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Sample records for dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis

  1. Synergistic impact of Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum and vincristine on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    ASHA; GAYATHRI, DEVARAJA

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. is the most dominant probiotic strain of bacteria. Evidence indicates that the consumption of Lactobacillus sp. reduces the risk of colorectal cancer in animal models. The present study was carried out to determine whether administration of Lactobacillus fermentum/ Lactobacillus plantarum alone or in combination with vincristine have a synergistic impact on the control of colorectal cancer in an animal model. Mice with 1,2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH) hydrochloride-induced colon cancer were fed with L. fermentum and L. plantarum isolated along with vincristine. An increase in body weight, a decrease in ammonia concentration, a decrease in β glucosidase and β glucuronidase enzyme activity and a reduction in the number of crypts in the mice in the pre-carcinogen-induced group was noted when compared to these variables in the post-carcinogen-induced group. The body weight of the mice fed L. fermentum along with vincristine was increased (6.5 g), and was found to be 3.5 times higher compared to that of the control. A marked decrease in the ammonia concentration (240 mg), and β glucosidase (0.0023 IU) and β glucopyranose enzyme activity (0.0027 IU) was observed; 22.59% less ammonia concentration, 73.26% less β glucosidase activity and 56.46% less β glucuronidase enzyme activity was noted when compared to the control. A significant reduction in the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) (90%) was observed when compared to the control. Maximum protection was observed in the mice fed the probiotics and vincristine prior to cancer induction. Among the different dietary combinations tested in the present study, L. fermentum and vincristine showed a more extensive reduction in ammonia concentration, β glucosidase, β glucuronidase activity and the number of ACF. PMID:22970015

  2. Polymeric black tea polyphenols inhibit 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish B.

    2008-02-15

    Tea polyphenols like epigallocatechin gallate and theaflavins are established chemopreventive agents for colorectal carcinogenesis. However, studies on evaluating similar chemopreventive properties of thearubigins or polymeric black tea polyphenols (PBPs), the most abundant polyphenols in black tea, are limited. Hence, in the present study we aim to investigate chemopreventive effects along with probable mechanisms of action of PBP extract employing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats as experimental model. The present study suggests that PBPs, like other tea polyphenols, also inhibit DMH-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by decreasing tumor volume and multiplicity. This study also shows that although the pretreatment with PBP extract could induce detoxifying enzymes in hepatic and colorectal tissue, it did not show any additional chemopreventive effects when compared to treatments with PBP extract after initiation with DMH. Mechanistically, PBP extract may inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis by decreasing DMH-induced cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Treatments with PBP extract showed decreased levels of COX-2, c-MYC and cyclin D1 proteins which aid cell proliferation probably by regulating {beta}-catenin by maintaining expression of APC and decreasing inactivation of GSK3{beta}. DMH-induced activation of MAP kinases such as ERK and JNK was also found to be inhibited by treatments with PBP extract. In conclusion, the protective effects of PBP extract could be attributed to inhibition of DMH-induced cellular proliferation probably through {beta}-catenin regulation.

  3. Selenium as a modulator of membrane stability parameters and surface changes during the initiation phase of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghadi, Fereshteh Ezzati; Malhotra, Anshoo; Ghara, Abdollah Ramzani; Dhawan, D K

    2012-10-01

    The present study evaluated the modulatory potential of selenium on colonic surface abnormalities and membrane fluidity changes following 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis. Rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, selenium treated, and DMH + selenium treated. Initiation of molecular events leading to colon carcinogenesis was started following weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/Kg body weight) for 10 weeks. Selenium in the form of sodium selenite was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 1 PPM in drinking water, ad libitum for the entire duration of the study. Brush border membranes were isolated from the colon of rats and the viscosity as well as fluidity parameters were assessed using the membrane extrinsic fluorophore pyrene. DMH treatment resulted in a significant increase in lipid peroxidation. Reduced glutathione levels (GSH) and the activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were found to be significantly decreased following DMH treatment. On the other hand, supplementation with selenium to DMH treated rats resulted in a significant decrease in the levels of lipid peroxidation but caused a significant increase in the levels of GSH as well in the activities of GR, GST, SOD, CAT, and GPx. The results further, demonstrated a marked decrease in membrane microviscosity following DMH treatment. On the other hand, a significant increase was observed in the excimer/monomer ratio and fluidity parameter of DMH treated rats when compared to normal control rats. However, the alterations in membrane microviscosity and the fluidity parameters were significantly restored following selenium treatment. Further, histological as well as colon surface alterations were also observed following DMH treatment, which however were greatly prevented upon selenium co-administration. The study, therefore, concludes

  4. Probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum modulates the formation of aberrant crypt foci, mucin-depleted foci, and cell proliferation on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Kansal, Vinod K; Kruzliak, Peter; Kumari, Archana

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) are pre-neoplastic lesions identified in the colon of carcinogen-treated rodents and in humans at high risk for colon cancer. The present study was carried out to divulge the protective potential of the probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LaVK2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BbVK3 alone or in combination with piroxicam (PXC) on the development of early biomarkers of colorectal carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats administered 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). DMH was injected subcutaneously at the rate of 40 mg/kg body weight per animal twice a week for 2 weeks. A total of 120 male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to five groups, each group having 24 animals. The rats were fed with buffalo milk or probiotic supplement (20 grams) alone or as an adjunct with PXC in addition to a basal diet ad libitum for 32 weeks. Group I was offered buffalo milk (BM) and served as the control group. Group II was administered DMH along with BM and served as the DMH-control group; group III was administered BM-DMH-PXC, in which besides administering BM-DMH, PXC was also offered. Group IV was offered probiotic LaBb Dahi and DMH, and group V was offered both probiotic LaBb Dahi and PXC along with DMH. The rats were euthanized at the 8(th), 16(th), and 32(nd) week of the experiment and examined for development of ACF, aberrant crypts per ACF (AC/ACF), mucin-depleted foci (MDF), large MDF, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling index. Administration of DMH in rats induced pre-neoplastic lesions (ACF and MDF) and increased the PCNA index in colorectal tissue. A significant (p<0.05) reduction in the number of ACF, AC/ACF, MDF, large MDF, and PCNA labeling index were observed in the probiotic LaBb Dahi group compared with the DMH control group. Feeding rats with LaBb Dahi or treatment with PXC diminished the initiation and progression of DMH-induced pre-neoplastic lesions and the PCNA index, and treatment with

  5. Açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) feeding attenuates dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Mariana F; Romualdo, Guilherme R; Ribeiro, Daniel A; Barbisan, Luis F

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of spray-dried açaí powder (AP) intake on colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in male Wistar rats. After 4 weeks of DMH administrations, the groups were fed with standard diet, a diet containing 2.5% or 5.0% AP or a diet containing 0.2% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for 10 weeks, using aberrant crypt foci (ACF) as the endpoint. Additionally, two groups were fed with standard diet or a diet containing 5.0% AP for 20 weeks, using colon tumors as the endpoint. In ACF assay, a reduction in the number of aberrant crypts (ACs) and ACF (1-3 AC) were observed in the groups fed with 5.0% AP (37% AC and 47% ACF inhibition, p=0.036) and 0.2% NAC (39% AC and 41% ACF inhibition, p=0.042). In tumor assay, a reduction in the number of invasive tumors (p<0.005) and tumor multiplicity (p=0.001) was observed in the group fed with 5.0% AP. Also, a reduction in tumor Ki-67 cell proliferation (p=0.003) and net growth index (p=0.001) was observed in the group fed with 5.0% AP. Therefore the findings of this study indicate that AP feeding may reduce the development of chemically-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. PMID:23597449

  6. Luteolin supplementation adjacent to aspirin treatment reduced dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Osman, Neamt H A; Said, Usama Z; El-Waseef, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Esraa S A

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that aspirin is used in colon cancer treatment. However, long-term of Aspirin usage is limited to gastric and renal toxicity. Luteolin (LUT) has cancer prevention and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of LUT supplementation and Aspirin treatment in dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced carcinogenesis in rats. DMH (20 mg/kg BW/week) treated rats received gavages with Aspirin (50 mg/kg BW/week) and LUT (0.2 mg/kg BW/day) for 15 weeks. DMH injections induce colon polyps and renal bleeding, significantly increasing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), oxidative stress, and kidney function tests and reducing antioxidant markers. Either Aspirin or LUT gavages alone or combined produce a significant decrease in colon polyp number and size, significantly decreasing CEA, COX-2, and oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant markers. In conclusion, the supplementations of LUT adjacent to Aspirin in the treatment of DMH-induced carcinogenesis in rats reflect a better effect than the use of Aspirin alone. PMID:25342594

  7. Chemopreventive effect of sinapic acid on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Balaji, C; Muthukumaran, J; Nalini, N

    2014-12-01

    Sinapic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring phenolic acid found in various herbal plants which is attributed with numerous pharmacological properties. This study was aimed to investigate the chemopreventive effect of SA on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Rats were treated with DMH injections (20 mg kg(-1) bodyweight (b.w.) subcutaneously once a week for the first 4 consecutive weeks and SA (20, 40 and 80 mg kg(-1) b.w.) post orally for 16 weeks. At the end of the 16-week experimental period, all the rats were killed, and the tissues were evaluated biochemically. Our results reveal that DMH alone treatment decreased the levels/activities of lipid peroxidation by-products such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, conjugated dienes and antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione in the intestine and colonic tissues which were reversed on supplementation with SA. Moreover, the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes of phase I (cytochrome P450 and P4502E1) were enhanced and those of phase II (glutathione-S-transferase, DT-diaphorase and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase) were diminished in the liver and colonic mucosa of DMH alone-treated rats and were reversed on supplementation with SA. All the above changes were supported by the histopathological observations of the rat liver and colon. These findings suggest that SA at the dose of 40 mg kg(-1) b.w. was the most effective dose against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis, and thus, SA could be used as a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:24532707

  8. Modulatory efficacy of rosmarinic acid on premalignant lesions and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karthikkumar, V; Sivagami, G; Vinothkumar, R; Rajkumar, D; Nalini, N

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths in Western countries and is becoming increasingly common in Asia. Rosmarinic acid (RA), one of the major components of polyphenol possesses attractive remedial features. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible chemopreventive mechanism of action of RA against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced rat colon carcinogenesis by evaluating the circulatory antioxidant status and colonic bacterial enzymes activities. Additionally, we analyzed the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and multiplicity in the colon of experimental groups. Wistar male rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 was control rats, group 2 rats received RA (10 mg/kg b.w., p.o. everyday), rats in groups 3-6 received DMH (20 mg/kg b.w., s.c.) for the first 4 weeks. In addition to DMH, groups 4-6 received 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg b.w. RA respectively. The results revealed that supplementation with RA significantly reduced the formation of ACF and ACF multiplicity in DMH treated rats. Moreover RA supplementation prevented the alterations in circulatory antioxidant enzymes and colonic bacterial enzymes activities. Overall, our results showed that all three doses of RA inhibited carcinogenesis, though the effect of the intermediary dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. was more pronounced. PMID:22960260

  9. Chemopreventive Effects of Azadirachta indica on Cancer Marker Indices and Ultrastructural Changes During 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Sun, Bo; Wu, Peiwei; Wei, Xi

    2015-09-01

    The present study elucidated the prospective of Azadirachta indica supplementation, if any, in affording chemoprevention by modulating the altered cancer markers and ultrastructural changes in DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats. The rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, A. indica treated, and DMH+AI treated. Initiation and induction of colon carcinogenesis were achieved through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for both 10 and 20 weeks. A. indica extract was supplemented to rats at a dose rate of 100 mg/kg body weight of animals thrice a week on alternative days, ad libitum for two different time durations of 10 and 20 weeks. The study observed a significant increase in the number of aberrant crypt foci in colons of DMH-treated rats at both the time intervals which were decreased significantly upon AI supplementation. Also, a significant increase was seen in the enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, which, however, was moderated upon AI administration to DMH-treated rats. Changes in the ultrastructural architecture of colonic cells were apparent following both the treatment schedules of DMH; however, the changes were prominent following 20 weeks of DMH treatment. The most obvious changes were seen in the form of altered nuclear shape and disruption of cellular integrity, which were appreciably improved upon AI supplementation. In conclusion, the study shows the chemopreventive abilities of AI against DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats. PMID:25697750

  10. Chemopreventive effect of Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) blume tuber against aberrant crypt foci and cell proliferation in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ansil, Puthuparampil Nazarudeen; Prabha, Santhibhavan Prabhakaran; Nitha, Anand; Latha, Mukalel Sankunni

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death, both in men and women. This study investigated the effects of Amorphophallus campanulatus tuber methanolic extract (ACME) on aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, colonic cell proliferation, lipid peroxidative damage and the antioxidant status in a long term preclinical model of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups, viz., group I rats served as controls; group II rats treated as drug controls receiving 250 mg/ kg body weight of ACME orally; group III rats received DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) subcutaneously once a week for the first 15 weeks; groups IV, V and VI rats received ACME along with DMH during the initiation, post- initiation stages and the entire period of the study, respectively. All the rats were sacrificed at the end of 30 weeks and the intestinal and colonic tissues from different groups were subjected to biochemical and histological studies. Administration of DMH resulted in significant (p ≤ 0.05) intestinal and colonic lipid peroxidation (MDA) and reduction of antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S- transferase and reduced glutathione. Whereas the supplementation of ACME significantly (p ≤ 0.05) improved the intestinal and colonic MDA and reduced glutathione levels and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in DMH intoxicated rats. ACME administration also significantly suppressed the formation and multiplicity of ACF. In addition, the DMH administered rats showed amplified expression of PCNA in the colon and decreased expression of this proliferative marker was clearly noted with initiation, post-initiation and entire period of ACME treatment regimens. These results indicate that ACME could exert a significant chemopreventive effect on colon carcinogenesis induced by DMH. PMID:24175821

  11. The modulatory influence of p-methoxycinnamic acid, an active rice bran phenolic acid, against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status and aberrant crypt foci in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sivagami, Gunasekaran; Karthikkumar, Venkatachalam; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namashivayam

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the chemopreventive effect of p-methoxycinnamic acid (p-MCA), an active phenolic acid of rice bran, turmeric, and Kaemperfia galanga against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 consisted of control rats that received a modified pellet diet and 0.1% carboxymethyl cellulose. The rats in Group 2 received a modified pellet diet supplemented with p-MCA [80 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) post-orally (p.o.)] everyday. The rats in Groups 3-6 received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg b.wt.) via subcutaneous injections once a week for the first 4 weeks; additionally, the rats in Groups 4, 5 and 6 received p-MCA at doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg b.wt./day p.o., respectively, everyday for 16 weeks. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the experimental period of 16 weeks. The DMH-treated rats exhibited an increased incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) development; an increased crypt multiplicity; decreased concentrations of tissue lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), conjugated dienes (CD) and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH); decreased levels of tissue enzymic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR); and decreased levels of non-enzymic antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH) and vitamins C, E and A in the colon. Supplementation with p-MCA significantly reversed these changes and significantly inhibited the formation of ACF and its multiplicity. Thus, our findings demonstrate that p-MCA exerts a strong chemopreventive activity against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis by virtue of its ability to prevent the alterations in DMH-induced circulatory and tissue oxidative stress and preneoplastic changes. p-MCA was more effective when administered at a dose of 40 mg/kg b.wt. than at the other two doses tested. PMID:22326950

  12. Effects of differing purified cellulose, pectin, and hemicellulose fiber diets on fecal enzymes in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H J

    1986-11-01

    The fecal microflora enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and beta-glucosidase, as well as fecal bacterial counts, were examined during colon carcinogenesis in rats administered parenteral 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and fed nutritionally equivalent diets free of fiber or containing one of three single sources of dietary fiber (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin). Whereas pectin-fed animals had increased fecal beta-glucuronidase activities, those fed cellulose and hemicellulose, two fibers protective in dimethylhydrazine colon neoplasia, had decreased activities. Although fecal bacterial counts were not significantly changed, similar differential changes in fecal beta-glucosidase activity were noted: cellulose but not pectin or hemicellulose feeding was associated with reduced activity. Although cellulose fiber may cause differing physiological effects resulting in a reduction in colonic neoplasia development in this experimental animal model, decreased bacterial metabolic enzyme activation of carcinogens or cocarcinogens may lead to diminished exposure of colonic cells to exogenous or endogenous mutagens. PMID:3019527

  13. Oral supplementation with troxerutin (trihydroxyethylrutin), modulates lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, R; Vinoth Kumar, R; Karthikkumar, V; Viswanathan, P; Kabalimoorthy, J; Nalini, N

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the chemopreventive potential of troxerutin on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced rat colon carcinogenesis by evaluating the antioxidant and lipid peroxidation (LPO) status. Rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group I rats served as control. Group II rats received troxerutin (50 mg/kgb.w., p.o.) for 16 weeks. Groups III-VI rats received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kgb.w., s.c.) once a week, for the first 4 weeks. In addition to DMH, groups IV-VI rats received troxerutin at the doses of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kgb.w., respectively. In DMH treated rats, our results showed decreased activities of antioxidants and increased levels of LPO in the liver. Moreover, LPO and antioxidants in the colon were found to be significantly diminished in DMH the treated rats. Furthermore, enhanced activity of colonic vitamin C and vitamin E levels were observed in DMH alone treated rats (group III), which was significantly reversed on troxerutin supplementation. Troxerutin at the dose of 25 mg/kgb.w. had shown profound beneficial effects by exhibiting near normal biochemical profile and well-preserved colon histology as compared to the other two tested doses (12.5 and 50 mg/kgb.w.). These findings suggest that troxerutin could serve as a novel agent for colon cancer chemoprevention. PMID:24355798

  14. The Tumor Microenvironment in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Peddareddigari, Vijay G.; Wang, Dingzhi

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Therapeutic developments in the past decade have extended life expectancy in patients with metastatic disease. However, metastatic colorectal cancers remain incurable. Numerous agents that were demonstrated to have significant antitumor activity in experimental models translated into disappointing results in extending patient survival. This has resulted in more attention being focused on the contribution of tumor microenvironment to the progression of a number of solid tumors including colorectal cancer. A more complete understanding of interactions between tumor epithelial cells and their stromal elements will enhance therapeutic options and improve clinical outcome. Here we will review the role of various stromal components in colorectal carcinogenesis and discuss the potential of targeting these components for the development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:21209781

  15. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  16. In vitro ¹⁴C-labeled amino acid uptake changes and surface abnormalities in the colon after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental carcinogenesis: protection by zinc.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Dhawan, Devinder K

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored the regulatory role of zinc on the in vitro uptake of ¹⁴C-glucose and ¹⁴C-labeled amino acids and on colonic surface abnormalities after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis. Rats were segregated into four groups: control, DMH-treated, zinc-treated, and DMH + zinc-treated. Colon carcinogenesis was induced through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Zinc (in the form of zinc sulfate) was given to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in their drinking water. DMH treatment caused a significant decrease in the activities of disaccharidases (sucrase, lactase, and maltase), but a significant increase in the activity of alkaline phosphatase. In vitro uptake of ¹⁴C-D-glucose and the amino acids ¹⁴C-glycine, ¹⁴C-alanine, ¹⁴C-lysine, and ¹⁴C-leucine were significantly higher in the colons of DMH-treated rats. Zinc supplementation of DMH-treated rats resulted in regulating the altered intestinal enzyme activities and in vitro uptake of ¹⁴C-amino acids and ¹⁴C-glucose. Scanning electron microscopy revealed drastic alterations in the colon surface morphology after DMH treatment, which were restored after zinc supplementation. Our results confirm a beneficial effect of zinc against DMH-induced alterations in the colons of rats. PMID:21967455

  17. Colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: a review of mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Kanwal; Ghias, Kulsoom

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men globally. CRC arises from one or a combination of chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Genetic instability is usually caused by aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity. Mutations in the tumor suppressor or cell cycle genes may also lead to cellular transformation. Similarly, epigenetic and/or genetic alterations resulting in impaired cellular pathways, such as DNA repair mechanism, may lead to microsatellite instability and mutator phenotype. Non-coding RNAs, more importantly microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have also been implicated at various CRC stages. Understanding the specific mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the underlying genetic and epigenetic traits is critical in comprehending the disease phenotype. This paper reviews these mechanisms along with the roles of various non-coding RNAs in CRCs. PMID:27144067

  18. Colorectal carcinogenesis-update and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raskov, Hans; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very common malignancy in the Western World and despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and screening, it is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in this part of the world. Numerous factors are found important in the development of CRC including colonocyte metbolism, high risk luminal environment, inflammation, as well as lifestyle factors such as diet, tobacco, and alchohol consumption. In recent years focus has turned towards the genetics and molecular biology of CRC and several interesting and promising correlations and pathways have been discovered. The major genetic pathways of CRC are the Chromosome Instability Pathway representing the pathway of sporadic CRC through the K-ras, APC, and P53 mutations, and the Microsatellite Instability Pathway representing the pathway of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer through mutations in mismatch repair genes. To identify early cancers, screening programs have been initiated, and the leading strategy has been the use of faecal occult blood testing followed by colonoscopy in positive cases. Regarding the treatment of colorectal cancer, significant advances have been made in the recent decade. The molecular targets of CRC include at least two important cell surface receptors: the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. The genetic and molecular knowledge of CRC has widen the scientific and clinical perspectives of diagnosing and treatment. However, despite significant advances in the understanding and treatment of CRC, results from targeted therapy are still not convincing. Future studies will determine the role for this new treatment modality. PMID:25561783

  19. Differential colorectal carcinogenesis: Molecular basis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Morán, Alberto; Ortega, Paloma; de Juan, Carmen; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Frías, Cristina; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio José; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Iniesta, Pilar; Benito, Manuel

    2010-03-15

    Colorectal cancer (CCR) is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries. It poses a major public health problem and there is renewed interest in understanding the basic principles of the molecular biology of colorectal cancer. It has been established that sporadic CCRs can arise from at least two different carcinogenic pathways. The traditional pathway, also called the suppressor or chromosomal instability pathway, follows the Fearon and Vogelstein model and shows mutation in classical oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, such as K-ras, adenomatous polyposis coli, deleted in colorectal cancer, or p53. Alterations in the Wnt pathway are also very common in this type of tumour. The second main colorectal carcinogenesis pathway is the mutator pathway. This pathway is present in nearly 15% of all cases of sporadic colorectal cancer. It is characterized by the presence of mutations in the microsatellite sequences caused by a defect in the DNA mismatch repair genes, mostly in hMLH1 or hMSH2. These two pathways have clear molecular differences, which will be reviewed in this article, but they also present distinct histopathological features. More strikingly, their clinical behaviours are completely different, having the "mutator" tumours a better outcome than the "suppressor" tumours. PMID:21160823

  20. Role of Fusobacteria in the serrated pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Han, Dong Soo; Oh, Young-Ha; Lee, A-reum; Lee, Yu-ra; Eun, Chang Soo

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacteria are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and are amplified during colorectal carcinogenesis. Compared to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of carcinogenesis, serrated neoplasm has distinct clinical features and a different molecular background. We aimed to compare the gut microbiome between tubular adenoma (TA) and sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P). Patients with TA, SSA/P, or CRC were recruited. Three pieces of colorectal mucosal tissue were obtained from each patient by endoscopic biopsy. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) were performed. Among 26 enrolled patients, 8, 10, and 8 had TA, SSA/P, and CRC, respectively. The relative abundance of Fusobacteria did not differ significantly between the TA and SSA/P groups (4.3% and 1.9%, P = 0.739) but was higher in the CRC group (33.8%) than in the TA or SSA/P group, respectively (TA vs. CRC, P = 0.002, false discovery rate [FDR] = 0.023; SSA/P vs. CRC, P < 0.001, FDR = 0.001). PICRUSt revealed that most functions in the TA metagenome were similar to those in the SSA/P metagenome. The gut microbiome, including relative abundance of Fusobacteria, did not differ between TA and SSA/P, suggesting that Fusobacteria may contribute to both the serrated pathway and the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. PMID:27125587

  1. Role of S100 Proteins in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moravkova, Paula; Kohoutova, Darina; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Cyrany, Jiri; Bures, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The family of S100 proteins represents 25 relatively small (9–13 kD) calcium binding proteins. These proteins possess a broad spectrum of important intracellular and extracellular functions. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men (after lung and prostate cancer) and the second most frequent cancer in women (after breast cancer) worldwide. S100 proteins are involved in the colorectal carcinogenesis through different mechanisms: they enable proliferation, invasion, and migration of the tumour cells; furthermore, S100 proteins increase angiogenesis and activate NF-κβ signaling pathway, which plays a key role in the molecular pathogenesis especially of colitis-associated carcinoma. The expression of S100 proteins in the cancerous tissue and serum levels of S100 proteins might be used as a precise diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with suspected or already diagnosed colorectal neoplasia. Possibly, in the future, S100 proteins will be a therapeutic target for tailored anticancer therapy. PMID:26880885

  2. Thrombospondin-1 in a Murine Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Dee, Zenaida P.; Chittur, Sridar V.; Patel, Hiral; Chinikaylo, Aleona; Lippert, Brittany; Patel, Bhumi; Lawler, Jack; Gutierrez, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the late complications observed in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Carcinogenesis is promoted by persistent chronic inflammation occurring in IBD. Understanding the mechanisms involved is essential in order to ameliorate inflammation and prevent CRC. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) is a multidomain glycoprotein with important roles in angiogenesis. The effects of TSP-1 in colonic tumor formation and growth were analyzed in a model of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. WT and TSP-1 deficient mice (TSP-1-/-) of the C57BL/6 strain received a single injection of azoxymethane (AOM) and multiple cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce chronic inflammation-related cancers. Proliferation and angiogenesis were histologically analyzed in tumors. The intestinal transcriptome was also analyzed using a gene microarray approach. When the area containing tumors was compared with the entire colonic area of each mouse, the tumor burden was decreased in AOM/DSS-treated TSP-1-/- versus wild type (WT) mice. However, these lesions displayed more angiogenesis and proliferation rates when compared with the WT tumors. AOM-DSS treatment of TSP-1-/- mice resulted in significant deregulation of genes involved in transcription, canonical Wnt signaling, transport, defense response, regulation of epithelial cell proliferation and metabolism. Microarray analyses of these tumors showed down-regulation of 18 microRNAs in TSP-1-/- tumors. These results contribute new insights on the controversial role of TSP-1 in cancer and offer a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of CRC. PMID:26461935

  3. Modifier-concept of colorectal carcinogenesis: Lipidomics as a technical tool in pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Klaus, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Reinartz, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In the modifier concept of intestinal carcinogenesis, lipids have been established as important variables and one focus is given to long-chain fatty acids. Increased consumption of long-chain fatty acids is in discussion to modify the development of colorectal carcinoma in humans. Saturated long-chain fatty acids, in particular, are assumed to promote carcinogenesis, whereas polyunsaturated forms are likely to act in the opposite way. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind these effects are not well understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated by lipidomics and associated molecular techniques, that activation and metabolic channeling of long-chain fatty acids are important mechanisms to modify colorectal carcinogenesis. In this Editorial, an overview about the present concept of long-chain fatty acids and its derivatives in colorectal carcinogenesis as well as technical algorithms in lipid analysis is given. PMID:20397257

