of flooding conditions on drainage relative permeabilities is not well understood and is the overall goal of this project. This project has three specific objectives: to improve the centrifuge relative permeability method, to measure capillary and bond number effects experimentally, and to develop a pore network model for multiphase flows. A centrifuge has been built that can accommodate high pressure core holders and x-ray saturation monitoring. The centrifuge core holders can operate at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and an overburden pressure of 17 MPa (2500 psi). The effect of capillary number on residual saturation and relative permeability in drainage flow has been measured. A pore network model has been developed to study the effect of capillary numbers and viscosity ratio on drainage relative permeability. Capillary and Reynolds number dependence of gas-condensate flow has been studied during well testing. A method has been developed to estimate relative permeability parameters from gas-condensate well test data.

  14. Building Numbers from Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  15. Enriching Number Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Exploring number systems of other cultures can be an enjoyable learning experience that enriches students' knowledge of numbers and number systems in important ways. It helps students deepen mental computation fluency, knowledge of place value, and equivalent representations for numbers. This article describes how the author designed her…

  16. Are Numbers Gendered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, James E. B.; Bodenhausen, Galen V.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the possibility that nonsocial, highly generic concepts are gendered. Specifically, we investigated the gender connotations of Arabic numerals. Across several experiments, we show that the number 1 and other odd numbers are associated with masculinity, whereas the number 2 and other even numbers are associated with femininity, in ways…

  17. Number Sense Made Simple Using Number Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Hui Fang Huang; Marinas, Carol; Furner, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights investigating intriguing number patterns utilising an emerging technology called the Square Tool. Mathematics teachers of grades K-12 will find the Square Tool useful in making connections and bridging the gap from the concrete to the abstract. Pattern recognition helps students discover various mathematical concepts. With…

  18. Similarity states of homogeneous stably-stratified turbulence at infinite Froude number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence of similarity states which may develop inhomogeneous stably-stratified flows if a dimensionless group in addition to the Reynolds number, the so-called Froude number, is sufficiently large. Here, we define the Froude number as the ratio of the internal wave time-scale to the turbulence time-scale. We examine three different similarity states which may develop depending on the initial conditions of the velocity and density fields. Theoretical arguments and results of large-eddy simulations will be presented. We will conclude this report with some speculative thoughts on similarity states which may develop in stably-stratified turbulence at arbitrary Froude number as well as our future research plans in this area.

  19. Estimation of a dimensionless group containing the product of matrix viscosity and a diffusive transport parameter from data on infilling of a boudin gap by component diffusion and matrix inflow: a back-of-the-envelope model with FEM refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Daniel Walter; Fletcher, Raymond Charles

    2013-04-01

    In many instances, simple field observations - requiring, however, extensive search for suitable examples - lead to estimates of rheological and transport parameters that may be obtained from simple analytical models. The structure of interest is the gap between separating boudins. The gap is filled initially by formation of a "pressure shadow", followed by matrix inflow. Here, flow of a viscous fluid between separating rigid plates is used to estimate the latter, with the pressure shadow assigned the same viscosity as the matrix. Dissolution along the upper boudin surface and precipitation along the gap surfaces, the two mediated by diffusion along a fluid film, is added to inflow to provide a back-of-the-envelope model for the process. The ratio of matrix inflow to the whole provides an estimate of the dimensionless group -24?(D?)c0V02 ? = H2 (H + L)RT where the quantities in the numerator are matrix viscosity, bulk diffusivity in aqueous fluid, interfacial film thickness, mean concentration of diffusing component, and specific volume of precipitating solid, and in the denominator, boudin layer thickness (2H), length (2L), gas constant and temperature kelvin. The rate of growth of the boudin gap (2Δ) is d (Δ ) [( Δ )3 ] - - = 4D¯xx - + ? dt H H where D¯xx is the bulk rate of extension. We apply this model to estimate parameter combinations that allow for observed boudin gap geometries. A further refinement of the present model has been carried out using the FEM. The implemented FEM model is free from the stringent constraints, especially regarding geometry, that underlie the analytical model. We compare the two and demonstrate where they are valid approximations to nature.

  20. Sum-Difference Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yixun

    2010-01-01

    Starting with an interesting number game sometimes used by school teachers to demonstrate the factorization of integers, "sum-difference numbers" are defined. A positive integer n is a "sum-difference number" if there exist positive integers "x, y, w, z" such that n = xy = wz and x ? y = w + z. This paper characterizes all sum-difference numbers…

  1. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  2. The Remarkable Number "1"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-01-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God…

  3. Number Relationships in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Myoungwhon

    2011-01-01

    When a child understands number relationships, he or she comprehends the meaning of numbers by developing multiple, flexible ways of representing them. The importance of developing number relationships in the early years has been highlighted because it helps children build a good foundation for developing a more sophisticated understanding of…

  4. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  5. Atomic Fisher information versus atomic number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Á.; Sen, K. D.

    2006-12-01

    It is shown that the Thomas Fermi Fisher information is negative. A slightly more sophisticated model proposed by Gáspár provides a qualitatively correct expression for the Fisher information: Gáspár's Fisher information is proportional to the two-third power of the atomic number. Accurate numerical calculations show an almost linear dependence on the atomic number.

  6. Flying and swimming animals cruise at a Strouhal number tuned for high power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Graham K.; Nudds, Robert L.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    2003-10-01

    Dimensionless numbers are important in biomechanics because their constancy can imply dynamic similarity between systems, despite possible differences in medium or scale. A dimensionless parameter that describes the tail or wing kinematics of swimming and flying animals is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, which divides stroke frequency (f) and amplitude (A) by forward speed (U). St is known to govern a well-defined series of vortex growth and shedding regimes for airfoils undergoing pitching and heaving motions. Propulsive efficiency is high over a narrow range of St and usually peaks within the interval 0.2 < St < 0.4 (refs 3-8). Because natural selection is likely to tune animals for high propulsive efficiency, we expect it to constrain the range of St that animals use. This seems to be true for dolphins, sharks and bony fish, which swim at 0.2 < St < 0.4. Here we show that birds, bats and insects also converge on the same narrow range of St, but only when cruising. Tuning cruise kinematics to optimize St therefore seems to be a general principle of oscillatory lift-based propulsion.

  7. Flying and swimming animals cruise at a Strouhal number tuned for high power efficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Nudds, Robert L; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2003-10-16

    Dimensionless numbers are important in biomechanics because their constancy can imply dynamic similarity between systems, despite possible differences in medium or scale. A dimensionless parameter that describes the tail or wing kinematics of swimming and flying animals is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, which divides stroke frequency (f) and amplitude (A) by forward speed (U). St is known to govern a well-defined series of vortex growth and shedding regimes for airfoils undergoing pitching and heaving motions. Propulsive efficiency is high over a narrow range of St and usually peaks within the interval 0.2 < St < 0.4 (refs 3-8). Because natural selection is likely to tune animals for high propulsive efficiency, we expect it to constrain the range of St that animals use. This seems to be true for dolphins, sharks and bony fish, which swim at 0.2 < St < 0.4. Here we show that birds, bats and insects also converge on the same narrow range of St, but only when cruising. Tuning cruise kinematics to optimize St therefore seems to be a general principle of oscillatory lift-based propulsion. PMID:14562101

  8. Molten droplet deposition and solidification at low Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Sonin, Ain A.

    1997-11-01

    Low Weber number deposition of small molten droplets on cold targets is of importance in certain dropwise buildup processes, but at this time, critical elements are absent from our theoretical understanding of the deposition process, and prediction from basic principles is not possible. This paper lays down a framework for understanding low Weber number deposition in terms of similarity laws and experimentation. Based on experiments from the highly viscous limit to the inertia-dominated limit, correlations are given for the spreading velocity, spreading time scales, post-spreading oscillation amplitudes, and oscillation damping time scales. Molten droplets are arrested, and their final solid shape determined, by contact line freezing. In homologous deposition, where the drop and the target are of the same material, the spreading factor is determined principally by the Stefan number, the dimensionless parameter which measures the temperature difference between the fusion point and the target temperature. Some concluding remarks are offered on what needs to be done to accurately compute such deposition processes.

  9. On Comparing Two Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This article expresses concern for the sloppy language that is often used by the media to describe numerical comparisons and suggests guidelines for how such comparisons should be described such that the meanings are unambiguous.

  10. Curvature and Tachibana numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Sergey E

    2011-07-31

    The aim of this paper is to define the rth Tachibana number t{sub r} of an n-dimensional compact oriented Riemannian manifold as the dimension of the space of conformally Killing r-forms, for r=1,2,...,n-1. We also describe properties of these numbers, by analogy with properties of the Betti numbers b{sub r} of a compact oriented Riemannian manifold. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  11. High Reynolds Number Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required are discussed. The operational characteristics and design features of the National Transonic Facility are reviewed.

  12. Templates, Numbers & Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemesha, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how a second-grade class used large templates to draw and paint five-digit numbers. The lesson integrated artistic knowledge and vocabulary with their mathematics lesson in place value. Students learned how draftspeople use templates, and they studied number paintings by Charles Demuth and Jasper Johns. (KM)

  13. Genetics by the Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Science > Genetics by the Numbers Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Genetics by the Numbers By Chelsea ... Genetics NIH's National DNA Day This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  14. The Fibonacci Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onstad, Torgeir

    1991-01-01

    After a brief historical account of Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci, some basic results concerning the Fibonacci numbers are developed and proved, and entertaining examples are described. Connections are made between the Fibonacci numbers and the Golden Ratio, biological nature, and other combinatorics examples. (MDH)

  15. The Number Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Herta Taussig; Freitag, Arthur H.

    The development of number concepts from prehistoric time to the present day are presented. Section 1 presents the historical development, logical development, and the infinitude of numbers. Section 2 focuses on non-positional and positional numeration systems. Section 3 compares historical and modern techniques and devices for computation. Section…

  16. First Graders' Number Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jonathan N.; Tabor, Pamela D.; Wright, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    As young children make sense of mathematics, they begin to see with new eyes. What once was uncertain may now be determined. Objects become countable; fingers become tools; and numbers become more than just names. Educators revel in such developments--which mark significant progress toward more sophisticated understanding of number--and work…

  17. Avogadro's Number Ferromagnetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Avogadro's number, usually denoted by N[subscript A], plays a fundamental role in both physics and chemistry. It defines the extremely useful concept of the mole, which is the base unit of the amount of matter in the international system of units. The fundamental character of this number can also be illustrated by its appearance in the definitions…

  18. Numbers in Action

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL. PMID:27524965

  19. High-Reynolds Number Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two coaxial co- or counter-rotating cylinders, is one of the paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids. The (dimensionless) control parameters are the Reynolds numbers of the inner and outer cylinders, the ratio of the cylinder radii, and the aspect ratio. One key response of the system is the torque required to retain constant angular velocities, which can be connected to the angular velocity transport through the gap. Whereas the low-Reynolds number regime was well explored in the 1980s and 1990s of the past century, in the fully turbulent regime major research activity developed only in the past decade. In this article, we review this recent progress in our understanding of fully developed Taylor-Couette turbulence from the experimental, numerical, and theoretical points of view. We focus on the parameter dependence of the global torque and on the local flow organization, including velocity profiles and boundary layers. Next, we discuss transitions between different (turbulent) flow states. We also elaborate on the relevance of this system for astrophysical disks (quasi-Keplerian flows). The review ends with a list of challenges for future research on turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

  20. Logo and Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Candace A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes LOGO's turtle graphics capabilities based on a sixth-grade classroom's activities with negative numbers and Logo programming. A sidebar explains LOGO and offers suggestions to teachers for using LOGO effectively. (LRW)

  1. Nursing by numbers.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Keith

    In the face of NHS budget cuts, nurses are being asked to justify their workforce numbers. Keith Hurst reviews some of the tools available for calculating staffing levels, examines their pros and cons, and discusses their application. PMID:17087410

  2. The Numbers Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustick, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes a simple activity that explores and reveals the principles of significant figures and scientific notation using a 500 gram bag of unpopped popcorn. Students must devise a method for determining the number of kernels in the bag. (DDR)

  3. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  4. Fibonacci's Forgotten Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ezra; Brunson, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Fibonacci's forgotten number is the sexagesimal number 1;22,7,42,33,4,40, which he described in 1225 as an approximation to the real root of x[superscript 3] + 2x[superscript 2] + 10x - 20. In decimal notation, this is 1.36880810785...and it is correct to nine decimal digits. Fibonacci did not reveal his method. How did he do it? There is also a…

  5. Density distribution of free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2)-expressing and GLP-1-producing enteroendocrine L cells in human and rat lower intestine, and increased cell numbers after ingestion of fructo-oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Tanaka, Ryo; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2011-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a multifunctional hormone in glucose metabolism and intestinal function released by enteroendocrine L-cells. The plasma concentration of GLP-1 is increased by indigestible carbohydrates and luminal infusion of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). However, the triggers and modulators of the GLP-1 release remain unclear. We hypothesized that SCFAs produced by bacterial fermentation are involved in enteroendocrine cell proliferation and hormone release through free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2, also known as FFAR2 or GPR43) in the large intestine. Fructo-oligosaccharide (Fructo-OS), fermentable indigestible carbohydrate, was used as a source of SCFAs. Rats were fed an indigestible-carbohydrate-free diet (control) or a 5% Fructo-OS-containing diet for 28 days. FFA2-, GLP-1-, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-positive enteroendocrine cells were quantified immunohistochemically in the colon, cecum, and terminal ileum. The same analysis was performed in surgical specimens from human lower intestine. The coexpression of FFA2 with GLP-1 was investigated both in rats and humans. Fructo-OS supplementation in rats increased the densities of FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells in rat proximal colon, by over two-fold, relative to control, in parallel with GLP-1-containing L-cells. The segmental distributions of these cells in human were similar to rats fed the control diet. The FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells were GLP-1-containing L-cells, but not 5-HT-containing EC cells, in both human and rat colon and terminal ileum. Fermentable indigestible carbohydrate increases the number of FFA2-positive L-cells in the proximal colon. FFA2 activation by SCFAs might be an important trigger for produce and release GLP-1 by enteroendocrine L-cells in the lower intestine. PMID:21113792

  6. Details of Exact Low Prandtl Number Boundary-Layer Solutions for Forced and For Free Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, E. M.; Gregg, J. L.

    1959-01-01

    A detailed report is given of exact (numerical) solutions of the laminar-boundary-layer equations for the Prandtl number range appropriate to liquid metals (0.003 to 0.03). Consideration is given to the following situations: (1) forced convection over a flat plate for the conditions of uniform wall temperature and uniform wall heat flux, and (2) free convection over an isothermal vertical plate. Tabulations of the new solutions are given in detail. Results are presented for the heat-transfer and shear-stress characteristics; temperature and velocity distributions are also shown. The heat-transfer results are correlated in terms of dimensionless parameters that vary only slightly over the entire liquid-metal range. Previous analytical and experimental work on low Prandtl number boundary layers is surveyed and compared with the new exact solutions.

  7. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  8. Beyond the Number Domain

    PubMed Central

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Platt, Michael L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    In a world without numbers, we would be unable to build a skyscraper, hold a national election, plan a wedding, or pay for a chicken at the market. The numerical symbols used in all these behaviors build on the approximate number system (ANS) which represents the number of discrete objects or events as a continuous mental magnitude. In this review, we first discuss evidence that the ANS bears a set of behavioral and brain signatures that are universally displayed across animal species, human cultures, and development. We then turn to the question of whether the ANS constitutes a specialized cognitive and neural domain--a question central to understanding how this system works, the nature of its evolutionary and developmental trajectory, and its physical instantiation in the brain. PMID:19131268

  9. Quantum random number generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Here, quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness — coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  10. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Here, quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at amore » high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  11. High Reynolds number and turbulence effects on aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.5 x 10 exp 6 and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15 percent. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range of Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump turbines. Specifically, the study aimed to determine (1) the effect of Reynolds number on heat transfer, (2) the effect of upstream turbulence on heat transfer and pressure distribution, and (3) the relationship between heat transfer at high Reynolds numbers and the current data base. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparison of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  12. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  13. Introducing Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudgian, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    One of the difficulties in any teaching of mathematics is to bridge the divide between the abstract and the intuitive. Throughout school one encounters increasingly abstract notions, which are more and more difficult to relate to everyday experiences. This article examines a familiar approach to thinking about negative numbers, that is an…

  14. Uniform random number generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Methods are presented for the generation of random numbers with uniform and normal distributions. Subprogram listings of Fortran generators for the Univac 1108, SDS 930, and CDC 3200 digital computers are also included. The generators are of the mixed multiplicative type, and the mathematical method employed is that of Marsaglia and Bray.

