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Sample records for dimerization sequence influence

  1. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  2. The regulator of nitrate assimilation in ascomycetes is a dimer which binds a nonrepeated, asymmetrical sequence.

    PubMed

    Strauss, J; Muro-Pastor, M I; Scazzocchio, C

    1998-03-01

    The regulation of nitrate assimilation seems to follow the same pattern in all ascomycetes where this process has been studied. We show here by in vitro binding studies and a number of protection and interference techniques that the transcription factor mediating nitrate induction in Aspergillus nidulans, a protein containing a binuclear zinc cluster DNA binding domain, recognizes an asymmetrical sequence of the form CTCC GHGG. We further show that the protein binds to its consensus site as a dimer. We establish the role of the putative dimerization element by its ability to replace the analogous element of the cI protein of phage lambda. Mutagenesis of crucial leucines of the dimerization element affect both the binding ability of the dimer and the conformation of the resulting protein-DNA complex. This is the first case to be described where a dimer recognizes such an asymmetrical nonrepeated sequence, presumably by each monomeric subunit making different contacts with different DNA half-sites. PMID:9488449

  3. Cloning and sequencing of the cDNA species for mammalian dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Arimitsu, E; Aoki, S; Ishikura, S; Nakanishi, K; Matsuura, K; Hara, A

    1999-01-01

    Cynomolgus and Japanese monkey kidneys, dog and pig livers and rabbit lens contain dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.1.20) associated with high carbonyl reductase activity. Here we have isolated cDNA species for the dimeric enzymes by reverse transcriptase-PCR from human intestine in addition to the above five animal tissues. The amino acid sequences deduced from the monkey, pig and dog cDNA species perfectly matched the partial sequences of peptides digested from the respective enzymes of these animal tissues, and active recombinant proteins were expressed in a bacterial system from the monkey and human cDNA species. Northern blot analysis revealed the existence of a single 1.3 kb mRNA species for the enzyme in these animal tissues. The human enzyme shared 94%, 85%, 84% and 82% amino acid identity with the enzymes of the two monkey strains (their sequences were identical), the dog, the pig and the rabbit respectively. The sequences of the primate enzymes consisted of 335 amino acid residues and lacked one amino acid compared with the other animal enzymes. In contrast with previous reports that other types of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, carbonyl reductases and enzymes with either activity belong to the aldo-keto reductase family or the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family, dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase showed no sequence similarity with the members of the two protein families. The dimeric enzyme aligned with low degrees of identity (14-25%) with several prokaryotic proteins, in which 47 residues are strictly or highly conserved. Thus dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase has a primary structure distinct from the previously known mammalian enzymes and is suggested to constitute a novel protein family with the prokaryotic proteins. PMID:10477285

  4. Blue Light-induced Dimerization of Monomeric Aureochrome-1 Enhances Its Affinity for the Target Sequence*

    PubMed Central

    Hisatomi, Osamu; Nakatani, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Ken; Takahashi, Fumio; Kataoka, Hironao

    2014-01-01

    Aureochrome-1 (AUREO1) is a blue light (BL) receptor that mediates the branching response in stramenopile alga, Vaucheria frigida. AUREO1 contains a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain in the central region and a light-oxygen-voltage sensing (LOV) domain at the C terminus, and has been suggested to function as a light-regulated transcription factor. We have previously reported that preparations of recombinant AUREO1 contained the complete coding sequence (full-length, FL) and N-terminal truncated protein (ZL) containing bZIP and LOV domains, and suggested that wild-type ZL (ZLwt2) was in a dimer form with intermolecular disulfide linkages at Cys162 and Cys182 (Hisatomi, O., Takeuchi, K., Zikihara, K., Ookubo, Y., Nakatani, Y., Takahashi, F., Tokutomi, S., and Kataoka, H. (2013) Plant Cell Physiol. 54, 93–106). In the present study, we report the photoreactions, oligomeric structures, and DNA binding of monomeric cysteine to serine-mutated ZL (ZLC2S), DTT-treated ZL (DTT-ZL), and FL (DTT-FL). Recombinant AUREO1 showed similar spectral properties and dark regeneration kinetics to those of dimeric ZLwt2. Dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography revealed that ZLC2S and DTT-ZL were monomeric in the dark state. Dissociation of intermolecular disulfide bonds of ZLwt2 was in equilibrium with a midpoint oxidation-redox potential of approximately −245 ± 15 mV. BL induced the dimerization of monomeric ZL, which subsequently increased its affinity for the target sequence. Also, DTT-FL was monomeric in the dark state and underwent BL-induced dimerization, which led to formation of the FL2·DNA complex. Taken together, our results suggest that monomeric AUREO1 is present in vivo, with dimerization playing a key role in its role as a BL-regulated transcription factor. PMID:24790107

  5. Clinical conditions and patient factors significantly influence diagnostic utility of D-dimer in venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Asghar; Duggan, Mary; O'Connell, Niamh; O'Driscoll, Anne

    2009-06-01

    Determining D-dimer levels remains important in the diagnostic algorithms for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The present study aimed to identify factors influencing D-dimer utility in diagnosing VTE. Consecutive symptomatic medical patients, who attended our emergency department from 1 November 2006 to 31 December 2006, had D-dimer levels measured as fibrinogen equivalent units (FEU), following clinical risk assessment. Diagnosis of VTE was established by venous compression ultrasonography and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. VTE-negative patients were followed for 2 months to detect future occurrence of thromboembolism. Impact of various factors on D-dimer levels was analyzed. Four thousand and twenty-six patients attended our emergency department, and 525 patients (median age 52 years) had D-dimer assessed. Final diagnosis of VTE was established in 25 (4.7%) patients on radiological investigations. Median D-dimer levels for VTE-negative patients less than 60 years old, with normal renal function and chest radiology were 0.38 microgFEU/ml (range 0.19-2.3), 0.39 microgFEU/ml (range 0.17-3.5) and 0.39 microgFEU/ml (range 0.1-4.3), respectively. Similar figures for those at least 60 years, with renal impairment and abnormal chest radiology, were 0.75 microgFEU/ml (range 0.22-4.3), 0.52 microgFEU/ml (range 0.17-4.4) and 0.92 microgFEU/ml (range 0.26-5.6), respectively. Factors including patient age, renal function and chest radiology had significant influence on D-dimer levels (P < 0.01). A triad of patient age at least 60 years, renal impairment (modification of diet in renal disease stage 2-5) and abnormal chest radiology had a false positive D-dimer in 96% of patients (n = 72). Use of D-dimer in patients with a triad of advanced age, renal impairment and abnormal chest radiology has no practical diagnostic value in VTE. PMID:19276796

  6. Sequence analysis of the dimerization initiation site of concordant and discordant viral variants superinfecting HIV type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Luzia; Powell, Rebecca; Kinge, Thompson; Nyambi, Phillipe N

    2011-11-01

    For HIV recombination to occur, the RNAs from two infecting strains within a cell must dimerize at the dimerization initiation site (DIS). We examined the sequence identity at the DIS (697-731 bp, Hxb2 numbering engine) in patients superinfected with concordant HIV-1 strains and compared them to those with discordant strains. Viral RNA in sequential plasma from four subjects superinfected with subtype-discordant and two subjects superinfected with subtype-concordant HIV-1 strains was extracted, amplified (5' LTR-early gag: 526-1200 bp, Hxb2 numbering engine), sequenced, and analyzed to determine their compatibility for dimerization in vivo. The concordant viruses infecting the two subjects exhibited identical sequences in the 35-bp-long DIS region while sequences from the discordant viruses revealed single nucleotide changes that were located in the DIS loop (715 bp), its flanking nucleotides (710 bp and 717 bp), and the DIS stem (719 bp). Evidence from in vitro experiments demonstrates that these in vivo changes identified can abolish dimerization and reduce recombination frequency. Therefore, these results revealing differences in the DIS of discordant strains versus the similarity noted for the concordant strains may contribute to the differences in the frequency of recombination in patients superinfected with such HIV-1 variants. PMID:21453132

  7. Large-Scale Conformational Transitions and Dimerization Are Encoded in the Amino-Acid Sequences of Hsp70 Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Malinverni, Duccio; Marsili, Simone; Barducci, Alessandro; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70s are a class of ubiquitous and highly conserved molecular chaperones playing a central role in the regulation of proteostasis in the cell. Hsp70s assist a myriad of cellular processes by binding unfolded or misfolded substrates during a complex biochemical cycle involving large-scale structural rearrangements. Here we show that an analysis of coevolution at the residue level fully captures the characteristic large-scale conformational transitions of this protein family, and predicts an evolutionary conserved–and thus functional–homo-dimeric arrangement. Furthermore, we highlight that the features encoding the Hsp70 dimer are more conserved in bacterial than in eukaryotic sequences, suggesting that the known Hsp70/Hsp110 hetero-dimer is a eukaryotic specialization built on a pre-existing template. PMID:26046683

  8. Sequence-selective carbohydrate-DNA interaction: dimeric and monomeric forms of the calicheamicin oligosaccharide interfere with transcription factor function.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Smith, B M; Ajito, K; Komatsu, H; Gomez-Paloma, L; Li, T; Theodorakis, E A; Nicolaou, K C; Vogt, P K

    1996-01-01

    The synthetic oligosaccharide moiety of the antibiotic calicheamicin and the head-to-head dimer of this oligosaccharide are known to bind to the minor groove of DNA in a sequence-selective manner preferring distinct target sequences. We tested these carbohydrates for their ability to interfere with transcription factor function. The oligosaccharides inhibit binding of transcription factors to DNA in a sequence-selective manner, probably by inducing a conformational change in DNA structure. They also interfere with transcription by polymerase II in vitro. The effective concentrations of the oligosaccharides for inhibition of transcription factor binding and for transcriptional inhibition are in the micromolar range. The dimer is a significantly more active inhibitor than is the monomer. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8570664

  9. Chromomycin dimer-DNA oligomer complexes. Sequence selectivity and divalent cation specificity.

    PubMed

    Gao, X L; Patel, D J

    1990-12-11

    This paper reports on a solution NMR characterization of the sequence selectivity and metal ion specificity in chromomycin-DNA oligomer complexes in the presence of divalent cations. The sequence selectivity studies have focused on chromomycin complexes with the self-complementary d(A1-A2-G3-G4-C5-C6-T7-T8) duplex containing a pair of adjacent (G3-G4).(C5-C6) steps and the self-complementary d(A1-G2-G3-A4-T5-C6-C7-T8) duplex containing a pair of separated (G2-G3).(C6-C7) steps in aqueous solution. The antitumor agent (chromomycin) and nucleic acid protons have been assigned following analysis of distance connectivities in NOESY spectra and coupling connectivities in DQF-COSY spectra for both complexes in H2O and D2O solution. The observed intermolecular NOEs establish that chromomycin binds as a Mg(II)-coordinated dimer [1 Mg(II) per complex] and contacts the minor-groove edge with retention of 2-fold symmetry centered about the (G3-G4-C5-C6).(G3-G4-C5-C6) segment of the d(A2G2C2T2) duplex. By contrast, complex formation is centered about the (G2-G3-A4-T5).(A4-T5-C6-C7) segment and results in removal of the two fold symmetry of the d(AG2ATC2T) duplex. Thus, the binding of one subunit of the chromomycin dimer at its preferred (G-G).(C-C) site assists in the binding of the second subunit to the less preferred adjacent (A-T).(A-T) site. These observations suggest a hierarchy of chromomycin binding sites, with a strong site detected at the (G-G) step due to the hydrogen-bonding potential of acceptor N3 and donor NH2 groups of guanosine that line the minor groove. The divalent cation specificity has been investigated by studies on the symmetric chromomycin-d(A2G2C2T2) complex in the presence of diamagnetic Mg(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cations and paramagnetic Ni(II) and Co(II) cations. A comparative NOESY study of the Mg(II) and Ni(II) symmetric complexes suggests that a single tightly bound divalent cation aligns the two chromomycins in the dimer through coordination to

  10. Temperature influences epimerization and composition of flavanol monomers, dimers and trimers during cocoa bean roasting.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Lisa; Zimmermann, Benno F; Galensa, Rudolf

    2013-12-15

    Cocoa consumption is suggested to promote many health benefits, since cocoa is a rich source of flavanols; but amounts and profiles of flavanols depend strongly on the bean type, origin and manufacturing process. Roasting is known as a crucial step in technical treatment of cocoa, which leads to flavanol losses and modifications, especially the epimerization of (-)-epicatechin to (-)-catechin. This study monitors the influence of cocoa bean roasting on the composition of flavanol monomers to trimers, with special focus on epimerization, which was quantified for procyanidin dimers, and also observed for trimers for the first time. Five dimeric and two trimeric potential epimerization products were detected and the extent of epimerization during cocoa roasting was shown to be a function of temperature. The data also showed remarkable variations in the change of flavanol content. The quantified flavanols decreased about 50% in Java beans and increased about 30% in Ivory Coast beans, despite being roasted under equal conditions. PMID:23993533

  11. The influence of zeolitic water on the rate of butadiene dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Zeolites find widespread usage as catalysts for a variety of chemical transformations. Frequently, the catalytically active agent is a transition metal ion located at an exchange site in contact with the zeolitic surface. Although the extraframework cation positions and relative populations can often be determined by spectroscopic methods, the influence of cation sitting and adsorbed reactant induced migration under reaction conditions is less well understood. This note describes the role which water exerts on the activity of copper-exchanged zeolite Y for the dimerization of butadiene to 4-vinylcyclohexene (4-VCH). 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Detergent Properties Influence the Stability of the Glycophorin A Transmembrane Helix Dimer in Lysophosphatidylcholine Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Stangl, Michael; Veerappan, Anbazhagan; Kroeger, Anja; Vogel, Peter; Schneider, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Detergents might affect membrane protein structures by promoting intramolecular interactions that are different from those found in native membrane bilayers, and fine-tuning detergent properties can be crucial for obtaining structural information of intact and functional transmembrane proteins. To systematically investigate the influence of the detergent concentration and acyl-chain length on the stability of a transmembrane protein structure, the stability of the human glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer has been analyzed in lyso-phosphatidylcholine micelles of different acyl-chain length. While our results indicate that the transmembrane protein is destabilized in detergents with increasing chain-length, the diameter of the hydrophobic micelle core was found to be less crucial. Thus, hydrophobic mismatch appears to be less important in detergent micelles than in lipid bilayers and individual detergent molecules appear to be able to stretch within a micelle to match the hydrophobic thickness of the peptide. However, the stability of the GpA TM helix dimer linearly depends on the aggregation number of the lyso-PC detergents, indicating that not only is the chemistry of the detergent headgroup and acyl-chain region central for classifying a detergent as harsh or mild, but the detergent aggregation number might also be important. PMID:23260047

  13. Cooperative binding of the yeast Spt10p activator to the histone upstream activating sequences is mediated through an N-terminal dimerization domain

    PubMed Central

    Mendiratta, Geetu; Eriksson, Peter R.; Clark, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The yeast Spt10p activator is a putative histone acetyltransferase (HAT) possessing a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (DBD) which binds to the upstream activation sequences (UAS elements) in the histone gene promoters. Spt10p binds to a pair of histone UAS elements with extreme positive cooperativity. The molecular basis of this cooperativity was addressed. Spt10p (640 residues) is an elongated dimer, but the isolated DBD (residues 283–396) is a monomer and binds non-cooperatively to DNA. A Spt10p fragment comprising the N-terminal domain (NTD), HAT domain and DBD (residues 1–396) binds cooperatively and is a dimer, whereas an overlapping Spt10p fragment comprising the DBD and C-terminal domains (residues 283–640) binds non-cooperatively and is a monomer. These observations imply that cooperative binding requires dimerization. The isolated NTD (residues 1–98) is a dimer and is responsible for dimerization. We propose that cooperativity involves a conformational change in the Spt10p dimer which facilitates the simultaneous recognition of two UAS elements. In vivo, deletion of the NTD results in poor growth, but does not prevent the binding at the HTA1 promoter, suggesting that dimerization is biologically important. Residues 1–396 are sufficient for normal growth, indicating that the critical functions of Spt10p reside in the N-terminal domains. PMID:17202156

  14. A Short Sequence Motif in the 5′ Leader of the HIV-1 Genome Modulates Extended RNA Dimer Formation and Virus Replication*

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The 5′ leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via intermolecular kissing loop (KL) base pairing. The KL dimer can be stabilized by including the DIS stem nucleotides in the intermolecular base pairing, forming an extended dimer (ED). The role of the ED RNA dimer in HIV-1 replication has hardly been addressed because of technical challenges. We analyzed a set of leader mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin for in vitro RNA dimerization and virus replication in T cells. In agreement with previous observations, DIS hairpin stability modulated KL and ED dimerization. An unexpected previous finding was that mutation of three nucleotides immediately upstream of the DIS hairpin significantly reduced in vitro ED formation. In this study, we tested such mutants in vivo for the importance of the ED in HIV-1 biology. Mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin replicated less efficiently than WT HIV-1. This defect was most severe when the upstream sequence motif was altered. Virus evolution experiments with the defective mutants yielded fast replicating HIV-1 variants with second site mutations that (partially) restored the WT hairpin stability. Characterization of the mutant and revertant RNA molecules and the corresponding viruses confirmed the correlation between in vitro ED RNA dimer formation and efficient virus replication, thus indicating that the ED structure is important for HIV-1 replication. PMID:25368321

  15. Dimer interface of bovine cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by local posttranslational modifications and lipid binding.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Mohammed, Shabaz; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Schmidt, Carla; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Bovine cytochrome c oxidase is an integral membrane protein complex comprising 13 protein subunits and associated lipids. Dimerization of the complex has been proposed; however, definitive evidence for the dimer is lacking. We used advanced mass spectrometry methods to investigate the oligomeric state of cytochrome c oxidase and the potential role of lipids and posttranslational modifications in its subunit interfaces. Mass spectrometry of the intact protein complex revealed that both the monomer and the dimer are stabilized by large lipid entities. We identified these lipid species from the purified protein complex, thus implying that they interact specifically with the enzyme. We further identified phosphorylation and acetylation sites of cytochrome c oxidase, located in the peripheral subunits and in the dimer interface, respectively. Comparing our phosphorylation and acetylation sites with those found in previous studies of bovine, mouse, rat, and human cytochrome c oxidase, we found that whereas some acetylation sites within the dimer interface are conserved, suggesting a role for regulation and stabilization of the dimer, phosphorylation sites were less conserved and more transient. Our results therefore provide insights into the locations and interactions of lipids with acetylated residues within the dimer interface of this enzyme, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of its structure in the natural membrane. Moreover dimeric cytochrome c oxidase, comprising 20 transmembrane, six extramembrane subunits, and associated lipids, represents the largest integral membrane protein complex that has been transferred via electrospray intact into the gas phase of a mass spectrometer, representing a significant technological advance. PMID:27364008

  16. Dimer interface of bovine cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by local posttranslational modifications and lipid binding

    PubMed Central

    Liko, Idlir; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Schmidt, Carla; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine cytochrome c oxidase is an integral membrane protein complex comprising 13 protein subunits and associated lipids. Dimerization of the complex has been proposed; however, definitive evidence for the dimer is lacking. We used advanced mass spectrometry methods to investigate the oligomeric state of cytochrome c oxidase and the potential role of lipids and posttranslational modifications in its subunit interfaces. Mass spectrometry of the intact protein complex revealed that both the monomer and the dimer are stabilized by large lipid entities. We identified these lipid species from the purified protein complex, thus implying that they interact specifically with the enzyme. We further identified phosphorylation and acetylation sites of cytochrome c oxidase, located in the peripheral subunits and in the dimer interface, respectively. Comparing our phosphorylation and acetylation sites with those found in previous studies of bovine, mouse, rat, and human cytochrome c oxidase, we found that whereas some acetylation sites within the dimer interface are conserved, suggesting a role for regulation and stabilization of the dimer, phosphorylation sites were less conserved and more transient. Our results therefore provide insights into the locations and interactions of lipids with acetylated residues within the dimer interface of this enzyme, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of its structure in the natural membrane. Moreover dimeric cytochrome c oxidase, comprising 20 transmembrane, six extramembrane subunits, and associated lipids, represents the largest integral membrane protein complex that has been transferred via electrospray intact into the gas phase of a mass spectrometer, representing a significant technological advance. PMID:27364008

  17. Application of systematic sequences of wave functions to the water dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D. )

    1992-04-15

    A systematic series of calculations encompassing a wide range of basis sets and correlated methods has been used to estimate the complete basis set, full CI hydrogen bond strength in the water dimer system. The largest basis set included up through {ital h} polarization functions on oxygen and {ital g} functions on hydrogen. The complete basis set limit for the self-consistent-field (SCF) interaction energy is estimated to be {minus}3.55 kcal/mol with an accompanying correlation contribution of {similar to}{minus}1.5 kcal/mol. This leads to an interaction energy of {minus}5.1 kcal/mol, exclusive of vibrational zero-point considerations, and is in good agreement with experimental measurements of {minus}5.4{plus minus}0.7 kcal/mol. Inclusion of an approximate adjustment for the basis set superposition error via the Boys/Bernardi counterpoise correction was found to substantially improve agreement with {Delta}{ital E}{sub {infinity}}, our estimate of the complete basis set interaction energy, at the both the SCF and correlated levels for basis sets that were lacking in sufficient near-valence diffuse functions. For diffuse-function-augmented basis sets, application of the CP correction was found to sometimes worsen agreement with {Delta}{ital E}{sub {infinity}}.

  18. Single-Molecule Analysis of Thymine Dimer-Containing G-Quadruplexes Formed from the Human Telomere Sequence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human telomere plays crucial roles in maintaining genome stability. In the presence of suitable cations, the repetitive 5′-TTAGGG-3′ human telomere sequence can fold into G-quadruplexes that adopt the hybrid, basket, or propeller fold. The telomere sequence is hypersensitive to UV-induced thymine dimer (T=T) formation, yet it does not cause telomere shortening. In this work, the potential structural disruption and thermodynamic stability of the T=T-containing natural telomere sequences were studied to understand why this damage is tolerated in telomeres. First, established methods, such as thermal melting measurements, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, were utilized to determine the effects of the damage on these structures. Second, a single-molecule ion channel recording technique using α-hemolysin (α-HL) was employed to examine further the structural differences between the damaged sequences. It was observed that the damage caused slightly lower thermal stabilities and subtle changes in the circular dichroism spectra for hybrid and basket folds. The α-HL experiments determined that T=Ts disrupt double-chain reversal loop formation but are tolerated in edgewise and diagonal loops. The largest change was observed for the T=T-containing natural telomere sequence when the propeller fold (all double-chain reversal loops) was studied. On the basis of the α-HL experiments, it was determined that a triplexlike structure exists under conditions that favor a propeller structure. The biological significance of these observations is discussed. PMID:25407781

  19. Mass spectrometric identification, sequence evolution, and intraspecific variability of dimeric peptides encoded by cockroach akh genes.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Sebastian; Predel, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Neuropeptides are structurally the most diverse group of messenger molecules of the nervous system. Regarding neuropeptide identification, distribution, function, and evolution, insects are among the best studied invertebrates. Indeed, more than 100 neuropeptides are known from single species. Most of these peptides can easily be identified by direct tissue or cell profiling using MALDI-TOF MS. In these experiments, protein hormones with extensive post-translational modifications such as inter- and intramolecular disulfides are usually missed. It is evident that an exclusion of these bioactive molecules hinders the utilization of direct profiling methods in comprehensive peptidomic analyses. In the current study, we focus on the detection and structural elucidation of homo- and heterodimeric adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptides (APRPs) of cockroaches. The physiological relevance of these molecules with highly conserved sequences in insects is still uncertain. Sequence similarities with vertebrate growth hormone-releasing factors have been reported, but remarkably, few data regarding APRP processing exist and these data are restricted to locusts. Here, we elucidated sequences of carbamidomethylated APRP monomers of different cockroaches by means of MALDI-TOF MS(2), and we were able to identify a surprisingly large number of APRP sequences, resulting either from intraspecific amino acid substitutions within the APRP sequences or C-terminal truncated APRPs. PMID:25524231

  20. Single Point Mutation in Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) Sequence of Endophilin Impairs Dimerization, Membrane Shaping, and Src Homology 3 Domain-mediated Partnership*

    PubMed Central

    Gortat, Anna; San-Roman, Mabel Jouve; Vannier, Christian; Schmidt, Anne A.

    2012-01-01

    Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain-containing proteins are essential players in the dynamics of intracellular compartments. The BAR domain is an evolutionarily conserved dimeric module characterized by a crescent-shaped structure whose intrinsic curvature, flexibility, and ability to assemble into highly ordered oligomers contribute to inducing the curvature of target membranes. Endophilins, diverging into A and B subgroups, are BAR and SH3 domain-containing proteins. They exert activities in membrane dynamic processes such as endocytosis, autophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, and permeabilization during apoptosis. Here, we report on the involvement of the third α-helix of the endophilin A BAR sequence in dimerization and identify leucine 215 as a key residue within a network of hydrophobic interactions stabilizing the entire BAR dimer interface. With the combination of N-terminal truncation retaining the high dimerization capacity of the third α-helices of endophilin A and leucine 215 substitution by aspartate (L215D), we demonstrate the essential role of BAR sequence-mediated dimerization on SH3 domain partnership. In comparison with wild type, full-length endophilin A2 heterodimers with one protomer bearing the L215D substitution exhibit very significant changes in membrane binding and shaping activities as well as a dramatic decrease of SH3 domain partnership. This suggests that subtle changes in the conformation and/or rigidity of the BAR domain impact both the control of membrane curvature and downstream binding to effectors. Finally, we show that expression, in mammalian cells, of endophilin A2 bearing the L215D substitution impairs the endocytic recycling of transferrin receptors. PMID:22167186

  1. Changes at the KinA PAS-A Dimerization Interface Influence Histidine Kinase Function

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James; Tomchick, Diana R.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Kort, Remco; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2008-11-12

    The Bacillus subtilis KinA protein is a histidine protein kinase that controls the commitment of this organism to sporulate in response to nutrient deprivation and several other conditions. Prior studies indicated that the N-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim domain (PAS-A) plays a critical role in the catalytic activity of this enzyme, as demonstrated by the significant decrease of the autophosphorylation rate of a KinA protein lacking this domain. On the basis of the environmental sensing role played by PAS domains in a wide range of proteins, including other bacterial sensor kinases, it has been suggested that the PAS-A domain plays an important regulatory role in KinA function. We have investigated this potential by using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods to examine PAS-A structure and function, both in isolation and within the intact protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the KinA PAS-A domain, showing that it crystallizes as a homodimer using {beta}-sheet/{beta}-sheet packing interactions as observed for several other PAS domain complexes. Notably, we observed two dimers with tertiary and quaternary structure differences in the crystalline lattice, indicating significant structural flexibility in these domains. To confirm that KinA PAS-A also forms dimers in solution, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy, gel filtration chromatography, and analytical ultracentrifugation, the results of which are all consistent with the crystallographic results. We experimentally tested the importance of several residues at the dimer interface using site-directed mutagenesis, finding changes in the PAS-A domain that significantly alter KinA enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. These results support the importance of PAS domains within KinA and other histidine kinases and suggest possible routes for natural or artificial regulation of kinase activity.

  2. Influence of C5-methylation of cytosine on the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2005-01-01

    The reaction pathways for thermal and photochemical formation of 5-methylcytosine (m 5C) pyrimidine dimers (CPD) are explored using density functional theory techniques. It is shown that the methylation of cytosine does not contribute to an increased yield of CPDs after UV irradiation due to an even lower excitation energy at the reactant complex of m 5C as compared to cytosine, a larger barrier to reach the decay channel corresponding to the transition state structure along the ground state reaction path, and a higher-lying decay channel.

  3. Interactions at the Dimer Interface Influence the Relative Efficiencies for Purine Nucleotide Synthesis and Pyrophosphorolysis in a Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Canyuk, Bhutorn; Medrano, Francisco J.; Wenck, MaryAnne; Focia, Pamela J.; Eakin, Ann E.; Craig III, Sydney P.

    2010-03-05

    Enzymes that salvage 6-oxopurines, including hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs), are potential targets for drugs in the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. For this reason, a number of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the HPRTs from protozoa have been reported. Although these structures did not reveal why HPRTs need to form dimers for catalysis, they revealed the existence of potentially relevant interactions involving residues in a loop of amino acid residues adjacent to the dimer interface, but the contributions of these interactions to catalysis remained poorly understood. The loop, referred to as active-site loop I, contains an unusual non-proline cis-peptide and is composed of residues that are structurally analogous with Leu67, Lys68, and Gly69 in the human HPRT. Functional analyses of site-directed mutations (K68D, K68E, K68N, K68P, and K68R) in the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease, show that the side-chain at position 68 can differentially influence the K{sub m} values for all four substrates as well as the k{sub cat} values for both IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis. Also, the results for the K68P mutant are inconsistent with a cis-trans peptide isomerization-assisted catalytic mechanism. These data, together with the results of structural studies of the K68R mutant, reveal that the side-chain of residue 68 does not participate directly in reaction chemistry, but it strongly influences the relative efficiencies for IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis, and the prevalence of lysine at position 68 in the HPRT of the majority of eukaryotes is consistent with there being a biological role for nucleotide pyrophosphorolysis.

  4. Resolution of mixed site DNA complexes with dimer-forming minor groove binders by using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: Compound structure and DNA sequence effects

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Sarah; Wang, Siming; Kumar, Arvind; Farahat, Abdelbasset A.; Boykin, David W.; Wilson, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule targeting of the DNA minor groove is a promising approach to modulate genomic processes necessary for normal cellular function. For instance, dicationic diamindines, a well-known class of minor groove binding compounds, have been shown to inhibit interactions of transcription factors binding to genomic DNA. The applications of these compounds could be significantly expanded if we understand sequence-specific recognition of DNA better and could use the information to design more sequence-specific compounds. Aside from polyamides, minor groove binders typically recognize DNA at A-tract or alternating AT base pair sites. Targeting sites with GC base pairs, referred to here as mixed base pair sequences, is much more difficult than those rich in AT base pairs. Compound 1 is the first dicationic diamidine reported to recognize a mixed base pair site. It binds in the minor groove of ATGA sequences as a dimer with positive cooperativity. Due to the well-characterized behavior of 1 with ATGA and AT rich sequences, it provides a paradigm for understanding the elements that are key for recognition of mixed sequence sites. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful method to screen DNA complexes formed by analogs of 1 for specific recognition. We also report a novel approach to determine patterns of recognition by 1 for cognate ATGA and ATGA-mutant sequences. We found that functional group modifications and mutating the DNA target site significantly affect binding and stacking, respectively. Both compound conformation and DNA sequence directionality are crucial for recognition. PMID:25703690

  5. Blue light-induced LOV domain dimerization enhances the affinity of Aureochrome 1a for its target DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, Udo; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    The design of synthetic optogenetic tools that allow precise spatiotemporal control of biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic control has developed rapidly over the last years. Rational design of such tools requires detailed knowledge of allosteric light signaling in natural photoreceptors. To understand allosteric communication between sensor and effector domains, characterization of all relevant signaling states is required. Here, we describe the mechanism of light-dependent DNA binding of the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) transcription factor Aureochrome 1a from Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PtAu1a) and present crystal structures of a dark state LOV monomer and a fully light-adapted LOV dimer. In combination with hydrogen/deuterium-exchange, solution scattering data and DNA-binding experiments, our studies reveal a light-sensitive interaction between the LOV and basic region leucine zipper DNA-binding domain that together with LOV dimerization results in modulation of the DNA affinity of PtAu1a. We discuss the implications of these results for the design of synthetic LOV-based photosensors with application in optogenetics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11860.001 PMID:26754770

  6. Dimeric Sesquiterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shang-Gao; Yue, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that a large number of proteins that are responsible for cellular function exist as dimers or need to be activated by dimerization before mediating certain signaling pathways. Simultaneously targeting both monomeric moieties of the dimeric proteins has shown potential in the development of various therapeutic agents. As dimeric molecules might be able to act on both moieties of a dimeric protein, dimeric sesquiterpenoids (DSs), which are generated biogenetically from coupling of two sesquiterpenoid molecules, are in essence potential biologically active molecules, and have attracted in recent years great attention for their peculiar structures and biological activities. In fact, a number of DSs are more potent than their monomeric precursors for some activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, immunosuppressive, potassium channel blocking, antimalarial, anti-virus, and neurotrophic activities.The complex and diversified structures of DSs also attracted attention of chemists in their isolation, structural elucidation, and synthetic construction.In the contribution, a general view of the classification and distribution of DSs will be provided. Strategies for the structural elucidation of DSs and their analogues is presented. Chemical strategies for the convergence of the two sesquiterpenoid units is reviewed. Biological activities are discussed under each type of activity. PMID:26659108

  7. Evaluation of performance including influence by interfering substances of the Innovance D-dimer assay on the Sysmex coagulation analyzer.

    PubMed

    Park, Seo-Jin; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Chun, Soh Hyun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2011-01-01

    D-dimer is formed during activation of the coagulation system and is commonly assayed in order to diagnose disseminated intravascular coagulation, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been validated as the reference method, but it is a time-consuming procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate a new immunoturbidimetric, particle-enhanced, Innovance(®) D-dimer immunoassay. A total of 129 plasma samples from apparently healthy individuals and 298 samples from patients were collected for linearity, precision, and correlation studies. Testing the precision of low- and high-controls yielded CV values of 2.08% and 1.76%, respectively. The central 95% non-parametric reference interval estimated from healthy controls was 0.093-0.68 mg/L Fibrinogen Equivalent Units (FEU; median, 0.26 mg/L FEU). Comparison analysis yielded acceptable correlation with the STA Liatest(®) D-dimer assay (R(2) = 0.9471). At a cut-off level of <0.5 mg/L FEU, the sensitivity and specificity indices of the Innovance D-dimer assay were 99.7% and 89.1%, respectively. Thus the Innovance D-dimer method showed acceptable precision and linearity, and the assay results showed acceptable correlation with the STA Liatest D-dimer method. The Innovance method was relatively unaffected by potential interfering substances such as bilirubin and hemoglobin. In conclusion, the Innovance D-dimer assay is suitable for monitoring D-dimer concentrations in various clinical conditions and should be useful in clinical laboratories. PMID:21325250

  8. Transport of rice cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase into mitochondria relies on a targeting sequence located in its C-terminal internal region.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sayaka; Teranishi, Mika; Izumi, Masanori; Takahashi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Fumio; Hidema, Jun

    2014-09-01

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), which represents a major type of DNA damage induced by ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation, is a principal cause of UVB-induced growth inhibition in plants. CPD photolyase is the primary enzyme for repairing CPDs and is crucial for determining the sensitivity of Oryza sativa (rice) to UVB radiation. CPD photolyase is widely distributed among species ranging from eubacteria to eukaryotes, and is classified into class I or II based on its primary structure. We previously demonstrated that rice CPD photolyase (OsPHR), which belongs to class II and is encoded by a single-copy gene, is a unique nuclear/mitochondrial/chloroplast triple-targeting protein; however, the location and nature of the organellar targeting information contained within OsPHR are unknown. Here, the nuclear and mitochondrial targeting signal sequences of OsPHR were identified by systematic deletion analysis. The nuclear and mitochondrial targeting sequences are harbored within residues 487-489 and 391-401 in the C-terminal region of OsPHR (506 amino acid residues), respectively. The mitochondrial targeting signal represents a distinct topogenic sequence that differs structurally and functionally from classical N-terminal pre-sequences, and this region, in addition to its role in localization to the mitochondria, is essential for the proper functioning of the CPD photolyase. Furthermore, the mitochondrial targeting sequence, which is characteristic of class-II CPD photolyases, was acquired before the divergence of class-II CPD photolyases in eukaryotes. These results indicate that rice plants have evolved a CPD photolyase that functions in mitochondria to protect cells from the harmful effects of UVB radiation. PMID:24947012

  9. Crop sequence and tillage influences on dryland spring wheat production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cropping systems and management practices for spring wheat production have changed during the past half century. Greater emphasis on soil and water conservation has helped to stabilize crop yields. Our objectives were to determine the influences of six crop sequences and two tillage practices on spr...

  10. Perinatally Influenced Autonomic System Fluctuations Drive Infant Vocal Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yisi S; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2016-05-23

    The variable vocal behavior of human infants is the scaffolding upon which speech and social interactions develop. It is important to know what factors drive this developmentally critical behavioral output. Using marmoset monkeys as a model system, we first addressed whether the initial conditions for vocal output and its sequential structure are perinatally influenced. Using dizygotic twins and Markov analyses of their vocal sequences, we found that in the first postnatal week, twins had more similar vocal sequences to each other than to their non-twin siblings. Moreover, both twins and their siblings had more vocal sequence similarity with each other than with non-sibling infants. Using electromyography, we then investigated the physiological basis of vocal sequence structure by measuring respiration and arousal levels (via changes in heart rate). We tested the hypothesis that early-life influences on vocal output are via fluctuations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) mediated by vocal biomechanics. We found that arousal levels fluctuate at ∼0.1 Hz (the Mayer wave) and that this slow oscillation modulates the amplitude of the faster, ∼1.0 Hz respiratory rhythm. The systematic changes in respiratory amplitude result in the different vocalizations that comprise infant vocal sequences. Among twins, the temporal structure of arousal level changes was similar and therefore indicates why their vocal sequences were similar. Our study shows that vocal sequences are tightly linked to respiratory patterns that are modulated by ANS fluctuations and that the temporal structure of ANS fluctuations is perinatally influenced. PMID:27068420

  11. Binding of 12-s-12 dimeric surfactants to calf thymus DNA: Evaluation of the spacer length influence.

    PubMed

    Sarrión, Beatriz; Bernal, Eva; Martín, Victoria Isabel; López-López, Manuel; López-Cornejo, Pilar; García-Calderón, Margarita; Moyá, María Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Several cationic dimeric surfactants have shown high affinity towards DNA. Bis-quaternary ammonium salts (m-s-m) have been the most common type of dimeric surfactants investigated and it is generally admitted that those that posses a short spacer (s≤3) show better efficiency to bind or compact DNA. However, experimental results in this work show that 12-s-12 surfactants with long spacers make the surfactant/ctDNA complexation more favorable than those with short spacers. A larger contribution of the hydrophobic interactions, which control the binding Gibbs energy, as well as a higher average charge of the surfactant molecules bound to the nucleic acid, which favors the electrostatic attractions, could explain the experimental observations. Dimeric surfactants with intermediate spacer length seem to be the less efficient for DNA binding. PMID:27108208

  12. Inhibiting EGFR Dimerization Using Triazolyl-Bridged Dimerization Arm Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Hanold, Laura E.; Oruganty, Krishnadev; Ton, Norman T.; Beedle, Aaron M.; Kannan, Natarajan; Kennedy, Eileen J.

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in multiple carcinomas and is the focus of a variety of targeted therapies. Here we report the design of peptide-based compounds that mimic the EGFR dimerization arm and inhibit allosteric activation of EGFR. These peptides are modified to contain a triazolyl bridge between the peptide strands to constrain the EGFR dimerization arm β-loop. In this study, we demonstrate that these peptides have significantly improved proteolytic stability over the non-modified peptide sequence, and their inhibitory effects are dependent on the number of the methylene units and orientation of the introduced triazolyl bridge. We identified a peptide, EDA2, which downregulates receptor phosphorylation and dimerization and reduces cell viability. This is the first example of a biologically active triazolyl-bridged peptide targeting the EGFR dimerization interface that effectively downregulates EGFR activation. PMID:25790232

  13. Free Energy Landscapes for Amyloidogenic Tetrapeptides Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Baumketner, A.; Shea, J.-E.

    2005-01-01

    The oligomerization of four peptide sequences, KFFE, KVVE, KLLE, and KAAE is studied using replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with an atomically detailed peptide model. Previous experimental studies reported that of these four peptides, only those containing phenylalanine and valine residues form fibrils. We show that the fibrillogenic propensities of these peptides can be rationalized in terms of the equilibrium thermodynamics of their early oligomers. Thermodynamic stability of dimers, as measured by the temperature of monomer association, is seen to be higher for those peptides that are able to form fibrils. Although the relative high and low stabilities of the KFFE and KAAE dimers arise from their respective high and low interpeptide interaction energies, the higher stability of the KVVE dimer over the KLLE system results from the smaller loss of configurational entropy accompanying the dimerization of KVVE. Free energy landscapes for dimerization are found to be strongly sequence-dependent, with a high free energy barrier separating the monomeric and dimeric states for KVVE, KLLE, and KAAE sequences. In contrast, the most fibrillogenic peptide, KFFE, displayed downhill assembly, indicating enhanced kinetic accessibility of its dimeric states. The dimeric phase for all peptide sequences is found to be heterogeneous, containing both antiparallel β-sheet structures that can grow into full fibrils as well as disordered dimers acting as on- or off-pathway intermediates for fibrillation. PMID:16127168

  14. Influence of heparin on fibrinogen and D-dimer plasma levels in acute myocardial infarction treated with streptokinase.

    PubMed

    Salvioni, A; Marenzi, G C; Agostoni, P; Grazi, S; Guazzi, M D

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether, to what extent, and through which mechanisms intravenous heparin, administered before and after streptokinase, affects the plasma levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen in myocardial infarction. Data concerning mortality and incidence of coronary recanalization in patients receiving heparin and thrombolytic therapy after acute myocardial infarction are controversial; furthermore, the mechanisms through which heparin acts in combination with thrombolytic therapy are unclear. Thirty-eight patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with streptokinase were considered. Nineteen of them received, immediately before the beginning of thrombolytic treatment, a bolus of heparin (100 U.kg-1 intravenously) and, 2 h later, intravenous heparin in doses raising the partial thromboplastin time to 2-2.5 times the normal value (Group 1); the remaining 19 did not receive anticoagulant treatment (Group 2). Multiple determinations of plasma D-dimer and fibrinogen levels were obtained in all patients before, and in the seven days following thrombolytic treatment. Six hours after streptokinase, fibrinogen decreased from 304 +/- 34 to 61 +/- 34 mg.dl-1 in Group 1 and from 312 +/- 29 to 38 +/- 21 mg.dl-1 in Group 2 (P < 0.02 versus Group 1). The same difference between groups persisted at the 12th and at the 18th hour. D-dimer values, from 0.5 +/- 0.1 microgram.dl-1 in Group 1 and 0.4 +/- 0.1 microgram.dl-1 in Group 2, increased at the 1st hour to 37.2 +/- 36.5 micrograms.dl-1 and 52.2 +/- 39.8 micrograms.dl-1, respectively. A peak value was reached in both groups at the 6th hour, which was followed by a slow decrease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8056006

  15. Colon cancer-derived oncogenic EGFR G724S mutant identified by whole genome sequence analysis is dependent on asymmetric dimerization and sensitive to cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with either enzymatic kinase inhibitors or anti-EGFR antibodies such as cetuximab, is an effective modality of treatment for multiple human cancers. Enzymatic EGFR inhibitors are effective for lung adenocarcinomas with somatic kinase domain EGFR mutations while, paradoxically, anti-EGFR antibodies are more effective in colon and head and neck cancers where EGFR mutations occur less frequently. In colorectal cancer, anti-EGFR antibodies are routinely used as second-line therapy of KRAS wild-type tumors. However, detailed mechanisms and genomic predictors for pharmacological response to these antibodies in colon cancer remain unclear. Findings We describe a case of colorectal adenocarcinoma, which was found to harbor a kinase domain mutation, G724S, in EGFR through whole genome sequencing. We show that G724S mutant EGFR is oncogenic and that it differs from classic lung cancer derived EGFR mutants in that it is cetuximab responsive in vitro, yet relatively insensitive to small molecule kinase inhibitors. Through biochemical and cellular pharmacologic studies, we have determined that cells harboring the colon cancer-derived G719S and G724S mutants are responsive to cetuximab therapy in vitro and found that the requirement for asymmetric dimerization of these mutant EGFR to promote cellular transformation may explain their greater inhibition by cetuximab than small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Conclusion The colon-cancer derived G719S and G724S mutants are oncogenic and sensitive in vitro to cetuximab. These data suggest that patients with these mutations may benefit from the use of anti-EGFR antibodies as part of the first-line therapy. PMID:24894453

  16. Dimerization-induced folding of MST1 SARAH and the influence of the intrinsically unstructured inhibitory domain: low thermodynamic stability of monomer.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu Aruxandei, Diana; Makbul, Cihan; Koturenkiene, Agne; Lüdemann, Maik-Borris; Herrmann, Christian

    2011-12-27

    The serine/threonine mammalian sterile 20-like kinase (MST1) is involved in promotion of caspase-dependent and independent apoptosis. Phosphorylation and oligomerization are required for its activation. The oligomerization domain, denoted as SARAH domain, forms an antiparallel coiled coil dimer, and it is important for both MST1 autophosphorylation and interactions with other proteins like the Rassf proteins containing also a SARAH domain. Here we show that the monomeric state of SARAH is thermodynamically unstable and that homodimerization is coupled with folding. Moreover, the influence of the inhibitory domain on SARAH stability and affinity is addressed. By investigating the thermal denaturation using differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism, we have found that the SARAH domain dissociates and unfolds cooperatively, without a stable intermediate monomeric state. Combining the data with information from isothermal titration calorimetry, a low thermodynamic stability of the monomeric species is obtained. Thus, it is proposed that the transition from MST1 SARAH homodimer to some specific heterodimer implies a non-native monomer intermediate. The inhibitory domain is found to be highly flexible and intrinsically unfolded, not only in isolation but also in the dimeric state of the inhibitory-SARAH construct. The existence of two caspase recognition motifs within the inhibitory domain suggests that its structural flexibility might be important for activation of MST1 during apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibitory domain increases the thermodynamic stability of the SARAH dimer and the homodimer affinity, while having almost no effect on the SARAH domain in the monomeric state. These results emphasize the importance of flexibility and binding-induced folding for specificity, affinity, and the capacity to switch from one state to another. PMID:22112013

  17. Influence of flanking sequences on presentation efficiency of a CD8+ cytotoxic T-cell epitope delivered by parvovirus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Rueda, P; Morón, G; Sarraseca, J; Leclerc, C; Casal, J I

    2004-03-01

    We have previously developed an antigen-delivery system based on hybrid recombinant porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV-VLPs) formed by the self-assembly of the VP2 protein of PPV carrying a foreign epitope at its N terminus. In this study, different constructs were made containing a CD8(+) T-cell epitope of chicken ovalbumin (OVA) to analyse the influence of the sequence inserted into VP2 on the correct processing of VLPs by antigen-presenting cells. We analysed the presentation of the OVA epitope inserted without flanking sequences or with either different natural flanking sequences or with the natural flanking sequences of a CD8(+) T-cell epitope from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus nucleoprotein, and as a dimer with or without linker sequences. All constructs were studied in terms of level of expression, assembly of VLPs and ability to deliver the inserted epitope into the MHC I pathway. The presentation of the OVA epitope was considerably improved by insertion of short natural flanking sequences, which indicated the relevance of the flanking sequences on the processing of PPV-VLPs. Only PPV-VLPs carrying two copies of the OVA epitope linked by two glycines were able to be properly processed, suggesting that the introduction of flexible residues between the two consecutive OVA epitopes may be necessary for the correct presentation of these dimers by PPV-VLPs. These results provide information to improve the insertion of epitopes into PPV-VLPs to facilitate their processing and presentation by MHC class I molecules. PMID:14993639

  18. Influence of softening sequencing on electrocoagulation treatment of produced water.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilirad, Nasim; Carlson, Ken; Omur Ozbek, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Electrocoagulation has been used to remove solids and some metals from both water and wastewater sources for decades. Additionally, chemical softening is commonly employed in water treatment systems to remove hardness. This paper assesses the combination and sequence of softening and EC methods to treat hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water from shale oil and gas operations. EC is one of the available technologies to treat produced water for reuse in frac fluids, eliminating not only the need to transport more water but also the costs of providing fresh water. In this paper, the influence of chemical softening on EC was studied. In the softening process, pH was raised to 9.5 and 10.2 before and after EC, respectively. Softening, when practiced before EC was more effective for removing turbidity with samples from wells older than one month (99% versus 88%). However, neither method was successful in treating samples collected from early flowback (1-day and 2-day samples), likely due to the high concentration of organic matter. For total organic carbon, hardness, Ba, Sr, and B removal, application of softening before EC appeared to be the most efficient approach, likely due to the formation of solids before the coagulation process. PMID:25464315

  19. An Analysis of Stimuli that Influence Compliance during the High-Probability Instruction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Normand, Matthew P.; Kestner, Kathryn; Jessel, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    When we evaluated variables that influence the effectiveness of the high-probability (high-p) instruction sequence, the sequence was associated with a precipitous decrease in compliance with high-"p" instructions for 1 participant, thereby precluding continued use of the sequence. We investigated the reasons for this decrease. Stimuli associated…

  20. D-dimer test

    MedlinePlus

    D-dimer tests are used to check for blood clotting problems. Blood clots can cause health problems, such ... that you probably do not have problems with blood clotting. If you are getting the D-dimer test ...

  1. ALGAL METABOLITE INFLUENCE ON BLOOM SEQUENCE IN EUTROPHIED FRESHWATER PONDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extracellular metabolites of planktonic bloom dominant algae play a most significant role in the determination of bloom sequence in a eutrophied freshwater pond. Certain extracellular metabolites of planktonic blue-green algae substantially inhibit the growth of planktonic di...

  2. Mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry of G-quadruplexes. A study of solvent effects on dimer formation and structural transitions in the telomeric DNA sequence d(TAGGGTTAGGGT).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rubén; Marchand, Adrien; Gabelica, Valérie

    2012-05-01

    We survey here state of the art mass spectrometry methodologies for investigating G-quadruplexes, and will illustrate them with a new study on a simple model system: the dimeric G-quadruplex of the 12-mer telomeric DNA sequence d(TAGGGTTAGGGT), which can adopt either a parallel or an antiparallel structure. We will discuss the solution conditions compatible with electrospray ionisation, the quantification of complexes using ESI-MS, the interpretation of ammonium ion preservation in the complexes in the gas phase, and the use of ion mobility spectrometry to resolve ambiguities regarding the strand stoichiometry, or separate and characterise different structural isomers. We also describe that adding electrospray-compatible organic co-solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol or acetonitrile) to aqueous ammonium acetate increases the stability and rate of formation of dimeric G-quadruplexes, and causes structural transitions to parallel structures. Structural changes were probed by circular dichroism and ion mobility spectrometry, and the excellent correlation between the two techniques validates the use of ion mobility to investigate G-quadruplex folding. We also demonstrate that parallel G-quadruplex structures are easier to preserve in the gas phase than antiparallel structures. PMID:22465284

  3. Evidence for involvement of the C-terminal domain in the dimerization of the CopY repressor protein from Enterococcus hirae

    SciTech Connect

    Pazehoski, Kristina O.; Cobine, Paul A.; Winzor, Donald J.; Dameron, Charles T.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} A metal-binding protein domain is directly involved in protein dimerization. {yields} Fusing the metal-binding domain to a monomeric protein induces dimerization. {yields} Frontal size-exclusion chromatography measures the strength of dimer interaction. {yields} Ultracentrifugation studies confirm the influence of metal binding on dimerization. -- Abstract: Metal binding to the C-terminal region of the copper-responsive repressor protein CopY is responsible for homodimerization and the regulation of the copper homeostasis pathway in Enterococcus hirae. Specific involvement of the 38 C-terminal residues of CopY in dimerization is indicated by zonal and frontal (large zone) size-exclusion chromatography studies. The studies demonstrate that the attachment of these CopY residues to the immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) promotes dimerization of the monomeric protein. Although sensitivity of dimerization to removal of metal from the fusion protein is smaller than that found for CopY (as measured by ultracentrifugation studies), the demonstration that an unrelated protein (GB1) can be induced to dimerize by extending its sequence with the C-terminal portion of CopY confirms the involvement of this region in CopY homodimerization.

  4. Dimerization of an immunoactivating peptide derived from mycobacterial hsp65 using N-hydroxysuccinimide based bifunctional reagents is critical for its antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Bezouška, Karel; Kubínková, Zuzana; Stříbný, Jiří; Volfová, Barbora; Pompach, Petr; Kuzma, Marek; Šírová, Milada; Říhová, Blanka

    2012-10-17

    We have shown previously that a short pentapeptide derived from the mycobacterial heat shock protein hsp65 can be highly activating for the immune system based on its strong reactivity with the early activation antigen of lymphocytes CD69. Here, we investigated an optimal form of presentation of this antigen to the cells of the immune system. Four different forms of the dimerized heptapeptide LELTEGY, and of the control inactive dimerized heptapeptide LELLEGY that both contained an extra UV active glycine-tyrosine sequence, were prepared using dihydroxysuccinimidyl oxalate (DSO), dihydroxysuccinimidyl tartarate (DST), dihydroxysuccinimidyl glutarate (DSG), and dihydroxysuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), respectively. Heptapeptides dimerized through DST and DSG linkers had optimal activity in CD69 precipitation assay. Moreover, dimerization of active heptapeptide resulted in a remarkable increase in its proliferation activity and production of cytokines in vitro. Furthermore, while DST and DSG dimerized heptapeptides both significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of natural killer cells in vitro, only the DSG dimerized compound was active in suppressing growth of melanoma tumors in mice and in enhancing the cytotoxic activity of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes ex vivo. Thus, while the dimerization of the immunoactive peptide caused a dramatic increase in its immunoactivating properties, its in vivo anticancer properties were influenced by the chemical nature of linker used for its dimerization. PMID:22988810

  5. Hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides: influence of sequence and length.

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, R

    1992-01-01

    The chemical stability of phosphodiester bonds of some oligoribonucleotides in the presence of a cofactor like polyvinylpyrolidine (PVP) is sequence dependent. It was found that pyrimidine-A (YA) and pyrimidine-C (YC) are especially susceptible to hydrolysis. The hydrolyzability of this same phosphodiester bond is dependent on its position in the oligomer. The presence of 3' and 5'-adjacent nucleotides enhances hydrolysis of the UA phosphodiester bond. The acceleration of the hydrolysis of UA by a 5'-adjacent nucleotide is not base dependent. However, a 3'-adjacent purine increases hydrolysis of a UA phosphodiester bond more than a 3'-pyrimidine. The presence of the exoamino group on the 3'-side base (on 6 and 4 position for adenosine and cytidine, respectively) of YA or YZ phosphodiester bond is required for hydrolysis. Images PMID:1408823

  6. Dimeric Cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Przemysław J

    2015-05-01

    Nature is full of dimeric alkaloids of various types from many plant families, some of them with interesting biological properties. However, dimeric Cinchona alkaloids were not isolated from any species but were products of designed partial chemical synthesis. Although the Cinchona bark is amongst the sources of oldest efficient medicines, the synthetic dimers found most use in the field of asymmetric synthesis. Prominent examples include the Sharpless dihydroxylation and aminohydroxylation ligands, and dimeric phase transfer catalysts. In this article the syntheses of Cinchona alkaloid dimers and oligomers are reviewed, and their structure and applications are outlined. Various synthetic routes exploit reactivity of the alkaloids at the central 9-hydroxyl group, quinuclidine, and quinoline rings, as well as 3-vinyl group. This availability of reactive sites, in combination with a plethora of linker molecules, contributes to the diversity of the products obtained. PMID:25586655

  7. Environment assisted energy transfer in dimer system

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Salman; Ibrahim, M.; Khan, M.K.

    2014-02-15

    The influence of collective and multilocal environments on the energy transfer between the levels of a dimer is studied. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated by considering coupling of collective environment with the levels of the dimer in the presence of both two individuals and mutually correlated multilocal environments. It is shown that every way of coupling we consider assists, though differently, the probability of transition between the levels of dimer. The probability of transition is strongly enhanced when the two local environments are mutually correlated. -- Highlights: • The dynamics of energy transfer between the levels of a dimer are studied. • Coupling of collective as well as individual environments are considered. • The environments are in spin star configurations. • The environment assists the energy transfer between the levels. • For correlated multilocal environments, the transition probability is almost 100%.

  8. Clinical study on the influence of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-Dimer index in patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ai, Liang; Lan, Xinzhi; Wang, Limin; Xu, Yanjie; Zhang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    To observe the effect of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index when it was applied to patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension. 212 cases of severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients diagnosed clinically were selected to be randomly divided into the research group and the control group. The research groups were given phloroglucinol, while the control groups were given magnesium sulfate. The plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index in patients were detected before treatment and after 7 days respectively with statistical analysis of results. The diffidence after treatment was statistically significant (P<0.05). Compared within the same group, the difference of each index before and after treatment in the research group was statistically significant (P<0.05), while the control group was not statistically significant (P>0.05). It showed that the research group could reduce the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index in severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients, and its effect was significantly better than the control group according to the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index changes in patients, it indicated that it was effective of phloroglucinol treatment for patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension disease and superior to the western medicine conventional treatment, worth clinical promotion. PMID:27592487

  9. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Valle, Javier; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2) that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7) sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM) were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target. PMID:26505190

  10. Dimerization of lipocalin allergens

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Merja H.; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Miettinen, Ilja; Jänis, Janne; Virtanen, Tuomas; Rouvinen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins are one of the most important groups of inhalant animal allergens. The analysis of structural features of these proteins is important to get insights into their allergenicity. We have determined two different dimeric crystal structures for bovine dander lipocalin Bos d 2, which was earlier described as a monomeric allergen. The crystal structure analysis of all other determined lipocalin allergens also revealed oligomeric structures which broadly utilize inherent structural features of the β-sheet in dimer formation. According to the moderate size of monomer-monomer interfaces, most of these dimers would be transient in solution. Native mass spectrometry was employed to characterize quantitatively transient dimerization of two lipocalin allergens, Bos d 2 and Bos d 5, in solution. PMID:26346541

  11. Dimeric 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene of Pyrococcus woesei in Escherichia coli and characterization of the protein. Structural and functional comparison with the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of Methanothermus fervidus.

    PubMed

    Hess, D; Krüger, K; Knappik, A; Palm, P; Hensel, R

    1995-10-01

    The gene coding for the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) of Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced. The gene sequence comprises 1230 bp coding for a polypeptide with the theoretical M(r) of 46,195. The deduced protein sequence exhibits a high similarity (46.1% and 46.6% identity) to the other known archaeal 3-phosphoglycerate kinases of Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanothermus fervidus [Fabry, S., Heppner, P., Dietmaier, W. & Hensel, R. (1990) Gene 91, 19-25]. By comparing the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase sequences of the mesophilic and the two thermophilic Archaea, trends in thermoadaptation were confirmed that could be deduced from comparisons of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sequences from the same organisms [Zwickl, P., Fabry, S., Bogedain, C., Haas, A. & Hensel, R. (1990) J. Bacteriol. 172, 4329-4338]. With increasing temperature the average hydrophobicity and the portion of aromatic residues increases, whereas the chain flexibility as well as the content in chemically labile residues (Asn, Cys) decreases. To study the phenotypic properties of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from thermophilic Archaea in more detail, the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase genes from P. woesei and M. fervidus were expressed in Escherichia coli. Comparisons of kinetic and molecular properties of the enzymes from the original organisms and from E. coli indicate that the proteins expressed in the mesophilic host are folded correctly. Besides their higher thermostability according to their origin from hyperthermophilic organisms, both enzymes differ from their bacterial and eucaryotic homologues mainly in two respects. (a) The 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from P. woesei and M. fervidus are homomeric dimers in their native state contrary to all other known 3-phosphoglycerate kinases, which are monomers including the enzyme from the mesophilic Archaeum M. bryantii. (b) Monovalent cations are essential for the activity of both archaeal enzymes with K+ being significantly more

  12. Sequence Effect on the Topology of 3 + 1 Interlocked Bimolecular DNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Cao, Yanwei; Yan, Yuting; Guo, Xinhua

    2016-05-17

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with fluorescence, circular dichroism, UV spectrophotometer, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques are used to study structural features of interlocked dimers formed by DNA sequence 93del (GGGGTGGGAGGAGGGT) and its derivatives. Herein, we demonstrate that the interlocked dimers can be distinguished from stacked dimers formed by sequences T30923 (GGGTGGGTGGGTGGGT) and T30177 (GTGGTGGGTGGGTGGGT). In addition, loop length, the base at 5'-end, and the isolation of T and TT to the first 4G tract do significantly influence the formation and topologies of interlocked dimers. Furthermore, our results suggest that the 4G tract and the 2G tract in various locations in the 93del derivative sequence can form interlocked structure. This work not only provides new insight into the assembly of 3 + 1 interlocked DNA conformations but also demonstrates that ESI-MS combined with other analytical methods is rapid and useful for DNA structural studies. PMID:27027538

  13. Dryland crop sequence and tillage influences on soil water storage: First 15 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management practices and cropping systems have greatly changed over the past half century. In the northern Great Plains, soil water storage during the non-crop period of annual cropping systems helps to stabilize crop yields. Our objectives were to determine the influences of six crop sequences an...