  4. Mitochondrial D310 mutations in colorectal adenomas: an early but not causative genetic event during colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Legras, Antoine; Lièvre, Astrid; Bonaiti-Pellié, Catherine; Cottet, Vanessa; Pariente, Alexandre; Nalet, Bernard; Lafon, Jacques; Faivre, Jean; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire; Goasguen, Nicolas; Penna, Christophe; Olschwang, Sylviane; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2008-05-15

    Somatic mutations of the D310 sequence of the mitochondrial DNA are reported in human cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRC). The presence of these mutations at early or late steps of colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Their prevalence increased significantly with the number of cytosines in the D310 sequence of the matched normal tissue (D310 polymorphism), suggesting that this polymorphism could be a risk factor for CRC. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the prevalence of D310 mutations in 64 colorectal adenomas and 36 liver metastases from 15 CRC patients, (ii) to assess the relation between D310 polymorphism and the risk of colorectal adenoma in a case-control study including 613 cases with colorectal adenoma and 572 polyp-free (PF) controls. D310 mutations were found in colorectal adenomas and liver metastases from CRC patients in 27 and 33%, respectively and so are an early genetic event in colorectal carcinogenesis. The frequency of the mutations increased significantly with the number of cytosines in the matched normal tissue D310 sequence (p < 0.001) but the distribution of D310 polymorphisms was not significantly different between adenoma cases (large (>9 mm) and small (<5 mm) adenomas) and PF controls (C(4)-C(7)TC(6): 47, 52 and 49%; C(8)TC(6): 44, 39 and 41%; C(9)-C(10)TC(6): 9, 9 and 10%, respectively; p > 0.05), suggesting that germline D310 polymorphism is not a risk factor for colorectal adenomas. Considering their high frequency in colorectal adenomas, mitochondrial D310 mutations could represent a biomarker for early detection of CRC although their causative role in colorectal carcinogenesis remains uncertain. PMID:18224678

  5. Cimetidine and Clobenpropit Attenuate Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Mori, Takayuki; Kurata, Ayumi; Watanabe, Naoki; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors (Hrhs) have been identified as critical molecules during inflammation and carcinogenesis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Hrh1-Hrh3 antagonists on inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Male ICR mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and 1.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, drinking water for 7 days) to induce colorectal carcinogenesis. The mice were then fed diets containing test chemical (500 ppm terfenadine, 500 ppm cimetidine or 10 ppm clobenpropit) for 15 weeks. At week 18, feeding with the diets containing cimetidine (Hrh2 antagonist) and clobenpropit (Hrh3 antagonist/inverse agonist) significantly lowered the multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma. Terfenadine (Hrh1 antagonist) did not affect AOM-DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Adenocarcinoma cells immunohistochemically expressed Hrh1, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 with varied intensities. Because clobenpropit is also known to be a Hrh4 receptor agonist, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 may be involved in inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional data, including the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes in the colonic mucosa, are also presented. PMID:26907350

  6. A review of dietary factors and its influence on DNA methylation in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arasaradnam, R P; Commane, D M; Bradburn, D; Mathers, J C

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer in non-smokers posing a significant health burden in the UK. Observational studies lend support to the impact of environmental factors especially diet on colorectal carcinogenesis. Significant advances have been made in understanding the biology of CRC carcinogenesis in particular epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation. DNA methylation is thought to occur at least as commonly as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In fact compared with other human cancers, promoter gene methylation occurs most commonly within the gastrointestinal tract. Emerging data suggest the direct influence of certain micronutrients for example folic acid, selenium as well as interaction with toxins such as alcohol on DNA methylation. Such interactions are likely to have a mechanistic impact on CRC carcinogenesis through the methylation pathway but also, may offer possible therapeutic potential as nutraceuticals. PMID:18682688

  7. Dissecting characteristics and dynamics of differentially expressed proteins during multistage carcinogenesis of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fang; Huang, Ying; Li, Mao-Yu; Li, Guo-Qing; Huang, Hui-Chao; Guan, Rui; Chen, Zhu-Chu; Liang, Song-Ping; Chen, Yong-Heng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To discover novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis or treatment of human colorectal cancer. METHODS: iTRAQ 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was used to identify differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in the human colonic epithelial carcinogenic process using laser capture microdissection-purified colonic epithelial cells from normal colon, adenoma, carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma tissues. RESULTS: A total of 326 DEPs were identified, and four DEPs (DMBT1, S100A9, Galectin-10, and S100A8) with progressive alteration in the carcinogenic process were further validated by immunohistochemistry. The DEPs were involved in multiple biological processes including cell cycle, cell adhesion, translation, mRNA processing, and protein synthesis. Some of the DEPs involved in cellular process such as “translation” and “mRNA splicing” were progressively up-regulated, while some DEPs involved in other processes such as “metabolism” and “cell response to stress” was progressively down-regulated. Other proteins with up- or down-regulation at certain stages of carcinogenesis may play various roles at different stages of the colorectal carcinogenic process. CONCLUSION: These findings give insights into our understanding of the mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis and provide clues for further investigation of carcinogenesis and identification of biomarkers. PMID:27182161

  8. Gut mucosal microbiome across stages of colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Geicho; Li, Xiangchun; Zhou, Haokui; Sheng, Jianqiu; Wong, Sunny Hei; Wu, William Ka Kai; Ng, Siew Chien; Tsoi, Ho; Dong, Yujuan; Zhang, Ning; He, Yuqi; Kang, Qian; Cao, Lei; Wang, Kunning; Zhang, Jingwan; Liang, Qiaoyi; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial dysbiosis contributes to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we catalogue the microbial communities in human gut mucosae at different stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. We analyse the gut mucosal microbiome of 47 paired samples of adenoma and adenoma-adjacent mucosae, 52 paired samples of carcinoma and carcinoma-adjacent mucosae and 61 healthy controls. Probabilistic partitioning of relative abundance profiles reveals that a metacommunity predominated by members of the oral microbiome is primarily associated with CRC. Analysis of paired samples shows differences in community configurations between lesions and the adjacent mucosae. Correlations of bacterial taxa indicate early signs of dysbiosis in adenoma, and co-exclusive relationships are subsequently more common in cancer. We validate these alterations in CRC-associated microbiome by comparison with two previously published data sets. Our results suggest that a taxonomically defined microbial consortium is implicated in the development of CRC. PMID:26515465

  9. Molecular biomarkers of colorectal carcinogenesis and their role in surveillance and early intervention.

    PubMed

    Garcea, G; Sharma, R A; Dennison, A; Steward, W P; Gescher, A; Berry, D P

    2003-05-01

    Modern medicine is increasingly focused towards population surveillance for disease, coupled with the implementation of preventative measures applied to 'at-risk' patients. Surveillance in colorectal cancer is limited by the cost and risk of endoscopy. Trials of putative chemopreventive agents in colorectal cancer are hampered by difficulties in following up large cohorts of patients over long periods of time to ascertain the clinical effect. Research into possible pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis has revealed a range of biological intermediates which could be used in surveillance, the identification of high risk populations and early diagnosis of cancer. The aim of this paper was to review the possible role of biomarkers in surveillance and the timing of intervention. A literature review using both Medline and Web of Science was performed from 1995 onwards using keywords: biomarkers, colorectal cancer, carcinogenesis, chemoprevention, surveillance and screening. Research has identified many potential biomarkers, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), oxidative DNA adducts and glutathione S-transferase (GST) polymorphisms, which could be applied in a clinical setting to screen for and detect colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers, such as COX-2, oxidative DNA adducts and GST polymorphisms offer new prospects in the detection of early colorectal cancer, surveillance of high-risk populations and prediction of the clinical effectiveness of chemopreventive drugs. Their role could be extended into surgical surveillance for potentially operable disease and post-operative follow-up for disease recurrence. Research should be directed at assessing complementary biomarkers to increase clinical effectiveness in determining management options for patients. PMID:12736102

  10. Characterization of hERG1 channel role in mouse colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Antonella; Carraresi, Laura; Morabito, Angela; Polvani, Simone; Fortunato, Angelo; Lastraioli, Elena; Femia, Angelo P; De Lorenzo, Emanuele; Caderni, Giovanna; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2013-10-01

    The human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG)1 K(+) channel is upregulated in human colorectal cancer cells and primary samples. In this study, we examined the role of hERG1 in colorectal carcinogenesis using two mouse models: adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc(min/+) ) and azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice. Colonic polyps of Apc(min/+) mice overexpressed mERG1 and their formation was reverted by the hERG1 blocker E4031. AOM was applied to either hERG1-transgenic (TG) mice, which overexpress hERG1 in the mucosa of the large intestine, or wild-type mice. A significant increase of both mucin-depleted foci and polyps in the colon of hERG1-TG mice was detected. Both the intestine of TG mice and colonic polyps of Apc(min/+) showed an upregulation of phospho-Protein Kinase B (pAkt)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) and an increased angiogenesis, which were reverted by treatment with E4031. On the whole, this article assigns a relevant role to hERG1 in the process of in vivo colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:24403225

  11. Colorectal carcinogenesis: a cellular response to sustained risk environment.

    PubMed

    Fung, Kim Y C; Ooi, Cheng Cheng; Zucker, Michelle H; Lockett, Trevor; Williams, Desmond B; Cosgrove, Leah J; Topping, David L

    2013-01-01

    The current models for colorectal cancer (CRC) are essentially linear in nature with a sequential progression from adenoma through to carcinoma. However, these views of CRC development do not explain the full body of published knowledge and tend to discount environmental influences. This paper proposes that CRC is a cellular response to prolonged exposure to cytotoxic agents (e.g., free ammonia) as key events within a sustained high-risk colonic luminal environment. This environment is low in substrate for the colonocytes (short chain fatty acids, SCFA) and consequently of higher pH with higher levels of free ammonia and decreased mucosal oxygen supply as a result of lower visceral blood flow. All of these lead to greater and prolonged exposure of the colonic epithelium to a cytotoxic agent with diminished aerobic energy availability. Normal colonocytes faced with this unfavourable environment can transform into CRC cells for survival through epigenetic reprogramming to express genes which increase mobility to allow migration and proliferation. Recent data with high protein diets confirm that genetic damage can be increased, consistent with greater CRC risk. However, this damage can be reversed by increasing SCFA supply by feeding fermentable fibre as resistant starch or arabinoxylan. High protein, low carbohydrate diets have been shown to alter the colonic environment with lower butyrate levels and apparently greater mucosal exposure to ammonia, consistent with our hypothesis. Evidence is drawn from in vivo and in vitro genomic and biochemical studies to frame experiments to test this proposition. PMID:23807509

  12. Mitotic crossover--an evolutionary rudiment which promotes carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rovcanin, Branislav; Ivanovski, Ivan; Djuric, Olivera; Nikolic, Dimitrije; Petrovic, Jelena; Ivanovski, Petar

    2014-09-21

    Mitotic crossover is a natural mechanism that is a main source of the genetic variability of primitive organisms. In complex organisms such as mammals, it represents an evolutionary rudiment which persisted as one of the numerous DNA repair mechanisms, and results in the production of homozygous allele combinations in all heterozygous genes located on the chromosome arm distal to the crossover. This event is familiar as loss of heterozygosity, which is one of the key mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of almost all cancers. We propose the hypothesis in which mitotic crossover is a principal source of the increased loss of heterozygosity that leads to the initiation and progression of colorectal carcinoma. The hypothesis could be tested by in vitro inhibition of Rad51 protein, orthotopic grafting of human colon cancer tissue into the gut of mice, and treatment with potential inhibitors. After these procedures, the frequency of mitotic crossover would be estimated. The development of selective inhibitors of mitotic crossover could stop further carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma, as well as many other neoplastic events. Loss of heterozygosity is an event responsible for carcinogenesis, its reduction by selective inhibitors of mitotic crossover could have a positive effect on cancer chemoprevention, as well as on growth reduction and a cessation in the progression of earlier developed tumors. PMID:25253953

  13. Kimchi Protects Against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:25029638

  14. TGF-beta during human colorectal carcinogenesis: the shift from epithelial to mesenchymal signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, K; Seki, T; Okazaki, K

    2006-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (Tbeta RI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), converting the mediator Smad3 to two distinct phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). While Tbeta RI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells, the activated mesenchymal cells invade via JNK/pSmad3L pathway. During sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis, TGF-beta signaling confers a selective advantage upon tumor cells by shifting from epithelial Tbeta RI/pSmad3C pathway to mesenchymal JNK/pSmad3L pathway. Loss of epithelial homeostasis and acquisition of a migratory, mesenchymal phenotype are essential for tumor invasion. In a future, specific inhibition of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway will become a therapy for human colorectal cancer that restores the lost tumor-suppressive function observed in normal colorectal epithelial cells at the expense of effects promoting the aggressive behavior. PMID:17093904

  15. Smad3 phosphoisoform-mediated signaling during sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, K

    2006-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling occurring during human colorectal carcinogenesis involves a shift in TGF-beta function, reducing the cytokine's antiproliferative effect, while increasing actions that promote invasion and metastasis. TGF-beta signaling involves phosphorylation of Smad3 at serine residues 208 and 213 in the linker region and serine residues 423 and 425 in the C-terminal region. Exogenous TGF-beta activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), changing unphosphorylated Smad3 to its phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). Either pSmad3C or pSmad3L oligomerizes with Smad4, and translocates into nuclei. While the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells in vivo, JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling promotes tumor cell invasion and extracellular matrix synthesis by activated mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, hepatocyte growth factor signaling interacts with TGF-beta to activate the JNK/pSmad3L pathway, accelerating nuclear transport of cytoplasmic pSmad3L. This reduces accessibility of unphosphorylated Smad3 to membrane-anchored TbetaRI, preventing Smad3C phosphorylation, pSmad3C-mediated transcription, and antiproliferative effects of TGF-beta on epithelial cells. As neoplasia progresses from normal colorectal epithelium through adenoma to invasive adenocarcinoma with distant metastasis, nuclear pSmad3L gradually increases while pSmad3C decreases. The shift from TbetaRI/pSmad3C-mediated to JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling is a major mechanism orchestrating a complex transition of TGF-beta signaling during sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the recent understanding of Smad3 phosphoisoform-mediated signaling, particularly 'cross-talk' between Smad3 and JNK pathways that cooperatively promote oncogenic activities. Understanding of these actions should help to develop more effective

  16. Morphological and cell kinetic effects of dietary manipulation during colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, D J; Jarrett, F; Boyle, P; Indran, M; Carr, K; Owen, R W; George, W D

    1987-01-01

    The effect of dietary manipulation of fat and fibre on the structural and cell kinetic characteristics of colonic mucosa was studied before and during experimental carcinogenesis in 232 male Albino Swiss rats. Carcinogen treated animals were given 12 weekly injections of azoxymethane (10 mg/kg/week). The animals were divided between four dietary groups (1) high fat, high fibre, (2) low fat, high fibre, (3) high fat, low fibre and (4) low fat, low fibre. Pathological and cell kinetic information together with details of certain faecal characteristics was collected when the animals were killed 4, 20, and 28 weeks after starting their experimental diet. Tumour induction was significantly influenced by diet. The highest risk of colorectal tumour development was found in groups fed diet 3: high fat, low fibre (p less than 0.03). In contrast, diet 2: low fat, high fibre was associated with the lowest risk. The proportion of histologically proven colonic tumours occurring in each dietary group was: diet 1-10.9%, diet 2-3.6%, diet 3-63.7%, diet 4-21.8%. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies done on selected samples indicated both dietary and azoxymethane related alterations in crypt unit integrity. The most marked surface architectural changes were seen in carcinogen treated animals maintained on diet 3 (high fat, low fibre). Stathmokinetic analysis revealed considerable intergroup variability. Both fat and fibre produced significant effects, principally during the preneoplastic phase of carcinogenesis. Faster proliferative activity tended to be found in animals at low risk of tumour induction (diet 2), slower proliferation being more characteristic of animals at high risk (p less than 0.05). The findings suggest that both topographical and cell kinetic parameters have an important relationship with promoting and protecting dietary factors during the development of colorectal cancer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:3040544

  17. Effect of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate feeding on rat colorectal 1,2-dimethylhydrazine carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karlin, D A; O'Donnell, R T; Jensen, W E

    1980-04-01

    The 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) rodent model for colorectal carcinogenesis was used to explore the effect of dietary dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS) on carcinogenesis. Inbred male F344 rats were divided into two groups of 84 each and fed the following diets: ground chow and 5% corn oil (control group) and ground chow, 5% corn oil, and 1% DSS (experimental group). All rats received high-dose DMH base, 20 mg/kg/week sc for 20 weeks. Twenty rats per group were killed after 3, 4, 5, and 6 months. Duodenum, small intestine, colon, and rectum were dissected out. Each tumor was measured for size and location and evaluated histologically. The percentage of rats bearing tumors in the control and experimental groups did not differ significantly. In each rat there were fewer gastrointestinal tumors in the DSS-fed group of all histologic types combined, at all organ sites, at 5 and 6 months. This difference between the control and DSS-fed rats reached the level of statistical significance for tumors of the duodenum, colon, and rectum and for total gastrointestinal tumors at the 5th month. PMID:6154162

  18. DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, causes a threshold in alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fahrer, Jörg; Frisch, Janina; Nagel, Georg; Kraus, Alexander; Dörsam, Bastian; Thomas, Adam D; Reißig, Sonja; Waisman, Ari; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are causally linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). NOC induce DNA alkylations, including O (6)-methylguanine (O (6)-MeG) and N-methylated purines, which are repaired by O (6)-MeG-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase (AAG)-initiated base excision repair, respectively. In view of recent evidence of nonlinear mutagenicity for NOC-like compounds, the question arises as to the existence of threshold doses in CRC formation. Here, we set out to determine the impact of DNA repair on the dose-response of alkylation-induced CRC. DNA repair proficient (WT) and deficient (Mgmt (-/-), Aag (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-)) mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate to trigger CRC. Tumors were quantified by non-invasive mini-endoscopy. A non-linear increase in CRC formation was observed in WT and Aag (-/-) mice. In contrast, a linear dose-dependent increase in tumor frequency was found in Mgmt (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-) mice. The data were corroborated by hockey stick modeling, yielding similar carcinogenic thresholds for WT and Aag (-/-) and no threshold for MGMT lacking mice. O (6)-MeG levels and depletion of MGMT correlated well with the observed dose-response in CRC formation. AOM induced dose-dependently DNA double-strand breaks in colon crypts including Lgr5-positive colon stem cells, which coincided with ATR-Chk1-p53 signaling. Intriguingly, Mgmt (-/-) mice displayed significantly enhanced levels of γ-H2AX, suggesting the usefulness of γ-H2AX as an early genotoxicity marker in the colorectum. This study demonstrates for the first time a non-linear dose-response for alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis and reveals DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, as a key node in determining a carcinogenic threshold. PMID:26243310

  19. Toll-like receptor signaling in colorectal cancer: Carcinogenesis to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Ting; Ogino, Shuji; Qian, Zhi Rong

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ line encoded innate immune sensors that recognize conserved microbial structures and host alarmins, and signal expression of major histocompatibility complex proteins, costimulatory molecules, and inflammatory mediators by macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and other cell types. These protein receptors are characterized by their ability to respond to invading pathogens promptly by recognizing particular TLR ligands, including flagellin and lipopolysaccharide of bacteria, nucleic acids derived from viruses, and zymosan of fungi. There are 2 major TLR pathways; one is mediated by myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88) adaptor proteins, and the other is independent of MYD88. The MYD88-dependent pathway involves early-phase activation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1 (NF-κB1) and all the TLRs, except TLR3, have been shown to activate this pathway. TLR3 and TLR4 act via MYD88-independent pathways with delayed activation of NF-κB signaling. TLRs play a vital role in activating immune responses. TLRs have been shown to mediate inflammatory responses and maintain epithelial barrier homeostasis, and are highly likely to be involved in the activation of a number of pathways following cancer therapy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers, and accounts for almost half a million deaths annually worldwide. Inflammation is considered a risk factor for many common malignancies including cancers of the colorectum. The key molecules involved in inflammation-driven carcinogenesis include TLRs. As sensors of cell death and tissue remodeling, TLRs may have a universal role in cancer; stimulation of TLRs to activate the innate immune system has been a legitimate therapeutic strategy for some years. TLRs 3/4/7/8/9 are all validated targets for cancer therapy, and a number of companies are developing agonists and vaccine adjuvants. On the other hand, antagonists may favor inhibition

  20. Genomic lesions and colorectal carcinogenesis: the effects of protein-calorie restriction and inulin supplementation on deficiency statuses.

    PubMed

    Cantero, W B; Takahachi, N A; Mauro, M O; Pesarini, J R; Rabacow, A P M; Antoniolli, A C M B; Oliveira, R J

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of restricting protein and calories and supplementation of inulin, a fiber comprising a linear type of polydisperse carbohydrates composed primarily of fructil-fructose bonds (β-(2→1), on the deficiency statuses of animals in which genomic lesion development and colorectal carcinogenesis had been induced. This experiment involved adult male Swiss mice (N = 11/group). The experimental groups were as follows: Negative Control (vehicle), Positive Control, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), Inulin, and Associate. DMH, which promoted colorectal cancer, was administered intraperitoneally in 4 20-mg/kg body weight (bw) doses during a 2-week period; inulin was administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg/kg bw. Each group was bifurcated; half of each group was fed a normal protein diet and the other half was fed a low-protein diet. The results indicated that a correlation existed between malnutrition and an increased frequency of genomic lesions but that malnutrition did not predispose animals to colorectal cancer development. Inulin exhibited genotoxic activity, which requires further investigation, and low anti-genotoxic activity. Moreover, inulin reduced the levels of intestinal carcinogenesis biomarkers in both malnourished and healthy animals. These data suggest that inulin holds therapeutic potential and is a strong candidate for inclusion among the functional foods used for cancer prevention in both properly nourished and malnourished individuals. PMID:25867388

  1. The MUTYH base excision repair gene protects against inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Francesca; Di Meo, Serena; De Luca, Gabriele; Pasquini, Luca; Rossi, Stefania; Boirivant, Monica; Biffoni, Mauro; Bignami, Margherita; Di Carlo, Emma

    2015-01-01

    MUTYH DNA glycosylase removes mismatched adenine opposite 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), which is the major mutagenic lesion induced by oxidative stress. Biallelic mutations in MUTYH are associated with MUTYH-Associated polyposis (MAP) and increased risk in colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated cancer susceptibility associated with MUTYH inactivation in a mouse model of inflammation-dependent carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulphate (DSS). Mutyh−/− mice were more sensitive than wild-type (WT) animals to AOM/DSS toxicity and accumulated DNA 8-oxoG in their gastrointestinal tract. AOM/DSS-induced colonic adenomas were significantly more numerous in Mutyh−/− than in WT animals, and frequently showed a tubulo-villous feature along with high-grade dysplasia and larger size lesions. This condition resulted in a greater propensity to develop adenocarcinomas. The colon of untreated Mutyh−/− mice expressed higher basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines GM-CSF and IFNγ, and treatment with AOM/DSS induced an early decrease in circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Adenomas from Mutyh−/− mice had a greater infiltrate of Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, granulocytes, macrophages, MDSCs and strong expression of TGF-β-latency-associated peptide and IL6. Our findings indicate that MUTYH loss is associated with an increase in CRC risk, which involves immunosuppression and altered inflammatory response. We propose that the AOM/DSS initiation/promotion protocol in Mutyh−/− mice provides a good model for MAP. PMID:26109431

  2. The MUTYH base excision repair gene protects against inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Francesca; Di Meo, Serena; De Luca, Gabriele; Pasquini, Luca; Rossi, Stefania; Boirivant, Monica; Biffoni, Mauro; Bignami, Margherita; Di Carlo, Emma

    2015-08-14

    MUTYH DNA glycosylase removes mismatched adenine opposite 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), which is the major mutagenic lesion induced by oxidative stress. Biallelic mutations in MUTYH are associated with MUTYH-Associated polyposis (MAP) and increased risk in colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated cancer susceptibility associated with MUTYH inactivation in a mouse model of inflammation-dependent carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulphate (DSS). Mutyh-/- mice were more sensitive than wild-type (WT) animals to AOM/DSS toxicity and accumulated DNA 8-oxoG in their gastrointestinal tract. AOM/DSS-induced colonic adenomas were significantly more numerous in Mutyh-/- than in WT animals, and frequently showed a tubulo-villous feature along with high-grade dysplasia and larger size lesions. This condition resulted in a greater propensity to develop adenocarcinomas. The colon of untreated Mutyh-/- mice expressed higher basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines GM-CSF and IFNγ, and treatment with AOM/DSS induced an early decrease in circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Adenomas from Mutyh-/- mice had a greater infiltrate of Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, granulocytes, macrophages, MDSCs and strong expression of TGF-β-latency-associated peptide and IL6. Our findings indicate that MUTYH loss is associated with an increase in CRC risk, which involves immunosuppression and altered inflammatory response. We propose that the AOM/DSS initiation/promotion protocol in Mutyh-/- mice provides a good model for MAP. PMID:26109431

  3. Increased expression of multidrug resistance related proteins Pgp, MRP1, and LRP/MVP occurs early in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, G A; Schroeijers, A B; Flens, M J; Meuwissen, S G; van der Valk, P; Baak, J P; Scheper, R J

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) related proteins at different steps in colorectal carcinogenesis. METHODS: The presence of three MDR related proteins (Pgp, MRP1, and LRP/MVP) was studied by means of immunohistochemistry in normal, adenomatous, and malignant colorectal epithelium. Formaldehyde fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections of 17 samples of colorectal tissue were used (normal mucosa, n = 4; adjacent mucosa, n = 5; adenoma, n = 5; carcinoma, n = 3). RESULTS: For all three proteins, expression was found in the surface epithelium and the upper parts of the crypts in normal colon. In the adenomas, staining was seen along the complete length of the crypts. In the carcinomas analysed, all epithelium showed positive staining. Mucosa adjacent to either carcinoma or adenoma showed staining patterns mostly resembling those of normal mucosa, but sometimes some extension of staining was seen along the crypt. CONCLUSIONS: These proteins already show increased expression in the adenoma stage. In the absence of adequate mucin production in adenomas, MDR related proteins could be an important factor in protecting the epithelium against further environmentally induced genetic damage. This could be one of the reasons why only about 5% of colorectal adenomas will actually progress to carcinomas. Images PMID:10562814

  4. Calcium inhibits promotion by hot dog of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced mucin-depleted foci in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Raphaelle L; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Guéraud, Françoise; Vendeuvre, Jean-Luc; Zhou, Lin; Anwar, Muhammad M; Mirvish, Sidney S; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiology suggests that processed meat is associated with colorectal cancer risk, but few experimental studies support this association. We have shown that a model of cured meat made in a pilot workshop promotes preneoplastic lesions, mucin-depleted foci (MDF) in the colon of rats. This study had two aims: to check if real store-bought processed meats also promote MDF, and to test if calcium carbonate, which suppresses heme-induced promotion, can suppress promotion by processed meat. A 14-day study was done to test the effect of nine purchased cured meats on fecal and urinary biomarkers associated with heme-induced carcinogenesis promotion. Fecal water from rats given hot dog or fermented raw dry sausage was particularly cytotoxic. These two cured meats were thus given to rats pretreated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, to evaluate their effect on colorectal carcinogenesis. After a 100-days feeding period, fecal apparent total N-nitroso compounds (ATNC) were assayed and colons were scored for MDF. Hot dog diet increased fecal ATNC and the number of MDF per colon compared with the no-meat control diet (3.0 ± 1.7 vs. 1.2 ± 1.4, p < 0.05). In a third study, addition of calcium carbonate (150 µmol/g) to the hot dog diet decreased the number of MDF/colon and fecal ATNC compared with the hot dog diet without calcium carbonate (1.2 ± 1.1 vs. 2.3 ± 1.4, respectively, p < 0.05). This is the first experimental evidence that a widely consumed processed meat promotes colon carcinogenesis in rats. It also shows that dietary prevention of this detrimental effect is possible. PMID:23712585