  15. Number in Classifier Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomoto, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Classifier languages are often described as lacking genuine number morphology and treating all common nouns, including those conceptually count, as an unindividuated mass. This study argues that neither of these popular assumptions is true, and presents new generalizations and analyses gained by abandoning them. I claim that no difference exists…

  16. "Better than Their Numbers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses College Summit, a nonprofit effort centered around the premise that there is a sizable number of students who are more capable of college academics than their test scores and grade point averages suggest. Its four-day summer sessions are focused not on ramping up students' academic performance but in mining students'…

  17. The Net by Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurdo, George

    1996-01-01

    The expansion of the commercial Internet has encouraged the interpretation of the Internet and its uses as a potential marketing medium. Examines statistical and demographic information about the Internet including number of Internet hosts and World Wide Web servers, and estimates of Internet users; and raises questions about definitions and…

  18. Counting and Number Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollefsrud-Anderson, Linda

    This study assessed estimation skills on both static and transformation (conservation) tasks on numerosities ranging from 3 to 16, and included addition and subtraction trials to control for response bias. A total of 148 four- and five-year-old children estimated the number of balls of yarn sewn on elastic straps, and participated in 1 addition, 1…

  19. Paint by Numbers Revived!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Nic

    2012-01-01

    Remember paint by numbers? This revived trend was a perfect solution to teaching geometric shapes to the author's first-grade students. Geometric shapes are identified and used in early elementary art classrooms, but this lesson gives students a deeper understanding of shape, encourages problem-solving, and makes a strong correlation between math…

  20. Playing the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Some say that the educators now have a gender-stratified system of higher education, with nearly 60 percent of all undergraduates being women and fewer men attending each year. The battle for gender equity for women in higher education has been a long and contentious one. In the decades since, increasing numbers of women have gone to college, to…

  1. Fun with Safronov Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Damian Joseph; Lund, M. B.

    2010-10-01

    A growing number (over 100!) of extra-solar planets (ESPs) have been discovered by transit photometry, and these systems are important because the transit strongly constrains their orbital inclination and allows accurate physical parameters for the planet to be derived, especially their radii. Their mass-radius relation allows us to probe their internal structure. In the present work we calculate Safronov numbers for the current sample of ESP and compare their masses and radii to current models with the goal of obtaining better constrains on their formation processes. Our calculation of Safronov numbers for the current TESP sample does show 2 classes, although about 20% lie above the formal Class I definition. These trends and recent results that argue against a useful distinction between Safronov classes are under further investigation. Mass-radius relations for the current sample of TESP are inconsistent with ESP models with very large core masses (> 100 M_Earth). Most TESP with radii near 1R_J are consistent with models with no core mass or core masses of 10 M_Earth. The inflated planets, with radii >1.2 R_J are not consistent with current ESP models, but may lie along the lower end of models for brown dwarfs. Although such models are nascent, it is important to establish trends for the current sample of ESP, which will further the understanding of their formation and evolution.

  2. Leading by numbers.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2005-01-01

    We measure to determine where we stand financially or in our quality outcomes. As people see the connection of measures and the success of the company, everything makes more sense. Izzo (2005) writes that profits/net margins are important to an organization and are like oxygen to a person. If we have oxygen, we can focus on the important things in life; if we don't we are preoccupied with gasping for air. Organizations are the same way. With the oxygen of profits, organizations can focus on those things that matter most to the staff and the customer. But when the search for profits becomes obsessive because of greed for excess profits or impending financial doom, everybody loses. Izzo (2005) reminds us that organizations shouldn't exist for only profit, just as people don't exist for only oxygen. Oxygen is merely an enabler for us to do the work of living. Measurement and numbers are the oxygen needed to achieve excellence. As people in organizations use numbers as their servants rather than being slaves to numbers, everyone will succeed. If the use of measurement is seen as punitive, and not a system of serving people to attain that zest for business and a higher mission, we will not achieve the level of excellence our people, patients, and communities deserve. PMID:16033147

  3. The Remarkable Number "1"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-09-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God made the integers; all else is the work of man," has spawned a lively modern philosophical discussion, and this discussion begins by trying to get a philosophical handle on "1." This approach remains under heavy discussion, and is more-or-less unresolved (Frege in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (English: The foundations of arithmetic). Polhman, 1884). In this note, we consider the many facets of "one" in it many guises and applications. Nonetheless, "one" has multiple meanings, from the very practical to the abstract, from mathematics to science to basically everything. We examine here a mere slice of mathematical history with a focus on the most basic and applicable concept therein. It troubles many, particularly students, even today.

  4. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  5. Nomogram for sunspot numbers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upreti, U. C.

    1997-12-01

    Nomogram construction using the parabolic relationship f0F2 = a0+a1R12+a2R122 between monthly median f0F2 and running average sunspot number (RASSN) R12 values has been described; here a0, a1 and a2 are the best fit coefficients. The nomogram can give the required local effective sunspot number (LESSN) values corresponding to any observed value of f0F2. Transforming the f0F2-RASSN relation to the form R122+pR12+q = 0 [where p = a1/a2 and q = (a0-f0F2)/a2], a practical method for the preparation of a single nomogram for f0F2-RASSN has been described and the problem of very high and very low values of the variables has also been dealt with successfully. A single nomogram for a large range of variables, namely, f0F2, a0, a1, and a2 has been obtained so that one can easily find LESSN values at any location, season, and time. The nomogram tends to minimize the errors in LESSN calculations at all levels of solar activity.

  6. Semi-analytical solution for the in-vitro sedimentation, diffusion and dosimetry model: surveying the impact of the Peclet number.

    PubMed

    Mahnama, Ali; Ghorbaniasl, Ghader; Allaei, S Mehdi Vaez; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Reducing size of the particles to the nanoscale range gives them new physicochemical properties. Several experiments have shown cytotoxic effects for different kinds of engineered nanoparticles (ENP). In-vitro cell culture assays are widely utilized by researchers to evaluate cytotoxic effects of the ENPs. The present paper deals with the "In vitro Sedimentation, Diffusion and Dosimetry (ISDD)" model. This mathematical model uses an advection-diffusion equation with specific assumptions and coefficients to estimate the dose of the particles delivered to the cells monolayer in the culture medium. In the present work, utilizing the generalized integral transform technique (GITT), a semi-analytical solution is developed for the ISDD model. The parameters affecting the ISDD predictions are integrated into two dimensionless numbers, Pe and τ. The Pe number shows the ratio of the convective to the diffusive mass transport rates and τ is a dimensionless time parameter. The quality of the results for an extensive range of Pe and τ numbers is surveyed through application of the developed formula to two series of test cases. A comparison of the results with those obtained from numerical methods shows deviations in the numerical results at high Pe numbers. Applying the developed formula, ISDD predictions for a wide practical range of Pe and τ numbers are calculated and plotted in two- and three-dimensional plots. The curves and formula obtained in this study facilitate the achievement of ISDD predictions with higher accuracies and capabilities for verification of the results. PMID:25064483

  7. An introduction to hyperharmonic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cereceda, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In this note, we deal with a generalization of the harmonic numbers proposed by Conway and Guy in their Book of Numbers, namely, the so-called hyperharmonic numbers. Our main aim is to prove, by mathematical induction, the formula defining the hyperharmonic numbers in terms of ordinary harmonic numbers. Moreover, we calculate the hyperharmonic numbers as the derivative of a certain binomial coefficient.

  8. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  9. CRC octane number requirement survey for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    An annual statistical survey of octane number requirements of current model vehicles is conducted by the Coordinating Research Council, Inc. Test data have been obtained by eighteen companies on 391 1989 vehicles including passenger cars and light-duty trucks and vans, of which 179 were equipped with knock sensors. Maximum octane number requirements were determined by testing at maximum-throttle conditions, as well as at part-throttle, with three unleaded fuel series of varying sensitivities. Requirements are expressed as the (R+M)/2 octane number, Research octane number, and Motor octane number of the reference fuel producing knock which was recurrent and repeatable at the lowest audible level. Estimated octane number requirements for the total vehicles are weighted in proportion to the 1989 vehicle model production and/or sales figures. The maximum octane number requirements of 1989 models with average sensitivity unleaded fuels were 85.1 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 50 percent satisfaction level, and 89.2 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 90 percent satisfaction level. Comparison with previous Surveys are made in this report.

  10. CRC octane number requirement survey 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    An annual statistical survey of octane number requirements of current model vehicles is conducted by the Coordinating Research Council, Inc. Test data have been obtained by ten companies on 184 1992 vehicles including passenger cars and light-duty trucks and vans, of which 88 were equipped with knock sensors. Octane number requirements were determined by testing at maximum-throttle conditions, as well as at part-throttle, with four unleaded fuel series of varying sensitivities, one containing 15 percent methyl tertiary butyl ether. Requirements are expressed as the (R+M)/2 octane number, Research octane number, and Motor octane number of the reference fuel producing knock which was recurrent and repeatable at the lowest audible level. Estimated octane number requirements for the total vehicles are weighted in proportion to the 1992 vehicle model production and/or sales figures. The octane number requirements of 1992 models with average sensitivity unleaded fuels were 85.1 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 50 percent satisfaction level, and 92.0 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 90 percent satisfaction level. In order to make a more powerful test of statistical significance of the FBRUM fuel series, the 1991 ONRS was pooled with the 1992 ONRS and compared with the pooled data for the FBRU fuel series. There was no significant difference between the two fuel series up to about 90 percent satisfaction. Beyond 90 percent satisfaction, the variability in the data is high.

  11. CRC octane-number-requirement survey, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    An annual statistical survey of octane number requirements of current model vehicles is conducted by the Coordinating Research Council, Inc. Test data have been obtained by seventeen companies on 356 1990 vehicles including passenger cars and light-duty trucks and vans, of which 169 were equipped with knock sensors. Octane number requirements were determined by testing at maximum-throttle conditions, as well as at part-throttle, with three unleaded fuel series of varying sensitivities. Requirements are expressed as the (R+M)/2 octane number, Research octane number, and Motor octane number of the reference fuel producing knock which was recurrent and repeatable at the lowest audible level. Estimated octane number requirements for the total vehicles are weighted in proportion to the 1990 vehicle model production and/or sales figures. The octane number requirements of 1990 models with average sensitivity unleaded fuels were 85.4 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 50 percent satisfaction level, and 89.2 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 90 percent satisfaction level.

  12. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate...

  13. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate...

  14. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate...

  15. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate...

  16. 7 CFR 29.9205 - Identification number (farm serial number).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification number (farm serial number). 29.9205 Section 29.9205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... number (farm serial number). The serial number assigned to an individual farm by the appropriate...

  17. The Akiyama-Tanigawa algorithm for Bernoulli numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Masanobu

    2000-12-01

    A direct proof is given for Akiyama and Tanigawa's algorithm for computing Bernoulli numbers. The proof uses a closed formula for Bernoulli numbers expressed in terms of Stirling numbers. The outcome of the same algorithm with different initial values is also briefly discussed.

  18. Flow and heat transfer with pressure gradients, Reynolds number and surface curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Umur, H.

    2000-04-01

    The combined effects of pressure gradients, Reynolds number and surface curvature on heat transfer are of great importance for such as gas turbine engines so that this investigation was conducted to enhance the knowledge of heat transfer prediction. Flow and heat transfer characteristics in laminar flows were investigated with pressure gradients, streamwise distance Reynolds number and wall curvature. Measurements were carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a dimensionless streamwise pressure gradient parameter of k{sub x}(=x/u{sub m}du{sub m}/dx) between {minus}0.4 and 1.0. Results were compared with analytical solutions and numerical predictions and a new empirical equation as a function of k{sub x}. It was found that Stanton numbers augmentation with Reynolds number became more pronounced than concave curvature. Favorable pressure gradients caused heat transfer to increase and adverse pressure gradients to decrease. The also results showed that the distribution of Stanton numbers with acceleration has similar trends with analytical solutions and numerical predictions. The proposed equation showed much better agreement with the measured Stanton numbers, in case of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients.

  19. Importance of wave-number dependence of Biot numbers in one-sided models of evaporative Marangoni instability: Horizontal layer and spherical droplet.

    PubMed

    Machrafi, H; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P; Dauby, P C

    2015-05-01

    A one-sided model of the thermal Marangoni instability owing to evaporation into an inert gas is developed. Two configurations are studied in parallel: a horizontal liquid layer and a spherical droplet. With the dynamic gas properties being admittedly negligible, one-sided approaches typically hinge upon quantifying heat and mass transfer through the gas phase by means of transfer coefficients (like in the Newton's cooling law), which in dimensionless terms eventually corresponds to using Biot numbers. Quite a typical arrangement encountered in the literature is a constant Biot number, the same for perturbations of different wavelengths and maybe even the same as for the reference state. In the present work, we underscore the relevance of accounting for its wave-number dependence, which is especially the case in the evaporative context with relatively large values of the resulting effective Biot number. We illustrate the effect in the framework of the Marangoni instability thresholds. As a concrete example, we consider HFE-7100 (a standard refrigerant) for the liquid and air for the inert gas. PMID:26066259

  20. Percents Are Not Natural Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Adults are prone to treating percents, one representational format of rational numbers, as novel cases of natural number. This suggests that percent values are not differentiated from natural numbers; a conceptual shift from the natural numbers to the rational numbers has not yet occurred. This is most surprising, considering people are inundated…

  1. Experimental investigation of free-convection heat transfer in vertical tube at large Grashof numbers / E. R. G. Eckert, A. J. Diaguila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1952-01-01

    Local free-convection heat-transfer coefficients and temperature fields in the turbulent flow range were obtained within a vertical, stationary tube closed at the boom, heated along its walls, and having a length-to-diameter ratio of 5. Convective heat-transfer coefficients were correlated by the general relations for free-convection heat transfer. These coefficients, converted to dimensionless Nusselt numbers were 35 percent below known relations for vertical flat plates. Air temperature measurements within the tube indicated a thin boundary layer along the heated wall surface and unstable conditions in the air flow.

  2. Parametric number covariance in quantum chaotic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinayak, Kumar, Sandeep; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-03-01

    We study spectral parametric correlations in quantum chaotic systems and introduce the number covariance as a measure of such correlations. We derive analytic results for the classical random matrix ensembles using the binary correlation method and obtain compact expressions for the covariance. We illustrate the universality of this measure by presenting the spectral analysis of the quantum kicked rotors for the time-reversal invariant and time-reversal noninvariant cases. A local version of the parametric number variance introduced earlier is also investigated.

  3. Parametric number covariance in quantum chaotic spectra.

    PubMed

    Vinayak; Kumar, Sandeep; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-03-01

    We study spectral parametric correlations in quantum chaotic systems and introduce the number covariance as a measure of such correlations. We derive analytic results for the classical random matrix ensembles using the binary correlation method and obtain compact expressions for the covariance. We illustrate the universality of this measure by presenting the spectral analysis of the quantum kicked rotors for the time-reversal invariant and time-reversal noninvariant cases. A local version of the parametric number variance introduced earlier is also investigated. PMID:27078354

  4. Even Perfect Numbers: (Update)2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezuszka, Stanley J.; Kenney, Margaret J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an assignment given to students to produce a report on perfect numbers and their properties. Summarizes the history of perfect numbers and their features. Recommends spreadsheet, theoretical, and programming activities on perfect numbers. (ASK)

  5. Low Reynolds number multiple-time-scale turbulence model and calculations of steady and pulsating shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1992-05-01

    A low Reynolds number multiple-time-scale turbulence model (LMS) and its application to fully developed turbulent channel flows and pulsating pipe flows are presented. The LMS can describe the inequilibrium turbulence phenomena down to the viscous sublayer. The calculated fluid flow and turbulence fields for the channel flows are in better agreement with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) results than those obtained using a Reynolds stress turbulence model, and the calculated near-wall dissipation rates are in qualitatively correct agreement with the DNS results. The LMS also successfully predicts the rapidly varying phase-lead of the wall shearing stress that occurs in a narrow range of the dimensionless frequency omega (+) = (omega x nu)/(upsilon x tau(exp2)) for the pulsating pipe flows while various other turbulence models fail to predict this phenomenon, and the LMS yields significantly improved numerical results for a wide range of the dimensionless frequency compared with those obtained using a rapid distortion theory (RDT).

  6. Low Reynolds number multiple-time-scale turbulence model and calculations of steady and pulsating shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1992-01-01

    A low Reynolds number multiple-time-scale turbulence model (LMS) and its application to fully developed turbulent channel flows and pulsating pipe flows are presented. The LMS can describe the inequilibrium turbulence phenomena down to the viscous sublayer. The calculated fluid flow and turbulence fields for the channel flows are in better agreement with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) results than those obtained using a Reynolds stress turbulence model, and the calculated near-wall dissipation rates are in qualitatively correct agreement with the DNS results. The LMS also successfully predicts the rapidly varying phase-lead of the wall shearing stress that occurs in a narrow range of the dimensionless frequency omega (+) = (omega x nu)/(upsilon x tau(exp2)) for the pulsating pipe flows while various other turbulence models fail to predict this phenomenon, and the LMS yields significantly improved numerical results for a wide range of the dimensionless frequency compared with those obtained using a rapid distortion theory (RDT).