  14. Sequence and Temperature Influence on Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement at Gold Electrode Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Biala, Katarzyna; Sedova, Ada; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe

    2015-09-16

    Understanding complex contributions of surface environment to tethered nucleic acid sensing experiments has proven challenging, yet it is important because it is essential for interpretation and calibration of indispensable methods, such as microarrays. We investigate the effects of DNA sequence and solution temperature gradients on the kinetics of strand displacement at heated gold wire electrodes, and at gold disc electrodes in a heated solution. Addition of a terminal double mismatch (toehold) provides a reduction in strand displacement energy barriers sufficient to probe the secondary mechanisms involved in the hybridization process. In four different DNA capture probe sequences (relevant for the identification of genetically modified maize MON810), all but one revealed a high activation energy up to 200 kJ/mol during hybridization, that we attribute to displacement of protective strands by capture probes. Protective strands contain 4 to 5 mismatches to ease their displacement by the surface-confined probes at the gold electrodes. A low activation energy (30 kJ/mol) was observed for the sequence whose protective strand contained a toehold and one central mismatch, its kinetic curves displayed significantly different shapes, and we observed a reduced maximum signal intensity as compared to other sequences. These findings point to potential sequence-related contributions to oligonucleotide diffusion influencing kinetics. Additionally, for all sequences studied with heated wire electrodes, we observed a 23 K lower optimal hybridization temperature in comparison with disc electrodes in heated solution, and greatly reduced voltammetric signals after taking into account electrode surface area. We propose that thermodiffusion due to temperature gradients may influence both hybridization and strand displacement kinetics at heated microelectrodes, an explanation supported by computational fluid dynamics. DNA assays with surface-confined capture probes and temperature

  15. Binding of the UvrB dimer to non-damaged and damaged DNA: residues Y92 and Y93 influence the stability of both subunits.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, Geri F; Schut, Menno; Goosen, Nora

    2005-06-01

    UvrB is the ultimate damage-binding protein in bacterial nucleotide excision repair. Previous AFM experiments have indicated that UvrB binds to a damage as a dimer. In this paper we visualize for the first time a UvrB dimer in a gel retardation assay, with the second subunit (B2) more loosely bound than the subunit (B1) that interacts with the damage. A beta-hairpin motif in UvrB plays an important role in damage specific binding. Alanine substitutions of Y92 or Y93 in the beta-hairpin result in proteins that kill E. coli cells as a consequence of incision in non-damaged DNA. Apparently, both residues are needed to prevent binding of UvrB to non-damaged DNA. The lethality of Y93A results from UvrC-mediated incisions, whereas that of Y92A is due to incisions by Cho. This difference could be ascribed to a difference in stability of the B2 subunit in the mutant UvrB-DNA complexes. We show that for 3' incision UvrC needs to displace this second UvrB subunit from the complex, whereas Cho seems capable to incise the dimer-complex. Footprint analysis of the contacts of UvrB with damaged DNA revealed that the B2 subunit interacts with the flanking DNA at the 3' side of the lesion. The B2 subunit of mutant Y92A appeared to be more firmly associated with the DNA, indicating that even when B1 is bound to a lesion, the B2 subunit probes the adjacent DNA for presence of damage. We propose this to be a reflection of the process that the UvrB dimer uses to find lesions in the DNA. In addition to preventing binding to non-damaged DNA, the Y92 and Y93 residues appear also important for making specific contacts (of B1) with the damaged site. We show that the concerted action of the two tyrosines lead to a conformational change in the DNA surrounding the lesion, which is required for the 3' incision reaction. PMID:15886069

  16. The influence of protein coding sequences on protein folding rates of all-β proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui Fang; Li, Hong

    2011-06-01

    It is currently believed that the protein folding rate is related to the protein structures and its amino acid sequence. However, few studies have been done on the problem that whether the protein folding rate is influenced by its corresponding mRNA sequence. In this paper, we analyzed the possible relationship between the protein folding rates and the corresponding mRNA sequences. The content of guanine and cytosine (GC content) of palindromes in protein coding sequence was introduced as a new parameter and added in the Gromiha's model of predicting protein folding rates to inspect its effect in protein folding process. The multiple linear regression analysis and jack-knife test show that the new parameter is significant. The linear correlation coefficient between the experimental and the predicted values of the protein folding rates increased significantly from 0.96 to 0.99, and the population variance decreased from 0.50 to 0.24 compared with Gromiha's results. The results show that the GC content of palindromes in the corresponding protein coding sequence really influences the protein folding rate. Further analysis indicates that this kind of effect mostly comes from the synonymous codon usage and from the information of palindrome structure itself, but not from the translation information from codons to amino acids. PMID:21613670

  17. Mesoscale elucidation of the influence of mixing sequence in electrode processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhixiao; Battaglia, Vincent; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2014-12-23

    Mixing sequence during electrode processing affects the internal microstructure and resultant performance of a lithium-ion battery. In order to fundamentally understand the microstructure evolution during electrode processing, a mesoscale model is presented, which investigates the influence of mixing sequence for different evaporation conditions. Our results demonstrate that a stepwise mixing sequence can produce larger conductive interfacial area ratios than that via a one-step mixing sequence. Small-sized cubical nanoparticles are beneficial for achieving a high conductive interfacial area ratio when a stepwise mixing sequence is employed. Two variants of multistep mixing have been investigated with constant temperature and linearly increasing temperature conditions. It is found that the temperature condition does not significantly affect the conductive interfacial area ratio. The homogeneity of binder distribution in the electrode is also studied, which plays an important role along with the solvent evaporation condition. This study suggests that an appropriate combination of mixing sequence and active particle size and morphology plays a critical role in the formation of electrode microstructures with improved performance. PMID:25470770

  18. Quantification and compensation of the influence of pulse transients on symmetry-based recoupling sequences.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Johannes J; Mertens, Valerie; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Meier, Beat H; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Deviations of amplitude and phase of radio-frequency pulses from the desired values, can have a severe impact on the performance of multiple-pulse sequences in NMR spectroscopy. A particular problem are pulse transients that appear every time there is a discontinuity in amplitude or phase. Based on a Floquet description using pulses with arbitrarily shaped amplitudes and phases we present a systematic study of the influence of pulse transients on symmetry-based pulse sequences in solid-state NMR under magic-angle spinning. This treatment explains the dependence of the experimentally observed transfer efficiency on the details of experimental setups. In addition, three approaches are compared which have the aim to re-establish highly efficient recoupling. We demonstrate that the application of transient-compensated pulses as basic elements of symmetry-based sequences leads to a significantly improved robustness of the experiments with respect to variations in the experimental setup. PMID:26766289

  19. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lise, Stefano; Broxholme, John; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Rimmer, Andy; Kanapin, Alexander; Lunter, Gerton; Fiddy, Simon; Allan, Chris; Aricescu, A. Radu; Attar, Moustafa; Babbs, Christian; Becq, Jennifer; Beeson, David; Bento, Celeste; Bignell, Patricia; Blair, Edward; Buckle, Veronica J; Bull, Katherine; Cais, Ondrej; Cario, Holger; Chapel, Helen; Copley, Richard R; Cornall, Richard; Craft, Jude; Dahan, Karin; Davenport, Emma E; Dendrou, Calliope; Devuyst, Olivier; Fenwick, Aimée L; Flint, Jonathan; Fugger, Lars; Gilbert, Rodney D; Goriely, Anne; Green, Angie; Greger, Ingo H.; Grocock, Russell; Gruszczyk, Anja V; Hastings, Robert; Hatton, Edouard; Higgs, Doug; Hill, Adrian; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Malcolm; Hughes, Linda; Humburg, Peter; Johnson, David; Karpe, Fredrik; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kini, Usha; Knight, Julian C; Krohn, Jonathan; Lamble, Sarah; Langman, Craig; Lonie, Lorne; Luck, Joshua; McCarthy, Davis; McGowan, Simon J; McMullin, Mary Frances; Miller, Kerry A; Murray, Lisa; Németh, Andrea H; Nesbit, M Andrew; Nutt, David; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Oturai, Annette Bang; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Patel, Smita Y; Percy, Melanie; Petousi, Nayia; Piazza, Paolo; Piret, Sian E; Polanco-Echeverry, Guadalupe; Popitsch, Niko; Powrie, Fiona; Pugh, Chris; Quek, Lynn; Robbins, Peter A; Robson, Kathryn; Russo, Alexandra; Sahgal, Natasha; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Schuh, Anna; Silverman, Earl; Simmons, Alison; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Taylor, John; Thakker, Rajesh V; Tomlinson, Ian; Trebes, Amy; Twigg, Stephen RF; Uhlig, Holm H; Vyas, Paresh; Vyse, Tim; Wall, Steven A; Watkins, Hugh; Whyte, Michael P; Witty, Lorna; Wright, Ben; Yau, Chris; Buck, David; Humphray, Sean; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Bell, John I; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; McVean, Gilean

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom prior screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the number of candidate variants identified using different strategies for variant calling, filtering, annotation and prioritisation. We found that jointly calling variants across samples, filtering against both local and external databases, deploying multiple annotation tools and using familial transmission above biological plausibility contributed to accuracy. Overall, we identified disease causing variants in 21% of cases, rising to 34% (23/68) for Mendelian disorders and 57% (8/14) in trios. We also discovered 32 potentially clinically actionable variants in 18 genes unrelated to the referral disorder, though only four were ultimately considered reportable. Our results demonstrate the value of genome sequencing for routine clinical diagnosis, but also highlight many outstanding challenges. PMID:25985138

  20. Modulative influence of lysozyme dimer on defence mechanisms in the carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European sheatfish (Silurus glanis) after suppression induced by herbicide Roundup.

    PubMed

    Terech-Majewska, E; Siwicki, A K; Szweda, W

    2004-01-01

    Immunomodulation is a commonly used method of prophylaxis in humans and animals. Lysozyme dimer (KLP-602) was used at a dose of 50 ug/kg b.w. in order to correct the immunosuppression caused by the action of herbicide glyphosate (Roundup- Monsanto), which was used in a single bath for 10 minutes in a concentration of 100 mg/l of water. The investigations were carried out on 2 species of fish: the carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and european catfish (Silurus glanis L.). Herbicide glyphosate caused a decrease in metabolic and phagocytic activity (RBA and PKA) and in proliferative response stimulated by Con A and LPS in carp and european catfish. The immunosuppression sustained for about 2 weeks. The results obtained indicate the possibility of correction of immunosuppression applying lysozyme dimmer (KLP-602) after use of which, the level of the studied indexes increased. PMID:15230544

  1. A monomer-dimer equilibrium modulates the interaction of the sunflower homeodomain leucine-zipper protein Hahb-4 with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Palena, C M; Gonzalez, D H; Chan, R L

    1999-01-01

    We have analysed the interaction of the sunflower homeodomain leucine-zipper (Hd-Zip) protein Hahb-4 with DNA. The complete Hd-Zip domain from Hahb-4 was able to select specific sequences from a random oligonucleotide mixture that contained a 9-bp core with four fixed and five degenerate positions. Analysis of the binding of some of the selected sequences suggests that Hahb-4 preferentially binds the dyad-symmetrical sequence CAAT(A/T)ATTG. Single-nucleotide replacements at positions 1, 5 or 9 of this sequence produced a decrease in binding of 2-4-fold. DNA binding as a function of protein concentration was non-hyperbolic. This behaviour could be explained by an equation in which dimer formation is a pre-requisite for DNA binding. A global dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.31x10(-14) M2 could be calculated. The removal of the leucine zipper promoted a change in specificity and a decrease in binding affinity (Kd=5. 03x10(-5) M). Mutation of Phe-20 of the homeodomain into Leu completely abolished DNA binding. The mutant protein, however, was able to inhibit DNA binding by the non-mutant form, presumably through the formation of heterodimers. The analysis of this inhibitory effect at different mutant concentrations allowed the estimation of the Kd for the dimer-monomer equilibrium [about (2-4)x10(-6) M]; from this, a Kd of 3-6x10(-9) M for the dimer-DNA complex could be estimated. The results obtained indicate that the formation of dimers is the main factor influencing the interaction of Hahb-4 with DNA. It is proposed that shifts in a dimer-monomer equilibrium could be used within the cell to modulate the interaction of this protein with target genes. PMID:10377247

  2. Disrupting Dimerization Translocates Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase to Peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W.; Das, Anjali J.; Barnes, Anthony P.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) neutralizing enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a neuronal enzyme, which has been localized in both the cytosol and peroxisomes. The molecular basis for its dual localization remains unclear as sEH contains a functional peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS). Recently, a missense polymorphism was identified in human sEH (R287Q) that enhances its peroxisomal localization. This same polymorphism has also been shown to generate weaker sEH homo-dimers. Taken together, these observations suggest that dimerization may mask the sEH PTS and prevent peroxisome translocation. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that dimerization is a key regulator of sEH subcellular localization. Specifically, we altered the dimerization state of sEH by introducing substitutions in amino acids responsible for the dimer-stabilizing salt-bridge. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusions of each of mutants were co-transfected into mouse primary cultured cortical neurons together with a PTS-linked red fluorescent protein to constitutively label peroxisomes. Labeled neurons were analyzed using confocal microscopy and co-localization of sEH with peroxisomes was quantified using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. We find that dimer-competent sEH constructs preferentially localize to the cytosol, whereas constructs with weakened or disrupted dimerization were preferentially targeted to peroxisomes. We conclude that the sEH dimerization status is a key regulator of its peroxisomal localization. PMID:27203283

  3. Human white blood cells contain cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer photolyase

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.V.

    1995-10-10

    Although enzymatic photoreactivation of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers in DNA is present in almost all organisms, its presence in placental mammals is controversial. We tested human white blood cells for photolyase by using three defined DNAs (suprecoiled pET-2, nonsupercoiled bacteriphage {lambda}, and a defined-sequence 287-bp oligonucleotide), two dimer-specific endonucleases (T4 endonuclease V and UV endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus), and three assay methods. We show that human white blood cells contain photolyase that can photorepair pyrimidine dimers in defined supercoiled and linear DNAs and in a 287-bp oligonucleotide and that human photolyase is active on genomic DNA in intact human cells. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Yu; Nishitani, Yosuke; Kitano, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop the new tribomaterials for mechanical sliding parts with sufficient balance of mechanical and tribological properties, we investigated the influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of the ternary nanocomposites: the polymer blends of polyamide 6 (PA6) and styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene copolymer (SEBS) filled with vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF-X), which is one of carbon nanofiber (CNF) and has 15nm diameter and 3μm length. Five different processing sequences: (1) VGCF-X, PA6 and SEBS were mixed simultaneously (Process A), (2) Re-mixing (Second compounding) of the materials prepared by Process A (Process AR),(3) SEBS was blended with PA6 (PA6/SEBS blends) and then these blends were mixed with VGCF-X (Process B), (4) VGCF-X was mixed with PA6 (VGCF-X/PA6 composites) and then these composites were blended with SEBS (Process C), and (5) VGCF-X were mixed with SEBS (VGCF-X/SEBS composites) and then these composites were blended with PA6 (Process D) were attempted for preparing of the ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites). These ternary polymer nanocomposites were extruded by a twin screw extruder and injection-molded. Their tribological properties were evaluated by using a ring-on-plate type sliding wear tester under dry condition. The tribological properties such as the frictional coefficient and the specific wear rate were influenced by the processing sequence. These results may be attributed to the change of internal structure formation, which is a dispersibility of SEBS particle and VGCF-X in ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS) by different processing sequences. In particular, the processing sequences of AR, B and D, which are those of re-mixing of VGCF-X, have a good dispersibility of VGCF-X for the improvement of tribological properties.

  5. Calcium-dependent Dimerization of Human Soluble Calcium Activated Nucleotidase: Characterization of the Dimer Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,M.; Horii, K.; Herr, A.; Kirley, T.

    2006-01-01

    Mammals express a protein homologous to soluble nucleotidases used by blood-sucking insects to inhibit host blood clotting. These vertebrate nucleotidases may play a role in protein glycosylation. The activity of this enzyme family is strictly dependent on calcium, which induces a conformational change in the secreted, soluble human nucleotidase. The crystal structure of this human enzyme was recently solved; however, the mechanism of calcium activation and the basis for the calcium-induced changes remain unclear. In this study, using analytical ultracentrifugation and chemical cross-linking, we show that calcium or strontium induce noncovalent dimerization of the soluble human enzyme. The location and nature of the dimer interface was elucidated using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical cross-linking, coupled with crystallographic analyses. Replacement of Ile{sup 170}, Ser{sup 172}, and Ser{sup 226} with cysteine residues resulted in calcium-dependent, sulfhydryl-specific intermolecular cross-linking, which was not observed after cysteine introduction at other surface locations. Analysis of a super-active mutant, E130Y, revealed that this mutant dimerized more readily than the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the E130Y mutant revealed that the mutated residue is found in the dimer interface. In addition, expression of the full-length nucleotidase revealed that this membrane-bound form can also dimerize and that these dimers are stabilized by spontaneous oxidative cross-linking of Cys{sup 30}, located between the single transmembrane helix and the start of the soluble sequence. Thus, calcium-mediated dimerization may also represent a mechanism for regulation of the activity of this nucleotidase in the physiological setting of the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi.

  6. Metalloporphines: Dimers and Trimers.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, Walter; Shelnutt, John A; Scheidt, W Robert

    2016-06-20

    Procedures for the purification and subsequent crystallization of the slightly soluble four-coordinate metallporphines, the simplest possible porphyrin derivatives, are described. Crystals of the porphine derivatives of cobalt(II), copper(II), platinum(II), and two polymorphs of zinc(II) were obtained. Analysis of the crystal and molecular structures shows that all except the platinum(II) derivative form an unusual trimeric species in the solid state. The isomorphous cobalt(II), copper(II), and one zinc(II) polymorph pack in the unit cell to form dimers as well as the trimers. Interplanar spacings between porphine rings are similar in both the dimers and trimers and range between 3.24 and 3.37 Å. Porphine rings are strongly overlapped with lateral shifts between ring centers in both the dimers and trimers with values between 1.52 and 1.70 Å or in Category S as originally defined by Scheidt and Lee. Periodic trends in the M-Np bond distances parallel those observed previously for tetraphenyl- and octaethylporphyrin derivatives. PMID:27276239

  7. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene. PMID:25481659

  8. Tracking Rh Atoms in Zeolite HY: First Steps of Metal Cluster Formation and Influence of Metal Nuclearity on Catalysis of Ethylene Hydrogenation and Ethylene Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Xu, Pinghong; Browning, Nigel D; Gates, Bruce C

    2016-07-01

    The initial steps of rhodium cluster formation from zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(C2H4)2 complexes in H2 at 373 K and 1 bar were investigated by infrared and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The data show that ethylene ligands on the rhodium react with H2 to give supported rhodium hydrides and trigger the formation of rhodium clusters. STEM provided the first images of the smallest rhodium clusters (Rh2) and their further conversion into larger clusters. The samples were investigated in a plug-flow reactor as catalysts for the conversion of ethylene + H2 in a molar ratio of 4:1 at 1 bar and 298 K, with the results showing how the changes in catalyst structure affect the activity and selectivity; the rhodium clusters are more active for hydrogenation of ethylene than the single-site complexes, which are more selective for dimerization of ethylene to give butenes. PMID:27315020

  9. Sequence and domain arrangements influence mechanical properties of elastin-like polymeric elastomers.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ming; Sitarz, Eva; Bellingham, Catherine M; Won, Emily; Muiznieks, Lisa D; Keeley, Fred W

    2013-06-01

    Elastin is the polymeric, extracellular matrix protein that provides properties of extensibility and elastic recoil to large arteries, lung parenchyma, and other tissues. Elastin assembles by crosslinking through lysine residues of its monomeric precursor, tropoelastin. Tropoelastin, as well as polypeptides based on tropoelastin sequences, undergo a process of self-assembly that aligns lysine residues for crosslinking. As a result, both the full-length monomer as well as elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) can be made into biomaterials whose properties resemble those of native polymeric elastin. Using both full-length human tropoelastin (hTE) as well as ELPs, we and others have previously reported on the influence of sequence and domain arrangements on self-assembly properties. Here we investigate the role of domain sequence and organization on the tensile mechanical properties of crosslinked biomaterials fabricated from ELP variants. In general, substitutions in ELPs involving similiar domain types (hydrophobic or crosslinking) had little effect on mechanical properties. However, modifications altering either the structure or the characteristic sequence style of these domains had significant effects on such properties. In addition, using a series of deletion and replacement constructs for full-length hTE, we provide new insights into the role of conserved domains of tropoelastin in determining mechanical properties. PMID:23529691

  10. A flexible method for estimating the fraction of fitness influencing mutations from large sequencing data sets.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sunjin; Akey, Joshua M

    2016-06-01

    A continuing challenge in the analysis of massively large sequencing data sets is quantifying and interpreting non-neutrally evolving mutations. Here, we describe a flexible and robust approach based on the site frequency spectrum to estimate the fraction of deleterious and adaptive variants from large-scale sequencing data sets. We applied our method to approximately 1 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) identified in high-coverage exome sequences of 6515 individuals. We estimate that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is higher than previously reported; quantify the effects of genomic context, codon bias, chromatin accessibility, and number of protein-protein interactions on deleterious protein-coding SNVs; and identify pathways and networks that have likely been influenced by positive selection. Furthermore, we show that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is significantly higher for Mendelian versus complex disease loci and in exons harboring dominant versus recessive Mendelian mutations. In summary, as genome-scale sequencing data accumulate in progressively larger sample sizes, our method will enable increasingly high-resolution inferences into the characteristics and determinants of non-neutral variation. PMID:27197222

  11. Dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) RNA: stimulation by cations and possible mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, R; Baudin, F; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L; Mougel, M; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B

    1991-01-01

    The retroviral genome consists of two identical RNA molecules joined close to their 5' ends by the dimer linkage structure. Recent findings indicated that retroviral RNA dimerization and encapsidation are probably related events during virion assembly. We studied the cation-induced dimerization of HIV-1 RNA and results indicate that all in vitro generated HIV-1 RNAs containing a 100 nucleotide domain downstream from the 5' splice site are able to dimerize. RNA dimerization depends on the concentration of RNA, mono- and multivalent cations, the size of the monovalent cation, temperature, and pH. Up to 75% of HIV-1 RNA is dimeric in the presence of spermidine. HIV-1 RNA dimer is fairly resistant to denaturing agents and unaffected by intercalating drugs. Antisense HIV-1 RNA does not dimerize but heterodimers can be formed between HIV-1 RNA and either MoMuLV or RSV RNA. Therefore retroviral RNA dimerization probably does not simply proceed through mechanisms involving Watson-Crick base-pairing. Neither adenine and cytosine protonation, nor quartets containing only guanines appear to determine the stability of the HIV-1 RNA dimer, while quartets involving both adenine(s) and guanine(s) could account for our results. A consensus sequence PuGGAPuA found in the putative dimerization-encapsidation region of all retroviral genomes examined may participate in the dimerization process. Images PMID:1645868

  12. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  13. MspA Nanopores from Subunit Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Pavlenok, Mikhail; Derrington, Ian M.; Gundlach, Jens H.; Niederweis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) forms an octameric channel and represents the founding member of a new family of pore proteins. Control of subunit stoichiometry is important to tailor MspA for nanotechnological applications. In this study, two MspA monomers were connected by linkers ranging from 17 to 62 amino acids in length. The oligomeric pore proteins were purified from M. smegmatis and were shown to form functional channels in lipid bilayer experiments. These results indicated that the peptide linkers did not prohibit correct folding and localization of MspA. However, expression levels were reduced by 10-fold compared to wild-type MspA. MspA is ideal for nanopore sequencing due to its unique pore geometry and its robustness. To assess the usefulness of MspA made from dimeric subunits for DNA sequencing, we linked two M1-MspA monomers, whose constriction zones were modified to enable DNA translocation. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that this construct also formed functional channels. Voltage gating of MspA pores made from M1 monomers and M1-M1 dimers was identical indicating similar structural and dynamic channel properties. Glucose uptake in M. smegmatis cells lacking porins was restored by expressing the dimeric mspA M1 gene indicating correct folding and localization of M1-M1 pores in their native membrane. Single-stranded DNA hairpins produced identical ionic current blockades in pores made from monomers and subunit dimers demonstrating that M1-M1 pores are suitable for DNA sequencing. This study provides the proof of principle that production of single-chain MspA pores in M. smegmatis is feasible and paves the way for generating MspA pores with altered stoichiometries. Subunit dimers enable better control of the chemical and physical properties of the constriction zone of MspA. This approach will be valuable both in understanding transport across the outer membrane in mycobacteria and in tailoring MspA for nanopore sequencing of DNA. PMID

  14. MspA nanopores from subunit dimers.

    PubMed

    Pavlenok, Mikhail; Derrington, Ian M; Gundlach, Jens H; Niederweis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) forms an octameric channel and represents the founding member of a new family of pore proteins. Control of subunit stoichiometry is important to tailor MspA for nanotechnological applications. In this study, two MspA monomers were connected by linkers ranging from 17 to 62 amino acids in length. The oligomeric pore proteins were purified from M. smegmatis and were shown to form functional channels in lipid bilayer experiments. These results indicated that the peptide linkers did not prohibit correct folding and localization of MspA. However, expression levels were reduced by 10-fold compared to wild-type MspA. MspA is ideal for nanopore sequencing due to its unique pore geometry and its robustness. To assess the usefulness of MspA made from dimeric subunits for DNA sequencing, we linked two M1-MspA monomers, whose constriction zones were modified to enable DNA translocation. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that this construct also formed functional channels. Voltage gating of MspA pores made from M1 monomers and M1-M1 dimers was identical indicating similar structural and dynamic channel properties. Glucose uptake in M. smegmatis cells lacking porins was restored by expressing the dimeric mspA M1 gene indicating correct folding and localization of M1-M1 pores in their native membrane. Single-stranded DNA hairpins produced identical ionic current blockades in pores made from monomers and subunit dimers demonstrating that M1-M1 pores are suitable for DNA sequencing. This study provides the proof of principle that production of single-chain MspA pores in M. smegmatis is feasible and paves the way for generating MspA pores with altered stoichiometries. Subunit dimers enable better control of the chemical and physical properties of the constriction zone of MspA. This approach will be valuable both in understanding transport across the outer membrane in mycobacteria and in tailoring MspA for nanopore sequencing of DNA. PMID

  15. The influence of nucleotide sequence and temperature on the activity of thermostable DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jesse L; Rejali, Nick; Wittwer, Carl T

    2014-05-01

    Extension rates of a thermostable, deletion-mutant polymerase were measured from 50°C to 90°C using a fluorescence activity assay adapted for real-time PCR instruments. Substrates with a common hairpin (6-base loop and a 14-bp stem) were synthesized with different 10-base homopolymer tails. Rates for A, C, G, T, and 7-deaza-G incorporation at 75°C were 81, 150, 214, 46, and 120 seconds(-1). Rates for U were half as fast as T and did not increase with increasing concentration. Hairpin substrates with 25-base tails from 0% to 100% GC content had maximal extension rates near 60% GC and were predicted from the template sequence and mononucleotide incorporation rates to within 30% for most sequences. Addition of dimethyl sulfoxide at 7.5% increased rates to within 1% to 17% of prediction for templates with 40% to 90% GC. When secondary structure was designed into the template region, extension rates decreased. Oligonucleotide probes reduced extension rates by 65% (5'-3' exo-) and 70% (5'-3' exo+). When using a separate primer and a linear template to form a polymerase substrate, rates were dependent on both the primer melting temperature (Tm) and the annealing/extension temperature. Maximum rates were observed from Tm to Tm - 5°C with little extension by Tm + 5°C. Defining the influence of sequence and temperature on polymerase extension will enable more rapid and efficient PCR. PMID:24607271

  16. Sequence Context Influences the Structure and Aggregation Behavior of a PolyQ Tract.

    PubMed

    Eftekharzadeh, Bahareh; Piai, Alessandro; Chiesa, Giulio; Mungianu, Daniele; García, Jesús; Pierattelli, Roberta; Felli, Isabella C; Salvatella, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Expansions of polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts in nine different proteins cause a family of neurodegenerative disorders called polyQ diseases. Because polyQ tracts are potential therapeutic targets for these pathologies there is great interest in characterizing the conformations that they adopt and in understanding how their aggregation behavior is influenced by the sequences flanking them. We used solution NMR to study at single-residue resolution a 156-residue proteolytic fragment of the androgen receptor that contains a polyQ tract associated with the disease spinobulbar muscular atrophy, also known as Kennedy disease. Our findings indicate that a Leu-rich region preceding the polyQ tract causes it to become α-helical and appears to protect the protein against aggregation, which represents a new, to our knowledge, mechanism by which sequence context can minimize the deleterious properties of these repetitive regions. Our results have implications for drug discovery for polyQ diseases because they suggest that the residues flanking these repetitive sequences may represent viable therapeutic targets. PMID:27276254

  17. HIV-1 gp140 epitope recognition is influenced by immunoglobulin DH gene segment sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuge; Kapoor, Pratibha; Parks, Robert; Silva-Sanchez, Aaron; Alam, S Munir; Verkoczy, Laurent; Liao, Hua-Xin; Zhuang, Yingxin; Burrows, Peter; Levinson, Michael; Elgavish, Ada; Cui, Xiangqin; Haynes, Barton F; Schroeder, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Complementarity Determining Region 3 of the immunoglobulin (Ig) H chain (CDR-H3) lies at the center of the antigen-binding site where it often plays a decisive role in antigen recognition and binding. Amino acids encoded by the diversity (DH) gene segment are the main component of CDR-H3. Each DH has the potential to rearrange into one of six DH reading frames (RFs), each of which exhibits a characteristic amino acid hydrophobicity signature that has been conserved among jawed vertebrates by natural selection. A preference for use of RF1 promotes the incorporation of tyrosine into CDR-H3 while suppressing the inclusion of hydrophobic or charged amino acids. To test the hypothesis that these evolutionary constraints on DH sequence influence epitope recognition, we used mice with a single DH that has been altered to preferentially use RF2 or inverted RF1. B cells in these mice produce a CDR-H3 repertoire that is enriched for valine or arginine in place of tyrosine. We serially immunized this panel of mice with gp140 from HIV-1 JR-FL isolate and then used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or peptide microarray to assess antibody binding to key or overlapping HIV-1 envelope epitopes. By ELISA, serum reactivity to key epitopes varied by DH sequence. By microarray, sera with Ig CDR-H3s enriched for arginine bound to linear peptides with a greater range of hydrophobicity but had a lower intensity of binding than sera containing Ig CDR-H3s enriched for tyrosine or valine. We conclude that patterns of epitope recognition and binding can be heavily influenced by DH germ line sequence. This may help explain why antibodies in HIV-infected patients must undergo extensive somatic mutation in order to bind to specific viral epitopes and achieve neutralization. PMID:26687685

  18. The hnRNPs F and H2 bind to similar sequences to influence gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Serkan A.; Martincic, Kathleen; Milcarek, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The hnRNPs (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins) F and H2 share a similar protein structure. Both have been implicated as regulating polyadenylation, but hnRNP H2 had a positive effect, whereas hnRNP F acted negatively. We therefore carried out side-by-side comparisons of their RNA-binding and in vivo actions. The binding of the CstF2 (64 kDa cleavage stimulatory factor) to SV40 (simian virus 40) late pre-mRNA substrates containing a downstream GRS (guanine-rich sequence) was reduced by hnRNP F, but not by hnRNP H2, in a UV-cross-linking assay. Point mutations of the 14-nt GRS influenced the binding of purified hnRNP F or H2 in parallel. Co-operative binding of the individual proteins to RNA was lost with mutations of the GRS in the G1−5 or G12−14 regions; both regions seem to be necessary for optimal interactions. Using a reporter green fluorescent protein assay with the GRS inserted downstream of the poly(A) (polyadenine) signal, expression in vivo was diminished by a mutant G1−5 sequence which decreased binding of both hnRNPs (SAA20) and was enhanced by a 12–14-nt mutant that showed enhanced hnRNP F or H2 binding (SAA10). Using small interfering RNA, down-regulation of hnRNP H2 levels diminished reporter expression, confirming that hnRNP H2 confers a positive influence; in contrast, decreasing hnRNP F levels had a negligible influence on reporter expression with the intact GRS. A pronounced diminution in reporter expression was seen with the SAA20 mutant for both. Thus the relative levels of hnRNP F and H2 in cells, as well as the target sequences in the downstream GRS on pre-mRNA, influence gene expression. PMID:16171461

  19. A dimeric form of prothrombin on membrane surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P J

    1998-01-01

    Blood coagulation requires the conversion of zymogens to active enzymes. These reactions are facilitated by Ca2+-dependent protein binding to membrane surfaces containing anionic phospholipids. Here it is shown that only in the presence of both Ca2+ and phospholipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine can a prothrombin dimer be chemically cross-linked. A cross-linker containing evenly spaced reactive groups was prepared by activating the carboxy groups of a ten-residue glutamic acid peptide and allowed to react with physiological concentrations of prothrombin. When Ca2+ and anionic phospholipids were both present during exposure to the cross-linker, it was found that more than 50% of the prothrombin was trapped as a chemically defined dimer with reaction times of the order of 1 min. The dimer yield remained high even when reactions were performed at high phospholipid-to-protein ratios at protein concentrations an order of magnitude less than physiological. Amino acid sequencing of a CNBr peptide produced from the purified dimer localized the cross-link to residues Lys341 and Lys427 of prothrombin. The specificity and high yield under mild conditions of the cross-linking suggest that dimeric membrane bound prothrombin might be a physiologically relevant substrate for the formation of thrombin. Prothrombinase converts this modified protein to an enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of a thrombin chromogenic substrate as efficiently as thrombin and is inhibited by a thrombin active-site directed inhibitor, but is a thrombin dimer. The thrombin dimer has impaired activity compared with thrombin with respect to physiological functions requiring binding to exosite I. A model based on the known structure of thrombin is presented that can account for the prothrombin dimer and the properties of the dimeric thrombin formed from it. PMID:9841875

  20. Choice of Reference Sequence and Assembler for Alignment of Listeria monocytogenes Short-Read Sequence Data Greatly Influences Rates of Error in SNP Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pightling, Arthur W.; Petronella, Nicholas; Pagotto, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The wide availability of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and an abundance of open-source software have made detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in bacterial genomes an increasingly accessible and effective tool for comparative analyses. Thus, ensuring that real nucleotide differences between genomes (i.e., true SNPs) are detected at high rates and that the influences of errors (such as false positive SNPs, ambiguously called sites, and gaps) are mitigated is of utmost importance. The choices researchers make regarding the generation and analysis of WGS data can greatly influence the accuracy of short-read sequence alignments and, therefore, the efficacy of such experiments. We studied the effects of some of these choices, including: i) depth of sequencing coverage, ii) choice of reference-guided short-read sequence assembler, iii) choice of reference genome, and iv) whether to perform read-quality filtering and trimming, on our ability to detect true SNPs and on the frequencies of errors. We performed benchmarking experiments, during which we assembled simulated and real Listeria monocytogenes strain 08-5578 short-read sequence datasets of varying quality with four commonly used assemblers (BWA, MOSAIK, Novoalign, and SMALT), using reference genomes of varying genetic distances, and with or without read pre-processing (i.e., quality filtering and trimming). We found that assemblies of at least 50-fold coverage provided the most accurate results. In addition, MOSAIK yielded the fewest errors when reads were aligned to a nearly identical reference genome, while using SMALT to align reads against a reference sequence that is ∼0.82% distant from 08-5578 at the nucleotide level resulted in the detection of the greatest numbers of true SNPs and the fewest errors. Finally, we show that whether read pre-processing improves SNP detection depends upon the choice of reference sequence and assembler. In total, this study demonstrates that researchers should

  1. Choice of reference sequence and assembler for alignment of Listeria monocytogenes short-read sequence data greatly influences rates of error in SNP analyses.

    PubMed

    Pightling, Arthur W; Petronella, Nicholas; Pagotto, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The wide availability of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and an abundance of open-source software have made detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in bacterial genomes an increasingly accessible and effective tool for comparative analyses. Thus, ensuring that real nucleotide differences between genomes (i.e., true SNPs) are detected at high rates and that the influences of errors (such as false positive SNPs, ambiguously called sites, and gaps) are mitigated is of utmost importance. The choices researchers make regarding the generation and analysis of WGS data can greatly influence the accuracy of short-read sequence alignments and, therefore, the efficacy of such experiments. We studied the effects of some of these choices, including: i) depth of sequencing coverage, ii) choice of reference-guided short-read sequence assembler, iii) choice of reference genome, and iv) whether to perform read-quality filtering and trimming, on our ability to detect true SNPs and on the frequencies of errors. We performed benchmarking experiments, during which we assembled simulated and real Listeria monocytogenes strain 08-5578 short-read sequence datasets of varying quality with four commonly used assemblers (BWA, MOSAIK, Novoalign, and SMALT), using reference genomes of varying genetic distances, and with or without read pre-processing (i.e., quality filtering and trimming). We found that assemblies of at least 50-fold coverage provided the most accurate results. In addition, MOSAIK yielded the fewest errors when reads were aligned to a nearly identical reference genome, while using SMALT to align reads against a reference sequence that is ∼0.82% distant from 08-5578 at the nucleotide level resulted in the detection of the greatest numbers of true SNPs and the fewest errors. Finally, we show that whether read pre-processing improves SNP detection depends upon the choice of reference sequence and assembler. In total, this study demonstrates that researchers should

  2. Quantification of loading in biomechanical testing: the influence of dissection sequence.

    PubMed

    Funabashi, Martha; El-Rich, Marwan; Prasad, Narasimha; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2015-09-18

    Sequential dissection is a technique used to investigate loads experienced by articular tissues. When the joint of interest is tested in an unconstrained manner, its kinematics change with each tissue removal. To address this limitation, sufficiently rigid robots are used to constrain joint kinematics. While this approach can quantify loads experienced by each tissue, it does not assure similar results when removal order is changed. Specifically, structure loading is assumed to be independent of removal order if the structure behaves linearly (i.e. principle of superposition applies), but dependent on removal order when response is affected by material and/or geometry nonlinearities and/or viscoelasticiy (e.g. biological tissues). Therefore, this experiment was conducted to evaluate if structure loading created through robotic testing is dependent on the order in which connectors are removed. Six identical models were 3D printed. Each model was composed of 2 rigid bodies and 3 connecting structures with nonlinear time-dependent behavior. To these models, pure rotations were applied about a predefined static center of rotation using a parallel robot. A unique dissection sequence was used for each of the six models and the same movements applied robotically after each dissection. When comparing the moments experienced by each structure between different removal sequences, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed. These results suggest that even in an optimized environment, the sequence in which nonlinear viscoelastic structures are removed influence model loading. These findings support prior work suggesting that tissue loads obtained from robotic testing are specific to removal order. PMID:26152461

  3. Acoustic markers of prominence influence infants' and adults' segmentation of speech sequences.

    PubMed

    Bion, Ricardo A H; Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Nespor, Marina

    2011-03-01

    Two experiments investigated the way acoustic markers of prominence influence the grouping of speech sequences by adults and 7-month-old infants. In the first experiment, adults were familiarized with and asked to memorize sequences of adjacent syllables that alternated in either pitch or duration. During the test phase, participants heard pairs of syllables with constant pitch and duration and were asked whether the syllables had appeared adjacently during familiarization. Adults were better at remembering pairs of syllables that during familiarization had short syllables preceding long syllables, or high-pitched syllables preceding low-pitched syllables. In the second experiment, infants were familiarized and tested with similar stimuli as in the first experiment, and their preference for pairs of syllables was accessed using the head-turn preference paradigm.When familiarized with syllables alternating in pitch, infants showed a preference to listen to pairs of syllables that had high pitch in the first syllable. However, no preference was found when the familiarization stream alternated in duration. It is proposed that these perceptual biases help infants and adults find linguistic units in the continuous speech stream.While the bias for grouping based on pitch appears early in development, biases for durational grouping might rely on more extensive linguistic experience. PMID:21524015

  4. Influence of seasonal cycles in Martian atmosphere on entry, descent and landing sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčeta, Dušan; Šegan, Stevo; Rašuo, Boško

    2014-05-01

    The phenomena like high eccentricity of Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion, separately or together can significantly alter not only the level of some Martian atmospheric parameters but also the characteristics of its diurnal and seasonal cycle. Considering that entry, descent and landing (EDL) sequence is mainly driven by the density profile of the atmosphere and aerodynamic characteristic of the entry vehicle. We have performed the analysis of the influence of the seasonal cycles of the atmospheric parameters on EDL profiles by using Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM). Since the height of the deployment of the parachute and the time passed from the deployment to propulsion firing (descent time) are of crucial importance for safe landing and the achievable landing site elevation we paid special attention to the influence of the areocentric longitude of the Sun (Ls) on these variables. We have found that these variables have periodic variability with respect to Ls and can be very well approximated with a sine wave function whose mean value depends only on the landing site elevation while the amplitudes and phases depend only on the landing site latitude. The amplitudes exhibit behavior which is symmetric with respect to the latitude but the symmetry is shifted from the equator to the northern mid-tropics. We have also noticed that the strong temperature inversions which are usual for middle and higher northern latitudes while Mars is around its orbital perihelion significantly alter the descent time without influencing the height of the parachute deployment. At last, we applied our model to determine the dependence of the accessible landing region on Ls and found that this region reaches maximum when Mars is around the orbital perihelion and can vary 50° in latitude throughout the Martian year.

  5. Influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the baseline acoustic nonlinearity of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave techniques are increasingly becoming popular in detecting damage in composite materials. It was earlier observed by the authors that the non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composite is influenced by the fiber orientation [Chakrapani, Barnard, and Dayal, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(2), 617-624 (2015)]. The current study expands this effort to investigate the effect of laminate sequence and fabric type on the non-classical nonlinear response. Two hypotheses were developed using the previous results, and the theory of interlaminar stresses to investigate the influence of laminate sequence and fabric type. Each hypothesis was tested by capturing the nonlinear response by performing nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and measuring frequency shifts, loss factors, and higher harmonics. It was observed that the laminate sequence can either increase or decrease the nonlinear response based on the stacking sequence. Similarly, tests were performed to compare unidirectional fabric and woven fabric and it was observed that woven fabric exhibited a lower nonlinear response compared to the unidirectional fabric. Conjectures based on the matrix properties and interlaminar stresses were used in an attempt to explain the observed nonlinear responses for different configurations. PMID:27250126

  6. Mechanically Stabilized Tetrathiafulvalene Radical Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Coskun, Ali; Spruell, Jason M.; Barin, Gokhan; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmieli, Raanan; Benitez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Friedman, Douglas C.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Two donor-acceptor [3]catenanes—composed of a tetracationic molecular square, cyclobis(paraquat-4,4'-biphenylene), as the π-electron deficient ring and either two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) containing macrocycles or two TTF-butadiyne-containing macrocycles as the π-electron rich components—have been investigated in order to study their ability to form TTF radical dimers. It has been proven that the mechanically interlocked nature of the [3]catenanes facilitates the formation of the TTF radical dimers under redox control, allowing an investigation to be performed on these intermolecular interactions in a so-called “molecular flask” under ambient conditions in considerable detail. In addition, it has also been shown that the stability of the TTF radical-cation dimers can be tuned by varying the secondary binding motifs in the [3]catenanes. By replacing the DNP station with a butadiyne group, the distribution of the TTF radical-cation dimer can be changed from 60% to 100%. These findings have been established by several techniques including cyclic voltammetry, spectroelectrochemistry and UV-vis-NIR and EPR spectroscopies, as well as with X-ray diffraction analysis which has provided a range of solid-state crystal structures. The experimental data are also supported by high-level DFT calculations. The results contribute significantly to our fundamental understanding of the interactions within the TTF radical dimers.

  7. Influence of transcriptional and translational control sequences on the expression of foreign genes in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Yap, W H; Thanabalu, T; Porter, A G

    1994-01-01

    The influence of expression control sequences (ECSs; promoters and ribosome-binding sites [RBSs]), transcriptional terminators, and gene orientation on the expression of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene in the gram-negative microorganisms Caulobacter crescentus and E. coli was investigated. A series of broad-host-range expression vectors, based on the RK2 plasmid derivative pRK248, were constructed. The ECSs included the tac promoter, the promoter for the surface layer protein of C. crescentus, and promoters from a number of gram-positive bacteria together with their associated RBSs. In addition, synthetic ECSs were constructed by using different combinations of promoters and RBSs. lacZ expression was found to be dependent on the nature of the promoter and RBS and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of a transcriptional terminator and the orientation of the promoter-lacZ construct in pRK248. The relative efficiencies of the various ECSs in driving lacZ expression differed markedly in C. crescentus and E. coli. In C. crescentus, the ECS ptac1 (tac promoter and consensus RBS for C. crescentus mRNAs) appeared to be the most efficient, producing 12-fold-higher activity than did pSL (promoter for the surface layer protein of C. crescentus and its putative RBS). pSL was not transcribed in E. coli, whereas various promoters from gram-positive microorganisms were transcribed in both C. crescentus and E. coli. A number of ECSs were also used to drive mosquitocidal toxin gene expression in C. crescentus, and a correlation between toxin expression and lacZ expression was observed. PMID:8169208

  8. Temperature influences on the expression of GFP promoted by the upstream sequence of cpcB from Arthrospira platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongzhong; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2007-07-01

    In order to investigate the regulation mechanism of the phycocyanin gene, a series of functional analyses of the upstream sequence of cpcB gene from Arthrospira platensis were conducted in E. coli with green fluorescent protein encoding gene (gfp) as the reporter. Results showed that the gfp gene could express at a high level under the promotion of the upstream sequence, suggesting the existence of some strong promoter elements in it. The expression of GFP was influenced by temperature. Higher temperature led to higher expression level. The bioinformatics analyses followed by mutation analyses on the secondary structure of translation initiation region (TIR) revealed that RNA thermosensor might account for the temperature regulation.

  9. Dimerization of the 3'UTR of bicoid mRNA involves a two-step mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Palacios, I; Jaeger, L; St Johnston, D; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C; Brunel, C

    2001-10-26

    The proper localization of bicoid (bcd) mRNA requires cis-acting signals within its 3' untranslated region (UTR) and trans-acting factors such as Staufen. Dimerization of bcd mRNA through intermolecular base-pairing between two complementary loops of domain III of the 3'UTR was proposed to be important for particle formation in the embryo. The participation in the dimerization process of each domain building the 3'UTR was evaluated by thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of various mutated and truncated RNAs. Although sequence complementarity between the two loops of domain III is required for initiating mRNA dimerization, the initial reversible loop-loop complex is converted rapidly into an almost irreversible complex. This conversion involves parts of RNA outside of domain III that promote initial recognition, and dimerization can be inhibited by sense or antisense oligonucleotides only before conversion has proceeded. Injection of the different bcd RNA variants into living Drosophila embryos shows that all elements that inhibit RNA dimerization in vitro prevent formation of localized particles containing Staufen. Particle formation appeared to be dependent on both mRNA dimerization and other element(s) in domains IV and V. Domain III of bcd mRNA could be substituted by heterologous dimerization motifs of different geometry. The resulting dimers were converted into stable forms, independently of the dimerization module used. Moreover, these chimeric RNAs were competent in forming localized particles and recruiting Staufen. The finding that the dimerization domain of bcd mRNA is interchangeable suggests that dimerization by itself, and not the precise geometry of the intermolecular interactions, is essential for the localization process. This suggests that the stabilizing interactions that are formed during the second step of the dimerization process might represent crucial elements for Staufen recognition and localization. PMID:11676536

  10. Adventures in Holographic Dimer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kachru, Shamit; Karch, Andreas; Yaida, Sho; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    We abstract the essential features of holographic dimer models, and develop several new applications of these models. Firstly, semi-holographically coupling free band fermions to holographic dimers, we uncover novel phase transitions between conventional Fermi liquids and non-Fermi liquids, accompanied by a change in the structure of the Fermi surface. Secondly, we make dimer vibrations propagate through the whole crystal by way of double trace deformations, obtaining nontrivial band structure. In a simple toy model, the topology of the band structure experiences an interesting reorganization as we vary the strength of the double trace deformations. Finally, we develop tools that would allow one to build, in a bottom-up fashion, a holographic avatar of the Hubbard model.

  11. Benchmarking of optical dimerizer systems.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Strickland, Devin; Vrana, Justin D; Tucker, Chandra L

    2014-11-21

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein-protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  12. The nucleotide composition of the spacer sequence influences the expression yield of heterologously expressed genes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Liebeton, Klaus; Lengefeld, Jette; Eck, Jürgen

    2014-12-10

    Bacillus subtilis is a commonly used host for the heterologous expression of genes in academia and industry. Many factors are known to influence the expression yield in this organism e.g. the complementarity between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (SD) and the 16S-rRNA or secondary structures in the translation initiation region of the transcript. In this study, we analysed the impact of the nucleotide composition between the SD sequence and the start codon (the spacer sequence) on the expression yield. We demonstrated that a polyadenylate-moiety spacer sequence moderately increases the expression level of laccase CotA from B. subtilis. By screening a library of artificially generated spacer variants, we identified clones with greatly increased expression levels of two model enzymes, the laccase CotA from B. subtilis (11 fold) and the metagenome derived protease H149 (30 fold). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effect of the spacer sequence is specific to the gene of interest. These results prove the high impact of the spacer sequence on the expression yield in B. subtilis. PMID:24997355

  13. Using reads to annotate the genome: influence of length, background distribution, and sequence errors on prediction capacity.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Nicolas; Boureux, Anthony; Bréhélin, Laurent; Tarhio, Jorma; Commes, Thérèse; Rivals, Eric

    2009-08-01

    Ultra high-throughput sequencing is used to analyse the transcriptome or interactome at unprecedented depth on a genome-wide scale. These techniques yield short sequence reads that are then mapped on a genome sequence to predict putatively transcribed or protein-interacting regions. We argue that factors such as background distribution, sequence errors, and read length impact on the prediction capacity of sequence census experiments. Here we suggest a computational approach to measure these factors and analyse their influence on both transcriptomic and epigenomic assays. This investigation provides new clues on both methodological and biological issues. For instance, by analysing chromatin immunoprecipitation read sets, we estimate that 4.6% of reads are affected by SNPs. We show that, although the nucleotide error probability is low, it significantly increases with the position in the sequence. Choosing a read length above 19 bp practically eliminates the risk of finding irrelevant positions, while above 20 bp the number of uniquely mapped reads decreases. With our procedure, we obtain 0.6% false positives among genomic locations. Hence, even rare signatures should identify biologically relevant regions, if they are mapped on the genome. This indicates that digital transcriptomics may help to characterize the wealth of yet undiscovered, low-abundance transcripts. PMID:19531739

  14. Using reads to annotate the genome: influence of length, background distribution, and sequence errors on prediction capacity

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Nicolas; Boureux, Anthony; Bréhélin, Laurent; Tarhio, Jorma; Commes, Thérèse; Rivals, Éric

    2009-01-01

    Ultra high-throughput sequencing is used to analyse the transcriptome or interactome at unprecedented depth on a genome-wide scale. These techniques yield short sequence reads that are then mapped on a genome sequence to predict putatively transcribed or protein-interacting regions. We argue that factors such as background distribution, sequence errors, and read length impact on the prediction capacity of sequence census experiments. Here we suggest a computational approach to measure these factors and analyse their influence on both transcriptomic and epigenomic assays. This investigation provides new clues on both methodological and biological issues. For instance, by analysing chromatin immunoprecipitation read sets, we estimate that 4.6% of reads are affected by SNPs. We show that, although the nucleotide error probability is low, it significantly increases with the position in the sequence. Choosing a read length above 19 bp practically eliminates the risk of finding irrelevant positions, while above 20 bp the number of uniquely mapped reads decreases. With our procedure, we obtain 0.6% false positives among genomic locations. Hence, even rare signatures should identify biologically relevant regions, if they are mapped on the genome. This indicates that digital transcriptomics may help to characterize the wealth of yet undiscovered, low-abundance transcripts. PMID:19531739

  15. The dimer of unsubstituted silole

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Deqing; Chen, Yue-Shen; Gaspar, P.P.

    1992-02-01

    Gas-phase flow pyrolysis of 1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-silacyclopent-3-ene and 1-methoxy-1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-silacyclopent-3-ene leads to the formation of the dimer of silole, 3,8-disila-3a, 4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methano-1H-indene. Attempts to isolate or trap the silole monomer by means other than self-reaction have failed. It is suggested that the initially formed intermediate silylene, 1-silacyclopent-3-enylidene, undergoes rearrangement to silole and that silole is not very reactive in 2 + 4 cycloadditions, but does undergo dimerization. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Theoretical studies on the dimerization of substituted paraphenylenediamine radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyain, Kraiwan; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2011-12-01

    Organic radical cations form dicationic dimers in solution, observed experimentally as diamagnetic species in temperature-dependent EPR and low temperature UV/Vis spectroscopy. Dimerization of paraphenylenediamine, N,N-dimethyl-paraphenylenediamine and 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-paraphenylenediamine radical cation in ethanol/diethylether mixture was investigated theoretically according to geometry, energetics and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Density Functional Theory including dispersion correction describes stable dimers after geometry optimization with conductor-like screening model of solvation and inclusion of the counter-ion. Energy corrections were done on double-hybrid Density Functional Theory with perturbative second-order correlation (B2PLYP-D) including basis set superposition error (BSSE), and multireference Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory method (MRMP2) based on complete active space method (CASSCF(2,2)) single point calculation, respectively. All three dication π-dimers exhibit long multicenter π-bonds around 2.9 ± 0.1 Å with strongly interacting orbitals. Substitution with methyl groups does not influence the dimerization process substantially. Dispersion interaction and electrostatic attraction from counter-ion play an important role to stabilize the dication dimers in solution. Dispersion-corrected double hybrid functional B2PLYP-D and CASSCF(2,2) can describe the interaction energetics properly. Vertical excitations were computed with Tamm-Dancoff approximation for time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDA-DFT) at the B3LYP level with the cc-pVTZ basis set including ethanol solvent molecules explicitly. A strong interaction of the counter-ion and the solvent ethanol with the monomeric species is observed, whereas in the dimers the strong interaction of both radical cation species is the dominating factor for the additional peak in UV/Vis spectra.

  17. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul K; Pappu, Rohit V

    2013-08-13

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence-ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence-ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  18. Gold(I) and silver(I) complexes containing a tripodal tetraphosphine ligand: influence of the halogen and stoichiometry on the properties. The X-ray crystal structure of two gold(I) dimeric aggregates.

    PubMed

    Fernández, D; García-Seijo, M I; Bardají, M; Laguna, A; García-Fernández, M E

    2008-05-21

    Complexes of the type [Au2(micro-PP3)2]X2 [X=Cl (), Br (), I ()], [Ag2(micro-PP3)2](NO3)2 (), Ag(PP3)Cl (), M3(micro-PP3)X3 [M=Au, X=Cl (), Br (), I (); M=Ag, X=NO3 ()] and Au4(micro-PP3)X4 [X=Cl (), Br (), I ()] have been prepared by interaction between gold(I) or silver(I) salts and the ligand tris[2-(diphenylphosphino)ethyl]phosphine (PP3) in the appropriate molar ratio. Microanalysis, mass spectrometry, IR and NMR spectroscopies and conductivity measurements were used for characterization. and are ionic dinuclear species containing four-coordinate gold(i) and four/three coordinate silver(i), respectively. Solutions of behave as mixtures of complexes in a 2:1 [Au2(micro-PP3)X2; X=Cl(), Br(), I()] and 4:1 () metal to ligand ratio. and react with free PP(3) in solution to generate the ionic compounds and , respectively. Complexes and , with four linear PAuX fragments per molecule, were shown by X-ray diffraction to consist of dimeric aggregates via close intermolecular gold(I)gold(I) contacts of 3.270 A () and 3.184 A (). The resultant octanuclear systems have an inversion center with two symmetry-related gold(I) atoms being totally out of the aurophilic area and represent a new form of aggregation compared to that found in other halo complexes of gold(I) containing polyphosphines. The luminescence properties of the ligand and complexes, in the solid state, have been studied. Most of the gold systems display intense luminescent emission at room and low temperature. The influence of the halogen on the aurophilic contacts of compounds with a 4:1 metal to ligand ratio results in different photophysical properties, while and are luminescent complex is nonemissive. The luminescence increases with increasing the phosphine/metal ratio affording for complexes , without aurophilic contacts, the stronger emissions. Silver complexes and are nonemissive at room temperature and show weaker emissions than gold(I) species at 77 K. PMID:18443708

  19. Influence of tacking sequence on residual stress and distortion of single sided fillet submerged arc welded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Arpan Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj; Bag, Swarup

    2015-07-01

    Submerged arc welding (SAW) is advantageous for joining high thickness materials in large structure due to high material deposition rate. The non-uniform heating and cooling generates the thermal stresses and subsequently the residual stresses and distortion. The longitudinal and transverse residual stresses and angular distortion are generally measured in large panel structure of submerged arc welded fillet joints. Hence, the objective of this present work is to quantify the amount of residual stress and distortion in and around the weld joint due to positioning of stiffeners tack. The tacking sequence influences the level of residual stress and proper controlling of tacking sequences is required to minimize the stress. In present study, an elasto-plastic material behavior is considered to develop the thermo mechanical model which predicts the residual stress and angular distortion with varying tacking sequences. The simulated result reveals that the tacking sequence heavily influences the residual stress and deformation pattern of the single sided fillet joint. The finite element based numerical model is calibrated by comparing the experimental data from published literature. Henceforth, the angular distortions are measured from an in-house developed experimental set-up. A fair agreement between the predicted and experimental results indicates the robustness of the developed numerical model. However, the most significant conclusion from present study states that tack weld position should be placed opposite to the fillet weld side to minimize the residual stress.

  20. Influence of time and length size feature selections for human activity sequences recognition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongqing; Chen, Long; Srinivasan, Raghavendiran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, Viterbi algorithm based on a hidden Markov model is applied to recognize activity sequences from observed sensors events. Alternative features selections of time feature values of sensors events and activity length size feature values are tested, respectively, and then the results of activity sequences recognition performances of Viterbi algorithm are evaluated. The results show that the selection of larger time feature values of sensor events and/or smaller activity length size feature values will generate relatively better results on the activity sequences recognition performances. PMID:24075148

  1. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.; Muedas, C.A.; Ferguson, R.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes improvement in a Group IIb photosensitized vapor phase dimerization of an organic compound in which a gaseous mixture of a Group IIB metal and the organic compound is irradiated in a reaction zone with a photosensitizing amount of radiant energy. The improvement comprises: a continuous stream of the gaseous mixture is passed as a vapor phase in a single pass through the reaction zone at a temperature at which the thus-produced dimer condenses immediately upon the formation thereof; the starting gaseous mixture comprises hydrogen and two ethylenically unsaturated compounds selected from the group consisting of alkenes of at least six carbon atoms, unsaturated nitriles, unsaturated epoxides, unsaturated silanes, unsaturated amines, unsaturated phosphines, and fluorinated alkenes; the gaseous mixture comprises nitrous oxide and the organic compound is a saturated compound with C-H bond strengths greater than 100 kcal/mol or a mixture of the saturated compound and an alkene; or the starting gaseous comprises an activating amount of hydrogen and the dimerization is a dehydrodimerization or cross-dimerization of a saturated hydrocarbon.

  2. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency. PMID:24794259

  3. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence–ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence–ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  4. Induced topological changes in DNA complexes: influence of DNA sequences and small molecule structures

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Rebecca A.; Munde, Manoj; Kumar, Arvind; Ismail, Mohamed A.; Farahat, Abdelbasset A.; Arafa, Reem K.; Say, Martial; Batista-Parra, Adalgisa; Tevis, Denise; Boykin, David W.; Wilson, W. David

    2011-01-01

    Heterocyclic diamidines are compounds with antiparasitic properties that target the minor groove of kinetoplast DNA. The mechanism of action of these compounds is unknown, but topological changes to DNA structures are likely to be involved. In this study, we have developed a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-based screening method to determine topological effects of heterocyclic diamidines on four minor groove target sequences: AAAAA, TTTAA, AAATT and ATATA. The AAAAA and AAATT sequences have the largest intrinsic bend, whereas the TTTAA and ATATA sequences are relatively straight. The changes caused by binding of the compounds are sequence dependent, but generally the topological effects on AAAAA and AAATT are similar as are the effects on TTTAA and ATATA. A total of 13 compounds with a variety of structural differences were evaluated for topological changes to DNA. All compounds decrease the mobility of the ATATA sequence that is consistent with decreased minor groove width and bending of the relatively straight DNA into the minor groove. Similar, but generally smaller, effects are seen with TTTAA. The intrinsically bent AAAAA and AAATT sequences, which have more narrow minor grooves, have smaller mobility changes on binding that are consistent with increased or decreased bending depending on compound structure. PMID:21266485

  5. Single residue modification of only one dimer within the hemoglobin tetramer reveals autonomous dimer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackers, Gary K.; Dalessio, Paula M.; Lew, George H.; Daugherty, Margaret A.; Holt, Jo M.

    2002-07-01

    The mechanism of cooperativity in the human hemoglobin tetramer (a dimer of dimers) has historically been modeled as a simple two-state system in which a low-affinity structural form (T) switches, on ligation, to a high-affinity form (R), yielding a net loss of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges in the dimer-dimer interface. Modifications that weaken these cross-dimer contacts destabilize the quaternary T tetramer, leading to decreased cooperativity and enhanced ligand affinity, as demonstrated in many studies on symmetric double modifications, i.e., a residue site modified in both - or both -subunits. In this work, hybrid tetramers have been prepared with only one modified residue, yielding molecules composed of a wild-type dimer and a modified dimer. It is observed that the cooperative free energy of ligation to the modified dimer is perturbed to the same extent whether in the hybrid tetramer or in the doubly modified tetramer. The cooperative free energy of ligation to the wild-type dimer is unperturbed, even in the hybrid tetramer, and despite the overall destabilization of the T tetramer by the modification. This asymmetric response by the two dimers within the same tetramer shows that loss of dimer-dimer contacts is not communicated across the dimer-dimer interface, but is transmitted through the dimer that bears the modified residue. These observations are interpreted in terms of a previously proposed dimer-based model of cooperativity with an additional quaternary (T/R) component.

  6. Characterization of mAb dimers reveals predominant dimer forms common in therapeutic mAbs.

    PubMed

    Plath, Friederike; Ringler, Philippe; Graff-Meyer, Alexandra; Stahlberg, Henning; Lauer, Matthias E; Rufer, Arne C; Graewert, Melissa A; Svergun, Dmitri; Gellermann, Gerald; Finkler, Christof; Stracke, Jan O; Koulov, Atanas; Schnaible, Volker

    2016-07-01

    The formation of undesired high molecular weight species such as dimers is an important quality attribute for therapeutic monoclonal antibody formulations. Therefore, the thorough understanding of mAb dimerization and the detailed characterization mAb dimers is of great interest for future pharmaceutical development of therapeutic antibodies. In this work, we focused on the analyses of different mAb dimers regarding size, surface properties, chemical identity, overall structure and localization of possible dimerization sites. Dimer fractions of different mAbs were isolated to a satisfactory purity from bulk material and revealed 2 predominant overall structures, namely elongated and compact dimer forms. The elongated dimers displayed one dimerization site involving the tip of the Fab domain. Depending on the stress applied, these elongated dimers are connected either covalently or non-covalently. In contrast, the compact dimers exhibited non-covalent association. Several interaction points were detected for the compact dimers involving the hinge region or the base of the Fab domain. These results indicate that mAb dimer fractions are rather complex and may contain more than one kind of dimer. Nevertheless, the overall appearance of mAb dimers suggests the existence of 2 predominant dimeric structures, elongated and compact, which are commonly present in preparations of therapeutic mAbs. PMID:27031922

  7. Influences on the variability of eruption sequences and style transitions in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Procter, Jonathan; Agustín-Flores, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanism is characterised by a complex array of eruptive behaviours, reflecting spatial and temporal variability of the magmatic properties (e.g. composition, eruptive volume, magma flux) as well as environmental factors at the vent site (e.g. availability of water, country rock geology, faulting). These combine to produce changes in eruption style over brief periods (minutes to days) in many eruption episodes. Monogenetic eruptions in some volcanic fields often start with a phreatomagmatic vent-opening phase that later transforms into "dry" magmatic explosive or effusive activity, with a strong variation in the duration and importance of this first phase. Such an eruption sequence pattern occurred in 83% of the known eruption in the 0.25 My-old Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand. In this investigation, the eruptive volumes were compared with the sequences of eruption styles preserved in the pyroclastic record at each volcano of the AVF, as well as environmental influencing factors, such as distribution and thickness of water-saturated semi- to unconsolidated sediments, topographic position, distances from known fault lines. The AVF showed that there is no correlation between ejecta ring volumes and environmental influencing factors that is valid for the entire AVF. In contrary, using a set of comparisons of single volcanoes with well-known and documented sequences, resultant eruption sequences could be explained by predominant patterns of the environment in which these volcanoes were erupted. Based on the spatial variability of these environmental factors, a first-order susceptibility hazard map was constructed for the AVF that forecasts areas of largest likelihood for phreatomagmatic eruptions by overlaying topographical and shallow geological information. Combining detailed phase-by-phase breakdowns of eruptive volumes and the event sequences of the AVF, along with the new susceptibility map, more realistic eruption scenarios can be

  8. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Ramsook, Sarah N.; Ni, Joyce; Shahangian, Shokofeh; Vakiloroayaei, Ana; Khan, Naveen; Kwan, Jamie J.