  5. Fatty acid metabolism pathway play an important role in carcinogenesis of human colorectal cancers by Microarray-Bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Juan, Chin-Hung; Wu, Chan-Han; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2006-02-28

    The present study systematically explored metabolic pathways and altered expressions of genes speculatively participating in colorectal carcinogenesis by using a Microarray-Bioinformatic analysis methods. The results revealed that 157 genes were up-regulated and 281 genes were down-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Gene Ontology (GO) and relevant bioinformatics tools indicated that the functional category to which 438 genes (12%; 438/3800) of the most frequent alteration belonged was metabolism. The analysis of 10 colorectal cancer tissue specimens demonstrated that genes involved in fatty acid metabolic pathways had high rates of overexpression. In addition, we stimulated CRL-1790 cell line with linoleic acid (a polyunsaturated fatty acid) for 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. Cell proliferation was elevated by 5, 25, 28 and 31% (P<0.05), respectively. Further analyses revealed that the genes increasingly expressed in the cell line included enoyl-Coenzyme A, hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl Coenzyme A dehydrogenase (EHHADH), enoyl Coenzyme A hydratase, short chain, 1, mitochondrial (ECHS1); glutaryl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase (GCDH), acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase 2, branched chain (ACOX2); acyl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase, C-2 to C-3 short chain precursor (ACADS); carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B), acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 5 (ACSL5), and cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily A, and polypeptide 11 (CYP4A11) genes. This indicated that the stimulating effect of linoleic acid on cell proliferation was due to interference with the metabolic pathway of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, genes with altered expression levels in CRC were mainly associated with fatty acid metabolic pathways speculated to have an important role linked to carcinogenesis. PMID:15885896

  6. Slit-Robo signaling induces malignant transformation through Hakai-mediated E-cadherin degradation during colorectal epithelial cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei-Jie; Geng, Zhen H; Chi, Shan; Zhang, Wenli; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Lan, Shu-Jue; Ma, Li; Yang, Xuesong; Wang, Li-Jing; Ding, Yan-Qing; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    The Slit family of guidance cues binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors and modulates cell migration. We report here that ectopic expression of Slit2 and Robo1 or recombinant Slit2 treatment of Robo1-expressing colorectal epithelial carcinoma cells recruited an ubiquitin ligase Hakai for E-cadherin (E-cad) ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and tumor growth and liver metastasis, which were rescued by knockdown of Hakai. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous Robo1 or specific blockade of Slit2 binding to Robo1 prevented E-cad degradation and reversed EMT, resulting in diminished tumor growth and liver metastasis. Ectopic expression of Robo1 also triggered a malignant transformation in Slit2-positive human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Importantly, the expression of Slit2 and Robo1 was significantly associated with an increased metastatic risk and poorer overall survival in colorectal carcinoma patients. We conclude that engagement of Robo1 by Slit2 induces malignant transformation through Hakai-mediated E-cad ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation during colorectal epithelial cell carcinogenesis. PMID:21283129

  7. Aged garlic extract inhibits 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon tumor development by suppressing cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jikihara, Hiroshi; Qi, Guangying; Nozoe, Koichiro; Hirokawa, Mayumi; Sato, Hiromi; Sugihara, Yuka; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2015-03-01

    Garlic and its constituents are reported to have a preventive effect against colorectal cancer in animal models. Aged garlic extract (AGE), which is produced by natural extraction from fresh garlic for more than 10 months in aqueous ethanol, also has reputed chemopreventive effects on colon carcinogenesis, but has never been studied for its effects on colon cancer development. We investigated the antitumor effects of AGE in rats with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced carcinogenesis, and the mechanism of AGE in human colon cancer cell proliferation. F344 rats randomly divided into three groups were administered DMH (20 mg/kg weight) subcutaneously once a week for 8 weeks in a basal diet. After the last injection, one group of rats was then moved onto a basal diet containing 3% wt/wt AGE, and rats were sacrificed at 8 or 31 weeks. The number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), histological type of tumor and proliferative activity of the tumor lesions were analyzed by macroscopic, pathological and immunohistochemical methods. DLD-1 human colon cancer cells were utilized to investigate the effect of AGE on anti-cell proliferation. AGE decreased the number of ACF but had no effect on gross tumor pathology. AGE showed a lower number of adenoma and adenocarcinoma lesions by histological analysis. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that AGE suppressed the proliferative activity in adenoma and adenocarcinoma lesions, but showed no effect on normal colon mucosa. Moreover, we demonstrated that AGE delayed cell cycle progression by downregulating cyclin B1 and cdk1 expression via inactivation of NF-κB in the human colorectal cancer cells but did not induce apoptosis. These findings suggest that AGE has an antitumor effect through suppression of cell proliferation. PMID:25573280

  8. Acceleration of Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation via c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase during human colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Hideo; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Mori, Shigeo; Yoshida, Katsunori; Tahashi, Yoshiya; Furukawa, Fukiko; Sekimoto, Go; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Uemura, Yoshiko; Sakaida, Noriko; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Kamiyama, Yasuo; Seki, Toshihito; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2005-01-01

    Conversion of normal epithelial cells to tumors is associated with a shift in transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) function: reduction of tumor suppressor activity and increase of oncogenic activity. However, specific mechanisms of this functional alteration during human colorectal carcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. TGF-beta signaling involves Smad2/3 phosphorylated at linker regions (pSmad2/3L) and COOH-terminal regions (pSmad2/3C). Using antibodies specific to each phosphorylation site, we herein showed that Smad2 and Smad3 were phosphorylated at COOH-terminal regions but not at linker regions in normal colorectal epithelial cells and that pSmad2/3C were located predominantly in their nuclei. However, the linker regions of Smad2 and Smad3 were phosphorylated in 31 sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas. In particular, late-stage invasive and metastatic cancers typically showed a high degree of phosphorylation of Smad2/3L. Their extent of phosphorylation in 11 adenomas was intermediate between those in normal epithelial cells and adenocarcinomas. Whereas pSmad2L remained in the cytoplasm, pSmad3L was located exclusively in the nuclei of Ki-67-immunoreactive adenocarcinomas. In contrast, pSmad3C gradually decreased as the tumor stage progressed. Activated c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase in cancers could directly phosphorylate Smad2/3L. Although Mad homology 2 region sequencing in the Smad4 gene revealed a G/A substitution at codon 361 in one adenocarcinoma, the mutation did not correlate with phosphorylation. No mutations in the type II TGF-beta receptor and Smad2 genes were observed in the tumors. In conclusion, pSmad3C, which favors tumor suppressor activity of TGF-beta, was found to decrease, whereas c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase tended to induce the phosphorylation of Smad2/3L in human colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence. PMID:15665291

  9. Genotoxicity of Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT) on Isogenic Human Colorectal Cell Lines: Potential Promoting Effects for Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Graillot, Vanessa; Dormoy, Inge; Dupuy, Jacques; Shay, Jerry W.; Huc, Laurence; Mirey, Gladys; Vignard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the human microbiota influences tumorigenesis, notably in colorectal cancer (CRC). Pathogenic Escherichia coli possesses a variety of virulent factors, among them the Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT). CDT displays dual DNase and phosphatase activities and induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a broad range of mammalian cells. As CDT could promote malignant transformation, we investigated the cellular outcomes induced by acute and chronic exposures to E. coli CDT in normal human colon epithelial cells (HCECs). Moreover, we conducted a comparative study between isogenic derivatives cell lines of the normal HCECs in order to mimic the mutation of three major genes found in CRC genetic models: APC, KRAS, and TP53. Our results demonstrate that APC and p53 deficient cells showed impaired DNA damage response after CDT exposure, whereas HCECs expressing oncogenic KRASV12 were more resistant to CDT. Compared to normal HCECs, the precancerous derivatives exhibit hallmarks of malignant transformation after a chronic exposure to CDT. HCECs defective in APC and p53 showed enhanced anchorage independent growth and genetic instability, assessed by the micronucleus formation assay. In contrast, the ability to grow independently of anchorage was not impacted by CDT chronic exposure in KRASV12 HCECs, but micronucleus formation is dramatically increased. Thus, CDT does not initiate CRC by itself, but may have promoting effects in premalignant HCECs, involving different mechanisms in function of the genetic alterations associated to CRC. PMID:27047802

  10. Antiproliferative efficacy of hesperetin (citrus flavanoid) in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranganathan, Selvaraj; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide and is increasing at an alarming rate. The present study was to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of hesperetin, a flavonoid commonly found in many herbal medicines and foods, on aberrant crypt foci (ACF), argyrophylic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Rats were given subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) weekly for 15 weeks to induce carcinogenesis, and hesperetin was administered orally at the dose of 20 mg/kg body weight. DMH exposure alone produced a high incidence of ACF and showed positive staining for PCNA and AgNORs in colonic tissues. Supplementation with hesperetin lowered the PCNA labeling index and suppressed the formation of ACF in the rats with colon cancer. These results clearly reveal that dietary hesperetin possesses antiproliferative ability against chemically induced colon tumourigenesis. PMID:22899565

  11. Exenatide suppresses 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer in diabetic mice: Effect on tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mona K; Mohamed, Magda I

    2016-08-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, which results from interactions of different factors. It is frequently a pathological consequence of persistent inflammation. Diabetes affects several cancers and is positively correlated with the incidence of colon cancer. This study aimed to study the effect of exenatide in ameliorating inflammation, angiogenesis and cell proliferation in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) induced colorectal carcinoma in diabetic mice. Mice were randomly allocated into six groups, 8 mice each. Group 1: vehicle control group. Group 2: diabetic control group. Group 3: DMH control group: diabetic mice treated with DMH (20mg/kg/week,s.c.) for 15 week. Group 4: DMH-cisplatin group: mice received cisplatin (4mg/kg/week, i.p.). Groups 5 & 6: DMH-exenatide (10 and 20μg/kg) group: mice received exenatide (10 or 20μg/kg/day,s.c.), respectively. The present results highlighted an increase in angiogenic markers and cell proliferation in the DMH-diabetic group in comparison with the control group with greater expression of endothelial marker (CD34) and Ki-67 in colon tissue. Monotherapy with cisplatin or exenatide (10 and 20μg/kg) downregulated these markers to different extents. The current results provided evidence that exenatide represents a promising chemopreventive effect against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in diabetic mice, at least in part, attributed to its anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative mechanisms. PMID:27470345

  12. Molecular evolution of colorectal cancer: from multistep carcinogenesis to the big bang.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Adriana; Chiara, Silvana; Pfeffer, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is characterized by exquisite genomic instability either in the form of microsatellite instability or chromosomal instability. Microsatellite instability is the result of mutation of mismatch repair genes or their silencing through promoter methylation as a consequence of the CpG island methylator phenotype. The molecular causes of chromosomal instability are less well characterized. Genomic instability and field cancerization lead to a high degree of intratumoral heterogeneity and determine the formation of cancer stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition mediated by the TGF-β and APC pathways. Recent analyses using integrated genomics reveal different phases of colorectal cancer evolution. An initial phase of genomic instability that yields many clones with different mutations (big bang) is followed by an important, previously not detected phase of cancer evolution that consists in the stabilization of several clones and a relatively flat outgrowth. The big bang model can best explain the coexistence of several stable clones and is compatible with the fact that the analysis of the bulk of the primary tumor yields prognostic information. PMID:26947218

  13. Inhibition of SALL4 suppresses carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer via regulating Gli1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ji; Deng, Rui; Wu, Chuanqing; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Ke; Shi, Liang; Liu, Xinghua; Bai, Jie; Deng, Meizhou; Gao, Jinbo; Shuai, Xiaoming; Wang, Guobin; Tao, Kaixiong

    2015-01-01

    Background: SALL4 is a novel oncogene mediating tumorigenesis in multiple carcinomas. However, its actual role and mechanisms participating in the development of colorectal cancer remains unclear. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot were conducted to detect the expression of SALL4 and other molecules. siRNA of SALL4 was transfected to silence SALL4 expression in Caco-2 cell line. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. Wound healing and transwell assay were used for invasion test. CCK-8 test was employed for cell proliferation and drug sensitivity assessment. Results: By inhibition of SALL4 expression, the proliferation, invasiveness and drug resistance were dramatically reduced while apoptosis rate was up-regulated. Gli1 was found to decrease its expression in SALL4 silencing cells. Moreover, the inhibition on tumorigenesis of Caco-2 by SALL4 silencing was antagonized by Gli1 up-regulation, suggesting Gli1 as a downstream target of SALL4 in cancer development. Conclusion: SALL4 inhibition limited oncogenesis on colorectal cancer by reducing Gli1 expression. PMID:26617716

  14. Implication of K-ras and p53 in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis in Tunisian population cohort.

    PubMed

    Ines, Chaar; Donia, Ounissi; Rahma, Boughriba; Ben Ammar, Azza; Sameh, Amara; Khalfallah, Taher; Abdelmajid, Ben Hmida; Sabeh, Mzabi; Saadia, Bouraoui

    2014-07-01

    According to the multistep route of genetic alterations in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the complex K-ras/p53 mutation is one of the first alterations to occur and represent an important genetic event in colorectal cancer (CRC). An evaluation of the mutation spectra in K-ras and p53 gene was effected in 167 Tunisian patients with sporadic CRC to determine whether our populations have similar pattern of genetic alteration as in Maghrebin's population. Mutation patterns of codon 12-13 of K-ras and exon 5-8 of p53 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and PCR-SSCP and confirmed by sequencing. Mutations in the K-ras gene were detected in 31.13 % and affect the women more than the men (p = 0.008). Immunostaining showed that expression of p21 ras was correlated with the advanced age (p = 0.004), whereas loss of signal was associated with mucinous histotype (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier survival curve found that patients with the K-ras mutation had a shorter survival compared with patients without mutation (p = 0.005). Alteration in p53 was seen in 17.4 % of patients and affects three hot spot codons such as 175, 245, and 248. Overexpression of p53 was seen in 34.1 % and correlated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) advanced stage (p = 0.037) and mucinous histotype (p = 0.001). A high concordance between p53 expression and alteration (p<0.005) was shown. Concomitant mutations in K-ras and p53 gene were detected in only 4 % of tumors. K-ras and p53 undergo separate pathways in colorectal tumorogenesis. Interestingly, mutations in the K-ras gene might be considered a valuable prognostic factor correlated to poor outcome. p53 gene alterations were rather low in our set, and methylation pattern of p53 is required to elucidate the molecular basis of this protein in CRC. PMID:24763823

  15. Prevention of preneoplastic lesions by dietary vitamin D in a mouse model of colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Doris Maria; Thiem, Ursula; Höbaus, Julia; Mesteri, Ildiko; Gober, Lukas; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Graça, João; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Kallay, Enikö

    2013-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer morbidity and mortality in Western countries. One of the risk factors for colorectal tumorigenesis is vitamin D insufficiency. The aim of this study was to establish whether increasing dietary vitamin D intake can prevent or delay development of chemically induced preneoplastic lesions in the colon of mice. We fed six weeks old female C57BL/6J mice (n=28) with increasing vitamin D3 concentrations (100, 400, 1000, 2500, 5000IU/kg diet). To induce dysplasia, a preneoplastic lesion, we injected mice with the carcinogen azoxymethane (10mg/kg) intraperitoneally, followed by three cycles of 2% dextran sodium sulfate salt, a tumor promoter, in the drinking water. To test our hypothesis that high vitamin D intake prevents formation of preneoplastic lesions, we have investigated the effect of increasing dietary vitamin D on development of premalignant colorectal lesions, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-D3) levels, and expression of renal vitamin D system genes. Dietary vitamin D concentration correlated inversely with dysplasia score (Spearman's correlation coefficient, ρ: -0.579, p=0.002) and positively with serum 25-D3 levels (ρ: 0.752, p=0.001). Increasing dietary vitamin D concentration beyond 1000IU/kg led to no further increase in circulating 25-D3 levels, while the dysplasia score leveled out at ≥2500IU/kg vitamin D. High dietary vitamin D intake led to increased renal mRNA expression of the vitamin D catabolizing enzyme cyp24a1 (ρ: 0.518, p=0.005) and decreased expression of the vitamin D activating enzyme cyp27b1 (ρ: -0.452, p=0.016), protecting the body from toxic serum levels of the active vitamin D metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3). Our data showed that increasing dietary vitamin D intake is able to prevent chemically induced preneoplastic lesions. The maximum impact was achieved when the mice consumed more than 2500IU vitamin D/kg diet. This article is part of a Special Issue

  16. Therapeutic effect of hydroxychloroquine on colorectal carcinogenesis in experimental murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junlin; Xie, Jiansheng; Xie, Binbin; Li, Yiran; Jiang, Liming; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in the intestine is a strong risk factor for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders and various tumors. However, little is known regarding the effects of HCQ on colitis-associated tumorigenesis. In this study, mice treated with HCQ showed a significant reduction in early-stage colitis following azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) administration, as well as a remarkable inhibition of colonic tumorigenesis and tumor growth at late stages of CAC. Mechanistically, the therapeutic effects of HCQ were attributed to inhibition of inflammatory responses and production of mutagenic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in immune cells and subsequent promotion of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, we found that HCQ inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and ROS in response to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in macrophages. Our data presented herein may help guide the clinical use of HCQ as a prevention and treatment strategy for CAC. PMID:27288548

  17. Mutator/Hypermutable Fetal/Juvenile Metakaryotic Stem Cells and Human Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Lohith G.; Herrero-Jimenez, Pablo; Kamath, Tushar; Sanghvi, Jayodita; Gutierrez, Efren; Hensle, David; Kogel, John; Kusko, Rebecca; Rexer, Karl; Kurzweil, Ray; Refinetti, Paulo; Morgenthaler, Stephan; Koledova, Vera V.; Gostjeva, Elena V.; Thilly, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Adult age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates increase exponentially from maturity, reach a maximum, then decline in extreme old age. Armitage and Doll (1) postulated that the exponential increase resulted from “n” mutations occurring throughout adult life in normal “cells at risk” that initiated the growth of a preneoplastic colony in which subsequent “m” mutations promoted one of the preneoplastic “cells at risk” to form a lethal neoplasia. We have reported cytologic evidence that these “cells at risk” are fetal/juvenile organogenic, then preneoplastic metakaryotic stem cells. Metakaryotic cells display stem-like behaviors of both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear divisions and peculiarities such as bell shaped nuclei and amitotic nuclear fission that distinguish them from embryonic, eukaryotic stem cells. Analyses of mutant colony sizes and numbers in adult lung epithelia supported the inferences that the metakaryotic organogenic stem cells are constitutively mutator/hypermutable and that their contributions to cancer initiation are limited to the fetal/juvenile period. We have amended the two-stage model of Armitage and Doll and incorporated these several inferences in a computer program CancerFit v.5.0. We compared the expectations of the amended model to adult (15–104 years) age-specific colon cancer rates for European-American males born 1890–99 and observed remarkable concordance. When estimates of normal colonic fetal/juvenile APC and OAT gene mutation rates (∼2–5 × 10−5 per stem cell doubling) and preneoplastic colonic gene loss rates (∼8 × 10−3) were applied, the model was in accordance only for the values of n = 2 and m = 4 or 5. PMID:24195059

  18. KAG-308, a newly-identified EP4-selective agonist shows efficacy for treating ulcerative colitis and can bring about lower risk of colorectal carcinogenesis by oral administration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Murata, Takahiko; Amakawa, Masahiro; Miyake, Yoshihide; Handa, Tango; Konishi, Katsuhiko; Matsumura, Yasushi; Tanaka, Takuji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2015-05-01

    Agonists for EP4 receptor, a prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype, appear to be a promising therapeutic strategy for ulcerative colitis (UC) due to their anti-inflammatory and epithelial regeneration activities. However, the clinical development of orally-available EP4 agonists for mild to moderate UC has not yet been reported. Furthermore, the possibility of an increased risk of colitis-associated cancer (CAC) through direct proliferative effects on epithelial cells via EP4 signaling has not been ruled out. Recently, we identified KAG-308 as an orally-available EP4-selective agonist. Here, we investigated the pharmacological and pharmacokinetic profiles of KAG-308. Then, we compared KAG-308 and sulfasalazine (SASP) for their abilities to prevent colitis and promote mucosal healing in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Finally, the effect of KAG-308 treatment on CAC was evaluated in an azoxymethane (AOM)/DSS-induced CAC mouse model. KAG-308 selectively activated EP4 and potently inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α production in peripheral whole blood and T cells. Oral administration of KAG-308, which showed relatively high bioavailability, suppressed the onset of DSS-induced colitis and promoted histological mucosal healing, while SASP did not. KAG-308 also prevented colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting colitis development and consequently decreasing mortality in a CAC model, whereas SASP had marginal effects. In contrast, MF-482, an EP4 antagonist, increased mortality. These results indicated that orally-administered KAG-308 suppressed colitis development and promoted mucosal healing. Moreover, it exhibited preventive effects on colorectal carcinogenesis, and thus may be a new therapeutic strategy for the management of UC that confers a reduced risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25704618

  19. Ethanolic Extract of Bark from Salix aegyptiaca Ameliorates 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Mice by Reducing Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Bounaama, Abdelkader; Enayat, Shabnam; Ceyhan, Muserref Seyma; Moulahoum, Hichem; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that ethanolic extract from bark (EEB) of Salix aegyptiaca (Musk Willow) can inhibit proliferation and motility and induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed EEB to be rich in catechin, catechol, and salicin. The present study investigated the chemopreventive effect of HPLC-fingerprinted EEB on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in mice. DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) was weekly injected subcutaneously to mice for the first 2 weeks. EEB (100 and 400 mg/kg body weight) was provided orally from the 7th to 14th week, after which colon tissues were evaluated histologically and biochemically. DMH treatment induced high number of ACF; EEB significantly reduced the number and multiplicity of ACF, along with a restoration in goblet cells and mucin accumulation. EEB supplementation improved the markers of inflammation (myeloperoxidase and neutrophil infiltration) and oxidative stress. More importantly, EEB amplified apoptosis of neoplastic cells in the colon mucosa of DMH-treated mice. It also lowered levels of markers for early transformation events such as EGFR, nuclear β-catenin, and COX-2 in colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT-116. The innocuity of EEB (up to 1600 mg/kg) to mice reinforces its potential as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:27093594

  20. Strawberry phytochemicals inhibit azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Crj: CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ni; Clinton, Steven K; Liu, Zhihua; Wang, Yongquan; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Zhang, Xiaoli; Pan, Zui; Chen, Tong

    2015-03-01

    Human and experimental colon carcinogenesis are enhanced by a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Pharmacologically driven chemopreventive agents and dietary variables are hypothesized to have future roles in the prevention of colon cancer by targeting these processes. The current study was designed to determine the ability of dietary lyophilized strawberries to inhibit inflammation-promoted colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical animal model. Mice were given a single i.p. injection of azoxymethane (10 mg kg-1 body weight). One week after injection, mice were administered 2% (w/v) dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water for seven days and then an experimental diet containing chemically characterized lyophilized strawberries for the duration of the bioassay. Mice fed control diet, or experimental diet containing 2.5%, 5.0% or 10.0% strawberries displayed tumor incidence of 100%, 64%, 75% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.05). The mechanistic studies demonstrate that strawberries reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators, suppressed nitrosative stress and decreased phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, strawberries target proinflammatory mediators and oncogenic signaling for the preventive efficacies against colon carcinogenesis in mice. This works supports future development of fully characterized and precisely controlled functional foods for testing in human clinical trials for this disease. PMID:25763529

  1. Strawberry Phytochemicals Inhibit Azoxymethane/Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Crj: CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ni; Clinton, Steven K.; Liu, Zhihua; Wang, Yongquan; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Pan, Zui; Chen, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Human and experimental colon carcinogenesis are enhanced by a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Pharmacologically driven chemopreventive agents and dietary variables are hypothesized to have future roles in the prevention of colon cancer by targeting these processes. The current study was designed to determine the ability of dietary lyophilized strawberries to inhibit inflammation-promoted colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical animal model. Mice were given a single i.p. injection of azoxymethane (10 mg kg−1 body weight). One week after injection, mice were administered 2% (w/v) dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water for seven days and then an experimental diet containing chemically characterized lyophilized strawberries for the duration of the bioassay. Mice fed control diet, or experimental diet containing 2.5%, 5.0% or 10.0% strawberries displayed tumor incidence of 100%, 64%, 75% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.05). The mechanistic studies demonstrate that strawberries reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators, suppressed nitrosative stress and decreased phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, strawberries target proinflammatory mediators and oncogenic signaling for the preventive efficacies against colon carcinogenesis in mice. This works supports future development of fully characterized and precisely controlled functional foods for testing in human clinical trials for this disease. PMID:25763529

  2. NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling pathways contribute to wogonin-mediated inhibition of inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J; Zhao, L; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Y; Sun, Y; Zhang, Y; Miao, H; You, Q-D; Hu, R; Guo, Q-L

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional factors nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) have been recently reported to have critical roles in protecting various tissues against inflammation and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (aberrant crypt foci). Our previous studies showed that wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone) possessed anti-neoplastic and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study extended these important earlier findings by exploring the effect of wogonin on the initiation and development of colitis-associated cancer. Wogonin lowered tumor incidence and inhibited the development of colorectal adenomas in azoxymethane- or dextran sulfate sodium-induced mice. We found that wogonin significantly decreased the secretion and expression of IL-6 and IL-1β, reduced cell proliferation and nuclear expression of NF-κB in adenomas and surrounding tissues and promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation in surrounding tissues, although overexpressed Nrf2 in tumor tissues was independent of wogonin administration. Furthermore, wogonin inhibited the interaction between human monocytic THP-1 cells and human colon cancer HCT116 cells, and significantly downregulated lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β in THP-1 cells. Further mechanism research revealed that wogonin inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and phosphorylation of IκB and IKKα/β, and promoted Nrf2 signaling pathway in HCT116 cells and THP-1 cells. Taken together, the present results indicated that wogonin effectively suppressed inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis and cancer development, suggesting its potential as a chemopreventive agent against colitis-associated colon cancer. PMID:24901054

  3. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  4. Effect of alterations in the quality and quantity of dietary fat on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon tumorigenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Locniskar, M; Newberne, P M