  7. Number Games, Magnitude Representation, and Basic Number Skills in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Jemma Catherine; Bull, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 3 intervention board games (linear number, linear color, and nonlinear number) on young children's (mean age = 3.8 years) counting abilities, number naming, magnitude comprehension, accuracy in number-to-position estimation tasks, and best-fit numerical magnitude representations was examined. Pre- and posttest performance was…

  8. The effect of Bond number on pool boiling for mini-fin surfaces and different working fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strąk, Ewelina; Pastuszko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Experimental nucleate pool boiling data were collected for structures in the form of extended surfaces sintered with perforated foil. The article describes experimental investigations for two kinds of surfaces: smooth and mini-fins with sintered perforated foil (MFP). The MFP surfaces were manufactured out of perforated copper foil (pore diameters: 0.05 - 0.3 mm) sintered with the mini-fins, uniformly spaced on the base surface. The experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure for four kinds of the fluids: water, ethanol, FC-72 and Novec 649. The results for these working fluids were compared in terms of the Bond number and other dimensionless parameters. For all working fluids, the heat transfer coefficients obtained for the MFP surfaces were from 2 to 5 times higher than those for the smooth surface. Using a regression analysis with reference to selected physical properties and several characteristic dimensions, it was possible to develop a correlation for the Nusselt number.

  9. Representing Numbers: Prime and Irrational

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina

    2005-01-01

    This article draws an analogy between prime and irrational numbers with respect to how these numbers are defined and how they are perceived by learners. Excerpts are presented from two research studies: a study on understanding prime numbers by pre-service elementary school teachers and a study on understanding irrational numbers by pre-service…

  10. Number counts and dynamical vacuum cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, N. Chandrachani; Borges, H. A.; Carneiro, S.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2015-03-01

    We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, ρΛ ∝ H, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses (M ≳ 1014 M⊙ h-1) when compared to the standard Λ cold dark matter model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

  11. 15. Stress Sheet, Truss number 2, span number 6, Superior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Stress Sheet, Truss number 2, span number 6, Superior Avenue viaduct. Drawing courtesy Engineering Dept., City of Cleveland. - Superior Avenue Viaduct, Cleveland East & West side, Cuyahoga Valley Vicinity, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. 96. RECTIFIER NUMBER 1 AND RECTIFIER NUMBER 2 ON EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    96. RECTIFIER NUMBER 1 AND RECTIFIER NUMBER 2 ON EAST WALL OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. A feeling for the numbers in biology

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Rob; Milo, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Although the quantitative description of biological systems has been going on for centuries, recent advances in the measurement of phenomena ranging from metabolism to gene expression to signal transduction have resulted in a new emphasis on biological numeracy. This article describes the confluence of two different approaches to biological numbers. First, an impressive array of quantitative measurements make it possible to develop intuition about biological numbers ranging from how many gigatons of atmospheric carbon are fixed every year in the process of photosynthesis to the number of membrane transporters needed to provide sugars to rapidly dividing Escherichia coli cells. As a result of the vast array of such quantitative data, the BioNumbers web site has recently been developed as a repository for biology by the numbers. Second, a complementary and powerful tradition of numerical estimates familiar from the physical sciences and canonized in the so-called “Fermi problems” calls for efforts to estimate key biological quantities on the basis of a few foundational facts and simple ideas from physics and chemistry. In this article, we describe these two approaches and illustrate their synergism in several particularly appealing case studies. These case studies reveal the impact that an emphasis on numbers can have on important biological questions. PMID:20018695

  14. A feeling for the numbers in biology.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rob; Milo, Ron

    2009-12-22

    Although the quantitative description of biological systems has been going on for centuries, recent advances in the measurement of phenomena ranging from metabolism to gene expression to signal transduction have resulted in a new emphasis on biological numeracy. This article describes the confluence of two different approaches to biological numbers. First, an impressive array of quantitative measurements make it possible to develop intuition about biological numbers ranging from how many gigatons of atmospheric carbon are fixed every year in the process of photosynthesis to the number of membrane transporters needed to provide sugars to rapidly dividing Escherichia coli cells. As a result of the vast array of such quantitative data, the BioNumbers web site has recently been developed as a repository for biology by the numbers. Second, a complementary and powerful tradition of numerical estimates familiar from the physical sciences and canonized in the so-called "Fermi problems" calls for efforts to estimate key biological quantities on the basis of a few foundational facts and simple ideas from physics and chemistry. In this article, we describe these two approaches and illustrate their synergism in several particularly appealing case studies. These case studies reveal the impact that an emphasis on numbers can have on important biological questions. PMID:20018695

  15. How Spencer Made Number: First Uses of the Number Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mix, Kelly S.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of number concepts between infancy and early childhood. It is based on a diary study that tracked number word use in a child from 12 to 38 months of age. Number words appeared early in the child's vocabulary, but accurate reference to specific numerosities evolved gradually over the entire 27-month period.…

  16. Feeling Number: Grounding Number Sense in a Sense of Quantity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, David; Davis, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on results from psychology and from cultural and linguistic studies, we argue for an increased focus on developing quantity sense in school mathematics. We explore the notion of "feeling number", a phrase that we offer in a twofold sense--resisting tendencies to feel numb-er (more numb) by developing a feeling for numbers and the…

  17. Natural Number Bias in Operations with Missing Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christou, Konstantinos P.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that there is a natural number bias that influences how students understand the effects of arithmetical operations involving both Arabic numerals and numbers that are represented by symbols for missing numbers. It also investigates whether this bias correlates with other aspects of students' understanding of…

  18. The Case of Blake: Number-Word and Number Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Alexis P.; Baroody, Arthur J.

    Noting that current research on childrens mathematical development does not adequately detail how toddlers represent small numbers and the role that number words play in the development of number understanding, this study used a combination of methods to examine mathematical development in one toddler. Underlying the study was an Integrated Model…

  19. Comparing two devices of suspended treadmill walking by varying body unloading and Froude number.

    PubMed

    Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Kho, Jenniefer; Weed, Matthew; Wilkinson, Miles W; Hargens, Alan R

    2009-11-01

    In rehabilitation, treadmill walking with body weight support is commonly used to reduce loads on lower extremities. (1) However, gait pattern alterations during unloading at constant Froude number are infrequently reported. (2) Furthermore, differences between two common devices for unloading are not well known. Therefore, we investigated two devices; a waist-high chamber with increased pressure called Lower Body Positive Pressure (LBPP), and a harness system (LiteGait), considered a standard system for unloading the lower body. Four gait parameters (cadence, normalized stride length, duty factor, and leg angle at touch down), heart rate, and comfort level were monitored in 12 healthy volunteers. Subjects walked at three body weight (BW) conditions (100%, 66%, and 33% BW) and three Froude numbers (Fr), which refer to a dimensionless speed reflecting slow walking (Fr=0.09), comfortable walking (Fr=0.25), and walk-run transition (Fr=0.5). Absolute treadmill speed was determined using Froude numbers reflecting dynamically similar motions during unloading. We found that (1) the normal gait pattern is altered during unloading at a constant Froude number. In rehabilitation, physical therapists should be aware that normal gait pattern may not need to be maintained during unloaded treadmill walking. (2) Gait parameters were not different when comparing LBPP to harness supported walking. However, heart rate was lower and comfort higher during unloaded LBPP ambulation compared to suspended harness walking. Therefore, suspended LBPP walking may be more appropriate for patients with cardiovascular disease and for conditions at high unloading. PMID:19674901

  20. Number Tracks, Number Lines, Number Strips Are They All the Same?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Paola

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that there is a big conceptual difference between number lines and number strips and that number lines should be consistently used as early as Y1. Her interest in the use of the number line as a powerful image of the real numbers, and how this is introduced in the early years, comes from her own experience as a…

  1. Who's Expressing in "Expressive Writing"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Janine

    In an attempt to understand what expressive writing means to themselves and to their students, teachers should explore and reflect on various questions regarding expressive writing theories and practices. For many, self-expression is the basis of all serious writing and an important stage in any act of learning, so it is essential to uncover the…

  2. Relating Mason number to Bingham number in magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Stephen G.; Becnel, Andrew C.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are described using two nondimensional numbers, the Bingham and Mason numbers. The Mason number is the ratio of particle magnetic forces to viscous forces and describes the behavior of MR fluids at the microscopic, particle level scale. At the macroscopic, continuum scale, Bingham number is the ratio of yield stress to viscous stress, and describes the bulk motion of the fluid. If these two nondimensional numbers can be related, then microscopic models can be directly compared to macroscopic results. We show that if microscopic and macroscopic forces are linearly related, then Bingham and Mason number are inversely related, or, alternatively, that the product of the Bingham number and the Mason number is a constant. This relationship is experimentally validated based on measurements of apparent viscosity on a high shear rate, γ ˙ ≈ 10 000s-1, Searle cell rheometer. This relationship between Mason number and Bingham number is then used to analyze a Mason number based result, and is also used to inform the MR fluid device design process.

  3. Number games, magnitude representation, and basic number skills in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Jemma Catherine; Bull, Rebecca

    2008-03-01

    The effect of 3 intervention board games (linear number, linear color, and nonlinear number) on young children's (mean age = 3.8 years) counting abilities, number naming, magnitude comprehension, accuracy in number-to-position estimation tasks, and best-fit numerical magnitude representations was examined. Pre- and posttest performance was compared following four 25-min intervention sessions. The linear number board game significantly improved children's performance in all posttest measures and facilitated a shift from a logarithmic to a linear representation of numerical magnitude, emphasizing the importance of spatial cues in estimation. Exposure to the number card games involving nonsymbolic magnitude judgments and association of symbolic and nonsymbolic quantities, but without any linear spatial cues, improved some aspects of children's basic number skills but not numerical estimation precision. PMID:18331146

  4. Poison control center - emergency number

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. ... centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions ...

  5. Numbers and Math. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Fred E.; Elkind, CavidEpstein, Ann S.; Copley, Juanita V.; Haugen, Ginny; Haugen, Kirsten

    2003-01-01

    Presents five articles addressing numbers and math instruction for young children: "Math Talk with Young Children: One Parent's Experience" (Fred E. Gross); "How Children Build Their Understanding of Numbers" (David Elkind); "Early Math: It's More than Numbers" (Ann S. Epstein); "Assessing Mathematical Learning: Observing and Listening to…

  6. A Lesson in Number Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a guided investigation into the spacial relationships between the centres of the squares in a Fibonacci tiling. It is essentially a lesson in number pattern, but includes work with surds, coordinate geometry, and some elementary use of complex numbers. The investigation could be presented to students in a number of ways…

  7. PLURIDICTA, Numbers 28-35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Johannes, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The eight titles in this document include the following: "Comprehension and Input Processing as Useful Terms in the Field of SLA" (number 28) (Teresa Cadierno); "On the Role of Instruction in SLA: Research Results and Theoretical Explanations" (number 29) (Teresa Cadierno); "Can Writing Be Taught" (number 30) (Stuart Greene); "Academic Listening"…

  8. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  9. What Exactly Do Numbers Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yi Ting; Spelke, Elizabeth; Snedeker, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Number words are generally used to refer to the exact cardinal value of a set, but cognitive scientists disagree about their meanings. Although most psychological analyses presuppose that numbers have exact semantics ("two" means exactly two), many linguistic accounts propose that numbers have lower-bounded semantics (at least two), and…

  10. Calibrating the Mental Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Veronique; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2008-01-01

    Human adults are thought to possess two dissociable systems to represent numbers: an approximate quantity system akin to a mental number line, and a verbal system capable of representing numbers exactly. Here, we study the interface between these two systems using an estimation task. Observers were asked to estimate the approximate numerosity of…

  11. Three Cubes in One Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jue, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Separate a three-digit number into its component digits. After raising each digit to the third power and computing the sum of the cubes, determine how often the original number reappears. Modular arithmetic is used to reduce the number of potential solutions to a more manageable quantity. (Contains 4 tables.)

  12. Linear or Exponential Number Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Pat

    2011-01-01

    Having decided to spend some time looking at one's understanding of numbers, the author was inspired by "Alex's Adventures in Numberland," by Alex Bellos to look at one's innate appreciation of number. Bellos quotes research studies suggesting that an individual's natural appreciation of numbers is more likely to be exponential rather than linear,…

  13. Symbiotic Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernecky, Robert; Herhut, Stephan; Scholz, Sven-Bodo

    We introduce symbiotic expressions, a method for algebraic simplification within a compiler, in lieu of an SMT solver, such as Yices or the Omega Calculator. Symbiotic expressions are compiler-generated expressions, temporarily injected into a program's abstract syntax tree (AST). The compiler's normal optimizations interpret and simplify those expressions, making their results available for the compiler to use as a basis for decisions about further optimization of the source program. The expressions are symbiotic, in the sense that both parties benefit: an optimization benefits, by using the compiler itself to simplify expressions that have been attached, lamprey-like, to the AST by the optimization; the program being compiled benefits, from improved run-time in both serial and parallel environments.

  14. Fermi-Dirac statistics and the number theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasiak, Anna; Korbicz, Jaroslaw K.; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2005-11-01

    We relate the Fermi-Dirac statistics of an ideal Fermi gas in a harmonic trap to partitions of given integers into distinct parts, studied in number theory. Using methods of quantum statistical physics we derive analytic expressions for cumulants of the probability distribution of the number of different partitions.

  15. Is Approximate Number Precision a Stable Predictor of Math Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that children's ability to estimate numbers of items using their Approximate Number System (ANS) predicts later math ability. To more closely examine the predictive role of early ANS acuity on later abilities, we assessed the ANS acuity, math ability, and expressive vocabulary of preschoolers twice, six months apart. We…

  16. Reynolds and froude number effect on the flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bonguk; Yang, Jianming; Yeon, Seong Mo; Stern, Frederick

    2014-09-01

    The two-phase turbulent flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder is studied using a high-fidelity orthogonal curvilinear grid solver with a Lagrangian dynamic subgrid-scale model for large-eddy simulation and a coupled level set and volume of fluid method for air-water interface tracking. The simulations cover the sub-critical and critical and post critical regimes of the Reynolds and sub and super-critical Froude numbers in order to investigate the effect of both dimensionless parameters on the flow. Significant changes in flow features near the air-water interface were observed as the Reynolds number was increased from the sub-critical to the critical regime. The interface makes the separation point near the interface much delayed for all Reynolds numbers. The separation region at intermediate depths is remarkably reduced for the critical Reynolds number regime. The deep flow resembles the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder, but includes the effect of the free-surface and the limited span length for sub-critical Reynolds numbers. At different Froude numbers, the air-water interface exhibits significantly changed structures, including breaking bow waves with splashes and bubbles at high Froude numbers. Instantaneous and mean flow features such as interface structures, vortex shedding, Reynolds stresses, and vorticity transport are also analyzed. The results are compared with reference experimental data available in the literature. The deep flow is also compared with the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder in the similar ranges of Reynolds numbers. Discussion is provided concerning the limitations of the current simulations and available experimental data along with future research

  17. Generalized Bernoulli-Hurwitz numbers and the universal Bernoulli numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ônishi, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    The three fundamental properties of the Bernoulli numbers, namely, the von Staudt-Clausen theorem, von Staudt's second theorem, and Kummer's original congruence, are generalized to new numbers that we call generalized Bernoulli-Hurwitz numbers. These are coefficients in the power series expansion of a higher-genus algebraic function with respect to a suitable variable. Our generalization differs strongly from previous works. Indeed, the order of the power of the modulus prime in our Kummer-type congruences is exactly the same as in the trigonometric function case (namely, Kummer's own congruence for the original Bernoulli numbers), and as in the elliptic function case (namely, H. Lang's extension for the Hurwitz numbers). However, in other past results on higher-genus algebraic functions, the modulus was at most half of its value in these classical cases. This contrast is clarified by investigating the analogue of the three properties above for the universal Bernoulli numbers. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  18. Children's mappings between number words and the approximate number system.

    PubMed

    Odic, Darko; Le Corre, Mathieu; Halberda, Justin

    2015-05-01

    Humans can represent number either exactly--using their knowledge of exact numbers as supported by language, or approximately--using their approximate number system (ANS). Adults can map between these two systems--they can both translate from an approximate sense of the number of items in a brief visual display to a discrete number word estimate (i.e., ANS-to-Word), and can generate an approximation, for example by rapidly tapping, when provided with an exact verbal number (i.e., Word-to-ANS). Here we ask how these mappings are initially formed and whether one mapping direction may become functional before the other during development. In two experiments, we gave 2-5 year old children both an ANS-to-Word task, where they had to give a verbal number response to an approximate presentation (i.e., after seeing rapidly flashed dots, or watching rapid hand taps), and a Word-to-ANS task, where they had to generate an approximate response to a verbal number request (i.e., rapidly tapping after hearing a number word). Replicating previous results, children did not successfully generate numerically appropriate verbal responses in the ANS-to-Word task until after 4 years of age--well after they had acquired the Cardinality Principle of verbal counting. In contrast, children successfully generated numerically appropriate tapping sequences in the Word-to-ANS task before 4 years of age--well before many understood the Cardinality Principle. We further found that the accuracy of the mapping between the ANS and number words, as captured by error rates, continues to develop after this initial formation of the interface. These results suggest that the mapping between the ANS and verbal number representations is not functionally bidirectional in early development, and that the mapping direction from number representations to the ANS is established before the reverse. PMID:25721021

  19. Approximate Number Sense, Symbolic Number Processing, or Number-Space Mappings: What Underlies Mathematics Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasanguie, Delphine; Gobel, Silke M.; Moll, Kristina; Smets, Karolien; Reynvoet, Bert

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the performance of typically developing 6- to 8-year-old children on an approximate number discrimination task, a symbolic comparison task, and a symbolic and nonsymbolic number line estimation task was examined. For the first time, children's performances on these basic cognitive number processing tasks were explicitly contrasted…

  20. Stability of the shape of a translating viscoelastic drop at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Haj-Hariri, H.; Borhan, A.