    2016-01-01

    Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG) domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors. PMID:27532129

  9. Analysis of hepatitis C virus RNA dimerization and core–RNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Kanevsky, Igor; Gabus, Caroline; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Ficheux, Damien; Penin, François; Fossé, Philippe; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    The core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown previously to act as a potent nucleic acid chaperone in vitro, promoting the dimerization of the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the HCV genomic RNA, a process probably mediated by a small, highly conserved palindromic RNA motif, named DLS (dimer linkage sequence) [G. Cristofari, R. Ivanyi-Nagy, C. Gabus, S. Boulant, J. P. Lavergne, F. Penin and J. L. Darlix (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 2623–2631]. To investigate in depth HCV RNA dimerization, we generated a series of point mutations in the DLS region. We find that both the plus-strand 3′-UTR and the complementary minus-strand RNA can dimerize in the presence of core protein, while mutations in the DLS (among them a single point mutation that abolished RNA replication in a HCV subgenomic replicon system) completely abrogate dimerization. Structural probing of plus- and minus-strand RNAs, in their monomeric and dimeric forms, indicate that the DLS is the major if not the sole determinant of UTR RNA dimerization. Furthermore, the N-terminal basic amino acid clusters of core protein were found to be sufficient to induce dimerization, suggesting that they retain full RNA chaperone activity. These findings may have important consequences for understanding the HCV replicative cycle and the genetic variability of the virus. PMID:16707664

  10. Monitoring Retroviral RNA Dimerization In Vivo via Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bijay K.; Scherer, Lisa; Zelby, Laurie; Bertrand, Edouard; Rossi, John J.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a strategy for colocalization of Psi (Ψ)-tethered ribozymes and targets to demonstrate that Ψ sequences are capable of specific interaction in the cytoplasm of both packaging and nonpackaging cells. These results indicate that current in vitro dimerization models may have in vivo counterparts. The methodology used may be applied to further genetic analyses on Ψ domain interactions in vivo. PMID:9733882

  11. Influence of next-generation sequencing and storage conditions on miRNA patterns generated from PAXgene blood.

    PubMed

    Backes, Christina; Leidinger, Petra; Altmann, Gabriela; Wuerstle, Maximilian; Meder, Benjamin; Galata, Valentina; Mueller, Sabine C; Sickert, Daniel; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Whole blood derived miRNA signatures determined by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) offer themselves as future minimally invasive biomarkers for various human diseases. The PAXgene system is a commonly used blood storage system for miRNA analysis. Central to all miRNA analyses that aim to identify disease specific miRNA signatures, is the question of stability and variability of the miRNA profiles that are generated by NGS. We characterized the influence of five different conditions on the genome wide miRNA expression pattern of human blood isolated in PAXgene RNA tubes. In detail, we analyzed 15 miRNomes from three individuals. The blood was subjected to different numbers of freeze/thaw cycles and analyzed for the influence of storage at -80 or 8 °C. We also determined the influence of blood collection and NGS preparations on the miRNA pattern isolated from a single individual, which has been sequenced 10 times. Here, five PAXGene tubes were consecutively collected that have been split in two replicates, representing two experimental batches. All samples were analyzed by Illumina NGS. For each sample, approximately 20 million NGS reads have been generated. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed an influence of the different conditions on the miRNA patterns. The effects of the different conditions on miRNA abundance are, however, smaller than the differences that are due to interindividual variability. We also found evidence for an influence of the NGS measurement on the miRNA pattern. Specifically, hsa-miR-1271-5p and hsa-miR-182-5p showed coefficients of variation above 100% indicating a strong influence of the NGS protocol on the abundance of these miRNAs. PMID:26207298

  12. The influence of tightening sequence and method on screw preload in implant superstructures.

    PubMed

    Al-Sahan, Maha M; Al Maflehi, Nassr S; Akeel, Riyadh F

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of six screw-tightening sequences and two tightening methods on the screw preload in implant-supported superstructures. The preload was measured using strain gauges following the screw tightening of a metal framework connected to four implants. The experiment included six sequences ([1] 1-2-3-4, [2] 4-2-3-1, [3] 4-3-1-2, [4] 1-4-2-3, [5] 2-3-4-1, and [6] 3-2-4-1), two methods (onestep, three-step), and five replications. Significant differences were found between tightening sequences and methods. In the three-step method, a higher total preload was found in sequences 2 (312 ± 85 N), 3 (246 ± 54 N), and 4 (310 ± 96 N). In the one-step method, a higher total preload was found in sequences 1 (286 ± 94 N), 5 (764 ± 142 N), and 6 (350 ± 69 N). It is concluded that the highest total screw preload was achieved when anterior implants of the superstructure were first tightened in one step, followed by posterior implants. PMID:24392482

  13. A Strategy for Complex Dimer Formation When Biomimicry Fails: Total Synthesis of Ten Coccinellid Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature’s presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class. PMID:24959981

  14. A strategy for complex dimer formation when biomimicry fails: total synthesis of ten coccinellid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Trotta, Adam H; Snyder, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature's presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class. PMID:24959981

  15. Influence of the sequence on elastic properties of long DNA chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillant, C.; Audit, B.; Thermes, C.; Arnéodo, A.

    2003-03-01

    We revisit the results of single-molecule DNA stretching experiments using a rodlike chain (RLC) model that explicitly includes some intrinsic structural disorder induced by the sequence. The investigation of artificial and real genomic sequences shows that the wormlike chain model reproduces quite well the data but with an effective bend stiffness Aeff, which underestimates the true elastic bend stiffness A, independently of the elastic twist stiffness C. Mainly dominated by the amplitude of the structural disorder, this correction seems rather insensitive to the presence of long-range correlations. This RLC model is shown to remarkably fit the experimental data for λ-DNA when considering A≃70±10 nm (>Aeff≃50 nm), in good agreement with previous experimental estimates of the “dynamic” persistent length. From the analysis of large human contigs, we speculate about the possible dependence of Aeff and/or A upon the (G+C) content of the considered sequence.

  16. Matching Measure, Benjamini-Schramm Convergence and the Monomer-Dimer Free Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abért, Miklós; Csikvári, Péter; Hubai, Tamás

    2015-10-01

    We define the matching measure of a lattice L as the spectral measure of the tree of self-avoiding walks in L. We connect this invariant to the monomer-dimer partition function of a sequence of finite graphs converging to L. This allows us to express the monomer-dimer free energy of L in terms of the matching measure. Exploiting an analytic advantage of the matching measure over the Mayer series then leads to new, rigorous bounds on the monomer-dimer free energies of various Euclidean lattices. While our estimates use only the computational data given in previous papers, they improve the known bounds significantly.

  17. Influence of pH and sequence in peptide aggregation via molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Enciso, Marta; Schütte, Christof; Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-12-28

    We employ a recently developed coarse-grained model for peptides and proteins where the effect of pH is automatically included. We explore the effect of pH in the aggregation process of the amyloidogenic peptide KTVIIE and two related sequences, using three different pH environments. Simulations using large systems (24 peptides chains per box) allow us to describe the formation of realistic peptide aggregates. We evaluate the thermodynamic and kinetic implications of changes in sequence and pH upon peptide aggregation, and we discuss how a minimalistic coarse-grained model can account for these details.

  18. A fractographic investigation of the influence of stacking sequence on the strength of notched laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Morris, Don H.

    1987-01-01

    The fracture behavior of T300/5208 CFRP laminate panels with 12 different combinations of ply orientation and stacking sequence is investigated experimentally, using optical microscopy, SEM, and X-ray radiography to characterize the notch-tip damage zones and fracture surfaces of center-cracked tension specimens subjected to tensile loading at constant crosshead displacement rate 20 micron/s. The results are presented graphically and analyzed in detail. Significant differences in notched strength are found for different ply fiber orientations and stacking sequences; the laminates with few major delaminations had a greater percentage of fracture due to broken fibers and also higher notched strength.

  19. Functional analysis of mouse Hoxa-7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: sequences outside the homeodomain base contact zone influence binding and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, M K; Gruss, P

    1994-01-01

    The murine developmental control gene product, Hoxa-7, was shown to function as a DNA-binding transactivator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The importance of the ATTA core, the preference for antp class flanking nucleotides, the importance of Asn-51 of the homeodomain (HD), and the synergism of multiple binding sites all reflect properties that have previously been described for HOM or Hox proteins in tissue culture systems. A comparison of contact positions among genes of paralog groups and classes of mammalian HDs points to a lack of diversity in positions that make base contact, suggesting that besides the combination of HD amino acid-base pair contacts, another means of recognizing differences between targets must exist if Hox genes select different targets. The HD of antennapedia is identical to the Hoxa-7 HD. The interaction of Hoxa-7 with the exact sequence used in the nuclear magnetic resonance three-dimensional structural analysis on the antennapedia HD was studied. Hoxa-7 binding and transactivation was influenced by sequences outside of the known base contact zone of this site. We conclude that Hoxa-7 protein has a second means to interact with DNA or/and that the sequences flanking the base contact zone influence HD interactions by distorting DNA within the contact zone (base or backbone). This result is discussed in terms of DNA flexure and two modes of transcription used in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:8264592

  20. The influence of viral coding sequences on pestivirus IRES activity reveals further parallels with translation initiation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Simon P; Ali, Iraj K; Kaminski, Ann; Digard, Paul; Jackson, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a member of the pestivirus family, which shares many features in common with hepatitis C virus (HCV). It is shown here that CSFV has an exceptionally efficient cis-acting internal ribosome entry segment (IRES), which, like that of HCV, is strongly influenced by the sequences immediately downstream of the initiation codon, and is optimal with viral coding sequences in this position. Constructs that retained 17 or more codons of viral coding sequence exhibited full IRES activity, but with only 12 codons, activity was approximately 66% of maximum in vitro (though close to maximum in transfected BHK cells), whereas with just 3 codons or fewer, the activity was only approximately 15% of maximum. The minimal coding region elements required for high activity were exchanged between HCV and CSFV. Although maximum activity was observed in each case with the homologous combination of coding region and 5' UTR, the heterologous combinations were sufficiently active to rule out a highly specific functional interplay between the 5' UTR and coding sequences. On the other hand, inversion of the coding sequences resulted in low IRES activity, particularly with the HCV coding sequences. RNA structure probing showed that the efficiency of internal initiation of these chimeric constructs correlated most closely with the degree of single-strandedness of the region around and immediately downstream of the initiation codon. The low activity IRESs could not be rescued by addition of supplementary eIF4A (the initiation factor with ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity). The extreme sensitivity to secondary structure around the initiation codon is likely to be due to the fact that the eIF4F complex (which has eIF4A as one of its subunits) is not required for and does not participate in initiation on these IRESs. PMID:12515388

  1. [Cooperative mechanism of phosphorylation of the monomeric and dimeric forms of inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast].

    PubMed

    Bakulevá, N P; Kasho, V N; Baĭkov, A A; Nazarova, T I; Avaeva, S M

    1982-07-01

    A comparative study of phosphorylation of native dimeric and artificial monomeric forms of inorganic pyrophosphatase and its fluoride-stabilized complex with PPi has been carried out. The maximal incorporation of Pi for the dimeric and monomeric proteins is 0.5 and 1 mole per mole of subunit, respectively. The saturation kinetic curves are suggestive of strong positive cooperative interactions. The value of the Hill coefficient (5.5) for the free dimeric enzyme drastically changes upon the active center blockage and/or transition to the monomeric enzyme. Acceleration of dephosphorylation induced by Pi in the presence of Mg2+ is observed only in the case of the dimeric protein. The data obtained indicate that phosphorylation of native dimeric pyrophosphatase occurs according to a "flip-flop" mechanism; the Pi binding in the active center exerts a strong influence on individual steps of the reaction. PMID:6126224

  2. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  3. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  4. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  5. Singlet fission in pentacene dimers.

    PubMed

    Zirzlmeier, Johannes; Lehnherr, Dan; Coto, Pedro B; Chernick, Erin T; Casillas, Rubén; Basel, Bettina S; Thoss, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik R; Guldi, Dirk M

    2015-04-28

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to supersede the traditional solar energy conversion scheme by means of boosting the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies beyond the 30% Shockley-Queisser limit. Here, we show unambiguous and compelling evidence for unprecedented intramolecular SF within regioisomeric pentacene dimers in room-temperature solutions, with observed triplet quantum yields reaching as high as 156 ± 5%. Whereas previous studies have shown that the collision of a photoexcited chromophore with a ground-state chromophore can give rise to SF, here we demonstrate that the proximity and sufficient coupling through bond or space in pentacene dimers is enough to induce intramolecular SF where two triplets are generated on one molecule. PMID:25858954

  6. Singlet fission in pentacene dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zirzlmeier, Johannes; Lehnherr, Dan; Coto, Pedro B.; Chernick, Erin T.; Casillas, Rubén; Basel, Bettina S.; Thoss, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik R.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to supersede the traditional solar energy conversion scheme by means of boosting the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies beyond the 30% Shockley–Queisser limit. Here, we show unambiguous and compelling evidence for unprecedented intramolecular SF within regioisomeric pentacene dimers in room-temperature solutions, with observed triplet quantum yields reaching as high as 156 ± 5%. Whereas previous studies have shown that the collision of a photoexcited chromophore with a ground-state chromophore can give rise to SF, here we demonstrate that the proximity and sufficient coupling through bond or space in pentacene dimers is enough to induce intramolecular SF where two triplets are generated on one molecule. PMID:25858954

  7. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  8. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  9. Long-term tillage and cropping sequence influence on dryland soil aggregate-carbon dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequestration and transformation of soil C as a result of long-term management practices occur mainly in aggregates. This study evaluated the 21-yr effect of tillage and cropping sequence combinations on dryland soil C sequestration and transformation into various C fractions in aggregates at the 0-...

  10. Children's Imitation of Causal Action Sequences Is Influenced by Statistical and Pedagogical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchsbaum, Daphna; Gopnik, Alison; Griffiths, Thomas L.; Shafto, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Children are ubiquitous imitators, but how do they decide which actions to imitate? One possibility is that children rationally combine multiple sources of information about which actions are necessary to cause a particular outcome. For instance, children might learn from contingencies between action sequences and outcomes across repeated…

  11. Entanglement and bifurcation in the integrable dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Xiwen; Chen Jinghua; Hu Bambi

    2005-03-01

    In this Brief Report the properties of both dynamical and static entanglement in the integrable quantum dimer are studied in terms of the reduced-density linear entropy and von Neumann entropy with various coupling parameters, total boson numbers, and initial states. The mean entanglement, which is defined to be averaged over time, is used to describe the influence of the classical separatrix on the behavior of entanglement. It is shown that the mean entanglement exhibits a maximum near the position of the corresponding classical separatrix energy and that the static entanglement of the state with the largest eigenvalue of the quantum spectrum displays a maximum near the bifurcation point. For weak coupling and larger total boson number the maximum entanglement state is exactly at the position of the classical separatrix and bifurcation. In strong coupling all initial states have nearly the same mean entanglement.

  12. An RSA study of dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-03-01

    The first theoretical study of a dimer adsorption process at a homogeneous surface is presented. By using the RSA algorithm, we show example monolayers, discuss estimations of random jamming coverages and measure the surface blocking function, which could be used for calculating real systems kinetics. We also find the correlation function for coverages generated and analyse the orientational ordering inside the adsorbed monolayer. The results are compared with theoretical and experimental data.

  13. Redox properties of metalloporphyrin dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Collman, J.P.; Prodolliet, J.W.; Leidner, C.R.

    1986-05-28

    Cyclic and rotated disk voltammetry of two metalloporphyrin dimers, (Ru(OEP))/sub 2/ and (Os(OEP))/sub 2/, exhibit four oxidations and two reductions for each compound which are all chemically and electrochemically reversible on the voltammetric time scale. Comparison of the formal potentials of the six couples suggests that the first two oxidations are metal-centered redox processes; the remaining four couples are likely to be ligand centered. Controlled chemical oxidations using ferricinium hexafluorophosphate, silver tetrafluoroborate, and tris(4-bromophenyl)ammonium hexachloroantimonate cleanly generate the monocations (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup +/ and the dications (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup 2 +/. NMR, ESR, and electronic spectroscopy of these dimeric, cationic products support the assignment of the two oxidations as metal centered. These oxidations permit the preparation of the two series of metalloporphyrin dimers: paramagnetic (M(OEP))/sub 2/ with bond order = 2, paramagnetic (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup +/ with bond order = 2.5, and diamagnetic (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with bond order = 3.

  14. LEF-1 recognition of platinated GG sequences within double-stranded DNA. Influence of flanking bases.

    PubMed

    Chválová, Katerina; Sari, Marie-Agnès; Bombard, Sophie; Kozelka, Jirí

    2008-02-01

    The lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1) recognizes a double-stranded 9 base-pairs (bp) long motif in DNA which is significantly bent upon binding. This bend is centered at two destacked adenines whose geometry closely resembles that of two adjacent guanines crosslinked by the antitumor drug cisplatin. It has been proposed that cisplatin-GG crosslinks could hijack high mobility group (HMG) box containing transcription factors such as LEF-1. In order to examine such a possibility, we used electrophoretic mobility shift assays to determine the affinity of the HMG box of LEF-1 for a series of 25 oligonucleotides containing a central GG sequence, free or site-specifically modified by cisplatin. The binding affinity of the GG-platinated oligonucleotides was 3-6-fold higher than that determined for the corresponding unplatinated oligonucleotides, however, the binding to all cisplatin-modified oligonucleotides was at least 1 order of magnitude weaker than that to the 25 bp oligonucleotide containing the recognition 9 bp motif. The binding affinity was dependent on the nature of bases flanking the cisplatin-crosslinked G(*)G(*) dinucleotide, the AG(*)G(*)T sequence displaying the strongest affinity and CG(*)G(*)T showing the strongest binding enhancement upon platination. In contrast, modification of the AGGT sequence with the third-generation platinum antitumor drug oxaliplatin did not enhance the affinity significantly. These results suggest that the cisplatin-caused bending of DNA does produce a target for LEF-1 binding, however, the cisplatinated DNA does not appear to be a strong competitor for the LEF-1 recognition sequence. PMID:17961652

  15. Functional Roles of the Dimer-Interface Residues in Human Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Yun; Liu, Yi-Liang; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of ornithine to putrescine and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. ODC is a dimeric enzyme, and the active sites of this enzyme reside at the dimer interface. Once the enzyme dissociates, the enzyme activity is lost. In this paper, we investigated the roles of amino acid residues at the dimer interface regarding the dimerization, protein stability and/or enzyme activity of ODC. A multiple sequence alignment of ODC and its homologous protein antizyme inhibitor revealed that 5 of 9 residues (residues 165, 277, 331, 332 and 389) are divergent, whereas 4 (134, 169, 294 and 322) are conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation analysis suggested that some dimer-interface amino acid residues contribute to formation of the dimer of ODC and that this dimerization results from the cooperativity of these interface residues. The quaternary structure of the sextuple mutant Y331S/Y389D/R277S/D332E/V322D/D134A was changed to a monomer rather than a dimer, and the Kd value of the mutant was 52.8 µM, which is over 500-fold greater than that of the wild-type ODC (ODC_WT). In addition, most interface mutants showed low but detectable or negligible enzyme activity. Therefore, the protein stability of these interface mutants was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. These results indicate that these dimer-interface residues are important for dimer formation and, as a consequence, are critical for enzyme catalysis. PMID:25140796

  16. Role of bulk and of interface contacts in the behavior of lattice model dimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Tiana, G; Provasi, D; Broglia, R A

    2003-05-01

    Some dimeric proteins first fold and then dimerize (three-state dimers) while others first dimerize and then fold (two-state dimers). Within the framework of a minimal lattice model, we can distinguish between sequences following one or the other mechanism on the basis of the distribution of the ground state energy between bulk and interface contacts. The topology of contacts is very different for the bulk than for the interface: while the bulk displays a rich network of interactions, the dimer interface is built up of a set of essentially independent contacts. Consequently, the two sets of interactions play very different roles both, in the folding and in the evolutionary history of the protein. Three-state dimers, where a large fraction of energy is concentrated in few contacts buried in the bulk, and where the relative contact energy of interface contacts is considerably smaller than that associated with bulk contacts, fold according to a hierarchical pathway controlled by local elementary structures, as also happens in the folding of single-domain monomeric proteins. On the other hand, two-state dimers display a relative contact energy of interface contacts, which is larger than the corresponding quantity associated with the bulk. In this case, the assembly of the interface stabilizes the system and leads the two chains to fold. The specific properties of three-state dimers acquired through evolution are expected to be more robust than those of two-state dimers; a fact that has consequences on proteins connected with viral diseases. PMID:12786180

  17. CLEC-2 activates Syk through dimerization.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Pollitt, Alice Y; Mori, Jun; Eble, Johannes A; Tomlinson, Michael G; Hartwig, John H; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Fütterer, Klaus; Watson, Steve P

    2010-04-01

    The C-type lectin receptor CLEC-2 activates platelets through Src and Syk tyrosine kinases, leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream adapter proteins and effector enzymes, including phospholipase-C gamma2. Signaling is initiated through phosphorylation of a single conserved tyrosine located in a YxxL sequence in the CLEC-2 cytosolic tail. The signaling pathway used by CLEC-2 shares many similarities with that used by receptors that have 1 or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif, defined by the sequence Yxx(L/I)x(6-12)Yxx(L/I), in their cytosolic tails or associated receptor chains. Phosphorylation of the conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines promotes Syk binding and activation through binding of the Syk tandem SH2 domains. In this report, we present evidence using peptide pull-down studies, surface plasmon resonance, quantitative Western blotting, tryptophan fluorescence measurements, and competition experiments that Syk activation by CLEC-2 is mediated by the cross-linking through the tandem SH2 domains with a stoichiometry of 2:1. In support of this model, cross-linking and electron microscopy demonstrate that CLEC-2 is present as a dimer in resting platelets and converted to larger complexes on activation. This is a unique mode of activation of Syk by a single YxxL-containing receptor. PMID:20154219

  18. Children's Preference for Sequenced Accompaniments: The Influence of Style and Perceived Tempo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the influence of tempo on musical preference for students in grades 2-6, focusing on the effects of various styles using a MIDI keyboard. Explains that the students listened to 10 musical selections identifying their preferences and perceptions of tempo. Reveals that the preferred styles were Hip-Hop, Heavy Rock Shuffle, Samba, and Funk2.…

  19. G domain dimerization controls dynamin's assembly-stimulated GTPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chappie, Joshua S.; Acharya, Sharmistha; Leonard, Marilyn; Schmid, Sandra L.; Dyda, Fred

    2010-06-14

    Dynamin is an atypical GTPase that catalyses membrane fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The mechanisms of dynamin's basal and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis are unknown, though both are indirectly influenced by the GTPase effector domain (GED). Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a human dynamin 1-derived minimal GTPase-GED fusion protein, which was dimeric in the presence of the transition state mimic GDP.AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structure reveals dynamin's catalytic machinery and explains how assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis is achieved through G domain dimerization. A sodium ion present in the active site suggests that dynamin uses a cation to compensate for the developing negative charge in the transition state in the absence of an arginine finger. Structural comparison to the rat dynamin G domain reveals key conformational changes that promote G domain dimerization and stimulated hydrolysis. The structure of the GTPase-GED fusion protein dimer provides insight into the mechanisms underlying dynamin-catalysed membrane fission.

  20. Frequency of the first feature in action sequences influences feature binding.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Paul S; Fournier, Lisa R; Behmer, Lawrence P

    2012-10-01

    We investigated whether binding among perception and action feature codes is a preliminary step toward creating a more durable memory trace of an action event. If so, increasing the frequency of a particular event (e.g., a stimulus requiring a movement with the left or right hand in an up or down direction) should increase the strength and speed of feature binding for this event. The results from two experiments, using a partial-repetition paradigm, confirmed that feature binding increased in strength and/or occurred earlier for a high-frequency (e.g., left hand moving up) than for a low-frequency (e.g., right hand moving down) event. Moreover, increasing the frequency of the first-specified feature in the action sequence alone (e.g., "left" hand) increased the strength and/or speed of action feature binding (e.g., between the "left" hand and movement in an "up" or "down" direction). The latter finding suggests an update to the theory of event coding, as not all features in the action sequence equally determine binding strength. We conclude that action planning involves serial binding of features in the order of action feature execution (i.e., associations among features are not bidirectional but are directional), which can lead to a more durable memory trace. This is consistent with physiological evidence suggesting that serial order is preserved in an action plan executed from memory and that the first feature in the action sequence may be critical in preserving this serial order. PMID:22777733

  1. Egg laying sequence influences egg mercury concentrations and egg size in three bird species: Implications for contaminant monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.; Yee, Julie L.; Hartman, C. Alex

    2016-01-01

    Bird eggs are commonly used in contaminant monitoring programs and toxicological risk assessments, but intra-clutch variation and sampling methodology could influence interpretability. We examined the influence of egg laying sequence on egg mercury concentrations and burdens in American avocets, black-necked stilts, and Forster's terns. The average decline in mercury concentrations between the first and last egg laid was 33% for stilts, 22% for terns, and 11% for avocets, and most of this decline occurred between the first and second eggs laid (24% for stilts, 18% for terns, and 9% for avocets). Trends in egg size with egg laying order were inconsistent among species and overall differences in egg volume, mass, length, and width were <3%. We summarized the literature and, among 17 species studied, mercury concentrations generally declined by 16% between the first and second eggs laid. Despite the strong effect of egg laying sequence, most of the variance in egg mercury concentrations still occurred among clutches (75%-91%) rather than within clutches (9%-25%). Using simulations, we determined that to accurately estimate a population's mean egg mercury concentration using only a single random egg from a subset of nests, it would require sampling >60 nests to represent a large population (10% accuracy) or ≥14 nests to represent a small colony that contained <100 nests (20% accuracy).

  2. Bifilar enzyme-sensitive sites in ultraviolet-irradiated DNA are indicative of closely opposed cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L H; Reynolds, R J

    1986-01-01

    Incubation of UV-irradiated DNA with pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase in cell-free lysates prepared from Micrococcus luteus results in the appearance of double-strand breaks. It has previously been assumed that such double-strand breaks result from cleavage at closely opposed dimers. We have used hybrid molecules of bacteriophage T7 DNA comprised of two unirradiated strands, two UV-irradiated strands, or one unirradiated and one UV-irradiated strand to test this hypothesis. Bifilar cleavage was observed only with molecules consisting of two irradiated strands and no bifilar cleavage was observed after the monomerization of pyrimidine dimers by enzymatic photoreactivation. Our results indicate that at least 80% of the double-strand breaks result from cleavage at closely opposed dimers and that the induction of dimers in one strand does not influence the induction of dimers at closely opposed positions in the complementary strand of a DNA double helix. PMID:3527288

  3. Influence of atom termination and stacking sequence on the θ‧/Al interfaces from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongqiang; Wang, Yongxin; Lu, Yanli; Chen, Zheng; Rao, Qinglei

    2016-06-01

    First-principles calculations was used to explore the influence of atom termination and stacking sequence on the interface strength and stability between θ‧(Al2Cu) precipitate and Al matrix along experimentally observed orientations, (001)θ‧/(001)Al and (010)θ‧/(010)Al interfaces. Six interfacial structures were modeled, and work of adhesion, bonding characters, number of valence electrons and thermal stability had been studied. Calculated results revealed that the Cu-terminated interface has larger work of adhesion than Al-terminated interface, and hollow site stacking sequence, with stronger bonding, is superior to top site stacking sequence, adhesion strength for coherent (001)θ‧/(001)Al interface is better than that for semi-coherent (010)θ‧/(010)Al interface. These differences are attributed to the bonding feature and number of valence electrons. Among the six interface models, the Cu-terminated (001)θ‧/(001)Al interface with hollow site stacking has the largest work of adhesion and the smallest interface energy, indicating that it has the best mechanical and thermodynamic properties.

  4. T box transcription antitermination riboswitch: Influence of nucleotide sequence and orientation on tRNA binding by the antiterminator element

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Hamid; Agyeman, Akwasi; Hines, Jennifer V.

    2008-01-01

    Many bacteria utilize riboswitch transcription regulation to monitor and appropriately respond to cellular levels of important metabolites or effector molecules. The T box transcription antitermination riboswitch responds to cognate uncharged tRNA by specifically stabilizing an antiterminator element in the 5′-untranslated mRNA leader region and precluding formation of a thermodynamically more stable terminator element. Stabilization occurs when the tRNA acceptor end base pairs with the first four nucleotides in the seven nucleotide bulge of the highly conserved antiterminator element. The significance of the conservation of the antiterminator bulge nucleotides that do not base pair with the tRNA is unknown, but they are required for optimal function. In vitro selection was used to determine if the isolated antiterminator bulge context alone dictates the mode in which the tRNA acceptor end binds the bulge nucleotides. No sequence conservation beyond complementarity was observed and the location was not constrained to the first four bases of the bulge. The results indicate that formation of a structure that recognizes the tRNA acceptor end in isolation is not the determinant driving force for the high phylogenetic sequence conservation observed within the antiterminator bulge. Additional factors or T box leader features more likely influenced the phylogenetic sequence conservation. PMID:19152843

  5. Dimerization of Human Growth Hormone by Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Brian C.; Mulkerrin, Michael G.; Wells, James A.

    1991-08-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation equilibrium studies demonstrated that zinc ion (Zn2+) induced the dimerization of human growth hormone (hGH). Scatchard analysis of 65Zn2+ binding to hGH showed that two Zn2+ ions associate per dimer of hGH in a cooperative fashion. Cobalt (II) can substitute for Zn2+ in the hormone dimer and gives a visible spectrum characteristic of cobalt coordinated in a tetrahedral fashion by oxygen- and nitrogen-containing ligands. Replacement of potential Zn2+ ligands (His18, His21, and Glu174) in hGH with alanine weakened both Zn2+ binding and hGH dimer formation. The Zn2+-hGH dimer was more stable than monomeric hGH to denaturation in guanidine-HCl. Formation of a Zn2+-hGH dimeric complex may be important for storage of hGH in secretory granules.

  6. Functional Significance of Serotonin Receptor Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Herrick-Davis, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    The original model of G protein activation by a single G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is giving way to a new model wherein two protomers of a GPCR dimer interact with a single G protein. This article will review the evidence suggesting that 5-HT receptors form dimers/oligomers and will compare the findings with results obtained from studies with other biogenic amine receptors. Topics to be covered include the origin or biogenesis of dimer formation, potential dimer interface(s), and oligomer size (dimer versus tetramer or higher order). The functional significance will be discussed in terms of G-protein activation following ligand binding to one or two protomers in a dimeric structure, the formation of heterodimers and the development of bivalent ligands. PMID:23811735

  7. Quantum criticality in dimerized spin ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitov, Gennady Y.; Ramakko, Brandon W.; Azzouz, Mohamed

    2008-06-01

    We analyze the possibility of quantum criticality (gaplessness) in dimerized antiferromagnetic two- and three-leg spin- (1)/(2) ladders. Contrary to earlier studies of these models, we examine different dimerization patterns in the ladder. We find that ladders with the columnar dimerization order have lower zero-temperature energies, and they are always gapped. For the staggered dimerization order, we find the quantum critical lines, in agreement with earlier analyses. The bond mean-field theory we apply demonstrates its quantitative accuracy and agrees with available numerical results. We conclude that unless some mechanism for locking dimerization into the energetically less favorable staggered configuration is provided, the dimerized ladders do not order into the phase where the quantum criticality occurs.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms in the Repair of the Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanali, Ali A.; Zhong, Dongping; Singer, Sherwin J.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to far UV radiation induces DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Cyclobutane dimer lesions can be repaired by the enzyme photolyase, in which the absorption of a blue light photon initiates a sequence of photochemical events leading to the injection of an electron at the site of the CPD lesion in DNA. The electron catalyzes the repair of the cyclobutane dimer, splitting the CPD to is original pyrimidine units, and is subsequently recaptured by the photolyase protein. In this work we investigate the molecular mechanism of the repair of the cyclobutane dimer radical anion in aqueous solution using ab initio MD simulations. Umbrella sampling is used to determine a two-dimensional free energy surface as a function of the C5-C5-4 and C6-C6-4 distances. The neutral dimer is unable to surmount a large free energy barrier for repair. Upon addition of an electron, the splitting of the C5-C5-4 coordinate is virtually barrier less. Transition state theory predicts that the splitting of the C6-C6-4 bond is complete on a picosecond timescale. The free energy surface suggests that the splitting of the two bonds is asynchronously concerted. Our work is the first to explicitly include the electronic degrees of freedom for both the cyclobutane dimer and the surrounding water pocket. The ab initio simulations show that at least 30% of the electron density is delocalized onto the surrounding solvent during the splitting process. Simulations on the neutral surface show that back electron transfer from the dimer is critical for the completion of splitting: splitting of the C5-C5' and C6-C6' bonds can be reversed or enhanced depending on when electron return occurs. To maximize splitting yield, the back electron transfer should occur beyond the transition state along the splitting coordinate. Non-equilibrium trajectories are also conducted that begin with the electron added to a neutral unrepaired solvated CPD. Our results indicate that there are two

  9. STIM1 dimers undergo unimolecular coupling to activate Orai1 channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yandong; Wang, Xizhuo; Wang, Xianming; Loktionova, Natalia A.; Cai, Xiangyu; Nwokonko, Robert M.; Vrana, Erin; Wang, Youjun; Rothberg, Brad S.; Gill, Donald L.

    2015-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor, STIM1, becomes activated when ER-stored Ca2+ is depleted and translocates into ER-plasma membrane junctions where it tethers and activates Orai1 Ca2+ entry channels. The dimeric STIM1 protein contains a small STIM-Orai-activating region (SOAR)--the minimal sequence sufficient to activate Orai1 channels. Since SOAR itself is a dimer, we constructed SOAR concatemer-dimers and introduced mutations at F394, which is critical for Orai1 coupling and activation. The F394H mutation in both SOAR monomers completely blocks dimer function, but F394H introduced in only one of the dimeric SOAR monomers has no effect on Orai1 binding or activation. This reveals an unexpected unimolecular coupling between STIM1 and Orai1 and argues against recent evidence suggesting dimeric interaction between STIM1 and two adjacent Orai1 channel subunits. The model predicts that STIM1 dimers may be involved in crosslinking between Orai1 channels with implications for the kinetics and localization of Orai1 channel opening.

  10. Monomer-dimer problem on some networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruijuan; Yan, Weigen

    2016-09-01

    Zhang et al. (2012) obtained the exact formula for the number of all possible monomer-dimer arrangements and the asymptotic growth constant on a scale-free small-world network. In this note, we generalize this result and obtain the exact solution on the monomer-dimer model on many networks. Particularly, we prove that these networks have the same asymptotic growth constant of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis using different colored dye dimer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmé, Nicole; Friedrich, Achim; Denapaite, Dalia; Hakenbeck, Regine; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2006-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching by dye dimer formation has been utilized to develop hairpin-structured DNA probes for the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the penicillin target gene pbp2x, which is implicated in the penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We designed two specific DNA probes for the identification of the pbp2x genes from a penicillin susceptible strain R6 and a resistant strain Streptococcus mitis 661 using green-fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) and red-fluorescent DY-636, respectively. Hybridization of each of the probes to its respective target DNA sequence opened the DNA hairpin probes, consequently breaking the nonfluorescent dye dimers into fluorescent species. This hybridization of the target with the hairpin probe achieved single nucleotide specific detection at nanomolar concentrations via increased fluorescence.

  12. Association of anthracyclines and synthetic hexanucleotides. Structural factors influencing sequence specificity.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, V; Battistini, C; Vigevani, A; Sacchi, N; Razzano, G; Arcamone, F; Garbesi, A; Colonna, F P; Capobianco, M; Tondelli, L

    1989-11-01

    The equilibrium and kinetic aspects of the interaction between four anthracyclines and two synthetic self-complementary hexanucleotides was investigated by fluorescence detection. Two of the studied anthracyclines are widely used antitumor drugs: doxorubicin (1, formerly adriamycin) and daunorubicin (2, formerly daunomycin). The other two, 9-deoxydoxorubicin (3) and 3'-deamino-3'-hydroxy-4'-epidoxorubicin (4), are doxorubicin analogues with modifications of the chemical groups that have been proposed as responsible for sequence specificity (Chen, K.-X., Gresh, N. and Pullman, B. (1985). J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. 3, 445-466). One of the oligonucleotides, d(CGTACG), is identical to that used in the high resolution x-ray structure determination of the daunorubicin intercalative complex (Wang, A. H.-J., Ughetto, G., Quigley, G. J. & Rich, A. (1987). Biochemistry 26, 1152-1163). Binding to this hexanucleotide is compared with intercalation into the d(CGCGCG) duplex, revealing sequence preferences of the four anthracyclines. Taking into account the anthracycline aggregation and the dissociation of the hexanucleotide double standard form, results can be interpreted with a model that assumes complete fluorescence quenching at intercalative sites containing the CG base pair, and a large residual fluorescence after intercalation within the TpA fragment. All four anthracyclines show preferential intercalation at sites near the ends of both hexanucleotide duplexes, partly as a result of positive cooperativity in the formation of di-intercalated species at these sites. Within the limits of experimental error, complete site specificity for the CpG fragment is found in the intercalation of 1 and 2 into d(CGTACG) duplex, whereas analogues 3 and 4 give increasing evidence of intercalation at other sites including the fluorescence-preserving TpA fragment. Site specificity is less pronounced in the association with d(CGCGCG), when cooperativity is taken into account. Kinetic data

  13. Sputtering of dimers off a silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L.; Rosandi, Yudi; Kopnarski, Michael; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2012-10-01

    We present experimental and molecular-dynamics simulation results of the sputtering of a Si surface by 2 keV Ar ions. Results on both the monomer and dimer distributions are presented. In simulation, these distributions follow a generalized Thompson law with power exponent n=2 and n=3, respectively. The experimental data, obtained via plasma post-ionization in an SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry) apparatus, show good agreement with respect to the dimer fraction, and the relative energy distributions of dimers and monomers. The consequences for the dimer sputtering mechanism are discussed.

  14. HIV-2 genome dimerization is required for the correct processing of Gag: a second-site reversion in matrix can restore both processes in dimerization-impaired mutant viruses.

    PubMed

    L'Hernault, Anne; Weiss, Eva U; Greatorex, Jane S; Lever, Andrew M

    2012-05-01

    A unique feature of retroviruses is the packaging of two copies of their genome, noncovalently linked at their 5' ends. In vitro, dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) RNA occurs by interaction of a self-complementary sequence exposed in the loop of stem-loop 1 (SL-1), also termed the dimer initiation site (DIS). However, in virions, HIV-2 genome dimerization does not depend on the DIS. Instead, a palindrome located within the packaging signal (Psi) is the essential motif for genome dimerization. We reported previously that a mutation within Psi decreasing genome dimerization and packaging also resulted in a reduced proportion of mature particles (A. L'Hernault, J. S. Greatorex, R. A. Crowther, and A. M. Lever, Retrovirology 4:90, 2007). In this study, we investigated further the relationship between HIV-2 genome dimerization, particle maturation, and infectivity by using a series of targeted mutations in SL-1. Our results show that disruption of a purine-rich ((392)-GGAG-(395)) motif within Psi causes a severe reduction in genome dimerization and a replication defect. Maintaining the extended SL-1 structure in combination with the (392)-GGAG-(395) motif enhanced packaging. Unlike that of HIV-1, which can replicate despite mutation of the DIS, HIV-2 replication depends critically on genome dimerization rather than just packaging efficiency. Gag processing was altered in the HIV-2 dimerization mutants, resulting in the accumulation of the MA-CA-p2 processing intermediate and suggesting a link between genome dimerization and particle assembly. Analysis of revertant SL-1 mutant viruses revealed that a compensatory mutation in matrix (70TI) could rescue viral replication and partially restore genome dimerization and Gag processing. Our results are consistent with interdependence between HIV-2 RNA dimerization and the correct proteolytic cleavage of the Gag polyprotein. PMID:22419802

  15. Experimental separation of virtual photon exchange and electron transfer in interatomic coulombic decay of neon dimers.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, T; Czasch, A; Schöffler, M; Schössler, S; Käsz, M; Titze, J; Kreidi, K; Grisenti, R E; Staudte, A; Jagutzki, O; Schmidt, L Ph H; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Ueda, K; Dörner, R

    2007-10-12

    We investigate the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) of neon dimers following photoionization with simultaneous excitation of the ionized atom (shakeup) in a multiparticle coincidence experiment. We find that, depending on the parity of the excited state, which determines whether ICD takes place via virtual dipole photon emission or overlap of the wave functions, the decay happens at different internuclear distances, illustrating that nuclear dynamics heavily influence the electronic decay in the neon dimer. PMID:17995162

  16. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, S; Davidkova, M; Spotheim-Maurizot, M

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro gamma-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain. PMID:19520056

  17. Polypyrimidine tract sequences direct selection of alternative branch sites and influence protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, P A

    1994-01-01

    IVS1, an intron derived from the rat fibronectin gene, is spliced inefficiently in vitro, involving the use of three alternative branch sites. Mutation of one branch point site, BP3, so as to increase complementarity to U2 snRNA resulted in exclusive use of that site and improved splicing efficiency, indicating that the wild type BP3 site is one determinant of poor IVS1 splicing. Deletions within the polypyrimidine tract had a variable effect on splicing efficiency and altered the pattern of branch site usage. Selection of each branch site was influenced negatively by purine substitutions ca. 20 nucleotides downstream. It is proposed that all three IVS1 branch sites are pyrimidine tract-dependent. Pyrimidine tract deletions also influenced the crosslinking of PTB (the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein), hnRNP C, and splicing factor U2AF65. All three proteins bound preferentially to distinct regions within the polypyrimidine tract and thus are candidates for mediating pyrimidine tract-dependent branch site selection. The findings indicate the complexity of the IVS1 polypyrimidine tract and suggest a crucial role for this region in modulating branch site selection and IVS1 splicing. Images PMID:7937104

  18. Influence of manure age and sunlight on the community structure of cattle fecal bacteria as revealed by Illumina sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Shaw, T. I.; Oladeinde, A.; Molina, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fecal pollution of environmental waters is a major concern for the general public because exposure to fecal-associated pathogens can have severe impacts on human health. Stream and river impairment due to fecal pollution is largely the result of agricultural activities in the United States. In the last few years, numerous metagenomic studies utilized next generation sequencing to develop microbial community profiles by massively sequencing the 16sRNA hypervariable region. This technology supports the application of water quality assessment such as pathogen detection and fecal source tracking. The bacteria communities of samples in these studies were determined when they were freshly collected; therefore, little is known about how feces age or how environmental stress influences the microbial ecology of fecal materials. In this study we monitored bacteria community changes in cattle feces for 57 days after excretion (day 0, 2, 4 8, 15, 22, 29, 43, 57) by sequencing the 16s variable region 4, using Illumnia MiSeq. Twelve cattle feces were studied; half of the samples were directly exposed to sunlight (unshaded) and half were shaded. Results indicate that the relative abundance (RA) profile in both shaded and unshaded samples rapidly changed from day 0 to 15, but stabilized from day 22 to 57. Firmcutes were the most abundant phylum (~40%) at day 0, but were reduced to <10% by day 57. The RA of Proteobacteria was only 1% at day 0, but increased to ~50% by day 57in both shaded and unshaded samples. By the end of the study, shaded and unshaded samples had a similar RA of Firmcutes and Proteobacteria but the RA of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria was, respectively, about 7% lower and 10% higher for unshaded samples. UV intensity, moisture, and temperature were significantly different between shaded and unshaded plots, indicating that these environmental stresses could influence the structure of fecal bacteria community in the natural environment. According to the

  19. Structural requirements for nucleocapsid protein-mediated dimerization of avian leukosis virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ali, Moez Ben; Chaminade, Françoise; Kanevsky, Igor; Ennifar, Eric; Josset, Laurence; Ficheux, Damien; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Fossé, Philippe

    2007-09-28

    The avian leukosis virus (ALV) belongs to the alpha group of retroviruses that are widespread in nature. The 5'-untranslated region of ALV genome contains the L3 element that is important for virus infectivity and the formation of an unstable RNA dimer in vitro. The L3 sequence is predicted to fold into a long stem-loop structure with two internal loops and an apical one. Phylogenetic analysis predicts that the L3 stem-loop is conserved in alpharetroviruses. Furthermore, a significant selection mechanism maintains a palindrome in the apical loop. The nucleocapsid protein of the alpharetroviruses (NCp12) is required for RNA dimer formation and replication in vivo. It is not known whether L3 can be an NCp12-mediated RNA dimerization site able to bind NCp12 with high affinity. Here, we report that NCp12 chaperones formation of a stable ALV RNA dimer through L3. To investigate the NCp12-mediated L3 dimerization reaction, we performed site-directed mutagenesis, gel retardation and heterodimerization assays and analysis of thermostability of dimeric RNAs. We show that the affinity of NCp12 for L3 is lower than its affinity for the microPsi RNA packaging signal. Results show that conservation of a long stem-loop structure and a loop-loop interaction are not required for NCp12-mediated L3 dimerization. We show that the L3 apical stem-loop is sufficient to form an extended duplex and the whole stem-loop L3 cannot be converted by NCp12 into a duplex extending throughout L3. Three-dimensional modelling of the stable L3 dimer supports the notion that the extended duplex may represent the minimal dimer linkage structure found in the genomic RNA. PMID:17706668

  20. HLA class II sequence variants influence tuberculosis risk in populations of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Gudmundsson, Larus J; Blondal, Kai; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon Axel; Helgadottir, Hafdis T; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Karason, Ari; Kardum, Ljiljana Bulat; Knežević, Jelena; Kristjansson, Helgi; Kristjansson, Mar; Love, Arthur; Luo, Yang; Magnusson, Olafur T; Sulem, Patrick; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Dembic, Zlatko; Nejentsev, Sergey; Blondal, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections cause 9 million new tuberculosis cases and 1.5 million deaths annually. To identify variants conferring risk of tuberculosis, we tested 28.3 million variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders for association with tuberculosis (8,162 cases and 277,643 controls), pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and M. tuberculosis infection. We found association of three variants in the region harboring genes encoding the class II human leukocyte antigens (HLAs): rs557011[T] (minor allele frequency (MAF) = 40.2%), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 3.1 × 10(-13)) and PTB (OR = 1.25, P = 5.8 × 10(-12)), and rs9271378[G] (MAF = 32.5%), associated with PTB (OR = 0.78, P = 2.5 × 10(-12))--both located between HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DRB1--and a missense variant encoding p.Ala210Thr in HLA-DQA1 (MAF = 19.1%, rs9272785), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (P = 9.3 × 10(-9), OR = 1.14). We replicated association of these variants with PTB in samples of European ancestry from Russia and Croatia (P < 5.9 × 10(-4)). These findings show that the HLA class II region contributes to genetic risk of tuberculosis, possibly through reduced presentation of protective M. tuberculosis antigens to T cells. PMID:26829749

  1. Did stresses from the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field influence the El Mayor-Cucapah rupture sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trugman, Daniel T.; Borsa, Adrian A.; Sandwell, David T.

    2014-12-01

    The Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake ruptured a complex fault system in northern Baja California that was previously considered inactive. The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (CPGF), site of the world's second largest geothermal power plant, is located approximately 15 km to the northeast of the EMC hypocenter. We investigate whether anthropogenic fluid extraction at the CPGF caused a significant perturbation to the stress field in the EMC rupture zone. We use Advanced Land Observing Satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar data to develop a laterally heterogeneous model of fluid extraction at the CPGF and estimate that this extraction generates positive Coulomb stressing rates of order 15 kPa/yr near the EMC hypocenter, a value which exceeds the local tectonic stressing rate. Although we cannot definitively conclude that production at the CPGF triggered the EMC earthquake, its influence on the local stress field is substantial and should not be neglected in local seismic hazard assessments.

  2. Dithiothreitol causes HIV-1 integrase dimer dissociation while agents interacting with the integrase dimer interface promote dimer formation.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Mukund, Susmith; Brendza, Katherine M; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Jin, Debi; Liu, Xiaohong; Mitchell, Michael; Sakowicz, Roman; Geleziunas, Romas

    2011-03-15

    We have developed a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay that detects the formation of HIV-1 integrase (IN) dimers. The assay utilizes IN monomers that express two different epitope tags that are recognized by their respective antibodies, coupled to distinct fluorophores. Surprisingly, we found that dithiothreitol (DTT), a reducing agent essential for in vitro enzymatic activity of IN, weakened the interaction between IN monomers. This effect of DTT on IN is dependent on its thiol groups, since the related chemical threitol, which contains hydroxyls in place of thiols, had no effect on IN dimer formation. By studying mutants of IN, we determined that cysteines in IN appear to be dispensable for the dimer dissociation effect of DTT. Peptides derived from the IN binding domain (IBD) of lens epithelium derived growth factor/transcriptional coactivator p75 (LEDGF), a cellular cofactor that interacts with the IN dimer interface, were tested in this IN dimerization assay. These peptides, which compete with LEDGF for binding to IN, displayed an intriguing equilibrium binding dose-response curve characterized by a plateau rising to a peak, then descending to a second plateau. Mathematical modeling of this binding system revealed that these LEDGF-derived peptides promote IN dimerization and block subunit exchange between IN dimers. This dose-response behavior was also observed with a small molecule that interacts with the IN dimer interface and inhibits LEDGF binding to IN. In conclusion, this novel IN dimerization assay revealed that peptide and small molecule inhibitors of the IN-LEDGF interaction also stabilize IN dimers and promote their formation. PMID:21222490

  3. Influence of ACE I/D Polymorphism on Circulating Levels of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, D-Dimer, Ultrasensitive C-Reactive Protein and Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sara Santos; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sabino, Adriano de Paula; Evangelista, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo; Gomes, Karina Braga; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases are associated with coagulation disorders, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and fibrosis. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (ACE I/D polymorphism) has also be linked to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to compare plasma levels of ultrassensible C-reactive protein (usCRP), PAI-1, D-dimer and TGF-β1 in patients undergoing HD with different ACE I/D polymorphisms. Methods The study was performed in 138 patients at ESRD under hemodialysis therapy for more than six months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the genotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood cells (leukocytes). ACE I/D polymorphism was investigated by single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of D-dimer, PAI-1 and TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the determination of plasma levels of usCRP was performed by immunonephelometry. Data were analyzed by the software SigmaStat 2.03. Results Clinical characteristics were similar in patients with these three ACE I/D polymorphisms, except for interdialytic weight gain. I allele could be associated with higher interdialytic weight gain (P = 0.017). Patients genotyped as DD and as ID had significantly higher levels of PAI-1 than those with II genotype. Other laboratory parameters did not significantly differ among the three subgroups (P = 0.033). Despite not reaching statistical significance, plasma levels of usCRP were higher in patients carrying the D allele. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphisms could be associated with changes in the regulation of sodium, fibrinolytic system, and possibly, inflammation. Our data showed that high levels of PAI-1 are detected when D allele is present, whereas greater interdialytic gain is associated with the presence of I allele. However, further studies with different experimental designs are necessary to elucidate the

  4. Dimerization of HIV-1 genomic RNA of subtypes A and B: RNA loop structure and magnesium binding.

    PubMed Central

    Jossinet, F; Paillart, J C; Westhof, E; Hermann, T; Skripkin, E; Lodmell, J S; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Marquet, R

    1999-01-01

    Retroviruses encapsidate their genome as a dimer of homologous RNA molecules noncovalently linked close to their 5' ends. The dimerization initiation site (DIS) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA is a hairpin structure that contains in the loop a 6-nt self-complementary sequence flanked by two 5' and one 3' purines. The self-complementary sequence, as well as the flanking purines, are crucial for dimerization of HIV-1 RNA, which is mediated by formation of a "kissing-loop" complex between the DIS of each monomer. Here, we used chemical modification interference, lead-induced cleavage, and three-dimensional modeling to compare dimerization of subtype A and B HIV-1 RNAs. The DIS loop sequences of these RNAs are AGGUGCACA and AAGCGCGCA, respectively. In both RNAs, ethylation of most but not all phosphate groups in the loop and methylation of the N7 position of the G residues in the self-complementary sequence inhibited dimerization. These results demonstrate that small perturbations of the loop structure are detrimental to dimerization. Conversely, methylation of the N1 position of the first and last As in the loop were neutral or enhanced dimerization, a result consistent with these residues forming a noncanonical sheared base pair. Phosphorothioate interference, lead-induced cleavage, and Brownian-dynamics simulation revealed an unexpected difference in the dimerization mechanism of these RNAs. Unlike subtype B, subtype A requires binding of a divalent cation in the loop to promote RNA dimerization. This difference should be taken into consideration in the design of antidimerization molecules aimed at inhibiting HIV-1 replication. PMID:10496223

  5. Influence of the agitation rate on the treatment of partially soluble wastewater in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Samantha Cristina; Ratusznei, Suzana Maria; Rodrigues, José Alberto Domingues; Foresti, Eugenio; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2004-11-01

    This work reports on the influence of the agitation rate on the organic matter degradation in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, containing biomass immobilized on 3 cm cubic polyurethane matrices, stirred mechanically and fed with partially soluble soymilk substrate with mean chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 974+/-70 mg l(-1). Hydrodynamic studies informed on the homogenization time under agitagion rates from 500 to 1100 rpm provided by three propeller impellers. It occurred very quickly compared to the total cycle time. The results showed that agitation provided good mixing and improved the overall organic matter consumption rates. A modified first-order kinetic model represented adequately the data in the entire range of agitation rate. The apparent first-order kinetic constant for suspended COD rose approximately 360% when the agitation rate was changed from 500 to 900 rpm, whereas the apparent first-order kinetic constant for soluble COD did not vary significantly. PMID:15491659

  6. Long-term tillage and cropping sequence influence on dryland soil aggregate-carbon dynam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainju, U.; Tonthat, T.-C.; Jabro, J. D.

    2009-04-01

    Sequestration and transformation of soil C as a result of long-term management practices occur mainly in aggregates. This study evaluated the 21-yr effect of tillage and cropping sequence combinations on dryland soil C sequestration and transformation into various C fractions in aggregates at the 0-20 cm depth in eastern Montana, USA. Tillage and cropping sequences were no-tilled continuous spring wheat (NTCW), spring-tilled continuous spring wheat (STCW), fall- and spring-tilled continuous spring wheat (FSTCW), fall- and spring-tilled spring wheat-barley (1984-1999) followed by spring wheat-pea (2000-2004) (FSTW-B/P), and spring-tilled spring wheat-fallow (STW-F). Carbon fractions were soil organic C (SOC), particulate organic C (POC), microbial biomass C (MBC), and potential C mineralization (PCM). Total amount of crop biomass (stems + leaves) residue returned to soil from 1984 to 2004 was lower in STW-F than in other treatments. Aggregate proportion was greater in NTCW than in FSTCW in 4.75-2.00 mm aggregate-size class at 0-5 cm but was greater in STW-F than in STCW in 2.00-0.25 mm size class at 5-20 cm. The SOC and POC were greater in NTCW and STCW than in STW-F in all aggregate-size classes at 0-5 cm and greater in NTCW than in STW-F in 4.75-2.00 mm and <0.25 mm size classes at 5-20 cm. The PCM was greater in STCW and FSTCW than in STW-F in all aggregate-size classes at 0-5 cm and greater in STCW than in NTCW, FSTCW, and STW-F in 4.75-2.00 mm size class at 5-20 cm. Similarly, MBC was greater in NTCW and STCW than in STW-F in <2.00 mm size class at 0-5 cm and greater in STCW and FSTCW than in STW-F in 4.75-0.25 mm class size at 5-20 cm. No-till increased aggregate proportion and POC but reduced PCM and MBC compared with tilled practices in the continuous spring wheat system in 4.75-2.00 mm size class. Aggregate proportion was greater in 2.00-0.25 mm size class than in other aggregate-size classes. The SOC, POC, and PCM were greater in 4.75-2.00 mm than in <0

  7. The water dimer I: Experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Cole, William T. S.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    As the archetype of water hydrogen bonding, the water dimer has been studied extensively by both theory and experiment for nearly seven decades. In this article, we present a detailed chronological review of the experimental dimer studies and the insights into the complex nature of water and hydrogen bonding gained from them. A subsequent letter will review the corresponding theoretical advances.

  8. Potassium Hexacyanoferrate (III)-Catalyzed Dimerization of Hydroxystilbene: Biomimetic Synthesis of Indane Stilbene Dimers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing-Shan; Wen, Jin; Wang, Xian-Fen; Zhang, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Ji-Fa; Kang, Yu-Long; Hui, You-Wei; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Yao, Chun-Suo

    2015-01-01

    Using potassium hexacyanoferrate (III)-sodium acetate as oxidant, the oxidative coupling reaction of isorhapontigenin and resveratrol in aqueous acetone resulted in the isolation of three new indane dimers 4, 6, and 7, together with six known stilbene dimers. Indane dimer 5 was obtained for the first time by direct transformation from isorhapontigenin. The structures and relative configurations of the dimers were elucidated using spectral analysis, and their possible formation mechanisms were discussed. The results indicate that this reaction could be used as a convenient method for the semi-synthesis of indane dimers because of the mild conditions and simple reaction products. PMID:26694345

  9. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Egg-laying sequence influences egg mercury concentrations and egg size in three bird species: Implications for contaminant monitoring programs.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Herzog, Mark P; Yee, Julie L; Hartman, C Alex

    2016-06-01

    Bird eggs are commonly used in contaminant monitoring programs and toxicological risk assessments, but intraclutch variation and sampling methodology could influence interpretability. The authors examined the influence of egg-laying sequence on egg mercury concentrations and burdens in American avocets, black-necked stilts, and Forster's terns. The average decline in mercury concentrations between the first and last eggs laid was 33% for stilts, 22% for terns, and 11% for avocets, and most of this decline occurred between the first and second eggs laid (24% for stilts, 18% for terns, and 9% for avocets). Trends in egg size with egg-laying order were inconsistent among species, and overall differences in egg volume, mass, length, and width were <3%. The authors summarized the literature, and among 17 species studied, mercury concentrations generally declined by 16% between the first and second eggs laid. Despite the strong effect of egg-laying sequence, most of the variance in egg mercury concentrations still occurred among clutches (75-91%) rather than within clutches (9%-25%). Using simulations, the authors determined that accurate estimation of a population's mean egg mercury concentration using only a single random egg from a subset of nests would require sampling >60 nests to represent a large population (10% accuracy) or ≥14 nests to represent a small colony that contained <100 nests (20% accuracy). Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1458-1469. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. PMID:26505635

  11. A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal

  12. A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal

  13. Statistical transmutation in doped quantum dimer models.

    PubMed

    Lamas, C A; Ralko, A; Cabra, D C; Poilblanc, D; Pujol, P

    2012-07-01

    We prove a "statistical transmutation" symmetry of doped quantum dimer models on the square, triangular, and kagome lattices: the energy spectrum is invariant under a simultaneous change of statistics (i.e., bosonic into fermionic or vice versa) of the holes and of the signs of all the dimer resonance loops. This exact transformation enables us to define the duality equivalence between doped quantum dimer Hamiltonians and provides the analytic framework to analyze dynamical statistical transmutations. We investigate numerically the doping of the triangular quantum dimer model with special focus on the topological Z(2) dimer liquid. Doping leads to four (instead of two for the square lattice) inequivalent families of Hamiltonians. Competition between phase separation, superfluidity, supersolidity, and fermionic phases is investigated in the four families. PMID:23031119

  14. Electronic transitions of palladium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, Zhihua; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-11-21

    The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been observed and analyzed. The gas-phase Pd{sub 2} molecule was produced by laser ablation of palladium metal rod. Eleven vibrational bands were observed and assigned to the [17.1] {sup 3}II{sub g} - X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} transition system. The bond length (r{sub o}) and vibrational frequency (ΔG{sub 1/2}) of the ground X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} state were determined to be 2.47(4) Å and 211.4(5) cm{sup −1}, respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram was used to understand the observed ground and excited electronic states. This is the first gas-phase experimental investigation of the electronic transitions of Pd{sub 2}.

  15. The amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment C100 occurs in monomeric and dimeric stable conformations and binds γ-secretase modulators.