    1983-09-01

    The effect of alterations in the quality and quantity of dietary fat on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer in rats was studied. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed semipurified diets containing 24% beef fat, 24% corn oil, 24% Crisco, or the three fats in equal parts to make a total of 5% fat with other macronutrients and micronutrients adjusted to balance the ratios of nutrient to calorie. After 4 weeks of dietary treatment, all rats, except vehicle-treated animals, received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (15 mg/kg) by gavage, once a week for 5 weeks. The animals were fed the experimental diets until intestinal tumors developed, and surviving animals were sacrificed at 60 weeks. There was no effect of any of the high-fat diets tested on intestinal tumor incidence, latency, size, or frequency. All groups contained the same proportion of adenomas (less than 3%) as well as adenocarcinomas classified as mucinous. In the group fed 24% Crisco, tumors occurred with greater frequency in the proximal section of the colon than in lower segments, but the distribution was approximately uniform in the other groups. Cumulative probability of death with colon carcinoma was lowest in the 24% Crisco group, but the other high-fat groups did not differ significantly from the 5% mixed fat group nor from one another. PMID:6871849

  5. CD24 knockout prevents colorectal cancer in chemically induced colon carcinogenesis and in APC(Min)/CD24 double knockout transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Inna; Zilberberg, Alona; Shapira, Shiran; Avivi, Doran; Kazanov, Dina; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina; Arber, Nadir; Kraus, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Increased expression of CD24 is seen in a large variety of solid tumors, including up to 90% of gastrointestinal (GI) tumors. Stable derivatives of SW480 colorectal cancer (CRC) cells that overexpress CD24 proliferate faster, and increase cell motility, saturation density, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. They also produce larger tumors in nude mice as compared to the parental SW480 cells. Most significantly, even depletion of one copy of the CD24 allele in the APC(Min/+) mice of a transgenic mouse model led to a dramatic reduction in tumor burden in all sections of the small intestine. Homozygous deletion of both CD24 alleles resulted in complete abolishment of tumor formation. Moreover, CD24 knockout mice exhibited resistance to chemically induced inflammation-associated CRC. Finally, a new signal transduction pathway is suggested: namely, CD24 expression downstream to COX2 and PGE2 synthesis, which is directly regulated by β-catenin. CD24 is shown in vitro and in vivo as being an important oncogene in the gut, and one that plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of carcinogenesis. PMID:24500912

  6. Time-serial Assessment of Drug Combination Interventions in a Mouse Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    LeGendre-McGhee, Susan; Rice, Photini S.; Wall, R. Andrew; Sprute, Kyle J.; Bommireddy, Ramireddy; Luttman, Amber M.; Nagle, Raymond B.; Abril, Edward R.; Farrell, Katrina; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Roe, Denise J.; Gerner, Eugene W.; Ignatenko, Natalia A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution, nondestructive imaging modality that enables time-serial assessment of adenoma development in the mouse model of colorectal cancer. In this study, OCT was utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions with the experimental antitumor agent α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac during early [chemoprevention (CP)] and late stages [chemotherapy (CT)] of colon tumorigenesis. Biological endpoints for drug interventions included OCT-generated tumor number and tumor burden. Immunochistochemistry was used to evaluate biochemical endpoints [Ki-67, cleaved caspase-3, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, β-catenin]. K-Ras codon 12 mutations were studied with polymerase chain reaction-based technique. We demonstrated that OCT imaging significantly correlated with histological analysis of both tumor number and tumor burden for all experimental groups (P < 0.0001), but allows more accurate and full characterization of tumor number and burden growth rate because of its time-serial, nondestructive nature. DFMO alone or in combination with sulindac suppressed both the tumor number and tumor burden growth rate in the CP setting because of DFMO-mediated decrease in cell proliferation (Ki-67, P < 0.001) and K-RAS mutations frequency (P = 0.04). In the CT setting, sulindac alone and DFMO/sulindac combination were effective in reducing tumor number, but not tumor burden growth rate. A decrease in COX-2 staining in DFMO/sulindac CT groups (COX-2, P < 0.01) confirmed the treatment effect. Use of nondestructive OCT enabled repeated, quantitative evaluation of tumor number and burden, allowing changes in these parameters to be measured during CP and as a result of CT. In conclusion, OCT is a robust minimally invasive method for monitoring colorectal cancer disease and effectiveness of therapies in mouse models. PMID:26396545

  7. P21 and CEA expression and AgNOR counts in dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinoma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Wu, Jing-Ying; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Gu, Da-Kun; Fang, Fang

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study P21 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression and to measure argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) counts in various lesions of colonic mucosa and the mechanism of carcinogenesis. METHODS: Thirty-eight male Wistar rats were injected with dimethylhydrazine (DMH) once a week for 25 wk. P21 and CEA expression was detected by immunohistochemical methods, and AgNOR was counted by silver staining paraffin sections from various colonic lesions. RESULTS: The incidence of colonic carcinoma in DMH-treated rats was 71.05% (27/38), and lymph node metastasis occurred in six rats. Immunohistochemical studies showed that P21 was primarily expressed in dysplasia and carcinomas, while CEA was expressed in carcinomas and metastatic tumors. AgNOR counts were higher in dysplasia and carcinomas. There were significant differences in P21 and CEA expression between benign and malignant lesions (P < 0.05). The difference in AgNOR counts was also significant between normal and dysplastic tissues, and between dysplasia and malignant lesions (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Dysplasia is a premalignant change of colonic carcinoma. The detection of P21 via immunohistochemistry and AgNOR counting may be an important clinical screening technique for colon carcinoma and premalignant lesions.

  8. Trivalent Chromium has no Effect on Delaying Azoxymethane-Induced Colorectal Cancer in FVB/NJ Mice.

    PubMed

    White, Pandora E; Deng, Ge; Kuykendall, M Kaitlyn; Tadros, Abbey M; Dyroff, Samantha L; Honan, Rachel E; Robertson, Preshus M; Vincent, John B; Rasco, Jane F

    2015-11-01

    As Cr(III) compounds have been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and decrease plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in rodent models of diabetes and insulin resistance and as colorectal cancer risk has been associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, the effects of the Cr(III) compound Cr3 ([Cr3O(O2CCH2CH3)6(H2O)3](+)) were investigated in male and female FVB/NJ mice with azoxymethane-induced colorectal cancer. In contrast to a previous study on the effects of Cr3 on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal cancer in Sprague Dawley rats, no effects of Cr3 at daily doses of 1 and 10 mg Cr/kg body mass were observed, leaving in question whether administration of Cr(III) compounds can delay or prevent the onset of colorectal cancer. PMID:25910900

  9. β-sitosterol prevents lipid peroxidation and improves antioxidant status and histoarchitecture in rats with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Arul Albert; Al Numair, Khalid S; Gabriel Paulraj, Micheal; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Muamar, May Al; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2012-04-01

    Oxidative stress has become widely viewed as an underlying condition in diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion disorders, central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, etc. The role that antioxidants play in the process of carcinogenesis has recently gained considerable attention. β-Sitosterol, a naturally occurring sterol molecule, is a relatively mild to moderate antioxidant and exerts beneficial effects in vitro by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species. The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of β-sitosterol in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis. The enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants and lipid peroxides in colonic and hepatic tissues were evaluated. Generation of reactive oxygen species, beyond the body's endogenous antioxidant capacity, causes a severe imbalance of cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms. Elevated levels of liver lipid peroxides by DMH induction were effectively decreased by β-sitosterol supplementation. β-Sitosterol also exhibited a protective action against DMH-induced depletion of antioxidants such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, and reduced glutathione in colonic and hepatic tissues of experimental animals. Supplementation with β-sitosterol restored the levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione). Histopathological alterations in DMH-induced animals were restored to near normal in rats treated with β-sitosterol. Thus, β-sitosterol by virtue of its antioxidant potential may be used as an effective agent to reduce DMH-induced oxidative stress in Wistar rats and may be an effective chemopreventive drug for colon carcinogenesis. PMID:22353013

  10. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its applicationto detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andrew J.; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K.; Roy, Hemant K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development. PMID:22559696

  11. Nutritional factors in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, M L

    1993-09-01

    There have been varying estimates of the role of nutritional as opposed to other contributors to carcinogenesis. Several considerations probably account for the different estimates: (1) genetic overestimates because of foetal and early life rearing practices and the nutritional modulation of genetic expression (2) errors in food intake methodology (3) the limitations of nutrient carcinogenesis hypotheses, ie models which are too naive and do not allow for non-nutrients in food, food patterns and the overall package which is food culture (4) indirect pathways connecting nutrition and cancer such as that via immunosurveillance. Examples of cancers where rapid change in nutritional thinking is underway are breast, prostatic, colorectal and pancreatic. With breast cancer, weakly oestrogenic compounds from foods may be comparable to tamoxifen. Changing food culture away from that rich in phyto-oestrogens may increase the risk of prostatic cancer in men as well. Colorectal cancer incidence has continued at high rates in urbanized society despite an awareness of dietary contribution comparable to the knowledge of diet and coronary heart disease is the analysis sufficiently stratified for large bowel site or nutritionally sophisticated enough to allow for aggregate food pattern effects? Pancreatic cancer on the rise presents questions about unidentified changes continuing in the diets of industrialized societies, possibly from an early age, and even during infant feeding. Nutritional surveillance with mathematical modelling of food intake at a more sophisticated level will be required to understand present food-cancer relationships, and those which may emerge with newer food technologies, especially those related to designer foods. PMID:24352145

  12. Thymoquinone subdues tumor growth and potentiates the chemopreventive effect of 5-fluorouracil on the early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kensara, Osama Adnan; El-Shemi, Adel Galal; Mohamed, Amr Mohamed; Refaat, Bassem; Idris, Shakir; Ahmad, Jawwad

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and has a high mortality rate. Insensitivity and the limited therapeutic efficacy of its standard chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), represents an important challenge in CRC treatment. The robust antitumor properties of thymoquinone (TQ), the main bioactive constituent of Nigella sativa, have recently been demonstrated on different cancers. We investigated whether TQ could potentiate the chemopreventive effect of 5-FU to eradicate the early stages of CRC and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. An intermediate-term (15 weeks) model of colorectal tumorigenesis was induced in male Wistar rats by azoxymethane (AOM), and the animals were randomly and equally divided into five groups: control, AOM, AOM/5-FU, AOM/TQ, and AOM/5-FU/TQ. TQ (35 mg/kg/d; 3 d/wk) was given during the seventh and 15th weeks post-AOM injection, while 5-FU was given during the ninth and tenth weeks (12 mg/kg/d for 4 days; then 6 mg/kg every other day for another four doses). At week 15, the resected colons were subjected to macroscopic, histopathological, molecular, and immunohistochemical examinations. Interestingly, 5-FU/TQ combination therapy resulted in a more significant reduction on AOM-induced colorectal tumors and large aberrant crypts foci than treatment with the individual drugs. Mechanistically, 5-FU and TQ remarkably cooperated to repress the expression of procancerous Wnt, β-catenin, NF-κB, COX-2, iNOS, VEGF, and TBRAS and upregulate the expression of anti-tumorigenesis DKK-1, CDNK-1A, TGF-β1, TGF-βRII, Smad4, and GPx. Overall, our findings present the first report describing the in vivo enhancement effect of combined TQ and 5-FU against early stages of CRC; however, further studies are required to determine the value of this combination therapy in an advanced long-term model of CRC and also to realize its clinical potential. PMID:27468227

  13. Endothelins and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Olender, Jacek; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Endothelins are a family of four endogenous peptides (ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, ET-4) secreted primarily in an inactive form by the endothelium. They are activated with the participation of converting enzyme. Numerous studies have described their pleiotropic biological activity. These peptides are involved, inter alia, in the regulation of processes such as cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Their important role in the regulation of blood pressure, tissue perfusion (especially in the central nervous system), and myocardial systolic function is also known. Moreover, changes in transcriptional activity of endothelin and its receptors may be involved, with the participation of a number of signaling pathways, in carcinogenesis, and the pathogenesis of numerous diseases (heart, kidney, lung and skin disorders, especially with the component of fibrosis). Their role has been documented in the development of breast, prostatic, colorectal, ovarian, lung, kidney, and endometrial cancer, and in melanoma. In this article we present a brief description of the endothelin group and the participation of them and their receptors in carcinogenesis. We also try to show their role as prognostic and predictive factors in human malignant tumors. The article also refers to clinical trials on the use of preparations of endothelin receptor antagonists in the design of molecular therapeutic strategies in human malignancies. PMID:27594562

  14. Bixin protects hepatocytes against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced genotoxicity but does not suppress DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; de Andrade, Kelly Jacqueline Barbosa; Paula, Marcela Cristina Ferreira; Oliveira Acésio, Nathália; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Borges, Priscilla Scalon Freitas; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-01-01

    Bixin is a carotenoid found in the seeds of Bixa orellana L., a plant native to tropical America that is used in the food industry. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bixin on DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in the liver and colon of Wistar rats. The animals received bixin at daily doses of 0.1, 1.0 and 10mg/kg body weight (bw) by gavage. For the assessment of DNA damage in hepatocytes and colon cells with the comet assay, the administration of bixin was for 7 days. The animals received a single subcutaneous injection of 25mg/kg bw of DMH, and were euthanized 4h later. For the evaluation of the frequency of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), the animals were treated with the different doses of bixin for 4 weeks. Four doses of 40mg/kg bw DMH, two doses in the first week and two doses in the second week, were administered and euthanasia occurred at 4 weeks after the beginning of treatment. Bixin reduced the frequency of DNA damage in hepatocytes at the highest two doses tested (1.0 and 10mg/kg bw). On the other hand, no differences in the frequency of DNA damage in colon cells were observed between animals treated with bixin plus DMH and those treated with DMH alone. In addition, the frequency of ACF did not differ significantly between the group treated with bixin plus DMH and the DMH group. The results suggest that bixin does not suppress the formation of ACF, indicating the absence of a protective effect against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24246722

  15. A randomized trial on folic acid supplementation and risk of recurrent colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Evidence from observational studies suggests that inadequate folate status enhances colorectal carcinogenesis, but results from some randomized trials do not support this hypothesis. Objective: To assess the effect of folic acid supplementation on recurrent colorectal adenoma, we conduc...

  16. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  17. Dietary fibres may protect or enhance carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harris, P J; Ferguson, L R

    1999-07-15

    Dietary fibre (DF) is widely considered to protect against cancer, especially colorectal cancer. However, a large prospective epidemiological study has shown no apparent effect of DF intake on the development of colorectal cancer. We suggest that this may be because the term DF represents a wide range of materials, some able to protect, but some able to enhance carcinogenesis. This is consistent with data from animal carcinogenesis experiments. Most of the DF in western diets is in the form of plant cell walls, but these vary in their composition and it is unlikely that all types are protective. The few data available indicate that plant cell walls containing suberin or lignin may be the most protective, although they are present in only small amounts in food plants. DFs are also added to foods. These include components obtained from plant cell walls, such as pectins, as well as soluble DFs from other sources. In general, animal carcinogenesis experiments indicate that soluble DFs do not protect and some may enhance carcinogenesis. Few human intervention studies have been done on DF or sources of DF, with the exception of wheat bran, a good source of DF, which has been shown to protect. Possible mechanisms whereby DF may enhance carcinogenesis are discussed. In addition to DFs, resistant starches and non-digestible oligosaccharides are added to foods; these, like DF, escape digestion in the small intestine. However, so far only a few animal carcinogenesis experiments have been reported using these materials, and no human intervention studies. We believe caution should be exercised in the addition of such materials to food. PMID:10415434

  18. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  19. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  20. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  1. Carcinogenesis and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, V.N.; Petrov, N.N.

    1987-01-01

    This 2-voluem set discusses the problem of inter-relation between carcinogenesis and aging, and the phenomenon of age-related increase in cancer incidence in animals and humans. Covered topics include current concepts in mechanisms of carcinogenesis and aging; data on chemical, radiation, ultraviolet-light, hormonal and viral carcinogenesis in aging; data on the role of age-related shifts in the activity of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes; binding of carcinogens with macromolecules; DNA repair; tissue proliferation; and immunity and homono-metabolic patterns in realization of initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis.

  2. Diet-induced obesity elevates colonic TNF-alpha in mice and is accompanied by an activation of Wnt signaling: a mechanism for obesity-associated colorectal cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation associated with obesity may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether the Wnt pathway, an intracellular signaling cascade that plays a critical role in colorectal carcinogenesis, is activated by obesity-induce...

  3. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  4. Colorectal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... SJ, et al. United States Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after ... consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Gastroenterology . 2012;143:844-857. ...

  5. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  6. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  7. Mechanism of carcinogenesis in familial tumors.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kazuo; Utsunomiya, Joji; Iwama, Takeo; Furuyama, Jun-ichi; Takagawa, Tetsuya; Takeda, Naohisa; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Nishigami, Takashi; Kusuhara, Kiyoshi; Sagayama, Ken; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yamamura, Takehira

    2004-08-01

    It is thought that malignant tumors occur through interactions of multiple environmental factors and a personal genetic factor. A normal somatic cell having an intrinsic function is able to acquire the characteristics of a malignant cell under the influence of many factors. A small percentage of all tumors have obvious familial aggregation. These entities are called familial cancer. The familial cancer syndrome is well defined for colorectal cancer, breast cancer, endocrine neoplasia, and so on. Traits of familial tumors are sequentially inherited by offspring through gametes in a Mendelian fashion, most commonly in an autosomal-dominant manner. Carcinogenesis requires multiple genetic events. A patient with a familial tumor is ahead of an individual without any germline mutation in the carcinogenesis process. In such a situation, patients frequently suffer from multiple malignant tumors at a young age. It is well known that three major genes are closely related to the cell cycle and tumorigenesis. These gene types are protooncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and DNA mismatch repair genes. Proto-oncogenes function to accelerate cells during the G1 or growth phase of the cell cycle. Tumor suppressor genes act as blocks against cell growth and proliferation. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires alterations in both alleles. These phenomena are known as Knudson's two-hits theory. However, DNA mismatch repair genes are known as caretaker genes and correct mismatch pair generation during DNA replication. Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair genes causes hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. The tumor phenotype from patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is demonstrated to be microsatellite instability positive. PMID:15375699

  8. Carcinogenesis and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    A suggested mechanism of carcinogenesis is presented. This scheme takes into account the effect of carcinogens at different integration levels: subcellular, tissue, and organism. Any of these levels may be age dependent. Age-associated changes in the activity of enzymes responsible for activation and inactivation of carcinogens, and variations in concentrations of lipids and proteins contributing to the transport of carcinogenic agents into cells, may play an important role in the modifying effect of age on carcinogenesis. The effects of age-associated changes in DNA repair need clarification. However, they are thought to exert a permissive influence on the age-associated rise in tumor incidence. It seems that proliferative activity of target tissues is the important modifying factor of carcinogenesis. Age-related changes of regulation at tissue and organism levels are also powerful factors in carcinogenesis modification. Age-dependent changes in the neuroendocrine system provide conditions for metabolic immunodepression and promotion of carcinogenesis. On the other hand, carcinogens per se (especially chemical and radiological) may intensify aging processes in the organism. Normalization, by drugs, of age-associated shifts requiring synthetic and energetic changes of a transformed tumor cells, and of immunological shifts, may exert both antitumor and geroprotective effects.

  9. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  10. [Colorectal carcinoma in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zügel, N P; Hehl, J A; Jechart, G; Tannapfel, A; Wienbeck, M; Witte, J

    2001-05-01

    We report a 63-year-old lady with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome, who developed colorectal cancer. A hemicolectomy was performed, and the tumor specimen was prepared for DNA-analysis and immunohistochemical screening. We found a mutation of p53 gene without APC- and ras-gene alteration and expression of erbB2-protooncogen. The polyps in non-hereditary Cronkhite-Canada-syndrom are neither adenomatous nor hyperplastic, but patients often develop colorectal cancers. The steps of mutation do not follow the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, first described by Vogelstein 1988. This and previous observations suggest that carcinogenesis in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome follows another independent sequence. PMID:11413916

  11. Dietary modifiers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, L; Simonsen, N; Mottus, K

    1995-01-01

    Dietary components express a wide range of activities that can affect carcinogenesis. Naturally occurring substances in foods have been shown in laboratory experiments to serve as dietary antimutagens, either as bioantimutagens or as desmutagens. Dietary desmutagens may function as chemical inactivaters, enzymatic inducers, scavengers, or antioxidants. Dietary components may also act later in the carcinogenic process as tumor growth suppressors. Examples of dietary factors acting in each of these stages of carcinogenesis are presented, and potential anticarcinogens such as the carotenoids, tocopherols, phenolic compounds, glucosinolates, metal-binding proteins, phytoestrogens, and conjugated linoleic acid are discussed. Individual foods typically contain multiple potential anticarcinogens. Many of these substances can influence carcinogenesis through more than one mechanism. Some substances exhibit both anticarcinogenic and carcinogenic activity in vitro, depending on conditions. Epidemiologic research indicates that high fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with lower cancer risk. Little research has focused on the effects of single substances or single foods in man. Realization of the potential of foodborne substances to reduce the human burden of cancer will only be achieved with better measurement of dietary exposures and funding of multidisciplinary research in this area commensurate with its importance. PMID:8741780

  12. Cadmium carcinogenesis in review.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, M P

    2000-04-01

    Cadmium is an inorganic toxicant of great environmental and occupational concern which was classified as a human carcinogen in 1993. Occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer in humans. Cadmium exposure has also, on occasion, been linked to human prostate cancer. The epidemiological data linking cadmium and pulmonary cancer are much stronger than for prostatic cancer. Other target sites for cadmium carcinogenesis in humans (liver, kidney, stomach) are considered equivocal. In rodents, cadmium causes tumors at several sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats results in pulmonary adenocarcinomas, supporting a role in human lung cancer. Prostate tumors and preneoplastic proliferative lesions can be induced in rats after cadmium ingestion or injection. Prostatic carcinogenesis in rats occurs only at cadmium doses below those that induce chronic degeneration and dysfunction of the testes, a well-known effect of cadmium, confirming the androgen dependency of prostate tumors. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the testes, adrenals, injection sites, and hematopoietic system. Various treatments can modify cadmium carcinogenesis including supplemental zinc, which prevents cadmium-induced injection site and testicular tumors while facilitating prostatic tumors. Cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect mechanisms, although the precise mechanisms remain unknown. PMID:10830873

  13. microRNAs and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ress, Anna Lena; Perakis, Samantha; Pichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common types of human cancer with high cancer-related morbidity and mortality rates. The development and clinical validation of novel therapeutic avenues have improved the clinical outcome, but metastatic CRC still remains an incurable disease in most cases. The interest in discovering novel pathophysiological drivers in CRC is intensively ongoing and the search for novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, for patient's stratification for prognostic purposes or for predicting treatment response are warranted. microRNAs are small RNA molecules that regulate the expression of larger messenger RNA species by different mechanisms with the final consequence to provide a fine tuning tool for global gene expression patterns. First discovered in worms, around 15 years ago it became clear that microRNAs are also existing in humans and that they are widely involved in human carcinogenesis. Within the last years, tremendous progress in the understanding of microRNAs and their role in CRC carcinogenesis has been developed. In this book chapter, several examples of previously identified microRNAs and how they influence colorectal carcinogenesis will be discussed. The information starting at the underlying molecular mechanisms towards clinical applications will be depicted and an overview what great potential these small molecules might carry in future colorectal cancer medicine, will be discussed. PMID:26658998

  14. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cipe, Gokhan; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Firat, Deniz; Bektasoglu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complex and vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26483877

  15. Diet and supplements and their impact on colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Marinos; Mandair, Dalvinder

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death among men and women. It has been proposed that dietary factors are responsible for 70-90% of colorectal cancer and diet optimization may prevent most cases. Aim To evaluate the role of dietary components and supplements in colorectal cancer. Methods Bibliographical searches were performed in Pubmed for the terms “diet and colorectal cancer”, “diet and colon cancer”, “diet and rectal cancer”, “nutrition and colorectal cancer”, “probiotics and colorectal cancer”, “prebiotics and colorectal cancer”, “alcohol and cancer” and “colorectal cancer epidemiology”. Results Consumption of processed or red meat, especially when cooked at high temperatures may be associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. The evidence for dietary fibre is unclear but foods that contain high amounts of fibre are usually rich in polyphenols which have been shown to alter molecular processes that can encourage colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses provide evidence on the benefits of circulating, diet-derived and supplemented, vitamin D and Calcium. We also found that diets rich in Folate may prevent colorectal carcinoma. The evidence on dietary micronutrients such as Zinc and Selenium in association with colorectal cancer is not conclusive. It has been suggested that there may be a direct association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted a possible protective role of prebiotics and probiotics. Conclusions The lack of randomized trials and the presence of confounding factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity and diabetes may often yield inconclusive results. Carefully designed randomized trials are recommended. PMID:24294513

  16. Sawmill chemicals and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J

    2001-01-01

    Workers in wood industries are exposed to variable medleys of chemicals, both natural and synthetic. Additional exposures include fungi, bacteria, bark and wood dusts, solvents, paints, and various other wood coatings. These individual and conglomerate exposures have been associated with diverse occupational illnesses and hazards, including cancers. In this commentary, I summarize both experimental and epidemiologic carcinogenesis results for several chemicals used in the wood industry, as well as for wood dust. Working in the wood industries entails excess risks of cancers, among other diseases and workplace injuries. A key to preventing occupationally and environmentally associated cancers, as in the wood industries, is avoiding exposures to chemicals and wood dusts and, in particular, chemicals known to cause cancer in animals or/and humans. PMID:11333179

  17. FXR and liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiong-fei; Zhao, Wei-yu; Huang, Wen-dong

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor family and a ligand-modulated transcription factor. In the liver, FXR has been considered a multi-functional cell protector and a tumor suppressor. FXR can suppress liver carcinogenesis via different mechanisms: 1) FXR maintains the normal liver metabolism of bile acids, glucose and lipids; 2) FXR promotes liver regeneration and repair after injury; 3) FXR protects liver cells from death and enhances cell survival; 4) FXR suppresses hepatic inflammation, thereby preventing inflammatory damage; and 5) FXR can directly increase the expression of some tumor-suppressor genes and repress the transcription of several oncogenes. However, inflammation and epigenetic silencing are known to decrease FXR expression during tumorigenesis. The reactivation of FXR function in the liver may be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver cancer. PMID:25500874

  18. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  19. Combined therapeutic efficacy of carvacrol and X-radiation against 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arivalagan, Sivaranjani; Thomas, Nisha Susan; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Mani, Vijay; Siddique, Aktarul Islam; Kuppsamy, Thayalan; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2015-12-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, and is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the combined therapeutic efficacy of carvacrol (CVC) and X-radiation against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control; group 2 received 40 mg/kg b.wt of CVC orally everyday throughout the experimental period (32 weeks); groups 3-6 received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg b.wt), once a week for the first 15 weeks; group 4 received a single dose of X-radiation at the 31st week; group 5 received CVC (40 mg/kg b.wt) two days after the last injection of DMH and continued everyday till the end of the experimental period; group 6 received CVC as in group 5 and radiation as in group 4. DMH-treated rats showed increased incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), dysplastic aberrant crypt foci (DACF), mast cell number, argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions; elevated activities of phase I enzymes, decreased activities of phase II enzymes, decreased mucin content and altered colonic and liver histology as compared to control rats. Though the individual treatments with CVC and X-radiation to DMH-treated rats reversed the above changes, the combined treatment with both CVC and X-radiation showed a marked effect. Our findings emphasize the potential role of combined therapeutic effect of CVC and X-radiation against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. PMID:26264073

  20. An investigation into the mechanism of co-carcinogenesis of dietary cholesterol during the induction of colon cancer in rats by 1,2 dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Cruse, J P; Lewin, M R; Clark, C G

    1984-09-01

    The mechanism by which dietary cholesterol facilities colon carcinogenesis was investigated in the dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon cancer model. Fifty female Wistar rats received a standard course of dimethylhydrazine (DMH) injections (40 mg/kg/week subcutaneously for ten weeks) while being fed Vivonex, a cholesterol-free elemental diet. Animals were allocated to one of five dietary regimens. One control group received Vivonex with added cholesterol (10 mg/100 ml Vivonex/rat/day) throughout the experiment, while another group received Vivonex alone. The remaining three groups received added cholesterol exclusively before, during or after the ten week DMH induction period. The experiment continued for over 500 days, and was evaluated by comparing, between groups, the time taken for the development of objective signs of colonic disease (time to tumour presentation or TTP). Animals either died spontaneously or were killed and autopsied. Colon cancers were confirmed histologically in every animal. The results showed that cholesterol feeding throughout the experiment or during the DMH induction period reduced the TTP compared to controls (p less than 0.05). Cholesterol prefeeding had no such effect. In the after group, the TTP was correspondingly delayed (p less than 0.05). Cholesterol-fed controls and groups receiving cholesterol during or after the DMH induction had more colon tumours and/or a greater incidence of metastases than cholesterol-free controls or those pre-fed cholesterol. The findings indicate a direct relationship between timing of cholesterol exposure and signs of colon cancer, and demonstrate that dietary cholesterol has promoter-like characteristics. PMID:6478681

  1. Hypermutability in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, B S

    1998-01-01

    The presence of numerous chromosomal changes and point mutations in tumors is well established. At least some of these changes play a role in the development of the tumors. It has been suggested that the number of these genetic changes requires that tumorigenesis involves an increase in mutation rate. However, the presence of numerous changes can also be accounted for by efficient selection. What is required to settle the issue is some measure of nonselected mutations in tumors. In order to determine whether the tumor suppressor TP53 (coding for the protein p53) is hypermutable at some stage of carcinogenesis, the frequency of silent and multiple mutations in this gene has been examined. Silent mutations make up approximately 3% of the total recorded but constitute 9.5% of the mutations found in tumors with multiple mutations. Multiple closely linked mutations are also observed. Such multiple mutations suggest the operation of an error-prone replication process in a subclass of cells. The published data indicate that TP53 is hypermutable at some stage of tumor development. It is not yet clear whether TP53 is unique or whether other genes display a similar pattern of silent and multiple mutations. PMID:9560381

  2. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer. The WHO Collaborating Centre for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shike, M.; Winawer, S. J.; Greenwald, P. H.; Bloch, A.; Hill, M. J.; Swaroop, S. V.