    2012-11-01

    We examine the stability of the shape of a viscoelastic drop translating in an immiscible, otherwise quiescent Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds number. Non-Newtonian stresses in the drop phase are characterized by the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Chilcott-Rallison model. A boundary integral method is used to numerically examine the time-evolution of initially perturbed drop shapes over a range of dimensionless parameters. For sufficiently small capillary numbers, the drop achieves an oblate spheroidal steady shape. For large initial deformations or capillary numbers, however, the drop deforms continuously and eventually breaks up through either the formation of an elongated tail or the development of a re-entrant cavity at its trailing end. These mechanisms of drop breakup are qualitatively similar to those reported earlier for Newtonian drops [C. J. Koh and L. G. Leal, Phys. Fluids A 1, 1309 (1989), 10.1063/1.857359; C. Pozrikidis, J. Fluid Mech. 210, 1 (1990), 10.1017/S0022112090001203; H. A. Stone, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 26, 65 (1994), 10.1146/annurev.fl.26.010194.000433]. Compared to the case of a Newtonian drop, drop phase elasticity is found to have a stabilizing (destabilizing) effect for initially oblate (prolate) shape perturbations, due to the development of polymeric stresses caused by deformation of polymer chains in alignment with streamlines of the flow. Polymer viscosity has a strong influence on the stability of the shape of drops, whereas polymer relaxation time and extensibility have relatively weak influences.

  1. Extending the Number Line to Make Connections with Number Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graviss, Tom; Greaver, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    Shares a coded version of the number line to provide concrete experiences for learning abstract concepts. Using the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, appropriate coded symbols are determined for the prime factorization of each natural number and used to study the concepts of greatest common divisor, least common multiple, square roots, and…

  2. Reprint Series: Prime Numbers and Perfect Numbers. RS-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaaf, William L., Ed.

    This is one in a series of SMSG supplementary and enrichment pamphlets for high school students. This series makes available expository articles which appeared in a variety of mathematical periodicals. Topics covered include: (1) the prime numbers; (2) mathematical sieves; (3) the factorgram; and (4) perfect numbers. (MP)

  3. Chaotic Nonlinear Prime Number Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, Luis A.

    2011-06-01

    Dynamical systems in nature, such as heartbeat patterns, DNA sequence pattern, prime number distribution, etc., exhibit nonlinear (chaotic) space-time fluctuations and exact quantification of the fluctuation pattern for predictability purposes has not yet been achieved [1]. In this paper a chaotic-nonlinear prime number function P(s) is developed, from which prime numbers are generated and decoded while composite numbers are encoded over time following the Euler product methodology, which works on sequences progressively culled from multiples of the preceding primes. By relating this P(s) to a virtually closed 2D number line manifold, it is possible to represent the evolving in time of nonlinear (chaotic) systems to a final value where the system becomes stable, becomes linear. This nonlinear prime number function is proposed as a chaotic model system able to describe chaotic systems.

  4. The neuronal code for number.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Humans and non-human primates share an elemental quantification system that resides in a dedicated neural network in the parietal and frontal lobes. In this cortical network, 'number neurons' encode the number of elements in a set, its cardinality or numerosity, irrespective of stimulus appearance across sensory motor systems, and from both spatial and temporal presentation arrays. After numbers have been extracted from sensory input, they need to be processed to support goal-directed behaviour. Studying number neurons provides insights into how information is maintained in working memory and transformed in tasks that require rule-based decisions. Beyond an understanding of how cardinal numbers are encoded, number processing provides a window into the neuronal mechanisms of high-level brain functions. PMID:27150407

  5. Nonliteral understanding of number words

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Justine T.; Wu, Jean Y.; Bergen, Leon; Goodman, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most puzzling and important facts about communication is that people do not always mean what they say; speakers often use imprecise, exaggerated, or otherwise literally false descriptions to communicate experiences and attitudes. Here, we focus on the nonliteral interpretation of number words, in particular hyperbole (interpreting unlikely numbers as exaggerated and conveying affect) and pragmatic halo (interpreting round numbers imprecisely). We provide a computational model of number interpretation as social inference regarding the communicative goal, meaning, and affective subtext of an utterance. We show that our model predicts humans’ interpretation of number words with high accuracy. Our model is the first to our knowledge to incorporate principles of communication and empirically measured background knowledge to quantitatively predict hyperbolic and pragmatic halo effects in number interpretation. This modeling framework provides a unified approach to nonliteral language understanding more generally. PMID:25092304

  6. Dynamic Virtual Credit Card Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Ian; Li, Jiangtao; Li, Ninghui

    Theft of stored credit card information is an increasing threat to e-commerce. We propose a dynamic virtual credit card number scheme that reduces the damage caused by stolen credit card numbers. A user can use an existing credit card account to generate multiple virtual credit card numbers that are either usable for a single transaction or are tied with a particular merchant. We call the scheme dynamic because the virtual credit card numbers can be generated without online contact with the credit card issuers. These numbers can be processed without changing any of the infrastructure currently in place; the only changes will be at the end points, namely, the card users and the card issuers. We analyze the security requirements for dynamic virtual credit card numbers, discuss the design space, propose a scheme using HMAC, and prove its security under the assumption the underlying function is a PRF.

  7. Refactorable Numbers - A Machine Invention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, Simon

    1999-02-01

    The HR (or Hardy-Ramanujan) program invents and analyses definitions in areas of pure mathematics, including finite algebras, graph theory and number theory. While working in number theory, HR recently invented a new integer sequence, the refactorable numbers, which are defined and developed here. A discussion of how HR works, along with details of well known sequences reinvented by HR and other new sequences invented by HR is also given.

  8. Familial sinistrals avoid exact numbers.

    PubMed

    Sauerland, Uli; Gotzner, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    We report data from an internet questionnaire of sixty number trivia. Participants were asked for the number of cups in their house, the number of cities they know and 58 other quantities. We compare the answers of familial sinistrals--individuals who are left-handed themselves or have a left-handed close blood-relative--with those of pure familial dextrals--right-handed individuals who reported only having right-handed close blood-relatives. We show that familial sinistrals use rounder numbers than pure familial dextrals in the survey responses. Round numbers in the decimal system are those that are multiples of powers of 10 or of half or a quarter of a power of 10. Roundness is a gradient concept, e.g. 100 is rounder than 50 or 200. We show that very round number like 100 and 1000 are used with 25% greater likelihood by familial sinistrals than by pure familial dextrals, while pure familial dextrals are more likely to use less round numbers such as 25, 60, and 200. We then use Sigurd's (1988, Language in Society) index of the roundness of a number and report that familial sinistrals' responses are significantly rounder on average than those of pure familial dextrals. To explain the difference, we propose that the cognitive effort of using exact numbers is greater for the familial sinistral group because their language and number systems tend to be more distributed over both hemispheres of the brain. Our data support the view that exact and approximate quantities are processed by two separate cognitive systems. Specifically, our behavioral data corroborates the view that the evolutionarily older, approximate number system is present in both hemispheres of the brain, while the exact number system tends to be localized in only one hemisphere. PMID:23544052

  9. Number development and developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    von Aster, Michael G; Shalev, Ruth S

    2007-11-01

    There is a growing consensus that the neuropsychological underpinnings of developmental dyscalculia (DD) are a genetically determined disorder of 'number sense', a term denoting the ability to represent and manipulate numerical magnitude nonverbally on an internal number line. However, this spatially-oriented number line develops during elementary school and requires additional cognitive components including working memory and number symbolization (language). Thus, there may be children with familial-genetic DD with deficits limited to number sense and others with DD and comorbidities such as language delay, dyslexia, or attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. This duality is supported by epidemiological data indicating that two-thirds of children with DD have comorbid conditions while one-third have pure DD. Clinically, they differ according to their profile of arithmetic difficulties. fMRI studies indicate that parietal areas (important for number functions), and frontal regions (dominant for executive working memory and attention functions), are under-activated in children with DD. A four-step developmental model that allows prediction of different pathways for DD is presented. The core-system representation of numerical magnitude (cardinality; step 1) provides the meaning of 'number', a precondition to acquiring linguistic (step 2), and Arabic (step 3) number symbols, while a growing working memory enables neuroplastic development of an expanding mental number line during school years (step 4). Therapeutic and educational interventions can be drawn from this model. PMID:17979867

  10. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  11. The Algebra of Complex Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePage, Wilbur R.

    This programed text is an introduction to the algebra of complex numbers for engineering students, particularly because of its relevance to important problems of applications in electrical engineering. It is designed for a person who is well experienced with the algebra of real numbers and calculus, but who has no experience with complex number…

  12. Counting copy number and calories.

    PubMed

    White, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) at several genomic loci has been associated with different human traits and diseases, but in many cases the findings could not be replicated. A new study provides insights into the degree of variation present at the amylase locus and calls into question a previous association between amylase copy number and body mass index. PMID:26220133

  13. On Counting the Rational Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almada, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show how to construct a function from the set N of natural numbers that explicitly counts the set Q[superscript +] of all positive rational numbers using a very intuitive approach. The function has the appeal of Cantor's function and it has the advantage that any high school student can understand the main idea at a glance…

  14. Some Ideas About Number Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, I. A.

    The material in this booklet is designed for non-professional mathematicians who have an interest in the theory of numbers. The author presents some elementary results of number theory without involving detailed proofs. Much of the material has direct application for secondary school mathematics teachers. A brief account of the nature of number…

  15. Building Buildings with Triangular Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Triangular numbers are used to unravel a new sequence of natural numbers here-to-fore not appearing on the Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences website. Insight is provided on the construction of the sequence using "buildings" as a viewable model of the sequence entries. A step-by-step analysis of the sequence pattern reveals a method for generating…

  16. Spontaneous Number Representation in Mosquitofish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadda, Marco; Piffer, Laura; Agrillo, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    While there is convincing evidence that preverbal human infants and non-human primates can spontaneously represent number, considerable debate surrounds the possibility that such capacity is also present in other animals. Fish show a remarkable ability to discriminate between different numbers of social companions. Previous work has demonstrated…

  17. Quantum Computing and Number Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yoshitaka

    2013-09-01

    The prime factorization can be efficiently solved on a quantum computer. This result was given by Shor in 1994. In the first half of this article, a review of Shor's algorithm with mathematical setups is given. In the second half of this article, the prime number theorem which is an essential tool to understand the distribution of prime numbers is given.

  18. The Search for Prime Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerance, Carl

    1982-01-01

    Until recently the testing of a 100-digit number to determine whether it is prime or composite could have taken a century. However, in the past two years a method has been developed enabling a computer to determine the primality of an arbitrary number in about 40 seconds of running time. (Author/JN)

  19. Number Talks Build Numerical Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Sherry D.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom number talks," five- to fifteen-minute conversations around purposefully crafted computation problems, are a productive tool that can be incorporated into classroom instruction to combine the essential processes and habits of mind of doing math. During number talks, students are asked to communicate their thinking when presenting and…

  20. Toddlers' Spontaneous Attention to Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Li, Xia; Lai, Meng-lung

    2008-01-01

    Hannula and Lehtinen (2001, 2005) defined spontaneous focusing on numerosity (SFON) as the tendency to notice the relatively abstract attribute of number despite the presence of other attributes. According to nativists, an innate concept of one to three directs young children's attention to these "intuitive numbers" in everyday situations--even…

  1. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  2. Computation of Most Probable Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Russek, Estelle; Colwell, Rita R.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid computational method for maximum likelihood estimation of most-probable-number values, incorporating a modified Newton-Raphson method, is presented. The method offers a much greater reliability for the most-probable-number estimate of total viable bacteria, i.e., those capable of growth in laboratory media. PMID:6870242

  3. Rayleigh Number for Core Convection: Three Independent Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbins, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Rayleigh number (Ra) for the Earth's core is a dimensionless measure of the heat flux crossing the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Recent calculations on the properties of liquid iron mixtures at core pressures and temperatures have provided reliable data for thermodynamic estimates of core heat flow, all of which suggests that heat budget is rather tight: Either the core is cooling so fast that the inner core is young and formed only 1~Gyr ago, or the core contains substantial radiogenic heating from K40. These heat flow estimates translate into Ra≈ 1000Rac, the critical value for convection assuming a magnetic field of typical core strength and turbulent values of viscosity and thermal diffusivity [Gubbins, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 128 3--12, 2001]. Magnetic fields facilitate convection in a rotating system; for core parameters they lower Rac by a factor of about 1000. The estimate of Ra is therefore close to the marginal value, the minimum heat flux needed for convection in the core if the magnetic field were absent. Another estimate was made by Jones [Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., 358 871--872, 2000] by considering the heat transported by convection in the core. This gives a similar value of 500Rac; it is independent because the basic information used is a typical estimate of core flow speed rather than CMB heat flux. The third estimate comes from the observation of low secular variation in the Pacific. Seismic tomography shows low velocity, probably hot material, at the base of the mantle in the Pacific region. Using this as a boundary condition for simple convection calculations shows that the usual Busse rolls are completely suppressed in the Pacific when lateral variations are 30%\\ of the mean heat flux and total heat flux is just above critical. While much work needs to be done on extending these simple calculations, they imply that the heat flux from the Pacific region is subadiabatic. Converting the variations of seismic velocity within D'' to heat

  4. Old and New Magic Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Talmi, Igal

    2008-11-11

    The discovery of magic numbers led to the shell model. They indicated closure of major shells and are robust: proton magic numbers are rather independent of the occupation of neutron orbits and vice versa. Recently the magic property became less stringent and we hear a lot about the discovery of new magic numbers. These, however, indicate sub-shell closures and strongly depend on occupation numbers and hence, may be called quasi-magic numbers. Some of these have been known for many years and the mechanism for their appearance as well as disappearance, was well understood within the simple shell model. The situation will be illustrated by a few examples which demonstrate the simple features of the shell model. Will this simplicity emerge from the complex computations of nuclear many-body theory?.

  5. Quantum random number generator using photon-number path entanglement.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Osung; Cho, Young-Wook; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2009-03-20

    We report a quantum random number generator based on the photon-number-path entangled state that is prepared by means of two-photon quantum interference at a beam splitter. The randomness in our scheme is truly quantum mechanical in origin since it results from the projection measurement of the entangled two-photon state. The generated bit sequences satisfy the standard randomness test. PMID:19305476

  6. A Laboratory Experiment on How to Create Dimensionless Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Robert V.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is described that illustrates how chemical engineering correlations are created. Balls of different diameters and different specific gravities (all less than one) are dropped from several heights into a pool of water, and the maximum depth reached by the ball is measured. This data is used to estimate the coefficients for a…

  7. Reynolds number influences in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Yip, Long P.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Lawing, Pierce L.; Batina, John T.; Hardin, Jay C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Fenbert, James W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds number, a measure of the ratio of inertia to viscous forces, is a fundamental similarity parameter for fluid flows and therefore, would be expected to have a major influence in aerodynamics and aeronautics. Reynolds number influences are generally large, but monatomic, for attached laminar (continuum) flow; however, laminar flows are easily separated, inducing even stronger, non-monatomic, Reynolds number sensitivities. Probably the strongest Reynolds number influences occur in connection with transitional flow behavior. Transition can take place over a tremendous Reynolds number range, from the order of 20 x 10(exp 3) for 2-D free shear layers up to the order of 100 x 10(exp 6) for hypersonic boundary layers. This variability in transition behavior is especially important for complex configurations where various vehicle and flow field elements can undergo transition at various Reynolds numbers, causing often surprising changes in aerodynamics characteristics over wide ranges in Reynolds number. This is further compounded by the vast parameterization associated with transition, in that any parameter which influences mean viscous flow development (e.g., pressure gradient, flow curvature, wall temperature, Mach number, sweep, roughness, flow chemistry, shock interactions, etc.), and incident disturbance fields (acoustics, vorticity, particulates, temperature spottiness, even electro static discharges) can alter transition locations to first order. The usual method of dealing with the transition problem is to trip the flow in the generally lower Reynolds number wind tunnel to simulate the flight turbulent behavior. However, this is not wholly satisfactory as it results in incorrectly scaled viscous region thicknesses and cannot be utilized at all for applications such as turbine blades and helicopter rotors, nacelles, leading edge and nose regions, and High Altitude Long Endurance and hypersonic airbreathers where the transitional flow is an innately critical

  8. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  9. Laryngology and the numbers game.