    PubMed

    Botev, Anne; Munter, Lisa-Marie; Wenzel, Ringo; Richter, Luise; Althoff, Veit; Ismer, Jochen; Gerling, Ulla; Weise, Christoph; Koksch, Beate; Hildebrand, Peter W; Bittl, Robert; Multhaup, Gerd

    2011-02-01

    The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is contained within the C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and is intimately linked to Alzheimer's disease. In vivo, Aβ is generated by sequential cleavage of β-CTF within the γ-secretase module. To investigate γ-secretase function, in vitro assays are in widespread use which require a recombinant β-CTF substrate expressed in bacteria and purified from inclusion bodies, termed C100. So far, little is known about the conformation of C100 under different conditions of purification and refolding. Since C100 dimerization influences the efficiency and specificity of γ-secretase cleavage, it is also of great interest to determine the secondary structure and the oligomeric state of the synthetic substrate as well as the binding properties of small molecules named γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) which we could previously show to modulate APP transmembrane sequence interactions [Richter et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14597-14602]. Here, we use circular dichroism and continuous-wave electron spin resonance measurements to show that C100 purified in a buffer containing SDS at micelle-forming concentrations adopts a highly stable α-helical conformation, in which it shows little tendency to aggregate or to form higher oligomers than dimers. By surface plasmon resonance analysis and molecular modeling we show that the GSM sulindac sulfide binds to C100 and has a preference for C100 dimers. PMID:21186781

  16. Saccades Influence the Visibility of Targets in Rapid Stimulus Sequences: The Roles of Mislocalization, Retinal Distance and Remapping.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Alessio; Melcher, David

    2016-01-01

    Briefly presented targets around the time of a saccade are mislocalized towards the saccadic landing point. This has been taken as evidence for a remapping mechanism that accompanies each eye movement, helping maintain visual stability across large retinal shifts. Previous studies have shown that spatial mislocalization is greatly diminished when trains of brief stimuli are presented at a high frequency rate, which might help to explain why mislocalization is rarely perceived in everyday viewing. Studies in the laboratory have shown that mislocalization can reduce metacontrast masking by causing target stimuli in a masking sequence to be perceived as shifted in space towards the saccadic target and thus more easily discriminated. We investigated the influence of saccades on target discrimination when target and masks were presented in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), as well as with forward masking and with backward masking. In a series of experiments, we found that performance was influenced by the retinal displacement caused by the saccade itself but that an additional component of un-masking occurred even when the retinal location of target and mask was matched. These results speak in favor of a remapping mechanism that begins before the eyes start moving and continues well beyond saccadic termination. PMID:27445718

  17. Saccades Influence the Visibility of Targets in Rapid Stimulus Sequences: The Roles of Mislocalization, Retinal Distance and Remapping

    PubMed Central

    Fracasso, Alessio; Melcher, David

    2016-01-01

    Briefly presented targets around the time of a saccade are mislocalized towards the saccadic landing point. This has been taken as evidence for a remapping mechanism that accompanies each eye movement, helping maintain visual stability across large retinal shifts. Previous studies have shown that spatial mislocalization is greatly diminished when trains of brief stimuli are presented at a high frequency rate, which might help to explain why mislocalization is rarely perceived in everyday viewing. Studies in the laboratory have shown that mislocalization can reduce metacontrast masking by causing target stimuli in a masking sequence to be perceived as shifted in space towards the saccadic target and thus more easily discriminated. We investigated the influence of saccades on target discrimination when target and masks were presented in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), as well as with forward masking and with backward masking. In a series of experiments, we found that performance was influenced by the retinal displacement caused by the saccade itself but that an additional component of un-masking occurred even when the retinal location of target and mask was matched. These results speak in favor of a remapping mechanism that begins before the eyes start moving and continues well beyond saccadic termination. PMID:27445718

  18. Evolutionary patterns of carbohydrate transport and metabolism in Halomonas boliviensis as derived from its genome sequence: influences on polyester production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Halomonas boliviensis is a halophilic bacterium that is included in the γ-Proteobacteria sub-group, and is able to assimilate different types of carbohydrates. H. boliviensis is also able to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in high yields using glucose as the carbon precursor. Accumulation of PHB by microorganisms is induced by excess of intracellular NADH. The genome sequences and organization in microorganisms should be the result of evolution and adaptation influenced by mutation, gene duplication, horizontal gen transfer (HGT) and recombination. Furthermore, the nearly neutral theory of evolution sustains that genetic modification of DNA could be neutral or selected, albeit most mutations should be at the border between neutrality and selection, i.e. slightly deleterious base substitutions in DNA are followed by a slightly advantageous substitutions. Results This article reports the genome sequence of H. boliviensis. The chromosome size of H. boliviensis was 4 119 979 bp, and contained 3 863 genes. A total of 160 genes of H. boliviensis were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and were organized as: 70 genes for metabolism of carbohydrates; 47 genes for ABC transport systems and 43 genes for TRAP-type C4-dicarboxylate transport systems. Protein sequences of H. boliviensis related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism were selected from clusters of orthologous proteins (COGs). Similar proteins derived from the genome sequences of other 41 archaea and 59 bacteria were used as reference. We found that most of the 160 genes in H. boliviensis, c.a. 44%, were obtained from other bacteria by horizontal gene transfer, while 13% of the genes were acquired from haloarchaea and thermophilic archaea, only 34% of the genes evolved among Proteobacteria and the remaining genes encoded proteins that did not cluster with any of the proteins obtained from the reference strains. Furthermore, the diversity of the enzymes derived from these genes

  19. Ratchet rotation of a 3D dimer on a vibrating plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Liu, Caishan; Jia, Yan-Bin; Ma, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the dynamics of a 3D dimer bouncing upon a horizontal plate undergoing a vertical harmonic vibration. Despite complex interactions within the system due to impacts and friction, numerical simulation shows that, under certain conditions prescribed for the dynamics, the center of mass of the dimer, when projected onto a horizontal plane, will follow a circular orbit. The phenomenon is like a particle under Coulomb friction performing a ratchet motion that rotates around. Investigations further reveal that the dimer dynamics bear some typical characteristics of a nonlinear system, including sensitivity to the initial conditions and bifurcation behaviors related to the physical parameters of the dynamics. Our results indicate that the coefficient of restitution and the plate's vibration intensity play critical roles in exciting the circular orbit, while the dimer's geometry and the vibration frequency mainly influence the trajectory characteristics. These findings may help understand transport mechanisms underlying systems of granular matter with anisotropic particles. PMID:24458553

  20. Comprehensive prediction of chromosome dimer resolution sites in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the replication process of bacteria with circular chromosomes, an odd number of homologous recombination events results in concatenated dimer chromosomes that cannot be partitioned into daughter cells. However, many bacteria harbor a conserved dimer resolution machinery consisting of one or two tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, and their 28-bp target site, dif. Results To study the evolution of the dif/XerCD system and its relationship with replication termination, we report the comprehensive prediction of dif sequences in silico using a phylogenetic prediction approach based on iterated hidden Markov modeling. Using this method, dif sites were identified in 641 organisms among 16 phyla, with a 97.64% identification rate for single-chromosome strains. The dif sequence positions were shown to be strongly correlated with the GC skew shift-point that is induced by replicational mutation/selection pressures, but the difference in the positions of the predicted dif sites and the GC skew shift-points did not correlate with the degree of replicational mutation/selection pressures. Conclusions The sequence of dif sites is widely conserved among many bacterial phyla, and they can be computationally identified using our method. The lack of correlation between dif position and the degree of GC skew suggests that replication termination does not occur strictly at dif sites. PMID:21223577

  1. dimerization and DNA binding alter phosphorylation of Fos and Jun

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, C.; Baker, S.J.; Curran, T. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Marshak, D.R. )

    1993-07-15

    Fos and Jun form dimeric complexes that bind to activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. The levels of expression and activities of these proteins are regulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. They are thought to function in nuclear signal transduction processes in many different cell types. The role of Fos and Jun in gene transcription is complex and may be regulated in several ways including association with different dimerization partners, interactions with other transcription factors, effects on DNA topology, and reduction/oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding domain. In addition, phosphorylation has been suggested to control the activity of Fos and Jun. Here the authors show that phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by several protein kinases is affected by dimerization and binding to DNA. Jun homodimers are phosphorylated efficiently by casein kinase II, whereas Fos-Jun heterodimers are not. DNA binding also reduces phosphorylation of Jun by casein kinase II, p34[sup cdc2] (cdc2) kinase, and protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of Fos by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cdc2 is relatively insensitive to dimerization and DNA binding, whereas phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by DNA-dependent protein kinase is dramatically stimulated by binding to the AP-1 site. These results imply that different protein kinases can distinguish among Fos and Jun proteins in the form of monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers and between DNA-bound and non-DNA-bound proteins. Thus, potentially, these different states of Fos and Jun can be recognized and regulated independently by phosphorylation. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Dimeric calixarenes: a new family of major-groove binders.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenbin; Blecking, Caroline; Kralj, Marijeta; Šuman, Lidija; Piantanida, Ivo; Schrader, Thomas

    2012-03-19

    A new class of potent DNA binding agents is presented. Dimeric calix[4]arenes with cationic groups at their upper rims and flexible alkyl bridges can be synthesized from triply acyl-protected calix[4]arene tetramines in relatively short synthetic sequences (3-5 steps). The compounds attach themselves to double-stranded nucleic acids in a noncovalent fashion, with micro- to nanomolar affinities. Guanidinium headgroups with their extended hydrogen-bonding "fingers" are more powerful than ammonium groups, and the benzylamine series is superior to the anilinium series (see below). The new ligands easily distinguish between RNA and various DNA types, and produce characteristic changes in UV/Vis, fluorescence, CD, as well as NMR spectra. Especially extended oligonucleotides of more than 100 base pairs are bound with affinities increasing from RNA (10 μM K(d))dimer per two BP), suggesting a potential aggregation of bound ligands inside the major groove. Most UV/Vis melting curves display an inverted shape, and start from drastically enhanced absorption intensities for the DNA complexes. DAPI displacement studies prove that up to one equivalent of calixarene dimer can be accommodated in the dye-loaded DNA. RNA complexation by calixarene dimers is accompanied by a drastic CD spectral transition from the typical A-form to a perfect B-signature, providing further experimental evidence for major-groove binding. The orientation of the ligands can be deduced from NMR titrations and is reproduced in Monte-Carlo simulations on 1:1 complexes in water. PMID:22336964

  3. The in vitro loose dimer structure and rearrangements of the HIV-2 leader RNA

    PubMed Central

    Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Pachulska-Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2011-01-01

    RNA dimerization is an essential step in the retroviral life cycle. Dimerization and encapsidation signals, closely linked in HIV-2, are located in the leader RNA region. The SL1 motif and nucleocapsid protein are considered important for both processes. In this study, we show the structure of the HIV-2 leader RNA (+1–560) captured as a loose dimer. Potential structural rearrangements within the leader RNA were studied. In the loose dimer form, the HIV-2 leader RNA strand exists in vitro as a single global fold. Two kissing loop interfaces within the loose dimer were identified: SL1/SL1 and TAR/TAR. Evidence for these findings is provided by RNA probing using SHAPE, chemical reagents, enzymes, non-denaturing PAGE mobility assays, antisense oligonucleotides hybridization and analysis of an RNA mutant. Both TAR and SL1 as isolated domains are bound by recombinant NCp8 protein with high affinity, contrary to the hairpins downstream of SL1. Foot-printing of the SL1/NCp8 complex indicates that the major binding site maps to the SL1 upper stem. Taken together, these data suggest a model in which TAR hairpin III, the segment of SL1 proximal to the loop and the PAL palindromic sequence play specific roles in the initiation of dimerization. PMID:21622659

  4. Loop Sequence Context Influences the Formation and Stability of the i-Motif for DNA Oligomers of Sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, under Slightly Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    McKim, Mikeal; Buxton, Alexander; Johnson, Courtney; Metz, Amanda; Sheardy, Richard D

    2016-08-11

    The structure and stability of DNA is highly dependent upon the sequence context of the bases (A, G, C, and T) and the environment under which the DNA is prepared (e.g., buffer, temperature, pH, ionic strength). Understanding the factors that influence structure and stability of the i-motif conformation can lead to the design of DNA sequences with highly tunable properties. We have been investigating the influence of pH and temperature on the conformations and stabilities for all permutations of the DNA sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, using spectroscopic approaches. All oligomers undergo transitions from single-stranded structures at pH 7.0 to i-motif conformations at pH 5.0 as evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) studies. These folded structures possess stacked C:CH(+) base pairs joined by loops of 5'-XXX-3'. Although the pH at the midpoint of the transition (pHmp) varies slightly with loop sequence, the linkage between pH and log K for the proton induced transition is highly loop sequence dependent. All oligomers also undergo the thermally induced i-motif to single-strand transition at pH 5.0 as the temperature is increased from 25 to 95 °C. The temperature at the midpoint of this transition (Tm) is also highly dependent on loop sequence context effects. For seven of eight possible permutations, the pH induced, and thermally induced transitions appear to be highly cooperative and two state. Analysis of the CD optical melting profiles via a van't Hoff approach reveals sequence-dependent thermodynamic parameters for the unfolding as well. Together, these data reveal that the i-motif conformation exhibits exquisite sensitivity to loop sequence context with respect to formation and stability. PMID:27438583

  5. A Sequence-Independent Study of the Influence of Short Loop Lengths on the Stability and Topology of Intramolecular DNA G-Quadruplexes†

    PubMed Central

    Bugaut, Anthony; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2008-01-01

    G-Rich sequences found within biologically important regions of the genome have been shown to form intramolecular G-quadruplexes with varied loop lengths and sequences. Many of these quadruplexes will be distinguishable from each other on the basis of their thermodynamic stabilities and folded conformations. It has been proposed that loop lengths can strongly influence the topology and stability of intramolecular G-quadruplexes. Previous studies have been limited to the analysis of quadruplex sequences with particular loop sequences, making it difficult to make generalizations. Here, we describe an original study that aimed to elucidate the effect of loop length on the biophysical properties of G-quadruplexes in a sequence-independent context. We employed UV melting and circular dichroism spectroscopy to examine and compare the properties of 21 DNA quadruplex libraries, each comprising partially randomized loop sequences with lengths ranging from one to three nucleotides. Our work supports a number of general predictions that can be made solely on the basis of loop lengths. In particular, the results emphasize the strong influence of single-nucleotide loops on quadruplex properties. This study provides a predictive framework that may help identify or classify biologically relevant G-quadruplex-forming sequences. PMID:18092816

  6. Single residue modification of only one dimer within the hemoglobin tetramer reveals autonomous dimer function

    PubMed Central

    Ackers, Gary K.; Dalessio, Paula M.; Lew, George H.; Daugherty, Margaret A.; Holt, Jo M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of cooperativity in the human hemoglobin tetramer (a dimer of αβ dimers) has historically been modeled as a simple two-state system in which a low-affinity structural form (T) switches, on ligation, to a high-affinity form (R), yielding a net loss of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges in the dimer–dimer interface. Modifications that weaken these cross-dimer contacts destabilize the quaternary T tetramer, leading to decreased cooperativity and enhanced ligand affinity, as demonstrated in many studies on symmetric double modifications, i.e., a residue site modified in both α- or both β-subunits. In this work, hybrid tetramers have been prepared with only one modified residue, yielding molecules composed of a wild-type dimer and a modified dimer. It is observed that the cooperative free energy of ligation to the modified dimer is perturbed to the same extent whether in the hybrid tetramer or in the doubly modified tetramer. The cooperative free energy of ligation to the wild-type dimer is unperturbed, even in the hybrid tetramer, and despite the overall destabilization of the T tetramer by the modification. This asymmetric response by the two dimers within the same tetramer shows that loss of dimer–dimer contacts is not communicated across the dimer–dimer interface, but is transmitted through the dimer that bears the modified residue. These observations are interpreted in terms of a previously proposed dimer-based model of cooperativity with an additional quaternary (T/R) component. PMID:12119405

  7. Coiled-Coil–Mediated Dimerization Is Not Required for Myosin VI to Stabilize Actin during Spermatid Individualization in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Tatsuhiko; Frank, Deborah J.; Isaji, Mamiko

    2009-01-01

    Myosin VI is a pointed-end–directed actin motor that is thought to function as both a transporter of cargoes and an anchor, capable of binding cellular components to actin for long periods. Dimerization via a predicted coiled coil was hypothesized to regulate activity and motor properties. However, the importance of the coiled-coil sequence has not been tested in vivo. We used myosin VI's well-defined role in actin stabilization during Drosophila spermatid individualization to test the importance in vivo of the predicted coiled coil. If myosin VI functions as a dimer, a forced dimer should fully rescue myosin VI loss of function defects, including actin stabilization, actin cone movement, and cytoplasmic exclusion by the cones. Conversely, a molecule lacking the coiled coil should not rescue at all. Surprisingly, neither prediction was correct, because each rescued partially and the molecule lacking the coiled coil functioned better than the forced dimer. In extracts, no cross-linking into higher molecular weight forms indicative of dimerization was observed. In addition, a sequence required for altering nucleotide kinetics to make myosin VI dimers processive is not required for myosin VI's actin stabilization function. We conclude that myosin VI does not need to dimerize via the predicted coiled coil to stabilize actin in vivo. PMID:19005209

  8. Simulations of potentials of mean force for separating a leucine zipper dimer and the basic region of a basic region leucine zipper dimer.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors involved in DNA recognition are dimeric proteins. The monomers consist of two subdomains, a leucine zipper sequence responsible for dimerization and a highly basic DNA recognition sequence. Leucine zippers are strongly dimerized, and in a bZIP, the basic region can, in the absence of DNA, undergo extensive relative monomer-to-monomer fluctuations. In this work, LZ and bZIP potentials of mean force (PMFs), which provide free energies along reaction coordinates, are simulated with a distance replica exchange method. The method uses restraint potentials to provide sampling along a reaction coordinate and enhances configuration space exploration by exchanging information between neighboring restraint potential configurations. Restraint potentials that are constructed from sums over a number of atom distances are employed. Their use requires a modification of the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM) procedure to combine and unbias the data from the different restraint-potential-biased window densities to provide a PMF. These methods are first used to obtain a PMF for separating a leucine zipper (GCN4-p1) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. The PMF indicates a very strong binding free energy that only weakens when the monomers are separated by about 12 Å, which is about 6 Å beyond their bound, dimer equilibrium distance. PMFs are also obtained for separating the basic subdomain monomer parts of the GCN4 bZIP transcriptional factor, in the absence of DNA. In a monomer separation range spanning the open, crystal-based structure to closer configurations, the basic subdomain PMF is quite flat, implying essentially thermal sampling in this distance range. A PMF generated starting from a "collapsed" state, taken from a previous simulation ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 6071 ), where collapsed refers to the feature that the basic subdomain monomers are also effectively dimerized, shows that this state is

  9. Molecular evolution of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes in wild emmer wheat and its ecological association

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background α-Amylase inhibitors are attractive candidates for the control of seed weevils, as these insects are highly dependent on starch as an energy source. In this study, we aimed to reveal the structure and diversity of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes in wild emmer wheat from Israel and to elucidate the relationship between the emmer wheat genes and ecological factors using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Another objective of this study was to find out whether there were any correlations between SNPs in functional protein-coding genes and the environment. Results The influence of ecological factors on the genetic structure of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes was evaluated by specific SNP markers. A total of 244 dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes were obtained from 13 accessions in 10 populations. Seventy-five polymorphic positions and 74 haplotypes were defined by sequence analysis. Sixteen out of the 75 SNP markers were designed to detect SNP variations in wild emmer wheat accessions from different populations in Israel. The proportion of polymorphic loci P (5%), the expected heterozygosity He, and Shannon's information index in the 16 populations were 0.887, 0.404, and 0.589, respectively. The populations of wild emmer wheat showed great diversity in gene loci both between and within populations. Based on the SNP marker data, the genetic distance of pair-wise comparisons of the 16 populations displayed a sharp genetic differentiation over long geographic distances. The values of P, He, and Shannon's information index were negatively correlated with three climatic moisture factors, whereas the same values were positively correlated by Spearman rank correlation coefficients' analysis with some of the other ecological factors. Conclusion The populations of wild emmer wheat showed a wide range of diversity in dimeric α-amylase inhibitors, both between and within populations. We suggested that SNP markers are useful for the estimation of

  10. Quantum dimer model for the pseudogap metal

    PubMed Central

    Punk, Matthias; Allais, Andrea; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum dimer model for the metallic state of the hole-doped cuprates at low hole density, p. The Hilbert space is spanned by spinless, neutral, bosonic dimers and spin S=1/2, charge +e fermionic dimers. The model realizes a “fractionalized Fermi liquid” with no symmetry breaking and small hole pocket Fermi surfaces enclosing a total area determined by p. Exact diagonalization, on lattices of sizes up to 8×8, shows anisotropic quasiparticle residue around the pocket Fermi surfaces. We discuss the relationship to experiments. PMID:26195771

  11. Biomimetic synthesis: discovery of xanthanolide dimers.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hai; Liu, Junhua; Bao, Ruiyang; Cao, Yu; Zhao, Kun; Xiao, Chengqian; Zhou, Bing; Hu, Lihong; Tang, Yefeng

    2014-12-22

    Starting from xanthatin, the biomimetic synthesis of 4β,5β-epoxyxanthatin-1α,4α-endoperoxide, a novel monomeric xanthanolide, has been achieved. Moreover, four unprecedented xanthanolide dimers were synthesized by three different dimerizations of xanthatin, either in a head-to-head or head-to-tail fashion. Notably, these dimeric compounds were firstly identified as artifacts in the laboratory, and two of them, mogolides A and B, proved to be natural products present in the Xanthium mogolium Kitag plant. PMID:25430055

  12. Spin 3/2 dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachel, S.

    2009-05-01

    We present a parent Hamiltonian for weakly dimerized valence bond solid states for arbitrary half-integral S. While the model reduces for S=1/2 to the Majumdar-Ghosh Hamiltonian, we discuss this model and its properties for S=3/2. Its degenerate ground state is the most popular toy model state for discussing dimerization in spin 3/2 chains. In particular, it describes the impurity-induced dimer phase in Cr8Ni as proposed recently. We point out that the explicit construction of the Hamiltonian and its main features apply to arbitrary half-integral spin S.

  13. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins. PMID:26013289

  14. The influence of radiative core growth on coronal X-ray emission from pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Scott G.; Adams, Fred C.; Davies, Claire L.

    2016-04-01

    Pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars of mass ≳0.35 M⊙ transition from hosting fully convective interiors to configurations with a radiative core and outer convective envelope during their gravitational contraction. This stellar structure change influences the external magnetic field topology and, as we demonstrate herein, affects the coronal X-ray emission as a stellar analogue of the solar tachocline develops. We have combined archival X-ray, spectroscopic, and photometric data for ˜1000 PMS stars from five of the best studied star-forming regions: the Orion Nebula Cluster, NGC 2264, IC 348, NGC 2362, and NGC 6530. Using a modern, PMS calibrated, spectral type-to-effective temperature and intrinsic colour scale, we de-redden the photometry using colours appropriate for each spectral type, and determine the stellar mass, age, and internal structure consistently for the entire sample. We find that PMS stars on Henyey tracks have, on average, lower fractional X-ray luminosities (LX/L*) than those on Hayashi tracks, where this effect is driven by changes in LX. X-ray emission decays faster with age for higher mass PMS stars. There is a strong correlation between L* and LX for Hayashi track stars but no correlation for Henyey track stars. There is no correlation between LX and radiative core mass or radius. However, the longer stars have spent with radiative cores, the less X-ray luminous they become. The decay of coronal X-ray emission from young early K to late G-type PMS stars, the progenitors of main-sequence A-type stars, is consistent with the dearth of X-ray detections of the latter.

  15. The Native GCN4 Leucine-Zipper Domain Does Not Uniquely Specify a Dimeric Oligomerization State

    PubMed Central

    Oshaben, Kaylyn M.; Salari, Reza; McCaslin, Darrell R.; Chong, Lillian T.; Horne, W. Seth

    2012-01-01

    The dimerization domain of the yeast transcription factor GCN4, one of the first coiled-coil proteins to be structurally characterized at high resolution, has served as the basis for numerous fundamental studies on α-helical folding. Mutations in the GCN4 leucine zipper are known to change its preferred oligomerization state from dimeric to trimeric or tetrameric; however, the wild-type sequence has been assumed to encode a two-chain assembly exclusively. Here we demonstrate that the GCN4 coiled-coil domain can populate either a dimer or trimer fold, depending on environment. We report high-resolution crystal structures of the wild-type sequence in dimeric and trimeric assemblies. Biophysical measurements suggest populations of both oligomerization states under certain experimental conditions in solution. We use parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond timescale to compare the stability of the dimer and trimer folded states in isolation. In total, our results suggest that the folding behavior of the well-studied GCN4 leucine-zipper domain is more complex than was previously appreciated. Our results have implications in ongoing efforts to establish predictive algorithms for coiled-coil folds and the selection of coiled-coil model systems for design and mutational studies where oligomerization state specificity is an important consideration. PMID:23116373

  16. Multiple-charge transfer and trapping in DNA dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, Sabine; Bulla, Ralf; Anders, Frithjof B.; Zwicknagl, Gertrud

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the charge transfer characteristics of one and two excess charges in a DNA base-pair dimer using a model Hamiltonian approach. The electron part comprises diagonal and off-diagonal Coulomb matrix elements such a correlated hopping and the bond-bond interaction, which were recently calculated by Starikov [E. B. Starikov, Philos. Mag. Lett. 83, 699 (2003)10.1080/0950083031000151374] for different DNA dimers. The electronic degrees of freedom are coupled to an ohmic or a superohmic bath serving as dissipative environment. We employ the numerical renormalization group method in the nuclear tunneling regime and compare the results to Marcus theory for the thermal activation regime. For realistic parameters, the rate that at least one charge is transferred from the donor to the acceptor in the subspace of two excess electrons significantly exceeds the rate in the single charge sector. Moreover, the dynamics is strongly influenced by the Coulomb matrix elements. We find sequential and pair transfer as well as a regime where both charges remain self-trapped. The transfer rate reaches its maximum when the difference of the on-site and intersite Coulomb matrix element is equal to the reorganization energy which is the case in a guanine/cytosine (GC)-dimer. Charge transfer is completely suppressed for two excess electrons in adenine/thymine (AT)-dimer in an ohmic bath and replaced by damped coherent electron-pair oscillations in a superohmic bath. A finite bond-bond interaction W alters the transfer rate: it increases as function of W when the effective Coulomb repulsion exceeds the reorganization energy (inverted regime) and decreases for smaller Coulomb repulsion.

  17. Formation of cystine slipknots in dimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2013-01-01

    We consider mechanical stability of dimeric and monomeric proteins with the cystine knot motif. A structure based dynamical model is used to demonstrate that all dimeric and some monomeric proteins of this kind should have considerable resistance to stretching that is significantly larger than that of titin. The mechanisms of the large mechanostability are elucidated. In most cases, it originates from the induced formation of one or two cystine slipknots. Since there are four termini in a dimer, there are several ways of selecting two of them to pull by. We show that in the cystine knot systems, there is strong anisotropy in mechanostability and force patterns related to the selection. We show that the thermodynamic stability of the dimers is enhanced compared to the constituting monomers whereas machanostability is either lower or higher. PMID:23520470

  18. Formation of Cystine Slipknots in Dimeric Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2013-01-01

    We consider mechanical stability of dimeric and monomeric proteins with the cystine knot motif. A structure based dynamical model is used to demonstrate that all dimeric and some monomeric proteins of this kind should have considerable resistance to stretching that is significantly larger than that of titin. The mechanisms of the large mechanostability are elucidated. In most cases, it originates from the induced formation of one or two cystine slipknots. Since there are four termini in a dimer, there are several ways of selecting two of them to pull by. We show that in the cystine knot systems, there is strong anisotropy in mechanostability and force patterns related to the selection. We show that the thermodynamic stability of the dimers is enhanced compared to the constituting monomers whereas machanostability is either lower or higher. PMID:23520470

  19. Efficiency influence of exogenous betaine on anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating high salinity mustard tuber wastewater.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Kong, Xiang-Juan; Chai, Hong-Xiang; Fan, Ming-Yu; Du, Jun

    2012-01-01

    When treating a composite mustard tuber wastewater with high concentrations of salt (about 20 g Cl(-) L(-1)) and organics (about 8000 mg L(-1) COD) by an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) in winter, both high salinity and low temperature will inhibit the activity of anaerobic microorganisms and lead to low treatment efficiency. To solve this problem, betaine was added to the influent to improve the activity of the anaerobic sludge, and an experimental study was carried to investigate the influence of betaine on treating high salinity mustard tuber wastewater by the ASBBR. The results show that, when using anaerobic acclimated sludge in the ASBBR, and controlling biofilm density at 50% and water temperature at 8-12 degrees C, the treatment efficiency of the reactor could be improved by adding the betaine at different concentrations. The efficiency reached the highest when the optimal dosage ofbetaine was 0.5 mmol L(-1). The average effluent COD, after stable acclimation, was 4461 mg L(-1). Relative to ASBBR without adding betaine, the activity of the sludge increased significantly. Meanwhile, the dehydrogenase activity of anaerobic microorganisms and the COD removal efficiency were increased by 18.6% and 18.1%, respectively. PMID:22988630

  20. Distance within colloidal dimers probed by rotation-induced oscillations of scattered light.

    PubMed

    van Vliembergen, Roland W L; van IJzendoorn, Leo J; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-01-25

    Aggregation processes of colloidal particles are of broad scientific and technological relevance. The earliest stage of aggregation, when dimers appear in an ensemble of single particles, is very important to characterize because it opens routes for further aggregation processes. Furthermore, it represents the most sensitive phase of diagnostic aggregation assays. Here, we characterize dimers by rotating them in a magnetic field and by recording the angle dependence of light scattering. At small scattering angles, the scattering cross section can be approximated by the total cross-sectional area of the dimer. In contrast, at scattering angles around 90 degrees, we reveal that the dependence of the scattering cross section on the dimer angle shows a series of peaks per single 2π rotation of the dimers. These characteristics originate from optical interactions between the two particles, as we have verified with two-particle Mie scattering simulations. We have studied in detail the angular positions of the peaks. It appears from simulations that the influence of particle size polydispersity, Brownian rotation and refractive index on the angular positions of the peaks is relatively small. However, the angular positions of the peaks strongly depend on the distance between the particles. We find a good correspondence between measured data and calculations for a gap of 180 nm between particles having a diameter of 1 micrometer. The experiment and simulations pave the way for extracting distance-specific data from ensembles of dimerizing colloidal particles, with application for sensitive diagnostic aggregation assays. PMID:26832566

  1. Dissection of the Dimerization Modes in the DJ-1 Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hoi Jong; Kim, Sangok; Kim, Yun Jae; Kim, Min-Kyu; Kang, Sung Gyun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Wankyu; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2012-01-01

    The DJ-1 superfamily (DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily) is distributed across all three kingdoms of life. These proteins are involved in a highly diverse range of cellular functions, including chaperone and protease activity. DJ-1 proteins usually form dimers or hexamers in vivo and show at least four different binding orientations via distinct interface patches. Abnormal oligomerization of human DJ-1 is related to neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, suggesting important functional roles of quaternary structures. However, the quaternary structures of the DJ-1 superfamily have not been extensively studied. Here, we focus on the diverse oligomerization modes among the DJ-1 superfamily proteins and investigate the functional roles of quaternary structures both computationally and experimentally. The oligomerization modes are classified into 4 types (DJ-1, YhbO, Hsp, and YDR types) depending on the distinct interface patches (I–IV) upon dimerization. A unique, rotated interface via patch I is reported, which may potentially be related to higher order oligomerization. In general, the groups based on sequence similarity are consistent with the quaternary structural classes, but their biochemical functions cannot be directly inferred using sequence information alone. The observed phyletic pattern suggests the dynamic nature of quaternary structures in the course of evolution. The amino acid residues at the interfaces tend to show lower mutation rates than those of non-interfacial surfaces. PMID:22228183

  2. Dimerization of truncated melittin analogues results in cytolytic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Rivett, D E; Kirkpatrick, A; Hewish, D R; Reilly, W; Werkmeister, J A

    1996-01-01

    A synthetic peptide with the sequence of the first 20 residues of melittin and terminating with an additional cysteine amide was found to have cytolytic activity similar to that of melittin. It was apparent from MS data that the cysteine-terminating peptides had formed disulphide dimers. A peptide in which the thiol was blocked by iodoacetate showed no activity, whereas the same peptide blocked by acetamidomethyl showed activity marginally less haemolytic than that of melittin. Cytolytic activity of melittin analogues comprising the full 26 residues could be obtained with wide sequence permutations providing that a general amphipathic helical structure was preserved. In contrast, the activity of the dimers was dependent not only on retention of an amphipathic helix but also on certain individual residues and a free positive charge. A free N-terminus was essential for haemolytic activity. In addition, a lysine or arginine residue at position 7 and a proline at position 14 were found to be necessary for activity, although it was apparent that additional residues are important for retention of the full lytic potential. PMID:8687396

  3. A dimeric form of lipocortin-1 in human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Pepinsky, R B; Sinclair, L K; Chow, E P; O'Brine-Greco, B

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized a 68 kDa lipocortin from human placenta that was identified as a covalently linked homodimer of lipocortin-1 by peptide mapping and sequence analysis. The site of cross-linking was localized within the 3 kDa N-terminal tail region, an exposed domain that contains the phosphorylation sites for protein tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C and is sensitive to proteolysis. Sequence analysis of the corresponding peptide revealed that glutamine-18 was modified, suggesting that the cross-link may be generated by a transglutaminase. By incubating lipocortin-1 with placental membranes and with labelled glycine ethyl ester we observed a Ca2+-dependent labelling of lipocortin-1 within the tail region, supporting this notion. Like lipocortin-1, the dimer inhibits phospholipase Ad2 activity, is a substrate for the epidermal-growth-factor (EGF) receptor/kinase, and display Ca2+-dependent binding to phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles. In preparations from human placenta the dimer is particularly abundant, accounting for approx. 20% of the lipocortin-1. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2532504

  4. Functional Role of Dimerization of Human Peptidylarginine Deiminase 4 (PAD4)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Liang; Chiang, Yu-Hsiu; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a homodimeric enzyme that catalyzes Ca2+-dependent protein citrullination, which results in the conversion of arginine to citrulline. This paper demonstrates the functional role of dimerization in the regulation of PAD4 activity. To address this question, we created a series of dimer interface mutants of PAD4. The residues Arg8, Tyr237, Asp273, Glu281, Tyr435, Arg544 and Asp547, which are located at the dimer interface, were mutated to disturb the dimer organization of PAD4. Sedimentation velocity experiments were performed to investigate the changes in the quaternary structures and the dissociation constants (Kd) between wild-type and mutant PAD4 monomers and dimers. The kinetic data indicated that disrupting the dimer interface of the enzyme decreases its enzymatic activity and calcium-binding cooperativity. The Kd values of some PAD4 mutants were much higher than that of the wild-type (WT) protein (0.45 µM) and were concomitant with lower kcat values than that of WT (13.4 s−1). The Kd values of the monomeric PAD4 mutants ranged from 16.8 to 45.6 µM, and the kcat values of the monomeric mutants ranged from 3.3 to 7.3 s−1. The kcat values of these interface mutants decreased as the Kd values increased, which suggests that the dissociation of dimers to monomers considerably influences the activity of the enzyme. Although dissociation of the enzyme reduces the activity of the enzyme, monomeric PAD4 is still active but does not display cooperative calcium binding. The ionic interaction between Arg8 and Asp547 and the Tyr435-mediated hydrophobic interaction are determinants of PAD4 dimer formation. PMID:21731701

  5. Comparability of D-dimer assays in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Freyburger, Geneviève; Labrouche, Sylvie

    2005-11-01

    D-dimers (DD) have shown sufficient proof of their efficiency in the last 10 years to play an important role in hemostasis laboratories for excluding thromboembolic events. Numerous reagents are available on the market but their performances differ. This overview takes stock of the methods used to evaluate the performances of DD assays, the results published in the literature, the technical parameters influencing assay performance, the difficulties caused by the lack of harmonization of DD units, and the attempts to tackle this problem. It raises the issue of the potential optimization of their use with regard to better adaptation to multidisciplinary diagnostic strategies and to target patient populations. PMID:16302154

  6. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion. PMID:25605536

  7. Identification of Specific Transmembrane Residues and Ligand-Induced Interface Changes Involved In Homo-Dimer Formation of A Yeast G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heejung; Lee, Byung-Kwon; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    The S. cerevisiae α-factor pheromone receptor, Ste2p, has been studied as a model for G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure and function. Dimerization has been demonstrated for many GPCRs, although the role(s) of dimerization in receptor function is disputed. Transmembrane domains one (TM1) and four (TM4) of Ste2p were shown previously to play a role in dimerization. In this study, single cysteine substitutions were introduced into a Cys-less Ste2p, and disulfide-mediated dimerization was assessed. Six residues in TM1 (L64 to M69) that had not been previously investigated and nineteen residues in TM7 (T278 to A296) of which fifteen were not previously investigated were mutated to create 25 single Cys-containing Ste2p molecules. Ste2p mutants V68C in TM1 and nine mutants in TM7 (cysteine substituted into residues 278, 285, 289, and 291 to 296) showed increased dimerization upon addition of an oxidizing agent in comparison to the background dimers formed by the Cys-less receptor. The formation of dimers was decreased for TM7 mutant receptors in the presence of α-factor indicating that ligand binding resulted in a conformational change that influenced dimerization. The effect of ligand on dimer formation suggests that dimers are formed in the resting state and the activated state of the receptor by different TM interactions. PMID:19839649

  8. Hydrogen bonding inside and outside carbon nanotubes: HF dimer as a case study.

    PubMed

    Roztoczyńska, Agnieszka; Kozłowska, Justyna; Lipkowski, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Wojciech

    2016-01-28

    In this theoretical work we analyze the noncovalent interactions of molecular complexes formed between the hydrogen bonded HF dimer and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of different diameters. In particular, the interaction energies of: (i) spatially confined hydrogen fluoride molecules and (ii) HF dimer and the exterior or interior of SWCNTs are investigated. The computations are carried out in a supermolecular manner using the M06-2X exchange-correlation functional. In order to establish the influence of mutual orientation of the hydrogen fluoride dimer and molecular carbon cages on the analyzed energetic parameters energy scans are performed. Furthermore, changes in the charge distribution of the investigated endo- and exohedral complexes are studied employing the Natural Bond Orbital analysis. Among others, the position of the HF dimer with respect to the carbon cages proves to have a significant influence on the analyzed quantities. The results of our study also indicate that the HF dimer interacts stronger with the interior rather than the exterior of SWCNTs. Moreover, a substantial enhancement of the basis set superposition error is disclosed. PMID:26701220

  9. Chiral and Achiral Nanodumbbell Dimers: The Effect of Geometry on Plasmonic Properties.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle W; Zhao, Hangqi; Zhang, Hui; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Wang, Yumin; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Link, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Metal nanoparticles with a dumbbell-like geometry have plasmonic properties similar to those of their nanorod counterparts, but the unique steric constraints induced by their enlarged tips result in distinct geometries when self-assembled. Here, we investigate gold dumbbells that are assembled into dimers within polymeric micelles. A single-particle approach with correlated scanning electron microscopy and dark-field scattering spectroscopy reveals the effects of dimer geometry variation on the scattering properties. The dimers are prepared using exclusively achiral reagents, and the resulting dimer solution produces no detectable ensemble circular dichroism response. However, single-particle circular differential scattering measurements uncover that this dimer sample is a racemic mixture of individual nanostructures with significant positive and negative chiroptical signals. These measurements are complemented with detailed simulations that confirm the influence of various symmetry elements on the overall peak resonance energy, spectral line shape, and circular differential scattering response. This work expands the current understanding of the influence self-assembled geometries have on plasmonic properties, particularly with regard to chiral and/or racemic samples which may have significant optical activity that may be overlooked when using exclusively ensemble characterization techniques. PMID:27172606

  10. Neonatal Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis Reduces Cleft Palate Width and Lengthens Soft Palate, Influencing Palatoplasty in Patients With Pierre Robin Sequence.

    PubMed

    Collares, Marcus V M; Duarte, Daniele W; Sobral, Davi S; Portinho, Ciro P; Faller, Gustavo J; Fraga, Mariana M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) on cleft dimensions and on early palatoplasty outcomes in patients with Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). In a prospective cohort study that enrolled 24 nonsyndromic patients with PRS, 12 submitted to the MDO group and 12 patients not treated (non-MDO group), the authors compared patients for cleft palate dimensions through 7 morphometric measurements at the moment of palatoplasty and for early palatoplasty outcomes. At palatoplasty, the MDO group presented a significant shorter distance between the posterior nasal spines (PNS-PNS, P < 0.001) and between uvular bases (UB-UB, P < 0.001), representing a reduction in cleft palate width. They also had significant soft palate lengthening represented by a larger distance between UB and retromolar space (UB-RM, P < 0.001) and UB and PNS (UB-PNS, P = 0.014). Their UB moved away from the posterior wall of the nasopharynx (UB-NPH, P < 0.001). The MDO group had a length of operative time significantly shorter (P < 0.001) and no early palatoplasty complications compared with the non-MDO group. In conclusion, MDO acted as an orthopedic procedure that reduced cleft palate width and elongated the soft palate in patients with PRS. These modifications enabled a reduction of around 11% in the length of operative time of palatoplasty (P < 0.001). PMID:27315309

  11. Ligand-induced Dimerization of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Coronavirus nsp5 Protease (3CLpro)

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Sakshi; Johnston, Melanie L.; St. John, Sarah E.; Osswald, Heather L.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Denison, Mark R.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    All coronaviruses, including the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from the β-CoV subgroup, require the proteolytic activity of the nsp5 protease (also known as 3C-like protease, 3CLpro) during virus replication, making it a high value target for the development of anti-coronavirus therapeutics. Kinetic studies indicate that in contrast to 3CLpro from other β-CoV 2c members, including HKU4 and HKU5, MERS-CoV 3CLpro is less efficient at processing a peptide substrate due to MERS-CoV 3CLpro being a weakly associated dimer. Conversely, HKU4, HKU5, and SARS-CoV 3CLpro enzymes are tightly associated dimers. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies support that MERS-CoV 3CLpro is a weakly associated dimer (Kd ∼52 μm) with a slow off-rate. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of MERS-CoV 3CLpro were synthesized and utilized in analytical ultracentrifugation experiments and demonstrate that MERS-CoV 3CLpro undergoes significant ligand-induced dimerization. Kinetic studies also revealed that designed reversible inhibitors act as activators at a low compound concentration as a result of induced dimerization. Primary sequence comparisons and x-ray structural analyses of two MERS-CoV 3CLpro and inhibitor complexes, determined to 1.6 Å, reveal remarkable structural similarity of the dimer interface with 3CLpro from HKU4-CoV and HKU5-CoV. Despite this structural similarity, substantial differences in the dimerization ability suggest that long range interactions by the nonconserved amino acids distant from the dimer interface may control MERS-CoV 3CLpro dimerization. Activation of MERS-CoV 3CLpro through ligand-induced dimerization appears to be unique within the genogroup 2c and may potentially increase the complexity in the development of MERS-CoV 3CLpro inhibitors as antiviral agents. PMID:26055715

  12. A structure-based approach for targeting the HIV-1 genomic RNA dimerization initiation site.

    PubMed

    Ennifar, Eric; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Bernacchi, Serena; Walter, Philippe; Pale, Patrick; Decout, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Dumas, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Dimerization of the genomic RNA is an important step of the HIV-1 replication cycle. The Dimerization Initiation Site (DIS) promotes dimerization of the viral genome by forming a loop-loop complex between two DIS hairpins. Crystal structures of the DIS loop-loop complex revealed an unexpected and strong similitude with the bacterial 16S ribosomal aminoacyl-tRNA site (A site), which is the target of aminoglycoside antibiotics. As a consequence of these structural and sequence similarities, the HIV-1 DIS also binds some aminoglycosides, not only in vitro, but also ex vivo, in lymphoid cells and in viral particles. Crystal structures of the DIS loop-loop in complex with several aminoglycoside antibiotics provide a detailed-view of the DIS/drug interaction and reveal some hints about possible modifications to increase the drug affinity and/or specificity. PMID:17434658

  13. A dominant negative inhibitor indicates that monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 functions as a dimer.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Rollins, B J

    1995-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a member of the chemokine family of proinflammatory cytokines, all of which share a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Aberrant expression of chemokines occurs in a variety of diseases that have an inflammatory component, such as atherosclerosis. Although structural analyses indicate that chemokines form homodimers, there is controversy about whether dimerization is necessary for activity. To address this question for MCP-1, we obtained evidence in four steps. First, coprecipitation experiments demonstrated that MCP-1 forms dimers at physiological concentrations. Second, chemically cross-linked MCP-1 dimers attract monocytes in vitro with a 50% effective concentration of 400 pM, identical to the activity of non-cross-linked MCP-1. Third, an N-terminal deletion variant of MCP-1 (called 7ND) that inhibits MCP-1-mediated monocyte chemotaxis specifically forms heterodimers with wild-type MCP-1. Finally, although 7ND inhibits wild-type MCP-1 activity, it has no effect on cross-linked MCP-1. These results indicate that 7ND is a dominant negative inhibitor, implying that MCP-1 activates its receptor as a dimer. In addition, chemical cross-linking restores activity to an inactive N-terminal insertional variant of MCP-1, further supporting the need for dimerization. Since the reported Kd for MCP-1 monomer dissociation is much higher than its 50% effective concentration or Kd for receptor binding, active dimer formation may require high local concentrations of MCP-1. Our data further suggest that the dimer interface can be a target for MCP-1 inhibitory drugs. PMID:7651403

  14. Structural basis for controlling the dimerization and stability of the WW domains of an atypical subfamily.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Satoshi; Tochio, Naoya; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Akasaka, Ryogo; Harada, Takushi; Seki, Eiko; Sato, Manami; Watanabe, Satoru; Fujikura, Yukiko; Koshiba, Seizo; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-09-01

    The second WW domain in mammalian Salvador protein (SAV1 WW2) is quite atypical, as it forms a beta-clam-like homodimer. The second WW domain in human MAGI1 (membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 1) (MAGI1 WW2) shares high sequence similarity with SAV1 WW2, suggesting comparable dimerization. However, an analytical ultracentrifugation study revealed that MAGI1 WW2 (Leu355-Pro390) chiefly exists as a monomer at low protein concentrations, with an association constant of 1.3 x 10(2) M(-1). We determined its solution structure, and a structural comparison with the dimeric SAV1 WW2 suggested that an Asp residue is crucial for the inhibition of the dimerization. The substitution of this acidic residue with Ser resulted in the dimerization of MAGI1 WW2. The spin-relaxation data suggested that the MAGI1 WW2 undergoes a dynamic process of transient dimerization that is limited by the charge repulsion. Additionally, we characterized a longer construct of this WW domain with a C-terminal extension (Leu355-Glu401), as the formation of an extra alpha-helix was predicted. An NMR structural determination confirmed the formation of an alpha-helix in the extended C-terminal region, which appears to be independent from the dimerization regulation. A thermal denaturation study revealed that the dimerized MAGI1 WW2 with the Asp-to-Ser mutation gained apparent stability in a protein concentration-dependent manner. A structural comparison between the two constructs with different lengths suggested that the formation of the C-terminal alpha-helix stabilized the global fold by facilitating contacts between the N-terminal linker region and the main body of the WW domain. PMID:18562638

  15. Structural and functional characterization of α-isopropylmalate synthase and citramalate synthase, members of the LeuA dimer superfamily.

    PubMed

    Frantom, Patrick A

    2012-03-15

    The manipulation of modular regulatory domains from allosteric enzymes represents a possible mechanism to engineer allostery into non-allosteric systems. Currently, there is insufficient understanding of the structure/function relationships in modular regulatory domains to rationally implement this methodology. The LeuA dimer regulatory domain represents a well-conserved, novel fold responsible for the regulation of two enzymes involved in branched chain amino acid biosynthesis, α-isopropylmalate synthase and citramalate synthase. The LeuA dimer regulatory domain is responsible for the feedback inhibition of these enzymes by their respective downstream products. Both enzymes display multidomain architecture with a conserved N-terminal TIM barrel catalytic domain and a C-terminal (βββα)2 LeuA dimer domain joined by a flexible linker region. Due to the similarity of three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanism combined with low sequence similarity, we propose these enzymes can be classified as members of the LeuA dimer superfamily. Despite their similarity, members of the LeuA dimer superfamily display diversity in their allosteric mechanisms. In this review, structural aspects of the LeuA dimer superfamily are discussed followed by three examples highlighting the diversity of allosteric mechanisms in the LeuA dimer superfamily. PMID:22033339

  16. Dimerization and Transactivation Domains as Candidates for Functional Modulation and Diversity of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Geraldo, Marcos Tadeu; Valente, Guilherme Targino; Nakajima, Rafael Takahiro; Martins, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Sox9 plays an important role in a large variety of developmental pathways in vertebrates. It is composed of three domains: high-mobility group box (HMG box), dimerization (DIM) and transactivation (TAD). One of the main processes for regulation and variability of the pathways involving Sox9 is the self-gene expression regulation of Sox9. However, the subsequent roles of the Sox9 domains can also generate regulatory modulations. Studies have shown that TADs can bind to different types of proteins and its function seems to be influenced by DIM. Therefore, we hypothesized that both domains are directly associated and can be responsible for the functional variability of Sox9. We applied a method based on a broad phylogenetic context, using sequences of the HMG box domain, to ensure the homology of all the Sox9 copies used herein. The data obtained included 4,921 sequences relative to 657 metazoan species. Based on coevolutionary and selective pressure analyses of the Sox9 sequences, we observed coevolutions involving DIM and TADs. These data, along with the experimental data from literature, indicate a functional relationship between these domains. Moreover, DIM and TADs may be responsible for the functional plasticity of Sox9 because they are more tolerant for molecular changes (higher Ka/Ks ratio than the HMG box domain). This tolerance could allow a differential regulation of target genes or promote novel targets during transcriptional activation. In conclusion, we suggest that DIM and TADs functional association may regulate differentially the target genes or even promote novel targets during transcription activation mediated by Sox9 paralogs, contributing to the subfunctionalization of Sox9a and Sox9b in teleosts. PMID:27196604

  17. Multiply charged monopoles in cubic dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Jaya, Sreejith; Powell, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The classical cubic dimer model is a 3D statistical mechanical system whose degrees of freedom are dimers that occupy the edges between nearest neighbour vertices of a cubic lattice. Dimer occupancies are subject to the local constraint that every vertex is associated with exactly one dimer. In the presence of an aligning interaction, it is known that the system exhibits an unconventional continuous thermal phase transition from a symmetry broken columnar phase to a Coulomb-phase. The transition is in the NCCP1 universality class, which also describes the Neel-VBS transition in the JQ model and the S =1/2 Heisenberg model with suppression of hedgehog defects. Using Monte-Carlo simulations of a pair of defects in a background of fluctuating dimers, we calculate the scaling exponents for fugacities of monopole defects of charge Q = 2 and 3 at this critical point. Our estimates suggest that Q = 3 monopoles are relevant and could therefore drive the JQ model away from the NCCP1 critical point on a hexagonal lattice.

  18. Dimeric tRNA gene arrangement in Schizosaccharomyces pombe allows increased expression of the downstream gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hottinger-Werlen, A; Schaack, J; Lapointe, J; Mao, J; Nichols, M; Söll, D

    1985-01-01

    Three Schizosaccharomyces pombe dimeric tRNA genes, consisting of a tRNASer gene encoding a minor species with an intervening sequence followed by a tRNAMeti gene, have been described [Mao et al. (1980) Cell 21, 509-516; Hottinger et al. (1982) Mol. Gen. Genet. 188, 219-224; Willis et al. (1984) EMBO J. 3, 1573-1580]. We have examined the reason for the dimeric structure by comparing the transcriptional efficiencies and competitive abilities of the genes subcloned from the dimeric arrangement. Both of the subcloned genes are active in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but only the tRNASer gene is efficiently transcribed in vitro. The tRNASer gene competes efficiently for transcription factors, while the tRNAMeti gene does so only weakly. Thus, it appears that the dimeric arrangement is required to support expression of the tRNAMeti gene. S. pombe genes encoding major species of tRNASer are transcribed considerably less efficiently than are the minor genes from the dimers, so coupling of the tRNAMeti gene to the minor species genes should lead to efficient production of tRNAMeti. Images PMID:3936021

  19. Structural model for an AxxxG-mediated dimer of surfactant-associated protein C.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K; Luy, Burkhard

    2004-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and is required for normal pulmonary function. One of the important components of the surfactant besides phospholipids is surfactant-associated protein C (SP-C). SP-C shows complex oligomerization behavior and a transition to beta-amyloid-like fibril structures, which are not yet fully understood. Besides this nonspecific oligomerization, MS and chemical cross-linking data combined with CD spectra provide evidence of a specific, mainly alpha-helical, dimer at low to neutral pH. Furthermore, resistance to CNBr cleavage and dual NMR resonances of porcine and human recombinant SP-C with Met32 replaced by isoleucine point to a dimerization site located at the C-terminus of the hydrophobic alpha-helix of SP-C, where a strictly conserved heptapeptide sequence is found. Computational docking of two SP-C helices, described here, reveals a dimer with a helix-helix interface that strikingly resembles that of glycophorin A and is mediated by an AxxxG motif similar to the experimentally determined GxxxG pattern of glycophorin A. It is highly likely that mature SP-C adopts such a dimeric structure in the lamellar bilayer systems found in the surfactant. Dimerization has been shown in previous studies to have a role in sorting and trafficking of SP-C and may also be important to the surfactant function of this protein. PMID:15153098

  20. Dimerization and DNA recognition rules of mithramycin and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Weidenbach, Stevi; Hou, Caixia; Chen, Jhong-Min; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Rohr, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The antineoplastic and antibiotic natural product mithramycin (MTM) is used against cancer-related hypercalcemia and, experimentally, against Ewing sarcoma and lung cancers. MTM exerts its cytotoxic effect by binding DNA as a divalent metal ion (Me(2+))-coordinated dimer and disrupting the function of transcription factors. A precise molecular mechanism of action of MTM, needed to develop MTM analogues selective against desired transcription factors, is lacking. Although it is known that MTM binds G/C-rich DNA, the exact DNA recognition rules that would allow one to map MTM binding sites remain incompletely understood. Towards this goal, we quantitatively investigated dimerization of MTM and several of its analogues, MTM SDK (for Short side chain, DiKeto), MTM SA-Trp (for Short side chain and Acid), MTM SA-Ala, and a biosynthetic precursor premithramycin B (PreMTM B), and measured the binding affinities of these molecules to DNA oligomers of different sequences and structural forms at physiological salt concentrations. We show that MTM and its analogues form stable dimers even in the absence of DNA. All molecules, except for PreMTM B, can bind DNA with the following rank order of affinities (strong to weak): MTM=MTM SDK>MTM SA-Trp>MTM SA-Ala. An X(G/C)(G/C)X motif, where X is any base, is necessary and sufficient for MTM binding to DNA, without a strong dependence on DNA conformation. These recognition rules will aid in mapping MTM sites across different promoters towards development of MTM analogues as useful anticancer agents. PMID:26760230

  1. Helix packing and orientation in the transmembrane dimer of gp55-P of the spleen focus forming virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Crocker, Evan; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2005-08-01

    gp55-P is a dimeric membrane protein with a single transmembrane helix that is coded by the env gene of the polycythemic strain of the spleen focus forming virus. gp55-P activates the erythropoietin (Epo) receptor through specific transmembrane helix interactions, leading to Epo-independent growth of erythroid progenitors and eventually promoting erythroleukemia. We describe the use of magic angle spinning deuterium NMR to establish the structure of the transmembrane dimer of gp55-P in model membranes. Comparison of the deuterium lineshapes of leucines in the center (Leu(396-399)) and at the ends (Leu(385), Leu(407)) of the transmembrane sequence shows that gp55-P has a right-handed crossing angle with Leu(399) packed in the dimer interface. We discuss the implications of the structure of the gp55-P transmembrane dimer for activation of the Epo receptor. PMID:15894629

  2. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  3. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  4. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  5. Thermodynamics of porphyrin dimerization in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Margalit, R; Rotenberg, M

    1984-01-01

    The dimerization equilibrium of deuteroporphyrin IX and of mesoporphyrin IX in aqueous solutions were studied by fluorimetric techniques over the 0.01-1 microM concentration range, where dimerization is the dominant aggregation process. Deuteroporphyrin IX was studied at several temperatures over the range 22-37 degrees C, and mesoporphyrin at 25 and 37 degrees C. The magnitudes determined for the dimerization equilibrium constants (25 degrees C, neutral pH, phosphate-buffered saline) are 2.3 X 10(6)M-1 and 5.4 X 10(6)M-1 for the deutero and meso derivatives respectively. The meso, deutero and haemato species tested show a similar temperature effect, namely dimerization decreasing with increasing temperature, indicating the involvement of a negative enthalpy change. Van't Hoff isochore of the dimerization constants determined for deuteroporphyrin IX was linear within the temperature range of 22-37 degrees C, allowing the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters. For deuteroporphyrin dimerization, those were found to be delta G0 = -36. 4kJ X mol-1; delta H0 = -46. 0kJ X mol-1 and delta S0 = -32.2J X K-1 X mol-1 (at neutral pH, 25 degrees C, phosphate-buffered saline), showing the process to be enthalpy-driven. Similar trends have been found for porphyrin species other than those studied here. Our data fit with a hypothesis giving a major role to the solvent in driving porphyrins to aggregate in aqueous solution. The magnitudes and directions of the energetic changes fit better with the expectation of the ' solvophobic force' theory predicting enthalpy-driven association, than with the classic hydrophobic bonding, predicting the association to be entropy-driven. PMID:6743228

  6. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  7. Temperature measurement of sputtered metal dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Fayet, P.; Wolf, J.P.; Woeste, L.

    1986-05-15

    The temperatures of sputtered alkali-metal dimers have been measured using one- and two-photon ionization spectroscopy. They are estimated to be 1470 +- 300 K, 1025 +- 200 K, and 1000 +- 200 K for Cs/sub 2/, K/sub 2/, and Na/sub 2/, respectively. The vibrational and rotational temperatures are found to be very similar. No dependence of the dimer excitation is found, neither on target temperature nor on the primary-ion energy. The results are compared with some currently used models to explain cluster formation in sputtering experiments.

  8. Dimeric Structure of the Bacterial Extracellular Foldase PrsA*

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Roman P.; Koch, Johanna R.; Burmann, Björn M.; Schmidpeter, Philipp A. M.; Hunkeler, Moritz; Hiller, Sebastian; Schmid, Franz X.; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    Secretion of proteins into the membrane-cell wall space is essential for cell wall biosynthesis and pathogenicity in Gram-positive bacteria. Folding and maturation of many secreted proteins depend on a single extracellular foldase, the PrsA protein. PrsA is a 30-kDa protein, lipid anchored to the outer leaflet of the cell membrane. The crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis PrsA reveals a central catalytic parvulin-type prolyl isomerase domain, which is inserted into a larger composite NC domain formed by the N- and C-terminal regions. This domain architecture resembles, despite a lack of sequence conservation, both trigger factor, a ribosome-binding bacterial chaperone, and SurA, a periplasmic chaperone in Gram-negative bacteria. Two main structural differences are observed in that the N-terminal arm of PrsA is substantially shortened relative to the trigger factor and SurA and in that PrsA is found to dimerize in a unique fashion via its NC domain. Dimerization leads to a large, bowl-shaped crevice, which might be involved in vivo in protecting substrate proteins from aggregation. NMR experiments reveal a direct, dynamic interaction of both the parvulin and the NC domain with secretion propeptides, which have been implicated in substrate targeting to PrsA. PMID:25525259

  9. The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences.

    PubMed

    Seegelke, Christian; Hughes, Charmayne M L

    2015-12-01

    It has been proposed that the preparation of goal-direct actions involves internal movement simulation, or motor imagery. Evidence suggests that motor imagery is critically involved in the prediction of action consequences and contributes heavily to movement planning processes. The present study examined whether the sensitivity towards end-state comfort and the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. Participants performed a mental rotation task in which two images were simultaneously presented. The image on the left depicted the start posture of a right hand when grasping a bar, while the right image depicted the hand posture at the end of the action sequence. The right image displayed the bar in a vertical orientation with the hand in a comfortable (thumb-up) or in an uncomfortable (thumb-down) posture, while the bar in the left image was rotated in picture plane in steps of 45°. Crucially, the two images formed either a physically possible or physically impossible to perform action sequence. Results revealed strikingly different response time patterns for the two action sequence conditions. In general, response times increased almost monotonically with increasing angular disparity for the possible to perform action sequences. However, slight deviations from this monotonicity were apparent when the sequences contained an uncomfortable as opposed to a comfortable final posture. In contrast, for the impossible sequences, response times did not follow a typical mental rotation function, but instead were uniformly very slow. These findings suggest that both biomechanical constraints (i.e., end-state comfort) and the awareness of the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. We conclude that motor representations contain information about the spatiotemporal movement organization and the possibility of performing an action, which are crucially involved in

  10. Synthesis and biological properties of caffeic acid-PNA dimers containing guanine.

    PubMed

    Gaglione, Maria; Malgieri, Gaetano; Pacifico, Severina; Severino, Valeria; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Russo, Luigi; Fiorentino, Antonio; Messere, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA; 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is endowed with high antioxidant activity. CA derivatives (such as amides) have gained a lot of attention due to their antioxidative, antitumor and antimicrobial properties as well as stable characteristics. Caffeoyl-peptide derivatives showed different antioxidant activity depending on the type and the sequence of amino acid used. For these reasons, we decided to combine CA with Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) to test whether the new PNA-CA amide derivatives would result in an improvement or gain of CA's biological (i.e., antioxidant, cytotoxic, cytoprotective) properties. We performed the synthesis and characterization of seven dimer conjugates with various combinations of nucleic acid bases and focused NMR studies on the model compound ga-CA dimer. We demonstrate that PNA dimers containing guanine conjugated to CA exhibited different biological activities depending on composition and sequence of the nucleobases. The dimer ag-CA protected HepG2, SK-B-NE(2), and C6 cells from a cytotoxic dose of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). PMID:23912270

  11. RNA dimerization plays a role in ribosomal frameshifting of the SARS coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Daniella; Plant, Ewan P.; Sims, Amy C.; Yount, Boyd L.; Roth, Braden M.; Eldho, Nadukkudy V.; Pérez-Alvarado, Gabriela C.; Armbruster, David W.; Baric, Ralph S.; Dinman, Jonathan D.; Taylor, Deborah R.; Hennig, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA encoded signals that are involved in programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) are typically two-stemmed hairpin (H)-type pseudoknots (pks). We previously described an unusual three-stemmed pseudoknot from the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) that stimulated -1 PRF. The conserved existence of a third stem–loop suggested an important hitherto unknown function. Here we present new information describing structure and function of the third stem of the SARS pseudoknot. We uncovered RNA dimerization through a palindromic sequence embedded in the SARS-CoV Stem 3. Further in vitro analysis revealed that SARS-CoV RNA dimers assemble through ‘kissing’ loop–loop interactions. We also show that loop–loop kissing complex formation becomes more efficient at physiological temperature and in the presence of magnesium. When the palindromic sequence was mutated, in vitro RNA dimerization was abolished, and frameshifting was reduced from 15 to 5.7%. Furthermore, the inability to dimerize caused by the silent codon change in Stem 3 of SARS-CoV changed the viral growth kinetics and affected the levels of genomic and subgenomic RNA in infected cells. These results suggest that the homodimeric RNA complex formed by the SARS pseudoknot occurs in the cellular environment and that loop–loop kissing interactions involving Stem 3 modulate -1 PRF and play a role in subgenomic and full-length RNA synthesis. PMID:23275571

  12. Regulation of UVR8 photoreceptor dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in Arabidopsis plants grown under photoperiodic conditions.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Kirsten M W; Jenkins, Gareth I

    2016-08-01

    The UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) photoreceptor specifically mediates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B. Photoreception induces dissociation of dimeric UVR8 into monomers to initiate responses. However, the regulation of dimer/monomer status in plants growing under photoperiodic conditions has not been examined. Here we show that UVR8 establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in plants growing in diurnal photoperiods in both controlled environments and natural daylight. The photo-equilibrium is determined by the relative rates of photoreception and dark-reversion to the dimer. Experiments with mutants in REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 (RUP1) and RUP2 show that these proteins are crucial in regulating the photo-equilibrium because they promote reversion to the dimer. In plants growing in daylight, the UVR8 photo-equilibrium is most strongly correlated with low ambient fluence rates of UV-B (up to 1.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ), rather than higher fluence rates or the amount of photosynthetically active radiation. In addition, the rate of reversion of monomer to dimer is reduced at lower temperatures, promoting an increase in the relative level of monomer at approximately 8-10 °C. Thus, UVR8 does not behave like a simple UV-B switch under photoperiodic growth conditions but establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium that is regulated by UV-B and also influenced by temperature. PMID:26864532

  13. Sequence and solvent effects on telomeric DNA bimolecular G-quadruplex folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Adrien; Ferreira, Rubén; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki; Gabelica, Valérie

    2013-10-17

    Telomeric DNA sequences are particularly polymorphic: the adopted structure is exquisitely sensitive to the sequence and to the chemical environment, for example, solvation. Dehydrating conditions are known to stabilize G-quadruplex structures, but information on how solvation influences the individual rates of folding and unfolding of G-quadruplexes remains scarce. Here, we used electrospray mass spectrometry for the first time to monitor bimolecular G-quadruplex formation from 12-mer telomeric strands, in the presence of common organic cosolvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, and acetonitrile). Based on the ammonium ion distribution, the total dimer signal was decomposed into contributions from the parallel and antiparallel structures to obtain individual reaction rates, and the antiparallel G-quadruplex structure was found to form faster than the parallel one. A dimeric reaction intermediate, in rapid equilibrium with the single strands, was also identified. Organic cosolvents increase the stability of the final structures mainly by increasing the folding rates. Our quantitative analysis of reaction rate dependence on cosolvent percentage shows that organic cosolvent molecules can be captured or released upon G-quadruplex formation, highlighting that they are not inert with DNA. In contrast to the folding rates, the G-quadruplex unfolding rates are almost insensitive to solvation effects, but are instead governed by the sequence and by the final structure: parallel dimers dissociate slower than antiparallel dimers only when thymine bases are present at the 5'-end. These results contribute unraveling the folding pathways of telomeric G-quadruplexes. The solvent effects revealed here enlighten that G-quadruplex structure in dehydrated, and molecularly crowded environments are modulated by the nature of cosolvent (e.g., methanol favors antiparallel structures) due to direct interactions, and by the time scale of the reaction, with >200-fold acceleration of

  14. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  15. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  16. Properties of the Lennard-Jones dimeric fluid in two dimensions: An integral equation study

    SciTech Connect

    Urbic, Tomaz; Dias, Cristiano L.