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common malignant neoplasm worldwide. Epidemiological and laboratory animal studies have established a link between various nutritional factors and the etiology of this cancer. Recent studies in genetic epidemiology and molecular biology have shown that inherited genetic factors also play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Thus, genetic-nutritional interactions may form the basis for the development of this cancer. Nutritional factors that appear to promote or attenuate the carcinogenic process in the colon include fat, excess calories, fibre, calcium, selenium, and various vitamins. Strategies for primary prevention of colorectal cancer should therefore be targeted to all populations who are at risk because of dietary and hereditary predisposition. Based on current knowledge, recommended nutrition guidelines for reducing the risk of colon cancer include decreased fat consumption, adequate amounts of fruits, vegetables, and calcium, and avoidance of overweight. Research to further elucidate the role of diet in colorectal carcinogenesis should include randomized studies in humans, testing of various nutritional regimens, and the use of colonic adenomas and markers of cell proliferation and differentiation as end-points. PMID:2203551

  3. Ionizing radiation, inflammation, and their interactions in colon carcinogenesis in Mlh1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, Takamitsu; Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kito, Seiji; Tokairin, Yutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Yoshimi, Naoki; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2015-01-01

    Genetic, physiological and environmental factors are implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutations in the mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) gene, one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, are a main cause of hereditary colon cancer syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. Long-term chronic inflammation is also a key risk factor, responsible for colitis-associated colorectal cancer; radiation exposure is also known to increase colorectal cancer risk. Here, we studied the effects of radiation exposure on inflammation-induced colon carcinogenesis in DNA mismatch repair-proficient and repair-deficient mice. Male and female Mlh1−/− and Mlh1+/+ mice were irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays when aged 2 weeks or 7 weeks and/or were treated with 1% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days at 10 weeks old to induce mild inflammatory colitis. No colon tumors developed after X-rays and/or DSS treatment in Mlh1+/+ mice. Colon tumors developed after DSS treatment alone in Mlh1−/− mice, and exposure to radiation prior to DSS treatment increased the number of tumors. Histologically, colon tumors in the mice resembled the subtype of well-to-moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of human Lynch syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression of both p53 and β-catenin and loss of p21 and adenomatosis polyposis coli proteins were observed at the later stages of carcinogenesis, suggesting a course of molecular pathogenesis distinct from typical sporadic or colitis-associated colon cancer in humans. In conclusion, radiation exposure could further increase the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis induced by inflammation under the conditions of Mlh1 deficiency. PMID:25529563

  4. Strong correlation between diet and development of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cappellani, Alessandro; Zanghì, Antonio; Di Vita, Maria; Cavallaro, Andrea; Piccolo, Gaetano; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Cavallaro, Vincenzo; de Paoli, Paolo; Veroux, Massimiliano; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple factors have been described among the causes of non-hereditary colorectal cancer. In Western countries, the most common risk factors include upper-middle socioeconomic status and dietary regimens rich in proteins and animal fats. High consumption of red meats, smoked foods, cold cuts, or canned foods is believed to contribute to carcinogenesis as they directly affect epithlial turnover and cause metabolism of biliary acids. Dietary fibers have protective effects in that they capture the fats and biliary acids, thereby inhibiting their activity. Tobacco smoking acts both locally and systemically on the colorectal mucosa through the production of carcinogenic agents. Finally, the action of alcohol, in association with nicotine addiction, also increases the risk of developing colorectal tumors. Knowledge of dietary and environmental factors is of paramount importance in implementing preventive strategies for colorectal cancer. PMID:23276917

  5. Role of micro-RNA in colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio; Menéndez Sánchez, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in carcinogenesis through postranscriptional gene regulatory activity. These molecules are involved in various physiological and pathological functions, such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation, which indicates their functionality in carcinogenesis as tumour suppressor genes or oncogenes. Several studies have determined the presence of microRNAs in different neoplastic diseases such as colon, prostate, breast, stomach, pancreas, and lung cancer. There are promising data on the usefulness of quantifying microRNAs in different organic fluids and tissues. We have conducted a review of the determinations of microRNAs in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. PMID:25088411

  6. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  7. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  8. Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhhuyen T; Weinberg, David S

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The main goals of screening are to prevent carcinogenesis (via adenoma detection and removal) and detect cancer at an early, curable stage. CRC mortality is steadily dropping in the United States, partly because of greater screening utilization. However, nearly 1 in 3 average-risk people are not up to date with standard CRC screening recommendations. This review surveys a wide range of CRC biomarkers in various stages of development, which may offer attractive risk stratification tools; a few have reached the commercial stage. If widely accepted, these tools may contribute to shift CRC screening practices away from 1-step colonoscopy to a 2-step risk stratification process of predictive biomarker measurements followed by colonoscopy for lower-risk patients with a positive result. Such strategies could potentially increase the rate of CRC screening. PMID:27496118

  9. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-14

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  10. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  11. Serrated colorectal cancer: Molecular classification, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Oscar; Juárez, Miriam; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Egoavil, Cecilia; Giner-Calabuig, Mar; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular advances support the existence of an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis that is based on the hypermethylation of specific DNA regions that silences tumor suppressor genes. This alternative pathway has been called the serrated pathway due to the serrated appearance of tumors in histological analysis. New classifications for colorectal cancer (CRC) were proposed recently based on genetic profiles that show four types of molecular alterations: BRAF gene mutations, KRAS gene mutations, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation of CpG islands. This review summarizes what is known about the serrated pathway of CRC, including CRC molecular and clinical features, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy. PMID:27053844

  12. Serrated colorectal cancer: Molecular classification, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Oscar; Juárez, Miriam; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Egoavil, Cecilia; Giner-Calabuig, Mar; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    Molecular advances support the existence of an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis that is based on the hypermethylation of specific DNA regions that silences tumor suppressor genes. This alternative pathway has been called the serrated pathway due to the serrated appearance of tumors in histological analysis. New classifications for colorectal cancer (CRC) were proposed recently based on genetic profiles that show four types of molecular alterations: BRAF gene mutations, KRAS gene mutations, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation of CpG islands. This review summarizes what is known about the serrated pathway of CRC, including CRC molecular and clinical features, prognosis, and response to chemotherapy. PMID:27053844

  13. Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Long, Min; Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Jiang, Tao; Wen, Qing; Park, Sophia L; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2015-05-01

    The progressive nature of colorectal cancer and poor prognosis associated with the metastatic phase of the disease create an urgent need for the development of more efficacious strategies targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. Cumulative evidence suggests that the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defence, represents a promising molecular target for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. Recently, we have identified cinnamon, the ground bark of Cinnamomum aromaticum (cassia cinnamon) and Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon), as a rich dietary source of the Nrf2 inducer cinnamaldehyde (CA) eliciting the Nrf2-regulated antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells, conferring cytoprotection against electrophilic and genotoxic insult. Here, we have explored the molecular mechanism underlying CA-induced Nrf2 activation in colorectal epithelial cells and have examined the chemopreventive potential of CA in a murine colorectal cancer model comparing Nrf2(+/+) with Nrf2(-/-) mice. In HCT116 cells, CA caused a Keap1-C151-dependent increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination with upregulation of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes and elevation of cellular glutathione. After optimizing colorectal Nrf2 activation and target gene expression by dietary CA-supplementation regimens, we demonstrated that CA suppresses AOM/DSS-induced inflammatory colon carcinogenesis with modulation of molecular markers of colorectal carcinogenesis. Dietary suppression of colorectal cancer using CA supplementation was achieved in Nrf2(+/+) but not in Nrf2(-/-) mice confirming the Nrf2 dependence of CA-induced chemopreventive effects. Taken together, our data suggest feasibility of colorectal cancer suppression by dietary CA, an FDA-approved food additive derived from the third most consumed spice in the world. PMID:25712056

  14. Potential Targets for Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Temraz, Sally; Mukherji, Deborah; Shamseddine, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The step-wise development of colorectal neoplasia from adenoma to carcinoma suggests that specific interventions could delay or prevent the development of invasive cancer. Several key factors involved in colorectal cancer pathogenesis have already been identified including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), survivin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Clinical trials of COX-2 inhibitors have provided the “proof of principle” that inhibition of this enzyme can prevent the formation of colonic adenomas and potentially carcinomas, however concerns regarding the potential toxicity of these drugs have limited their use as a chemopreventative strategy. Curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin are chemopreventive agents that are able to suppress multiple signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis and hence are attractive candidates for further research. PMID:23975167

  15. Iron homeostasis and distal colorectal adenoma risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi; Wood, Richard J; Xue, Xiaonan; Huang, Wen-Yi; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B; Gunter, Marc J

    2011-09-01

    Red meat consumption has been positively associated with colorectal cancer; however, the biological mechanism underlying this relationship is not understood. Red meat is a major source of iron, which may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis via increased crypt cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, and endogenous N-nitrosation. In a nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, we prospectively evaluated multiple iron exposure parameters, including dietary intake and serum measures of iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) in relation to incident colorectal adenoma in 356 cases and 396 matched polyp-free controls. We also investigated variation in eight key genes involved in iron homeostasis in relation to colorectal adenoma in an additional series totaling 1,126 cases and 1,173 matched controls. We observed a positive association between red meat intake and colorectal adenoma [OR comparing extreme quartiles (OR(q4-q1)) = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.02-2.49, P(trend) = 0.03]. Serum TIBC and UIBC were inversely associated with colorectal adenoma (OR(q4-q1) = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37-0.88, P(trend) = 0.03; and OR(q4-q1) = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.40-0.95, P(trend) = 0.04, respectively). Colorectal adenoma was not associated with serum ferritin, iron, or transferrin saturation or with polymorphisms in genes involved in iron homeostasis. Serum TIBC and UIBC, parameters that have a reciprocal relationship with overall iron load, were inversely related to colorectal adenoma, suggesting that individuals with lower iron status have a reduced risk of developing colorectal adenoma. PMID:21685236

  16. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  17. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  18. Mouse models for the study of colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Daniel W.; Giardina, Charles; Tanaka, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    The study of experimental colon carcinogenesis in rodents has a long history, dating back almost 80 years. There are many advantages to studying the pathogenesis of carcinogen-induced colon cancer in mouse models, including rapid and reproducible tumor induction and the recapitulation of the adenoma–carcinoma sequence that occurs in humans. The availability of recombinant inbred mouse panels and the existence of transgenic, knock-out and knock-in genetic models further increase the value of these studies. In this review, we discuss the general mechanisms of tumor initiation elicited by commonly used chemical carcinogens and how genetic background influences the extent of disease. We will also describe the general features of lesions formed in response to carcinogen treatment, including the underlying molecular aberrations and how these changes may relate to the pathogenesis of human colorectal cancer. PMID:19037092

  19. IRON AND COLORECTAL CANCER RISK IN THE ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL, BETA-CAROTENE CANCER PREVENTION STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro and in vivo studies have associated iron with both the initiation and promotional stages of carcinogenesis. We investigated whether iron was associated with colorectal cancer in a nested case-control study within the a-tocopherol, b-carotene cancer prevention study cohort. Exposure was asse...

  20. Folate and carcinogenesis-mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large and growing body of both pre-clinical and clinical studies pertaining to colorectal neoplasms constitutes the most compelling evidence for the protective effect of folate against the development of cancer, although evidence is also accruing in this regard for cancers of the breast, lung, pan...

  1. Ultrastructural alterations in field carcinogenesis measured by enhanced backscattering spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Yi, Ji; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Bianchi, Laura K.; Bajaj, Shailesh; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Optical characterization of biological tissue in field carcinogenesis offers a method with which to study the mechanisms behind early cancer development and the potential to perform clinical diagnosis. Previously, low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS) has demonstrated the ability to discriminate between normal and diseased organs based on measurements of histologically normal-appearing tissue in the field of colorectal (CRC) and pancreatic (PC) cancers. Here, we implement the more comprehensive enhanced backscattering (EBS) spectroscopy to better understand the structural and optical changes which lead to the previous findings. EBS provides high-resolution measurement of the spatial reflectance profile P(rs) between 30 microns and 2.7 mm, where information about nanoscale mass density fluctuations in the mucosa can be quantified. A demonstration of the length-scales at which P(rs) is optimally altered in CRC and PC field carcinogenesis is given and subsequently these changes are related to the tissue’s structural composition. Three main conclusions are made. First, the most significant changes in P(rs) occur at short length-scales corresponding to the superficial mucosal layer. Second, these changes are predominantly attributable to a reduction in the presence of subdiffractional structures. Third, similar trends are seen for both cancer types, suggesting a common progression of structural alterations in each. PMID:24008865

  2. Modeling intercellular interactions during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Rainer K; Chan, Michael; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2005-09-01

    By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or premalignant cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells can play a key role in carcinogenesis. However, current commonly used quantitative models for induction of cancers by ionizing radiation focus on single cells and their progeny. Intercellular interactions are neglected or assumed to be confined to unidirectional radiation bystander effect signals from cells of the same tissue type. We here formulate a parsimoniously parameterized two-stage logistic (TSL) carcinogenesis model that incorporates some effects of intercellular interactions during the growth of premalignant cells. We show that for baseline tumor rates, involving no radiation apart from background radiation, this TSL model gives acceptable fits to a number of data sets. Specifically, it gives the same baseline hazard function, using the same number of adjustable parameters, as does the commonly used two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model, so it is automatically applicable to the many data sets on baseline cancer that have been analyzed using the TSCE model. For perturbations of baseline rates due to radiation, the models differ. We argue from epidemiological and laboratory evidence, especially results for the atomic bomb survivors, that for radiation carcinogenesis the TSL model gives results at least as realistic as the TSCE or similar models, despite involving fewer adjustable parameters in many cases. PMID:16137206

  3. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  4. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  5. A microenvironmental model of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    We propose that carcinogenesis requires tumour populations to surmount six distinct microenvironmental proliferation barriers that arise in the adaptive landscapes of normal and premalignant populations growing from epithelial surfaces. Somatic evolution of invasive cancer can then be viewed as a sequence of phenotypical adaptations to these barriers. The genotypical and phenotypical heterogeneity of cancer populations is explained by an equivalence principle in which multiple strategies can successfully adapt to the same barrier. This model provides a theoretical framework in which the diverse cancer genotypes and phenotypes can be understood according to their roles as adaptive strategies to overcome specific microenvironmental growth constraints. PMID:18059462

  6. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D.; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E.; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M.; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  7. Dynamic microbe and molecule networks in a mouse model of colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xujun; Li, Huiying; Tian, Geng; Li, Shao

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial colonisation of the gut is involved in the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer. However, it remains unclear how the gut microbiota dynamically shifts correlating with colorectal carcinogenesis. Here, we reveal the longitudinal shifts in the microbial community that occur with colitis-associated colorectal cancer. High-throughput sequencing results for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene (V3 region) were compared for azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulphate-treated mice and control mice. We found that microbial community structure was significantly altered by chronic colitis. Microbes in the species Streptococcus luteciae, Lactobacillus hamster, Bacteroides uniformis and Bacteroides ovatus were increased during colorectal carcinogenesis. Histological measurements for a molecular network including six interconnected key factors from inflammation to cancer, namely p65, p53, COX-2, PPARγ, CCR2 and β-catenin, indicated that the microbiome modifications were correlated with molecular pathogenesis of colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Phylotype modifications after each AOM/DSS cycle were identified. A longitudinal microbial network was then constructed for the gut microbiome and showed that the phylotype shifts during this process were complex and highly dynamic. This work may provide a deeper understanding of the role of the microbiota and microbe-host interactions in colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:24828543

  8. Dynamic microbe and molecule networks in a mouse model of colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xujun; Li, Huiying; Tian, Geng; Li, Shao

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial colonisation of the gut is involved in the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer. However, it remains unclear how the gut microbiota dynamically shifts correlating with colorectal carcinogenesis. Here, we reveal the longitudinal shifts in the microbial community that occur with colitis-associated colorectal cancer. High-throughput sequencing results for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene (V3 region) were compared for azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulphate-treated mice and control mice. We found that microbial community structure was significantly altered by chronic colitis. Microbes in the species Streptococcus luteciae, Lactobacillus hamster, Bacteroides uniformis and Bacteroides ovatus were increased during colorectal carcinogenesis. Histological measurements for a molecular network including six interconnected key factors from inflammation to cancer, namely p65, p53, COX-2, PPARγ, CCR2 and β-catenin, indicated that the microbiome modifications were correlated with molecular pathogenesis of colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Phylotype modifications after each AOM/DSS cycle were identified. A longitudinal microbial network was then constructed for the gut microbiome and showed that the phylotype shifts during this process were complex and highly dynamic. This work may provide a deeper understanding of the role of the microbiota and microbe-host interactions in colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:24828543

  9. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  10. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik−/−/Apcmin/+ mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apcmin/+ mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  11. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik(-/-)/Apc(min/+) mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  12. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  13. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  14. Molecular mechanism of cholangiocarcinoma carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji; Takao, Sonshin

    2014-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly malignant cancer of the biliary tract with a poor prognosis, which often arises from conditions causing long-term inflammation, injury, and reparative biliary epithelial cell proliferation. Several conditions are known to be major risk factors for cancer in the biliary tract or gallbladder, including primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver fluke infection, pancreaticobiliary maljunction, and chemical exposure in proof-printing workers. Abnormalities in various signaling cascades, molecules, and genetic mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of CCA. CCA is characterized by a series of highly recurrent mutations in genes, including KRAS, BRF, TP53, Smad, and p16(INK4a) . Cytokines that are affected by inflammatory environmental conditions, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), play an important role in cancer pathogenesis. Prominent signaling pathways important in carcinogenesis include TGF-β/Smad, IL-6/STAT-3, PI3K/AKT, Wnt, RAF/MEK/MAPK, and Notch. Additionally, some microRNAs regulate targets in critical pathways of CCA development and progression. This review article provides the understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanism(s) of carcinogenesis in CCA, which leads to the development of new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating cancer. PMID:24895231

  15. Expression of TMEM207 in Colorectal Cancer: Relation between TMEM207 and Intelectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kenichi; Saigo, Chiemi; Kito, Yusuke; Sakuratani, Takuji; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Recent research advances highlighted an intestinal goblet cell-produced lectin, intelectin-1 (also known as omentin-1), as a tumor suppressor. One study indicated that downregulation of intelectin-1 may be related to the unfavorable prognosis among patients with colorectal carcinoma at an advanced stage. The present study was aimed at analyzing the expression of a hitherto uncharacterized transmembrane protein TMEM207 in colorectal carcinoma, and we found that the TMEM207 function is linked to intelectin-1 processing. With specific antibodies, TMEM207 immunoreactivity was detected in 38 of 216 colorectal cancer tissue samples. TMEM207 immunoreactivity correlated inversely with lymph node metastatic status (p < 0.01). TMEM207 expression significantly correlated with the mucinous phenotype of colorectal carcinoma. A coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed an interaction between intelectin-1 and TMEM207 in colorectal cancer cells. A proximal ligation assay indicated that intelectin-1 and TMEM207 were colocalized to the cytoplasm of the colorectal cancer cells. A small-interfering-RNA-mediated knockdown of TMEM207 increased polyubiquitination and proteasome degradation of intelectin-1 in cultured colorectal cancer cells and decreased intelectin-1 secretion. These findings indicate that a loss of TMEM207 expression leads to insufficient intelectin-1 production thus promoting colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26819645

  16. Clinical applications of next-generation sequencing in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Lee, Sug-Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Like other solid tumors, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genomic disorder in which various types of genomic alterations, such as point mutations, genomic rearrangements, gene fusions, or chromosomal copy number alterations, can contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease. The advent of a new DNA sequencing technology known as next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the speed and throughput of cataloguing such cancer-related genomic alterations. Now the challenge is how to exploit this advanced technology to better understand the underlying molecular mechanism of colorectal carcinogenesis and to identify clinically relevant genetic biomarkers for diagnosis and personalized therapeutics. In this review, we will introduce NGS-based cancer genomics studies focusing on those of CRC, including a recent large-scale report from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We will mainly discuss how NGS-based exome-, whole genome- and methylome-sequencing have extended our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis. We will also introduce the unique genomic features of CRC discovered by NGS technologies, such as the relationship with bacterial pathogens and the massive genomic rearrangements of chromothripsis. Finally, we will discuss the necessary steps prior to development of a clinical application of NGS-related findings for the advanced management of patients with CRC. PMID:24187453

  17. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toru; Sunamura, Makoto; Horii, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies. Intensive investigation of molecular pathogenesis might lead to identifying useful molecules for diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma harbors complicated aberrations of alleles including losses of 1p, 6q, 9p, 12q, 17p, 18q, and 21q, and gains of 8q and 20q. Pancreatic cancer is usually initiated by mutation of KRAS and aberrant expression of SHH. Overexpression of AURKA mapping on 20q13.2 may significantly enhance overt tumorigenesity. Aberrations of tumor suppressor genes synergistically accelerate progression of the carcinogenic pathway through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma. Abrogation of CDKN2A occurs in low-grade/early PanIN, whereas aberrations of TP53 and SMAD4 occur in high-grade/late PanIN. SMAD4 may play suppressive roles in tumorigenesis by inhibition of angiogenesis. Loss of 18q precedes SMAD4 inactivation, and restoration of chromosome 18 in pancreatic cancer cells results in tumor suppressive phenotypes regardless of SMAD4 status, indicating the possible existence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) other than SMAD4 on 18q. DUSP6 at 12q21-q22 is frequently abrogated by loss of expression in invasive ductal adenocarcinomas despite fairly preserved expression in PanIN, which suggests that DUSP6 works as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Restoration of chromosome 12 also suppresses growths of pancreatic cancer cells despite the recovery of expression of DUSP6; the existence of yet another tumor suppressor gene on 12q is strongly suggested. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis will likely provide novel clues for preventing, detecting, and ultimately curing this life-threatening disease. PMID:16367914

  18. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy. PMID:24648381

  19. Aberrant DNA methylation of WNT pathway genes in the development and progression of CIMP-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Bodor, András; Ribli, Dezső; Krenács, Tibor; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barnabás; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tóth, Kinga; Valcz, Gábor; Spisák, Sándor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-01

    The WNT signaling pathway has an essential role in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression, which involves a cascade of genetic and epigenetic changes. We aimed to analyze DNA methylation affecting the WNT pathway genes in colorectal carcinogenesis in promoter and gene body regions using whole methylome analysis in 9 colorectal cancer, 15 adenoma, and 6 normal tumor adjacent tissue (NAT) samples by methyl capture sequencing. Functional methylation was confirmed on 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colorectal cancer cell line datasets. In parallel with the DNA methylation analysis, mutations of WNT pathway genes (APC, β-catenin/CTNNB1) were analyzed by 454 sequencing on GS Junior platform. Most differentially methylated CpG sites were localized in gene body regions (95% of WNT pathway genes). In the promoter regions, 33 of the 160 analyzed WNT pathway genes were differentially methylated in colorectal cancer vs. normal, including hypermethylated AXIN2, CHP1, PRICKLE1, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, and hypomethylated CACYBP, CTNNB1, MYC; 44 genes in adenoma vs. NAT; and 41 genes in colorectal cancer vs. adenoma comparisons. Hypermethylation of AXIN2, DKK1, VANGL1, and WNT5A gene promoters was higher, while those of SOX17, PRICKLE1, DAAM2, and MYC was lower in colon carcinoma compared to adenoma. Inverse correlation between expression and methylation was confirmed in 23 genes, including APC, CHP1, PRICKLE1, PSEN1, and SFRP1. Differential methylation affected both canonical and noncanonical WNT pathway genes in colorectal normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Aberrant DNA methylation appears already in adenomas as an early event of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27245242

  20. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  1. The gastrointestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Deveaux, April; Jovov, Biljana; Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is home to a complex and diverse microbiota that contributes to the overall homeostasis of the host. Increasingly, the intestinal microbiota is recognized as an important player in human illness such as colorectal cancer (CRC), inflammatory bowel diseases, and obesity. CRC in itself is one of the major causes of cancer mortality in the Western world. The mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to CRC are complex and not fully understood, but increasing evidence suggests a link between the intestinal microbiota and CRC as well as diet and inflammation, which are believed to play a role in carcinogenesis. It is thought that the gut microbiota interact with dietary factors to promote chronic inflammation and CRC through direct influence on host cell physiology, cellular homeostasis, energy regulation, and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. This review provides an overview on the role of commensal gut microbiota in the development of human CRC and explores its association with diet and inflammation. PMID:25540232