    PubMed

    Lucente, F E

    1980-01-01

    Numbers play a great role in our practice of laryngology, and when used appropriately can be extremely valuable. However, careless or uncritical use may cause them to be an impediment of detriment to clinical practice and teaching. Examples of problems which arise with numbers are readily found in the areas of tumor staging (TNM system), the scientific literature, resident training and communications with third-party agencies. Consideration of these examples reminds us of the need to evaluate our use of numbers frequently. PMID:7458142

  10. On the drag of model dendrite fragments at low Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakhem, R.; Weidman, P. D.; Degroh, H. C., III

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of low Reynolds number drag on laboratory models of dendrite fragments has been conducted. The terminal velocities of the dendrites undergoing free fall along their axis of symmetry were measured in a large Stokes flow facility. Corrections for wall interference give nearly linear drag vs Reynolds number curves. Corrections for both wall interference and inertia effects show that the dendrite Stokes settling velocities are always less than that of a sphere of equal mass and volume. In the Stokes limit, the settling speed ratio is found to correlate well with primary dendrite arm aspect ratio and a second dimensionless shape paremeter which serves as a measure of the fractal-like nature of the dendrite models. These results can be used to estimate equiaxed grain velocities and distance of travel in metal castings. The drag measurements may be used in numerical codes to calculate the movement of grains in a convecting melt in an effort to determine macrosegregation patterns caused by the sink/float mechanism.

  11. Drag force on a spherical intruder in a granular bed at low Froude number.

    PubMed

    Hilton, J E; Tordesillas, A

    2013-12-01

    The drag force on an object, or "intruder," in a granular material arises from interparticle friction, as well as the cyclic creation and buckling of force chains within the material. In contrast to fluids, for which drag forces are well understood, there is no straightforward relationship between speed and mean drag force in granular materials. We investigate spherical intruder particles of varying radii moving at low speeds through granular beds. The system can be parametrized using the dimensionless Froude number Fr=2v/√[gR], for intruders of radius R moving at a speed v. For frictional systems, we find the drag force obeys a linear relationship with Fr for low Froude numbers above Fr>1. For Fr<1 we observe a deviation from this linear trend. This transition can be explained by considering the characteristic inertial and gravitational granular time scales of the system. We show that a suitably normalized measure of dissipated power obeys a linear relationship with the imposed intruder velocity, independent of the intruder dimensions. This is found to hold even for particles with no friction, identifying a relationship between the imposed motion of the intruder and the resistance of the granular material to purely geometric rearrangements. PMID:24483432

  12. Efficient computation of root numbers and class numbers of parametrized families of real abelian number fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louboutin, Stephane R.

    2007-03-01

    Let \\{K_m\\} be a parametrized family of simplest real cyclic cubic, quartic, quintic or sextic number fields of known regulators, e.g., the so-called simplest cubic and quartic fields associated with the polynomials P_m(x) Dx^3 -mx^2-(m+3)x+1 and P_m(x) Dx^4 -mx^3-6x^2+mx+1 . We give explicit formulas for powers of the Gaussian sums attached to the characters associated with these simplest number fields. We deduce a method for computing the exact values of these Gaussian sums. These values are then used to efficiently compute class numbers of simplest fields. Finally, such class number computations yield many examples of real cyclotomic fields Q(zeta_p)^+ of prime conductors pge 3 and class numbers h_p^+ greater than or equal to p . However, in accordance with Vandiver's conjecture, we found no example of p for which p divides h_p^+ .

  13. Atomic Structure - A Numbers Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, W. O.; Vincent, A.

    1975-01-01

    Emphasizes the simplicity and elegance of early discoveries related to the hydrogen spectrum and provides an elementary experimental basis of quantum theory based on a "numbers game" which can be played by students. (Author/GS)

  14. Young Students Investigate Number Cubes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Alex

    1997-01-01

    Describes a series of learning activities built around number cubes. Sample activities introduce elementary properties of the cube, the magic rule of seven, and basic concepts related to graphs in the plane coordinate system. (PVD)

  15. Fibonacci Numbers and the Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verderber, Nadine L.

    1991-01-01

    Described is a classroom activity incorporating a computer spreadsheet to study number patterns generated by the Fibonacci sequence. Included are examples and suggestions for the use of the spreadsheet in other recursive relationships. (JJK)

  16. Integral Presentations of Catalan Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We compute in three different ways the same definite parametric integral. By-products are the derivation of a combinatorial identity and two integral presentations of Catalan numbers. One of them leads to a presentation using the [gamma] function.

  17. Heptagonal Numbers: A Neglected Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of these numbers is shown to give students an opportunity to make use of such mathematical skills as algebraic substitution, modular arithmetic, counting arguments, and mathematical induction. (MP)

  18. Pluridicta, Numbers 1-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluridicta, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The following titles are included: (1) "Computer in Foreign Language Instruction"; (2) "Two Sides of the Same Coin: Prose and Poetry in Translation"; (3) "Notions of Culture in Foreign Language Departments in Different Countries"; (4) "Developing Materials for Teaching Danish to Adult Immigrants"; (5) "Conversational Strategies in Expressive,…

  19. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  20. Entropy estimation and Fibonacci numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Evgeniy A.; Kaltchenko, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a new metric on a space of right-sided infinite sequences drawn from a finite alphabet. Emerging from a problem of entropy estimation of a discrete stationary ergodic process, the metric is important on its own part and exhibits some interesting properties. Notably, the number of distinct metric values for a set of sequences of length m is equal to Fm+3 - 1, where Fm is a Fibonacci number.

  1. Digital random-number generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brocker, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    For binary digit array of N bits, use N noise sources to feed N nonlinear operators; each flip-flop in digit array is set by nonlinear operator to reflect whether amplitude of generator which feeds it is above or below mean value of generated noise. Fixed-point uniform distribution random number generation method can also be used to generate random numbers with other than uniform distribution.

  2. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yicheng; Chng, Brenda; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  3. Copy number variation and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  4. 1987 CRC (Coordinating Research Council) octane number requirement survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    In the forty-first annual statistical survey of current model vehicles conducted by the Coordinating Research Council, Inc., test data were obtained on 389 1987 model vehicles, including 300 passenger cars and 89 light-duty trucks and vans. Eighteen laboratories participated in this Survey. Maximum octane number requirements were determined by testing at maximum-throttle conditions, as well as at part-throttle. Requirements are expressed as the (R+M)/2 octane number, Research octane number, and Motor octane number of the reference-fuel producing knock which was recurrent and repeatable at the lowest audible level. The primary analyses used in this report are based upon (R+M)/2 octane number requirements, rather than upon Research octane number requirements as in Survey reports prior to 1985. Estimated octane number requirements for the total vehicles are weighted in proportion to the 1987 vehicle model production and/or sales figures.

  5. CRC (Coordinating Research Council) octane number requirement survey, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    In the fortieth annual statistical survey of current model vehicles conducted by the Coordinating Research Council, Inc., test data were obtained on 377 1986 model vehicles, including 314 US vehicles and 63 imported vehicles. Sixteen laboratories participated in this survey. Maximum octane number requirements were determined by testing at maximum-throttle conditions, as well as a part-throttle. Requirements are expressed as the (R+M)/2 octane number, Research octane number, and motor octane number of the reference fuel producing knock which was recurrent and repeatable at the lowest audible level. The primary analyses used in this report are based upon (R+M)/2 octane number requirements, rather than upon Research octane number requirements as in the survey reports prior to 1985. Estimated octane-number requirements for the US vehicles are weighted in proportion to the 1986 vehicle model production figures and, for the imported models, in proportion to import sales volume in the United States.

  6. CRC (Coordinating Research Council) octane number requirement survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the thirty-ninth annual statistical survey of current-model vehicles conducted by the Coordinating Research Council, Inc., test data were obtained on 374 1985 model vehicles, including 309 US vehicles and 65 imported vehicles. Fifteen laboratories participated in this Survey. Maximum octane number requirements were determined by testing under part-throttle conditions, as well as at maximum-throttle. Requirements are expressed as the (R+M)/2 octane number, Research octane number, and Motor octane number of the reference fuel producing knock which was recurrent and repeatable at the lowest audible level. The primary analyses used in this report are based upon (R+M)/2 octane number requirements, rather than upon Research octane number requirements as in previous reports. Estimated octane number requirements for the US vehicles are weighted in proportion to the 1985 vehicle model production figures and, for the imported models, in proportion to import sales volume in the United States.

  7. Number Meaning and Number Grammar in English and Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, Kathryn; Carreiras, Manuel; Meseguer, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Grammatical agreement makes different demands on speakers of different languages. Being widespread in the languages of the world, the features of agreement systems offer valuable tests of how language affects deep-seated domains of human cognition and categorization. Number agreement is one such domain, with intriguing evidence that typological…

  8. Are Number Gestures Easier than Number Words for Preschoolers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoladis, Elena; Pika, Simone; Marentette, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Some researchers have argued that children's earliest symbols are based on their sensorimotor experience and that arbitrary symbol-referent mapping poses a challenge for them. If so, exposure to iconic symbols (such as one-finger-for-one-object manual gestures) might help children in a difficult domain such as number. We assessed 44 preschoolers'…

  9. Nanoplasmonics of prime number arrays.

    PubMed

    Forestiere, Carlo; Walsh, Gary F; Miano, Giovanni; Dal Negro, Luca

    2009-12-21

    In this paper, we investigate the plasmonic near-field localization and the far-field scattering properties of non-periodic arrays of Ag nanoparticles generated by prime number sequences in two spatial dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that the engineering of plasmonic arrays with large spectral flatness and particle density is necessary to achieve a high density of electromagnetic hot spots over a broader frequency range and a larger area compared to strongly coupled periodic and quasi-periodic structures. Finally, we study the far-field scattering properties of prime number arrays illuminated by plane waves and we discuss their angular scattering properties. The study of prime number arrays of metal nanoparticles provides a novel strategy to achieve broadband enhancement and localization of plasmonic fields for the engineering of nanoscale nano-antenna arrays and active plasmonic structures. PMID:20052140

  10. Biotechnology at low Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, J P; Yager, P; Goldstein, R E; Austin, R H

    1996-01-01

    The shrinking of liquid handling systems to the micron and submicron size range entails moving into the area of small Reynolds numbers. The fluid dynamics in this regime are very different from the macroscale. We present an intuitive explanation of how the different physics of small Reynolds numbers flow, along with microscopic sizes, can influence device design, and give examples from our own work using fluid flow in microfabricated devices designed for biological processing. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8968612

  11. Statistical error in particle simulations of low mach number flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjiconstantinou, N G; Garcia, A L

    2000-11-13

    We present predictions for the statistical error due to finite sampling in the presence of thermal fluctuations in molecular simulation algorithms. The expressions are derived using equilibrium statistical mechanics. The results show that the number of samples needed to adequately resolve the flowfield scales as the inverse square of the Mach number. Agreement of the theory with direct Monte Carlo simulations shows that the use of equilibrium theory is justified.

  12. An Estimate of Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauffer, Frederic R.

    1991-01-01

    Calculates an approximation to Avagadro's number for one mole of water by assuming the mole to be in cubical form and then halving the cube three times, thereby doubling the surface area of the original cube. The calculations are derived from the work necessary to perform these divisions. Presents calculated values for several liquids. (MDH)

  13. Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... John’s A1C and blood sugar numbers are too high. John and his health care team talk about what he can do to get closer to his A1C and blood sugar goals. John decides he will be more active. He ...

  14. Not Just a Number Anymore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    In the Essex, Cincinnati retirement center where they both worked as nurses, Holly Doherty and Michele Schavoir often heard aides complain about one longtime resident in particular. The patient kicks and screams and nurses can not stand to be around her. After a year of playing detective, Doherty found a number of the patient's relatives in…

  15. Number Program for Primary Schoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, James M.

    The arithmetic portion of the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program, as it applies to children of ages 5 to 8, is described in some detail. The terminal objective of the number program of the primary segment of DMP is the ability of the child to correctly write, read and validate mathematical sentences of the form A = B plus or minus X.…

  16. A generalized sense of number

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Roberto; Togoli, Irene; Burr, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Much evidence has accumulated to suggest that many animals, including young human infants, possess an abstract sense of approximate quantity, a number sense. Most research has concentrated on apparent numerosity of spatial arrays of dots or other objects, but a truly abstract sense of number should be capable of encoding the numerosity of any set of discrete elements, however displayed and in whatever sensory modality. Here, we use the psychophysical technique of adaptation to study the sense of number for serially presented items. We show that numerosity of both auditory and visual sequences is greatly affected by prior adaptation to slow or rapid sequences of events. The adaptation to visual stimuli was spatially selective (in external, not retinal coordinates), pointing to a sensory rather than cognitive process. However, adaptation generalized across modalities, from auditory to visual and vice versa. Adaptation also generalized across formats: adapting to sequential streams of flashes affected the perceived numerosity of spatial arrays. All these results point to a perceptual system that transcends vision and audition to encode an abstract sense of number in space and in time. PMID:25377454

  17. Materiales. Numbers 21-23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Materiales, 1997

    1997-01-01

    These three journals of contemporary cultural, historical, and social interest contain activities designed to enhance the awareness of students of Spanish as a foreign language regarding the entire panorama of daily life in Spain. Number 21 focuses on the role of modern Spanish women; their career status; female authors; and the changing place of…

  18. Materiales. Numbers 17-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Materiales, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Four booklets present articles on Spanish language and culture aimed at teachers of Spanish in the United States for student use in their classes. Number 17, "Los Jovenes Espanoles" (Spanish Youth), includes articles on Spanish youth sports, music, gangs, thoughts, and t-shirt slogans: (1) "Young Spanish Athletes"; (2) "Youth Music"; (3) "Urban…

  19. Number Crunching: A Sheep's Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sam, Chris Lam

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about an allegorical tale which he has written as a message for teachers of mathematics. The story is about Gordon, who led a flock of small sheep. Gordon was a mathematics genius; however, his flock criticized his teaching of numbers and his boring lectures. His furry-god-farmer advised him to share his…

  20. Dual numbers and supersymmetric mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydryszak, Andrzej M.

    2005-11-01

    We show that dual numbers, apart from the known practical applications to the description of a rigid body movements in three dimensional space and natural presence in abstract differential algebra, play a role in field theory and are related to supersymmetry as well. Relevant models are considered.

  1. Time to Make the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surrena, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In order to inspire her students to work in mixed media, the author chose to highlight the art of Jasper Johns and Robert Indiana, both of whom used numbers and letters as a main focus in their art. In this article, the author describes a mixed-media printmaking project. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  2. The elephant brain in numbers

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Avelino-de-Souza, Kamilla; Neves, Kleber; Porfírio, Jairo; Messeder, Débora; Mattos Feijó, Larissa; Maldonado, José; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    What explains the superior cognitive abilities of the human brain compared to other, larger brains? Here we investigate the possibility that the human brain has a larger number of neurons than even larger brains by determining the cellular composition of the brain of the African elephant. We find that the African elephant brain, which is about three times larger than the human brain, contains 257 billion (109) neurons, three times more than the average human brain; however, 97.5% of the neurons in the elephant brain (251 billion) are found in the cerebellum. This makes the elephant an outlier in regard to the number of cerebellar neurons compared to other mammals, which might be related to sensorimotor specializations. In contrast, the elephant cerebral cortex, which has twice the mass of the human cerebral cortex, holds only 5.6 billion neurons, about one third of the number of neurons found in the human cerebral cortex. This finding supports the hypothesis that the larger absolute number of neurons in the human cerebral cortex (but not in the whole brain) is correlated with the superior cognitive abilities of humans compared to elephants and other large-brained mammals. PMID:24971054

  3. Oxidation Numbers and Their Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a method for determining oxidation numbers in covalent compounds and balancing mixed organic-inorganic or purely organic systems. Points out ambiguities presented when adjacent atoms have small or zero electronegativity differences. Presents other limitations that arise when using electronegativity values. (CW)

  4. On Milne's quantum number function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsch, H. Jürgen

    1985-06-01

    The quantum number function N( E) introduced by Milne is studied in detail. It is shown that N( E) is not uniquely defined for energies different from the bound state values. The density of states {dN }/{dE } is nowhere unique and not necessarily positive.