    2014-03-07

    The thermodynamic and structural properties of the planar soft-sites dumbbell fluid are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. The dimers are built of two Lennard-Jones segments. Site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions for a range of elongations and densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated. We analyze the influence of the bond length on critical point as well as tested correctness of site-site integral equation theory with different closures. The integral equations can be used to predict the phase diagram of dimers whose molecular parameters are known.

  17. Properties of the Lennard-Jones dimeric fluid in two dimensions: An integral equation study

    PubMed Central

    Urbic, Tomaz; Dias, Cristiano L.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic and structural properties of the planar soft-sites dumbbell fluid are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. The dimers are built of two Lennard-Jones segments. Site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions for a range of elongations and densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated. We analyze the influence of the bond length on critical point as well as tested correctness of site-site integral equation theory with different closures. The integral equations can be used to predict the phase diagram of dimers whose molecular parameters are known. PMID:24606372

  18. Transport properties of the H2O@C60-dimer-based junction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengbo; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-09-23

    Theoretical predictions play an important role in finding potential applications in molecular electronics. Fullerenes have a number of potential applications, and the charge flow from a single C60 molecule to another becomes more versatile and more interesting after doping. Here, we report the conductance of two H2O@C60 molecules in series order and how the number of encapsulated water molecules influences the transport properties of the junction. Encapsulating an H2O molecule into one of the C60 cages increases the conductance of the dimer. Negative differential resistance is found in the dimer systems, and its peak-to-valley current ratio depends on the number of encapsulated H2O molecules. The conductance of the C60 dimer and the H2O@C60 dimer is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the C60 monomer. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the conductance of the molecular junctions based on the H2O@C60 dimer can be tuned by moving the encapsulated H2O molecules. The conductance is H2O-position dependent. Our findings indicate that H2O@C60 can be used as a building block in C60-based molecular electronic devices and sensors. PMID:26325223

  19. Transport properties of the H2O@C60-dimer-based junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengbo; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical predictions play an important role in finding potential applications in molecular electronics. Fullerenes have a number of potential applications, and the charge flow from a single C60 molecule to another becomes more versatile and more interesting after doping. Here, we report the conductance of two H2O@C60 molecules in series order and how the number of encapsulated water molecules influences the transport properties of the junction. Encapsulating an H2O molecule into one of the C60 cages increases the conductance of the dimer. Negative differential resistance is found in the dimer systems, and its peak-to-valley current ratio depends on the number of encapsulated H2O molecules. The conductance of the C60 dimer and the H2O@C60 dimer is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the C60 monomer. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the conductance of the molecular junctions based on the H2O@C60 dimer can be tuned by moving the encapsulated H2O molecules. The conductance is H2O-position dependent. Our findings indicate that H2O@C60 can be used as a building block in C60-based molecular electronic devices and sensors.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of heteronuclear dimers in the gas phase and supported on graphene: relativistic density-functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Błoński, Piotr; Hafner, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of mixed PtCo, PtFe, and IrCo dimers in the gas phase and supported on a free-standing graphene layer have been calculated using density-functional theory, both in the scalar-relativistic limit and self-consistently including spin-orbit coupling. The influence of the strong magnetic moments of the 3d atoms on the spin and orbital moments of the 5d atoms, and the influence of the strong spin-orbit coupling contributed by the 5d atom on the orbital moments of the 3d atoms have been studied in detail. The magnetic anisotropy energy is found to depend very sensitively on the nature of the eigenstates in the vicinity of the Fermi level, as determined by band filling, exchange splitting and spin-orbit coupling. The large magnetic anisotropy energy of free PtCo and IrCo dimers relative to the easy direction parallel to the dimer axis is coupled to a strong anisotropy of the orbital magnetic moments of the Co atom for both dimers, and also on the Ir atom in IrCo. In contrast the PtFe dimer shows a weak perpendicular anisotropy and only small spin and orbital anisotropies of opposite sign on the two atoms. For dimers supported on graphene, the strong binding within the dimer and the stronger interaction of the 3d atom with the substrate stabilizes an upright geometry. Spin and orbital moments on the 3d atom are strongly quenched, but due to the weaker binding within the dimer the properties of the 5d atom are more free-atom-like with increased spin and orbital moments. The changes in the magnetic moment are reflected in the structure of the electronic eigenstates near the Fermi level, for all three dimers the easy magnetic direction is now parallel to the dimer axis and perpendicular to the graphene layer. The already very large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of IrCo is further enhanced by the interaction with the support, the MAE of PtFe changes sign, and that of the PtCo dimer is reduced. These changes are discussed in relation to

  1. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric RAF dimer activation.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Bohuszewicz, Olga; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2014-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in cell regulatory mechanisms. Dimerization plays also a crucial role in the kinase activity of many kinases, including RAF, CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), with heterodimers often being the most active forms. However, the structural and mechanistic details of how phosphorylation affects the activity of homo- and hetero-dimers are largely unknown. Experimentally, synthesizing protein samples with fully specified and homogeneous phosphorylation states remains a challenge for structural biology and biochemical studies. Typically, multiple changes in phosphorylation lead to activation of the same protein, which makes structural determination methods particularly difficult. It is also not well understood how the occurrence of phosphorylation and dimerization processes synergize to affect kinase activities. In the present article, we review available structural data and discuss how MD simulations can be used to model conformational transitions of RAF kinase dimers, in both their phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. PMID:25109958

  2. Dimers on the 33 .42 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we obtain explicit expression of the number of close-packed dimers (perfect matchings) of the 33 .42 lattice with cylindrical boundary condition. Particularly, we show that the entropy of 33 .42 lattice is the same for cylindrical and toroidal boundary conditions.

  3. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Freed, Daniel M; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers. PMID:26060020

  4. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  5. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers.

  6. Localized light-induced protein dimerization in living cells using a photocaged dimerizer

    PubMed Central

    Ballister, Edward R.; Aonbangkhen, Chanat; Mayo, Alyssa M.; Lampson, Michael A.; Chenoweth, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated protein localization is critical for many cellular processes. Several techniques have been developed for experimental control over protein localization, including chemically induced and light-induced dimerization, which both provide temporal control. Light-induced dimerization offers the distinct advantage of spatial precision within subcellular length scales. A number of elegant systems have been reported that utilize natural light-sensitive proteins to induce dimerization via direct protein–protein binding interactions, but the application of these systems at cellular locations beyond the plasma membrane has been limited. Here we present a new technique to rapidly and reversibly control protein localization in living cells with subcellular spatial resolution using a cell-permeable, photoactivatable chemical inducer of dimerization. We demonstrate light-induced recruitment of a cytosolic protein to individual centromeres, kinetochores, mitochondria and centrosomes in human cells, indicating that our system is widely applicable to many cellular locations. PMID:25400104

  7. Dimerization of visual pigments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Cao, Li-Hui; Kumar, Sandeep; Enemchukwu, Nduka O; Zhang, Ning; Lambert, Alyssia; Zhao, Xuchen; Jones, Alex; Wang, Shixian; Dennis, Emily M; Fnu, Amrita; Ham, Sam; Rainier, Jon; Yau, King-Wai; Fu, Yingbin

    2016-08-01

    It is a deeply engrained notion that the visual pigment rhodopsin signals light as a monomer, even though many G protein-coupled receptors are now known to exist and function as dimers. Nonetheless, recent studies (albeit all in vitro) have suggested that rhodopsin and its chromophore-free apoprotein, R-opsin, may indeed exist as a homodimer in rod disk membranes. Given the overwhelmingly strong historical context, the crucial remaining question, therefore, is whether pigment dimerization truly exists naturally and what function this dimerization may serve. We addressed this question in vivo with a unique mouse line (S-opsin(+)Lrat(-/-)) expressing, transgenically, short-wavelength-sensitive cone opsin (S-opsin) in rods and also lacking chromophore to exploit the fact that cone opsins, but not R-opsin, require chromophore for proper folding and trafficking to the photoreceptor's outer segment. In R-opsin's absence, S-opsin in these transgenic rods without chromophore was mislocalized; in R-opsin's presence, however, S-opsin trafficked normally to the rod outer segment and produced functional S-pigment upon subsequent chromophore restoration. Introducing a competing R-opsin transmembrane helix H1 or helix H8 peptide, but not helix H4 or helix H5 peptide, into these transgenic rods caused mislocalization of R-opsin and S-opsin to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, a similar peptide-competition effect was observed even in WT rods. Our work provides convincing evidence for visual pigment dimerization in vivo under physiological conditions and for its role in pigment maturation and targeting. Our work raises new questions regarding a potential mechanistic role of dimerization in rhodopsin signaling. PMID:27462111

  8. The influence of aging, environmental exposures and local sequence features on the variation of DNA methylation in blood

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Scott M; Houseman, E Andres; Christensen, Brock C; Wiencke, John K; Nelson, Heather H; Karagas, Margaret R; Marsit, Carmen J

    2011-01-01

    In order to properly comprehend the epigenetic dysregulation that occurs during the course of disease, there is a need to characterize the epigenetic variability in healthy individuals that arises in response to aging and exposures, and to understand such variation within the biological context of the DNA sequence. We analyzed the methylation of 26,486 autosomal CpG loci in blood from 205 healthy subjects, using three complementary approaches to assess the association between methylation, age or exposures and local sequence features, such as CpG island status, repeat sequences, location within a polycomb target gene or proximity to a transcription factor binding site. We clustered CpGs (1) using unsupervised recursively partitioned mixture modeling (RPMM) and (2) bioinformatically-informed methods and (3) also employed a marginal model-based (non-clustering) approach. We observed associations between age and methylation and hair dye use and methylation, where the direction and magnitude was contingent on the local sequence features of the CpGs. Our results demonstrate that CpGs are differentially methylated dependent upon the genomic features of the sequence in which they are embedded, and that CpG methylation is associated with age and hair dye use in a CpG context-dependent manner in healthy individuals. PMID:21617368

  9. Path Forward for RAF Therapies: Inhibition of Monomers and Dimers.

    PubMed

    Kortum, Robert L; Morrison, Deborah K

    2015-09-14

    Current BRAF inhibitors block signaling from monomeric BRAF(V600E), but not from oncogenic RAS, which requires RAF dimerization. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Yao and colleagues investigate why current drugs are ineffective against RAF dimers, while Peng and colleagues describe a pan-RAF inhibitor targeting both monomeric and dimeric RAF. PMID:26373275

  10. Dimerization mediated through a leucine zipper activates the oncogenic potential of the met receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, G A; Park, M

    1993-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of the met (hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor) receptor tyrosine kinase involves a genomic rearrangement that generates a hybrid protein containing tpr-encoded sequences at its amino terminus fused directly to the met-encoded receptor kinase domain. Deletion of Tpr sequences abolishes the transforming ability of this protein, implicating this region in oncogenic activation. We demonstrate, by site-directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, that a leucine zipper motif within Tpr mediates dimerization of the tpr-met product and is essential for the transforming activity of the met oncogene. By analogy with ligand-stimulated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, we propose that constitutive dimerization mediated by a leucine zipper motif within Tpr is responsible for oncogenic activation of the Met kinase. The possibility that this mechanism of activation represents a paradigm for a class of receptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes activated by DNA rearrangement is discussed. Images PMID:8413267

  11. Rotationally resolved water dimer spectra in atmospheric air and pure water vapour in the 188-258 GHz range.

    PubMed

    Serov, E A; Koshelev, M A; Odintsova, T A; Parshin, V V; Tretyakov, M Yu

    2014-12-21

    New experimental results regarding "warm" water dimer spectra under equilibrium conditions are presented. An almost equidistant series of six peaks corresponding to the merged individual lines of the bound dimer with consecutive rotational quantum numbers is studied in the 188-258 GHz frequency range in water vapour over a broad range of pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's atmosphere. The series is a continuation of the sequence detected earlier at lower frequencies at room temperature. The signal-to-noise ratio of the observed spectra allowed investigating their evolution, when water vapour was diluted by atmospheric air with partial pressure from 0 up to 540 Torr. Analysis of the obtained spectra permitted determining the dimerization constant as well as the hydrogen bond dissociation energy and the dimer spectral parameters, including the average coefficient of collisional broadening of individual lines by water vapour and air. The manifestation of metastable states of the dimer in the observed spectra is assessed. The contribution of three possible pair states of water molecules to the second virial coefficient is evaluated over the broad range of temperatures. The work supports the significant role of the water dimer in atmospheric absorption and related processes. PMID:25363156

  12. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  13. Human MUC5AC mucin dimerizes in the rough endoplasmic reticulum, similarly to the MUC2 mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Asker, N; Axelsson, M A; Olofsson, S O; Hansson, G C

    1998-01-01

    Biosynthetic studies on the human MUC5AC mucin were performed by immunoprecipitations with antisera recognizing only the non-O-glycosylated apomucin in the colon adenocarcinoma cell line LS 174T. Pulse-chase studies and subcellular fractionations showed that MUC5AC formed dimers in the rough endoplasmic reticulum within 15 min of the initiation of biosynthesis. No non-O-glycosylated species larger than dimers were identified. The dimerization was N-glycosylation-dependent, because tunicamycin treatment significantly lowered the rate of dimerization. When the biosynthesis of MUC5AC apomucin was compared with that of MUC2 apomucin, also produced in the LS 174T cell line, both apomucins were assembled in similar ways with respect to their rates of dimerization with and without inhibition of N-glycosylation. No heterodimerization was observed between the human MUC5AC and the MUC2 apomucins despite the extensive sequence similarities in the positions of the cysteine residues in the C-termini proposed to be involved in mucin dimerization. PMID:9761738

  14. Single-molecule study of protein-DNA target search mechanisms for dimer-active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Markita; Huang, Wai Mun; Chemla, Yann

    2012-02-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are essential to cellular processes, many of which require proteins to recognize a specific DNA target-site. This search process is well-documented for monomeric proteins, but not as well understood for systems that require dimerization at the target site for activity. We present a single-molecule study of the target-search mechanism of Protelomerase TelK, a recombinase-like protein that is only active as a dimer. We observe that TelK undergoes 1D diffusion on non-target DNA as a monomer, as expected, but becomes immobile on DNA as a dimer or oligomer despite the absence of its target site. We further show that TelK condenses non-target DNA upon dimerization, forming a tightly bound nucleo-protein complex. Together with simulations, our results suggest a search model whereby monomers diffuse along DNA, and subsequently dimerize to form an active complex on target DNA. These results show that target-finding occurs faster than nonspecific dimerization at biologically relevant protein concentrations. This model may provide insights into the search mechanisms of proteins that are active as multimeric complexes for a more accurate and comprehensive model for the target-search process by sequence specific proteins.

  15. Four-wave mixing spectroscopy of molecular dimers. Application to dimers of pentacene in p-terphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsky, Howard; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1982-10-01

    Dispersive coherent Stokes-Raman scattering (CSRS) experiments on pentacene dimers in p-terphenyl were performed to locate the corresponding singly excited, delocalized, dimer levels. In addition the CNRS technique was used to locate the doubly excited dimer state. Future experiments exploring the dynamics of this novel state are discussed.

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Dimerization and Activation Require Ligand-Induced Conformational Changes in the Dimer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jessica P.; Berger, Mitchell B.; Lin, Chun-Chi; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemmon, Mark A.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies have shown that ligand-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) dimerization involves major domain rearrangements that expose a critical dimerization arm. However, simply exposing this arm is not sufficient for receptor dimerization, suggesting that additional ligand-induced dimer contacts are required. To map these contributions to the dimer interface, we individually mutated each contact suggested by crystallographic studies and analyzed the effects on receptor dimerization, activation, and ligand binding. We find that domain II contributes >90% of the driving energy for dimerization of the extracellular region, with domain IV adding little. Within domain II, the dimerization arm forms much of the dimer interface, as expected. However, a loop from the sixth disulfide-bonded module (immediately C-terminal to the dimerization arm) also makes a critical contribution. Specific ligand-induced conformational changes in domain II are required for this loop to contribute to receptor dimerization, and we identify a set of ligand-induced intramolecular interactions that appear to be important in driving these changes, effectively “buttressing” the dimer interface. Our data also suggest that similar conformational changes may determine the specificity of ErbB receptor homo- versus heterodimerization. PMID:16107719

  17. Targeted next-generation sequencing in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: mutations in multiple glomerular genes may influence disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Bullich, Gemma; Trujillano, Daniel; Santín, Sheila; Ossowski, Stephan; Mendizábal, Santiago; Fraga, Gloria; Madrid, Álvaro; Ariceta, Gema; Ballarín, José; Torra, Roser; Estivill, Xavier; Ars, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diagnosis of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) using Sanger sequencing is complicated by the high genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic variability of this disease. We aimed to improve the genetic diagnosis of SRNS by simultaneously sequencing 26 glomerular genes using massive parallel sequencing and to study whether mutations in multiple genes increase disease severity. High-throughput mutation analysis was performed in 50 SRNS and/or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) patients, a validation cohort of 25 patients with known pathogenic mutations, and a discovery cohort of 25 uncharacterized patients with probable genetic etiology. In the validation cohort, we identified the 42 previously known pathogenic mutations across NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1, TRPC6, and INF2 genes. In the discovery cohort, disease-causing mutations in SRNS/FSGS genes were found in nine patients. We detected three patients with mutations in an SRNS/FSGS gene and COL4A3. Two of them were familial cases and presented a more severe phenotype than family members with mutation in only one gene. In conclusion, our results show that massive parallel sequencing is feasible and robust for genetic diagnosis of SRNS/FSGS. Our results indicate that patients carrying mutations in an SRNS/FSGS gene and also in COL4A3 gene have increased disease severity. PMID:25407002

  18. Long-term tillage and cropping sequence influence on dryland soil carbon, nitrogen, physical properties, and crop yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel management practices are needed to improve dryland soil C and N sequestration, N mineralization, soil physical properties, and crop yields in the northern Great Plains. We evaluated the 21-yr effect of tillage and cropping sequence on dryland soil aggregation, C and N storage, N mineralization...

  19. Structure-function studies of HIV-1: influence of long terminal repeat U3 region sequences on virus production.

    PubMed

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Otsuka, T; Cartas, M; Srinivasan, A

    1992-06-01

    DNA sequence analyses of several human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates revealed extensive genetic diversity in the env gene and, to a lesser extent, in other regions of the viral genome, including the long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences. Since the LTRs contain elements responsible for the control of transcription, the difference in the LTR region may play a crucial role in the overall replication rate of HIV. To evaluate the role of the LTR, we have constructed a number of infectious hybrid HIV molecular clones containing LTRs from different proviral DNAs linked to the body of the viral genome, and analyzed them in a transient expression system. Both parental and hybrid proviral DNAs were transfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells for monitoring virus production. Proviral DNA designate pZ6 (HIVZr6) showed a high level of virus in the medium of the transfected culture in comparison to the pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) and pARV (HIVSF-2) DNAs. Hybrid proviral DNAs containing viral genes from pZ6, linked to LTR U3 sequences of pHXB2 and pARV at the 5' end, showed virus production similar to the levels observed with pZ6. These results indicate that the extent of virus production does not correlate with the LTR U3 sequences, and may involve other regions of the viral genome. PMID:1351391

  20. Dryland Crop Yields and Soil Organic Matter as Influenced by Long-Term Tillage and Cropping Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel management practices are needed to improve the declining dryland crop yields and soil organic matter using conventional farming practices in the northern Great Plains. We evaluated the 21-yr effect of tillage and cropping sequence on dryland grain and biomass (stems + leaves) yields of spring ...

  1. Evidence of Alternative Cystatin C Signal Sequence Cleavage Which Is Influenced by the A25T Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Annie; Hulleman, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Cystatin C (Cys C) is a small, potent, cysteine protease inhibitor. An Ala25Thr (A25T) polymorphism in Cys C has been associated with both macular degeneration and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Previously, studies have suggested that this polymorphism may compromise the secretion of Cys C. Interestingly, we found that untagged A25T, A25T tagged C-terminally with FLAG, or A25T FLAG followed by green fluorescent protein (GFP), were all secreted as efficiently from immortalized human cells as their wild-type (WT) counterparts (e.g., 112%, 100%, and 88% of WT levels from HEK-293T cells, respectively). Supporting these observations, WT and A25T Cys C variants also showed similar intracellular steady state levels. Furthermore, A25T Cys C did not activate the unfolded protein response and followed the same canonical endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi trafficking pathway as WT Cys C. WT Cys C has been shown to undergo signal sequence cleavage between residues Gly26 and Ser27. While the A25T polymorphism did not affect Cys C secretion, we hypothesized that it may alter where the Cys C signal sequence is preferentially cleaved. Under normal conditions, WT and A25T Cys C have the same signal sequence cleavage site after Gly26 (referred to as ‘site 2’ cleavage). However, in particular circumstances when the residues around site 2 are modified (such as by the presence of an N-terminal FLAG tag immediately after Gly26, or by a Gly26Lys (G26K) mutation), A25T has a significantly higher likelihood than WT Cys C of alternative signal sequence cleavage after Ala20 (‘site 1’) or even earlier in the Cys C sequence. Overall, our results indicate that the A25T polymorphism does not cause a significant reduction in Cys C secretion, but instead predisposes the protein to be cleaved at an alternative signal sequence cleavage site if site 2 is hindered. Additional N-terminal amino acids resulting from alternative signal sequence cleavage may, in turn, affect the protease

  2. Translational initiation in Leishmania tarentolae and Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida) is strongly influenced by pre-ATG triplet and its 5' sequence context.

    PubMed

    Lukes, Julius; Paris, Zdenek; Regmi, Sandesh; Breitling, Reinhard; Mureev, Sergey; Kushnir, Susanna; Pyatkov, Konstantin; Jirků, Milan; Alexandrov, Kirill A

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the influence of sequence context of translation initiation codon on translation efficiency in Kinetoplastida, we constructed a library of expression plasmids randomized in the three nucleotides prefacing ATG of a reporter gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). All 64 possible combinations of pre-ATG triplets were individually stably integrated into the rDNA locus of Leishmania tarentolae and the resulting cell lines were assessed for EGFP expression. The expression levels were quantified directly by measuring the fluorescence of EGFP protein in living cells and confirmed by Western blotting. We observed a strong influence of the pre-ATG triplet on the level of protein expression over a 20-fold range. To understand the degree of evolutionary conservation of the observed effect, we transformed Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid parasite of plants, with a subset of the constructs. The pattern of translational efficiency mediated by individual pre-ATG triplets in this species was similar to that observed in L. tarentolae. However, the pattern of translational efficiency of two other proteins (red fluorescent protein and tetracycline repressor) containing selected pre-ATG triplets did not correlate with either EGFP or each other. Thus, we conclude that a conserved mechanism of translation initiation site selection exists in kinetoplastids that is strongly influenced not only by the pre-ATG sequences but also by the coding region of the gene. PMID:16644031

  3. Pyrimidine dimer formation and repair in human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Harber, L.C.; Kochevar, I.E.

    1980-09-01

    Cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers have been detected in the DNA of human skin following in vivo irradiation with suberythermal doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from FS-20 sun lamp fluorescent tubes. Dimers were assayed by treatment of extracted DNA with Micrococus luteus UV-specific endonuclease, alkaline agarose electrophoresis, and ethidum bromide staining. This technique, in contrast to conventional dimer assays, can be used with nonradioactive DNA and is optimal at low UV light doses. These data suggest that some dimer disappearance by excision repair occurs within 20 min of UV irradiation and that photoreactivation of dimers can make a contribution to the total repair process.

  4. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Dimerization Is Required for Hydrolase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W.; Subrahmanyan, Rishi M.; Summers, Sol A.; Xiao, Xiangshu; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a key role in the metabolic conversion of the protective eicosanoid 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid to 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. Accordingly, inhibition of sEH hydrolase activity has been shown to be beneficial in multiple models of cardiovascular diseases, thus identifying sEH as a valuable therapeutic target. Recently, a common human polymorphism (R287Q) was identified that reduces sEH hydrolase activity and is localized to the dimerization interface of the protein, suggesting a relationship between sEH dimerization and activity. To directly test the hypothesis that dimerization is essential for the proper function of sEH, we generated mutations within the sEH protein that would either disrupt or stabilize dimerization. We quantified the dimerization state of each mutant using a split firefly luciferase protein fragment-assisted complementation system. The hydrolase activity of each mutant was determined using a fluorescence-based substrate conversion assay. We found that mutations that disrupted dimerization also eliminated hydrolase enzymatic activity. In contrast, a mutation that stabilized dimerization restored hydrolase activity. Finally, we investigated the kinetics of sEH dimerization and found that the human R287Q polymorphism was metastable and capable of swapping dimer partners faster than the WT enzyme. These results indicate that dimerization is required for sEH hydrolase activity. Disrupting sEH dimerization may therefore serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for reducing sEH hydrolase activity. PMID:23362272

  5. Soluble epoxide hydrolase dimerization is required for hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonathan W; Subrahmanyan, Rishi M; Summers, Sol A; Xiao, Xiangshu; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2013-03-15

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a key role in the metabolic conversion of the protective eicosanoid 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid to 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. Accordingly, inhibition of sEH hydrolase activity has been shown to be beneficial in multiple models of cardiovascular diseases, thus identifying sEH as a valuable therapeutic target. Recently, a common human polymorphism (R287Q) was identified that reduces sEH hydrolase activity and is localized to the dimerization interface of the protein, suggesting a relationship between sEH dimerization and activity. To directly test the hypothesis that dimerization is essential for the proper function of sEH, we generated mutations within the sEH protein that would either disrupt or stabilize dimerization. We quantified the dimerization state of each mutant using a split firefly luciferase protein fragment-assisted complementation system. The hydrolase activity of each mutant was determined using a fluorescence-based substrate conversion assay. We found that mutations that disrupted dimerization also eliminated hydrolase enzymatic activity. In contrast, a mutation that stabilized dimerization restored hydrolase activity. Finally, we investigated the kinetics of sEH dimerization and found that the human R287Q polymorphism was metastable and capable of swapping dimer partners faster than the WT enzyme. These results indicate that dimerization is required for sEH hydrolase activity. Disrupting sEH dimerization may therefore serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for reducing sEH hydrolase activity. PMID:23362272

  6. Kinetics of the monomer-dimer reaction of yeast hexokinase PI.

    PubMed

    Hoggett, J G; Kellett, G L

    1992-10-15

    Kinetic studies of the glucose-dependent monomer-dimer reaction of yeast hexokinase PI at pH 8.0 in the presence of 0.1 M-KCl have been carried out using the fluorescence temperature-jump technique. A slow-relaxation effect was observed which was attributed from its dependence on enzyme concentration to the monomer-dimer reaction; the reciprocal relaxation times tau-1 varied from 3 s-1 at low concentrations of glucose to 42 s-1 at saturating concentrations. Rate constants for association (kass.) and dissociation (kdiss.) were determined as a function of glucose concentration using values of the equilibrium association constant of the monomer-dimer reaction derived from sedimentation ultracentrifugation studies under similar conditions, and also from the dependence of tau-2 on enzyme concentration. kass. was almost independent of glucose concentration and its value (2 x 10(5) M-1.s-1) was close to that expected for a diffusion-controlled process. The influence of glucose on the monomer-dimer reaction is entirely due to effects on kdiss., which increases from 0.21 s-1 in the absence of glucose to 25 s-1 at saturating concentrations. The monomer and dimer forms of hexokinase have different affinities and Km values for glucose, and the results reported here imply that there may be a significant lag in the response of the monomer-dimer reaction to changes in glucose concentrations in vivo with consequent hysteretic effects on the hexokinase activity. PMID:1445216

  7. Kinetics of the monomer-dimer reaction of yeast hexokinase PI.

    PubMed Central

    Hoggett, J G; Kellett, G L

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the glucose-dependent monomer-dimer reaction of yeast hexokinase PI at pH 8.0 in the presence of 0.1 M-KCl have been carried out using the fluorescence temperature-jump technique. A slow-relaxation effect was observed which was attributed from its dependence on enzyme concentration to the monomer-dimer reaction; the reciprocal relaxation times tau-1 varied from 3 s-1 at low concentrations of glucose to 42 s-1 at saturating concentrations. Rate constants for association (kass.) and dissociation (kdiss.) were determined as a function of glucose concentration using values of the equilibrium association constant of the monomer-dimer reaction derived from sedimentation ultracentrifugation studies under similar conditions, and also from the dependence of tau-2 on enzyme concentration. kass. was almost independent of glucose concentration and its value (2 x 10(5) M-1.s-1) was close to that expected for a diffusion-controlled process. The influence of glucose on the monomer-dimer reaction is entirely due to effects on kdiss., which increases from 0.21 s-1 in the absence of glucose to 25 s-1 at saturating concentrations. The monomer and dimer forms of hexokinase have different affinities and Km values for glucose, and the results reported here imply that there may be a significant lag in the response of the monomer-dimer reaction to changes in glucose concentrations in vivo with consequent hysteretic effects on the hexokinase activity. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1445216

  8. Functional Characterization of Rhodopsin Monomers and Dimers in Detergents*S

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Maeda, Tadao; Zhu, Li; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Filipek, Slawomir; Engel, Andreas; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    Rhodopsin (Rho) is a G protein-coupled receptor that initiates phototransduction in rod photoreceptors. High expression levels of Rho in the disc membranes of rod outer segments and the propensity of Rho to form higher oligomeric structures are evident from atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and chemical cross-linking experiments. To explore the structural and functional properties of Rho in n-dodecyl-β-maltoside, frequently used to purify heterologously expressed Rho and its mutants, we used gel filtration techniques, blue native gel electrophoresis, and functional assays. Here, we show that in micelles containing n-dodecyl-β-maltoside at concentrations greater than 3 mm, Rho is present as a single monomer per detergent micelle. In contrast, in 12 mm 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS), micelles contain mostly dimeric Rho. The cognate G protein transducin (Gt) appears to have a preference for binding to the Rho dimer, and the complexes fall apart in the presence of guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate. Cross-linked Rho dimers release the chromophore at a slower rate than monomers and are much more resistant to heat denaturation. Both Rho* monomers and dimers are capable of activating Gt, and both of them are phosphorylated by Rho kinase. Rho expressed in HEK293 cells is also readily cross-linked by a bifunctional reagent. These studies provide an explanation of how detergent influences the oligomer-dimer-monomer equilibrium of Rho and describe the functional characterization of Rho monomers and dimers in detergent. PMID:15489507

  9. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  10. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  11. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  12. Potential energy studies on silane dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlanen, Riina; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2011-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions and parameters for use in MD studies of large molecule systems have earlier been determined for hydrocarbons, carbon tetrahalides and sulfur. The paper reports a model representing nonbonding interactions between silane molecules, which were examined in the same way as hydrocarbons in an earlier (neopentane, isopropane, propane, and ethane) study. Intermolecular potentials were determined for 11 combinations of silane compound pairs (silane SiH 4, disilane Si 2H 6, trisilane Si 3H 8, isotetrasilane Si 4H 10 and neopentasilane Si 5H 12) with MP2/aug(df)-6-311G ∗ab initio calculations. The most stable dimer configurations were identified. With use of the modified Morse potential model to represent the interactions, 276 new potential energy surfaces were generated for silane dimers. Separate and generic pair potentials were calculated for the silanes. The pair potentials can be used in MD studies of silanes.

  13. Blocking cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation by steric hindrance.

    PubMed

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Yamaji, Minoru; Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-04-26

    The efficiency of thymine (Thy) and uracil (Ura) to form cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in solution, upon UV irradiation differs by one order of magnitude. This could to be partially related to the steric hindrance induced by the methyl at C5 in thymine. The aim of the present work is to establish the influence of a bulky moiety at this position on the photoreactivity of pyrimidines. With this purpose, photosensitization with benzophenone and acetone of a 5-tert-butyl uracil derivative () and the equivalent Thy () has been compared. Introduction of the tert-butyl group completely blocks CPD formation. Moreover, the mechanistic insight obtained by laser flash photolysis is in accordance with the observed photoreactivity. PMID:27112630

  14. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  15. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; et al

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  16. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  17. Repair of DNA-containing pyrimidine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L.; Caron, P.R.; Mazur, S.J.; Oh, E.Y.

    1988-08-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA are recognized and repaired by a number of unique cellular surveillance systems. The most direct biochemical mechanism responding to this kind of genotoxicity involves direct photoreversal by flavin enzymes that specifically monomerize pyrimidine:pyrimidine dimers monophotonically in the presence of visible light. Incision reactions are catalyzed by a combined pyrimidine dimer DNA-glycosylase:apyrimidinic endonuclease found in some highly UV-resistant organisms. At a higher level of complexity, Escherichia coli has a uvr DNA repair system comprising the UvrA, UvrB, and UvrC proteins responsible for incision. There are several preincision steps governed by this pathway, which includes an ATP-dependent UvrA dimerization reaction required for UvrAB nucleoprotein formation. This complex formation driven by ATP binding is associated with localized topological unwinding of DNA. This same protein complex can catalyze an ATPase-dependent 5'----3'-directed strand displacement of D-loop DNA or short single strands annealed to a single-stranded circular or linear DNA. This putative translocational process is arrested when damaged sites are encountered. The complex is now primed for dual incision catalyzed by UvrC. The remainder of the repair process involves UvrD (helicase II) and DNA polymerase I for a coordinately controlled excision-resynthesis step accompanied by UvrABC turnover. Furthermore, it is proposed that levels of repair proteins can be regulated by proteolysis. UvrB is converted to truncated UvrB* by a stress-induced protease that also acts at similar sites on the E. coli Ada protein. Although UvrB* can bind with UvrA to DNA, it cannot participate in helicase or incision reactions. It is also a DNA-dependent ATPase.21 references.

  18. Nanoradar based on nonlinear dimer nanoantenna.

    PubMed

    Lapshina, Nadezhda; Noskov, Roman; Kivshar, Yuri

    2012-09-15

    We introduce the concept of a nanoradar based on the operation of a nonlinear plasmonic nanoantenna. The nanoradar action originates from modulational instability occurring in a dimer nanoantenna consisting of two subwavelength nonlinear nanoparticles. Modulation instability causes a dynamical energy exchange between the nanoantenna eigenmodes resulting in periodic scanning of the nanoantenna scattering pattern. Such nanoradar demonstrates a wide scanning sector, low operation threshold, and ultrafast time response being potentially useful for many applications in nanophotonics circuitry. PMID:23041904

  19. Plasmomechanical Resonators Based on Dimer Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Rutger; Kippenberg, Tobias J; Polman, Albert; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-06-10

    Nanomechanical resonators are highly suitable as sensors of minute forces, displacements, or masses. We realize a single plasmonic dimer antenna of subwavelength size, integrated with silicon nitride nanobeams. The sensitive dependence of the antenna response on the beam displacement creates a plasmomechanical system of deeply subwavelength size in all dimensions. We use it to demonstrate transduction of thermal vibrations to scattered light fields and discuss the noise properties and achievable coupling strengths in these systems. PMID:25938170

  20. Dimer models and quiver gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichai, Ramadevi

    2013-12-01

    = 1 quiver gauge theories on coincident D3 branes placed at a tip of a Calabi-Yau singularity C are dual to string theories on AdS5×X5 where X5 are Sasaki-Einstein spaces. We present a neat combinatorial approach called dimer model to understand interrelations between toric quiver gauge theories and toric data representing the Calabi-Yau singularities.

  1. Onion-like glycodendrimersomes from sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers and influence of architecture on reactivity to a lectin

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qi; Zhang, Shaodong; Wang, Zhichun; Sherman, Samuel E.; Moussodia, Ralph-Olivier; Peterca, Mihai; Muncan, Adam; Williams, Dewight R.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Vértesy, Sabine; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Klein, Michael L.; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    A library of eight amphiphilic Janus glycodendrimers (GDs) with d-mannose (Man) headgroups, a known routing signal for lectin-mediated transport processes, was constructed via an iterative modular methodology. Sequence-defined variations of the Janus GD modulate the surface density and sequence of Man after self-assembly into multilamellar glycodendrimersomes (GDSs). The spatial mode of Man presentation is decisive for formation of either unilamellar or onion-like GDS vesicles. Man presentation and Janus GD concentration determine GDS size and number of bilayers. Beyond vesicle architecture, Man topological display affects kinetics and plateau level of GDS aggregation by a tetravalent model lectin: the leguminous agglutinin Con A, which is structurally related to endogenous cargo transporters. The agglutination process was rapid, efficient, and readily reversible for onion-like GDSs, demonstrating their value as versatile tools to explore the nature of physiologically relevant glycan/lectin pairing. PMID:26787853

  2. Onion-like glycodendrimersomes from sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers and influence of architecture on reactivity to a lectin.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qi; Zhang, Shaodong; Wang, Zhichun; Sherman, Samuel E; Moussodia, Ralph-Olivier; Peterca, Mihai; Muncan, Adam; Williams, Dewight R; Hammer, Daniel A; Vértesy, Sabine; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Klein, Michael L; Percec, Virgil

    2016-02-01

    A library of eight amphiphilic Janus glycodendrimers (GDs) with d-mannose (Man) headgroups, a known routing signal for lectin-mediated transport processes, was constructed via an iterative modular methodology. Sequence-defined variations of the Janus GD modulate the surface density and sequence of Man after self-assembly into multilamellar glycodendrimersomes (GDSs). The spatial mode of Man presentation is decisive for formation of either unilamellar or onion-like GDS vesicles. Man presentation and Janus GD concentration determine GDS size and number of bilayers. Beyond vesicle architecture, Man topological display affects kinetics and plateau level of GDS aggregation by a tetravalent model lectin: the leguminous agglutinin Con A, which is structurally related to endogenous cargo transporters. The agglutination process was rapid, efficient, and readily reversible for onion-like GDSs, demonstrating their value as versatile tools to explore the nature of physiologically relevant glycan/lectin pairing. PMID:26787853

  3. RNA sequencing as a powerful tool in searching for genes influencing health and performance traits of horses.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Monika; Ropka-Molik, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) by next-generation technology is a powerful tool which creates new possibilities in whole-transcriptome analysis. In recent years, with the use of the RNA-seq method, several studies expanded transcriptional gene profiles to understand interactions between genotype and phenotype, supremely contributing to the field of equine biology. To date, in horses, massive parallel sequencing of cDNA has been successfully used to identify and quantify mRNA levels in several normal tissues, as well as to annotate genes. Moreover, the RNA-seq method has been applied to identify the genetic basis of several diseases or to investigate organism adaptation processes to the training conditions. The use of the RNA-seq approach has also confirmed that horses can be useful as a large animal model for human disease, especially in the field of immune response. The presented review summarizes the achievements of profiling gene expression in horses (Equus caballus). PMID:26446669

  4. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  5. Dimerization of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 N terminus results in DNA looping within the upstream regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Ramon, Elena E; Burns, Julie E; Zhang, Wenke; Walker, Hannah F; Allen, Stephanie; Antson, Alfred A; Maitland, Norman J

    2008-05-01

    Papillomavirus E2 proteins play a central role in regulating viral gene expression and replication. DNA-binding activity is associated with the C-terminal domain of E2, which forms a stable dimer, while the N-terminal domain is responsible for E2's replication and transactivation functions. The crystal structure of the latter domain revealed a second dimerization interface on E2 which may be responsible for DNA loop formation in the regulatory region of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome. We investigated the biological significance of the N-terminal dimerization by introducing single amino acid substitutions into the dimerization interface. As expected, these substitutions did not influence the C-terminal dimerization and DNA-binding functions of E2. However, the mutations led to reduced transactivation of a synthetic E2-responsive reporter gene, while HPV DNA replication was unaffected. The effect of the mutations on DNA looping was visualized by atomic force microscopy. While wild-type E2 was able to generate DNA loops, all three mutant E2 proteins were defective in this ability. Our results suggest that N-terminal dimerization plays a role in E2-mediated transactivation, probably via DNA looping, a common mechanism for remote regulation of gene transcription. PMID:18337573

  6. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; laFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Objective First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Results Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Conclusion Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR

  7. Comparison of the cleavage of pyrimidine dimers by the bacteriophage T4 and Micrococcus luteus uv-specific endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.K.; Haseltine, W.A.

    1980-12-25

    A comparison was made of the activity of the uv-specific endonucleases of bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) and of Micrococcus luteus on ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA substrates of defined sequence. The two enzyms cleave DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers with the same frequency. The products of the cleavage reaction are the same. The pyrimidine dimer DNA-glycosylase activity of both enzymes is more active on double-stranded DNA than it is on single-stranded DNA.

  8. Influence of 63Ser phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on the structure of the stathmin helical nucleation sequence: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Missimer, John H; Steinmetz, Michel O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2012-10-23

    Phosphorylation is an important mechanism regulating protein-protein interactions involving intrinsically disordered protein regions. Stathmin, an archetypical example of an intrinsically disordered protein, is a key regulator of microtubule dynamics in which phosphorylation of 63Ser within the helical nucleation sequence strongly down-regulates the tubulin binding and microtubule destabilizing activities of the protein. Experimental studies on a peptide encompassing the 19-residue helical nucleation sequence of stathmin (residues 55-73) indicate that phosphorylation of 63Ser destabilizes the peptide's secondary structure by disrupting the salt bridges supporting its helical conformation. In order to investigate this hypothesis at atomic resolution, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated stathmin-[55-73] at room temperature and pressure, neutral pH, and explicit solvation using the recently released GROMOS force field 54A7. In the simulations of nonphosphorylated stathmin-[55-73] emerged salt bridges associated with helical configurations. In the simulations of 63Ser phosphorylated stathmin-[55-73] these configurations dispersed and were replaced by a proliferation of salt bridges yielding disordered configurations. The transformation of the salt bridges was accompanied by emergence of numerous interactions between main and side chains, involving notably the oxygen atoms of the phosphorylated 63Ser. The loss of helical structure induced by phosphorylation is reversible, however, as a final simulation showed. The results extend the hypothesis of salt bridge derangement suggested by experimental observations of the stathmin nucleation sequence, providing new insights into regulation of intrinsically disordered protein systems mediated by phosphorylation. PMID:22978582

  9. Functional connectivity in the resting-state motor networks influences the kinematic processes during motor sequence learning

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Laura; Palmaro, Eleonora; Teodorescu, Roxana; Fleysher, Lazar; Inglese, Matilde; Bove, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies support the involvement of the cerebello-cortical and striato-cortical motor loops in motor sequence learning. Here, we investigated whether the gain of motor sequence learning could depend on a priori resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) between motor areas and structures belonging to these circuits. Fourteen healthy subjects underwent a resting-state fMRI session. Afterward, they were asked to reproduce a verbally-learned sequence of finger opposition movements as fast and accurate as possible. All subjects increased their movement rate with practice, by reducing touch duration and/or inter tapping interval. The rsFC analysis showed that at rest left and right M1 and left and right supplementary motor cortex (SMA) were mainly connected with other motor areas. The covariate analysis taking into account the different kinematic parameters indicated that the subjects achieving greater movement rate increase were those showing stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the right lobule VIII of the cerebellum. Notably, the subjects with greater inter tapping interval reduction showed stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the association nuclei of the thalamus. Conversely, the regression analysis with the right M1 and SMA seeds showed only few significant clusters for the different covariates not located in the cerebellum and thalamus. No common clusters were found between right M1 and SMA. All these findings indicate important functional connections at rest of those neural circuits responsible of motor learning improvement, involving the motor areas related to the hemisphere directly controlling the finger movements, the thalamus and the cerebellum. PMID:25328043

  10. Influence of dosing sequence and film thickness on structure and resistivity of Al-ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Evan B. Lad, Robert J.

    2014-07-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were deposited onto amorphous silica substrates using an atomic layer deposition process with diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl aluminum (TMA), and deionized water at 200 °C. Three different Al doping sequences were used at a ZnO:Al ratio of 11:1 within the films. A minimum film resistivity of 1.6 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm was produced using sequential dosing of DEZ, TMA, DEZ, followed by H{sub 2}O for the Al doping step. This “ZAZW” sequence yielded an AZO film resistivity that is independent of film thickness, crystallographic texture, and grain size, as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD). A pseudo-Voigt analysis method yields values for grain sizes that are smaller than those calculated using other XRD methods. Anisotropic grain sizes or variations in crystallographic texture have minimal influence on film resistivity, which suggests that factors other than film texture, such as intragrain scattering, may be important in influencing film resistivity.

  11. Influence of Quasi-Specific Sites on Kinetics of Target DNA Search by a Sequence-Specific DNA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functions of transcription factors require formation of specific complexes at particular sites in cis-regulatory elements of genes. However, chromosomal DNA contains numerous sites that are similar to the target sequences recognized by transcription factors. The influence of such “quasi-specific” sites on functions of the transcription factors is not well understood at present by experimental means. In this work, using fluorescence methods, we have investigated the influence of quasi-specific DNA sites on the efficiency of target location by the zinc finger DNA-binding domain of the inducible transcription factor Egr-1, which recognizes a 9 bp sequence. By stopped-flow assays, we measured the kinetics of Egr-1’s association with a target site on 143 bp DNA in the presence of various competitor DNAs, including nonspecific and quasi-specific sites. The presence of quasi-specific sites on competitor DNA significantly decelerated the target association by the Egr-1 protein. The impact of the quasi-specific sites depended strongly on their affinity, their concentration, and the degree of their binding to the protein. To quantitatively describe the kinetic impact of the quasi-specific sites, we derived an analytical form of the apparent kinetic rate constant for the target association and used it for fitting to the experimental data. Our kinetic data with calf thymus DNA as a competitor suggested that there are millions of high-affinity quasi-specific sites for Egr-1 among the 3 billion bp of genomic DNA. This study quantitatively demonstrates that naturally abundant quasi-specific sites on DNA can considerably impede the target search processes of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26502071

  12. UV light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are mutagenic in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic-Sabljic, M.; Tuteja, N.; Munson, P.J.; Hauser, J.; Kraemer, K.H.; Dixon, K.

    1986-10-01

    We used a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, to determine the role of pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers in UV light-induced mutagenesis in monkey cells. The vector DNA was UV irradiated and then introduced into monkey cells by transfection. After replication, vector DNA was recovered from the cells and tested for mutations in its supF suppressor tRNA marker gene by transformation of Escherichia coli carrying a nonsense mutation in the beta-galactosidase gene. When the irradiated vector was treated with E. coli photolyase prior to transfection, pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers were removed selectively. Removal of approximately 90% of the pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers increased the biological activity of the vector by 75% and reduced its mutation frequency by 80%. Sequence analysis of 72 mutants recovered indicated that there were significantly fewer tandem double-base changes and G X C----A X T transitions (particularly at CC sites) after photoreactivation of the DNA. UV-induced photoproducts remained (although at greatly reduced levels) at all pyr-pyr sites after photoreactivation, but there was a relative increase in photoproducts at CC and TC sites and a relative decrease at TT and CT sites, presumably due to a persistence of (6-4) photoproducts at some CC and TC sites. These observations are consistent with the fact that mutations were found after photoreactivation at many sites at which only cyclobutane dimers would be expected to occur. From these results we conclude that UV-induced pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers are mutagenic in DNA replicated in monkey cells.

  13. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR's opening-closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1-NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP-bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a "partial NBD dimer" state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and "partial" separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR's NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  14. Mechanism of hairpin-duplex conversion for the HIV-1 dimerization initiation site.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Ennifar, Eric; Tóth, Katalin; Walter, Philippe; Langowski, Jörg; Dumas, Philippe

    2005-12-01

    We have used the dimerization initiation site of HIV-1 genomic RNA as a model to investigate hairpin-duplex interconversion with a combination of fluorescence, UV melting, gel electrophoresis, and x-ray crystallographic techniques. Fluorescence studies with molecular beacons and crystallization experiments with 23-nucleotide dimerization initiation site fragments showed that the ratio of hairpin to duplex formed after annealing in water essentially depends on RNA concentration and not on cooling kinetics. With natural sequences allowing to form the most stable duplex, and thus also the loop-loop complex (or "kissing complex"), concentrations as low as 3 mum in strands are necessary to obtain a majority of the hairpin form. With a mutated sequence preventing kissing complex formation, a majority of hairpins was even obtained at 80 mum in strands. However, this did not prevent an efficient conversion from hairpin to duplex in the presence of salts. Kinetic considerations are in favor of duplex formation from intermediates involving hairpins engaged in cruciform dimers rather than from free strands. The very first step of formation of such a cruciform intermediate could be trapped in a crystal structure. This mechanism might be significant for the dynamics of small RNAs beyond the strict field of HIV-1. PMID:16169845

  15. Genome-wide association study using whole-genome sequencing rapidly identifies new genes influencing agronomic traits in rice.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kenji; Yamamoto, Eiji; Aya, Koichiro; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Lo, Pei-Ching; Hu, Li; Yamasaki, Masanori; Yoshida, Shinya; Kitano, Hidemi; Hirano, Ko; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) can be a powerful tool for the identification of genes associated with agronomic traits in crop species, but it is often hindered by population structure and the large extent of linkage disequilibrium. In this study, we identified agronomically important genes in rice using GWAS based on whole-genome sequencing, followed by the screening of candidate genes based on the estimated effect of nucleotide polymorphisms. Using this approach, we identified four new genes associated with agronomic traits. Some genes were undetectable by standard SNP analysis, but we detected them using gene-based association analysis. This study provides fundamental insights relevant to the rapid identification of genes associated with agronomic traits using GWAS and will accelerate future efforts aimed at crop improvement. PMID:27322545

  16. N-terminal peptide sequence repetition influences the kinetics of backbone fragmentation: a manifestation of the Jahn-Teller effect?

    PubMed

    Good, David M; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of large (>10,000 entries) databases consisting of high-resolution tandem mass spectra of peptide dications revealed with high statistical significance (P < 1[Symbol: see text]10(-3)) that peptides with non-identical first two N-terminal amino acids undergo cleavages of the second peptide bond at higher rates than repetitive sequences composed of the same amino acids (i.e., in general AB- and BA- bonds cleave more often than AA- and BB- bonds). This effect seems to depend upon the collisional energy, being stronger at lower energies. The phenomenon is likely to indicate the presence of the diketopiperazine structure for at least some b2 (+) ions. When consisting of two identical amino acids, these species should form through intermediates that have a symmetric geometry and, thus, must be subject to the Jahn-Teller effect that reduces the stability of such systems. PMID:23633015

  17. Insights into Strand Exchange in BTB Domain Dimers from the Crystal Structures of FAZF and Miz1

    SciTech Connect

    Stogios, Peter J.; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Chen, Lu; Pomroy, Neil C.; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2010-09-22

    The BTB domain is a widely distributed protein-protein interaction motif that is often found at the N-terminus of zinc finger transcription factors. Previous crystal structures of BTB domains have revealed tightly interwound homodimers, with the N-terminus from one chain forming a two-stranded anti-parallel {beta}-sheet with a strand from the other chain. We have solved the crystal structures of the BTB domains from Fanconi anemia zinc finger (FAZF) and Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc finger 1) to resolutions of 2.0 {angstrom} and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. Unlike previous examples of BTB domain structures, the FAZF BTB domain is a nonswapped dimer, with each N-terminal {beta}-strand associated with its own chain. As a result, the dimerization interface in the FAZF BTB domain is about half as large as in the domain-swapped dimers. The Miz1 BTB domain resembles a typical swapped BTB dimer, although it has a shorter N-terminus that is not able to form the interchain sheet. Using cysteine cross-linking, we confirmed that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) BTB dimer is strand exchanged in solution, while the FAZF BTB dimer is not. A phylogenic tree of the BTB fold based on both sequence and structural features shows that the common ancestor of the BTB domain in BTB-ZF (bric a brac, tramtrack, broad-complex zinc finger) proteins was a domain-swapped dimer. The differences in the N-termini seen in the FAZF and Miz1 BTB domains appear to be more recent developments in the structural evolution of the domain.

  18. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  19. Equivalence between XY and dimerized models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Roncaglia, Marco

    2010-06-01

    The spin-1/2 chain with XY anisotropic coupling in the plane and the XX isotropic dimerized chain are shown to be equivalent in the bulk. For finite systems, we prove that the equivalence is exact in given parity sectors, after taking care of the precise boundary conditions. The proof is given constructively by finding unitary transformations that map the models onto each other. Moreover, we considerably generalized our mapping and showed that even in the case of fully site-dependent couplings the XY chain can be mapped onto an XX model. This result has potential application in the study of disordered systems.

  20. Critical Factors Determining Dimerization of Human Antizyme Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kuo-Liang; Liao, Ya-Fan; Hung, Hui-Chih; Liu, Guang-Yaw

    2009-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the first enzyme involved in polyamine biosynthesis, and it catalyzes the decarboxylation of ornithine to putrescine. ODC is a dimeric enzyme, whereas antizyme inhibitor (AZI), a positive regulator of ODC that is homologous to ODC, exists predominantly as a monomer and lacks decarboxylase activity. The goal of this paper was to identify the essential amino acid residues that determine the dimerization of AZI. The nonconserved amino acid residues in the putative dimer interface of AZI (Ser-277, Ser-331, Glu-332, and Asp-389) were substituted with the corresponding residues in the putative dimer interface of ODC (Arg-277, Tyr-331, Asp-332, and Tyr-389, respectively). Analytical ultracentrifugation analysis was used to determine the size distribution of these AZI mutants. The size-distribution analysis data suggest that residue 331 may play a major role in the dimerization of AZI. Mutating Ser-331 to Tyr in AZI (AZI-S331Y) caused a shift from a monomer configuration to a dimer. Furthermore, in comparison with the single mutant AZI-S331Y, the AZI-S331Y/D389Y double mutant displayed a further reduction in the monomer-dimer Kd, suggesting that residue 389 is also crucial for AZI dimerization. Analysis of the triple mutant AZI-S331Y/D389Y/S277R showed that it formed a stable dimer (Kd value = 1.3 μm). Finally, a quadruple mutant, S331Y/D389Y/S277R/E332D, behaved as a dimer with a Kd value of ∼0.1 μm, which is very close to that of the human ODC enzyme. The quadruple mutant, although forming a dimer, could still be disrupted by antizyme (AZ), further forming a heterodimer, and it could rescue the AZ-inhibited ODC activity, suggesting that the AZ-binding ability of the AZI dimer was retained. PMID:19635796

  1. The properties of dimers confined between two charged plates.

    PubMed

    Hatlo, Marius M; Bohinc, Klemen; Lue, Leo

    2010-03-21

    We consider two like-charged planar surfaces immersed in solution of oppositely charged dimer counterions with a bond length l. To analyze this system, we extend and employ a self-consistent field theory that has been shown to be accurate from the weak to the intermediate through to the strong coupling regimes. In the limit of very short dimers, the results converge to the results for pointlike divalent ions. Near the surfaces, the dimers lie parallel to the charged plates. In the intermediate coupling regime, the dimers are aligned perpendicularly to the surface when they are a distance l from a surface. In the weak coupling regime, the interactions are only repulsive. At slightly higher couplings, there is a minimum in the variation of the free energy with distance at approximately the bond length of the dimers, which arises from bridging conformations of the dimers. In the intermediate coupling regime, an additional minimum in the free energy is observed at much smaller distances, which is due to the correlations between the dimers. For large dimer bond lengths, this minimum is metastable with respect to the previous minimum. However, as the bond length decreases, this minimum becomes the stable, while the minimum associated with the dimer bond length becomes metastable and eventually disappears. For shorter dimer bond length the attractive interaction is the result of correlations between counterions and charges on the surfaces. We find that dimers can mediate attractive interaction between like-charged surfaces in the intermediate coupling regime. The analysis of orientations confirms the bridging mechanism for sufficiently long dimers, whereas at high electrostatic couplings charge correlations contribute to the attraction. PMID:20331276

  2. RING domain dimerization is essential for RNF4 function.

    PubMed

    Liew, Chu Wai; Sun, Huaiyu; Hunter, Tony; Day, Catherine L

    2010-10-01

    RNF4 [RING (really interesting new gene) finger protein 4] family ubiquitin ligases are RING E3 ligases that regulate the homoeostasis of SUMOylated proteins by promoting their ubiquitylation. In the present paper we report that the RING domain of RNF4 forms a stable dimer, and that dimerization is required for ubiquitin transfer. Our results suggest that the stability of the E2~ubiquitin thioester bond is regulated by RING domain dimerization. PMID:20681948

  3. Roles for cytosolic NADPH redox in regulating pulmonary artery relaxation by thiol oxidation-elicited subunit dimerization of protein kinase G1α.

    PubMed

    Neo, Boon Hwa; Patel, Dhara; Kandhi, Sharath; Wolin, Michael S

    2013-08-01

    The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) appears to control a vascular smooth muscle relaxing mechanism regulated through cytosolic NADPH oxidation. Since our recent studies suggest that thiol oxidation-elicited dimerization of the 1α form of protein kinase G (PKG1α) contributes to the relaxation of isolated endothelium-removed bovine pulmonary arteries (BPA) to peroxide and responses to hypoxia, we investigated whether cytosolic NADPH oxidation promoted relaxation by PKG1α dimerization. Relaxation of BPA to G6PD inhibitors 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN) and epiandrosterone (studied under hypoxia to minimize basal levels of NADPH oxidation and PKG1α dimerization) was associated with increased PKG1α dimerization and PKG-mediated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. Depletion of PKG1α by small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) inhibited relaxation of BPA to 6-AN and attenuated the increase in VASP phosphorylation. Relaxation to 6-AN did not appear to be altered by depletion of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Depletion of G6PD, thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), and Trx reductase-1 (TrxR-1) in BPA with siRNA increased PKG1α dimerization and VASP phosphorylation and inhibited force generation under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Depletion of TrxR-1 with siRNA inhibited the effects of 6-AN and enhanced similar responses to peroxide. Peroxiredoxin-1 depletion by siRNA inhibited PKG dimerization to peroxide, but it did not alter PKG dimerization under hypoxia or the stimulation of dimerization by 6-AN. Thus regulation of cytosolic NADPH redox by G6PD appears to control PKG1α dimerization in BPA through its influence on Trx-1 redox regulation by the NADPH dependence of TrxR-1. NADPH regulation of PKG dimerization may contribute to vascular responses to hypoxia that are associated with changes in NADPH redox. PMID:23709600

  4. Rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer: A dimer bound with three different types of hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2014-10-28

    Pure rotational spectra of the propargyl alcohol dimer and its three deuterium isotopologues have been observed in the 4 to 13 GHz range using a pulsed-nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. For the parent dimer, a total of 51 transitions could be observed and fitted within experimental uncertainty. For two mono-substituted and one bi-substituted deuterium isotopologues, a total of 14, 17, and 19 transitions were observed, respectively. The observed rotational constants for the parent dimer [A = 2321.8335(4) MHz, B = 1150.4774(2) MHz, and C = 1124.8898(2) MHz] are close to those of the most stable structure predicted by ab initio calculations. Spectra of the three deuterated isotopologues and Kraitchman analysis positively confirm this structure. Geometrical parameters and “Atoms in Molecules” analysis on the observed structure reveal that the two propargyl alcohol units in the dimer are bound by three different types of hydrogen bonds: O–H⋯O, O–H⋯π, and C–H⋯π. To the best of our knowledge, propargyl alcohol seems to be the smallest molecule forming a homodimer with three different points of contact.

  5. On the correlation factor of pure polar fluids whose molecules dimerize to nonpolar dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mognaschi, E. R.; Laboranti, L. M.; Chierico, A.

    The dipolar correlation of pure polar fluids whose molecules undergo dimerization, resulting in the formation of nonpolar ring dimers and polar monomers in statistical equilibrium, has been studied. Such a system has been treated as a solution of polar molecules (monomers) in an apolar solvent (dimers). This approach allowed us to introduce a new parameter that accounts for the correlation among polar monomers, besides the well known Kirkwood-Fröhlich correlation factor. A relation between the two correlation factors, involving the degree of association, has been established. The above summarized model was applied to the case of five monocarboxylic fatty acids: propionic, n-butyric, n-valeric, caprylic, and pelargonic. On going from high to low molecular mass terms the room temperature static dielectric constant of the considered series of acids increases together with the degree of association, obtained from adiabatic compressibility data on the hypothesis that only dimerization occurs. This behaviour of the static dielectric constant, unexpected on the basis of the decrease of polar monomer density due to the increase of the degree of association, has been interpreted taking into account the dipolar correlation among monomers.