  2. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four -stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a ‘parallel’ evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a ‘stepwise’ evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  3. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Fukugaiti, Márcia H.; Ignacio, Aline; Fernandes, Miriam R.; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old) visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatum and C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer. PMID:26691472

  4. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Min; An, Chang Hyeok; Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-09-29

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four-stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a 'parallel' evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a 'stepwise' evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  5. Anti-cancer properties of phenolics from apple waste on colon carcinogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    McCann, M J; Gill, C I R; O' Brien, G; Rao, J R; McRoberts, W C; Hughes, P; McEntee, R; Rowland, I R

    2007-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Western countries. The World Health Organisation identifies diet as a critical risk factor in the development and progression of this disease and the protective role of high levels of fruit and vegetable consumption. Several studies have shown that apples contain several phenolic compounds that are potent anti-oxidants in humans. However, little is known about other beneficial properties of apple phenolics in cancer. We have used the HT29, HT115 and CaCo-2 cell lines as in vitro models to examine the effect of apple phenolics (0.01-0.1% apple extract) on key stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, namely; DNA damage (Comet assay), colonic barrier function (TER assay), cell cycle progression (DNA content assay) and invasion (Matrigel assay). Our results indicate that a crude extract of apple phenolics can protect against DNA damage, improve barrier function and inhibit invasion (p<0.05). The anti-invasive effects of the extract were enhanced with twenty-four hour pretreatment of cells (p<0.05). We have shown that a crude apple extract from waste, rich in phenolic compounds, beneficially influences key stages of carcinogenesis in colon cells in vitro. PMID:17300861

  6. Somatic gene copy number alterations in colorectal cancer: new quest for cancer drivers and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Liang, L; Fang, J-Y; Xu, J

    2016-04-21

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the accumulation of genetic alterations, and somatic copy number alterations (CNAs) are crucial for the development of CRC. Genome-wide survey of CNAs provides opportunities for identifying cancer driver genes in an unbiased manner. The detection of aberrant CNAs may provide novel markers for the early diagnosis and personalized treatment of CRC. A major challenge in array-based profiling of CNAs is to distinguish the alterations that play causative roles from the random alterations that accumulate during colorectal carcinogenesis. In this view, we systematically discuss the frequent CNAs in CRC, focusing on functional genes that have potential diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic significance. PMID:26257062

  7. Mechanisms of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, I C; Jones, H B

    1994-03-01

    Until recently, the mechanism of carcinogenesis has been regarded as a two-stage phenomenon involving damage to the genetic material, which initiates the process, followed by a cell-division stimulus, which promotes the development of the tumour. However, exposure to some chemicals has been shown to result in carcinogenesis without involvement of the initiation step. The mechanism of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis is not fully understood, but is believed to involve stimulation of cell division with a consequent increased probability of a mutation occurring spontaneously. In this article, Ian Shaw and Huw Jones review the theories of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis with reference to specific examples of known non-genotoxic carcinogens. PMID:8184492

  8. Targeting cell death signaling in colorectal cancer: Current strategies and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Bruno Christian; Jäger, Dirk; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The evasion from controlled cell death induction has been considered as one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. Defects in cell death signaling are a fundamental phenomenon in colorectal cancer. Nearly any non-invasive cancer treatment finally aims to induce cell death. However, apoptosis resistance is the major cause for insufficient therapeutic success and disease relapse in gastrointestinal oncology. Various compounds have been developed and evaluated with the aim to meet with this obstacle by triggering cell death in cancer cells. The aim of this review is to illustrate current approaches and future directions in targeting cell death signaling in colorectal cancer. The complex signaling network of apoptosis will be demonstrated and the “druggability” of targets will be identified. In detail, proteins regulating mitochondrial cell death in colorectal cancer, such as Bcl-2 and survivin, will be discussed with respect to potential therapeutic exploitation. Death receptor signaling and targeting in colorectal cancer will be outlined. Encouraging clinical trials including cell death based targeted therapies for colorectal cancer are under way and will be demonstrated. Our conceptual understanding of cell death in cancer is rapidly emerging and new types of controlled cellular death have been identified. To meet this progress in cell death research, the implication of autophagy and necroptosis for colorectal carcinogenesis and therapeutic approaches will also be depicted. The main focus of this topic highlight will be on the revelation of the complex cell death concepts in colorectal cancer and the bridging from basic research to clinical use. PMID:24587670

  9. The TNF family member APRIL promotes colorectal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lascano, V; Zabalegui, L F; Cameron, K; Guadagnoli, M; Jansen, M; Burggraaf, M; Versloot, M; Rodermond, H; van der Loos, C; Carvalho-Pinto, C E; Kalthoff, H; Medema, J P; Hahne, M

    2012-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family member APRIL (A proliferation inducing ligand) is a disease promoter in B-cell malignancies. APRIL has also been associated with a wide range of solid malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). As evidence for a supportive role of APRIL in solid tumor formation was still lacking, we studied the involvement of APRIL in CRC. We observed that ectopic APRIL expression exacerbates the number and size of adenomas in ApcMin mice and in a mouse model for colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, knockdown of APRIL in primary spheroid cultures of colon cancer cells and both mouse and human CRC cell lines reduced tumor clonogenicity and in vivo outgrowth. Taken together, our data therefore indicate that both tumor-derived APRIL and APRIL produced by non-tumor cells is supportive in colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:22705846

  10. Role of MGMT as biomarker in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inno, Alessandro; Fanetti, Giuseppe; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Gori, Stefania; Maggi, Claudia; Cirillo, Massimo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Nichetti, Federico; Martinetti, Antonia; de Braud, Filippo; Bossi, Ilaria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, occurring in about 30%-40% of metastatic colorectal cancer. Its prognostic role has not been defined yet, but loss of expression of MGMT, which is secondary to gene promoter methylation, results in an interesting high response to alkylating agents such as dacarbazine and temozolomide. In a phase 2 study on heavily pre-treated patients with MGMT methylated metastatic colorectal cancer, temozolomide achieved about 30% of disease control rate. Activating mutations of RAS or BRAF genes as well as mismatch repair deficiency may represent mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents, but a dose-dense schedule of temozolomide may potentially restore sensitivity in RAS-mutant patients. Further development of temozolomide in MGMT methylated colorectal cancer includes investigation of synergic combinations with other agents such as fluoropyrimidines and research for additional biomarkers, in order to better define the role of temozolomide in the treatment of individual patients. PMID:25516857

  11. Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Long, Min; Tao, Shasha; de la Vega, Montserrat Rojo; Jiang, Tao; Wen, Qing; Park, Sophia L.; Zhang, Donna D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2015-01-01

    The progressive nature of colorectal cancer (CRC) and poor prognosis associated with the metastatic phase of the disease create an urgent need for the development of more efficacious strategies targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. Cumulative evidence suggests that the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defence, represents a promising molecular target for CRC chemoprevention. Recently, we have identified cinnamon, the ground bark of Cinnamomum aromaticum (cassia cinnamon) and Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon), as a rich dietary source of the Nrf2 inducer cinnamaldehyde (CA) eliciting the Nrf2-regulated antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells, conferring cytoprotection against electrophilic and genotoxic insult. Here, we have explored the molecular mechanism underlying CA-induced Nrf2 activation in colorectal epithelial cells and have examined the chemopreventive potential of CA in a murine CRC model comparing Nrf2+/+ and Nrf2−/− mice. In HCT116 cells, CA caused a Keap1-C151-dependent increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination with upregulation of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes and elevation of cellular glutathione. After optimizing colorectal Nrf2 activation and target gene expression by dietary CA-supplementation regimens, we demonstrated that CA suppresses AOM/DSS-induced inflammatory colon carcinogenesis with modulation of molecular markers of colorectal carcinogenesis. Dietary suppression of CRC using CA supplementation was achieved in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− mice confirming the Nrf2-dependence of CA-induced chemopreventive effects. Taken together, our data suggest feasibility of CRC suppression by dietary CA, an FDA-approved food additive derived from the third most consumed spice in the world. PMID:25712056

  12. The AOM/DSS murine model for the study of colon carcinogenesis: From pathways to diagnosis and therapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Robertis, Mariangela De; Massi, Emanuela; Poeta, Maria Luana; Carotti, Simone; Morini, Sergio; Cecchetelli, Loredana; Signori, Emanuela; Fazio, Vito Michele

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in industrialized countries. Although inflammation-linked carcinogenesis is a well accepted concept and is often observed within the gastrointestinal tract, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Inflammation can indeed provide initiating and promoting stimuli and mediators, generating a tumour-prone microenvironment. Many murine models of sporadic and inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis have been developed in the last decade, including chemically induced CRC models, genetically engineered mouse models, and xenoplants. Among the chemically induced CRC models, the combination of a single hit of azoxymethane (AOM) with 1 week exposure to the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in rodents has proven to dramatically shorten the latency time for induction of CRC and to rapidly recapitulate the aberrant crypt foci–adenoma–carcinoma sequence that occurs in human CRC. Because of its high reproducibility and potency, as well as the simple and affordable mode of application, the AOM/DSS has become an outstanding model for studying colon carcinogenesis and a powerful platform for chemopreventive intervention studies. In this article we highlight the histopathological and molecular features and describe the principal genetic and epigenetic alterations and inflammatory pathways involved in carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS–treated mice; we also present a general overview of recent experimental applications and preclinical testing of novel therapeutics in the AOM/DSS model. PMID:21483655

  13. Decorin deficiency promotes hepatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsolt; Kovalszky, Ilona; Fullár, Alexandra; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V.; Baghy, Kornélia

    2014-01-01

    experimental carcinogenesis by providing an environment devoid of this potent pan-RTK inhibitor. Thus, our results support future utilization of decorin as an antitumor agent in liver cancer. PMID:24361483

  14. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of "what dose does?" in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of "what dose is?" Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

  15. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-08-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  16. Radiation carcinogenesis: lessons from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Williams, D

    2008-12-01

    Radiation is a carcinogen, interacting with DNA to produce a range of mutations. Irradiated cells also show genomic instability, as do adjacent non-irradiated cells (the bystander effect); the importance to carcinogenesis remains to be established. Current knowledge of radiation effects is largely dependent on evidence from exposure to atomic bomb whole body radiation, leading to increases in a wide range of malignancies. In contrast, millions of people were exposed to radioactive isotopes in the fallout from the Chernobyl accident, within the first 20 years there was a large increase in thyroid carcinoma incidence and a possible radiation-related increase in breast cancer, but as yet there is no general increase in malignancies. The increase in thyroid carcinoma, attributable to the very large amounts of iodine 131 released, was first noticed in children with a strong relationship between young age at exposure and risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The extent of the increase, the reasons for the relationship to age at exposure, the reduction in attributable fraction with increasing latency and the role of environmental factors are discussed. The large number of radiation-induced PTCs has allowed new observations. The subtype and molecular findings change with latency; most early cases were solid PTCs with RET-PTC3 rearrangements, later cases were classical PTCs with RET-PTC1 rearrangements. Small numbers of many other RET rearrangements have occurred in 'Chernobyl' PTCs, and also rearrangement of BRAF. Five of the N-terminal genes found in papillary carcinoma rearrangements are also involved in rearrangements in hematological malignancies; three are putative tumor suppressor genes, and two are further genes fused to RET in PTCs. Radiation causes double-strand breaks; the rearrangements common in these radiation-induced tumors reflect their etiology. It is suggested that oncogenic rearrangements may commonly involve both a tumor-suppressor gene

  17. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Million Strong Shop Join the Movement Share Your Story Check our Calendar Colorectal Support Community Latest News Help Wanted Read Blogs Get Social Free Printable Coloring Sheets Action Alerts About Our ...

  18. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on staging, see “ Colorectal cancer stages ” The normal colon and rectum The colon and rectum are parts ... through the anus . Types of cancer in the colon and rectum Adenocarcinomas make up more than 95% ...

  19. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Peter; Leon, Maria Elena

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a important public health problem: there are nearly one million new cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed world-wide each year and half a million deaths. Recent reports show that, in the US, it was the most frequent form of cancer among persons aged 75 years and older. Given that the majority of cancers occur in elder people and with the ageing of the population in mind, this observation gives further impetus to investigating prevention and treatment strategies among this subgroup of the population. Screening research, recommendations and implementation is an obvious priority. While there are many questions to be resolved, it is apparent that many facets of colorectal cancer are becoming increasingly understood and prospects for prevention are becoming apparent. Achieving colorectal cancer control is the immediate challenge. PMID:12421722

  20. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic fields, or radioactive substances to ... has spread to the liver. Ultrasound Ultrasound uses sound waves and their echoes to create images of the ...

  1. Anticancer Effect of Lycopene in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Gastric cancer ranks as the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis include oxidative stress, DNA damage, Helicobacter pylori infection, bad eating habits, and smoking. Since oxidative stress is related to DNA damage, smoking, and H. pylori infection, scavenging of reactive oxygen species may be beneficial for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. Lycopene, one of the naturally occurring carotenoids, has unique structural and chemical features that contributes to a potent antioxidant activity. It shows a potential anticancer activity and reduces gastric cancer incidence. This review will summarize anticancer effect and mechanism of lycopene on gastric carcinogenesis based on the recent experimental and clinical studies. PMID:26151041

  2. Anticancer Effect of Lycopene in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks as the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis include oxidative stress, DNA damage, Helicobacter pylori infection, bad eating habits, and smoking. Since oxidative stress is related to DNA damage, smoking, and H. pylori infection, scavenging of reactive oxygen species may be beneficial for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. Lycopene, one of the naturally occurring carotenoids, has unique structural and chemical features that contributes to a potent antioxidant activity. It shows a potential anticancer activity and reduces gastric cancer incidence. This review will summarize anticancer effect and mechanism of lycopene on gastric carcinogenesis based on the recent experimental and clinical studies. PMID:26151041

  3. [Colorectal foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Thim, Troels; Laurberg, Søren

    2006-09-25

    A patient with a retained anally introduced colorectal foreign body or complications hereof needs appropriate treatment. The patient may be in danger and is certainly in discomfort. The problem is relatively rare; however, its incidence may be expected to increase. Guidelines for handling of the situation are lacking in many textbooks. Here, a suggestion for handling of a patient with a retained colorectal foreign body or complications hereof is presented. PMID:17032594

  4. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test. PMID:21954677

  5. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  6. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, W. J.; Moorehead, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma represents a major cause of cancer deaths in the United Kingdom. Tumours detected at an early or even premalignant stage have a better prognosis. In this review we consider the argument for screening for colorectal carcinomas and discuss the means available and the implications of implementing screening programmes using some of these methods. A suggestion is made for the more rational use of limited resources to target those at greatest risk. PMID:9185482

  7. Colorectal cancer in adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, A.; Renaut, A. J.; Whelan, J.; Taylor, I.

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, one of the most common malignancies among adults, is rare in adolescence. This low incidence coupled with non-specific symptoms and aggressive natural history leads to a poorer prognosis than in reported adult series. This article describes two cases of colorectal cancer in adolescents and reviews the literature regarding this rare condition. Earlier diagnosis and a greater understanding of the natural history may lead to improved treatment with concomitant improvements in survival. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10364965

  8. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too. PMID:26298897

  9. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset. PMID:24574765

  10. Fecal DNA testing for colorectal cancer screening: Molecular targets and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Amaninder; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J; Oikonomou, Katerina G; Moshenyat, Yitzchak

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of colorectal cancer with effective screening is essential for reduction of cancer-specific mortality. The addition of fecal DNA testing in the armamentarium of screening methods already in clinical use launches a new era in the noninvasive part of colorectal cancer screening and emanates from a large number of previous and ongoing clinical investigations and technological advancements. In this review, we discuss the molecular rational and most important genetic alterations hallmarking the early colorectal carcinogenesis process. Also, representative DNA targets-markers and key aspects of their testing at the clinical level in comparison or/and association with other screening methods are described. Finally, a critical view of the strengths and limitations of fecal DNA tests is provided, along with anticipated barriers and suggestions for further exploitation of their use. PMID:26483873

  11. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. Asad Umar, ... know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  12. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... section Colorectal Cancer 4 of 6 sections Take Action! Take Action: Get Tested The best way to prevent colorectal ... I at Risk? 5 of 6 sections Take Action: Healthy Habits Quit smoking. People who smoke are ...

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  14. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  15. Endobronchial metastases of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosado Dawid, Natalia-Zuberoa; Villegas Fernández, Francisco Ramón; Rodríguez Cruz, María Del Mar; Ramos Meca, Asunción

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal metastases affecting trachea or bronchi are highly unusual. Up to 26% of endotracheal/endobronchial metastases are due to colorectal cancer. Treatment and palliative management rely on a multidisciplinary team to improve their quality of life. PMID:26856850

  16. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  17. Absence of somatic alterations of the EB1 gene adenomatous polyposis coli-associated protein in human sporadic colorectal cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Jaïs, P.; Sabourin, J. C.; Bombled, J.; Rougier, P.; Lasser, P.; Duvillard, P.; Bénard, J.; Bressac-de Paillerets, B.

    1998-01-01

    The human EB1 gene product was recently found, by a yeast two-hybrid screening, to be associated with the carboxy terminus of the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) protein, the product of a tumour-suppressor gene thought to act as a gatekeeper in colorectal carcinogenesis. Because virtually all of the APC mutations result in the synthesis of carboxy-terminal truncated proteins, mutant APC proteins are expected to lose their ability to interact with EB1 gene product. Thus, the interaction between APC and EB1 proteins may be important for the tumour-suppressor activity of APC protein, and raises the hypothesis that EB1 is also involved in sporadic colorectal tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, somatic mutations in the entire coding sequence of EB1 cDNA were searched by reverse transcriptase single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in 21 sporadic colorectal cancers and seven adenomas. None of these tumours contained somatic mutation, whereas a silent cDNA variant was identified in 14% of alleles. Furthermore, to investigate whether EB1 locus was included within a region subjected to losses of heterozygosity, four polymorphism markers surrounding EB1 locus were surveyed. Only one out of 28 colorectal tumours contained a loss of heterozygosity at the D20S107 marker. In conclusion, the present findings strongly suggest that EB1 gene is not involved in somatic colorectal carcinogenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9823979

  18. A Systems Approach to Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlatky, Lynn

    Understanding carcinogenesis risk is complicated by a number of factors, among these the lack of a common platform to integrate and analyze the available data, and the inherently systemsbiologic nature of the problem. We have investigated mechanistic approaches to radiogenic risk estimation that draw on unifying biological principles and incorporate data from multiscale sources. The resultant modeling takes into account that carcinogenesis is a multi-scale phenomenon, critically influenced by determinants not only at the molecular level, but at the cell and tissue-levels as well. To account for cell-level carcinogenesis progression as influenced by inter-tissue signaling, we have developed a dynamic carrying capacity construct that couples the growth of a tumor with the degree of induced vascularization. We have also characterized the molecular responses to radiation incorporating tissue-level angiogenesis implications, and have found striking radiation-quality-dependent responses. The molecular-level events of initiation and promotion are considered in our Two-Stage Logistic model, while incorporating in a rudimentary way the larger-scale growth-limiting role of cell-cell interactions. These and other recent studies undertaken to elaborate radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed, in pursuit of a more complete paradigm for understanding radiation induction of cancer and the consequent risk.

  19. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides. (PSB)

  20. ORGAN AND SPECIES SPECIFICITY IN CHEMICAL CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of the Symposium and this volume is the relative susceptibility of specific animal species strains and organs to various carcinogens. For the first time, investigators in chemical carcinogenesis are able to pool their discoveries in this area. Once analyzed, this data c...

  1. Curcumin ameliorates the tumor-enhancing effects of a high-protein diet in an azoxymethane-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Byun, So-Young; Kim, Dan-Bi; Kim, Eunjung

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of reports suggest that a high-protein diet (HPD) is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). One of the proposed mechanisms is that an HPD increases the delivery of protein to the colon and generates various toxic metabolites that contribute to colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin was shown to exert significant preventive properties against CRC. We therefore hypothesized that curcumin can reverse the tumor-enhancing effects of an HPD. This study examined the effects of curcumin on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal tumors in HPD-fed mice. A total of 30 female Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: those fed a normal diet (20% casein), those fed an HPD (HPD; 50% casein), and those fed an HPD supplemented with curcumin (HPDC; 0.02% curcumin). The mice were subjected to an AOM-dextran sodium sulfate colon carcinogenesis protocol. Mice in the HPDC group exhibited a significant (40%) reduction in colorectal tumor multiplicity when compared with those in the HPD group. The expression of colonic inflammatory proteins (cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase), the levels of plasma inflammatory markers (nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α), fecal ammonia, short- and branched-chain fatty acid levels, and the rate of colonocyte proliferation were significantly lower in the HPDC than the HPD group. In conclusion, curcumin inhibited the development of colorectal tumors in an AOM-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis by attenuating colonic inflammation, proliferation, and toxic metabolite production. Curcumin might be useful in the chemoprevention of CRC in individuals consuming an HPD. PMID:26094212

  2. Expression profile of mucin-associated sialyl-Tn antigen in Chinese patients with different colorectal lesions (adenomas, carcinomas)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Fan, Cuizhen; Fan, Shanshan; Liu, Fuquan; Wen, Tao; An, Guangyu; Feng, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The sialyl-Tn (sTn) antigen is a mucin-associated carbohydrate antigen expressed by numerous human carcinomas, and is also claimed to be a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. But the associations between sTn and colorectal cancer remain elusive and controversial. Here, we investigated the expression profile of sTn antigen in a series of human colorectal tissue samples including normal colon, colorectal adenomas, and colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), with an aim to analyzing whether sTn plays a role in the progression and development of Chinese patients with CRCs. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining of sTn antigen was performed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colonic sections from 4 healthy controls, 44 patients with colorectal adenomas, and 186 patients with primary CRCs. Results: No sTn antigen was detected in normal colonic tissues. There were 41 of 44 patients with colorectal adenomas (93.2%), and 141 of 186 patients with CRCs (75.8%) found to express sTn antigen. The patterns of sTn localization were different in adenomas and carcinomas of colonic tissues. Colorectal adenomas showed predominant supranuclear distribution of sTn antigen, while carcinomas revealed apical membrane, mucin droplet and diffuse cytoplasmic localization. Notably, sTn was significantly associated with the degree of differentiation (P = 0.006) and perineural invasion (P = 0.041) of the tumors, but was independent of age, gender, tumor location, depth of penetration, status of lymph nodes, lymphovascular invasion and TNM stage. Conclusions: These results indicate that sTn may play a role in initiating colorectal carcinogenesis and promoting tumor progression. Determination of sTn expression and localization may assist in evaluating malignant status of colorectal lesions. PMID:26617889

  3. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  4. Human colon carcinogenesis is associated with increased interleukin-17-driven inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaohui; Qu, Yine; Leng, Yanli; Sun, Wenxiu; Ma, Siqi; Wei, Jingbo; Hu, Jiangong; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is known to contribute to carcinogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17 or IL-17A) has been shown to play a critical role in colon carcinogenesis in mouse models. However, few studies have investigated IL-17A in human colon tissues. In the present study, we assessed IL-17-driven inflammatory responses in 17 cases of human colon adenocarcinomas, 16 cases of human normal colon tissues adjacent to the resected colon adenocarcinomas, ten cases of human ulcerative colitis tissues from biopsies, and eight cases of human colon polyps diagnosed as benign adenomas. We found that human colon adenocarcinomas contained the highest levels of IL-17A cytokine, which was significantly higher than the IL-17A levels in the adenomas, ulcerative colitis, and normal colon tissues (P<0.01). The levels of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) were also the highest in human colon adenocarcinomas, followed by adenomas and ulcerative colitis. The increased levels of IL-17A and IL-17RA were accompanied with increased IL-17-driven inflammatory responses, including activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways, increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9, MMP7, MMP2, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2), and cyclin D1, decrease in Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) expression, and increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) expression that were associated with increased angiogenesis. These findings suggest that IL-17 and its signaling pathways appear as promising new targets in the design and development of drugs for cancer prevention and treatment, particularly in colorectal cancer. PMID:25834404

  5. Genomic Landscape of Colorectal Mucosa and Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Borras, Ester; San Lucas, F Anthony; Chang, Kyle; Zhou, Ruoji; Masand, Gita; Fowler, Jerry; Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Taggart, Melissa W; McAllister, Florencia; Jones, David A; Davies, Gareth E; Edelmann, Winfried; Ehli, Erik A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hawk, Ernest T; Capella, Gabriel; Scheet, Paul; Vilar, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The molecular basis of the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition has been deduced using comparative analysis of genetic alterations observed through the sequential steps of intestinal carcinogenesis. However, comprehensive genomic analyses of adenomas and at-risk mucosa are still lacking. Therefore, our aim was to characterize the genomic landscape of colonic at-risk mucosa and adenomas. We analyzed the mutation profile and copy number changes of 25 adenomas and adjacent mucosa from 12 familial adenomatous polyposis patients using whole-exome sequencing and validated allelic imbalances (AI) in 37 adenomas using SNP arrays. We assessed for evidence of clonality and performed estimations on the proportions of driver and passenger mutations using a systems biology approach. Adenomas had lower mutational rates than did colorectal cancers and showed recurrent alterations in known cancer driver genes (APC, KRAS, FBXW7, TCF7L2) and AIs in chromosomes 5, 7, and 13. Moreover, 80% of adenomas had somatic alterations in WNT pathway genes. Adenomas displayed evidence of multiclonality similar to stage I carcinomas. Strong correlations between mutational rate and patient age were observed in at-risk mucosa and adenomas. Our data indicate that at least 23% of somatic mutations are present in at-risk mucosa prior to adenoma initiation. The genomic profiles of at-risk mucosa and adenomas illustrate the evolution from normal tissue to carcinoma via greater resolution of molecular changes at the inflection point of premalignant lesions. Furthermore, substantial genomic variation exists in at-risk mucosa before adenoma formation, and deregulation of the WNT pathway is required to foster carcinogenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 417-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27221540

  6. Apple polysaccharide reduces NF-Kb mediated colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dian; Mi, Man; Jiang, Fengliang; Sun, Yang; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Libin; Fan, Lei; Li, Qian; Meng, Jin; Yue, Zhenggang; Liu, Li; Mei, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is an important molecule in mediating inflammatory colitis, which can lead to colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive efficacy of apple polysaccharide extract (AP) in inhibiting NF-κB-mediated inflammation pathways in CRC. We evaluated AP in vitro in HT-29 and SW620 human CRC cells. We also used the azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulphate (AOM/DSS) model to induce colon carcinogenesis in vivo. The chemoprotective effects of AP were assessed using Western blot, immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and flow cytometry. AP reduced AOM/DSS-associated toxicities, prevented carcinogenesis, and decreased the expression of TLR4, MD2, MyD88, TRAM, TRIF-related adapter molecule, interferon-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. The protective effects of AP may be related to the inhibition of TLR4/MD2-mediated signaling, including MyD88 and TRIF, as well as the inhibition of NF-κB-mediated inflammatory signaling pathways. Therefore, AP could be used in combination therapy for the prevention of colitis-associated colon cancer. PMID:25412264

  7. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation. PMID:25796713

  8. Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis: Current Findings in Epidemiological Trends, Causes and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Futoshi