  5. Residual number processing in dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia - a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts - is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and categorical colour-decision tasks with numerical and non-numerical stimuli, with adults with dyscalculia performing slower than controls in the number semantic tasks only. Structural imaging showed less grey-matter volume in the right parietal cortex in people with dyscalculia relative to controls. Functional MRI showed that accurate number semantic judgements were maintained by parietal and inferior frontal activations that were common to adults with dyscalculia and controls, with higher activation for participants with dyscalculia than controls in the right superior frontal cortex and the left inferior frontal sulcus. Enhanced activation in these frontal areas was driven by people with dyscalculia who made faster rather than slower numerical decisions; however, activation could not be accounted for by response times per se, because it was greater for fast relative to slow dyscalculics but not greater for fast controls relative to slow dyscalculics. In conclusion, our results reveal two frontal brain regions that support efficient number processing in dyscalculia. PMID:24266008

  6. High Reynolds number research - 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W. (Editor); Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required were examined. Potential experiments which maximize the research returns from the use of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) were outlined. Calibration plans were reviewed and the following topics were discussed: fluid dynamics; high lit; configuration aerodynamics; aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics; wind tunnel/flight correlation; space vehicles; and theoretical aerodynamics

  7. Distance Effects in Number Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweppe, Judith

    2013-01-01

    One pronoun production experiment and one pronoun comprehension experiment were performed to investigate the role of grammatical number information in long-distance anaphora, with referent and pronoun either in adjacent sentences or separated by an intervening sentence. The experiments tested the assumption that the influence of grammatical number…

  8. Solar System Number-Crunching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

    1997-01-01

    Defines terrestrial and Jovian planets and provides directions to obtain planetary data from the National Space Science Data Center Web sites. Provides "number-crunching" activities for the terrestrial planets using Texas Instruments TI-83 graphing calculators: computing volumetric mean radius and volume, density, ellipticity, speed, surface…

  9. Poison control center - emergency number

    MedlinePlus

    For a POISON EMERGENCY call: 1-800-222-1222 ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you talk to ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12630734 . Shannon MW. Emergency management of poisoning. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, ...

  10. Number of eggs in egg-noodles.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Emilio; De Acutis, Rodolfo; Festa, Maria Rosa

    2002-01-01

    The official method to determine the number of eggs present in egg-noodles is the digitonin method. By applying this method the total content of sterols is determined and expressed as total sterols. The official method is time consuming, not very accurate and its performance is very complicated. Its results are not very reliable either because the composition of the wheat is not considered. In this paper some markers are proposed to verify the correct ratio between eggs and triticum durum (TD) semolina used to prepare egg-noodles. Markers are selected ratios between sterols and FAME. The lipid extract is trans-esterified and injected into a gas chromatograph. The ratio between the areas of the selected components gives the markers. This method is proposed to substitute or alternate the official method because is more accurate and time saving. PMID:11993278

  11. New Upper Bounds for Taxicab and Cabtaxi Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Christian

    2008-03-01

    Hardy was surprised by Ramanujan's remark about a London taxi numbered 1729: "it is a very interesting number, it is the smallest number expressible as a sum of two cubes in two different ways". In memory of this story, this number is now called Taxicab(2) = 1729 = 9^3 + 10^33 = 1^33 + 12^33, Taxicab(n) being the smallest number expressible in n ways as a sum of two cubes. We can generalize the problem by also allowing differences of cubes: Cabtaxi(n) is the smallest number expressible in n ways as a sum or difference of two cubes. For example, Cabtaxi(2) = 91 = 3^3 + 4^3 = 6^3 - 5^3. Results were only known up to Taxicab(6) and Cabtaxi(9). This paper presents a history of the two problems since Fermat, Frenicle and Viete, and gives new upper bounds for Taxicab(7) to Taxicab(19), and for Cabtaxi(10) to Cabtaxi(30). Decompositions are explicitly given up to Taxicab(12) and Cabtaxi(20).

  12. Stochastic-Conceptual Models Applied to Number Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Megaklis Th.

    2011-09-01

    Concepts are defined as couples (O, A) of sets O and A: the object O (a set of none, or one or more elements) is assigned to the set A of these elements' (common) attributes. The objects change according to the sequence of attributes. Only couples of objects and attributes, that is concepts, are adequate for our world. The connections and links we need in databases and multimedia are expressed, naturally, by concepts, since concepts have been proved to dispose the order of a lattice (more complex and rich than linear and hierarchical ones). The lattice can be created by two algebraic operations: "intersection" as the multiplication and "symmetric-difference (!)" as the addition (!). There are, also, two other operations: the "union" and the "complement of a concept". Intersection and union (which cannot play the role neither of the addition nor of the multiplication) express similarities, while the other two operations express dissimilarities. The operation "complement of a concept" expresses the different, the uncommon, the variety. The symmetric-difference of two concepts has been proved to be a "distance" between them (in the mathematical sense!). We must not always see the natural numbers with their linear order (1,2,…,n,n+1,…), but is rather better to give them a more complex structure: the structure of a lattice. We need three operations: "union" of two numbers, "intersection" of two numbers and "complement" of a number. Research conclusion: the conceptual distance of (O1, A1) and (O2,A2) and is always a prime number! (conceptual means, from the point of view of the characteristic "divisibility" we are examining now and not the Euclidean or any other distance). This is the unique way the prime numbers are generated: not by unions and intersections(which express similarities), but by distances(differences)! …

  13. Number-theory dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2011-05-01

    We propose that the stability of dark matter is ensured by a discrete subgroup of the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry, Z(B-L). We introduce a set of chiral fermions charged under the U(1)B-L in addition to the right-handed neutrinos, and require the anomaly-cancellation conditions associated with the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry. We find that the possible number of fermions and their charges are tightly constrained, and that non-trivial solutions appear when at least five additional chiral fermions are introduced. The Fermat theorem in the number theory plays an important role in this argument. Focusing on one of the solutions, we show that there is indeed a good candidate for dark matter, whose stability is guaranteed by Z(B-L).

  14. How to Differentiate a Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ufnarovski, Victor; Ahlander, Bo

    2003-09-01

    We define the derivative of an integer to be the map sending every prime to 1 and satisfying the Leibnitz rule. The aim of the article is to consider the basic properties of this map and to show how to generalize the notion to the case of rational and arbitrary real numbers. We make some conjectures and find some connections with Goldbach's Conjecture and the Twin Prime Conjecture. Finally, we solve the easiest associated differential equations and calculate the generating function.

  15. Lozenge Tilings and Hurwitz Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    We give a new proof of the fact that, near a turning point of the frozen boundary, the vertical tiles in a uniformly random lozenge tiling of a large sawtooth domain are distributed like the eigenvalues of a GUE random matrix. Our argument uses none of the standard tools of integrable probability. In their place, it uses a combinatorial interpretation of the Harish-Chandra/Itzykson-Zuber integral as a generating function for desymmetrized Hurwitz numbers.

  16. Determination of the Schmidt number

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2011-04-15

    Optimized, necessary, and sufficient conditions for the identification of the Schmidt number will be derived in terms of general Hermitian operators. These conditions apply to arbitrary mixed quantum states. The optimization procedure delivers equations similar to the eigenvalue problem of an operator. The properties of the solution of these equations will be studied. We solve these equations for classes of operators. The solutions will be applied to phase randomized two-mode squeezed-vacuum states in continuous variable systems.

  17. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, A H; Masters, A; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-09-18

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (M_{A}) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ~0.3τ_{c}, where τ_{c} is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and M_{A} and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same M_{A}, a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming. PMID:26430997

  18. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  19. Automatic Assignment of EC Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Egelhofer, Volker; Schomburg, Ida; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    A wide range of research areas in molecular biology and medical biochemistry require a reliable enzyme classification system, e.g., drug design, metabolic network reconstruction and system biology. When research scientists in the above mentioned areas wish to unambiguously refer to an enzyme and its function, the EC number introduced by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB) is used. However, each and every one of these applications is critically dependent upon the consistency and reliability of the underlying data for success. We have developed tools for the validation of the EC number classification scheme. In this paper, we present validated data of 3788 enzymatic reactions including 229 sub-subclasses of the EC classification system. Over 80% agreement was found between our assignment and the EC classification. For 61 (i.e., only 2.5%) reactions we found that their assignment was inconsistent with the rules of the nomenclature committee; they have to be transferred to other sub-subclasses. We demonstrate that our validation results can be used to initiate corrections and improvements to the EC number classification scheme. PMID:20126531

  20. Stagnation Region Heat Transfer: The Influence of Turbulence Parameters, Reynolds Number and Body Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. James; Simoneau, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of velocity gradient on stagnation region heat transfer augmentation by free stream turbulence was investigated. Heat transfer was measured in the stagnation region of four models with elliptical leading edges with ratios of major to minor axes of 1:1, 1.5:1, 2.25:1, and 3:1. Four geometrically similar, square bar, square mesh, biplane grids were used to generate free stream turbulence with different intensities and length. Heat transfer measurements were made for the following ranges of parameters: Reynolds number, based on leading edge diameter, 37,000 to 228,000; dimensionless leading edge velocity gradient, 1.20 to 1.80; turbulence intensity, 1.1 to 15.9%; and length scale to leading edge diameter ratio, 0.05 to 0.30. Stagnation point heat transfer augmentation by free stream turbulence can be predicted using a modified version of a previously developed correlation for a circular leading edge. Heat transfer augmentation was independent of body shape at the stagnation point. The heat transfer distribution down-stream from the stagnation point can be predicted using the normalized laminar heat transfer distribution.

  1. Lake number, a quantitative indicator of mixing used to estimate changes in dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Imberger, Jorg

    1994-01-01

    Lake Number, LN, values are shown to be quantitative indicators of deep mixing in lakes and reservoirs that can be used to estimate changes in deep water dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. LN is a dimensionless parameter defined as the ratio of the moments about the center of volume of the water body, of the stabilizing force of gravity associated with density stratification to the destabilizing forces supplied by wind, cooling, inflow, outflow, and other artificial mixing devices. To demonstrate the universality of this parameter, LN values are used to describe the extent of deep mixing and are compared with changes in DO concentrations in three reservoirs in Australia and four lakes in the U.S.A., which vary in productivity and mixing regimes. A simple model is developed which relates changes in LN values, i.e., the extent of mixing, to changes in near bottom DO concentrations. After calibrating the model for a specific system, it is possible to use real-time LN values, calculated using water temperature profiles and surface wind velocities, to estimate changes in DO concentrations (assuming unchanged trophic conditions).

  2. Theory of cylindrical and spherical Langmuir probes in the limit of vanishing Debye number

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, M.J.M.; Storey, L.R.O.; Parker, L.W.; Laframboise, J.G.

    1982-12-01

    A theory has been developed for cylindrical and spherical probes and other collectors in collisionless plasmas, in the limit where the ratio of Debye length to probe radius (the Debye number lambda/sub D/) vanishes. Results are presented for the case of equal electron and ion temperatures. On the scale of the probe radius, the distributions of potential and density in the presheath appear to have infinite slope at the probe surface. The dimensionless current--voltage characteristic is the same for the cylinder as for the sphere, within the limits of error of the numerical results, although no physical reason for this is evident. As the magnitude of probe potential (relative to space) increases, the current does not saturate abruptly but only asymptotically; its limiting value is about 45% larger than at space potential. Probe currents for small nonzero lambda/sub D/ approach those for zero lambda/sub D/ only very slowly, showing power-law behavior as function of lambda/sub D/ in the limit as lambda/sub D/ ..-->.. 0, with power-law exponents less than unity, resulting in infinite limiting derivatives with respect to lambda/sub D/.

  3. Granular-flow rheology: Role of shear-rate number in transition regime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the rationale behind the semiempirical formulation of a generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in the light of the Reiner-Rivlin constitutive theory and the viscoplastic theory, thereby identifying the parameters that control the rheology of granular flow. The shear-rate number (N) proves to be among the most significant parameters identified from the GVF model. As N ??? 0 and N ??? ???, the GVF model can reduce asymptotically to the theoretical stress versus shear-rate relations in the macroviscous and graininertia regimes, respectively, where the grain concentration (C) also plays a major role in the rheology of granular flow. Using available data obtained from the rotating-cylinder experiments of neutrally buoyant solid spheres dispersing in an interstitial fluid, the shear stress for granular flow in transition between the two regimes proves dependent on N and C in addition to some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution. The insufficiency of data on rotating-cylinder experiments cannot presently allow the GVF model to predict how a granular flow may behave in the entire range of N; however, the analyzed data provide an insight on the interrelation among the relevant dimensionless parameters.

  4. Nanofluid slip flow over a stretching cylinder with Schmidt and Péclet number effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md Basir, Md Faisal; Uddin, M. J.; Md. Ismail, A. I.; Bég, O. Anwar

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model is presented for three-dimensional unsteady boundary layer slip flow of Newtonian nanofluids containing gyrotactic microorganisms over a stretching cylinder. Both hydrodynamic and thermal slips are included. By applying suitable similarity transformations, the governing equations are transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions. The transformed nonlinear ordinary differential boundary value problem is then solved using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order numerical method in Maple 18 symbolic software. The effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, nanoparticle volume fractions and microorganism motile density functions have been illustrated graphically. Comparisons of the present paper with the existing published results indicate good agreement and supports the validity and the accuracy of our numerical computations. Increasing bioconvection Schmidt number is observed to depress motile micro-organism density function. Increasing thermal slip parameter leads to a decrease in temperature. Thermal slip also exerts a strong influence on nano-particle concentration. The flow is accelerated with positive unsteadiness parameter (accelerating cylinder) and temperature and micro-organism density function are also increased. However nano-particle concentration is reduced with positive unsteadiness parameter. Increasing hydrodynamic slip is observed to boost temperatures and micro-organism density whereas it decelerates the flow and reduces nano-particle concentrations. The study is relevant to nano-biopolymer manufacturing processes.

  5. Who can escape the natural number bias in rational number tasks? A study involving students and experts.

    PubMed

    Obersteiner, Andreas; Hoof, Jo Van; Verschaffel, Lieven; Dooren, Wim Van

    2016-08-01

    Many learners have difficulties with rational number tasks because they persistently rely on their natural number knowledge, which is not always applicable. Studies show that such a natural number bias can mislead not only children but also educated adults. It is still unclear whether and under what conditions mathematical expertise enables people to be completely unaffected by such a bias on tasks in which people with less expertise are clearly biased. We compared the performance of eighth-grade students and expert mathematicians on the same set of algebraic expression problems that addressed the effect of arithmetic operations (multiplication and division). Using accuracy and response time measures, we found clear evidence for a natural number bias in students but no traces of a bias in experts. The data suggested that whereas students based their answers on their intuitions about natural numbers, expert mathematicians relied on their skilled intuitions about algebraic expressions. We conclude that it is possible for experts to be unaffected by the natural number bias on rational number tasks when they use strategies that do not involve natural numbers. PMID:26566736

  6. Valence, Covalence, Hypervalence, Oxidation State, and Coordination Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    2005-01-01

    Valence as a numerical measure of an atom's combining power, expressed by the number of bonds it forms in a molecular formulation of the compound in question, was unable to cope with coordination compounds. The covalence of an atom is the nearest model equivalent, but is subject to ambiguity since it often depends on which bonding model is being…

  7. Dynamic Modeling for Development and Education: From Concepts to Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Geert, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The general aim of the article is to teach the reader how to transform conceptual models of change, development, and learning into mathematical expressions and how to use these equations to build dynamic models by means of the widely used spreadsheet program Excel. The explanation is supported by a number of Excel files, which the reader can…

  8. A Pseudo-Random Number Generator Based on Normal Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2004-12-31

    In a recent paper, Richard Crandall and the present author established that each of a certain class of explicitly given real constants, uncountably infinite in number, is b-normal, for an integer that appears in the formula defining the constant. A b-normal constant is one where every string of m digits appears in the base-b expansion of the constant with limiting frequency b{sup -m}. This paper shows how this result can be used to fashion an efficient and effective pseudo-random number generator, which generates successive strings of binary digits from one of the constants in this class. The resulting generator, which tests slightly faster than a conventional linear congruential generator, avoids difficulties with large power-of-two data access strides that may occur when using conventional generators. It is also well suited for parallel processing--each processor can quickly and independently compute its starting value, with the collective sequence generated by all processors being the same as that generated by a single processor.

  9. A Numbering System for MFS Transporter Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joanna; Sands, Zara A.; Biggin, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest classes of secondary active transporters and is widely expressed in many domains of life. It is characterized by a common 12-transmembrane helix motif that allows the selective transport of a vast range of diverse substrates across the membrane. MFS transporters play a central role in many physiological processes and are increasingly recognized as potential drug targets. Despite intensive efforts, there are still only a handful of crystal structures and therefore homology modeling is likely to be a necessary process for providing models to interpret experiments for many years to come. However, the diversity of sequences and the multiple conformational states these proteins can exist in makes the process significantly more complicated, especially for sequences for which there is very little sequence identity to known templates. Inspired by the approach adopted many years ago for GPCRs, we have analyzed the large number of MFS sequences now available alongside the current structural information to propose a series of conserved contact points that can provide additional guidance for the homology modeling process. To enable cross-comparison across MFS models we also present a numbering scheme that can be used to provide a point of reference within each of the 12 transmembrane regions. PMID:27314000

  10. Topological number of edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kimura, Taro

    2016-05-01

    We show that the edge states of the four-dimensional class A system can have topological charges, which are characterized by Abelian/non-Abelian monopoles. The edge topological charges are a new feature of relations among theories with different dimensions. From this novel viewpoint, we provide a non-Abelian analog of the TKNN number as an edge topological charge, which is defined by an SU(2) 't Hooft-Polyakov BPS monopole through an equivalence to Nahm construction. Furthermore, putting a constant magnetic field yields an edge monopole in a noncommutative momentum space, where D-brane methods in string theory facilitate study of edge fermions.