  6. Structural Basis of p75 Transmembrane Domain Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdin, Kirill D; García-Carpio, Irmina; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Mineev, Konstantin S; Arseniev, Alexander S; Vilar, Marçal

    2016-06-01

    Dimerization of single span transmembrane receptors underlies their mechanism of activation. p75 neurotrophin receptor plays an important role in the nervous system, but the understanding of p75 activation mechanism is still incomplete. The transmembrane (TM) domain of p75 stabilizes the receptor dimers through a disulfide bond, essential for the NGF signaling. Here we solved by NMR the three-dimensional structure of the p75-TM-WT and the functionally inactive p75-TM-C257A dimers. Upon reconstitution in lipid micelles, p75-TM-WT forms the disulfide-linked dimers spontaneously. Under reducing conditions, p75-TM-WT is in a monomer-dimer equilibrium with the Cys(257) residue located on the dimer interface. In contrast, p75-TM-C257A forms dimers through the AXXXG motif on the opposite face of the α-helix. Biochemical and cross-linking experiments indicate that AXXXG motif is not on the dimer interface of p75-TM-WT, suggesting that the conformation of p75-TM-C257A may be not functionally relevant. However, rather than mediating p75 homodimerization, mutagenesis of the AXXXG motif reveals its functional role in the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of p75 catalyzed by the γ-secretase complex. Our structural data provide an insight into the key role of the Cys(257) in stabilization of the weak transmembrane dimer in a conformation required for the NGF signaling. PMID:27056327

  7. Kinase-mediated quasi-dimers of EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Bublil, Erez M.; Pines, Gur; Patel, Gargi; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Ng, Tony; Yarden, Yosef

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-induced dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB-1/EGFR) involves conformational changes that expose an extracellular dimerization interface. Subsequent alterations within the cytoplasmic kinase domain, which culminate in tyrosine phosphorylation, are less understood. Our study addressed this question by using two strategies: a chimeric receptor approach employed ErbB-3, whose defective kinase domain was replaced by the respective part of EGFR. The implanted full-length kinase, unlike its subdomains, conferred dimerization and catalysis. The data infer that the kinase function of EGFR is restrained by the carboxyl tail; once grafted distally to the ectopic tail of ErbB-3, the kinase domain acquires quasi-dimerization and activation. In an attempt to alternatively refold the cytoplasmic tail, our other approach employed kinase inhibitors. Biophysical measurements and covalent cross-linking analyses showed that inhibitors targeting the active conformation of EGFR, in contrast to a compound recognizing the inactive conformation, induce quasi-dimers in a manner similar to the chimeric ErbB-3 molecule. Collectively, these observations unveil kinase domain-mediated quasi-dimers, which are regulated by an autoinhibitory carboxyl tail. On the basis of these observations, we propose that quasi-dimers precede formation of ligand-induced, fully active dimers, which are stabilized by both extracellular and intracellular receptor-receptor interactions.—Bublil, E. M., Pines, G., Patel, G., Fruhwirth, G., Ng, T., Yosef Yarden. Kinase-mediated quasi-dimers of EGFR. PMID:20682838

  8. Villain transformation for ferrimagnetic spin chain with dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ge; Chen, Yuge; Chen, Bin

    2015-10-01

    The dimerized ferrimagnetic spin chain has been approached both in the presence and absence of the external magnetic field by using the Villain transformation. Two branches of the low-lying energy modes have been presented and the upper branch of the mode demonstrates the exotic omega-shape when the dimerization parameter is greater than 0.6. We also find that the competition between magnetic field and the dimerization parameter also contribute the omega-shape in lower branch mode. Thermodynamic quantities like free energy, specific heat, magnetization, and susceptibility in finite temperature and magnetic field with different dimerization parameters have also been presented.

  9. A Directly Fused Subporphyrin Dimer with a Wavelike Structure.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaki, Eiji; Oh, Juwon; Sung, Jooyoung; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2016-08-01

    [Ni(cod)2 ]-mediated intramolecular reductive coupling of β-β' linked meso,meso'-dibromosubporphyrin dimer gave the anti-isomer of meso-meso', β-β' doubly linked subporphyrin dimer as the first example of a fused subporphyrin dimer. The fused dimer 3anti displays an wavelike coplanar structure, a perturbed and red-shifted absorption spectrum, reversible redox behaviors with a decreased electrochemical HOMO-LUMO band gap, and a short S1 -state lifetime owing to the delocalized π-electronic network. PMID:27325499

  10. Structure of the Response Regulator PhoP from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a Dimer Through the Receiver Domain

    SciTech Connect

    S Menon; S Wang

    2011-12-31

    The PhoP protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a response regulator of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, whose structure consists of an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain. How the DNA-binding activities are regulated by phosphorylation of the receiver domain remains unclear due to a lack of structural information on the full-length proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length PhoP of M. tuberculosis. Unlike other known structures of full-length proteins of the same subfamily, PhoP forms a dimer through its receiver domain with the dimer interface involving {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, a common interface for activated receiver domain dimers. However, the switch residues, Thr99 and Tyr118, are in a conformation resembling those of nonactivated receiver domains. The Tyr118 side chain is involved in the dimer interface interactions. The receiver domain is tethered to the DNA-binding domain through a flexible linker and does not impose structural constraints on the DNA-binding domain. This structure suggests that phosphorylation likely facilitates/stabilizes receiver domain dimerization, bringing the DNA-binding domains to close proximity, thereby increasing their binding affinity for direct repeat DNA sequences.

  11. Crystal structure of the human protein kinase CK2 regulatory subunit reveals its zinc finger-mediated dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Chantalat, L; Leroy, D; Filhol, O; Nueda, A; Benitez, M J; Chambaz, E M; Cochet, C; Dideberg, O

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a tetramer composed of two alpha catalytic subunits and two beta regulatory subunits. The structure of a C-terminal truncated form of the human beta subunit has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.7 A resolution. One dimer is observed in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. The most striking feature of the structure is the presence of a zinc finger mediating the dimerization. The monomer structure consists of two domains, one entirely alpha-helical and one including the zinc finger. The dimer has a crescent shape holding a highly acidic region at both ends. We propose that this acidic region is involved in the interactions with the polyamines and/or catalytic subunits. Interestingly, conserved amino acid residues among beta subunit sequences are clustered along one linear ridge that wraps around the entire dimer. This feature suggests that protein partners may interact with the dimer through a stretch of residues in an extended conformation. PMID:10357806

  12. [Influence of organic loading rate on the start-up of a sequencing airlift aerobic granular reactor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Yuan; Zhou, Dan-Dan; Gao, Lin-Lin; Ma, De-Fang; Zhang, Yu-Meng; Li, Ke-Yu

    2012-10-01

    The cultivation and stability of aerobic granular sludge in a three sequencing airlift internal-loop aerobic granular fluidized beds (R1-R3) under different organic loading rates (OLR) were investigated, where the selective pressure was un-controlled. R1 and R2 were start-up at the COD loading of 7 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) and 3 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) respectively, and R3 was start-up at an increasing COD loading rates of 1.5-3 kg x (m3 x d)(-1). The results showed that the aerobic granules could be formed successfully in all the reactors, however, filamentous bulking happened as the reactor was start-up at an aimed OLR (R1 and R2). It seems the overgrowth of filamentous could be controlled effectively by means of increasing OLR gradually. The granular development characteristics, the physical characteristics and extracellular polymeric substances contents were analyzed especially during the aerobic granules cultivation. Compared with the granules in R1 and R2, aerobic granules formed in R3 presented clearer outer morphology and compact structure, advanced COD removal efficiency and a significant increase in polysaccharides, resulted an enhanced stability. PMID:23233984

  13. How knowledge of the song influences the matching of "melodies" to rhythm sequences tapped in the right and left palms.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, M W; Bormann, L; Harts, K

    1990-12-01

    Previous work by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988) has demonstrated that the right hemisphere (RH) is superior to the left hemisphere (LH) in the matching of tape-recorded melodies to rhythm sequences tapped in the palms of the hands. This asymmetrical advantage was attributed to a RH superiority in the perceptual processing of intonation as compared to the rhythm component of these musical stimuli. In the present study, subjects were taught that the monotone sound of two wooden drumsticks struck together in a specified rhythm actually represented non-melodic translations of songs with identifiable melodies. After such mental associations had been formed, these non-melodic stimuli (which produced no asymmetric performance in Exp. 2 of the O'Boyle and Sanford study), now produced a RH advantage that was comparable to that induced by the original melodies. This finding suggests that the physical presence of intonation and its subsequent perceptual analysis, are not necessarily critical to the RH advantage reported by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988). Rather, the asymmetry may be related to a superior ability of the RH to generate and/or manipulate echoic images in memory. PMID:2081400

  14. Sequence Variation in Amplification Target Genes and Standards Influences Interlaboratory Comparison of BK Virus DNA Load Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Sueur, Charlotte; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Soulier, Eric; Chabaud, Angeline; Perrin, Peggy; Moulin, Bruno; Bahram, Seiamak; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    International guidelines define a BK virus (BKV) load of ≥4 log10 copies/ml as presumptive of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVN) and a cutoff for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether BKV DNA loads (BKVL) are comparable between laboratories, 2 panels of 15 and 8 clinical specimens (urine, whole blood, and plasma) harboring different BKV genotypes were distributed to 20 and 27 French hospital centers in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Although 68% of the reported results fell within the acceptable range of the expected result ±0.5 log10, the interlaboratory variation ranged from 1.32 to 5.55 log10. Polymorphisms specific to BKV genotypes II and IV, namely, the number and position of mutations in amplification target genes and/or deletion in standards, arose as major sources of interlaboratory disagreements. The diversity of DNA purification methods also contributed to the interlaboratory variability, in particular for urine samples. Our data strongly suggest that (i) commercial external quality controls for BKVL assessment should include all major BKV genotypes to allow a correct evaluation of BKV assays, and (ii) the BKV sequence of commercial standards should be provided to users to verify the absence of mismatches with the primers and probes of their BKV assays. Finally, the optimization of primer and probe design and standardization of DNA extraction methods may substantially decrease interlaboratory variability and allow interinstitutional studies to define a universal cutoff for presumptive BKVN and, ultimately, ensure adequate patient care. PMID:26468499

  15. Dimer-dimer interaction of the bacterial selenocysteine synthase SelA promotes functional active site formation and catalytic specificity

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J.; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is incorporated translationally into proteins, and is synthesized on its specific tRNA (tRNASec). In Bacteria, the selenocysteine synthase SelA converts Ser-tRNASec, formed by seryl-tRNA synthetase, to Sec-tRNASec. SelA, a member of the fold-type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme superfamily, has an exceptional homodecameric quaternary structure with a molecular mass of about 500 kDa. Our previously determined crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexed with tRNASec revealed that the ring-shaped decamer is composed of pentamerized SelA dimers, with two SelA dimers arranged to collaboratively interact with one Ser-tRNASec. The SelA catalytic site is close to the dimer-dimer interface, but the significance of the dimer-pentamerization in the catalytic site formation remained elusive. In the present study, we examined the quaternary interactions, and demonstrated their importance for SelA activity by systematic mutagenesis. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of “depentamerized” SelA variants with mutations at the dimer-dimer interface that prevent pentamerization. These dimeric SelA variants formed a distorted and inactivated catalytic site, and confirmed that the pentamer interactions are essential for productive catalytic site formation. Intriguingly, the conformation of the non-functional active site of dimeric SelA shares structural features with other fold-type-I PLP-dependent enzymes with native dimer or tetramer (dimer-of-dimers) quaternary structures. PMID:24456689

  16. Glassy dislocation dynamics in colloidal dimer crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbode, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    Dislocation mobility is central to both the mechanical response and the relaxation mechanisms of crystalline materials. Recent experiments have explored the role of novel particle anisotropies in affecting the rules of defect motion in crystals. ``Peanut-shaped'' colloidal dimer particles consisting of two connected spherical lobes form densely packed crystals in 2D. In these ``degenerate crystals,'' the particle lobes occupy triangular lattice sites while the particle axes are randomly oriented among the three crystalline directions. One consequence of the random orientations of the dimers is that dislocation glide is severely limited by certain particle arrangements in the degenerate crystals. Using optical tweezers to manipulate single lobe-sized spherical intruder particles, we locally deform the crystal, creating defects. During subsequent relaxation, the dislocations formed during the deformation leave the crystal grain, either via annihilation with other dislocations or by moving to a grain boundary. Interestingly, in large crystalline grains this dislocation relaxation occurs through a two-stage process reminiscent of slow relaxations in glassy systems, suggesting the novel concept that glassy phenomena may be introduced to certain kinds of colloidal crystals via simple anisotropic constituents.

  17. Rotational Spectrum of Propargyl Alcohol Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2013-06-01

    Propargyl alcohol is a molecule of interest to astrophysics as well as combustion studies. Rotational-tunneling spectra of propargyl alcohol monomer is well known and shows that the molecule exists in gauche form. Recently we reported microwave spectra of Ar...propargyl alcohol complex. Propargyl alcochol exists in gauche form in the complex as well. In this study we have recorded pure rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer between 4-13 GHz range.A total of 47 transitions, 24 a-type, 16 b-type and 7 c-type, have been observed and fitted with semi rigid rotor asymmetric top hamiltonian. The fitted rotational constants are: A = 2321.83323(47) MHz, B = 1150.47726(24) MHz and C = 1124.89000(20) MHz. The standard deviation for the fit is 2.5 kHz. The experimental rotational constants are very close to the structure predicted by ab-initio calculations in which two gauche-propargyl alcohol moieties are in three point contact stabilized by O-H...O, O-H...pi and C-H...pi interactions. Few transitions for duterated isotopologues of the dimer have also been observed and search for the remaining transitions is in progress. Details will be presented in the talk. E. Hirota,J. Mol. Spectrosc. 26 (1968) 335-350. J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 234 (2005) 149-156. D. Mani, E. Arunan, ChemPhysChem 14 (2013) 754-763.

  18. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  19. Dual RNA-Sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi Challenge Reveals Pathogen and Host Factors Influencing Compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Febé E.; Shuey, Louise S.; Naidoo, Sitha; Mamni, Thandekile; Berger, Dave K.; Myburg, Alexander A.; van den Berg, Noëlani; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2016-01-01

    Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers, and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1). Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets, and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction. PMID:26973660

  20. The New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Science Standards influence on the scope and sequence of the high school science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Tena R.

    This study describes changes to the secondary science curriculum for college preparatory students as a consequence of the implementation of the New Jersey Core Content Curriculum Standards (NJCCCS) in Science. The study compares curriculum changes by the district's socio-economic status (DFG) and participation in the New Jersey Statewide Systemic Initiative (NJSSI), a systemic science reform effort of the National Science Foundation. A 26-question survey was mailed to 285 secondary school districts in New Jersey. A total of 132 districts returned the survey, resulting in a response rate of 48%. The study finds that some curriculum changes have taken place since the inception of the NJCCS Science standards; although few were found to be statistically significant certain trends did appear. One trend suggested by the data is that more curricular change took place in Grade 9 than in any other grade. Another trend indicates that the Biology/Chemistry sequence remains intact, with many districts now offering Biology in Grade 9 and Chemistry in Grade 10; this is particularly common in upper-income districts. While the state mandates a third year of science for graduation, Physics is not a requirement. Forty-four districts reported no changes to their curriculum. The most frequently reported change was a change in text. The second most frequent change reported was creating a new Grade 9 course; moving Biology to Grade 9 was the third most commonly reported change. Chemistry and physics were added to courses in Grades 9 and 10. Participation in NJSSI did not appear to be significant. Overall, upper-income districts reported making the greatest change, while middle-income districts reported the greatest change in Grade 9. Very few districts reported changes in the scope of Chemistry and Physics. The changes reported by the school districts reflect the conservative nature of high school education and the perseverance of the "layer-cake" curriculum indigenous to American high

  1. Dual RNA-Sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi Challenge Reveals Pathogen and Host Factors Influencing Compatibility.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Febé E; Shuey, Louise S; Naidoo, Sitha; Mamni, Thandekile; Berger, Dave K; Myburg, Alexander A; van den Berg, Noëlani; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2016-01-01

    Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers, and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1). Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets, and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction. PMID:26973660

  2. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasma DNA from Cancer Patients: Factors Influencing Consistency with Tumour DNA and Prospective Investigation of Its Utility for Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kaisaki, Pamela J; Cutts, Anthony; Popitsch, Niko; Camps, Carme; Pentony, Melissa M; Wilson, Gareth; Page, Suzanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Vavoulis, Dimitris; Henderson, Shirley; Gupta, Avinash; Middleton, Mark R; Karydis, Ioannis; Talbot, Denis C; Schuh, Anna; Taylor, Jenny C

    2016-01-01

    Use of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a liquid biopsy has been proposed for potential identification and monitoring of solid tumours. We investigate a next-generation sequencing approach for mutation detection in ctDNA in two related studies using a targeted panel. The first study was retrospective, using blood samples taken from melanoma patients at diverse timepoints before or after treatment, aiming to evaluate correlation between mutations identified in biopsy and ctDNA, and to acquire a first impression of influencing factors. We found good concordance between ctDNA and tumour mutations of melanoma patients when blood samples were collected within one year of biopsy or before treatment. In contrast, when ctDNA was sequenced after targeted treatment in melanoma, mutations were no longer found in 9 out of 10 patients, suggesting the method might be useful for detecting treatment response. Building on these findings, we focused the second study on ctDNA obtained before biopsy in lung patients, i.e. when a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer had been made, but no treatment had started. The main objective of this prospective study was to evaluate use of ctDNA in diagnosis, investigating the concordance of biopsy and ctDNA-derived mutation detection. Here we also found positive correlation between diagnostic lung biopsy results and pre-biopsy ctDNA sequencing, providing support for using ctDNA as a cost-effective, non-invasive solution when the tumour is inaccessible or when biopsy poses significant risk to the patient. PMID:27626278

  3. A growth kinetics model of rate decomposition for Si1-xGex alloy based on dimer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xian-Ying; Ji, Yao; Hao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    According to the dimer theory on semiconductor surface and chemical vapor deposition(CVD) growth characteristics of Si1-xGex, two mechanisms of rate decomposition and discrete flow density are proposed. Based on these two mechanisms, the Grove theory and Fick's first law, a CVD growth kinetics model of Si1-xGex alloy is established. In order to make the model more accurate, two growth control mechanisms of vapor transport and surface reaction are taken into account. The paper also considers the influence of the dimer structure on the growth rate. The results show that the model calculated value is consistent with the experimental values at different temperatures.

  4. Single-stranded DNA ligation and XLF-stimulated incompatible DNA end ligation by the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex: influence of terminal DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiafeng; Lu, Haihui; Tsai, Albert G; Schwarz, Klaus; Lieber, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    The double-strand DNA break repair pathway, non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ), is distinctive for the flexibility of its nuclease, polymerase and ligase activities. Here we find that the joining of ends by XRCC4-ligase IV is markedly influenced by the terminal sequence, and a steric hindrance model can account for this. XLF (Cernunnos) stimulates the joining of both incompatible DNA ends and compatible DNA ends at physiologic concentrations of Mg2+, but only of incompatible DNA ends at higher concentrations of Mg2+, suggesting charge neutralization between the two DNA ends within the ligase complex. XRCC4-DNA ligase IV has the distinctive ability to ligate poly-dT single-stranded DNA and long dT overhangs in a Ku- and XLF-independent manner, but not other homopolymeric DNA. The dT preference of the ligase is interesting given the sequence bias of the NHEJ polymerase. These distinctive properties of the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex explain important aspects of its in vivo roles. PMID:17717001

  5. Structure, Aggregation, and Activity of a Covalent Insulin Dimer Formed During Storage of Neutral Formulation of Human Insulin.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Christian Fogt; Norrman, Mathias; Wahlund, Per-Olof; Benie, Andrew J; Petersen, Bent O; Jessen, Christian M; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Naver, Helle; Hubálek, František; Poulsen, Christian; Otzen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A specific covalently linked dimeric species of insulin high molecular weight products (HMWPs), formed during prolonged incubation of a neutral pharmaceutical formulation of human insulin, were characterized in terms of tertiary structure, self-association, biological activity, and fibrillation properties. The dimer was formed by a covalent link between A21Asn and B29Lys. It was analyzed using static and dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering to evaluate its self-association behavior. The tertiary structure was obtained using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of HMWP was determined using 2 in vitro assays, and its influence on fibrillation was investigated using Thioflavin T assays. The dimer's tertiary structure was nearly identical to that of the noncovalent insulin dimer, and it was able to form hexamers in the presence of zinc. The dimer exhibited reduced propensity for self-association in the absence of zinc but significantly postponed the onset of fibrillation in insulin formulations. Consistent with its dimeric state, the tested species of HMWP showed little to no biological activity in the used assays. This study is the first detailed characterization of a specific type of human insulin HMWP formed during storage of a marketed pharmaceutical formulation. These results indicate that this specific type of HMWP is unlikely to antagonize the physical stability of the formulation, as HMWP retained a tertiary structure similar to the noncovalent dimer and participated in hexamer assembly in the presence of zinc. In addition, increasing amounts of HMWP reduce the rate of insulin fibrillation. PMID:26921119

  6. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dimers are predicted to have functional significance in antigen presentation. The putative contact amino acids of the I-Ak class II dimer of dimers have been identified by molecular modeling based on the DR1 crystal structure (Nydam et al., Int. Immunol. 10, 1237,1998). We have previously reported the role in antigen presentation of dimer of dimers contact amino acids located in the C-terminal domains of the alpha- and beta-chains of class II. Our calculations show that residues Ealpha89 and Ralpha145 in the alpha2-domain form an inter alpha-chain salt bridge between pairs of alphabeta-heterodimers. Other residues, Qalpha92 and Nalpha115, may be involved in close association in that part of the alpha-chain. We investigated the role of these amino acids on class II expression and antigen presentation. Class II composed of an Ealpha89K substituted alpha-chain paired with a wt beta-chain exhibited inhibited antigen presentation and expression of alpha-chain serologic epitopes. In contrast, mutation of Ralpha145E had less affect on antigen presentation and did not affect I-Ak serologic epitopes. Interchanging charges of the salt bridge residues by expressing both Ralpha145E and Ealpha89K on the same chain obviated the large negative effect of the Ealpha89K mutation on antigen presentation but not on the serologic epitopes. Our results are similar for those reported for mutation of DR3's inter-chain salt bridge with the exception that double mutants did not moderate the DR3 defect. Interestingly, the amino acids differences between I-A and DR change the location of the inter-chain salt bridges. In DR1 these residues are located at positions Ealpha88 and Kalpha111; in I-Ak these residues are located at position Ealpha89 and Ralpha145. Inter alpha-chain salt bridges are thus maintained in various class II molecules by amino acids located in different parts of the alpha2-domain. This conservation of structure suggests that considerable functional

  7. Effects of Symmetry Breaking and Conductive Contact on the Plasmon Coupling in Gold Nanorod Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, Liane S.; Wu, Yanpeng; Willingham, Britain A.; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan

    2010-08-24

    We have explored the consequences of symmetry breaking on the coupled surface plasmon resonances in individual dimers of gold nanorods using single-particle dark-field scattering spectroscopy and numerical simulations. Pairs of chemically grown nanorods can exhibit wide variation in sizes, gap distances, and relative orientation angles. The combination of single-particle spectroscopy and theoretical analysis allowed us to discern the effects of specific asymmetry-inducing parameters one at a time. The dominant influence of symmetry breaking occurred for longitudinal resonances in strongly coupled nanorods in linear end-to-end configurations. In particular, we found that the normally dark antibonding dimer mode becomes visible when the sizes of the two nanorods are different. In addition, we observed a conductively coupled plasmon mode that was red-shifted by at least 250 nm from the bonding plasmon mode for the corresponding nontouching geometry. Gaining detailed insight into how symmetry breaking influences coupled surface plasmon resonances of individual nanorod dimers is an important step toward the general understanding of the optical properties of assemblies of chemically synthesized nanorods with unavoidable irregularities in size and orientation.

  8. Photophysics of rhodamine dimers in Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorimaa, E.; Ikonen, M.; Lemmetyinen, H.

    1994-11-01

    Temperature dependent dimerization processes of octadecylrhodamine B (RB) and octadecylrhodamine 6G (R6G) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. The geometry of the dimers in LB films is equal for both dyes, but different to the geometry of the dimers found in solutions. The sandwich-type dimers with lifetimes of 710 ps for RB and 620 ps for R6G have their fluorescence maxima at 635 and 620 nm for RB and R6G, respectively. The dimer with an oblique geometry has its fluorescence maximum at 675 nm for both dyes, and its fluorescence lifetime is 4.6 ns for RB and 4.9 ns for R6G. The proportion of fluorescent dimers increases with decreasing temperature, when the nonfluorescent H dimers reorganize to fluorescent J dimers. The activation energy for this temperature induced process is 1.4 and 2.6 kJ mol -1 for RB and R6G, respectively.

  9. Photophysics of rhodamine dimers in Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorimaa, E.; Ikonen, M.; Lemmetyinen, H.

    1994-11-01

    Temperature dependent dimerization processes of octadecylrhodamine B (RB) and octadecylrhodamine 6G (R6G) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. The geometry of the dimers in LB films is equal for both dyes, but different to the geometry of the dimers found in solutions. The sandwich-type dimers with lifetimes of 710 ps for RB and 620 ps for R6G have their fluorescence maxima at 635 and 620 nm for RB and R6G, respectively. The dimer with an oblique geometry has its fluorescence maximum at 675 nm for both dyes, and its fluorescence lifetime is 4.6 ns for RB and 4.9 ns for R6G. The proportion of fluorescent dimers increases with decreasing temperature, when the nonfluorescent H dimers reorganize to fluorescent J dimers. The activation energy for this temperature induced process is 1.4 and 2.6 kJ/mol for RB and R6G, respectively.

  10. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers....

  11. Advantage of Being a Dimer for Serratia marcescens Endonuclease?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuanying; Krause, Kurt; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    The monomer and dimer of the bacterium Serratia marcescens endonuclease (SMnase) are each catalytically active and the two subunits of the dimer function independently of each other. Nature however chooses the dimer form instead of the monomer. In order to explain this, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both model built complexes of a subunit of SMnase and the dimer with DNA in aqueous solution. We estimated the electrostatic binding energy, analyzed the distribution and dynamics of water around the complexes, identified water clusters in the protein, and related dynamics of water to the protein's function. We find that the dimer form has an electrostatic advantage over the monomer to associate with DNA. Although Mg2+ remains hexa-coordinated during the simulation, the binding pathway of DNA to Mg2+ changes from inner-sphere binding in the monomer to outer-sphere in the dimer, which may be more energetically favorable. In addition, two water clusters in the active site of each monomer and in the dimer complex were identified and localized in two regions, named ‘stabilizing’ and ‘working’ region. Water in the ‘working’ region in the dimer complex has larger fluctuations than that in the monomer. PMID:19053714

  12. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in producing, manufacturing,...

  13. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in producing, manufacturing,...

  14. Ising and dimer models in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moessner, R.; Sondhi, S. L.

    2003-08-01

    Motivated by recent interest in 2+1 dimensional quantum dimer models, we revisit Fisher’s mapping of two-dimensional Ising models to hardcore dimer models. First, we note that the symmetry breaking transition of the ferromagnetic Ising model maps onto a non-symmetry breaking transition in dimer language—instead it becomes a deconfinement transition for test monomers. Next, we introduce a modification of Fisher’s mapping in which a second dimer model, also equivalent to the Ising model, is defined on a generically different lattice derived from the dual. In contrast to Fisher’s original mapping, this enables us to reformulate frustrated Ising models as dimer models with positive weights and we illustrate this by providing a new solution of the fully frustrated Ising model on the square lattice. Finally, by means of the modified mapping we show that a large class of three-dimensional Ising models are precisely equivalent, in the time continuum limit, to particular quantum dimer models. As Ising models in three dimensions are dual to Ising gauge theories, this further yields an exact map between the latter and the quantum dimer models. The paramagnetic phase in Ising language maps onto a deconfined, topologically ordered phase in the dimer models. Using this set of ideas, we also construct an exactly soluble quantum eight vertex model.

  15. Sr(2+) induces unusually stable d(GGGTGGGTGGGTGGG) quadruplex dimers.

    PubMed

    Lomidze, Levan; Kelley, Sean; Gogichaishvili, Shota; Metreveli, Nunu; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Kankia, Besik

    2016-11-01

    Guanine-rich sequences are able to form quadruplexes consisting of G-quartet structural units. Quadruplexes play an important role in the regulation of gene expression and have therapeutic and biotechnological potential. The HIV-1 integrase inhibitor, (GGGT)4 , and its variants demonstrate unusually high thermal stability. This property has been exploited in the use of quadruplex formation to drive various endergonic reactions of nucleic acids such as isothermal DNA amplification. Quadruplex stability is mainly determined by cations, which specifically bind into the inner core of the structure. In the present work, we report a systematic study of a variant of the HIV-1 integrase inhibitor, GGGTGGGTGGGTGGG (G3T), in the presence of alkali and alkaline-earth cations. We show that Sr(2+) -G3T is characterized by the highest thermal stability and that quadruplex formation requires only one Sr(2+) ion that binds with low micromolar affinity. These concentrations are sufficient to drive robust isothermal quadruplex priming DNA amplification reaction. The Sr(2+) -quadruplexes are also able to form unusually stable dimers through end-to-end stacking. The multimerization can be induced by a combination of quadruplex forming cations (i.e., K(+) or Sr(2+) ) and non-specific Mg(2+) . PMID:27416320

  16. Potent T Cell Activation with Dimeric Peptide–Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Ligand: The Role of CD4 Coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Abdel Rahim A.; O'Herrin, Sean M.; Lebowitz, Michael S.; Srikrishnan, Ananth; Bieler, Joan; Schneck, Jonathan; Pardoll, Drew

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of the T cell receptor (TCR) with its cognate peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a primary event during T cell activation. Here we used a dimeric IEk-MCC molecule to study its capacity to activate antigen-specific T cells and to directly analyze the role of CD4 in physically stabilizing the TCR–MHC interaction. Dimeric IEk-MCC stably binds to specific T cells. In addition, immobilized dimeric IEk-MCC can induce TCR downregulation and activate antigen-specific T cells more efficiently than anti-CD3. The potency of the dimeric IEk-MCC is significantly enhanced in the presence of CD4. However, CD4 does not play any significant role in stabilizing peptide-MHC–TCR interactions as it fails to enhance binding of IEk-MCC to specific T cells or influence peptide-MHC–TCR dissociation rate or TCR downregulation. Moreover, these results indicate that dimerization of peptide-MHC class II using an IgG molecular scaffold significantly increases its binding avidity leading to an enhancement of its stimulatory capacity while maintaining the physiological properties of cognate peptide–MHC complex. These peptide-MHC–IgG chimeras may, therefore, provide a novel approach to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9802975

  17. Simple Sequence Repeats in Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat length polymorphisms were utilized to examine genetic relatedness among accessions of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai). A size-fractionated TaqI genomic library was screened for the occurrence of dimer and trimer simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total o...

  18. Dimer Involvement and Origin of Crossover in Nickel-Catalyzed Aldehyde–Alkyne Reductive Couplings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of nickel(0)-catalyzed reductive coupling of aldehydes and alkynes has been studied. Extensive double-labeling crossover studies have been conducted. While previous studies illustrated that phosphine- and N-heterocyclic carbene-derived catalysts exhibited differing behavior, the origin of these effects has now been evaluated in detail. Many variables, including ligand class, sterics of the ligand and alkyne, temperature, and ring size being formed in intramolecular versions, all influence the extent of crossover observed. A computational evaluation of these effects suggests that dimerization of a key metallacyclic intermediate provides the origin of crossover. Protocols that proceed with crossover are typically less efficient than those without crossover given the thermodynamic stability and low reactivity of the dimeric metallacycles involved in crossover pathways. PMID:25401337

  19. Canine intracranial meningiomas: Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers.

    PubMed

    Font, Cristina; de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2015-12-01

    The haemostatic system influences angiogenesis, cell growth and metastasis in solid tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate tissue factor (TF) expression, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimer deposition, as well as the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine intracranial meningiomas using immunohistochemistry. All but three (26/29) meningiomas expressed TF. TF immunolabelling was significantly higher in high-grade (grades II and III) than in low-grade (grade I) meningiomas. Fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimer deposits were detected in all meningiomas and staining scores were statistically different between different meningioma grades. IVT was detected in 19/29 specimens, but no statistical differences were observed between different malignancy grades. In conclusion, the haemostatic system may be involved in meningioma pathobiology and may be a potential therapeutic target for canine meningiomas, as also suggested for human meningiomas. PMID:26526524

  20. Toward an Enhancement of the Photoactivity of Multiphotochromic Dimers Using Plasmon Resonance: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Fihey, Arnaud; Le Guennic, Boris; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-08-01

    Building dimers of organic photochromic compounds paves the way to multifunctional switches, but such architectures often undergo partial photoreactivity only. Combining photochromism of molecules and plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles (NPs) is known to affect the photochromism of monomers, yet the impact on multimers remains unknown. Here we propose a theoretical study of dimers of dithienylethenes by the mean of a hybrid calculation scheme (discrete-interaction model/quantum mechanics). We aim to assess how the optical properties of multiphotochromes are tuned by the influence of the plasmon resonances. We show that, for a typical chemisorption orientation on the NP, the absorption bands responsible for the photochromism are significantly enhanced for both the doubly open and mixed closed-open isomers of the dyad, hinting that plasmon resonance could be used to boost the generally poor photoactivity of dithienylethene dyads. PMID:26267018

  1. Vertically-oriented nanoparticle dimer based on focused plasmonic trapping.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhe; Su, Lei; Shen, Yao-Chun

    2016-07-11

    We proposed a vertically-oriented dimer structure based on focused plasmonic trapping of metallic nanoparticle. Quantitative FDTD calculations and qualitative analysis by simplified dipole approximation revealed that localized surface plasmon coupling dominates in the plasmon hybridization, and the vertically-oriented dimer can effectively make use of the dominant longitudinal component of the surface plasmon virtual probe thus providing much stronger electric field in the gap. Furthermore, for practical application the top nanoparticle of the dimer can be replaced with an atomic force microscope tip which enables the precise control of the gap distance of the dimer. Therefore the proposed vertically-oriented dimer structure provides both the scanning capability and the extremely-high electrical field necessary for the high sensitivity Raman imaging. PMID:27410874

  2. Rovibrationally Inelastic Collisions of Ultracold Lithium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, William; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We have calculated cross sections for rovibrationally inelastic collisions of Li2 A(1) 1Σu+ colliding with neon and xenon on ab initio potentials. We find that the inelastic cross section can be very large and increasing at low collision velocity. This behavior is very well modeled as a Langevin process. The total inelastic cross section is a sizable fraction of the total capture cross section, typically about a third. For Li2 - Xe, the total inelastic rate constants are several thousand square angstroms, and level-to-level rate constants are several hundred square angstroms at collision speeds below 1000 cm/s, implying that such collisions might be observable in photoassociated lithium dimer.

  3. Integrability of PT-symmetric dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickton, J.; Susanto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The coupled discrete linear and Kerr nonlinear Schrödinger equations with gain and loss describing transport on dimers with parity-time (PT)-symmetric potentials are considered. The model is relevant among others to experiments in optical couplers and proposals on Bose-Einstein condensates in PT-symmetric double-well potentials. It is known that the models are integrable. Here, the integrability is exploited further to construct the phase portraits of the system. A pendulum equation with a linear potential and a constant force for the phase difference between the fields is obtained, which explains the presence of unbounded solutions above a critical threshold parameter. The behavior of all solutions of the system, including changes in the topological structure of the phase plane, is then discussed.

  4. Role of the EHD2 Unstructured Loop in Dimerization, Protein Binding and Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Kriti; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The C-terminal Eps 15 Homology Domain proteins (EHD1-4) play important roles in regulating endocytic trafficking. EHD2 is the only family member whose crystal structure has been solved, and it contains an unstructured loop consisting of two proline-phenylalanine (PF) motifs: KPFRKLNPF. In contrast, despite EHD2 having nearly 70% amino acid identity with its paralogs, EHD1, EHD3 and EHD4, the latter proteins contain a single KPF or RPF motif, but no NPF motif. In this study, we sought to define the precise role of each PF motif in EHD2’s homo-dimerization, binding with the protein partners, and subcellular localization. To test the role of the NPF motif, we generated an EHD2 NPF-to-NAF mutant to mimic the homologous sequences of EHD1 and EHD3. We demonstrated that this mutant lost both its ability to dimerize and bind to Syndapin2. However, it continued to localize primarily to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane. On the other hand, EHD2 NPF-to-APA mutants displayed normal dimerization and Syndapin2 binding, but exhibited markedly increased nuclear localization and reduced association with the plasma membrane. We then hypothesized that the single PF motif of EHD1 (that aligns with the KPF of EHD2) might be responsible for both binding and localization functions of EHD1. Indeed, the EHD1 RPF motif was required for dimerization, interaction with MICAL-L1 and Syndapin2, as well as localization to tubular recycling endosomes. Moreover, recycling assays demonstrated that EHD1 RPF-to-APA was incapable of supporting normal receptor recycling. Overall, our data suggest that the EHD2 NPF phenylalanine residue is crucial for EHD2 localization to the plasma membrane, whereas the proline residue is essential for EHD2 dimerization and binding. These studies support the recently proposed model in which the EHD2 N-terminal region may regulate the availability of the unstructured loop for interactions with neighboring EHD2 dimers, thus promoting oligomerization. PMID

  5. Formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers photosensitized by pyridopsoralens: Quantitative and qualitative distribution within DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Moysan, A.; Viari, A.; Vigny, P. ); Voituriez, L.; Cadet J. ); Moustacchi, E.; Sage, E. )

    1991-07-23

    As after irradiation with 254-nm UV light, exposure of thymidine and three isomeric pyridopsoralen derivatives to UVA radiation, in the dry state, leads to the formation of the six diastereomers of cyclobutadithymidine as the predominant reaction. This unexpected photosensitized reaction, which also gives rise to both 5R* and 5S* diastereomers of 5,6-dihydro-5-({alpha}-thymidylyl)thymidine (or spore photoproduct), is selective since (2+2) dimerization of 2{prime}-deoxycytidine was not detected under the same experimental conditions. The cis-syn isomer of cyclobutadithymine was also found to be produced within isolated DNA following UVA irradiation in aqueous solutions containing 7-methylpyrido (3,4-c)psoralen. Quantitatively, this photoproduct represents about one-fifth of the overall yield of the furan-side pyridopsoralen (2+2) photocycloadducts the thymine. DNA sequencing methodology was used to demonstrate that pyridopsoralen-photosensitized DNA is a substrate for T4 endonuclease V and Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme, two enzymes acting specifically on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. The formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers concomitant to that of thymine-furocoumarin photoadducts and their eventual implication in the photobiological effects of the pyridopsoralens are discussed.

  6. Crystal structure of the arcelin-1 dimer from Phaseolus vulgaris at 1.9-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Mourey, L; Pédelacq, J D; Birck, C; Fabre, C; Rougé, P; Samama, J P

    1998-05-22

    Arcelin-1 is a glycoprotein from kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) which displays insecticidal properties and protects the seeds from predation by larvae of various bruchids. This lectin-like protein is devoid of monosaccharide binding properties and belongs to the phytohemagglutinin protein family. The x-ray structure determination at 1.9-A resolution of native arcelin-1 dimers, which correspond to the functional state of the protein in solution, was solved using multiple isomorphous replacement and refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.208. The three glycosylation sites on each monomer are all covalently modified. One of these oligosaccharide chains provides interactions with protein atoms at the dimer interface, and another one may act by preventing the formation of higher oligomeric species in the arcelin variants. The dimeric structure and the severe alteration of the monosaccharide binding site in arcelin-1 correlate with the hemagglutinating properties of the protein, which are unaffected by simple sugars and sugar derivatives. Sequence analysis and structure comparisons of arcelin-1 with the other insecticidal proteins from kidney beans, arcelin-5, and alpha-amylase inhibitor and with legume lectins, yield insights into the molecular basis of the different biological functions of these proteins. PMID:9582323

  7. Pentapeptide-repeat proteins that act as topoisomerase poison resistance factors have a common dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Zhang, Yong; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The protein AlbG is a self-resistance factor against albicidin, a nonribosomally encoded hybrid polyketide-peptide with antibiotic and phytotoxic properties produced by Xanthomonas albilineans. Primary-sequence analysis indicates that AlbG is a member of the pentapeptide-repeat family of proteins (PRP). The structure of AlbG from X. albilineans was determined at 2.0 Å resolution by SAD phasing using data collected from a single trimethyllead acetate derivative on a home source. AlbG folds into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix composed of approximately eight semi-regular coils. The regularity of the β-­helix is blemished by a large loop/deviation in the β-helix between coils 4 and 5. The C-terminus of the β-helix is capped by a dimerization module, yielding a dimer with a 110 Å semi-collinear β-helical axis. This method of dimer formation appears to be common to all PRP proteins that confer resistance to topoisomerase poisons and contrasts with most PRP proteins, which are typically monomeric. PMID:21393830

  8. Dimer linkage structure in retroviruses: models that include both duplex and quadruplex domains.

    PubMed

    Zarudnaya, M I; Kolomiets, I M; Potyahaylo, A L; Hovorun, D M

    2005-01-01

    Genome of all known retroviruses consists of two identical molecules of RNA, which are non-covalently linked. The most stable contact site between two RNA molecules is located near their 5' ends. The molecular interactions in the dimer linkage structure (DLS) in mature virions are currently unknown. Recently we suggested that the dimer linkage structure in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) contains both duplex and quadruplex domains and proposed a model of DLS in HIV-1Mal (Central African virus). In this paper we showed that similar models can be also built for HIV- 1Lai, a representative of the North-American and European viruses. One of the double-stranded domains in the model structures represents either an extended duplex formed by different pathways (through base pair melting and subsequent reannealing or by a recombination mechanism) or kissing loop complex. The quadruplexes contain both G- and mixed tetrads, for example, G.C.G.C or A.U.A.U. Phylogenetic analysis of 350 isolates from NCBI database showed that similar models of DLS are predictable practically for all HIV-1 isolates surveyed. A model of dimer linkage structure in Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) is also presented. The structure includes a duplex formed by the palindromic sequences and several quadruplexes. PMID:16335231

  9. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing. PMID:24770325

  10. His499 Regulates Dimerization and Prevents Oncogenic Activation by Asparagine Mutations of the Human Thrombopoietin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Emilie; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Sato, Takeshi; Dass, Sharmila; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Shwe, Myat M; Staerk, Judith; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2016-02-01

    Ligand binding to the extracellular domain of the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) imparts a specific orientation on the transmembrane (TM) and intracellular domains of the receptors that is required for physiologic activation via receptor dimerization. To map the inactive and active dimeric orientations of the TM helices, we performed asparagine (Asn)-scanning mutagenesis of the TM domains of the murine and human TpoR. Substitution of Asn at only one position (S505N) activated the human receptor, whereas Asn substitutions at several positions activated the murine receptor. Second site mutational studies indicate that His(499) near the N terminus of the TM domain is responsible for protecting the human receptor from activation by Asn mutations. Structural studies reveal that the sequence preceding His(499) is helical in the murine receptor but non-helical in peptides corresponding to the TM domain of the inactive human receptor. The activating S505N mutation and the small molecule agonist eltrombopag both induce helix in this region of the TM domain and are associated with dimerization and activation of the human receptor. Thus, His(499) regulates the activation of human TpoR and provides additional protection against activating mutations, such as oncogenic Asn mutations in the TM domain. PMID:26627830

  11. Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication and Virus Particle Assembly Require Specific Dimerization of the NS4A Protein Transmembrane Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kohlway, Andrew; Pirakitikulr, Nathan; Barrera, Francisco N.; Potapova, Olga; Engelman, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4A is a single-pass transmembrane (TM) protein essential for viral replication and particle assembly. The sequence of the NS4A TM domain is highly conserved, suggesting that it may be important for protein-protein interactions. To test this hypothesis, we measured the potential dimerization of the NS4A TM domain in a well-characterized two-hybrid TM protein interaction system. The NS4A TM domain exhibited a strong homotypic interaction that was comparable in affinity to glycophorin A, a well-studied human blood group antigen that forms TM homodimers. Several mutations predicted to cluster on a common surface of the NS4A TM helix caused significant reductions in dimerization, suggesting that these residues form an interface for NS4A dimerization. Mutations in the NS4A TM domain were further examined in the JFH-1 genotype 2a replicon system; importantly, all mutations that destabilized NS4A dimers also caused defects in RNA replication and/or virus assembly. Computational modeling of NS4A TM interactions suggests a right-handed dimeric interaction of helices with an interface that is consistent with the mutational effects. Furthermore, defects in NS4A oligomerization and virus particle assembly of two mutants were rescued by NS4A A15S, a TM mutation recently identified through forward genetics as a cell culture-adaptive mutation. Together, these data provide the first example of a functionally important TM dimer interface within an HCV nonstructural protein and reveal a fundamental role of the NS4A TM domain in coordinating HCV RNA replication and virus particle assembly. PMID:24173222

  12. Long- and short-term in vitro D-dimer stability measured with INNOVANCE D-Dimer.

    PubMed

    Böhm-Weigert, M; Wissel, T; Muth, H; Kemkes-Matthes, B; Peetz, D

    2010-02-01

    In vitro D-dimer stability in plasma is widely assumed, but has not yet been documented by systematic studies using samples covering a wide range of D-dimer. We investigated the short- and long-term stability of D-dimer in clinical citrated plasma samples with normal and pathological levels. The short-term stability was analysed by measuring D-dimer fresh, after storage of plasma for 4 hours at room temperature (RT) and after an additional 24 h storage at +2 to +8 degrees C (n=40). Long-term stability samples (n=40) were measured fresh and after storage for 19, 25 and 36 months at < or =-60 degrees C. The effect of repeated freezing was analysed by measuring samples (n=50) fresh and after four consecutive freeze-thaw cycles. D-dimer was measured on the BCS System using the INNOVANCE D-Dimer assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Products GmbH, Marburg, Germany). D-dimer values at baseline ranged from 0.23-22.2 mg/l FEU. The mean percentage change after storage for 4 hours at RT and additional 24 hours at +2 to +8 degrees C was +3.8% and +2.7%, respectively. The mean percentage change after frozen storage for 19, 25 and 36 months at < or =-60 degrees C was -11.7%, -4.8% and -9.3%, respectively. The small decrease of D-dimer values after frozen storage was not time-dependent. Repeated freezing did not significantly alter D-dimer values (mean change < or =5%). The data demonstrate stability of D-dimer in plasma prior to freezing for up to 4 hours at RT and for up to 24 hours at +2 to +8 degrees C as well as in plasma stored for up to three years at < or =-60 degrees C. PMID:20126827

  13. Diagnostic Value of Elevated D-Dimer Level in Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Acute or Subacute Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Jin; Im, Sun; Jang, Yong Jun; Park, So Young; Sohn, Dong Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To define the risk factors that influence the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with acute or subacute brain lesions and to determine the usefulness of D-dimer levels for VTE screening of these patients. Methods Medical data from January 2012 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Mean D-dimer levels in those with VTE versus those without VTE were compared. Factors associated with VTE were analyzed and the odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. The D-dimer cutoff value for patients with hemiplegia was defined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Of 117 patients with acute or subacute brain lesions, 65 patients with elevated D-dimer levels (mean, 5.1±5.8 mg/L; positive result >0.55 mg/L) were identified. Logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of VTE was 3.9 times higher in those with urinary tract infections (UTIs) (p=0.0255). The risk of VTE was 4.5 times higher in those who had recently undergone surgery (p=0.0151). Analysis of the ROC showed 3.95 mg/L to be the appropriate D-dimer cutoff value for screening for VTE (area under the curve [AUC], 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-0.8) in patients with acute or subacute brain lesions. This differs greatly from the conventional D-dimer cutoff value of 0.55 mg/L. D-dimer levels less than 3.95 mg/L in the absence of surgery showed a negative predictive value of 95.8% (95% CI, 78.8-99.8). Conclusion Elevated D-dimer levels alone have some value in VTE diagnosis. However, the concomitant presence of UTI or a history of recent surgery significantly increased the risk of VTE in patients with acute or subacute brain lesions. Therefore, a different D-dimer cutoff value should be applied in these cases. PMID:26798616

  14. Mass spectrometry analysis of the oxidation states of the pro-oncogenic protein anterior gradient-2 reveals covalent dimerization via an intermolecular disulphide bond.

    PubMed

    Clarke, David J; Murray, Euan; Faktor, Jakub; Mohtar, Aiman; Vojtesek, Borek; MacKay, C Logan; Smith, Pat Langridge; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-05-01

    Anterior Gradient-2 (AGR2) is a component of a pro-oncogenic signalling pathway that can promote p53 inhibition, metastatic cell migration, limb regeneration, and cancer drug-resistance. AGR2 is in the protein-disulphide isomerase superfamily containing a single cysteine (Cys-81) that forms covalent adducts with its client proteins. We have found that mutation of Cysteine-81 attenuates its biochemical activity in its sequence-specific peptide docking function, reduces binding to Reptin, and reduces its stability in cells. As such, we evaluated how chemical oxidation of its cysteine affects its biochemical properties. Recombinant AGR2 spontaneously forms covalent dimers in the absence of reductant whilst DTT promotes dimer to monomer conversion. Mutation of Cysteine-81 to alanine prevents peroxide catalysed dimerization of AGR2 in vitro, suggesting a reactive cysteine is central to covalent dimer formation. Both biochemical assays and ESI mass spectrometry were used to demonstrate that low levels of a chemical oxidant promote an intermolecular disulphide bond through formation of a labile sulfenic acid intermediate. However, higher levels of oxidant promote sulfinic or sulfonic acid formation thus preventing covalent dimerization of AGR2. These data together identify the single cysteine of AGR2 as an oxidant responsive moiety that regulates its propensity for oxidation and its monomeric-dimeric state. This has implications for redox regulation of the pro-oncogenic functions of AGR2 protein in cancer cells. PMID:26876500

  15. Dimeric phenalenyl-based neutral radical molecular conductors.

    PubMed

    Chi, X; Itkis, M E; Kirschbaum, K; Pinkerton, A A; Oakley, R T; Cordes, A W; Haddon, R C

    2001-05-01

    We report the preparation, crystallization, and solid-state characterization of ethyl (3)- and butyl (4)-substituted spiro-biphenalenyl radicals. Both of these compounds are found to be conducting face-to-face pi-dimers in the solid state but with different room-temperature magnetic ground states. At room temperature, 4 exists as a diamagnetic pi-dimer (interplanar separation of approximately 3.1 A), whereas 3 is a paramagnetic pi-dimer (interplanar separation of approximately 3.3 A), and both compounds show phase transitions between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic forms. Electrical resistivity measurements of single crystals of 3 and 4 show that the transition from the high-temperature paramagnetic pi-dimer form to the low-temperature diamagnetic pi-dimer structure is accompanied by an increase in conductivity by about 2 orders of magnitude. This behavior is unprecedented and is very difficult to reconcile with the usual understanding of a Peierls dimerization, which inevitably leads to an insulating ground state. We tentatively assign the enhancement in the conductivity to a decrease in the on-site Coulombic correlation energy (U), as the dimers form a super-molecule with twice the amount of conjugation. PMID:11457155

  16. The Talin Dimer Structure Orientation Is Mechanically Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Golji, Javad; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of a stable cell-substrate contact can be regulated by mechanical force, especially at the focal adhesion. Individual proteins that make up the focal adhesions, such as talin, can exhibit mechanosensing. We previously described one mode of talin mechanosensing in which the vinculin-binding site of talin is exposed after force-induced stretch of a single talin rod domain. Here, we describe a second mode of talin mechanosensing in which the talin dimer itself can adopt different orientations in response to mechanical stimulation. Using molecular dynamics models, we demonstrate that the C-terminus region of the talin dimer is flexible mainly at the linker between the dimerization helices and the nearby actin-binding helical bundle. Our molecular dynamics simulations reveal two possible orientations of the talin dimer at its C-terminus. The extracellular matrix (ECM)-bound integrins cross-linked by talin can be forced apart leading to an elongated orientation of the talin dimer, and the ECM-bound integrins can be forced together by the ECM producing a collapsed orientation of the talin dimer. Formation of the elongated orientation is shown to be more favorable. Switching between the two talin dimer orientations constitutes a mode of mechanosensing. PMID:25418161

  17. Biomimetic Total Syntheses of (−)-Leucoridines A and C through the Dimerization of (−)-Dihydrovalparicine

    PubMed Central

    Kokkonda, Praveen; Brown, Keaon R.; Seguin, Trevor J.; Wheeler, Steven E.; Vaddypally, Shivaiah; Zdilla, Michael J.; Andrade, Rodrigo B.

    2016-01-01

    Concise biomimetic syntheses of the Strychnos-Strychnos-type bis-indole alkaloids (−)-leucoridine A (1) and C (2) were accomplished through the biomimetic dimerization of (−)-dihydrovalparicine (3). En route to 3, the known alkaloids (+)-geissoschizoline (8) and (−)-dehydrogeissoschizoline (10) were also prepared. DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the mechanism, which favors a stepwise aza-Michael/spirocyclization sequence over the alternate hetero-Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. PMID:26315453

  18. Proton conduction in gramicidin A and in its dioxolane-linked dimer in different lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, S; Quigley, E P; Crumrine, D S

    1997-01-01

    concentration was linear at low bulk concentrations of H+ (0.01-2 M) and saturated at concentrations of more than 3 M. It is concluded that 1) The mobility of protons in gramicidin A channels in different lipid bilayers is remarkably similar to proton mobilities in aqueous solutions. In particular, at high concentrations of HCl, proton mobilities in gramicidin A channel and in solution differ by only 25%. 2) Differences between proton conductances in gramicidin A channels in GMO and PEPC cannot be explained by surface charge effects on PEPC membranes. It is proposed that protonated phospholipids adjacent to the mouth of the pore act as an additional source of protons for conduction through gA channels in relation to GMO bilayers. 3) Some experimental results cannot be reconciled with simple alterations in access resistance to proton flow in gA channels. Said differences could be explained if the structure and/or dynamics of water molecules inside gramicidin A channels is modulated by the lipid environment and by modifications in the structure of gA channels. 4) The dioxolane ring is probably responsible for the closing flickers seen in the dimer channel. However, other factors can also influence closing flickers. PMID:9370442

  19. Sequence Variations and Protein Expression Levels of the Two Immune Evasion Proteins Gpm1 and Pra1 Influence Virulence of Clinical Candida albicans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shanshan; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Münzberg, Christin; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, the important human fungal pathogen uses multiple evasion strategies to control, modulate and inhibit host complement and innate immune attack. Clinical C. albicans strains vary in pathogenicity and in serum resistance, in this work we analyzed sequence polymorphisms and variations in the expression levels of two central fungal complement evasion proteins, Gpm1 (phosphoglycerate mutase 1) and Pra1 (pH-regulated antigen 1) in thirteen clinical C. albicans isolates. Four nucleotide (nt) exchanges, all representing synonymous exchanges, were identified within the 747-nt long GPM1 gene. For the 900-nt long PRA1 gene, sixteen nucleotide exchanges were identified, which represented synonymous, as well as non-synonymous exchanges. All thirteen clinical isolates had a homozygous exchange (A to G) at position 73 of the PRA1 gene. Surface levels of Gpm1 varied by 8.2, and Pra1 levels by 3.3 fold in thirteen tested isolates and these differences influenced fungal immune fitness. The high Gpm1/Pra1 expressing candida strains bound the three human immune regulators more efficiently, than the low expression strains. The difference was 44% for Factor H binding, 51% for C4BP binding and 23% for plasminogen binding. This higher Gpm1/Pra1 expressing strains result in enhanced survival upon challenge with complement active, Factor H depleted human serum (difference 40%). In addition adhesion to and infection of human endothelial cells was increased (difference 60%), and C3b surface deposition was less effective (difference 27%). Thus, variable expression levels of central immune evasion protein influences immune fitness of the human fungal pathogen C. albicans and thus contribute to fungal virulence. PMID:25692293

  20. Influences of diurnal sampling bias on fixed-point monitoring of plankton biodiversity determined using a massively parallel sequencing-based technique.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Satoshi; Hida, Kohsuke; Urushizaki, Shingo; Onitsuka, Goh; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Fujiwara, Atushi; Tajimi, Seisuke; Kimoto, Katsunori; Kobayashi, Takanori; Gojobori, Takashi; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of diurnal sampling bias on the community structure of plankton by comparing the biodiversity among seawater samples (n=9) obtained every 3h for 24h by using massively parallel sequencing (MPS)-based plankton monitoring at a fixed point conducted at Himedo seaport in Yatsushiro Sea, Japan. The number of raw operational taxonomy units (OTUs) and OTUs after re-sampling was 507-658 (558 ± 104, mean ± standard deviation) and 448-544 (467 ± 81), respectively, indicating high plankton biodiversity at the sampling location. The relative abundance of the top 20 OTUs in the samples from Himedo seaport was 48.8-67.7% (58.0 ± 5.8%), and the highest-ranked OTU was Pseudo-nitzschia species (Bacillariophyta) with a relative abundance of 17.3-39.2%, followed by Oithona sp. 1 and Oithona sp. 2 (Arthropoda). During seawater sampling, the semidiurnal tidal current having an amplitude of 0.3ms(-1) was dominant, and the westward residual current driven by the northeasterly wind was continuously observed during the 24-h monitoring. Therefore, the relative abundance of plankton species apparently fluctuated among the samples, but no significant difference was noted according to G-test (p>0.05). Significant differences were observed between the samples obtained from a different locality (Kusuura in Yatsushiro Sea) and at different dates, suggesting that the influence of diurnal sampling bias on plankton diversity, determined using the MPS-based survey, was not significant and acceptable. PMID:26475937

  1. Electric and magnetic hotspots in dielectric nanowire dimers.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Ali; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E

    2015-04-14

    We study the formation of the electric and magnetic near-field hotspots in dielectric cylindrical dimers. We compare dielectric and metallic dimers by using experimental data for all materials and consider both TM and TE polarizations of light. We demonstrate that dielectric dimers allow us to simultaneously achieve pure magnetic and electric near-field hotspots for both polarizations in contrast to plasmonic structures. This offers new approaches for near-field engineering such as sensing, control of spontaneous emission, and enhanced Raman scattering. PMID:25773044

  2. Dynamic combinatorial enrichment of polyconformational D-/L-peptide dimers.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Kirtikumar B; Lichtenecker, Roman J; Bullach, Anke; Mandal, Bhubaneswar; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2015-04-01

    D-/L-peptides such as gramicidin A (gA) adopt unique dimeric β-helical structures of different topologies. To overcome their conformational promiscuity and enrich individual components, a dynamic combinatorial approach assisted by thiol tags was developed. This method led to identification of the preferential formation of antiparallel dimers under a broad range of conditions, which was independent of peptide side-chain polarity. Exclusive formation of an antiparallel cyclic dimer was achieved in the presence of cesium ions. PMID:25711604

  3. Asymmetric and connected graphene dimers for a tunable plasmonic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolen, G.; Maes, B.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the infrared response of graphene dimers with various doping and polarization configurations. The interaction between the plasmonic resonances of graphene nanodisks leads to a rich, tunable behavior. The hybridization of the nanodisk modes enables the excitation of resonances that would be invisible or dark in a single disk. The simulation results show various anticrossings that depend on dark-bright or bright-bright mode coupling, which we can describe via a simple Hamiltonian model. In addition, we determine the response of a dimer bridged by a tunable graphene junction. This structure leads to charge transfer plasmons, with an even higher absorption efficiency and tunability than nonbridged dimers.

  4. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Franco V. A.; Hall, Christopher R.; Anderson, Harry L.; Meech, Stephen R.; Heisler, Ismael A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral) angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution. PMID:26798839

  5. Adsorption of silver dimer on graphene - A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2014-04-24

    We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of silver dimer (Ag{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Ag2-graphene system are calculated. The minimum energy configuration for a silver dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms directly above the centre of carbon-carbon bond. The negligible charge transfer between the dimer and the surface is also indicative of a weak bond. The methodology demonstrated in this paper may be applied to larger silver clusters on graphene sheet.

  6. Anisotropic dynamics in a shaken granular dimer gas experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, J.; Olafsen, J. S.

    2005-06-01

    The dynamics, velocity fluctuations, and particle-plate interactions for a two-dimensional granular gas of shaken, nonspherical particles are studied experimentally. The experiment consists of a horizontal plate that is vertically oscillated to drive the dynamics of macroscopic dimers, spherical pairs that are loosely connected by a rod that couple the interaction each of the spheres has with the shaking plate. The extended nature of the particles results in more than one energy-momentum transfer between the plate and each dimer per shaking cycle. This complex interaction results in anisotropic behavior for the dimer that is a function of the shaking parameters.