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a definite cancer-causing factor as revealed by cumulative basic, clinical and epidemiological studies. It is mostly induced by infectious agents. For instance, infection with papillomaviruses associates with anogenital cancers, especially cervical cancers; Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach tends to increase the risk of stomach cancer; chronic hepatitis B & C viruses and fluke infections of the liver increase liver cancers; autoimmune diseases, e.g., inflammatory bowel diseases, associate with development of colorectal cancer, and aerial irritants (foreign bodies) such as asbestos or fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in outdoor air increase malignant pleural mesotheliomas or lung cancers. These are typical examples of inflammation-related carcinogenesis. It is apparent that the pathogens to induce inflammatory reactions in specific organs are not related to each other. However, the underlying pathogenesis in common is to induce and/or sustain inflammation. In this article, I would like to review the up-to-date findings of epidemiological trends, causes and mechanisms of inflammation-related carcinogenesis. PMID:25324587

  9. Apc-driven colon carcinogenesis in Pirc rat is strongly reduced by polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Becherucci, Caterina; Crucitta, Stefania; Caderni, Giovanna

    2015-11-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is one of the most powerful agents in reducing chemically induced carcinogenesis in rat colon. However, contrasting results in Min mice dampened the enthusiasm on this potentially strong and virtually safe, cancer chemopreventing agent. Pirc (F344/NTac-Apc (am1137) ) rats carrying a germline heterozygous mutation in the Apc gene, spontaneously develop multiple tumours in the colon thus modelling both familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). Given this similarity, we thought that these rats could be appropriate to test the efficacy of PEG 8000 in reducing carcinogenesis. Pirc male rats aged one month were treated with 5% PEG in drinking water for 2 or 6 months. Precancerous lesions were dramatically reduced after 2 months of PEG treatment (Mucin depleted foci (MDF)/colon were 99 ± 17 and 12 ± 8 in Controls and PEG-treated rats, respectively; p < 0.001; mean ± SD). Similarly, colon tumors were significantly reduced after 6 months of treatment (tumors/rat were 8.1 ± 2.3 and 3.6 ± 2.2 in Controls and PEG-treated rats, respectively; p < 0.05; mean ± SD). Colon proliferation, a parameter correlated to cancer risk, was also significantly lower in PEG-treated rats than in Controls, while apoptosis was not significantly affected. In conclusion, PEG markedly reduces colon carcinogenesis in Pirc rats mutated in Apc; we thus suggest that PEG may be used as chemopreventive agent to reduce cancer risk in FAP and CRC patients. PMID:25912754

  10. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  11. Lesser-Known Molecules in Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lozneanu, Ludmila; Cojocaru, Elena; Giuşcă, Simona Eliza; Cărăuleanu, Alexandru; Căruntu, Irina-Draga

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the deciphering of the signaling pathways brings about new advances in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of ovarian carcinogenesis, which is based on the interaction of several molecules with different biochemical structure that, consequently, intervene in cell metabolism, through their role as regulators in proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Given that the ensemble of biomarkers in OC includes more than 50 molecules the interest of the researchers focuses on the possible validation of each one's potential as prognosis markers and/or therapeutic targets. Within this framework, this review presents three protein molecules: ALCAM, c-FLIP, and caveolin, motivated by the perspectives provided through the current limited knowledge on their role in ovarian carcinogenesis and on their potential as prognosis factors. Their structural stability, once altered, triggers the initiation of the sequences characteristic for ovarian carcinogenesis, through their role as modulators for several signaling pathways, contributing to the disruption of cellular junctions, disturbance of pro-/antiapoptotic equilibrium, and alteration of transmission of the signals specific for the molecular pathways. For each molecule, the text is built as follows: (i) general remarks, (ii) structural details, and (iii) particularities in expression, from different tumors to landmarks in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:26339605

  12. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  13. OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer progression through epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kun; Cai, Xin-Yi; Li, Qiang; Yang, Zhi-Bin; Xiong, Wei; Shen, Tao; Wang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • OTX1 is overexpression in colorectal cancer tissues. • Overexpression of OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. • Depletion of OTX1 inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. • Overexpression of OTX1 is linked to the EMT-like phenotype. - Abstract: Orthodenticle homeobox 1 (OTX1), a transcription factor containing a bicoid-like homeodomain, plays a role in brain and sensory organ development. In this study, we report that OTX1 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and OTX1 overexpression is associated with higher stage. Functional analyses reveal that overexpression of OTX1 results in accumulation of CRC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, whereas ablation of OTX1 expression significantly inhibits the proliferative and invasive capability of CRC cells in vitro. Together, our results indicate that OTX1 is involved in human colon carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human colorectal cancer.

  14. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  15. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  16. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  17. Mechanisms of diet and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, M J

    1999-12-01

    There is consistent and strong evidence that a high risk of colorectal cancer is associated with obesity and with a low intake of vegetables, of whole grain cereals and of fish. Many other food groups or nutrients have been associated with this cancer, but the evidence for them is inconsistent and therefore untenable. Vegetables contain a wide range of protective agents that protect against cancer at many other sites as well as the large bowel. The same is true of whole grain cereals; these can also protect against colorectal cancer by mechanisms specific to the large bowel. Fish are rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that are thought to protect the colon against malignancy via the prostaglandin pathway. Overweight is the result of an excess of energy intake over energy output, and there is good evidence to suggest that overweight might be a surrogate measure of lack of exercise. PMID:10772423

  18. miRNA-144 suppresses proliferation and migration of colorectal cancer cells through GSPT1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruilin; Li, Cui; Chai, Baofeng

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs play a key role in carcinogenesis or tumor progression, which negatively and posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression and function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, as well as regulators of cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, migration and other processes. A number of miRNAs are reported be related to the occurrence and development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, these studies were not involved in the effect of miRNA 144 of CRC, whose function remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression level of miRNA 144 was markedly down-regulated in colorectal cancer HCT116 cells compared with normal control FHC cells. Meanwhile, we found that GSPT1 was over-expressed in human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. Subsequently, GSPT1 was identified as a target of miRNA 144 through bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays. Besides, we also confirmed that miRNA 144 can inhibit the proliferation and migration of colorectal cancer HCT116 cells . Next, we observed RNA-mediated knockdown of GSPT1 can also inhibit the proliferation and migration of colorectal cancer cells. Thus, we concluded that miRNA 144 inhibits cell proliferation and migration through GSPT1 in CRC. In addition, further mechanic investigations revealed that miRNA-144 suppressed the expression of GSPT1 to regulate the expression of c-myc, survivin and Bcl2L15 which are involved in cell proliferation, and that metastasis related factor MMP28 was also down-regulated by miRNA144. Our findings suggested that microRNA 144 might be an important element to control the status of colorectal cancer, which has provided a new insight into the mechanism of proliferation and migration and a new target in therapy against colorectal cancer. PMID:26349975

  19. Worldwide variations in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Center, Melissa M; Jemal, Ahmedin; Smith, Robert A; Ward, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented significant international variations in colorectal cancer rates. However, these studies were limited because they were based on old data or examined only incidence or mortality data. In this article, the colorectal cancer burden and patterns worldwide are described using the most recently updated cancer incidence and mortality data available from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The authors provide 5-year (1998-2002), age-standardized colorectal cancer incidence rates for select cancer registries in IARC's Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, and trends in age-standardized death rates by single calendar year for select countries in the World Health Organization mortality database. In addition, available information regarding worldwide colorectal cancer screening initiatives are presented. The highest colorectal cancer incidence rates in 1998-2002 were observed in registries from North America, Oceania, and Europe, including Eastern European countries. These high rates are most likely the result of increases in risk factors associated with "Westernization," such as obesity and physical inactivity. In contrast, the lowest colorectal cancer incidence rates were observed from registries in Asia, Africa, and South America. Colorectal cancer mortality rates have declined in many longstanding as well as newly economically developed countries; however, they continue to increase in some low-resource countries of South America and Eastern Europe. Various screening options for colorectal cancer are available and further international consideration of targeted screening programs and/or recommendations could help alleviate the burden of colorectal cancer worldwide. PMID:19897840

  20. Fusobacterium nucleatum and T-cells in Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Yamauchi, Mai; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Nowak, Jonathan A.; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Kostic, Alecsandar D.; Giannakis, Marios; Watanabe, Hideo; Bullman, Susan; Milner, Danny A.; Harris, Curtis C.; Giovannucci, Edward; Garraway, Levi A.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Dranoff, Glenn; Chan, Andrew T.; Garrett, Wendy S.; Huttenhower, Curtis; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    -cells (for a unit increase in quartile categories of CD3+ T-cells as an outcome: multivariable odds ratio, 0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.87; Ptrend = 0.006). The amount of Fusobacterium nucleatum was not significantly associated with the density of CD8+, CD45RO+, or FOXP3+ T-cells (Ptrend > 0.013). Conclusions and relevance The amount of tissue Fusobacterium nucleatum is inversely associated with CD3+ T-cell density in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Upon validation, our human population data may provide an impetus for further investigations on potential interactive roles of Fusobacterium and host immunity in carcinogenesis. PMID:26181352

  1. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the paradigm of tumoral growth that is susceptible to preventive measures, especially screening. Various screening strategies with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency are currently available, notable examples being the fecal occult blood test and endoscopic tests. In addition, new modalities have appeared in the last few years that could become viable alternatives in the near future. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Orlando in May 2013, with special emphasis on the medium- and long-term results of strategies using the fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy, as well as initial experiences with the use of new biomarkers. PMID:24160954

  2. Historical origins of current concepts of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lawley, P D

    1994-01-01

    The first attempts to understand the causes of cancer were based on generalizations of what might now be termed a "holistic" nature, and hereditary influences were recognized at an early stage; these views survive principally through a supposed positive connection between psychological factors such as stress and diminished ability to combat the progressive development of tumors through some form of immunologically mediated rejection of potentially cancerous cells. While evidence for immunosurveillance is generally accepted, it is now widely regarded as almost wholly confined to instances where tumor viruses are involved as causative agents. The earliest theorists drew an analogy between the processes of carcinogenesis and of evolution; the cancer cells acquired the ability to outstrip their normal counterparts in their capacity for proliferation. This was even before evolution had been interpreted as involving a continuous succession of mutations. Evidence was already to hand before the end of the 18th century that exogenous agents, notably soot, a product of the "industrial revolution," could cause skin cancer. Somewhat over 100 years later, another industrial innovation, the manufacture of synthetic dyestuffs, implicated specific chemical compounds that could act systemically to cause bladder cancer. Meanwhile, the 19th century saw the establishment of the fundamentals of modern medical science; of particular relevance to cancer was the demonstration that it involved abnormalities in the process of cell division. The commencement of the 20th century was marked by a rediscovery of the concept of mutation; and it was proposed that cancer originated through uncontrolled division of somatically mutated cells. At around this time, two further important exogenous causative agents were discovered: X-rays and tumor viruses. In the late 1920s, x-radiation became the first established exogenous cause of mutagenesis. The discoverer of this phenomenon, H. J. Muller

  3. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  4. [Epigenetics and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Pablo; Villarejo, Pedro; Padilla, David; Menéndez, José María; Rodríguez Montes, José Antonio

    2012-05-01

    The epigenetic and physiological mechanisms that alter the structure of chromatin include the methylation of DNA, changes in the histones, and changes in RNA. A literature review has been carried out using PubMed on the evidence published on the association between epigenetics and colorectal cancer. The scientific literature shows that epigenetic changes, such as genetic modifications may be very significant in the origin of neoplastic disease, contributing both to the development and progression of the disease. PMID:22425513

  5. Techniques for colorectal anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yik-Hong; Ashour, Mohamed Ahmed Tawfik

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leak remains one of the most feared post-operative complications, particularly after anterior resection of the rectum with, the shift from abdomino-peritoneal resections to total mesorectal excision and primary anastomosis. The literature fails to demonstrate superiority of stapled over hand-sewn techniques in colorectal anastomosis, regardless of the level of anastomosis, although a high stricture rate was noted in the former technique. Thus, improvements in safety aspects of anastomosis and alternatives to hand-sewn and stapled techniques are being sought. Here, we review alternative anastomotic techniques used to fashion bowel anastomosis. Compression anastomosis using compression anastomotic clips, endoluminal compression anastomotic rings, AKA-2, biofragmental anastomotic rings, or Magnamosis all involve the concept of creating a sutureless end-to-end anastomosis by compressing two bowel ends together, leading to a simultaneous necrosis and healing process that joins the two lumens. Staple line reinforcement is a new approach that reduce the drawbacks of staplers used in colorectal practice, i.e. leakage, bleeding, misfiring, and inadequate tissue approximation. Various non-absorbable, semi or fully absorbable materials are now available. Two other techniques can provide alternative anastomotic support to the suture line: a colorectal drain and a polyester stent, which can be utilized in ultra-low rectal excision and can negate the formation of a defunctioning stoma. Doxycycline coated sutures have been used to overcome the post-operative weakness in anastomosis secondary to rapid matrix degradation mediated by matrix metalloproteinase. Another novel technique, the electric welding system, showed promising results in construction of a safe, neat, smooth sutureless bowel anastomosis. Various anastomotic techniques have been shown to be comparable to the standard techniques of suturing and stapling. However, most of these alternatives need

  6. Effects of calcium supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in colorectal adenoma patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baiyu; Gross, Myron D; Fedirko, Veronika; McCullough, Marjorie L; Bostick, Roberd M

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play important roles in colorectal carcinogenesis. There is strong evidence that calcium reduces risk for colorectal neoplasms, possibly through its ability to bind bile acids and prevent their colonic toxicity (which occurs via an oxidative mechanism and results in an inflammatory response). In a previously reported pilot, randomized, controlled trial among sporadic colorectal adenoma patients we found that those on 2.0 g/day of calcium, relative to those on placebo, had an estimated drop in a combined cytokine z-score of 48% (P = 0.18) over 6 months. To follow-up these promising preliminary findings, we tested the efficacy of two doses of supplemental calcium (1.0 or 2.0 g/day) relative to placebo on modulating circulating biomarkers of inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP) and 10 cytokines] and oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes) over a 4-month treatment period among 193 patients with previous sporadic, colorectal adenoma in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The inflammation markers were measured in plasma using electrochemiluminescence detection-based immunoassays, and F2-isoprostanes were measured in plasma using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Over a 4-month treatment period, we found no appreciable effects of calcium on CRP, cytokines, or F2-isoprostanes (P > 0.4), overall or within strata of several major risk factors for colorectal carcinogenesis, such as body mass index and regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Overall, our results provide no evidence that calcium supplementation favorably modulates concentrations of circulating biomarkers of inflammation or oxidative stress over 4 months among patients with a previous colorectal adenoma. PMID:26304464

  7. Methylator phenotype in colorectal cancer: A prognostic factor or not?

    PubMed

    Gallois, C; Laurent-Puig, P; Taieb, J

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is due to different types of genetic alterations that are translated into different phenotypes. Among them, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP+) is the most recently involved in carcinogenesis of some CRC. The malignant transformation in this case is mainly due to the transcriptional inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. CIMP+ are reported to be more frequently found in the elderly and in women. The tumors are more frequently located in the proximal part of the colon, BRAF mutated and are associated with microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. All sporadic MSI CRC belong to the methylator phenotype, however some non MSI CRC may also harbor a methylator phenotype. The prognostic value of CIMP is not well known. Most studies show a worse prognosis in CIMP+ CRC, and adjuvant treatments seem to be more efficient. We review here the current knowledge on prognostic and predictive values in CIMP+ CRC. PMID:26702883

  8. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  9. Epidemiological transition of colorectal cancer in developing countries: Environmental factors, molecular pathways, and opportunities for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Vacca, Michele; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related mortality worldwide. The disease has been traditionally a major health problem in industrial countries, however the CRC rates are increasing in the developing countries that are undergoing economic growth. Several environmental risk factors, mainly changes in diet and life style, have been suggested to underlie the rise of CRC in these populations. Diet and lifestyle impinge on nuclear receptors, on the intestinal microbiota and on crucial molecular pathways that are implicated in intestinal carcinogenesis. In this respect, the epidemiological transition in several regions of the world offers a unique opportunity to better understand CRC carcinogenesis by studying the disease phenotypes and their environmental and molecular associations in different populations. The data from these studies may have important implications for the global prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:24876728

  10. Multistage carcinogenesis in the urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S M; Greenfield, R E; Ellwein, L B

    1983-01-01

    The induction of cancer of the urinary bladder is a multi-stage process involving multiple exogenous and endogenous factors. Based on the classical initiation-promotion model, we have used N-[4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]formamide (FANFT) as initiator and sodium saccharin (SAC) or tryptophan as promoters. These latter chemicals have the properties expected of promoters: induction of hyperplasia, reversibility and nonmutagenicity. Also, tumors were induced whether the promoter was administered immediately after FANFT or beginning 6 weeks after FANFT was discontinued, but no tumors resulted if either promoter was given without initiation with FANFT. Factor(s) present in normal urine also are involved in the promotion process, in addition to the role of urine as a carrier of carcinogens. However, administration of SAC to animals with a rapidly proliferating bladder mucosa, induced by ulceration, pellet insertion, or in utero, resulted in bladder tumor induction, even without prior initiation with FANFT. To better understand the complex interaction of the multiple variables in bladder carcinogenesis, a stochastic computer model has been formulated based on long-term carcinogenicity and tissue kinetic studies in vivo. This model indicates the importance of cell proliferation and the development of hyperplasia in carcinogenesis. PMID:6832093

  11. Carcinogenesis--a new point of view.

    PubMed

    Gevorkyan, L; Gambashidze, K

    2014-04-01

    Presented article suggests the novel hypothesis of carcinogenesis, where the key moment for all types (biological, physical, chemical) of carcinogenesis has been discussed. For confirmation of the hypothesis thorough theoretical analysis of the mechanisms of malignant transformation of cells after influence of any type of carcinogens and results of experiments have been presented. Hypothesis highlights are formulated as follows: 1) Covalent bond disorders between S+-methionine and Fe3+ atoms in cytochrome; 2) Electron transport chain blockade with certain ligand after its penetration in cytochrome pocket with further formation of 6th coordination bond between ligand and Fe atom (in one case increase in mitochondrial pH precede-, and in other, it follows electron transport chain blockade in cytochromes); 3) Fe3+ reduction up to Fe2+ leading to blockade of aerobic glycolysis; 4) Decrease in enzyme (Е1-TDP, oxidases etc.) activity due to mitochondrial pH alterations; 5) Production of S-adenosylmethionine owing to lipoic acid amide leading to accumulation of homocysteine in cytoplasm with further penetration in cell nucleus producing DNA mutations; 6) Fe2+ wash-out from cytochrome and its deposition in ferritin. PMID:24850610

  12. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Rodrigo, Luis; Pinyol-Felis, Carme; Vinyas-Salas, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Methods Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. Results No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). Conclusion We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats. PMID:18667092

  13. THE REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES (ROS) THEORY OF ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At this time, there is not a scientific consensus on the mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis. Proposed mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis include but are not limited to clastogenic effects, mutation, oxidative stress (via ROS and other chemic...

  14. THE REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES (ROS) THEORY OF ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Arsenic is a human carcinogen in skin, lung, liver, urinary bladder
    and kidney. At this time, there is not a scientific consensus on the
    mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis. Proposed
    mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesi...

  15. Other 1-carbon micronutrients and age modulate the effects of folate on colorectal carcinogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable evidence arising from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicates that a habitually low intake of folate increases the risk of malignant transformation. Moreover, the pre-clinical observations convincingly substantiate true causation. The data in this regard is most compelling for ...

  16. Recent Developments in Colorectal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this review is to provide an update on important recent advances in radiologic colorectal imaging, with emphasis on detection, staging, and surveillance of colorectal neoplasia. Recent findings Colorectal imaging advances with magnetic resonance (MR), CT colonography (CTC), and positron emission tomography (PET) over the past year or so have been substantial. Progress in MR imaging for rectal cancer was most notable in terms of assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy. Continued maturation and clinical validation of CTC was observed for the evaluation of advanced neoplasia, among other areas. Multimodality approaches to colorectal imaging that incorporate functional PET data have also made impressive strides forward. Summary Recent advances in cross-sectional and functional radiologic imaging of the colorectum will positively impact the clinical capabilities for noninvasive evaluation of colorectal neoplasia PMID:25394232

  17. Dietary Intakes of Red Meat, Poultry, and Fish During High School and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in Women

    PubMed Central

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Bernstein, Adam M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Wu, Kana

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent diet may be etiologically relevant for colorectal carcinogenesis. We examined the association between meat and fish intakes during adolescence and the risk of colorectal adenomas later in life among 19,771 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II. Subjects had completed a validated food frequency questionnaire in 1998 (when aged 34–51 years) about their diets during high school and subsequently underwent at least 1 lower-bowel endoscopy during the study period (1998–2007). During this period, 1,494 subjects were diagnosed with colorectal adenomas. Intake of red meat during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk when comparing those in the highest versus lowest category of intake (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 1.35). Similarly, intake of fish during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.78, 1.17). Intake of poultry during adolescence was associated with a lower risk of total colorectal (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.99), distal (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.99), rectal (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.90), and advanced (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.38, 0.93) adenomas. Replacement of 1 serving per day of red meat with 1 serving per day of poultry or fish was associated with 41% and 35% decreased risks for rectal adenomas and advanced adenomas, respectively. Our findings do not suggest an association between red meat intake during adolescence and colorectal adenomas later in life, but higher poultry intake during this time was associated with a lower risk of colorectal adenomas. PMID:23785116

  18. Current targeted therapies in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Andrew; O’Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, John; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Treatment strategies for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have undergone dramatic changes in the past decade and despite improved patient outcomes, there still exist areas for continued development. The introduction of targeted agents has provided clinicians with additional treatment options in mCRC, however, results have been mixed at best. These novel therapies were designed to interfere with specific molecules involved in the cellular carcinogenesis pathway and ultimately deliver a more focused treatment. Currently, their use in mCRC has been limited primarily as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy regimens. This review explores the relevant cell-signaling networks in colorectal cancer, provides focus on the current targeted agent armamentarium approved for use in mCRC and explores the usefulness of predictive mCRC biomarkers. PMID:27482287

  19. Metal interactions in carcinogenesis: enhancement, inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, Gunnar F.; Andersen, Ole

    1981-01-01

    Metals constitute a fundamentally important part of the total human environment. Since human exposure often involves complex mixtures of metal compounds and, possibly, organic compounds which may be carcinogenic per se, interactions between these compounds may add significantly to human cancer risk. Our present knowledge about these kinds of interactions is very limited. The best investigated area is benzo(a)pyrene (BP)-metal oxide particle interactions in respiratory carcinogenesis in the hamster. Metal oxide particles were also shown to modify the carcinogenic effect of nitrosamines. Several reports describe experiments in which selenium compounds exerted a generally anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic activity. Inorganic arsenic compounds, which are accepted to be carcinogenic in man, have so far been negative in animal experiments except for one recent suggested report. Several authors have, however, suggested that these compounds may act as cocarcinogens due to their inhibition of DNA repair, although animal experiments to demonstrate a cocarcinogenic effect of arsenic compounds have been negative so far, except for one preliminary report. The concentration of zinc in the diet seemed to influence both transplanted tumor growth and the carcinogenicity of several organic compounds, and the possibility of a correlation between dietary zinc and certain cancer forms in man has been suggested. Protection against development of Leydigiomas usually induced by cadmium injection was afforded by simultaneous injection of zinc salts. Nickel carcinogenesis has been reported to be antagonized by manganese, and synergism between Ni and organic carcinogens, e.g. BP, has been demonstrated. There is no firm evidence that lead may be a cocarcinogen, although some limited experimental evidence is available. Oxidizing agents have been demonstrated to increase, and reducing agents to antagonize, the mutagenic effect of chromium compounds in vitro. The content of carcinogenic and

  20. Identification of diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer via integrative epigenomics and genomics data

    PubMed Central

    KOK-SIN, TEOW; MOKHTAR, NORFILZA MOHD; HASSAN, NUR ZARINA ALI; SAGAP, ISMAIL; ROSE, ISA MOHAMED; HARUN, ROSLAN; JAMAL, RAHMAN

    2015-01-01

    contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25997610

  1. Urinary total isothiocyanates and colorectal cancer: a prospective study of men in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Kristin A.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Chung, Fung-Lung; Van Den Berg, David; Wang, Renwei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yu, Mimi C.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory and epidemiological evidence suggest that dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs) may have a chemopreventive effect on cancer. Humans are exposed to ITCs primarily through ingestion of cruciferous vegetables which contain glucosinolates, the precursors to ITCs. The association between urinary total ITC level and colorectal cancer risk was examined in a cohort of 18,244 men in Shanghai, China, with 16 years of follow-up. Urinary total ITCs were quantified on 225 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 1119 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. High levels of urinary total ITCs were associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer five years after baseline measurements of ITCs whereas a statistically nonsignificant increase in the risk of colorectal cancer was observed for cases within five years of post-enrollment (OR=1.93; 95% CI =0.85, 4.39 for the upper three quartiles of urinary ITCs versus the lowest quartile). The inverse ITC-colorectal cancer association became stronger with a longer duration of follow-up. Compared with the first quartile, ORs (95% CIs) for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of total ITCs in urine collected 10 or more years before cancer diagnosis were 0.61 (0.35, 1.05), 0.51 (0.29, 0.92), and 0.46 (0.25, 0.83), respectively, for risk of colorectal cancer (P for trend = 0.006). The present study suggests that dietary ITCs may exert tumor inhibitory effects, especially during earlier stages of the multistage process of carcinogenesis. PMID:18559550

  2. Identification of GABRA1 and LAMA2 as new DNA methylation markers in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunwoo; Oh, Taejeong; Chung, Hyuncheol; Rha, Sunyoung; Kim, Changjin; Moon, Youngho; Hoehn, Benjamin D; Jeong, Dongjun; Lee, Seunghoon; Kim, Namkyu; Park, Chanhee; Yoo, Miae; An, Sungwhan

    2012-03-01

    Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in the promoter region of genes is a common epigenetic phenomenon found in early cancers. Therefore conducting genome-scale methylation studies will enhance our understanding of the epigenetic etiology behind carcinogenesis by providing reliable biomarkers for early detection of cancer. To discover novel hypermethylated genes in colorectal cancer by genome-wide search, we first defined a subset of genes epigenetically reactivated in colon cancer cells after treatment with a demethylating agent. Next, we identified another subset of genes with relatively down-regulated expression patterns in colorectal primary tumors when compared with normal appearing-adjacent regions. Among 29 genes obtained by cross-comparison of the two gene-sets, we subsequently selected, through stepwise subtraction processes, two novel genes, GABRA1 and LAMA2, as methylation targets in colorectal cancer. For clinical validation pyrosequencing was used to assess methylation in 134 matched tissue samples from CRC patients. Aberrant methylation at target CpG sites in GABRA1 and LAMA2 was observed with high frequency in tumor tissues (92.5% and 80.6%, respectively), while less frequently in matched tumor-adjacent normal tissues (33.6% for GABRA1 and 13.4% for LAMA2). Methylation levels in primary tumors were not significantly correlated with clinico-pathological features including age, sex, survival and TNM stage. Additionally, we found that ectopic overexpression of GABRA1 in colon cancer cell lines resulted in strong inhibition of cell growth. These results suggest that two novel hypermethylated genes in colorectal cancer, GABRA1 and LAMA2, may have roles in colorectal tumorigenesis and could be potential biomarkers for the screening and the detection of colorectal cancer in clinical practice. PMID:22038115