  11. Propulsion at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Ali; Golestanian, Ramin

    2005-04-01

    We study the propulsion of two model swimmers at low Reynolds number. Inspired by Purcell's model, we propose a very simple one-dimensional swimmer consisting of three spheres that are connected by two arms whose lengths can change between two values. The proposed swimmer can swim with a special type of motion, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry. We also show that an ellipsoidal membrane with tangential travelling wave on it can also propel itself in the direction preferred by the travelling wave. This system resembles the realistic biological animals like Paramecium.

  12. 'Magic numbers' in the melting of a cluster of point charges on a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Livshits, A. M. Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2010-11-15

    The thermodynamic properties of a cluster of point Coulomb charges on a sphere have been analyzed using the Monte Carlo method for the number of charges 20 {<=} N {<=} 90. The ground state of the system of charges is described in the model of a closed quasi-two-dimensional triangular lattice with topological defects. We have determined the dependence of the Lindeman parameter {delta}{sub L} of this system on N and on the dimensionless parameter, which is proportional to the temperature T and to the radius R of the cluster, where element is the dielectric constant of the medium and the charge of a particle. The 'magic numbers,' i.e., the N values, for which the melting point of the closed triangular lattice of charges is much higher than those for neighboring N values, have been found. The evolution of the lattice-melting mechanisms with an increase in the number of charges N in a mesoscopic cluster has been analyzed. For N {<=} 32, the melting of the lattice does not involve dislocations (nontopological melting); this behavior of the mesoscopic system of charges on the sphere differs from the behavior of the extended planar two-dimensional system. At N {>=} 50, melting is accompanied by the formation of dislocations. The mechanism of dislocation-free non-topological melting of a closed lattice, which occurs at small N values and is associated with the cooperative rotational motion of 'rings' of particles, has been analyzed. The model has various implementations in the mesoscopic region; in particular, it describes the system of electrons over the liquid-helium cluster, the liquid-helium cluster with incorporated charged particles, a multielectron bubble in liquid helium, a charged quantum dot, etc.

  13. Factorising numbers with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Christoph; Page, Steffen; Holthaus, Martin

    2004-10-01

    The problem to express a natural number N as a product of natural numbers without regard to order corresponds to a thermally isolated non-interacting Bose gas in a one-dimensional potential with logarithmic energy eigenvalues. This correspondence is used for characterising the probability distribution which governs the number of factors in a randomly selected factorisation of an asymptotically large N. Asymptotic upper bounds on both the skewness and the excess of this distribution, and on the total number of factorisations, are conjectured. The asymptotic formulas are checked against exact numerical data obtained with the help of recursion relations. It is also demonstrated that for large numbers which are the product of different primes the probability distribution approaches a Gaussian, while identical prime factors give rise to non-Gaussian statistics.

  14. CRC (Coordinating Research Council) octane number requirement survey, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    An annual statistical survey of octane number requirements of late-model vehicles is conducted by the Coordinating Research Council, Inc. Test data were obtained by nineteen companies on 391 1988 vehicles including passenger cars and light-duty trucks and vans, of which 155 were equipped with knock sensors. Maximum octane-number requirements were determined by testing at maximum-throttle conditions, as well as at part-throttle, with three unleaded fuel series of varying sensitivities. Requirements are expressed as the (R+M)/2 octane number, Research octane number, and Motor octane number of the reference fuel producing knock which was recurrent and repeatable at the lowest audible level. Estimated octane number requirements for the total vehicles are weighted in proportion to the 1988-vehicle-model production and/or sales figures. The maximum octane number requirements of 1988 models with average sensitivity unleaded fuels were 84.7 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 50% satisfaction level, and 89.3 (R+M)/2 octane numbers at the 90% satisfaction level. Comparison with previous Surveys are made in this report.

  15. An experimental analysis of bed load transport in gravel-bed braided rivers with high grain Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vincenzo, Annamaria; Brancati, Francesco; Pannone, Marilena

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed with nearly uniform fluvial gravel (D50=9 mm, D10=5 mm and D90=13 mm) to analyse the relationship between stream power and bed load transport rate in gravel-bed braided rivers at high grain Reynolds numbers. The values of the unit-width dimensionless bed-load rate qb* and unit-width dimensionless stream power ω* were evaluated in equilibrium conditions based on ten different experimental runs. Then, they were plotted along with values obtained during particularly representative field studies documented in the literature, and a regression law was derived. For comparison, a regression analysis was performed using the data obtained from laboratory experiments characterized by smaller grain sizes and, therefore, referring to relatively low grain Reynolds numbers. A numerical integration of Exner's equation was performed to reconstruct the local and time-dependent functional dependence of qb* and ω*. The results led to the following conclusions: 1) At equilibrium, the reach-averaged bed load transport rate is related to the reach-averaged stream power by different regression laws at high and low grain Reynolds numbers. Additionally, the transition from bed to suspended load transport is accelerated by low Re*, with the corresponding bed load discharge increasing with stream power at a lower, linear rate. 2) When tested against the gravel laboratory measurements, the high Re* power law derived in the present study performs considerably better than do previous formulas. 3) The longitudinal variability of the section-averaged equilibrium stream power is much more pronounced than that characterizing the bed load rate, at least for high Re*. Thus, the stream power and its local-scale heterogeneity seem to be directly responsible for transverse sediment re-distribution and, ultimately, for the determination of the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the gravel bedforms. 4) Finally, the stochastic interpretation of the wetted

  16. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I-IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN) Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  17. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I–IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN). Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP. Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  18. The precision of mapping between number words and the approximate number system predicts children's formal math abilities.

    PubMed

    Libertus, Melissa E; Odic, Darko; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Children can represent number in at least two ways: by using their non-verbal, intuitive approximate number system (ANS) and by using words and symbols to count and represent numbers exactly. Furthermore, by the time they are 5years old, children can map between the ANS and number words, as evidenced by their ability to verbally estimate numbers of items without counting. How does the quality of the mapping between approximate and exact numbers relate to children's math abilities? The role of the ANS-number word mapping in math competence remains controversial for at least two reasons. First, previous work has not examined the relation between verbal estimation and distinct subtypes of math abilities. Second, previous work has not addressed how distinct components of verbal estimation-mapping accuracy and variability-might each relate to math performance. Here, we addressed these gaps by measuring individual differences in ANS precision, verbal number estimation, and formal and informal math abilities in 5- to 7-year-old children. We found that verbal estimation variability, but not estimation accuracy, predicted formal math abilities, even when controlling for age, expressive vocabulary, and ANS precision, and that it mediated the link between ANS precision and overall math ability. These findings suggest that variability in the ANS-number word mapping may be especially important for formal math abilities. PMID:27348475

  19. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-07-16

    This paper will explore the difficulties of deep reductions by examining the technical verification challenges. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 (Pifer 2010). Further reductions will include stepping stones at 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national lab complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  20. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  1. Numbers, Counting, and Infinity in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meconi, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of middle-school students' natural understanding of large numbers to introduce the concept of infinity. Presents activities that investigate infinite sets by demonstrating a one-to-one correspondence between the counting numbers and the given set. Examples include prime numbers, Fibonacci numbers, fractions, even and odd numbers,…

  2. FSHD: copy number variations on the theme of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cabianca, Daphne Selvaggia

    2010-01-01

    In humans, copy number variations (CNVs) are a common source of phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an important genetic disease caused by CNVs. It is an autosomal-dominant myopathy caused by a reduction in the copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat located at chromosome 4q35. Interestingly, the reduction of D4Z4 copy number is not sufficient by itself to cause FSHD. A number of epigenetic events appear to affect the severity of the disease, its rate of progression, and the distribution of muscle weakness. Indeed, recent findings suggest that virtually all levels of epigenetic regulation, from DNA methylation to higher order chromosomal architecture, are altered at the disease locus, causing the de-regulation of 4q35 gene expression and ultimately FSHD. PMID:21149563

  3. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  4. Numerical investigations of lift suppression by feedback rotary oscillation of circular cylinder at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Qin, Jian-Min; Teng, Bin; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    This article describes a strategy of active flow control for lift force reduction of circular cylinder subjected to uniform flow at low Reynolds numbers. The flow control is realized by rotationally oscillating the circular cylinder about its axis with ω(t )=-λCL(t), where ω(t ) is the dimensionless angular speed of rotation cylinder, λ is the control parameter and CL(t) is the feedback signal of lift coefficient. The study focuses on seeking optimum λ for the low Reynolds numbers of 60, 80, 100, 150, and 200. The effectiveness of the proposed flow control in suppressing lift force is examined comprehensively by a numerical model based on the finite element solution of two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The dependence of lift reduction on the control parameter λ is investigated. The threshold of λ, denoted by λc, is identified for the Reynolds numbers considered in this work. The numerical results show that the present active rotary oscillation of circular cylinder is able to reduce the amplitude of lift force significantly as long as λ ≤λc, at least 50% for the laminar flow regime. Meanwhile, the present active flow control does not result in the undesirable increase in the drag force. The Strouhal number is observed to decrease slightly with the increase of λ. As for a specific Reynolds number, the larger λ gives rise to the larger amount of lift reduction. The lift reduction reaches the maximum at λ =λc. The mechanism behind the present lift reduction method is revealed by comparing the flow patterns and pressure distributions near the active rotationally oscillating circular cylinder and the stationary circular cylinder. It is found that the critical value λc generally increases with Reynolds number. Two types of lift shift are observed in the numerical results for the cases with λ >λc. The first is characterized by the regular fluctuation of lift coefficient but with nonzero mean value, while the second is associated with the

  5. Shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra and shifted Hurwitz numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quan

    2016-05-01

    We construct the shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra, which is isomorphic to the central subalgebra A ∞ of infinite symmetric group algebra and to the shifted Schur symmetrical function algebra Λ* defined by Okounkov and Olshanskii. As an application, we get some differential equations for the generating functions of the shifted Hurwitz numbers; thus, we can express the generating functions in terms of the shifted genus expanded cut-and-join operators.

  6. Processing Idiomatic Expressions: Effects of Semantic Compositionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabossi, Patrizia; Fanari, Rachele; Wolf, Kinou

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments tested the main claims of the idiom decomposition hypothesis: People have clear intuitions on the semantic compositionality of idiomatic expressions, which determines the syntactic behavior of these expressions and how they are recognized. Experiment 1 showed that intuitions are clear only for a very restricted number of…

  7. "We All Have Something that Has to Do with Tens": Counting School Days, Decomposing Number, and Determining Place Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrow, Anne M.; Kidd, Kasia

    2008-01-01

    This article looks at how the activity of decomposing number--having students write numerical expressions equivalent to the number of days in school--can help students develop understanding of place value. (Contains 3 figures.)

  8. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  9. Semiperfect and Integer-Perfect Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The number theory concepts of perfect, deficient, and abundant numbers are subdivided and then utilized to discuss propositions concerning semiperfect, weird, and integer-perfect numbers. Conjectures about relationships among these latter numbers are suggested as avenues for further investigation. (JJK)

  10. Avogadro Number and Mole: A Royal Confusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emiliani, Cesare

    1991-01-01

    There is a great deal of confusion in physics and chemistry textbooks, dictionaries, manuals, and handbooks about the definition of Avogadro's number and the term "mole." Avogadro's number is defined simply as the number of atomic mass units in one gram. Mole is defined as the mass of one Avogadro number of identical items. (Author/PR)

  11. Girotondo dei Numeri (A Ring of Numbers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palandra, Maria; And Others

    This workbook in Italian for learning the numbers from one to ten is intended for use in a bilingual education setting. It is introduced and concluded by a song about playing "ring around the rosy" with numbers. Each paqe has a pen and ink drawing illustrating the number and a sentence about the picture and the number. (AMH)

  12. 14 CFR 47.15 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 100AB). The letters “I” and “O” may not be used. The first zero in a number must always be preceded by... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification number. 47.15 Section 47.15... REGISTRATION General § 47.15 Identification number. (a) Number required. An applicant for Aircraft...

  13. The Decimal Number System and Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author believes that a visual image of the number system is helpful to everyone, especially children, in understanding what is, after all, an abstract idea. The simplest model is the number line, a row of equally spaced numbers, starting at zero. This illustrates the continuous progression of the natural numbers, moving to the…

  14. Contextual Effects on Number-Time Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Aitao; Hodges, Bert; Zhang, Jijia; Zhang, John X.

    2009-01-01

    Time perception has long been known to be affected by numerical representations. Recent studies further demonstrate that when participants estimate the duration of Arabic numbers, number magnitude, though task-irrelevant, biases duration judgment to produce underestimation for smaller numbers and overestimation for larger numbers. Such effects…

  15. Visuospatial Priming of the Mental Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoianov, Ivilin; Kramer, Peter; Umilta, Carlo; Zorzi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    It has been argued that numbers are spatially organized along a "mental number line" that facilitates left-hand responses to small numbers, and right-hand responses to large numbers. We hypothesized that whenever the representations of visual and numerical space are concurrently activated, interactions can occur between them, before response…

  16. 7 CFR 46.20 - Lot numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lot numbers. 46.20 Section 46.20 Agriculture... Receivers § 46.20 Lot numbers. An identifying lot number shall be assigned to each shipment of produce to be sold on consignment or joint account or for the account of another person or firm. A lot number...

  17. 14 CFR 47.15 - Registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Registration number. 47.15 Section 47.15... REGISTRATION General § 47.15 Registration number. (a) Number required. An applicant for aircraft registration must place a U.S. registration number (registration mark) on the Aircraft Registration Application,...

  18. 9 CFR 355.8 - Official number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official number. 355.8 Section 355.8... IDENTIFICATION AS TO CLASS, QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND CONDITION Inauguration of Inspection § 355.8 Official number. To each plant granted inspection an official number shall be assigned. Such number shall be...

  19. 7 CFR 75.48 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification number. 75.48 Section 75.48 Agriculture... number. The Director may require the use of official identification numbers in connection with seed certificated or sampled under the Act. When identification numbers are required, they shall be specified by...

  20. 7 CFR 900.5 - Docket number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Docket number. 900.5 Section 900.5 Agriculture... Docket number. Each proceeding, immediately following its institution, shall be assigned a docket number by the hearing clerk and thereafter the proceeding may be referred to by such number....

  1. 7 CFR 900.5 - Docket number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Docket number. 900.5 Section 900.5 Agriculture... Docket number. Each proceeding, immediately following its institution, shall be assigned a docket number by the hearing clerk and thereafter the proceeding may be referred to by such number....

  2. 9 CFR 355.8 - Official number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official number. 355.8 Section 355.8... IDENTIFICATION AS TO CLASS, QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND CONDITION Inauguration of Inspection § 355.8 Official number. To each plant granted inspection an official number shall be assigned. Such number shall be...

  3. 7 CFR 900.5 - Docket number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Docket number. 900.5 Section 900.5 Agriculture... Docket number. Each proceeding, immediately following its institution, shall be assigned a docket number by the hearing clerk and thereafter the proceeding may be referred to by such number....

  4. 7 CFR 987.102 - Lot number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lot number. 987.102 Section 987.102 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules Definitions § 987.102 Lot number. Lot number is synonymous with code and means a combination of letters or numbers, or both, acceptable to the Committee,...

  5. 7 CFR 75.48 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification number. 75.48 Section 75.48 Agriculture... number. The Director may require the use of official identification numbers in connection with seed certificated or sampled under the Act. When identification numbers are required, they shall be specified by...

  6. 7 CFR 29.32 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification number. 29.32 Section 29.32 Agriculture... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.32 Identification number. A number or a combination of letters and numbers in a design or mark approved by the Director, stamped, printed, or stenciled on a lot of...

  7. 7 CFR 29.32 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification number. 29.32 Section 29.32 Agriculture... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.32 Identification number. A number or a combination of letters and numbers in a design or mark approved by the Director, stamped, printed, or stenciled on a lot of...

  8. 7 CFR 987.102 - Lot number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lot number. 987.102 Section 987.102 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules Definitions § 987.102 Lot number. Lot number is synonymous with code and means a combination of letters or numbers, or both, acceptable to the Committee,...

  9. 7 CFR 29.32 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification number. 29.32 Section 29.32 Agriculture... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.32 Identification number. A number or a combination of letters and numbers in a design or mark approved by the Director, stamped, printed, or stenciled on a lot of...

  10. 7 CFR 46.20 - Lot numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lot numbers. 46.20 Section 46.20 Agriculture... Receivers § 46.20 Lot numbers. An identifying lot number shall be assigned to each shipment of produce to be sold on consignment or joint account or for the account of another person or firm. A lot number...

  11. 9 CFR 355.8 - Official number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official number. 355.8 Section 355.8... IDENTIFICATION AS TO CLASS, QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND CONDITION Inauguration of Inspection § 355.8 Official number. To each plant granted inspection an official number shall be assigned. Such number shall be...