  7. Calculated distortions of duplex DNA by a cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimer are unaffected by a 3' TpA step.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, M G; Miller, J H

    1997-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the duplex DNA dodecamers d(CGCGAA TT CGCG): d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and d(GCACGAA TT AAG): d(CTTAATTCGTGC), where TT denotes a cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimer. The constant temperature and pressure algorithm of the AMBER 4.1 molecular-modeling package was used with explicit water and counterions, periodic boundary conditions and electrostatic interactions evaluated by the particle-mesh Ewald method. Results were analyzed by the CURVES algorithm and its implementation in DIALS and WINDOWS. Calculated distortions of DNA structure by the thymine dimer were qualitatively and quantitatively similar for the two sequences. Despite the enhanced flexibility of the native TpA dinucleotide step, major deviations from the B-DNA values of helicoidal parameters were found only at the Ap and p dinucleotide steps in both sequences. Only the AT base pairs of the two sequences that contain the 5' thymine of the dimers exhibited weakened Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds and anomalous stretching. Hence, we conclude that the pattern of structural perturbations responsible for recognition of cis, syn thymine dimers by repair enzymes is not sensitive to their sequence context. PMID:9060440

  8. Global properties and propensity to dimerization of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment through the modeling of its monomer and dimer diffusion coefficients and electrophoretic mobilities.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused mainly by amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment (monomer) and its dimer are characterized at low pH through the modeling of their diffusion coefficients and effective electrophoretic mobilities. Translational diffusion coefficient experimental values of monomer and dimer analogs of this peptide fragment and monomer and dimer mixtures at thermodynamic equilibrium are used as reported in the literature for different monomer initial concentrations. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are employed to evaluate the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment propensity to dimerization through a thermodynamic theoretical framework. Therefore equilibrium constants are considered at pH 2.9 to elucidate one of the amyloidogenic mechanisms involving the central hydrophobic region LVFFA of the peptide spanning residues 17-21 associated with phenylalanine at positions 19 and 20 in the amino acid sequence of amyloid-beta peptides. An analysis demonstrating that peptide aggregation is a concentration-dependent process is provided, where both pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena become relevant. It is shown that the modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment is crucial to understand the effect of hydrophobic region LVFFA in the amyloidogenic process. PMID:25403948

  9. BH3-in-groove dimerization initiates and helix 9 dimerization expands Bax pore assembly in membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Kale, Justin; Liao, Chenyi; Huang, Bo; Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Condon, Samson G F; Lapolla, Suzanne M; Hays, Franklin A; Ding, Jingzhen; He, Feng; Zhang, Xuejun C; Li, Jianing; Senes, Alessandro; Andrews, David W; Lin, Jialing

    2016-01-18

    Pro-apoptotic Bax induces mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) by forming oligomers through a largely undefined process. Using site-specific disulfide crosslinking, compartment-specific chemical labeling, and mutational analysis, we found that activated integral membrane Bax proteins form a BH3-in-groove dimer interface on the MOM surface similar to that observed in crystals. However, after the α5 helix was released into the MOM, the remaining interface with α2, α3, and α4 helices was rearranged. Another dimer interface was formed inside the MOM by two intersected or parallel α9 helices. Combinations of these interfaces generated oligomers in the MOM. Oligomerization was initiated by BH3-in-groove dimerization, without which neither the other dimerizations nor MOMP occurred. In contrast, α9 dimerization occurred downstream and was required for release of large but not small proteins from mitochondria. Moreover, the release of large proteins was facilitated by α9 insertion into the MOM and localization to the pore rim. Therefore, the BH3-in-groove dimerization on the MOM nucleates the assembly of an oligomeric Bax pore that is enlarged by α9 dimerization at the rim. PMID:26702098

  10. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  11. Emergence of long-range order in sheets of magnetic dimers

    PubMed Central

    Haravifard, S.; Banerjee, A.; van Wezel, J.; Silevitch, D. M.; dos Santos, A. M.; Lang, J. C.; Kermarrec, E.; Srajer, G.; Gaulin, B. D.; Molaison, J. J.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum spins placed on the corners of a square lattice can dimerize and form singlets, which then can be transformed into a magnetic state as the interactions between dimers increase beyond threshold. This is a strictly 2D transition in theory, but real-world materials often need the third dimension to stabilize long-range order. We use high pressures to convert sheets of Cu2+ spin 1/2 dimers from local singlets to global antiferromagnet in the model system SrCu2(BO3)2. Single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements at pressures above 5 GPa provide a direct signature of the antiferromagnetic ordered state, whereas high-resolution neutron powder and X-ray diffraction at commensurate pressures reveal a tilting of the Cu spins out of the plane with a critical exponent characteristic of 3D transitions. The addition of anisotropic, interplane, spin–orbit terms in the venerable Shastry–Sutherland Hamiltonian accounts for the influence of the third dimension. PMID:25246541

  12. Dimerization of FIR Upon FUSE DNA Binding Suggests Mechanism of c-myc Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow,G.; Zhou, H.; Hsiao, H.; Frederick, K.; Debrosse, M.; Yang, Y.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Chung, H.; Fan, C.; et al

    2008-01-01

    c-myc is essential for cell homeostasis and growth but lethal if improperly regulated. Transcription of this oncogene is governed by the counterbalancing forces of two proteins on TFIIH--the FUSE binding protein (FBP) and the FBP-interacting repressor (FIR). FBP and FIR recognize single-stranded DNA upstream of the P1 promoter, known as FUSE, and influence transcription by oppositely regulating TFIIH at the promoter site. Size exclusion chromatography coupled with light scattering reveals that an FIR dimer binds one molecule of single-stranded DNA. The crystal structure confirms that FIR binds FUSE as a dimer, and only the N-terminal RRM domain participates in nucleic acid recognition. Site-directed mutations of conserved residues in the first RRM domain reduce FIR's affinity for FUSE, while analogous mutations in the second RRM domain either destabilize the protein or have no effect on DNA binding. Oppositely oriented DNA on parallel binding sites of the FIR dimer results in spooling of a single strand of bound DNA, and suggests a mechanism for c-myc transcriptional control.

  13. MAD structure of Pseudomonas nautica dimeric cytochrome c552 mimicks the c4 Dihemic cytochrome domain association.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Nurizzo, D; Besson, S; Shepard, W; Moura, J; Moura, I; Tegoni, M; Cambillau, C

    1999-06-18

    The monohemic cytochrome c552from Pseudomonas nautica (c552-Pn) is thought to be the electron donor to cytochrome cd1, the so-called nitrite reductase (NiR). It shows as high levels of activity and affinity for the P. nautica NiR (NiR-Pn), as the Pseudomonas aeruginosa enzyme (NiR-Pa). Since cytochrome c552is by far the most abundant electron carrier in the periplasm, it is probably involved in numerous other reactions. Its sequence is related to that of the c type cytochromes, but resembles that of the dihemic c4cytochromes even more closely. The three-dimensional structure of P. nautica cytochrome c552has been solved to 2.2 A resolution using the multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) technique, taking advantage of the presence of the eight Fe heme ions in the asymmetric unit. Density modification procedures involving 4-fold non-crystallographic averaging yielded a model with an R -factor value of 17.8 % (Rfree=20.8 %). Cytochrome c552forms a tight dimer in the crystal, and the dimer interface area amounts to 19% of the total cytochrome surface area. Four tighly packed dimers form the eight molecules of the asymmetric unit. The c552dimer is superimposable on each domain of the monomeric cytochrome c4from Pseudomomas stutzeri (c4-Ps), a dihemic cytochrome, and on the dihemic c domain of flavocytochrome c of Chromatium vinosum (Fcd-Cv). The interacting residues which form the dimer are both similar in character and position, which is also true for the propionates. The dimer observed in the crystal also exists in solution. It has been hypothesised that the dihemic c4-Ps may have evolved via monohemic cytochrome c gene duplication followed by evolutionary divergence and the adjunction of a connecting linker. In this process, our dimeric c552structure might be said to constitute a "living fossile" occurring in the course of evolution between the formation of the dimer and the gene duplication and fusion. The availability of the structure of the cytochrome c552

  14. Structural characterization of blotting membranes and the influence of membrane parameters for electroblotting and subsequent amino acid sequence analysis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Eckerskorn, C; Lottspeich, F

    1993-09-01

    Various blotting membranes were evaluated and correlated with the efficiency of electroblotting and the performance in the sequencing process. Structural parameters including specific surface area, pore size distribution, pore volumes, and permeabilities of different solvents lead to discrimination of the membranes relative to their accessible surfaces and membrane densities. Protein binding capacities as well as protein recoveries in electroblotting correlate with the specific surface areas. Almost quantitative retention of proteins during electroblotting from gels was obtained for membranes with a high specific surface area and narrow pores (Trans-Blot, Immobilon PSQ, Fluorotrans), whereas membranes with a relatively low specific surface area (Immobilon P, Glassybond) showed reduced recoveries of between 10-20% for the tested proteins. Initial yields and repetitive yields were compared for radioiodinated standard proteins that have been either electroblotted or loaded by direct adsorption. The results showed that the different permeabilities for solutions of the Edman chemistry have a major influence on initial yields. The glass fiber-based membranes with an extremely low flow restriction produce consistently high initial yields independent of the application mode of the protein (spotted or electroblotted) or the application of the membranes into the cartridge (discs or small pieces). In contrast, the polymeric membranes showed decreasing initial yields with increasing membrane density for spotted and electroblotted proteins. Yields varied considerably when the membranes were applied as discs into the cartridge. This effect could be minimized by cutting the membranes into pieces as small as possible, as demonstrated for electroblotted proteins. PMID:8223390

  15. Influence of the cycle length on the production of PHA and polyglucose from glycerol by bacterial enrichments in sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Moralejo-Gárate, Helena; Palmeiro-Sánchez, Tania; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2013-12-01

    PHA, a naturally occurring biopolymer produced by a wide range of microorganisms, is known for its applications as bioplastic. In recent years the use of agro-industrial wastewater as substrate for PHA production by bacterial enrichments has attracted considerable research attention. Crude glycerol as generated during biodiesel production is a waste stream that due to its high organic matter content and low price could be an interesting substrate for PHA production. Previously we have demonstrated that when glycerol is used as substrate in a feast-famine regime, PHA and polyglucose are simultaneously produced as storage polymers. The work described in this paper aimed at understanding the effect of the cycle length on the bacterial enrichment process with emphasis on the distribution of glycerol towards PHA and polyglucose. Two sequencing batch reactors where operated with the same hydraulic and biomass retention time. A short cycle length (6 h) favored polyglucose production over PHA, whereas at long cycle length (24 h) PHA was more favored. In both communities the same microorganism appeared dominating, suggesting a metabolic rather than a microbial competition response. Moreover, the presence of ammonium during polymer accumulation did not influence the maximum amount of PHA that was attained. PMID:23835920

  16. Light-induced conformational changes in photosynthetic reaction centers: redox-regulated proton pathway near the dimer.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Kálmán, László

    2011-04-26

    The influence of the hydrogen bonds on the light-induced structural changes were studied in the wild type and 11 mutants with different hydrogen bonding patterns of the primary electron donor of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Previously, using the same set of mutants at pH 8, a marked light-induced change of the local dielectric constant in the vicinity of the dimer was reported in wild type and in mutants retaining Leu L131 that correlated with the recovery kinetics of the charge-separated state [ Deshmukh et al. (2011) Biochemistry, 50, 340-348]. In this work after prolonged illumination the recovery of the oxidized dimer was found to be multiphasic in all mutants. The fraction of the slowest phase, assigned to a recovery from a conformationally altered state, was strongly pH dependent and found to be extremely long at room temperature, at pH 6, with rate constants of ∼10(-3) s(-1). In wild type and in mutants with Leu at L131 the very long recovery kinetics was coupled to a large proton release at pH 6 and a decrease of up to 79 mV of the oxidation potential of the dimer. In contrast, in the mutants carrying the Leu to His mutation at the L131 position, only a negligible fraction of the dimer exhibited lowered potential, the large proton release was not observed, the oxidized dimer recovered 1 or 2 orders of magnitude faster depending on the pH, and the very long-lived state was not or barely detectable. These results are modeled as arising from the loss of a proton pathway from the bacteriochlorophyll dimer to the solvent when His is present at the L131 position. PMID:21410139

  17. Smectic Phase Formed by DNA Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Gleeson, James; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Samuel; Dhont, Jan; Stiakakis, Emmanuel

    The rapidly expanding bio market is driving the development and characterization of new multifunctional materials. In particular, nucleic acids are under intense study for gene therapy, drug delivery and other bio-safe applications [1,2,3]. DNA is well-known to form a cholesteric nematic liquid crystal in its native form; however, much recent research has focused on self-assembly and mesomorphic behavior in concentrated solutions of short DNA helices [4]. Our work focuses on DNA dimers, consisting of 48 base-pair double-stranded helices connected by a 5 to 20 base flexible single strand, and suspended in a natural buffer. Depending on temperature, concentration and length of the flexible spacer, polarizing optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering reveal cholesteric nematic and, remarkably, smectic liquid crystalline phases. A model for smectic phase formation in this system will be presented. 1] J.-L. Lim et al., Int. J. of. Pharm. 490 (2015) 2652] D.-H. Kim et al., Nature Biotech. 23 (2005) 2223] K. Liu et al., Chem. Eur. J. 21 (2015) 48984] M. Nakata et al., Science 318 (2007) 1276 NSF DMR 1307674.

  18. Spin Dimers: from BEC to Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Localized spin systems, and in particular dimer systems, provide a fantastic laboratory to study the interplay between quantum effects and the interaction between excitations. Magnetic field and temperature allow an excellent control on the density of excitations and various very efficient probes such as neutrons and NMR are available. They can thus be used as ``quantum simulators'' to tackle with great success questions that one would normally search in itinerant interacting quantum systems. In particular they have provided excellent realizations of Bose-Einstein condensates [1,2]. This allowed not only to probe the properties of interacting bosons in a variety of dimensions but also to study in a controlled way additional effects such as disorder. If the dimensionality is reduced they also allow to test in a quantitative way Luttinger liquid physics [3,4,5]. I will discuss these various cases, and show that we have now good theoretical tools to make quantitative comparisons with the experiments. Finally, how to go from this low dimensional case where the spins behave essentially as fermions, to the higher dimensional case where they behave as (essentially free) bosons, is a very challenging, and experimentally relevant issue. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  19. Examination of the dimerization states of the single-stranded RNA recognition protein pentatricopeptide repeat 10 (PPR10).

    PubMed

    Li, Quanxiu; Yan, Chuangye; Xu, Huisha; Wang, Zheng; Long, Jiafu; Li, Wenqi; Wu, Jianping; Yin, Ping; Yan, Nieng

    2014-11-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, particularly abundant in plastids and mitochrondria of angiosperms, include a large number of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins that are involved in diverse aspects of organelle RNA metabolisms. PPR proteins contain multiple tandom repeats, and each repeat can specifically recognize a RNA base through residues 2, 5, and 35 in a modular fashion. The crystal structure of PPR10 from maize chloroplast exhibits dimeric existence both in the absence and presence of the 18-nucleotide psaJ RNA element. However, previous biochemical analysis suggested a monomeric shift of PPR10 upon RNA binding. In this report, we show that the amino-terminal segments of PPR10 determine the dimerization state of PPR10. A single amino acid alteration of cysteine to serine within repeat 10 of PPR10 further drives dimerization of PPR10. The biochemical elucidation of the determinants for PPR10 dimerization may provide an important foundation to understand the working mechanisms of PPR proteins underlying their diverse physiological functions. PMID:25231995

  20. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L.; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V.; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR. PMID:26778126

  1. Examination of the Dimerization States of the Single-stranded RNA Recognition Protein Pentatricopeptide Repeat 10 (PPR10)*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanxiu; Yan, Chuangye; Xu, Huisha; Wang, Zheng; Long, Jiafu; Li, Wenqi; Wu, Jianping; Yin, Ping; Yan, Nieng

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, particularly abundant in plastids and mitochrondria of angiosperms, include a large number of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins that are involved in diverse aspects of organelle RNA metabolisms. PPR proteins contain multiple tandom repeats, and each repeat can specifically recognize a RNA base through residues 2, 5, and 35 in a modular fashion. The crystal structure of PPR10 from maize chloroplast exhibits dimeric existence both in the absence and presence of the 18-nucleotide psaJ RNA element. However, previous biochemical analysis suggested a monomeric shift of PPR10 upon RNA binding. In this report, we show that the amino-terminal segments of PPR10 determine the dimerization state of PPR10. A single amino acid alteration of cysteine to serine within repeat 10 of PPR10 further drives dimerization of PPR10. The biochemical elucidation of the determinants for PPR10 dimerization may provide an important foundation to understand the working mechanisms of PPR proteins underlying their diverse physiological functions. PMID:25231995

  2. The Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Plant Cellulose Synthase and Its Assembly into Dimers[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  3. Time-Resolved Detection of Light-Induced Dimerization of Monomeric Aureochrome-1 and Change in Affinity for DNA.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yuki; Nakasone, Yusuke; Nakatani, Yoichi; Hisatomi, Osamu; Terazima, Masahide

    2016-08-01

    Aureochrome (Aureo) is a recently discovered blue light sensor protein initially from Vaucheria frigida, in which it controls blue light-dependent branch formation and/or development of a sex organ by a light-dependent change in the affinity for DNA. Although photochemical reactions of Aureo-LOV (LOV is a C-terminal light-oxygen-voltage domain) and the N-terminal truncated construct containing a bZIP (N-terminal basic leucine zipper domain) and a LOV domain have previously been reported, the reaction kinetics of the change in affinity for DNA have never been elucidated. The reactions of Aureo where the cysteines are replaced by serines (AureoCS) as well as the kinetics of the change in affinity for a target DNA are investigated in the time-domain. The dimerization rate constant is obtained as 2.8 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), which suggests that the photoinduced dimerization occurs in the LOV domain and the bZIP domain dimerizes using the interaction with DNA. Surprisingly, binding with the target DNA is completed very quickly, 7.7 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), which is faster than the protein dimerization rate. It is proposed that the nonspecific electrostatic interaction, which is observed as a weak binding with DNA, may play a role in the efficient searching for the target sequence within the DNA. PMID:27404115

  4. Tensor renormalization group approach to classical dimer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Krishanu; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2015-05-01

    We analyze classical dimer models on a square and a triangular lattice using a tensor network representation of the dimers. The correlation functions are numerically calculated using the recently developed "tensor renormalization group" (TRG) technique. The partition function for the dimer problem can be calculated exactly by the Pfaffian method, which is used here as a platform for comparing the numerical results. The TRG approach turns out to be a powerful tool for describing gapped systems with exponentially decaying correlations very efficiently due to its fast convergence. This is the case for the dimer model on the triangular lattice. However, the convergence becomes very slow and unstable in the case of the square lattice where the model has algebraically decaying correlations. We highlight these aspects with numerical simulations and critically appraise the robustness of the TRG approach by contrasting the results for small and large system sizes against the exact calculations. Furthermore, we benchmark our TRG results with the classical Monte Carlo method.

  5. Sodium dimers on the surface of liquid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Ancilotto, F.; DeToffol, G.; Toigo, F.

    1995-12-01

    We have studied the structure of a sodium dimer interacting with liquid {sup 4}He. We calculated the equilibrium configuration and binding energy of a Na{sub 2} molecule solvated in a bulk liquid {sup 4}He ``bubble`` and near the liquid-vapor interface ``dimple`` by using a density-functional approach. We find that the solvated molecule is a metastable state, while the the lowest energy bound state occurs when the molecule lies flat on the surface of the liquid. The binding energy for the ``erect`` dimer is only {similar_to}1 K higher than the flat dimer, with no potential energy barrier between the two orientations, implying relatively free rotations of the molecule on the surface. The small effects of the liquid environment on the vibrational properties of the dimer are investigated.

  6. Non-stripe charge order in dimerized organic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takehiko

    2016-06-01

    This paper demonstrates charge order is important in dimerized β - and κ -phase organic conductors similar to the uniform θ - and α -phase conductors. Here the magnitude of the dimerization represents the deviation from the ideal triangular lattice in analogy with the anisotropy in the θ phase. Since the ratio of the intradimer transfer integral to the interdimer transfer integral is as large as ˜2.6 , these dimerized phases lead to a dimer Mott insulator, whereas the Coulomb repulsion is closer to the triangular lattice because the ratio of the intradimer Coulomb repulsion to the interdimer Coulomb repulsion is comparatively small (˜1.7 ). Accordingly, in the static-limit calculation, non-stripe charge order with threefold periodicity appears between the uniform and the stripe phases, and the analogy with the θ phase suggests the first-order nature of the metal-insulator transition.

  7. Emission of dimers from a free surface of heated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, A. A.; Polyakova, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    The emission rate of water dimers from a free surface and a wetted solid surface in various cases was calculated by a simplified Monte Carlo method with the use of the binding energy of water molecules. The binding energy of water molecules obtained numerically assuming equilibrium between the free surface of water and vapor in the temperature range of 298-438 K corresponds to the coordination number for liquid water equal to 4.956 and is close to the reference value. The calculation results show that as the water temperature increases, the free surface of water and the wetted solid surface become sources of free water dimers. At a temperature of 438 K, the proportion of dimers in the total flow of water molecules on its surface reaches 1%. It is found that in the film boiling mode, the emission rate of dimers decreases with decreasing saturation vapor. Two mechanisms of the emission are described.

  8. Glassy dislocation dynamics in 2D colloidal dimer crystals.

    PubMed

    Gerbode, Sharon J; Agarwal, Umang; Ong, Desmond C; Liddell, Chekesha M; Escobedo, Fernando; Cohen, Itai

    2010-08-13

    Although glassy relaxation is typically associated with disorder, here we report on a new type of glassy dynamics relating to dislocations within 2D crystals of colloidal dimers. Previous studies have demonstrated that dislocation motion in dimer crystals is restricted by certain particle orientations. Here, we drag an optically trapped particle through such dimer crystals, creating dislocations. We find a two-stage relaxation response where initially dislocations glide until encountering particles that cage their motion. Subsequent relaxation occurs logarithmically slowly through a second process where dislocations hop between caged configurations. Finally, in simulations of sheared dimer crystals, the dislocation mean squared displacement displays a caging plateau typical of glassy dynamics. Together, these results reveal a novel glassy system within a colloidal crystal. PMID:20868079

  9. Highly tunable gold nanorod dimer resonances mediated through conductive junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Jake; Ratna, Banahalli

    2015-03-01

    Tailoring the resonant frequency in plasmonic nanostructures is critical to developing disruptive metamaterial technologies. Here we numerically study the optical properties of gold nanorod dimers connected end-to-end by a thin metallic bridge. We find the resonant frequency along the long axis of the dimer shifts linearly with the nanorod aspect ratio behaving as it was a single nanorod with an aspect ratio nearly an order of magnitude larger. We show by controlling the material and geometry of the connecting bridge the effective depolarization factor of the dimer is significantly modulated tuning the resonant frequency over a decade, from 1 to 10 μm. We present an alternative description for the emergence and behavior of the dimer resonance using a straightforward ``Drude-like'' model and self-assembly experiments creating such structures.

  10. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  11. Copper-Catalyzed Dimerization/Cyclization of Itaconates.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Ruirui; Jiang, Lan; Li, Zhengning

    2015-01-01

    A copper-catalyzed domino reaction between itaconate esters and diethyl zinc (or silane) is developed, affording itaconate dimerization products, multi-ester-substituted cyclopentanones, in moderate to high yields. PMID:26287154

  12. Superconductivity in the liquid-dimer valence-bond state

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, L.B.; Larkin, A.I. )

    1989-10-01

    Introducing an unambiguous prescription which converts singlet dimers into quasidipoles, we describe the low-energy excitations in the liquid-dimer state as fluctuations of the average dipole moment. The exchange of these fluctuations leads to a long-range interaction between holes in this state. This interaction favors the two-particle Bose condensate and destroys the order parameter of the one-particle Bose condensate even at zero temperature.

  13. Synthesis and fluxional behaviour of novel chloroborole dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuolun; Wang, Zheng; Haehnel, Martin; Eichhorn, Antonius; Edkins, Robert M; Steffen, Andreas; Krueger, Anke; Lin, Zhenyang; Marder, Todd B

    2016-08-11

    The (B-Cl)-chloroboroles 2-chloro-1,3-di(4-R-phenyl)-2,4,5,6-tetra-hydrocyclopenta[c]borole (R = H, Br) undergo a novel dimerisation process in CH2Cl2 solution. The resulting unsymmetric dimers are highly fluxional in solution via reversible enantiomerisation through an intermediate with mirror symmetry. DFT calculations suggest an unusual dimerisation mechanism and provide insight into the dynamics of the dimers. PMID:27405535

  14. Absorption cross sections of the ClO dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huder, K. J.; DeMore, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of the ClO dimer, ClOOCl, are important to the photochemistry of ozone depletion in the Antarctic. In this work, new measurements were made of the dimer cross sections at 195 K. the results yield somewhat lower values in the long wavelength region, compared to those currently recommended in the NASA data evaluation (JPL 94-26). The corresponding solar photodissociation rates in the Antarctic are reduced by about 40%.

  15. Structural Determinants Underlying Constitutive Dimerization of Unoccupied Human Follitropin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Rongbin; Wu, Xueqing; Feng, Xiuyan; Zhang, Meilin; Hébert, Terence E.; Segaloff, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    The human follitropin receptor (hFSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) central to reproductive physiology that is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) fused to a serpentine region. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in living cells, we show that hFSHR dimers form constitutively during their biosynthesis. Mutations in TM1 and TM4 had no effect on hFSHR dimerization, alone or when combined with mutation of Tyr110 in the ECD, a residue predicted to mediate dimerization of the soluble hormone-binding portion of the ECD complexed with FSH (Q. Fan and W. Hendrickson, Nature 433:269–277, 2005). Expressed individually, the serpentine region and a membrane-anchored form of the hFSHR ECD each exhibited homodimerization, suggesting that both domains contribute to dimerization of the full-length receptor. However, even in the context of only the membrane-anchored ECD, mutation of Tyr110 to alanine did not inhibit dimerization. The full-length hFSHR and the membrane-anchored ECD were then each engineered to introduce a consensus site for N-linked glycosylation at residue 110. Despite experimental validation of the presence of carbohydrate on residue 110, we failed to observe disruption of dimerization of either the full-length hFSHR or membrane-anchored ECD containing the inserted glycan wedge. Taken altogether, our data suggest that both the serpentine region and the ECD contribute to hFSHR dimerization and that the dimerization interface of the unoccupied hFSHR does not involve Tyr110 of the ECD. PMID:19800402

  16. VUV spectroscopy of rare gas van der Waals dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Pratt, Stephen T.

    1982-08-01

    We have undertaken a systematic study of the photoionization spectra of the homonuclear and heteronuclear rare gas dimers in order to better understand the nature of the bonding in the Rydberg states adnd ions of these molecules. We have obtained results for Ar2, Kr2, Xe2, NeAr, NeKr, NeXe, ArKr, ArXe, and KrXe. Of the remaining dimer species (Ne2 and the Herare gas dimers), only Ne2 has been studied using photoionization mass spectrometry. The results of the present series of experiments provide information both on the excited states of the neutral dimers and on the ground and excited states of the dimer ions. Using the data obtained in these measurements, we are able to compile for the first time a nearly complete list of ground state dissociation energies for the homonuclear and heteronuclear rare gas dimer ions. Somewhat less complete results are obtained for the excited states of these species. The observed trends in binding energy provide an excellent example of the systematic changes that occur as a result of changes in atomic orbital energies, polarizability, and internuclear distance, and these trends can be explained qualitatively in terms of simple molecular orbital theory.

  17. Human Erythropoietin Dimers with Markedly Enhanced in vivo Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.; Dotimas Lunn, Elizabeth; Davis, Kerry Lynn; Feldman, Laurie; Siekman, Suvia

    1998-02-01

    Human erythropoietin, a widely used and important therapeutic glycoprotein, has a relatively short plasma half-life due to clearance by glomerular filtration as well as by other mechanisms. We hypothesized that an erythropoietin species with a larger molecular size would exhibit an increased plasma half-life and, potentially, an enhanced biological activity. We now report the production of biologically active erythropoietin dimers and trimers by chemical crosslinking of the conventional monomeric form. We imparted free sulfhydryl residues to a pool of erythropoietin monomer by chemical modification. A second pool was reacted with another modifying reagent to yield monomer with male-imido groups. Upon mixing these two pools, covalently linked dimers and trimers were formed that were biologically active in vitro. The plasma half-life of erythropoietin dimers in rabbits was >24 h compared with 4 h for the monomers. Importantly, erythropoietin dimers were biologically active in vivo as shown by their ability to increase the hematocrits of mice when injected subcutaneously. In addition, the dimers exhibited >26-fold higher activity in vivo than did the monomers and were very effective after only one dose. Dimeric and other oligomeric forms of Epo may have an important role in therapy.

  18. Cholesterol-dependent Conformational Plasticity in GPCR Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Xavier; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    The organization and function of the serotonin1A receptor, an important member of the GPCR family, have been shown to be cholesterol-dependent, although the molecular mechanism is not clear. We performed a comprehensive structural and dynamic analysis of dimerization of the serotonin1A receptor by coarse-grain molecular dynamics simulations totaling 3.6 ms to explore the molecular details of its cholesterol-dependent association. A major finding is that the plasticity and flexibility of the receptor dimers increase with increased cholesterol concentration. In particular, a dimer interface formed by transmembrane helices I-I was found to be sensitive to cholesterol. The modulation of dimer interface appears to arise from a combination of direct cholesterol occupancy and indirect membrane effects. Interestingly, the presence of cholesterol at the dimer interface is correlated with increased dimer plasticity and flexibility. These results represent an important step in characterizing the molecular interactions in GPCR organization with potential relevance to therapeutic interventions. PMID:27535203

  19. Dimerization of Bacterial Diaminopimelate Decarboxylase Is Essential for Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Peverelli, Martin G; Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Kirby, Nigel; Perugini, Matthew A

    2016-04-29

    Diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DAPDC) catalyzes the final step in the diaminopimelate biosynthesis pathway of bacteria. The product of the reaction is the essential amino acid l-lysine, which is an important precursor for the synthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall, housekeeping proteins, and virulence factors of bacteria. Accordingly, the enzyme is a promising antibacterial target. Previous structural studies demonstrate that DAPDC exists as monomers, dimers, and tetramers in the crystal state. However, the active oligomeric form has not yet been determined. We show using analytical ultracentrifugation, small angle x-ray scattering, and enzyme kinetic analyses in solution that the active form of DAPDC from Bacillus anthracis, Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Vibrio cholerae is a dimer. The importance of dimerization was probed further by generating dimerization interface mutants (N381A and R385A) of V. cholerae DAPDC. Our studies indicate that N381A and R385A are significantly attenuated in catalytic activity, thus confirming that dimerization of DAPDC is essential for function. These findings provide scope for the development of new antibacterial agents that prevent DAPDC dimerization. PMID:26921318

  20. Mechanism of dimerization of the human melanocortin 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zanna, Paola T.; Sanchez-Laorden, Berta L.; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Turpin, Maria C.; Herraiz, Cecilia; Jimenez-Cervantes, Celia; Garcia-Borron, Jose C.

    2008-04-04

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a dimeric G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, where it regulates the amount and type of melanins produced and determines the tanning response to ultraviolet radiation. We have studied the mechanisms of MC1R dimerization. Normal dimerization of a deleted mutant lacking the seventh transmembrane fragment and the C-terminal cytosolic extension excluded coiled-coil interactions as the basis of dimerization. Conversely, the electrophoretic pattern of wild type receptor and several Cys {yields} Ala mutants showed that four disulfide bonds are established between the monomers. Disruption of any of these bonds abolished MC1R function, but only the one involving Cys35 was essential for traffic to the plasma membrane. A quadruple Cys35-267-273-275Ala mutant migrating as a monomer in SDS-PAGE in the absence of reducing agents was able to dimerize with WT, suggesting that in addition to disulfide bond formation, dimerization involves non-covalent interactions, likely of domain swap type.

  1. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  2. Specific dimerization of the light chains of human immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, G T; Straus, D

    1968-07-01

    1. The light chains of human immunoglobulin were allowed to dimerize in vitro on removal of the dispersing agents acetic acid or urea. 2. On electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel at pH8.8 the dimers yielded up to nine regularly spaced bands. This approximates to the number of electrophoretic components known to occur among the monomers. 3. Single electrophoretic components of the dimers were isolated from the gel, dissociated into monomers, and subjected as such to electrophoresis in urea-containing gels. Each gave two adjacent bands. 4. Similarly, after all the light chains as monomers had been subjected to electrophoresis in urea-containing gels, single electrophoretic components were isolated and allowed to dimerize. When examined now as dimers in the absence of urea, each component gave two adjacent bands. 5. These findings are explicable on the following basis. (a) The dimerization of the light chains is specific, at least inasmuch as it occurs between monomers of the same electrophoretic mobilities. (b) With the buffer constant, different light chains undergo different changes in net charge on being transferred from urea-containing to urea-free solution; in this way two different chains of the same initial charge can acquire a charge difference of 1. 6. Experiments with Bence-Jones proteins and other homogeneous light chains gave results substantiating the conclusions (a) and (b). PMID:4174431

  3. Covalently dimerized SecA is functional in protein translocation.

    PubMed

    de Keyzer, Jeanine; van der Sluis, Eli O; Spelbrink, Robin E J; Nijstad, Niels; de Kruijff, Ben; Nouwen, Nico; van der Does, Chris; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2005-10-21

    The ATPase SecA provides the driving force for the transport of secretory proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. SecA exists as a dimer in solution, but the exact oligomeric state of SecA during membrane binding and preprotein translocation is a topic of debate. To study the requirements of oligomeric changes in SecA during protein translocation, a non-dissociable SecA dimer was formed by oxidation of the carboxyl-terminal cysteines. The cross-linked SecA dimer interacts with the SecYEG complex with a similar stoichiometry as non-cross-linked SecA. Cross-linking reversibly disrupts the SecB binding site on SecA. However, in the absence of SecB, the activity of the disulfide-bonded SecA dimer is indistinguishable from wild-type SecA. Moreover, SecYEG binding stabilizes a cold sodium dodecylsulfate-resistant dimeric state of SecA. The results demonstrate that dissociation of the SecA dimer is not an essential feature of the protein translocation reaction. PMID:16115882

  4. Photodissociation pathways and lifetimes of protonated peptides and their dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Aravind, G.; Klaerke, B.; Rajput, J.; Toker, Y.; Andersen, L. H.; Bochenkova, A. V.; Antoine, R.; Racaud, A.; Dugourd, P.; Lemoine, J.

    2012-01-07

    Photodissociation lifetimes and fragment channels of gas-phase, protonated YA{sub n} (n = 1,2) peptides and their dimers were measured with 266 nm photons. The protonated monomers were found to have a fast dissociation channel with an exponential lifetime of {approx}200 ns while the protonated dimers show an additional slow dissociation component with a lifetime of {approx}2 {mu}s. Laser power dependence measurements enabled us to ascribe the fast channel in the monomer and the slow channel in the dimer to a one-photon process, whereas the fast dimer channel is from a two-photon process. The slow (1 photon) dissociation channel in the dimer was found to result in cleavage of the H-bonds after energy transfer through these H-bonds. In general, the dissociation of these protonated peptides is non-prompt and the decay time was found to increase with the size of the peptides. Quantum RRKM calculations of the microcanonical rate constants also confirmed a statistical nature of the photodissociation processes in the dipeptide monomers and dimers. The classical RRKM expression gives a rate constant as an analytical function of the number of active vibrational modes in the system, estimated separately on the basis of the equipartition theorem. It demonstrates encouraging results in predicting fragmentation lifetimes of protonated peptides. Finally, we present the first experimental evidence for a photo-induced conversion of tyrosine-containing peptides into monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon along with a formamide molecule both found in space.

  5. Investigating the Influence of Ribavirin on Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Synthesis by Using a High-Resolution Transcriptome Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Aljabr, Waleed; Touzelet, Olivier; Pollakis, Georgios; Wu, Weining; Munday, Diane C.; Hughes, Margaret; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Kenny, John; Fearns, Rachel; Barr, John N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of serious respiratory tract infection. Treatment options include administration of ribavirin, a purine analog, although the mechanism of its anti-HRSV activity is unknown. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to investigate the genome mutation frequency and viral mRNA accumulation in HRSV-infected cells that were left untreated or treated with ribavirin. In the absence of ribavirin, HRSV-specific transcripts accounted for up to one-third of total RNA reads from the infected-cell RNA population. Ribavirin treatment resulted in a >90% reduction in abundance of viral mRNA reads, while at the same time no such reduction was detected for the abundance of cellular transcripts. The presented data reveal that ribavirin significantly increases the frequency of HRSV-specific RNA mutations, suggesting a direct influence on the fidelity of the HRSV polymerase. The presented data show that transitions and transversions occur during HRSV replication and that these changes occur in hot spots along the HRSV genome. Examination of nucleotide substitution rates in the viral genome indicated an increase in the frequency of transition but not transversion mutations in the presence of ribavirin. In addition, our data indicate that in the continuous cell types used and at the time points analyzed, the abundances of some HRSV mRNAs do not reflect the order in which the mRNAs are transcribed. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major pediatric pathogen. Ribavirin can be used in children who are extremely ill to reduce the amount of virus and to lower the burden of disease. Ribavirin is used as an experimental therapy with other viruses. The mechanism of action of ribavirin against HRSV is not well understood, although it is thought to increase the mutation rate of the viral polymerase during replication. To investigate this hypothesis, we used a high-resolution approach that allowed us to

  6. S-Nitrosated human serum albumin dimer as novel nano-EPR enhancer applied to macromolecular anti-tumor drugs such as micelles and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Ryo; Ishima, Yu; Ikeda, Mayumi; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; Fang, Jun; Nakamura, Hideaki; Chuang, Victor T G; Tanaka, Ryota; Maeda, Hitoshi; Kodama, Azusa; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-11-10

    The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect is a unique phenomenon of solid tumors, and it can serve as a basis for the development of macromolecular anticancer therapy. We have previously found that recombinant human serum albumin dimer, and especially its S-nitrosated form (SNO-HSA-Dimer), is an enhancer of the EPR effect. In this study, we investigated the influence of SNO-HSA-Dimer on the anti-tumor effect of two types of macromolecular anti-tumor drugs, namely N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide polymer conjugated with zinc protoporphyrin, which forms micelles and can be used for fluorescence studies. The other was PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), a typical example of a stealth liposome approved for medical usage. In mice having C26 tumors with highly permeable vasculature, SNO-HSA-Dimer increases tumor accumulation of the drugs by a factor 3-4 and thereby their anti-tumor effects. Experiments with Evans blue revealed increased EPR effect in all parts of the tumor. Furthermore, SNO-HSA-Dimer improves the anti-metastatic effects of Doxil and reduces its minor uptake in non-tumorous organs such as liver and kidney. Tumor accumulation of Doxil in B16 tumors, which are characterized by a low permeable vasculature, increased even more (6-fold) in the presence of SNO-HSA-Dimer, and the improved accumulation lead to decreased tumor volume and increased survival of the animals. The administration of SNO-HSA-Dimer itself is safe, because it has no effect on blood pressure, heart rate or on several biochemical parameters. The present findings indicate that SNO-HSA-Dimer is promising for enhancing the EPR effect and consequently the specific, therapeutic effects of macromolecular anticancer drugs. PMID:26302904

  7. Layer Thinning in Freely-Suspended Thin Liquid Films of a Symmetric Liquid Crystal Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardaev, Shokir; Parsouzi, Zeinab; Gleeson, James; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Samuel

    We report optical reflectivity and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies on freely suspended smectic films of a symmetric liquid crystal dimer, which exhibits the phase sequence isotropic--nematic--twist-bend nematic--smectic in cooling. In sufficiently thin films the reflectivity R is expected to scale as the square of the number of smectic layers (N2) while the frequency f of underdamped layer fluctuations scales as N - 1 / 2. On heating thin films drawn in the smectic phase, we observe a sequence of layer thinning transitions, with R and f following the expected scaling relations, provided the stepwise melting involves double rather than single layers. We will describe a model to explain the unusual layer thinning process. We thank M. G. Tamba and G. Mehl for providing the liquid crystal compound: NSF grant DMR-1307674.

  8. Photoionization of the alkali dimer cations Li+2, Na+2 and LiNa+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitriu, Irina; Vanne, Yulian V.; Awasthi, Manohar; Saenz, Alejandro

    2007-05-01

    Photoionization cross sections for the three alkali dimer cations (Li+2, Na+2 and LiNa+) were calculated at the equilibrium internuclear distance for parallel, perpendicular and isotropic orientations of the molecular axis with respect to the field. A model-potential method was used for the description of the cores. The influence of the model-potential parameters on the photoionization spectra was investigated. Two different methods, a time-independent and a time-dependent one, were implemented and used for computing the cross sections.

  9. Gbp1p, a Protein with RNA Recognition Motifs, Binds Single-Stranded Telomeric DNA and Changes Its Binding Specificity upon Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Stephen D.; Lew, Jodi E.; Berman, Judith

    1999-01-01

    Gbp1p is a putative telomere-binding protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that contains two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) which are commonly found in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Previously we demonstrated that Gbp1p binds single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) containing the Chlamydomonas telomeric sequence but not the RNA containing the cognate sequence. Here we show that at lower protein concentrations Gbp1 can also bind an RNA containing the cognate sequence. We found that mutation of the two RRM motifs of Gbp1p to match the highly conserved region of hnRNP RRMs did not alter the affinity of Gbp1p for either RNA or DNA. The ability of Gbp1p to associate with either of these two nucleic acids is governed by the dimerization state of the protein. Monomeric Gbp1p associates with either ssDNA or RNA, showing a small binding preference for RNA. Dimeric Gbp1p has a strong preference for binding ssDNA and shows little affinity for RNA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a protein that qualitatively shifts its nucleic acid binding preference upon dimerization. The biological implications of a telomere-binding protein that is regulated by dimerization are discussed. PMID:9858616

  10. Structural basis of RNA recognition and dimerization by the STAR proteins T-STAR and Sam68

    PubMed Central

    Feracci, Mikael; Foot, Jaelle N.; Grellscheid, Sushma N.; Danilenko, Marina; Stehle, Ralf; Gonchar, Oksana; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Meyer, N. Helge; Liu, Yilei; Lahat, Albert; Sattler, Michael; Eperon, Ian C.; Elliott, David J.; Dominguez, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Sam68 and T-STAR are members of the STAR family of proteins that directly link signal transduction with post-transcriptional gene regulation. Sam68 controls the alternative splicing of many oncogenic proteins. T-STAR is a tissue-specific paralogue that regulates the alternative splicing of neuronal pre-mRNAs. STAR proteins differ from most splicing factors, in that they contain a single RNA-binding domain. Their specificity of RNA recognition is thought to arise from their property to homodimerize, but how dimerization influences their function remains unknown. Here, we establish at atomic resolution how T-STAR and Sam68 bind to RNA, revealing an unexpected mode of dimerization different from other members of the STAR family. We further demonstrate that this unique dimerization interface is crucial for their biological activity in splicing regulation, and suggest that the increased RNA affinity through dimer formation is a crucial parameter enabling these proteins to select their functional targets within the transcriptome. PMID:26758068

  11. Correlation effects and collective excitations in bosonic bilayers: Role of quantum statistics, superfluidity, and the dimerization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filinov, A.

    2016-07-01

    A two-component, two-dimensional (2D) dipolar bosonic system in the bilayer geometry is considered. By performing quantum Monte Carlo simulations in a wide range of layer spacings we analyze in detail the pair correlation functions, the static response function, and the kinetic and interaction energies. By reducing the layer spacing we observe a transition from weakly to strongly bound dimer states. The transition is accompanied by the onset of short-range correlations, suppression of the superfluid response, and rotonization of the excitation spectrum. A dispersion law and a dynamic structure factor for the in-phase (symmetric) and out-of-phase (antisymmetric) collective modes during the dimerization is studied in detail with the stochastic reconstruction method and the method of moments. The antisymmetric mode spectrum is most strongly influenced by suppression of the inlayer superfluidity (specified by the superfluid fraction γs=ρs/ρ ). In a pure superfluid (normal fluid) phase, only an acoustic [optical (gapped)] mode is recovered. In a partially superfluid phase, both are present simultaneously, and the dispersion splits into two branches corresponding to a normal and a superfluid component. The spectral weight of the acoustic mode scales linearly with γs. This weight transfers to the optical branch when γs is reduced due to formation of dimer states. In summary, we demonstrate how the interlayer dimerization in dipolar bilayers can be uniquely identified by static and dynamic properties.

  12. Structural basis of RNA recognition and dimerization by the STAR proteins T-STAR and Sam68.

    PubMed

    Feracci, Mikael; Foot, Jaelle N; Grellscheid, Sushma N; Danilenko, Marina; Stehle, Ralf; Gonchar, Oksana; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Meyer, N Helge; Liu, Yilei; Lahat, Albert; Sattler, Michael; Eperon, Ian C; Elliott, David J; Dominguez, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Sam68 and T-STAR are members of the STAR family of proteins that directly link signal transduction with post-transcriptional gene regulation. Sam68 controls the alternative splicing of many oncogenic proteins. T-STAR is a tissue-specific paralogue that regulates the alternative splicing of neuronal pre-mRNAs. STAR proteins differ from most splicing factors, in that they contain a single RNA-binding domain. Their specificity of RNA recognition is thought to arise from their property to homodimerize, but how dimerization influences their function remains unknown. Here, we establish at atomic resolution how T-STAR and Sam68 bind to RNA, revealing an unexpected mode of dimerization different from other members of the STAR family. We further demonstrate that this unique dimerization interface is crucial for their biological activity in splicing regulation, and suggest that the increased RNA affinity through dimer formation is a crucial parameter enabling these proteins to select their functional targets within the transcriptome. PMID:26758068

  13. Using stable MutS dimers and tetramers to quantitatively analyze DNA mismatch recognition and sliding clamp formation.

    PubMed

    Groothuizen, Flora S; Fish, Alexander; Petoukhov, Maxim V; Reumer, Annet; Manelyte, Laura; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Marinus, Martin G; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Svergun, Dmitri I; Friedhoff, Peter; Sixma, Titia K

    2013-09-01

    The process of DNA mismatch repair is initiated when MutS recognizes mismatched DNA bases and starts the repair cascade. The Escherichia coli MutS protein exists in an equilibrium between dimers and tetramers, which has compromised biophysical analysis. To uncouple these states, we have generated stable dimers and tetramers, respectively. These proteins allowed kinetic analysis of DNA recognition and structural analysis of the full-length protein by X-ray crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering. Our structural data reveal that the tetramerization domains are flexible with respect to the body of the protein, resulting in mostly extended structures. Tetrameric MutS has a slow dissociation from DNA, which can be due to occasional bending over and binding DNA in its two binding sites. In contrast, the dimer dissociation is faster, primarily dependent on a combination of the type of mismatch and the flanking sequence. In the presence of ATP, we could distinguish two kinetic groups: DNA sequences where MutS forms sliding clamps and those where sliding clamps are not formed efficiently. Interestingly, this inability to undergo a conformational change rather than mismatch affinity is correlated with mismatch repair. PMID:23821665

  14. Hydrogen bond-induced vibronic mode mixing in benzoic acid dimer: a laser-induced fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Chayan K; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2004-05-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of benzoic acid dimer in the cold environment of supersonic jet expansion have been reinvestigated with improved spectral resolution of measurements. The spectra are analyzed with the aid of the normal mode vibrations of the dimer calculated by the ab initio quantum chemistry method at the DFT/B3LYP/6-311+G(*) (*) level of theory. The analysis reveals that the low-frequency intermolecular hydrogen bond modes are mixed extensively with the carboxyl as well as aromatic ring vibrations upon electronic excitation. The mode mixing is manifested as the complete loss of mirror symmetry relation between the fluorescence excitation and dispersed fluorescence spectra of the S(1) origin, and appearance of large number of cross-sequence transitions when the DF spectra are measured by exciting the low-energy vibrations near the S(1) origin. The cross-sequence bands are found in all the cases to be the combinations of two nontotally symmetric fundamentals consisting of one of the intermolecular hydrogen bond modes and the other from the aromatic ring and carboxyl group vibrations. The implications of this mode mixing on the excited state dynamics of the dimer are discussed. PMID:15267778

  15. Integrability and conformal data of the dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin-Duchesne, Alexi; Rasmussen, Jørgen; Ruelle, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The central charge of the dimer model on the square lattice is still being debated in the literature. In this paper, we provide evidence supporting the consistency of a c=-2 description. Using Lieb’s transfer matrix and its description in terms of the Temperley-Lieb algebra {{TL}}n at β =0, we provide a new solution of the dimer model in terms of the model of critical dense polymers on a tilted lattice and offer an understanding of the lattice integrability of the dimer model. The dimer transfer matrix is analyzed in the scaling limit, and the result for {L}0-\\frac{c}{24} is expressed in terms of fermions. Higher Virasoro modes are likewise constructed as limits of elements of {{TL}}n and are found to yield a c=-2 realization of the Virasoro algebra, familiar from fermionic bc ghost systems. In this realization, the dimer Fock spaces are shown to decompose, as Virasoro modules, into direct sums of Feigin-Fuchs modules, themselves exhibiting reducible yet indecomposable structures. In the scaling limit, the eigenvalues of the lattice integrals of motion are found to agree exactly with those of the c=-2 conformal integrals of motion. Consistent with the expression for {L}0-\\frac{c}{24} obtained from the transfer matrix, we also construct higher Virasoro modes with c = 1 and find that the dimer Fock space is completely reducible under their action. However, the transfer matrix is found not to be a generating function for the c = 1 integrals of motion. Although this indicates that Lieb’s transfer matrix description is incompatible with the c = 1 interpretation, it does not rule out the existence of an alternative, c = 1 compatible, transfer matrix description of the dimer model.

  16. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; Asare, B K; Biswas, P K; Rajnarayanan, R V

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide "I-box" derived from ER residues 503-518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479-485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497-506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511-520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497-506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27462021

  17. D-dimer as a Biomarker for Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jia-sen; Jing, Zai-ping; Zhuang, Shun-jiu; Qi, Shao-hong; Li, Li; Zhou, Jun-wen; Zhang, Wang; Zhao, Yun; Qi, Ning; Yin, Yang-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To perform a meta-analysis and examine the use of D-dimer levels for diagnosing acute aortic dissection (AAD). Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched until April 23, 2014, using the following search terms: biomarker, acute aortic dissection, diagnosis, and D-dimer. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of acute aortic dissection, D-dimer levels obtained, 2-armed study. Outcome measures were the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of D-dimer level for the diagnosis of AAD. Sensitivity analysis was performed using the leave-one-out approach. Of 34 articles identified, 5 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. The age of participants was similar between treatments within studies. The number of AAD patients ranged from 16 to 107 (total = 274), and the number of control group patients ranged from 32 to 206 (total = 469). The pooled sensitivity of D-dimer levels in AAD patients was 94.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.1%–98.8%, P < 0.001), and the specificity was 69.1% (95% CI 43.7%–86.5%, P = 0.136). The pooled area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for D-dimer levels in AAD patients was 0.916 (95% CI 0.863–0.970, P < 0.001). The direction and magnitude of the combined estimates did not change markedly with the exclusion of individual studies, indicating the meta-analysis had good reliability. D-dimer levels are best used for ruling out AAD in patients with low likelihood of the disease. PMID:25634194

  18. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Mononucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2- methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2(+) in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MelmpU and 2-MelmpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-Iinked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of intemucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MelmpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  19. The Activation Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein Mediates Association of DNA-Bound Dimers to form DNA Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Jonathan D.; Li, Rong; Botchan, Michael

    1991-04-01

    The E2 transactivator protein of bovine papillomavirus binds its specific DNA target sequence as a dimer. We have found that E2 dimers, performed in solution independent of DNA, exhibit substantial cooperativity of DNA binding as detected by both nitrocellulose filter retention and footprint analysis techniques. If the binding sites are widely spaced, E2 forms stable DNA loops visible by electron microscopy. When three widely separated binding sites reside on te DNA, E2 condenses the molecule into a bow-tie structure. This implies that each E2 dimer has at least two independent surfaces for multimerization. Two naturally occurring shorter forms of the protein, E2C and D8/E2, which function in vivo as repressors of transcription, do not form such loops. Thus, the looping function of E2 maps to the 161-amino acid activation domain. These results support the looping model of transcription activation by enhancers.

  20. Fractal analysis of DNA sequence data

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the [open quote]sandbox method[close quote]. Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base-content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than to invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  1. Fractal Analysis of DNA Sequence Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelsen, Cheryl Lynn

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the "sandbox method." Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base -content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than do invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  2. Mesophase structure and behaviour in bulk and restricted geometry of a dimeric compound exhibiting a nematic-nematic transition.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, N; Tamba, M G; Stannarius, R; de la Fuente, M R; Salamonczyk, M; Cukrov, G; Gleeson, J; Sprunt, S; Jákli, A; Welch, C; Ahmed, Z; Mehl, G H; Eremin, A

    2016-07-28

    We present structural studies of a dimeric compound composed of a central heptyl spacer linking two mesogens consisting of terphenyl units at which two adjacent fluoro groups are attached to each central ring. The terminal rings are linked to pentyl chains as terminal groups. The material exhibits a nematic-nematic transition and a low temperature modulated phase. The higher temperature nematic phase was found to exhibit an anomaly of the bend elastic constant similar to that of the dimers with N-Ntb phase sequence, and the physical properties of the low-temperature nematic phase are similar to those of the known Ntb materials. The structure of the low-temperature modulated smectic/columnar phase is described together with its ability to form freely suspended films and fibres. The relation of the modulated structure to the fibre formation and to the appearance of the labyrinthine instability in freely-suspended films is discussed. PMID:27375037

  3. Time- and Frequency-Dependent Imaging of Nuclear Dynamics in Laser-Excited Nobel-Gas Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Kramer, A.; Bartschat, K.; Thumm, U.

    2014-05-01

    We study the nuclear dynamics of noble-gas dimer ions resolved in time using intense ultrashort pump in combination with delayed probe laser pulses. We compare our time-dependent numerical results with those from a complementary description of the same basic dynamics in the frequency domain. This alternative analysis is based on the Fourier transformation of the time- and internuclear-separation-dependent wavefunction probability density or, equivalently, the Fourier transformation of the delay-dependent kinetic-energy-release spectra. Specifically, for pump-laser excited diatomic molecules, it allows for the characterization of their nuclear motion in terms of coherently superimposed stationary vibrational states and the mapping of the laser-dressed nuclear potential curves, thereby supplementing the time-domain formulation, as we will demonstrate for the sequence He2+ to Xe2+ of dimer cations.

  4. Comorbidities, alone and in combination with D-dimer, as risk factors for recurrence after a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism in the extended follow-up of the PROLONG study.

    PubMed

    Cosmi, Benilde; Legnani, Cristina; Tosetto, Alberto; Pengo, Vittorio; Ghirarduzzi, Angelo; Testa, Sophie; Prisco, Domenico; Poli, Daniela; Tripodi, Armando; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2010-06-01

    The PROLONG randomised clinical trial showed that an abnormal D-dimer at one month after vitamin K antagonist (VKA) suspension for a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with a higher risk of recurrence. However, other patient characteristics, such as comorbidities, in combination with D-dimer could also influence the recurrence risk. It was the objective of this study to assess the predictive value of comorbidities and D-dimer in combination for recurrence after withdrawal of VKA in patients enrolled in the PROLONG study. On the day of VKA suspension, the presence of known (coronary, peripheral,cerebral) vascular disease, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, autoimmune disease, diabetes, arterial hypertension, obesity and dyslipidaemias was registered. D-dimer was measured at 30 +/- 10 days afterwards. The primary outcome was recurrent objectively documented VTE. Mean follow-up was 2.55 years. An abnormal D-dimer was observed in 44% (135/309) of patients with comorbidities and in 29% (87/299) of patients without (p=0.0003). An on-treatment analysis was conducted in 483 patients in whom VKAs were not resumed. In patients with a normal D-dimer, recurrences were observed in 14.3% (24/168) of patients with comorbidities and 10.8% (22/203) of subjects without (p=ns). In patients with an abnormal D-dimer, recurrences were observed in 24.6% (16/65) patients with comorbidities and 21.3% (10/47) of patients without (p=ns). Although abnormal D-dimer levels were significantly more frequent in patients with comorbidities, D-dimer was an independent risk factor for recurrence and the presence of comorbidities did not increase the risk of recurrence associated with an abnormal post-anticoagulation D-dimer. PMID:20352167

  5. Synthesis of a distinct water dimer inside fullerene C70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Murata, Michihisa; Aharen, Tomoko; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Murata, Yasujiro

    2016-05-01

    The water dimer is an ideal chemical species with which to study hydrogen bonds. Owing to the equilibrium between the monomer and oligomer structure, however, selective generation and separation of a genuine water dimer has not yet been achieved. Here, we report a synthetic strategy that leads to the successful encapsulation of one or two water molecules inside fullerene C70. These endohedral C70 compounds offer the opportunity to study the intrinsic properties of a single water molecule without any hydrogen bonding, as well as an isolated water dimer with a single hydrogen bond between the two molecules. The unambiguously determined off-centre position of water in (H2O)2@C70 by X-ray diffraction provides insights into the formation of (H2O)2@C70. Subsequently, the 1H NMR spectroscopic measurements for (H2O)2@C70 confirmed the formation of a single hydrogen bond rapidly interchanging between the encapsulated water dimer. Our theoretical calculations revealed a peculiar cis-linear conformation of the dimer resulting from confinement effects inside C70.

  6. Highly stable tetrathiafulvalene radical dimers in [3]catenanes

    SciTech Connect

    Spruell, Jason M.; Coskun, Ali; Friedman, Douglas C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Trabolsi, Ali; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barin, Gokhan; Paxton, Walter F.; Dey, Sanjeev K.; Olson, Mark A.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmielli, Raanan; Caldwell, Stuart T.; Rosair, Georgina M.; Hewage, Shanika Gunatilaka; Duclairoir, Florence; Seymour, Jennifer L.; Slawin, Alexandra M.Z.; Goddard, III, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Cooke, Graeme; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-12-03

    Two [3]catenane 'molecular flasks' have been designed to create stabilized, redox-controlled tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) dimers, enabling their spectrophotometric and structural properties to be probed in detail. The mechanically interlocked framework of the [3]catenanes creates the ideal arrangement and ultrahigh local concentration for the encircled TTF units to form stable dimers associated with their discrete oxidation states. These dimerization events represent an affinity umpolung, wherein the inversion in electronic affinity replaces the traditional TTF-bipyridinium interaction, which is over-ridden by stabilizing mixed-valence (TTF){sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}+} and radical-cation (TTF{sup {sm_bullet}+}){sub 2} states inside the 'molecular flasks.' The experimental data, collected in the solid state as well as in solution under ambient conditions, together with supporting quantum mechanical calculations, are consistent with the formation of stabilized paramagnetic mixed-valence dimers, and then diamagnetic radical-cation dimers following subsequent one-electron oxidations of the [3]catenanes.

  7. A single ligand is sufficient to activate EGFR dimers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Cleveland, Thomas E.; Bouyain, Samuel; Byrne, Patrick O.; Longo, Patti A.; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Crystal structures of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with bound ligand revealed symmetric, doubly ligated receptor dimers thought to represent physiologically active states. Such complexes fail to rationalize negative cooperativity of epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to EGFR and the behavior of the ligandless EGFR homolog ErbB2/HER2, however. We report cell-based assays that provide evidence for active, singly ligated dimers of human EGFR and its homolog, ErbB4/HER4. We also report crystal structures of the ErbB4/HER4 extracellular region complexed with its ligand Neuregulin-1β that resolve two types of ErbB dimer when compared to EGFR:Ligand complexes. One type resembles the recently reported asymmetric dimer of Drosophila EGFR with a single high-affinity ligand bound and provides a model for singly ligated human ErbB dimers. These results unify models of vertebrate and invertebrate EGFR/ErbB signaling, imply that the tethered conformation of unliganded ErbBs evolved to prevent crosstalk among ErbBs, and establish a molecular basis for both negative cooperativity of ligand binding to vertebrate ErbBs and the absence of active ErbB2/HER2 homodimers in normal conditions. PMID:22699492

  8. Palladium dimers adsorbed on graphene: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-05-15

    The 2D structure of graphene shows a great promise for enhanced catalytic activity when adsorbed with palladium. We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Pd{sub 2}-graphene system are calculated. Both horizontal and vertical orientations of Pd{sub 2} on graphene are studied. Our calculations revealed that the minimum energy configuration for Pd dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms occupying centre of adjacent hexagonal rings of graphene sheet. Magnetic moment is induced for Pd dimer adsorbed on graphene in vertical orientation while horizontal orientation of Pd dimer on graphene do not exhibit magnetism. Insignificant energy differences among adsorption sites means that dimer mobility on the graphene sheet is high. There is imperceptible distortion of graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane. However, some lateral displacements are seen.

  9. Hydrogenated fullerenes dimer, peanut and capsule: An atomic comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated fullerenes are detected in the Universe in space but their identification is still unsolved task. Therefore, this paper provides useful information about hydrogenated fullerenes (dimer, peanut and capsule) using DFT method at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The stability, geometric structures, hydrogen adsorption energies and NMR chemical shifts are calculated. The results show that the energy of most stable isomer of C118 dimer is lower than the energies sum of C60 and C58 cages by 1.77 eV and the energy per carbon atom of C144 capsule is more stable than C60 cage by 126.98 meV. Also, endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut are found to be most stable structures than exohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut by 2.19 eV/Ti and 3.52 eV/Ti, respectively. The hydrogenation process is found to be enhanced (especially at the caps) for endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut through electronic surface modifications. The most active hydrogenation sites are selected and it is found that the most stable hydrogenation sites are Houts1 and Houts3 for fullerenes and endohedral Ti-doped fullerenes, respectively.

  10. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  11. Effects of Dimerization of Serratia marcescens Endonuclease on Water Dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Beck, Brian W.; Krause, Kurt; Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-02-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The dynamics and structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease and its neighboring solvent are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Comparisons are made with structural and biochemical experiments. The dimer form is physiologic and functions more processively than the monomer. We previously found a channel formed by connected clusters of waters from the active site to the dimer interface. Here, we show that dimerization clearly changes correlations in the water structure and dynamics in the active site not seen in the monomer. Our results indicate that water at the active sites of the dimer is less affected compared with bulk solvent than in the monomer where it has much slower characteristic relaxation times. Given that water is a required participant in the reaction, this gives a clear advantage to dimerization in the absence of an apparent ability to use both active sites simultaneously.

  12. Chemistry of the CO dimer at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Roux, E. T.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers conducted a series of experiments on the chlorine-catalyzed photodecomposition of O sub 3 both in the gas and in inert solvents such as CF sub 4 and CO sub 2 in the temperature range about 190 to 225 K. The liquid medium was chosen in order to minimize possible surface loss of long-lived ClO dimer, and to aid in the stabilization of transient excited intermediates. The mechanism of dimer formation was as follows: (1) Cl sub 2 + hv yields Cl + Cl; (2) Cl + O sub 3 yields ClO + O sub 2; (3) ClO + ClO yields Cl sub 2 O sub 2. The experiments were done in cooled low temperature cells, with irradiation from an Osram high pressure mercury arc, filtered to remove radiation below 325 nm. Spectral analysis was by means of a Cary Model 2200 UV spectrometer. The principal objectives were: (1) to determine the lifetime of the dimer as a function of temperature; (2) to observe spectral changes in the mixtures which could be attributed to dimer or related products; and (3) to observe chemical or photochemical reactions of the dimer.

  13. Recognition of HIV TAR RNA by triazole linked neomycin dimers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    A series of neomycin dimers have been synthesized using “click chemistry” with varying linker functionality and length to target the TAR RNA region of HIV virus. TAR (Trans Activation Response) RNA region, a 59 base pair stem loop structure located at 5′-end of all nascent HIV-1 transcripts interacts with a key regulatory protein, Tat, and necessitates the replication of HIV-1 virus. Neomycin, an aminosugar, has been shown to exhibit more than one binding site with HIV TAR RNA. Multiple TAR binding sites of neomycin prompted us to design and synthesize a small library of neomycin dimers using click chemistry. The binding between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA was characterized using spectroscopic techniques including FID (Fluorescent Intercalator Displacement) titration and UV-thermal denaturation. UV thermal denaturation studies demonstrate that neomycin dimer binding increase the melting temperature (Tm) of the HIV TAR RNA up to 10 °C. Ethidium bromide displacement titrations revealed nanomolar IC50 between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA, whereas with neomycin, a much higher IC50 in the micromolar range is observed. PMID:21757341

  14. Structural investigation of protonated azidothymidine and protonated dimer.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Blake E; Marta, Rick A; Burt, Michael B; Martens, Sabrina M; Martens, Jonathan K; McMahon, Terry B

    2014-02-01

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemical calculations have been used to explore the possible structures of protonated azidothymidine and the corresponding protonated dimer. Many interesting differences between the protonated and neutral forms of azidothymidine were found, particularly associated with keto-enol tautomerization. Comparison of computational vibrational and the experimental IMRPD spectra show good agreement and give confidence that the dominant protonated species has been identified. The protonated dimer of azidothymidine exhibits three intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The IRMPD spectrum of the protonated dimer is consistent with the spectrum of the most stable computational structure. This work brings to light interesting keto-enol tautomerization and exocyclic hydrogen bonding involving azidothymidine and its protonated dimer. The fact that one dominant protonated species is observed in the gas phase, despite both the keto and enol structures being similar in energy, is proposed to be the direct result of the electrospray ionization process in which the dominant protonated dimer structure dissociates in the most energetically favorable way. PMID:24306778

  15. Mechanism of ubiquitylation by dimeric RING ligase RNF4.

    PubMed

    Plechanovová, Anna; Jaffray, Ellis G; McMahon, Stephen A; Johnson, Kenneth A; Navrátilová, Iva; Naismith, James H; Hay, Ronald T

    2011-09-01

    Mammalian RNF4 is a dimeric RING ubiquitin E3 ligase that ubiquitylates poly-SUMOylated proteins. We found that RNF4 bound ubiquitin-charged UbcH5a tightly but free UbcH5a weakly. To provide insight into the mechanism of RING-mediated ubiquitylation, we docked the UbcH5~ubiquitin thioester onto the RNF4 RING structure. This revealed that with E2 bound to one monomer of RNF4, the thioester-linked ubiquitin could reach across the dimer to engage the other monomer. In this model, the 'Ile44 hydrophobic patch' of ubiquitin is predicted to engage a conserved tyrosine located at the dimer interface of the RING, and mutation of these residues blocked ubiquitylation activity. Thus, dimeric RING ligases are not simply inert scaffolds that bring substrate and E2-loaded ubiquitin into close proximity. Instead, they facilitate ubiquitin transfer by preferentially binding the E2~ubiquitin thioester across the dimer and activating the thioester bond for catalysis. PMID:21857666

  16. Structure and Stability of the Dimeric Triosephosphate Isomerase from the Thermophilic Archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Park, Mi Seul; Moon, Sojin; Song, Mi Kyung; Park, Han Su; Hahn, Hyunggu; Kim, Soon-Jong; Bae, Euiyoung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplasma acidophilum is a thermophilic archaeon that uses both non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway for glucose degradation. While triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), a well-known glycolytic enzyme, is not involved in the ED pathway in T. acidophilum, it has been considered to play an important role in the EMP pathway. Here, we report crystal structures of apo- and glycerol-3-phosphate-bound TPI from T. acidophilum (TaTPI). TaTPI adopts the canonical TIM-barrel fold with eight α-helices and parallel eight β-strands. Although TaTPI shares ~30% sequence identity to other TPIs from thermophilic species that adopt tetrameric conformation for enzymatic activity in their harsh physiological environments, TaTPI exists as a dimer in solution. We confirmed the dimeric conformation of TaTPI by analytical ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. Helix 5 as well as helix 4 of thermostable tetrameric TPIs have been known to play crucial roles in oligomerization, forming a hydrophobic interface. However, TaTPI contains unique charged-amino acid residues in the helix 5 and adopts dimer conformation. TaTPI exhibits the apparent Td value of 74.6°C and maintains its overall structure with some changes in the secondary structure contents at extremely acidic conditions (pH 1–2). Based on our structural and biophysical analyses of TaTPI, more compact structure of the protomer with reduced length of loops and certain patches on the surface could account for the robust nature of Thermoplasma acidophilum TPI. PMID:26709515

  17. Engineering of Helicobacter pylori Dimeric Oxidoreductase DsbK (HP0231)

    PubMed Central

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M.; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J.; Banaś, Anna M.; Jastrząb, Katarzyna; Pisarczyk, Karolina; Kolarzyk, Anna; Łasica, Anna M.; Collet, Jean-François; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of disulfide bonds that are catalyzed by proteins of the Dsb (disulfide bond) family is crucial for the correct folding of many extracytoplasmic proteins. Thus, this formation plays an essential, pivotal role in the assembly of many virulence factors. The Helicobacter pylori disulfide bond-forming system is uncomplicated compared to the best-characterized Escherichia coli Dsb pathways. It possesses only two extracytoplasmic Dsb proteins named HP0377 and HP0231. As previously shown, HP0377 is a reductase involved in the process of cytochrome c maturation. Additionally, it also possesses disulfide isomerase activity. HP0231 was the first periplasmic dimeric oxidoreductase involved in disulfide generation to be described. Although HP0231 function is critical for oxidative protein folding, its structure resembles that of dimeric EcDsbG, which does not confer this activity. However, the HP0231 catalytic motifs (CXXC and the so-called cis-Pro loop) are identical to that of monomeric EcDsbA. To understand the functioning of HP0231, we decided to study the relations between its sequence, structure and activity through an extensive analysis of various HP0231 point mutants, using in vivo and in vitro strategies. Our work shows the crucial role of the cis-Pro loop, as changing valine to threonine in this motif completely abolishes the protein function in vivo. Functioning of HP0231 is conditioned by the combination of CXXC and the cis-Pro loop, as replacing the HP0231 CXXC motif by the motif from EcDsbG or EcDsbC results in bifunctional protein, at least in E. coli. We also showed that the dimerization domain of HP0231 ensures contact with its substrates. Moreover, the activity of this oxidase is independent on the structure of the catalytic domain. Finally, we showed that HP0231 chaperone activity is independent of its redox function. PMID:27507968

  18. Finite-difference time-domain studies of the optical properties of nanoshell dimers.

    PubMed

    Oubre, C; Nordlander, P

    2005-05-26

    The optical properties of metallic nanoshell dimers are investigated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We discuss issues of numerical convergence specific for the dimer system. We present results for both homodimers and heterodimers. The results show that retardation effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of realistic size nanoparticle dimers. The optical properties of the nanoshell dimer are found to be strongly polarization dependent. Maximal coupling between the nanoshells in a dimer occurs when the electric field of the incident pulse is aligned parallel to the dimer axis. The wavelengths of the peaks in the extinction cross section of the dimer are shown to vary by more than 100 nm, depending on the incident electric field polarization. The calculations show that electric field enhancements in the dimer junctions depend strongly on dimer separation. The maximum field enhancements occur in the dimer junction and at the expense of a reduced electric field enhancement in other regions of space. We investigate the usefulness of nanoshell dimers substrates for SERS by integrating the fourth power of the electric field enhancements around the surfaces of the nanoparticles as a function of dimer separation and wavelength. The SERS efficiency is shown to depend strongly on dimer separation but much weaker than the fourth power of the maximum electric field enhancement at a particular point. The SERS efficiency is also found to depend strongly on the wavelength of the incident light. Maximum SERS efficiency occurs for resonant excitation of the dimer plasmons. PMID:16852215

  19. Using Surface Curvature to Control the Dimerization of a Surface-Active Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylowicz, Martin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the influence of surface geometry on adsorbed proteins promises new possibilities in biophysics, such as topographical catalysis, molecular recognition of geometric cues, and modulations of oligomerization or ligand binding. We have created nano-textured hydrophobic surfaces that are stable in buffer by spin coating polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) to form patchy NP monolayers on a PS substrate, yielding flat and highly curved areas on the same sample. Moreover, we have separated surface chemistry from texture by floating a 10 nm thick film of monodisperse PS onto the NP-functionalized surface. Using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy we have compared in situ the distribution of detachment lengths for proteins on curved surfaces to that measured on flat surfaces. We have shown that β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG), a surface-active protein which helps to stabilize oil droplets in milk, forms dimers on both flat PS surfaces and surfaces with a radius of curvature of 100 nm, whereas β-LG monomers exist for more highly curved surfaces with radii of curvature of 25 and 40 nm. It is surprising that rather large radii of curvature have such a strong influence on proteins whose radius is only ˜2 nm. Furthermore, the transition from dimer to monomer with changes in surface curvature offers promising applications for proteins whose function can be modified by their oligomerization state.

  20. Molecular Models of STAT5A Tetramers Complexed to DNA Predict Relative Genome-Wide Frequencies of the Spacing between the Two Dimer Binding Motifs of the Tetramer Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, Bangalore K.; Li, Peng; Lin, Jian-Xin; Leonard, Warren J.

    2016-01-01

    STAT proteins bind DNA as dimers and tetramers to control cellular development, differentiation, survival, and expansion. The tetramer binding sites are comprised of two dimer-binding sites repeated in tandem. The genome-wide distribution of the spacings between the dimer binding sites shows a distinctive, non-random pattern. Here, we report on estimating the feasibility of building possible molecular models of STAT5A tetramers bound to a DNA double helix with all possible spacings between the dimer binding sites. We found that the calculated feasibility estimates correlated well with the experimentally measured frequency of tetramer-binding sites. This suggests that the feasibility of forming the tetramer complex was a major factor in the evolution of this DNA sequence variation. PMID:27537504

  1. The position of the Gly-xxx-Gly motif in transmembrane segments modulates dimer affinity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2006-12-01

    Although the intrinsic low solubility of membrane proteins presents challenges to their high-resolution structure determination, insight into the amino acid sequence features and forces that stabilize their folds has been provided through study of sequence-dependent helix-helix interactions between single transmembrane (TM) helices. While the stability of helix-helix partnerships mediated by the Gly-xxx-Gly (GG4) motif is known to be generally modulated by distal interfacial residues, it has not been established whether the position of this motif, with respect to the ends of a given TM segment, affects dimer affinity. Here we examine the relationship between motif position and affinity in the homodimers of 2 single-spanning membrane protein TM sequences: glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 coat protein (MCP). Using the TOXCAT assay for dimer affinity on a series of GpA and MCP TM segments that have been modified with either 4 Leu residues at each end or with 8 Leu residues at the N-terminal end, we show that in each protein, centrally located GG4 motifs are capable of stronger helix-helix interactions than those proximal to TM helix ends, even when surrounding interfacial residues are maintained. The relative importance of GG4 motifs in stabilizing helix-helix interactions therefore must be considered not only in its specific residue context but also in terms of the location of the interactive surface relative to the N and C termini of alpha-helical TM segments. PMID:17215886

  2. Purification, cDNA cloning, and expression profiles of the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Eiji; Mochizuki, Miwa; Yamane, Yukiko; Ryoji, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    Photolyase is a light-dependent enzyme that repairs pyrimidine dimers in DNA. Two types of photolyases have been found in frog Xenopus laevis, one for repairing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD photolyase) and the other for pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4)photoproduct [(6-4)photolyase]. However, little is known about the former type of the Xenopus photolyases. To characterize this enzyme and its expression profiles, we isolated the entire coding region of a putative CPD photolyase cDNA by extending an EST (expressed sequence tag) sequence obtained from the Xenopus database. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed a protein of 557 amino acids with close similarity to CPD photolyase of rat kangaroo. The identity of this cDNA was further established by the molecular mass (65 kDa) and the partial amino acid sequences of the major CPD photolyase that we purified from Xenopus ovaries. The gene of this enzyme is expressed in various tissues of Xenopus. Even internal organs like heart express relatively high levels of mRNA. A much smaller amount was found in skin, although UV damage is thought to occur most frequently in this tissue. Such expression profiles suggest that CPD photolyase may have roles in addition to the photorepair function. PMID:16302973

  3. Hydrogen bonded and stacked geometries of the temozolomide dimer.

    PubMed

    Kasende, Okuma Emile; Muya, Jules Tshishimbi; de Paul N Nziko, Vincent; Scheiner, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) and MP2 quantum chemical methods are used to examine homodimers of temozolomide (TMZ). Of the 12 dimer configurations found to be minima, the antarafacial stacked dimer is the most favored, it is lower in energy than coplanar dimers which are stabilized by H-bonds. The comparison between B3LYP and B3LYP-D binding energies points to dispersion as a primary factor in stabilizing the stacked geometries. CO(π) → CO(π*) charge transfers between amide groups in the global minimum are identified by NBO, as well as a pair of weak CH∙∙N H-bonds. AIM analysis of the electron density provides an alternative description which includes N∙∙O, N∙∙N, and C∙∙C noncovalent bonds. Graphical Abstract Hydrogen bonded and stacked geometries of the temozolomide dimerᅟ. PMID:26971506

  4. An exploration of the ozone dimer potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve

    2014-06-28

    The (O{sub 3}){sub 2} dimer potential energy surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding energies between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O{sub 3} monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction energy points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic energy, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O⋯O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm{sup −1}. In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified.

  5. Optofluidic taming of a colloidal dimer with a silicon nanocavity

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, C.; Renaut, C.; Cluzel, B. Fornel, F. de; Peyrade, D.; Picard, E.; Hadji, E.

    2014-10-27

    We report here the optical trapping of a heterogeneous colloidal dimer above a photonic crystal nanocavity used as an on-chip optical tweezer. The trapped dimer consists of a cluster of two dielectric microbeads of different sizes linked by van der Waals forces. The smallest bead, 1 μm in diameter, is observed to be preferentially trapped by the nanotweezer, leaving the second bead untrapped. The rotational nature of the trapped dimer Brownian motion is first evidenced. Then, in the presence of a fluid flow, control of its orientation and rotation is achieved. The whole system is found to show high rotational degrees of freedom, thereby acting as an effective flow-sensitive microscopic optical ball joint.

  6. Plasmonic Fano resonances in compositional heterogenous Al- Au nanorod dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Botao; Xue, Yingxian; Ma, Qiang; Ding, Chengjie; Rong, Youying; Liu, Yan; Chen, Lingxiao; Wu, E.; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated theoretically the plasmon resonance coupling in compositional heterogenous Al-Au nanorod dimers organized in a close proximity by end-to-end. It has been proved that the destructive interference between the bright dipole mode from Al nanorod and the dark quadrupole mode from Au nanorod nearby results in the appearance of apparent Fano resonance in the extinction spectra. The Fano resonance response on the structural dimension modifications in the proposed nanorod dimers have been estimated and determined. The Al-Au heterogeneous nanorod dimer shows a high sensitivity to the surrounding environment with a local surface plasmon resonance figure of merit of 7.6, which enables its promising applications in plasmonic sensing and detection.

  7. An exploration of the ozone dimer potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve

    2014-06-01

    The (O3)2 dimer potential energy surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding energies between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O3 monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction energy points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic energy, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O⋯O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm-1. In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified.

  8. An exploration of the ozone dimer potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve

    2014-06-28

    The (O3)2 dimer potential energy surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding energies between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O3 monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction energy points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic energy, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O⋯O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm(-1). In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified. PMID:24985642

  9. ERAP1-ERAP2 dimerization increases peptide-trimming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Evnouchidou, Irini; Weimershaus, Mirjana; Saveanu, Loredana; van Endert, Peter

    2014-07-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases (ERAP)1 and ERAP2 play a critical role in the production of final epitopes presented by MHC class I molecules. Formation of heterodimers by ERAP1 and ERAP2 has been proposed to facilitate trimming of epitope precursor peptides, but the effects of dimerization on ERAP function remain unknown. In this study, we produced stabilized ERAP1-ERAP2 heterodimers and found that they produced several mature epitopes more efficiently than a mix of the two enzymes unable to dimerize. Physical interaction with ERAP2 changes basic enzymatic parameters of ERAP1 and improves its substrate-binding affinity. Thus, by bringing the two enzymes in proximity and by producing allosteric effects on ERAP1, dimerization of ERAP1/2 creates complexes with superior peptide-trimming efficacy. Such complexes are likely to enhance Ag presentation by cells displaying coordinated expression of the two enzymes. PMID:24928998

  10. Dimer ribbons of ATP synthase shape the inner mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-01-01

    ATP synthase converts the electrochemical potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane into chemical energy, producing the ATP that powers the cell. Using electron cryo-tomography we show that the ATP synthase of mammalian mitochondria is arranged in long ∼1-μm rows of dimeric supercomplexes, located at the apex of cristae membranes. The dimer ribbons enforce a strong local curvature on the membrane with a 17-nm outer radius. Calculations of the electrostatic field strength indicate a significant increase in charge density, and thus in the local pH gradient of ∼0.5 units in regions of high membrane curvature. We conclude that the mitochondrial cristae act as proton traps, and that the proton sink of the ATP synthase at the apex of the compartment favours effective ATP synthesis under proton-limited conditions. We propose that the mitochondrial ATP synthase organises itself into dimer ribbons to optimise its own performance. PMID:18323778

  11. Rotational coherence spectroscopy and structure of phenol dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, L. L.; Ohline, S. M.; Joireman, P. W.; Corcoran, T. C.; Felker, P. M.

    1992-02-01

    Rotational coherence spectroscopy has been used to measure the rotational constants of four isotopomers of phenol dimer and a single isotopomer of p-cresol dimer. From the results of these measurements, together with spectroscopic results reported by others, a geometry for phenol dimer is deduced. The species is found to be bound by an O-HṡṡṡO hydrogen bond. The orientation of the phenyl moieties is such that they make maximal contact consistent with the constraints imposed by the hydrogen bond and by the van der Waals radii of the atoms. This geometric feature is cited as evidence for the significance of aromatic-aromatic attraction in the intermolecular interaction between the phenols.

  12. Epoxidation of propylene dimers and isomerization of mixtures obtained

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, D.M.; Kurtev, K.S.

    1988-05-10

    Mixtures of hexenes are obtained in the dimerization of propylene on a Ziegler catalyst. By the epoxidation of this mixture by organic peroxides, followed by isomerization of the oxides, C/sub 6/ ketones, which are used as solvents, can be obtained. The hexenes were obtained by dimerization of propylene in the presence of a Ni(C/sub 5/H/sub 7/O/sub 2/)/sub 2/-P(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 3/-(C/sub 3/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/AlCl catalytic system. The epoxidation was carried with technical grade isopropylbenzyl hydroperoxide (IPBHP). MoO/sub 2/(C/sub 5/H/sub 7/O/sub 2/)/sub 2/ was used as the catalyst. The relative rates of epoxidation of different isomers contained in the dimeric fraction, with respect to 2-methyl-1-pentene, was determined by means of competing reactions.

  13. Antiferromagnetic Spin-S Chains with Exactly Dimerized Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Frédéric; Vernay, François; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Mila, Frédéric

    2012-03-01

    We show that spin S Heisenberg spin chains with an additional three-body interaction of the form (Si-1·Si)(Si·Si+1)+H.c. possess fully dimerized ground states if the ratio of the three-body interaction to the bilinear one is equal to 1/[4S(S+1)-2]. This result generalizes the Majumdar-Ghosh point of the J1-J2 chain, to which the present model reduces for S=1/2. For S=1, we use the density matrix renormalization group method to show that the transition between the Haldane and the dimerized phases is continuous with a central charge c=3/2. Finally, we show that such a three-body interaction appears naturally in a strong-coupling expansion of the Hubbard model, and we discuss the consequences for the dimerization of actual antiferromagnetic chains.

  14. Fluxional σ-Bonds of the 2,5,8-Trimethylphenalenyl Dimer: Direct Observation of the Sixfold σ-Bond Shift via a π-Dimer.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuyuki; Mou, Zhongyu; Kertesz, Miklos; Kubo, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Direct evidence for σ-bond fluxionality in a phenalenyl σ-dimer was successfully obtained by a detailed investigation of the solution-state dynamics of 2,5,8-trimethylphenalenyl (TMPLY) using both experimental and theoretical approaches. TMPLY formed three diamagnetic dimers, namely, the σ-dimer (RR/SS), σ-dimer (RS), and π-dimer, which were fully characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and electronic absorption measurements. The experimental findings gave the first quantitative insights into the essential preference of these competitive and unusual dimerization modes. The spectroscopic analyses suggested that the σ-dimer (RR/SS) is the most stable in terms of energy, whereas the others are metastable; the energy differences between these three isomers are less than 1 kcal mol(-1). Furthermore, the intriguing dynamics of the TMPLY dimers in the solution state were fully revealed by means of (1)H-(1)H exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) measurements and variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies. Surprisingly, the σ-dimer (RR/SS) demonstrated a sixfold σ-bond shift between the six sets of α-carbon pairs. This unusual σ-bond fluxionality is ascribed to the presence of a direct interconversion pathway between the σ-dimer (RR/SS) and the π-dimer, which was unambiguously corroborated by the EXSY measurements. The proposed mechanism of the sixfold σ-bond shift based on the experimental findings was well-supported by theoretical calculations. PMID:26961216

  15. Structure of the indole-benzene dimer revisited.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Himansu S; Gloaguen, Eric; Mons, Michel; Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2011-09-01

    The structure of the indole-benzene dimer has been investigated using experimental techniques, namely, UV spectroscopy and infrared-ultraviolet (IR/UV) double resonance spectroscopy, combined with quantum chemical calculations such as MP2 and dispersion corrected DFT methods. The red shift of the indole N-H stretch frequency in the dimer provides direct evidence that the experimentally observed indole-benzene dimer is an N-H···π bound hydrogen bonded complex. Theoretical investigations suggest that the potential energy surface (PES) of the complex is rather flat along the coordinate describing the tilt angle between the molecular planes of indole and benzene, with several minima of similar energies, namely, parallel displaced (PD), right-angle T-shaped (T), and other intermediate structures which can be categorized as tilted T-shaped (T') and tilted parallel displaced (PD') structures. Three different computational methods, namely, RI-MP2, RI-B97-D, and PBE1-DCP, are used to arrive at a new structural assignment after assessing their performance in predicting the structure of the pyrrole dimer, for which accurate experimental data are available. By comparing the computed IR spectra of PD, T, and T'/PD' structures with the experimental IR spectrum, the tilted T-shaped (T') structure was assigned to the indole-benzene dimer. The empirically dispersion-corrected functionals (RI-B97-D and PBE1-DCP) correctly reproduce the experimental IR spectrum whereas the popular post-Hartree-Fock, MP2 method gives disappointing results. These results are also in agreement with the experimental dissociation energy (D(0)) reported in the literature. The N-H stretch frequency of the indole-benzene dimer has been found to be a more pertinent parameter for the structural assignment than the dissociation energy (D(0)). PMID:21413767

  16. Covalent intermolecular interaction of the nitric oxide dimer (NO)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Gui-Li; Lv, Gang; Geng, Yi-Zhao; Ji, Qing

    2015-09-01

    Covalent bonds arise from the overlap of the electronic clouds in the internucleus region, which is a pure quantum effect and cannot be obtained in any classical way. If the intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, the result from direct applications of classical simulation methods to the molecular system would be questionable. Here, we analyze the special intermolecular interaction between two NO molecules based on quantum chemical calculation. This weak intermolecular interaction, which is of covalent character, is responsible for the formation of the NO dimer, (NO)2, in its most stable conformation, a cis conformation. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis gives an intuitive illustration of the formation of the dimer bonding and antibonding orbitals concomitant with the breaking of the π bonds with bond order 0.5 of the monomers. The dimer bonding is counteracted by partially filling the antibonding dimer orbital and the repulsion between those fully or nearly fully occupied nonbonding dimer orbitals that make the dimer binding rather weak. The direct molecular mechanics (MM) calculation with the UFF force fields predicts a trans conformation as the most stable state, which contradicts the result of quantum mechanics (QM). The lesson from the investigation of this special system is that for the case where intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, a specific modification of the force fields of the molecular simulation method is necessary. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 90403007 and 10975044), the Key Subject Construction Project of Hebei Provincial Universities, China, the Research Project of Hebei Education Department, China (Grant Nos. Z2012067 and Z2011133), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11147103), and the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y5

  17. Geometric Frustration of Colloidal Dimers on a Honeycomb Magnetic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierno, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    We study the phase behavior and the collective dynamics of interacting paramagnetic colloids assembled above a honeycomb lattice of triangular shaped magnetic minima. A frustrated colloidal molecular crystal is realized when filling these potential minima with exactly two particles per pinning site. External in-plane rotating fields are used to anneal the system into different phases, including long range ordered stripes, random fully packed loops, labyrinth and disordered states. At a higher amplitude of the annealing field, the dimer lattice displays a two-step melting transition where the initially immobile dimers perform first localized rotations and later break up by exchanging particles across consecutive lattice minima.

  18. Nitric Oxide Inhibitory Dimeric Sesquiterpenoids from Artemisia rupestris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Wang, Shu; Zeng, Ke-Wu; Li, Jun; Ferreira, Daneel; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Liu, Bing-Yu; Guo, Xiao-Yu; Jin, Hong-Wei; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2016-01-22

    Twelve new dimeric sesquiterpenoids (1-12) were isolated from the dried whole plants of Artemisia rupestris. Their structures were determined using MS and NMR data, and the absolute configurations were elucidated on the basis of experimental and calculated ECD spectra. Compounds 1-9 are presumably formed via biocatalyzed [2+2] or [4+2] cycloaddition reactions. Stereoselectivity of the [4+2] Diels-Alder reaction dictated the formation of endo-products. The dimeric sesquiterpenoids exhibited moderate inhibition on NO production stimulated by lipopolysaccharide in BV-2 microglial cells, with IC50 values in the range 17.0-71.8 μM. PMID:26696523

  19. A Pfaffian Formula for Monomer-Dimer Partition Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Jauslin, Ian; Lieb, Elliott H.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the monomer-dimer partition function on arbitrary finite planar graphs and arbitrary monomer and dimer weights, with the restriction that the only non-zero monomer weights are those on the boundary. We prove a Pfaffian formula for the corresponding partition function. As a consequence of this result, multipoint boundary monomer correlation functions at close packing are shown to satisfy fermionic statistics. Our proof is based on the celebrated Kasteleyn theorem, combined with a theorem on Pfaffians proved by one of the authors, and a careful labeling and directing procedure of the vertices and edges of the graph.

  20. Geometric Frustration of Colloidal Dimers on a Honeycomb Magnetic Lattice.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro

    2016-01-22

    We study the phase behavior and the collective dynamics of interacting paramagnetic colloids assembled above a honeycomb lattice of triangular shaped magnetic minima. A frustrated colloidal molecular crystal is realized when filling these potential minima with exactly two particles per pinning site. External in-plane rotating fields are used to anneal the system into different phases, including long range ordered stripes, random fully packed loops, labyrinth and disordered states. At a higher amplitude of the annealing field, the dimer lattice displays a two-step melting transition where the initially immobile dimers perform first localized rotations and later break up by exchanging particles across consecutive lattice minima. PMID:26849619

  1. Increased concentrations of D-dimers in newborn infants.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, I R; Gibson, B E; Brownlie, J; Holland, B M; Turner, T L; Webber, R G

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of D-dimers (the D fragments of fibrinogen) were measured in blood from 15 preterm infants, and 45 born at full term, to establish normal ranges. The adult normal range is less than 0.25 mg/l; 31 of the 60 infants (52%) had values less than 0.25 mg/l, in 16 (27%) they were 0.25-0.5, in eight (13%) 0.5-1, in three (5%) 1-2, and in two (3%) 2-4. D-dimer concentrations measured during the neonatal period should be interpreted with caution. PMID:2337364

  2. Structural and mechanistic insights into cooperative assembly of dimeric Notch transcription complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, Kelly L.; Hass, Matthew; McArthur, Debbie G.; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G.; Aster, Jon C.; Kopan, Raphael; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2010-11-12

    Ligand-induced proteolysis of Notch produces an intracellular effector domain that transduces essential signals by regulating the transcription of target genes. This function relies on the formation of transcriptional activation complexes that include intracellular Notch, a Mastermind co-activator and the transcription factor CSL bound to cognate DNA. These complexes form higher-order assemblies on paired, head-to-head CSL recognition sites. Here we report the X-ray structure of a dimeric human Notch1 transcription complex loaded on the paired site from the human HES1 promoter. The small interface between the Notch ankyrin domains could accommodate DNA bending and untwisting to allow a range of spacer lengths between the two sites. Cooperative dimerization occurred on the human and mouse Hes5 promoters at a sequence that diverged from the CSL-binding consensus at one of the sites. These studies reveal how promoter organizational features control cooperativity and, thus, the responsiveness of different promoters to Notch signaling.

  3. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  4. Activation of PKR by RNA misfolding: HDV ribozyme dimers activate PKR

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, Laurie A.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Protein Kinase R (PKR), the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase, plays important roles in innate immunity. Previous studies have shown that PKR is activated by long stretches of dsRNA, RNA pseudoknots, and certain single-stranded RNAs; however, regulation of PKR by RNAs with globular tertiary structure has not been reported. In this study, the HDV ribozyme is used as a model of a mostly globular RNA. In addition to a catalytic core, the ribozyme contains a peripheral 13-bp pairing region (P4), which, upon shortening, affects neither the catalytic activity of the ribozyme nor its ability to crystallize. We report that the HDV ribozyme sequence alone can activate PKR. To elucidate the RNA structural basis for this, we prepared a number of HDV variants, including those with shortened or lengthened P4 pairing regions, with the anticipation that lengthening the P4 extension would yield a more potent activator since it would offer more base pairs of dsRNA. Surprisingly, the variant with a shortened P4 was the most potent activator. Through native gel mobility and enzymatic structure mapping experiments we implicate misfolded HDV ribozyme dimers as the PKR-activating species, and show that the shortened P4 leads to enhanced occupancy of the RNA dimer. These observations have implications for how RNA misfolding relates to innate immune response and human disease. PMID:23105000

  5. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Liow, Hien-haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Brent, Michael; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA Adenine Methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried Interaction or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome, and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  6. Mechanism of amyloid β-protein dimerization determined using single-molecule AFM force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhengjian; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Condron, Margaret M.; Teplow, David B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-10-01

    Aβ42 and Aβ40 are the two primary alloforms of human amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The two additional C-terminal residues of Aβ42 result in elevated neurotoxicity compared with Aβ40, but the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule force microscopy to characterize interpeptide interactions for Aβ42 and Aβ40 and corresponding mutants. We discovered a dramatic difference in the interaction patterns of Aβ42 and Aβ40 monomers within dimers. Although the sequence difference between the two peptides is at the C-termini, the N-terminal segment plays a key role in the peptide interaction in the dimers. This is an unexpected finding as N-terminal was considered as disordered segment with no effect on the Aβ peptide aggregation. These novel properties of Aβ proteins suggests that the stabilization of N-terminal interactions is a switch in redirecting of amyloids form the neurotoxic aggregation pathway, opening a novel avenue for the disease preventions and treatments.

  7. The export receptor Crm1 forms a dimer to promote nuclear export of HIV RNA

    PubMed Central

    Booth, David S; Cheng, Yifan; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    The HIV Rev protein routes viral RNAs containing the Rev Response Element (RRE) through the Crm1 nuclear export pathway to the cytoplasm where viral proteins are expressed and genomic RNA is delivered to assembling virions. The RRE assembles a Rev oligomer that displays nuclear export sequences (NESs) for recognition by the Crm1-RanGTP nuclear receptor complex. Here we provide the first view of an assembled HIV-host nuclear export complex using single-particle electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, Crm1 forms a dimer with an extensive interface that enhances association with Rev-RRE and poises NES binding sites to interact with a Rev oligomer. The interface between Crm1 monomers explains differences between Crm1 orthologs that alter nuclear export and determine cellular tropism for viral replication. The arrangement of the export complex identifies a novel binding surface to possibly target an HIV inhibitor and may point to a broader role for Crm1 dimerization in regulating host gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04121.001 PMID:25486595

  8. Conditionally controlling nuclear trafficking in yeast by chemical-induced protein dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Johnson, Cole A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    We present here a protocol to conditionally control the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in yeast. In this system, rapamycin is used to heterodimerize two chimeric proteins. one chimera consists of a FK506-binding protein (FKBp12) fused to a cellular ‘address’ (nuclear localization signal or nuclear export sequence). the second chimera consists of a target protein fused to a fluorescent protein and the FKBp12-rapamycin-binding (FrB) domain from FKBp-12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (Frap1, also known as mtor). rapamycin induces dimerization of the FKBp12- and FrB-containing chimeras; these interactions selectively place the target protein under control of the cell address, thereby directing the protein into or out of the nucleus. By chemical-induced dimerization, protein mislocalization is reversible and enables the identification of conditional loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes, in contrast to other systems that require permanent modification of the targeted protein. Yeast strains for this analysis can be constructed in 1 week, and the technique allows protein mislocalization within 15 min after drug treatment. PMID:21030958

  9. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Hass, Matthew R; Liow, Hien-Haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T; Brent, Michael R; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-08-20

    We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA adenine methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried. Either direct interaction between proteins or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding, thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  10. UV Radiation–Sensitive Norin 1 Rice Contains Defective Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer Photolyase

    PubMed Central

    Hidema, Jun; Kumagai, Tadashi; Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2000-01-01

    Norin 1, a progenitor of many economically important Japanese rice strains, is highly sensitive to the damaging effects of UVB radiation (wavelengths 290 to 320 nm). Norin 1 seedlings are deficient in photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. However, the molecular origin of this deficiency was not known and, because rice photolyase genes have not been cloned and sequenced, could not be determined by examining photolyase structural genes or upstream regulatory elements for mutations. We therefore used a photoflash approach, which showed that the deficiency in photorepair in vivo resulted from a functionally altered photolyase. These results were confirmed by studies with extracts, which showed that the Norin 1 photolyase–dimer complex was highly thermolabile relative to the wild-type Sasanishiki photolyase. This deficiency results from a structure/function alteration of photolyase rather than of nonspecific repair, photolytic, or regulatory elements. Thus, the molecular origin of this plant DNA repair deficiency, resulting from a spontaneously occurring mutation to UV radiation sensitivity, is defective photolyase. PMID:11006332

  11. AAFreqCoil: a new classifier to distinguish parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yuan; Yan, Renxiang

    2015-07-01

    Coiled coils are characteristic rope-like protein structures, constituted by one or more heptad repeats. Native coiled-coil structures play important roles in various biological processes, while the designed ones are widely employed in medicine and industry. To date, two major oligomeric states (i.e. dimeric and trimeric states) of a coiled-coil structure have been observed, plausibly exerting different biological functions. Therefore, exploration of the relationship between heptad repeat sequences and coiled coil structures is highly important. In this paper, we develop a new method named AAFreqCoil to classify parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils. Our method demonstrated its competitive performance when benchmarked based on 10-fold cross validation and jackknife cross validation. Meanwhile, the rules that can explicitly explain the prediction results of the test coiled coil can be extracted from the AAFreqCoil model for a better explanation of user predictions. A web server and stand-alone program implementing the AAFreqCoil algorithm are freely available at . PMID:25918905

  12. Three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy of dimeric kinesin and ncd motor domains on microtubules.

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, K; Lockhart, A; Cross, R A; Amos, L A

    1996-01-01

    Kinesin and ncd motor proteins are homologous in sequence yet move in opposite directions along microtubules. We have previously shown that monomeric kinesin and ncd bind in the same orientation on equivalent sites relative to the ends of tubulin sheets of known polarity. We now report cryoelectron microscope images of 16-protofilament microtubules decorated with both single- and double-headed kinesin and double-headed ncd. Three-dimensional density maps and difference maps show that, in adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate, both dimeric motors bind tightly to microtubules via one head, leaving the other free, though apparently in a fixed position. The attached heads of dimers bind to tubulin in the same way as single kinesin heads. The second heads are connected to the tops of the first but, whereas the second kinesin head is closely associated with the first, pairs of ncd heads are splayed apart. There is also a distinct difference in orientation: the second kinesin head is tilted toward the microtubule plus end, while the second head of ncd points toward the minus end. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8790366

  13. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Smallest Sugar Dimer: Interplay of Hydrogen Bonds in the Glycolaldehyde Dimer.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sabrina; Medcraft, Chris; Betz, Thomas; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-05-10

    Molecular recognition of carbohydrates plays an important role in nature. The aggregation of the smallest sugar, glycolaldehyde, was studied in a conformer-selective manner using high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. Two different dimer structures were observed. The most stable conformer reveals C2 -symmetry by forming two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, giving up the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the monomers and thus showing high hydrogen bond selectivity. By analyzing the spectra of the (13) C and (18) O isotopologues of the dimer in natural abundance, we could precisely determine the heavy backbone structure of the dimer. Comparison to the monomer structure and the complex with water provides insight into intermolecular interactions. Despite hydrogen bonding being the dominant interaction, precise predictions from quantum-chemical calculations highly rely on the consideration of dispersion. PMID:27060475

  14. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR’s opening–closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1–NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP–bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a “partial NBD dimer” state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and “partial” separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR’s NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  15. UV-Induced Charge Transfer States in DNA Promote Sequence Selective Self-Repair.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Dominik Benjamin; Kufner, Corinna Lucia; Schlueter, Alexander; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2016-01-13

    Absorption of UV-radiation in nucleotides initiates a number of photophysical and photochemical processes, which may finally cause DNA damage. One major decay channel of photoexcited DNA leads to reactive charge transfer states. This study shows that these states trigger self-repair of DNA photolesions. The experiments were performed by UV spectroscopy and HPLC on different single and double stranded oligonucleotides containing a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. In a first experiment we show that photoexcitation of adenine adjacent to a CPD has no influence on this lesion. However, excitation of a guanine (G) adenine (A) sequence leads to reformation of the intact thymine (T) bases. The involvement of two bases for the repair points to a long-living charge transfer state between G and A to be responsible for the repair. The negatively charged A radical anion donates an electron to the CPD, inducing ring splitting and repair. In contrast, a TA sequence, having an inverted charge distribution (T radical anion, A radical cation), is not able to repair the CPD lesion. The investigations show that the presence of an adjacent radical ion is not sufficient for repair. More likely it is the driving power represented by the oxidation potential of the radical ion, which controls the repair. Thus, repair capacities are strongly sequence-dependent, creating DNA regions with different tendencies of self-repair. This self-healing activity represents the simplest sequence-dependent DNA repair system. PMID:26651219

  16. Biophysical Characterization of the Dimer and Tetramer Interface Interactions of the Human Cytosolic Malic Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Sujithkumar; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2012-01-01

    The cytosolic NADP+-dependent malic enzyme (c-NADP-ME) has a dimer-dimer quaternary structure in which the dimer interface associates more tightly than the tetramer interface. In this study, the urea-induced unfolding process of the c-NADP-ME interface mutants was monitored using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activities. Here, we demonstrate the differential protein stability between dimer and tetramer interface interactions of human c-NADP-ME. Our data clearly demonstrate that the protein stability of c-NADP-ME is affected predominantly by disruptions at the dimer interface rather than at the tetramer interface. First, during thermal stability experiments, the melting temperatures of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are 8–10°C higher than those of the dimer interface mutants. Second, during urea denaturation experiments, the thermodynamic parameters of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are almost identical. However, for the dimer interface mutants, the first transition of the urea unfolding curves shift towards a lower urea concentration, and the unfolding intermediate exist at a lower urea concentration. Third, for tetrameric WT c-NADP-ME, the enzyme is first dissociated from a tetramer to dimers before the 2 M urea treatment, and the dimers then dissociated into monomers before the 2.5 M urea treatment. With a dimeric tetramer interface mutant (H142A/D568A), the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 2.5 M urea treatment, while for a dimeric dimer interface mutant (H51A/D90A), the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 1.5 M urea treatment, indicating that the interactions of c-NADP-ME at the dimer interface are truly stronger than at the tetramer interface. Thus, this study provides a reasonable explanation for why malic enzymes need to assemble as a dimer of dimers. PMID:23284632

  17. Commonly-occurring polymorphisms in the COMT, DRD1 and DRD2 genes influence different aspects of motor sequence learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Baetu, Irina; Burns, Nicholas R; Urry, Kristi; Barbante, Girolamo Giovanni; Pitcher, Julia B

    2015-11-01

    Performing sequences of movements is a ubiquitous skill that involves dopamine transmission. However, it is unclear which components of the dopamine system contribute to which aspects of motor sequence learning. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the relationship between different components of the dopamine system and specific aspects of sequence learning in humans. In particular, we investigated variations in genes that code for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme, the dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors (DRD1 and DRD2). COMT and the DAT regulate dopamine availability in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum, respectively, two key regions recruited during learning, whereas dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are thought to be involved in long-term potentiation and depression, respectively. We show that polymorphisms in the COMT, DRD1 and DRD2 genes differentially affect behavioral performance on a sequence learning task in 161 Caucasian participants. The DRD1 polymorphism predicted the ability to learn new sequences, the DRD2 polymorphism predicted the ability to perform a previously learnt sequence after performing interfering random movements, whereas the COMT polymorphism predicted the ability to switch flexibly between two sequences. We used computer simulations to explore potential mechanisms underlying these effects, which revealed that the DRD1 and DRD2 effects are possibly related to neuroplasticity. Our prediction-error algorithm estimated faster rates of connection strengthening in genotype groups with presumably higher D1 receptor densities, and faster rates of connection weakening in genotype groups with presumably higher D2 receptor densities. Consistent with current dopamine theories, these simulations suggest that D1-mediated neuroplasticity contributes to learning to select appropriate actions, whereas D2-mediated neuroplasticity is involved in learning to inhibit incorrect action plans. However, the

  18. Nucleosome dynamics: Sequence matters.

    PubMed

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut; van Noort, John

    2016-06-01

    About three quarter of all eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around protein cylinders, forming nucleosomes. Even though the histone proteins that make up the core of nucleosomes are highly conserved in evolution, nucleosomes can be very different from each other due to posttranslational modifications of the histones. Another crucial factor in making nucleosomes unique has so far been underappreciated: the sequence of their DNA. This review provides an overview of the experimental and theoretical progress that increasingly points to the importance of the nucleosomal base pair sequence. Specifically, we discuss the role of the underlying base pair sequence in nucleosome positioning, sliding, breathing, force-induced unwrapping, dissociation and partial assembly and also how the sequence can influence higher-order structures. A new view emerges: the physical properties of nucleosomes, especially their dynamical properties, are determined to a large extent by the mechanical properties of their DNA, which in turn depends on DNA sequence. PMID:26896338

  19. Dimer asymmetry and the catalytic cycle of alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Orhanović, Stjepan; Pavela-Vrancic, Maja

    2003-11-01

    Although alkaline phosphatase (APase) from Escherichia coli crystallizes as a symmetric dimer, it displays deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetics, supported by a model describing a dimeric enzyme with unequal subunits [Orhanović S., Pavela-Vrancic M. and Flogel-Mrsić M. (1994) Acta. Pharm.44, 87-95]. The possibility, that the observed asymmetry could be attributed to negative cooperativity in Mg2+ binding, has been examined. The influence of the metal ion content on the catalytic properties of APase from E. coli has been examined by kinetic analyses. An activation study has indicated that Mg2+ enhances APase activity by a mechanism that involves interactions between subunits. The observed deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetics are independent of saturation with Zn2+ or Mg2+ ions, suggesting that asymmetry is an intrinsic property of the dimeric enzyme. In accordance with the experimental data, a model describing the mechanism of substrate hydrolysis by APase has been proposed. The release of the product is enhanced by a conformational change generating a subunit with lower affinity for both the substrate and the product. In the course of the catalytic cycle the conformation of the subunits alternates between two states in order to enable substrate binding and product release. APase displays higher activity in the presence of Mg2+, as binding of Mg2+ increases the rate of conformational change. A conformationally controlled and Mg2+-assisted dissociation of the reaction product (Pi) could serve as a kinetic switch preventing loss of Pi into the environment. PMID:14622301

  20. Packing Interface Energetics in Different Crystal Forms of the λ Cro Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Miyashita, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Variation among crystal structures of the λ Cro dimer highlights conformational flexibility. The structures range from a wild type closed to a mutant fully open conformation, but it is unclear if each represents a stable solution state or if one may be the result of crystal packing. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to investigate the energetics of crystal packing interfaces and the influence of site-directed mutagenesis on them, in order to examine the effect of crystal packing on wild type and mutant Cro dimer conformation. Replica exchange MD of mutant Cro in solution shows that the observed conformational differences between the wild type and mutant protein are not the direct consequence of mutation. Instead, simulation of Cro in different crystal environments reveals that mutation affects the stability of crystal forms. Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area binding energy calculations reveal the detailed energetics of packing interfaces. Packing interfaces can have diverse properties in strength, energetic components, and some are stronger than the biological dimer interface. Further analysis shows that mutation can strengthen packing interfaces by as much as ~5 kcal/mol in either crystal environment. Thus, in the case of Cro, mutation provides an additional energetic contribution during crystal formation that may stabilize a fully open higher energy state. Moreover, the effect of mutation in the lattice can extend to packing interfaces not involving mutation sites. Our results provide insight into possible models for the effect of crystallization on Cro conformational dynamics and emphasize careful consideration of protein crystal structures. PMID:24218107

  1. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2014-06-01

    In human gliomas, tissue factor (TF) is overexpressed, associated with the grade of malignancy and influences tumour biology. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition and activation of the fibrinolytic system also play a role in tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The first aim of the present study was to investigate TF expression and the presence of fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine glioma biopsies, graded according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system. The second aim was to investigate the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine gliomas, as a potential histological marker of glioma type or grade of malignancy. An immunohistochemical study using antibodies against TF, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers was performed with 24 glioma samples, including 15 oligodendrogliomas, 6 astrocytomas and 3 mixed gliomas. Immunohistochemical data were statistically analysed to determine whether there was any relationship between glioma type and grade of malignancy. All gliomas were moderate to strongly positive for TF and the staining score was significantly higher (P = 0.04) in high-grade (III or IV) than in low-grade (II) gliomas. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition was detected in all tumour biopsies assessed, and D-dimers were detected in 17/24 gliomas. IVT was a frequent finding, but was not linked to a specific glioma type or malignancy grade. TF expression, fibrin/fibrinogen deposition, extravascular fibrinolytic system activation and IVT occur in canine gliomas. Canine glioma might be a suitable model for studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as potential therapeutic targets for human gliomas. PMID:24745770

  2. Repetitive Sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repetitive sequences, or repeats, account for a substantial portion of the eukaryotic genomes. These sequences include very different types of DNA with respect to mode of origin, function, structure, and genomic distribution. Two large families of repetitive sequences can be readily recognized, ta...

  3. Mutations of the domain forming the dimeric interface of the ArdA protein affect dimerization and antimodification activity but not antirestriction activity

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Gareth A; Chen, Kai; Bower, Edward K M; Madrzak, Julia; Woods, Arcadia; Barker, Amy M; Cooper, Laurie P; White, John H; Blakely, Garry W; Manfield, Iain; Dryden, David T F

    2013-01-01

    ArdA antirestriction proteins are encoded by genes present in many conjugative plasmids and transposons within bacterial genomes. Antirestriction is the ability to prevent cleavage of foreign incoming DNA by restriction-modification (RM) systems. Antimodification, the ability to inhibit modification by the RM system, can also be observed with some antirestriction proteins. As these mobile genetic elements can transfer antibiotic resistance genes, the ArdA proteins assist their spread. The consequence of antirestriction is therefore the enhanced dissemination of mobile genetic elements. ArdA proteins cause antirestriction by mimicking the DNA structure bound by Type I RM enzymes. The crystal structure of ArdA showed it to be a dimeric protein with a highly elongated curved cylindrical shape [McMahon SA et al. (2009) Nucleic Acids Res37, 4887–4897]. Each monomer has three domains covered with negatively charged side chains and a very small interface with the other monomer. We investigated the role of the domain forming the dimer interface for ArdA activity via site-directed mutagenesis. The antirestriction activity of ArdA was maintained when up to seven mutations per monomer were made or the interface was disrupted such that the protein could only exist as a monomer. The antimodification activity of ArdA was lost upon mutation of this domain. The ability of the monomeric form of ArdA to function in antirestriction suggests, first, that it can bind independently to the restriction subunit or the modification subunits of the RM enzyme, and second, that the many ArdA homologues with long amino acid extensions, present in sequence databases, may be active in antirestriction. Structured digital abstract ArdA and ArdA bind by molecular sieving (1, 2) ArdA and ArdA bind by cosedimentation in solution (1, 2) PMID:23910724

  4. A systematic computational analysis of the rRNA-3' UTR sequence complementarity suggests a regulatory mechanism influencing post-termination events in metazoan translation.

    PubMed

    Pánek, Josef; Kolář, Michal; Herrmannová, Anna; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2016-07-01

    Nucleic acid sequence complementarity underlies many fundamental biological processes. Although first noticed a long time ago, sequence complementarity between mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs still lacks a meaningful biological interpretation. Here we used statistical analysis of large-scale sequence data sets and high-throughput computing to explore complementarity between 18S and 28S rRNAs and mRNA 3' UTR sequences. By the analysis of 27,646 full-length 3' UTR sequences from 14 species covering both protozoans and metazoans, we show that the computed 18S rRNA complementarity creates an evolutionarily conserved localization pattern centered around the ribosomal mRNA entry channel, suggesting its biological relevance and functionality. Based on this specific pattern and earlier data showing that post-termination 80S ribosomes are not stably anchored at the stop codon and can migrate in both directions to codons that are cognate to the P-site deacylated tRNA, we propose that the 18S rRNA-mRNA complementarity selectively stabilizes post-termination ribosomal complexes to facilitate ribosome recycling. We thus demonstrate that the complementarity between 18S rRNA and 3' UTRs has a non-random nature and very likely carries information with a regulatory potential for translational control. PMID:27190231

  5. Mechanisms of Activation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Monomers or Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play essential roles in cellular processes, including metabolism, cell-cycle control, survival, proliferation, motility and differentiation. RTKs are all synthesized as single-pass transmembrane proteins and bind polypeptide ligands, mainly growth factors. It has long been thought that all RTKs, except for the insulin receptor (IR) family, are activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptors. An increasing number of diverse studies, however, indicate that RTKs, previously thought to exist as monomers, are present as pre-formed, yet inactive, dimers prior to ligand binding. The non-covalently associated dimeric structures are reminiscent of those of the IR family, which has a disulfide-linked dimeric structure. Furthermore, recent progress in structural studies has provided insight into the underpinnings of conformational changes during the activation of RTKs. In this review, I discuss two mutually exclusive models for the mechanisms of activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, the neurotrophin receptor and IR families, based on these new insights. PMID:24758840

  6. Plasma D-dimer concentration in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Volpe, Alessandro; Caramaschi, Paola; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disorder of the connective tissue characterized by widespread vascular lesions and fibrosis. Little is known so far on the activation of the hemostatic and fibrinolytic systems in SSc, and most preliminary evidences are discordant. Methods To verify whether SSc patients might display a prothrombotic condition, plasma D-dimer was assessed in 28 consecutive SSc patients and in 33 control subjects, matched for age, sex and environmental habit. Results and discussion When compared to healthy controls, geometric mean and 95% confidence interval (IC95%) of plasma D-dimer were significantly increased in SSc patients (362 ng/mL, IC 95%: 361–363 ng/mL vs 229 ng/mL, IC95%: 228–231 ng/mL, p = 0.005). After stratifying SSc patients according to disease subset, no significant differences were observed between those with limited cutaneous pattern and controls, whereas patients with diffuse cutaneous pattern displayed substantially increased values. No correlation was found between plasma D-dimer concentration and age, sex, autoantibody pattern, serum creatinine, erythrosedimentation rate, nailfold videocapillaroscopic pattern and pulmonary involvement. Conclusion We demonstrated that SSc patients with diffuse subset are characterized by increased plasma D-dimer values, reflecting a potential activation of both the hemostatic and fibrinolytic cascades, which might finally predispose these patients to thrombotic complications. PMID:16420700

  7. The Internal Structure of Nanoparticle Dimers Linked by DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Lara, Fernando; Cheng, Ching-Jung; Gang, Oleg; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-02-01

    The self-assembly of inorganic units controlled by the interactions of biological molecules, like DNA, has received attention for the possibility to specify higher-order structure, with potential biological, optical and electronic applications. In biology, self-assembly of complex materials (eg. bone, spider silk) frequently occurs in a stepwise, hierarchical fashion. Here, we consider a first step towards a hierarchical approach for synthetic nanostructures of nanoparticles (NPs) linked by DNA. The most basic unit in this multiscale approach is a dimer of NPs linked by DNA. We use a coarse-grained molecular model to explain experimental measurements of the separation of two DNA-coated NPs connected by linking single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). We show that the dimer separation is primarily controlled by the number of DNA links between NPs. If these links are not constrained to lie along the axis between NPs, the separation is limited by off-axis connections that force the NPs to be closer. We also determine how the number of connections alters the effective persistence length of the ssDNA that connects the dimer. We discuss how these dimers might be used for subsequent assembly at larger scales.

  8. Reversible Adsorption Kinetics of Near Surface Dimer Colloids.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Paul F; Hudson, Steven D

    2016-08-30

    We investigate the effect of shape on reversible adsorption kinetics using colloidal polystyrene dimers near a solid glass surface as a model system. The interaction between colloid and wall is tuned using electrostatic, depletion, and gravity forces to produce a double-well potential. The dwell time in each of the potential wells is measured from long duration particle trajectories. The height of each monomer relative to the glass surface is measured to a resolution of <20 nm by in-line holographic microscopy. The measured transition probability distributions are used in kinetic equations to describe the flux of particles to and from the surface. The dimers are compared to independent isolated monomers to determine the effects of shape on adsorption equilibria and kinetics. To elucidate these differences, we consider both mass and surface coverage and two definitions of surface coverage. The results show that dimers with single coverage produce slower adsorption, lower surface coverage, and higher mass coverage in comparison to those of monomers, while dimers with double coverage adsorb faster and result in higher surface coverage. PMID:27483023

  9. Homogeneous gold-catalyzed efficient oxidative dimerization of propargylic acetates.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Zhang, Guozhu; Zhang, Liming

    2009-07-15

    A highly efficient gold-catalyzed oxidative dimerization of propargylic acetates is developed. In this chemistry, Selectfluor oxidation of Au(I) to Au(III) is readily incorporated into Au-catalyzed tandem reactions of propargylic acetates, and transmetallation and reductive elimination on Au(III) intermediates are likely involved. PMID:19362834

  10. Asymptotics of Height Change on Toroidal Temperleyan Dimer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubédat, Julien; Gheissari, Reza

    2015-04-01

    The dimer model is an exactly solvable model of planar statistical mechanics. In its critical phase, various aspects of its scaling limit are known to be described by the Gaussian free field. For periodic graphs, criticality is an algebraic condition on the spectral curve of the model, determined by the edge weights (Kenyon et al. in Ann Math (2) 163(3):1019-1056, 2006); isoradial graphs provide another class of critical dimer models, in which the edge weights are determined by the local geometry. In the present article, we consider another class of graphs: general Temperleyan graphs, i.e. graphs arising in the (generalized) Temperley bijection between spanning trees and dimer models. Building in particular on Forman's formula and representations of Laplacian determinants in terms of Poisson operators, and under a minimal assumption—viz. that the underlying random walk converges to Brownian motion—we show that the natural topological observable on macroscopic tori converges in law to its universal limit, i.e. the law of the periods of the dimer height function converges to that of the periods of a compactified free field.

  11. Comparative assay of antioxidant packages for dimer of estolide esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of 26 different antioxidants and commercial antioxidant packages, containing both natural and synthetic-based materials, were evaluated with dimeric coconut-oleic estolide 2-ethylhexyl ester. The different antioxidants were broken down into different classes of materials: phenolic, aminic, ...

  12. Tubulin domains responsible for assembly of dimers and protofilaments.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, K; Mandelkow, E M

    1985-01-01

    The protein domains responsible for the dimerization and polymerization of tubulin have been determined using chemical cross-linking and limited proteolysis. The intra-dimer bond is formed by the N-terminal domain of alpha-tubulin and the C-terminal domain of beta-tubulin. Conversely, the inter-dimer bond along protofilaments is formed by the N-terminal domain of beta-tubulin (carrying the exchangeable GTP) and the C-terminal domain of alpha-tubulin. The domains of proteolytically cleaved tubulin remain tightly associated in solution. Apart from the monomer, tubulin shows three levels of assembly: the dimer, oligomer and polymer. Several oligomeric species can be visualized by electron microscopy of rotary shadowed phosphocellulose-tubulin, h.p.l.c. and non-denaturing gel electrophoresis. Tubulin's capacity to form the higher level aggregates is not destroyed by enzymatic nicking. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:4076170

  13. Electrostatic forces contribute to interactions between trp repressor dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K S; Royer, C A; Howard, K P; Carey, J; Liu, Y C; Matthews, K; Heyduk, E; Lee, J C

    1994-01-01

    The trp repressor of Escherichia coli (TR), although generally considered to be dimeric, has been shown by fluorescence anisotropy of extrinsically labeled protein to undergo oligomerization in solution at protein concentrations in the micromolar range (Fernando, T., and C. A. Royer 1992. Biochemistry. 31:3429-3441). Providing evidence that oligomerization is an intrinsic property of TR, the present studies using chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, and molecular sieve chromatography demonstrate that unmodified TR dimers form higher order aggregates. Tetramers and higher order species were observed in chemical cross-linking experiments at concentrations between 1 and 40 microM. Results from analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration chromatography were consistent with average molecular weight values between tetramer and dimer, although no plateaus in the association were evident over the concentration ranges studied, indicating that higher order species are populated. Analytical ultracentrifugation data in presence of corepressor imply that corepressor binding destabilizes the higher order aggregates, an observation that is consistent with the earlier fluorescence work. Through the investigation of the salt and pH dependence of oligomerization, the present studies have revealed an electrostatic component to the interactions between TR dimers. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8038388

  14. Cantharimide dimers from the Chinese blister beetle, Mylabris phalerate PALLAS.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Takafumi; Jinpo, Katsuaki; Noda, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Five cantharidin-related compounds were isolated from the Chinese blister beetle, Mylabris phalerate PALLAS (Meloidae). Their structures were determined based on spectroscopic and chemical evidence. Three of them were identified as cantharimide dimers, which consist of two units of cantharimide combined with a tri-, tetra-, or penta-methylene group. PMID:17202708

  15. Inhibitors that stabilize a closed RAF kinase domain conformation induce dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Gavory, Gwenaëlle; Li, John; Padeganeh, Abbas; Guiral, Sébastien; Duchaine, Jean; Mao, Daniel Y. L.; Bouvier, Michel; Sicheri, Frank; Therrien, Marc

    2016-01-01

    RAF kinases play a prominent role in cancer. Their mode of activation is complex, but critically requires dimerization of their kinase domains. Unexpectedly, several ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors were recently found to promote dimerization and transactivation of RAF kinases in a RAS-dependent manner and as a result undesirably stimulate RAS/ERK-mediated cell growth. The mechanism by which these inhibitors induce RAF kinase domain dimerization remains unclear. Here we describe BRET-based biosensors for the extended RAF family enabling the detection of RAF dimerization in living cells. Notably, we demonstrate the utility of these tools for profiling kinase inhibitors that selectively modulate RAF dimerization as well as for probing structural determinants of RAF dimerization in vivo. Our findings, which appear generalizable to other kinase families allosterically regulated by kinase domain dimerization, suggest a model whereby ATP-competitive inhibitors mediate RAF dimerization by stabilizing a rigid closed conformation of the kinase domain. PMID:23685672

  16. Facile synthesis of dimer phase of coronene and its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Song, H.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S.

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized very pure dimer phase of coronene by simple heat-treatment and subsequent sublimation purification. It was found that the dimer phase emits very bright red light under the irradiation of low energy ultra-violet light.

  17. Twists of Plücker Coordinates as Dimer Partition Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, R. J.; Scott, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    The homogeneous coordinate ring of the Grassmannian Gr k, n has a cluster structure defined in terms of planar diagrams known as Postnikov diagrams. The cluster corresponding to such a diagram consists entirely of Plücker coordinates. We introduce a twist map on Gr k, n , related to the Berenstein-Fomin-Zelevinsky-twist, and give an explicit Laurent expansion for the twist of an arbitrary Plücker coordinate in terms of the cluster variables associated with a fixed Postnikov diagram. The expansion arises as a (scaled) dimer partition function of a weighted version of the bipartite graph dual to the Postnikov diagram, modified by a boundary condition determined by the Plücker coordinate. We also relate the twist map to a maximal green sequence.

  18. Phosphorylation-Induced Dimerization of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Unmasks DNA Binding and a Bipartite Transactivation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Marié, Isabelle; Smith, Eric; Prakash, Arun; Levy, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is an interferon (IFN)-inducible transcription factor required for activation of a subset of IFN-α genes that are expressed with delayed kinetics following viral infection. IRF7 is synthesized as a latent protein and is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation in infected cells. Phosphorylation required a carboxyl-terminal regulatory domain that controlled the retention of the active protein exclusively in the nucleus, as well as its binding to specific DNA target sequences, multimerization, and ability to induce target gene expression. Transcriptional activation by IRF7 mapped to two distinct regions, both of which were required for full activity, while all functions were masked in latent IRF7 by an autoinhibitory domain mapping to an internal region. A conditionally active form of IRF7 was constructed by fusing IRF7 with the ligand-binding and dimerization domain of estrogen receptor (ER). Hormone-dependent dimerization of chimeric IRF7-ER stimulated DNA binding and transcriptional transactivation of endogenous target genes. These studies demonstrate the regulation of IRF7 activity by phosphorylation-dependent allosteric changes that result in dimerization and that facilitate nuclear retention, derepress transactivation, and allow specific DNA binding. PMID:11073981

  19. A Designed “Nested” Dimer of Cyanovirin-N Increases Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woodrum, Brian W.; Maxwell, Jason; Allen, Denysia M.; Wilson, Jennifer; Krumpe, Lauren R.H.; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Hill, R. Blake; Kibler, Karen V.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is an antiviral lectin with potent activity against enveloped viruses, including HIV. The mechanism of action involves high affinity binding to mannose-rich glycans that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses. In the case of HIV, antiviral activity of CV-N is postulated to require multivalent interactions with envelope protein gp120, achieved through a pseudo-repeat of sequence that adopts two near-identical glycan-binding sites, and possibly involves a 3D-domain-swapped dimeric form of CV-N. Here, we present a covalent dimer of CV-N that increases the number of active glycan-binding sites, and we characterize its ability to recognize four glycans in solution. A CV-N variant was designed in which two native repeats were separated by the “nested” covalent insertion of two additional repeats of CV-N, resulting in four possible glycan-binding sites. The resulting Nested CV-N folds into a wild-type-like structure as assessed by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, and displays high thermal stability with a Tm of 59 °C, identical to WT. All four glycan-binding domains encompassed by the sequence are functional as demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, which revealed two sets of binding events to dimannose with dissociation constants Kd of 25 μM and 900 μM, assigned to domains B and B’ and domains A and A’ respectively. Nested CV-N displays a slight increase in activity when compared to WT CV-N in both an anti-HIV cellular assay and a fusion assay. This construct conserves the original binding specifityies of domain A and B, thus indicating correct fold of the two CV-N repeats. Thus, rational design can be used to increase multivalency in antiviral lectins in a controlled manner. PMID:27275831

  20. A Designed "Nested" Dimer of Cyanovirin-N Increases Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, Brian W; Maxwell, Jason; Allen, Denysia M; Wilson, Jennifer; Krumpe, Lauren R H; Bobkov, Andrey A; Hill, R Blake; Kibler, Karen V; O'Keefe, Barry R; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is an antiviral lectin with potent activity against enveloped viruses, including HIV. The mechanism of action involves high affinity binding to mannose-rich glycans that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses. In the case of HIV, antiviral activity of CV-N is postulated to require multivalent interactions with envelope protein gp120, achieved through a pseudo-repeat of sequence that adopts two near-identical glycan-binding sites, and possibly involves a 3D-domain-swapped dimeric form of CV-N. Here, we present a covalent dimer of CV-N that increases the number of active glycan-binding sites, and we characterize its ability to recognize four glycans in solution. A CV-N variant was designed in which two native repeats were separated by the "nested" covalent