  12. 7 CFR 29.32 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification number. 29.32 Section 29.32 Agriculture... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.32 Identification number. A number or a combination of letters and numbers in a design or mark approved by the Director, stamped, printed, or stenciled on a lot of...

  13. 7 CFR 987.102 - Lot number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lot number. 987.102 Section 987.102 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules Definitions § 987.102 Lot number. Lot number is synonymous with code and means a combination of letters or numbers, or both, acceptable to the Committee,...

  14. 7 CFR 46.20 - Lot numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lot numbers. 46.20 Section 46.20 Agriculture... Receivers § 46.20 Lot numbers. An identifying lot number shall be assigned to each shipment of produce to be sold on consignment or joint account or for the account of another person or firm. A lot number...

  15. 14 CFR 47.15 - Registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Registration number. 47.15 Section 47.15... REGISTRATION General § 47.15 Registration number. (a) Number required. An applicant for aircraft registration must place a U.S. registration number (registration mark) on the Aircraft Registration Application,...

  16. 14 CFR 47.15 - Registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Registration number. 47.15 Section 47.15... REGISTRATION General § 47.15 Registration number. (a) Number required. An applicant for aircraft registration must place a U.S. registration number (registration mark) on the Aircraft Registration Application,...

  17. How is the ERBE region number determined?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    The ERBE region number can be easily determined with the following: 2.5-degree Data: Region number = int(colat / 2.5) * 144 + (lon / 2.5) 5-degree Data: Region number = int(colat / 5) * 72 + (lon / 5) 10-degree Data: Region number ...

  18. 7 CFR 75.48 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification number. 75.48 Section 75.48 Agriculture... number. The Director may require the use of official identification numbers in connection with seed certificated or sampled under the Act. When identification numbers are required, they shall be specified by...

  19. 7 CFR 75.48 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification number. 75.48 Section 75.48 Agriculture... number. The Director may require the use of official identification numbers in connection with seed certificated or sampled under the Act. When identification numbers are required, they shall be specified by...

  20. 7 CFR 900.5 - Docket number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Docket number. 900.5 Section 900.5 Agriculture... Docket number. Each proceeding, immediately following its institution, shall be assigned a docket number by the hearing clerk and thereafter the proceeding may be referred to by such number....

  1. 7 CFR 46.20 - Lot numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lot numbers. 46.20 Section 46.20 Agriculture... Receivers § 46.20 Lot numbers. An identifying lot number shall be assigned to each shipment of produce to be sold on consignment or joint account or for the account of another person or firm. A lot number...

  2. 7 CFR 987.102 - Lot number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lot number. 987.102 Section 987.102 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules Definitions § 987.102 Lot number. Lot number is synonymous with code and means a combination of letters or numbers, or both, acceptable to the Committee,...

  3. 7 CFR 46.20 - Lot numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lot numbers. 46.20 Section 46.20 Agriculture... Receivers § 46.20 Lot numbers. An identifying lot number shall be assigned to each shipment of produce to be sold on consignment or joint account or for the account of another person or firm. A lot number...

  4. 7 CFR 900.5 - Docket number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Docket number. 900.5 Section 900.5 Agriculture... Docket number. Each proceeding, immediately following its institution, shall be assigned a docket number by the hearing clerk and thereafter the proceeding may be referred to by such number....

  5. 7 CFR 987.102 - Lot number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lot number. 987.102 Section 987.102 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules Definitions § 987.102 Lot number. Lot number is synonymous with code and means a combination of letters or numbers, or both, acceptable to the Committee,...

  6. 9 CFR 355.8 - Official number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official number. 355.8 Section 355.8... IDENTIFICATION AS TO CLASS, QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND CONDITION Inauguration of Inspection § 355.8 Official number. To each plant granted inspection an official number shall be assigned. Such number shall be...

  7. 7 CFR 29.32 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification number. 29.32 Section 29.32 Agriculture... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.32 Identification number. A number or a combination of letters and numbers in a design or mark approved by the Director, stamped, printed, or stenciled on a lot of...

  8. 7 CFR 75.48 - Identification number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification number. 75.48 Section 75.48 Agriculture... number. The Director may require the use of official identification numbers in connection with seed certificated or sampled under the Act. When identification numbers are required, they shall be specified by...

  9. Some Remarks on Numbers and their Cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakaran, P. P.

    2014-07-01

    Humans perceive numbers (positive integers) through counting, i.e., by establishing a correspondence between the cardinality of a set of objects and a structured set of number symbols or number names. The structure requires the choice of a base -- `succession' structure alone is not enough. The point is made that for numbers below the base, cognition involves the learning and recalling of this association, fixed once and for all, while for larger numbers it results from learning the rules of construction of based numbers. Experiments on number cognition which do not take into account this essential distinction are likely to remain inconclusive.

  10. Integrated-Circuit Pseudorandom-Number Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steelman, James E.; Beasley, Jeff; Aragon, Michael; Ramirez, Francisco; Summers, Kenneth L.; Knoebel, Arthur

    1992-01-01

    Integrated circuit produces 8-bit pseudorandom numbers from specified probability distribution, at rate of 10 MHz. Use of Boolean logic, circuit implements pseudorandom-number-generating algorithm. Circuit includes eight 12-bit pseudorandom-number generators, outputs are uniformly distributed. 8-bit pseudorandom numbers satisfying specified nonuniform probability distribution are generated by processing uniformly distributed outputs of eight 12-bit pseudorandom-number generators through "pipeline" of D flip-flops, comparators, and memories implementing conditional probabilities on zeros and ones.

  11. On the number of limit cycles for perturbed pendulum equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasull, A.; Geyer, A.; Mañosas, F.

    2016-08-01

    We consider perturbed pendulum-like equations on the cylinder of the form x ¨ + sin ⁡ (x) = ε∑s=0mQn,s (x)x˙s where Qn,s are trigonometric polynomials of degree n, and study the number of limit cycles that bifurcate from the periodic orbits of the unperturbed case ε = 0 in terms of m and n. Our first result gives upper bounds on the number of zeros of its associated first order Melnikov function, in both the oscillatory and the rotary regions. These upper bounds are obtained expressing the corresponding Abelian integrals in terms of polynomials and the complete elliptic functions of first and second kind. Some further results give sharp bounds on the number of zeros of these integrals by identifying subfamilies which are shown to be Chebyshev systems.

  12. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-05-15

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy.

  13. A simplified Mach number scaling law for helicopter rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aravamudan, K. S.; Lee, A.; Harris, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Mach number scaling laws are derived for the rotational and the high-frequency broadband noise from helicopter rotors. The rotational scaling law is obtained directly from the theory of Lowson and Ollerhead (1969) by exploiting the properties of the dominant terms in the expression for the complex Fourier coefficients of sound radiation from a point source. The scaling law for the high-frequency broadband noise is obtained by assuming that the noise sources are acoustically compact and computing the instantaneous pressure due to an element on an airfoil where vortices are shed. Experimental results on the correlation lengths for stationary airfoils are extended to rotating airfoils. On the assumption that the correlation length varies as the boundary layer displacement thickness, it is found that the Mach number scaling law contains a factor of Mach number raised to the exponent 5.8. Both scaling laws were verified by model tests.

  14. Enteric neuronal plasticity and a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in hypertrophic rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    Ekblad, E; Sjuve, R; Arner, A; Sundler, F

    1998-01-01

    Background—Partial obstruction of the ileum causes a notable hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and enteric neurones in the proximally located intestine. 
Aims—To study the expression of neuromessengers in the hypertrophic ileum of rat as little is known about neuromessenger plasticity under these conditions. To investigate the presence of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in hypertrophic ileum. 
Methods—Ileal hypertrophy was induced by circumferential application of a strip of plastic film for 18-24 days. Immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridisation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry, and ethidium bromide staining were used to investigate the number of enteric neurones expressing neuropeptides and nitric oxide synthase, and the frequency of ICC. 
Results—In the hypertrophic ileum several neuronal populations showed changes in their expression of neuromessengers. Myenteric neurones expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, and galanin were notably increased in number. In submucous ganglia the number of VIP immunoreactive neurones decreased while those expressing VIP mRNA increased. NADPH diaphorase positive submucous neurones increased dramatically while the number of neuronal type nitric oxide synthase expressing ones was unchanged. The number of ICC decreased notably in hypertrophic ileum. 
Conclusion—Enteric neurones change their levels of expression of neuromessengers in hypertrophic ileum. ICC are also affected. The changes are presumably part of an adaptive response to the increased work load. 

 Keywords: enteric nerves; interstitial cells of Cajal; hypertrophy; neuropeptides; nitric oxide; neuronal plasticity PMID:9691923

  15. Generation of a two-center overlap integral over Slater orbitals of higher principal quantum numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.

    1992-01-01

    The expressions for two-center overlap integrals between angular s, p, and d Slater orbitals of arbitrary, higher principal quantum number are explicitly listed. The expressions obtained are extremely compact and independent of the coordinate system. It is further shown that the numerical values of the integrals obtained in this way are free from any numerical instability.

  16. Group Sunspot Numbers: Sunspot Cycle Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.; Wilson, R. M.; Reichmann, E. J.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We examine the "Group" sunspot numbers constructed by Hoyt and Schatten to determine their utility in characterizing the solar activity cycle. We compare smoothed monthly Group Sunspot Numbers to Zurich (International) Sunspot Numbers, 10.7-cm radio flux, and total sunspot area. We find that the Zurich numbers follow the 10.7-cm radio flux and total sunspot area measurements slightly better than the Group numbers. We examine several significant characteristics of the sunspot cycle using both Group numbers and Zurich numbers. We find that the "Waldmeier Effect" - the anti-correlation between cycle amplitude and the elapsed time between minimum and maximum of a cycle - is much more apparent in the Zurich numbers. The "Amplitude-Period Effect" the anti-correlation between cycle amplitude and the length of the previous cycle from minimum to minimum - is also much more apparent in the Zurich numbers. The "Amplitude-Minimum Effect" - the correlation between cycle amplitude and the activity level at the previous (onset) minimum is equally apparent in both the Zurich numbers and the Group numbers. The "Even-Odd Effect" - in which odd-numbered cycles are larger than their even-numbered precursors - is somewhat stronger in the Group numbers but with a tighter relationship in the Zurich numbers. The "Secular Trend" - the increase in cycle amplitudes since the Maunder Minimum - is much stronger in Group numbers. After removing this trend we find little evidence for multi-cycle periodicities like the 80 year Gleissberg cycle or the two- and three-cycle periodicities. We also find little evidence for a correlation between the amplitude of a cycle and its period or for a bimodal distribution of cycle periods. We conclude that the Group numbers are most useful for extending the sunspot cycle data further back in time and thereby adding more cycles and improving the statistics. However, the Zurich numbers are more useful for characterizing the on-going levels of solar activity.

  17. The Translated Dowling Polynomials and Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Mangontarum, Mahid M.; Macodi-Ringia, Amila P.; Abdulcarim, Normalah S.

    2014-01-01

    More properties for the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind such as horizontal generating function, explicit formula, and exponential generating function are proposed. Using the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind, we will define the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers. Basic properties such as exponential generating functions and explicit formula for the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers are obtained. Convexity, integral representation, and other interesting identities are also investigated and presented. We show that the properties obtained are generalizations of some of the known results involving the classical Bell polynomials and numbers. Lastly, we established the Hankel transform of the translated Dowling numbers.

  18. Quality measures for gene expression biclusters.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  19. Quality Measures for Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S.

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  20. Preparation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression plasmids.

    PubMed

    Drew, David; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Expression plasmids for Saccharomyces cerevisiae offer a wide choice of vector copy number, promoters of varying strength and selection markers. These expression plasmids are usually shuttle vectors that can be propagated both in yeast and bacteria, making them useful in gene cloning. For heterologous production of membrane proteins, we used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion technology which was previously developed in the Escherichia coli system. We designed an expression plasmid carrying an inducible GAL1 promoter, a gene encoding a membrane protein of interest and the GFP-octa-histidine sequence. Here we describe construction of multi-copy yeast expression plasmids by homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae. PMID:22454112

  1. Disorder of written expression

    MedlinePlus

    Written expression disorder; Dysgraphia; Specific learning disorder with impairment in written expression ... Specific learning disorder with impairment in written expression is as common as other learning disorders, which is about 5 ...

  2. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  3. Plasmid Copy Number Determination by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Anindyajati; Artarini, A Anita; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins are biopharmaceutical products that develop rapidly for years. Recombinant protein production in certain hosts requires vector expression harboring the gene encoding the corresponding protein. Escherichia coli is the prokaryote organism mostly used in recombinant protein production, commonly using a plasmid as the expression vector. Recombinant protein production is affected by plasmid copy number harboring the encoded gene, hence the determination of plasmid copy number also plays an important role in establishing a recombinant protein production system. On the industrial scale, a low copy number of plasmids are more suitable due to their better stability. In the previous study we constructed pCAD, a plasmid derived from the low copy number pBR322 plasmid. This study was aimed to confirm pCAD's copy number by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Plasmid copy number was determined by comparing the quantification signal from the plasmid to those from the chromosome. Copy number was then calculated by using a known copy number plasmid as a standard. Two pairs of primers, called tdk and ori, were designed for targeting a single gene tdk in the chromosome and a conserved domain in the plasmid's ori, respectively. Primer quality was analyzed in silico using PrimerSelect DNASTAR and PraTo software prior to in vitro evaluation on primer specificity and efficiency as well as optimization of qPCR conditions. Plasmid copy number determination was conducted on E. coli lysates harboring each plasmid, with the number of cells ranging from 10(2)-10(5) cells/μL. Cells were lysed by incubation at 95ºC for 10 minutes, followed by immediate freezing at -4°C. pBR322 plasmid with the copy number of ~19 copies/cell was used as the standard, while pJExpress414-sod plasmid possessing the high copy number pUC ori was also determined to test the method being used. In silico analysis based on primer-primer and primer-template interactions showed

  4. 40 CFR 86.1204 - Section numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1204 Section numbering. The section numbering system set forth...

  5. Quantity Cognition: Numbers, Numerosity, Zero and Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ben M

    2016-05-23

    Physical quantities differ from abstract numbers and mathematics, but recent results are revealing the neural representation of both: a new study demonstrates how an absence of quantity is transformed into a representation of zero as a number. PMID:27218850

  6. Number Theory in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dence, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates some of the usefulness of number theory to students on the high school setting in four areas: Fibonacci numbers, Diophantine equations, continued fractions, and algorithms for computing pi. (ASK)

  7. The Many Pearls of Number Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prielipp, Robert W.

    1970-01-01

    Presents information about prime numbers which the elementary or junior high school teacher might introduce to students. Gives five definition statements followed by at least one theorem and its proof. Introduces some historical aspects to prime numbers. (RR)

  8. Poison control center - Emergency number (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. ... control centers in the U.S. use this national number. You should call if you have any questions ...

  9. Is Approximate Number Precision a Stable Predictor of Math Ability?

    PubMed Central

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that children’s ability to estimate numbers of items using their Approximate Number System (ANS) predicts later math ability. To more closely examine the predictive role of early ANS acuity on later abilities, we assessed the ANS acuity, math ability, and expressive vocabulary of preschoolers twice, six months apart. We also administered attention and memory span tasks to ask whether the previously reported association between ANS acuity and math ability is ANS-specific or attributable to domain-general cognitive skills. We found that early ANS acuity predicted math ability six months later, even when controlling for individual differences in age, expressive vocabulary, and math ability at the initial testing. In addition, ANS acuity was a unique concurrent predictor of math ability above and beyond expressive vocabulary, attention, and memory span. These findings of a predictive relationship between early ANS acuity and later math ability add to the growing evidence for the importance of early numerical estimation skills. PMID:23814453

  10. On Anti-Elite Prime Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M"Uller, Tom

    2007-09-01

    An odd prime number p is called anti-elite if only finitely many Fermat numbers are quadratic non-residues to p. This concept is the exact opposite to that of elite prime numbers. We study some fundamental properties of anti-elites and show that there are infinitely many of them. A computational search among all the numbers up to 100 billion yielded 84 anti-elite primes.

  11. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  16. 48 CFR 304.7001 - Numbering acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Numbering acquisitions. 304.7001 Section 304.7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Acquisition Instrument Identification Numbering System 304.7001 Numbering acquisitions....

  17. 48 CFR 304.7001 - Numbering acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Numbering acquisitions. 304.7001 Section 304.7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Acquisition Instrument Identification Numbering System 304.7001 Numbering acquisitions....

  18. 48 CFR 304.7001 - Numbering acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Numbering acquisitions. 304.7001 Section 304.7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Acquisition Instrument Identification Numbering System 304.7001 Numbering acquisitions....

  19. 48 CFR 304.7001 - Numbering acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Numbering acquisitions. 304.7001 Section 304.7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Acquisition Instrument Identification Numbering System 304.7001 Numbering acquisitions....

  20. 48 CFR 304.7001 - Numbering acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Numbering acquisitions. 304.7001 Section 304.7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Acquisition Instrument Identification Numbering System 304.7001 Numbering acquisitions....