  3. miR-506 inhibits cell proliferation and invasion by targeting TET family in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Minghao; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Anliu; Tian, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Ten-eleven translocation (TET) family members have been shown to be involved in the development of many tumors. However, the biological role of the TET family and its mechanism of action in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression remain poorly understood. Materials and Methods: We measured the expression levels of TET family members in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens, in the corresponding normal tissues and in cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Both the protein function and the protein-independent role of TETs were investigated by cell viability assays and cell invasion assays using in vitro and in vivo models. Results: We found that all three TET genes were strongly up-regulated at the transcript level in CRC samples compared to matched normal tissues. The same results were observed in colorectal cancer cell lines. Knockdown of TETs by shTET1/2/3 showed that TET family members inhibited CRC growth and metastasis. We showed that TET family member degradation by miR-506 inhibits cell proliferation and invasion in colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Through this study, we advance our understanding of the expression levels TETs and miR-506 in CRC and further clarify the internal regulatory mechanism of miR-506 by targeting TET during CRC processes. These findings may contribute to a novel avenue for researching and developing targeted therapies for CRC. PMID:27114802

  4. Toward a Molecular Classification of Colorectal Cancer: The Role of MGMT

    PubMed Central

    Minoo, Parham

    2013-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair enzyme with the ability to protect cells from DNA mutations by removing alkyl groups from the O6 position of guanine. Colon mucosa is exposed to the direct effects of environmental carcinogens and therefore maintaining a proficient DNA repair system is very important to stay protected against DNA mutagenesis. Loss of MGMT expression is almost exclusively associated with methylation of CpG islands in the MGMT gene promoter region which is found in approximately 40% of colorectal cancers. The role of MGMT loss in colorectal tumorigenesis is complex but numerous studies have documented methylation of this gene even in the normal appearing mucosa as well as in aberrant crypt foci, suggesting that MGMT methylation can be regarded as an early event or “field defect” in colon cancer neoplasia. The focus of this perspective is the role of MGMT in different pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis as well as the implication of this molecule in treatment decisions in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:24151575

  5. FAM172A is a tumor suppressor in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chunhui; Ye, Lili; Huang, Zonghai; Huang, Shuxin; Liu, Hao; Yu, Jinlong

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the regulatory role of a novel protein FAM172A in carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Investigation of clinical samples using Western blotting showed that expression of FAM172A is significantly lower in cancerous tissues than in adjacent tissues. Furthermore, we constructed in vitro model for continuous overexpression and silencing of FAM172A with a retroviral vector system. FAM172A suppressed the proliferative and invasive potentials of LOVO cells as shown in MTT test, transwell migration assay, wound healing assay, 3D-culture morphologic study, and xenograft experiment. RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that FAM172A overexpression inhibited expressions of Cyclin D1, CDK2, MMP-2, MMP-9, PERK, elF2α, ATF6, XBP1, and GRP78, while FAM172A silencing induced their expressions. FAM172A might regulate ERS through PERK-elF2α, ATF6-XBP1-GRP78 signal pathway. The results implicated that FAM172A functioned as a tumor suppressor in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26637224

  6. Bowman-Birk inhibitors from legumes as colorectal chemopreventive agents

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant functioning of serine proteases in inflammatory and carcinogenic processes within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has prompted scientists to investigate the potential of serine protease inhibitors, both natural and synthetic, as modulators of their proteolytic activities. Protease inhibitors of the Bowman-Birk type, a major protease inhibitor family in legume seeds, which inhibit potently and specifically trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteases, are currently being investigated as colorectal chemopreventive agents. Physiologically relevant amounts of Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) can reach the large intestine in active form due to their extraordinary resistance to extreme conditions within the GIT. Studies in animal models have proven that dietary BBI from several legume sources, including soybean, pea, lentil and chickpea, can prevent or suppress carcinogenic and inflammatory processes within the GIT. Although the therapeutic targets and the action mechanism of BBI have not yet been elucidated, the emerging evidence suggests that BBI exert their preventive properties via protease inhibition; in this sense, serine proteases should be considered as primary targets in early stages of carcinogenesis. The validation of candidate serine proteases as therapeutic targets together with the identification, within the wide array of natural BBI variants, of the most potent and specific protease inhibitors, are necessary to better understand the potential of this protein family as colorectal chemopreventive agents. PMID:25132747

  7. Proteomics for discovery of candidate colorectal cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Chaver, Paula; Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe and other Western countries, mainly due to the lack of well-validated clinically useful biomarkers with enough sensitivity and specificity to detect this disease at early stages. Although it is well known that the pathogenesis of CRC is a progressive accumulation of mutations in multiple genes, much less is known at the proteome level. Therefore, in the last years many proteomic studies have been conducted to find new candidate protein biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and as therapeutic targets for this malignancy, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis. An important advantage of the proteomic approaches is the capacity to look for multiple differentially expressed proteins in a single study. This review provides an overview of the recent reports describing the different proteomic tools used for the discovery of new protein markers for CRC such as two-dimensional electrophoresis methods, quantitative mass spectrometry-based techniques or protein microarrays. Additionally, we will also focus on the diverse biological samples used for CRC biomarker discovery such as tissue, serum and faeces, besides cell lines and murine models, discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and summarize the most frequently identified candidate CRC markers. PMID:24744574

  8. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  9. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. PMID:25955461

  10. (Radiation carcinogenesis in the whole body system)

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1990-12-14

    The objectives of the trip were: to take part in and to give the summary of a Symposium on Radiation Carcinogenesis at Tokyo, and to give a talk at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences at Chiba. The breadth of the aspects considered at the conference was about as broad as is possible, from effects at the molecular level to human epidemiology, from the effects of tritium to cancer induction by heavy ions. The events induced by cancer that lead to cancer and the events that are secondary are beginning to come into better focus but much is still not known. Interest in suppressor genes is increasing rapidly in the studies of human tumors and many would predict that the three or four suppressor genes associated with cancer are only the first sighting of a much larger number.

  11. Chemical basis of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hiroshi; Tatemichi, Masayuki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2003-09-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by biological, chemical, and physical factors has been associated with increased risk of human cancer at various sites. Inflammation activates a variety of inflammatory cells, which induce and activate several oxidant-generating enzymes such as NADPH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, myeloperoxidase, and eosinophil peroxidase. These enzymes produce high concentrations of diverse free radicals and oxidants including superoxide anion, nitric oxide, nitroxyl, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and hypobromous acid, which react with each other to generate other more potent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite. These species can damage DNA, RNA, lipids, and proteins by nitration, oxidation, chlorination, and bromination reactions, leading to increased mutations and altered functions of enzymes and proteins (e.g., activation of oncogene products and/or inhibition of tumor-suppressor proteins) and thus contributing to the multistage carcinogenesis process. Appropriate treatment of inflammation should be explored further for chemoprevention of human cancers. PMID:12921773

  12. [Recent advances in bladder urothelial carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pignot, Géraldine; le Goux, Constance; Bieche, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth cause of cancer mortality in France and prognosis of muscle-invasive tumors remains poor due to lack of effective treatments. Recent advances in molecular biology applied to tumors and results of recent genome-wide studies have brought a important impact on the understanding of bladder carcinogenesis. Main molecular alterations concern FGFR3, TP53 and HER2, and it is now possible to distinguish three subgroups of tumors according to molecular profile. This paper proposes a review of different genetic and epigenetic alterations in bladder cancer, their potential role as theranostic markers in clinical oncology and new targeted therapies according to the concept of personalized medicine. PMID:26617115

  13. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  14. Oxidative DNA damage accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Farinati, F; Cardin, R; Degan, P; Rugge, M; Di, M; Bonvicini, P; Naccarato, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric carcinogenesis is a multifactorial, multistep process, in which chronic inflammation plays a major role. 
Aims—In order to ascertain whether free radical mediated oxidative DNA damage is involved in such a process, concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), a mutagenic/carcinogenic adduct, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as an indirect measure of free radical mediated damage, were determined in biopsy specimens from patients undergoing endoscopy. 
Patients—Eighty eight patients were divided into histological subgroups as follows: 27 with chronic non-atrophic gastritis, 41 with atrophic gastritis, six with gastric cancer, and 14 unaffected controls. 
Methods—Intestinal metaplasia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and disease activity were semiquantitatively scored. 8OHdG concentrations were assessed by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and TBARS concentrations were fluorimetrically assayed. 
Results—8OHdG concentrations (mean number of adducts/105 dG residues) were significantly higher in chronic atrophic gastritis (p=0.0009). Significantly higher concentrations were also detected in the presence of severe disease activity (p=0.02), intestinal metaplasia (p=0.035), and H pylori infection (p=0.001). TBARS concentrations were also higher in atrophic gastritis, though not significantly so. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, 8OHdG concentrations correlated best with the presence and severity of H pylori infection (r=0.53, p=0.002). 
Conclusions—Chronic gastritis is characterised by the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage with mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. H pylori infection is the major determinant for DNA adduct formation. 

 Keywords: free radicals; oxidative DNA damage; gastric carcinogenesis; precancerous changes; peroxidative damage PMID:9577340

  15. Cathepsin B promotes colorectal tumorigenesis, cell invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Benjamin; Mongrain, Sébastien; Cagnol, Sébastien; Langlois, Marie‐Josée; Boulanger, Jim; Bernatchez, Gérald; Carrier, Julie C.; Boudreau, François

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a cysteine proteinase that primarily functions as an endopeptidase within endolysosomal compartments in normal cells. However, during tumoral expansion, the regulation of cathepsin B can be altered at multiple levels, thereby resulting in its overexpression and export outside of the cell. This may suggest a possible role of cathepsin B in alterations leading to cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intracellular and extracellular cathepsin B in growth, tumorigenesis, and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Results show that mRNA and activated levels of cathepsin B were both increased in human adenomas and in CRCs of all stages. Treatment of CRC cells with the highly selective and non‐permeant cathepsin B inhibitor Ca074 revealed that extracellular cathepsin B actively contributed to the invasiveness of human CRC cells while not essential for their growth in soft agar. Cathepsin B silencing by RNAi in human CRC cells inhibited their growth in soft agar, as well as their invasion capacity, tumoral expansion, and metastatic spread in immunodeficient mice. Higher levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 were observed in cathepsin B‐deficient tumors as well as an increase in cyclin B1. Finally, cathepsin B colocalized with p27Kip1 within the lysosomes and efficiently degraded the inhibitor. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that cathepsin B is a significant factor in colorectal tumor development, invasion, and metastatic spreading and may, therefore, represent a potential pharmacological target for colorectal tumor therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808857

  16. Academic Colorectal Surgery Job Search

    PubMed Central

    Kalady, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer. PMID:25067918

  17. Academic colorectal surgery job search.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer. PMID:25067918

  18. A central role for heme iron in colon carcinogenesis associated with red meat intake.

    PubMed

    Bastide, Nadia M; Chenni, Fatima; Audebert, Marc; Santarelli, Raphaelle L; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Surya, Reggie; Hobbs, Ditte A; Kuhnle, Gunter G; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Gueraud, Françoise; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiology shows that red and processed meat intake is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Heme iron, heterocyclic amines, and endogenous N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are proposed to explain this effect, but their relative contribution is unknown. Our study aimed at determining, at nutritional doses, which is the main factor involved and proposing a mechanism of cancer promotion by red meat. The relative part of heme iron (1% in diet), heterocyclic amines (PhIP + MeIQx, 50 + 25 μg/kg in diet), and NOC (induced by NaNO₂+ NaNO₂; 0.17 + 0.23 g/L of drinking water) was determined by a factorial design and preneoplastic endpoints in chemically induced rats and validated on tumors in Min mice. The molecular mechanisms (genotoxicity, cytotoxicity) were analyzed in vitro in normal and Apc-deficient cell lines and confirmed on colon mucosa. Heme iron increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, but dietary heterocyclic amines and NOC had no effect on carcinogenesis in rats. Dietary hemoglobin increased tumor load in Min mice (control diet: 67 ± 39 mm²; 2.5% hemoglobin diet: 114 ± 47 mm², P = 0.004). In vitro, fecal water from rats given hemoglobin was rich in aldehydes and was cytotoxic to normal cells, but not to premalignant cells. The aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal and 4-hydroxyhexenal were more toxic to normal versus mutated cells and were only genotoxic to normal cells. Genotoxicity was also observed in colon mucosa of mice given hemoglobin. These results highlight the role of heme iron in the promotion of colon cancer by red meat and suggest that heme iron could initiate carcinogenesis through lipid peroxidation. . PMID:25592152

  19. IL-15 suppresses colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis by inducing antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bahri, Rajia; Pateras, Ioannis S; D’Orlando, Orietta; Goyeneche-Patino, Diego A; Campbell, Michelle; Polansky, Julia K; Sandig, Hilary; Papaioannou, Marilena; Evangelou, Kostas; Foukas, Periklis G; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    IL-15 regulates the development, survival, and proliferation of multiple innate and adaptive immune cells and plays a dual role, inducing both tumor cell growth and antitumor immunity. However, the role of IL-15 in inflammation-induced cancer remains unclear. To explore this, we have compared the colon carcinoma burden of Il15−/− and Il15rα−/− mice with wild type (WT) mice after induction of colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis utilizing the AOM/DSS model. Compared to WT mice, Il15−/− but not Il15rα−/− mice showed reduced survival, along with higher tumor incidence, colon weight, and tumor size. This suggests that low affinity IL-15 signaling via the shared IL-2Rβ/γc decreases the risk for developing colitis-associated cancer. CD11c-Il15 mice, in which IL-15 expression is reconstituted in Il15−/− mice under the control of the CD11c-promoter, showed that selective reconstitution of IL-15 in antigen-presenting cells restored the CD8+ T and NK cell compartments, serum levels of IFNγ, G-CSF, IL-10, and CXCL1 and reduced tumor burden. After demonstrating IL-15 expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in situ, we investigated the role of this cytokine in the modulation of key colonic oncogenic pathways in the tumor. While these pathways were found to be unaltered in the absence of IL-15, tumor transcriptome analysis showed that the loss of IL-15 upregulates key inflammatory mediators associated with colon cancer progression, such as IL-1β, IL-22, IL-23, Cxcl5, and Spp1. These findings provide evidence that IL-15 suppresses colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis through regulation of antitumor cytotoxicity, and modulation of the inflammatory tumor micromilieu. PMID:26405589

  20. Genetic polymorphisms of MMP1, MMP3 and MMP7 gene promoter and risk of colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lièvre, Astrid; Milet, Jacqueline; Carayol, Jérôme; Le Corre, Delphine; Milan, Chantal; Pariente, Alexandre; Nalet, Bernard; Lafon, Jacques; Faivre, Jean; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire; Olschwang, Sylviane; Bonaiti-Pellié, Catherine; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) have been shown to play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC). More recently, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP7 functional gene promoter polymorphisms have been found to be associated with CRC occurrence and prognosis. To document the role of MMP polymorphisms in the early step of colorectal carcinogenesis, we investigated their association with colorectal adenoma risk in a case-control study comprising 295 patients with large adenomas (LA), 302 patients with small adenomas (SA) and 568 polyp-free (PF) controls. Methods Patients were genotyped using automated fragment analysis for MMP1 -1607 ins/del G and MMP3 -1612 ins/delA (MMP3.1) polymorphisms and allelic discrimination assay for MMP3 -709 A/G (MMP3.2) and MMP7 -181 A/G polymorphisms. Association between MMP genotypes and colorectal adenomas was first tested for each polymorphism separately and then for combined genotypes using the combination test. Adjustment on relevant variables and estimation of odds ratios were performed using unconditional logistic regression. Results No association was observed between the polymorphisms and LA when compared to PF or SA. When comparing SA to PF controls, analysis revealed a significant association between MMP3 -1612 ins/delA polymorphism and SA with an increased risk associated with the 6A/6A genotype (OR = 1.67, 95%CI: 1.20–2.34). Using the combination test, the best association was found for MMP3.1-MMP1 (p = 0.001) with an OR of 1.88 (95%CI: 1.08–3.28) for the combined genotype 2G/2G-6A/6A estimated by logistic regression. Conclusion These data show a relation between MMP1 -1607 ins/del G and MMP3 -1612 ins/delA combined polymorphisms and risk of SA, suggesting their potential role in the early steps of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:17125518

  1. Transforming growth factor-beta during carcinogenesis: the shift from epithelial to mesenchymal signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2006-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), changing unphosphorylated Smad3 to its phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). While the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells, JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling is involved in invasion by activated mesenchymal cells. During sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis, TGF-beta signaling confers a selective advantage on tumor cells by shifting from the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway characteristic of mature epithelial cells to the JNK/pSmad3L pathway, which is more characteristic of the state of flux shown by the activated mesenchymal cells. JNK acts as a regulator of TGF-beta signaling by increasing the basal level of pSmad3L available for action in the nuclei of the invasive adenocarcinoma, in the meantime shutting down TGF-beta-dependent nuclear activity of pSmad3C. Loss of epithelial homeostasis and acquisition of a migratory, mesenchymal phenotype are essential for tumor invasion. From the viewpoint of TGF-beta signaling, a key therapeutic aim in cancer would be restoration of the lost tumor suppressor function observed in normal colorectal epithelial cells at the expense of effects promoting aggressive behavior of the adenocarcinoma. Specific inhibitors of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway might prove useful in this respect. In the case of molecularly targeted therapy for human cancer, pSmad3L and pSmad3C could be assessed as biomarkers to evaluate the likely benefit from specific inhibition of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway. PMID:16741607

  2. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  3. Primary prevention: phytoprevention and chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Turini, Marco E; DuBois, Raymond N

    2002-08-01

    Considering the various stages of carcinogenesis and the numerous tumor types and available chemoprevention agents, knowledge of the etiology and the type of cancer to be treated, or possibly prevented, and understanding of the mechanisms by which agents exert their chemoprevention benefits may provide for improved strategy in designing therapeutic regimens. Because cancer usually develops over a 10- to 20-year period, it may be necessary for some agents to be provided before or early in the initiation steps of carcinogenesis to have beneficial effects. On the other hand, some agents may be more suitable for CRC prevention if provided at a later stage of carcinogenesis. Gene array, genomics, and proteomics are useful tools in advancing our understanding of the molecular events involved in carcinogenesis and in identifying markers of risk and surrogate end-points for colorectal cancer progression. These techniques may also serve for screening, identifying, and providing treatment targets for high-risk patients populations. Treatment could be developed depending on a patient's individual needs and genomic tumor profile. Clinical markers and surrogate end-points should be considered, together with molecular measurements, to more accurately assess risk. NSAIDs and COXIBs are clinically recognized as chemoprevention agents, and clinical trials evaluating their efficacy are ongoing. Treatment protocols, including dose and timing, remain to be determined, however. DFMO may best be used in combination with other chemoprevention agents. Dietary fiber and calcium supplements, as part of an overall low-fat diet, may decrease CRC risk. Long-term compliance with this regimen may be necessary to effect a beneficial outcome. Folate holds promise but needs further investigation, especially because its beneficial effects may depend on cancer type. Phytochemicals have been identified as strong candidates for use as agents to prevent colorectal cancer in cell culture and in rodent

  4. Effect of meat (beef, chicken, and bacon) on rat colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Parnaud, Géraldine; Peiffer, Ginette; Taché, Sylviane; Corpet, Denis E.

    1998-01-01

    High intake of red meat or processed meat is associated with increased risk of colon cancer. In contrast, consumption of white meat (chicken) is not associated with risk and might even reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer. We speculated that a diet containing beef or bacon would increase and a diet containing chicken would decrease colon carcinogenesis in rats. One hundred female Fischer 344 rats were given a single injection of azoxymethane (20 mg/kg i.p.), then randomized to 10 different AIN-76-based diets. Five diets were adjusted to 14% fat and 23% protein and five other diets to 28% fat and 40% protein. Fat and protein were supplied by 1) lard and casein, 2) olive oil and casein, 3) beef, 4) chicken with skin, and 5) bacon. Meat diets contained 30% or 60% freeze-dried fried meat. The diets were given ad libitum for 100 days, then colon tumor promotion was assessed by the multiplicity of aberrant crypt foci [number of crypts per aberrant crypt focus (ACF)]. The ACF multiplicity was nearly the same in all groups, except bacon-fed rats, with no effect of fat and protein level or source (p = 0.7 between 8 groups by analysis of variance). In contrast, compared with lard- and casein-fed controls, the ACF multiplicity was reduced by 12% in rats fed a diet with 30% bacon and by 20% in rats fed a diet with 60% bacon (p < 0.001). The water intake was higher in bacon-fed rats than in controls (p < 0.0001). The concentrations of iron and bile acids in fecal water and total fatty acids in feces changed with diet, but there was no correlation between these concentrations and the ACF multiplicity. Thus the hypothesis that colonic iron, bile acids, or total fatty acids can promote colon tumors is not supported by this study. The results suggest that, in rats, beef does not promote the growth of ACF and chicken does not protect against colon carcinogenesis. A bacon-based diet appears to protect against carcinogenesis, perhaps because bacon contains 5% NaCl and increased

  5. Residual-QSAR. Implications for genotoxic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both main types of carcinogenesis, genotoxic and epigenetic, were examined in the context of non-congenericity and similarity, respectively, for the structure of ligand molecules, emphasizing the role of quantitative structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) studies in accordance with OECD (Organization for Economic and Cooperation Development) regulations. The main purpose of this report involves electrophilic theory and the need for meaningful physicochemical parameters to describe genotoxicity by a general mechanism. Residual-QSAR Method The double or looping multiple linear correlation was examined by comparing the direct and residual structural information against the observed activity. A self-consistent equation of observed-computed activity was assumed to give maximum correlation efficiency for those situations in which the direct correlations gave non-significant statistical information. Alternatively, it was also suited to describe slow and apparently non-noticeable cancer phenomenology, with special application to non-congeneric molecules involved in genotoxic carcinogenesis. Application and Discussions The QSAR principles were systematically applied to a given pool of molecules with genotoxic activity in rats to elucidate their carcinogenic mechanisms. Once defined, the endpoint associated with ligand-DNA interaction was used to select variables that retained the main Hansch physicochemical parameters of hydrophobicity, polarizability and stericity, computed by the custom PM3 semiempirical quantum method. The trial and test sets of working molecules were established by implementing the normal Gaussian principle of activities that applies when the applicability domain is not restrained to the congeneric compounds, as in the present study. The application of the residual, self-consistent QSAR method and the factor (or average) method yielded results characterized by extremely high and low correlations, respectively, with the latter resembling

  6. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  7. Wound-healing error model for radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei

    1995-12-31

    Epidemiological studies of lung cancer in uranium miners exposed to radon suggest that radon is a tumor promoter. I will refine this notion by applying the wound-healing error model proposed for radiation carcinogenesis in general.

  8. Diet-related DNA adduct formation in relation to carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hemeryck, Lieselot Y; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-08-01

    The human diet contributes significantly to the initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis. It has become clear that the human diet contains several groups of natural foodborne chemicals that are at least in part responsible for the genotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic potential of certain foodstuffs. Electrophilic chemicals are prone to attack nucleophilic sites in DNA, resulting in the formation of altered nucleobases, also known as DNA adducts. Since DNA adduct formation is believed to signal the onset of chemically induced carcinogenesis, the DNA adduct-inducing potential of certain foodstuffs has been investigated to gain more insight into diet-related pathways of carcinogenesis. Many studies have investigated diet-related DNA adduct formation. This review summarizes work on known or suspected dietary carcinogens and the role of DNA adduct formation in hypothesized carcinogenesis pathways. PMID:27330144

  9. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  10. Suppressed rate of carcinogenesis and decreases in tumour volume and lung metastasis in CXCL14/BRAK transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hata, Ryu-Ichiro; Izukuri, Kazuhito; Kato, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi; Maehata, Yojiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Akasaka, Tetsu; Yang, Xiaoyan; Nagashima, Yoji; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Kiyono, Tohru; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer progression involves carcinogenesis, an increase in tumour size, and metastasis. Here, we investigated the effect of overexpressed CXC chemokine ligand 14 (CXCL14) on these processes by using CXCL14/BRAK (CXCL14) transgenic (Tg) mice. The rate of AOM/DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in these mice was significantly lower compared with that for isogenic wild type C57BL/6 (Wt) mice. When tumour cells were injected into these mice, the size of the tumours that developed and the number of metastatic nodules in the lungs of the animals were always significantly lower in the Tg mice than in the Wt ones. Injection of anti-asialo-GM1 antibodies to the mice before and after injection of tumour cells attenuated the suppressing effects of CXCL14 on the tumor growth and metastasis, suggesting that NK cell activity played an important role during CXCL14-mediated suppression of tumour growth and metastasis. The importance of NK cells on the metastasis was also supported when CXCL14 was expressed in B16 melanoma cells. Further, the survival rates after tumour cell injection were significantly increased for the Tg mice. As these Tg mice showed no obvious abnormality, we propose that CXCL14 to be a promising molecular target for cancer suppression/prevention. PMID:25765541

  11. Pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma and therapeutic implications: the roles of the ubiquitin–proteasome system and Cox-2

    PubMed Central

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Pathways of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma have been extensively studied and molecular lesions during the development of the disease have been revealed. High up in the list of colorectal cancer lesions are APC (adenomatous polyposis coli), K-ras, Smad4 (or DPC4-deleted in pancreatic cancer 4) and p53 genes. All these molecules are part of important pathways for the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis and as a result perturbation of these processes lead to carcinogenesis. The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) is comprised of a multi-unit cellular protease system that regulates several dozens of cell proteins after their ligation with the protein ubiquitin. Given that among these proteins are regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, adhesion and cell signalling, this system plays a significant role in cell fate and carcinogenesis. UPS inhibition has been found to be a pre-requisite for apoptosis and is already clinically exploited with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in multiple myeloma. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is the inducible form of the enzyme that metabolizes the lipid arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2, the first step of prostaglandins production. This enzyme is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and in several other cancers. Inhibition of Cox-2 by aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been found to inhibit proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and in epidemiologic studies has been shown to reduce colon polyp formation in genetically predisposed populations and in the general population. NSAIDs have also Cox-independent anti-proliferative effects. Targeted therapies, the result of increasingly understanding carcinogenesis in the molecular level, have entered the field of anti-neoplastic treatment and are used by themselves and in combination with chemotherapy drugs. Combinations of targeted drugs have started also to be investigated. This article reviews the molecular

  12. GNAS gene mutation may be present only transiently during colorectal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Peter; Marotta, Stephen P; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the gene GNAS have been shown to activate the adenylate cyclase gene and lead to constitutive cAMP signaling. Several preliminary reports have suggested a role for GNAS gene mutations during colorectal carcinogenesis, particularly mucinous carcinomas. The aim of this study was to clarify the incidence of GNAS mutations in adenomas (tubular, tubulovillous, and villous), carcinomas with residual adenoma, and carcinomas, and to relate these findings to mutations of the KRAS gene and to the mucinous status of the tumors. We used standard PCR techniques and direct gene sequencing to evaluate tumors for gene mutations. No GNAS mutations were identified in 25 tubular adenomas, but were present in 6.4% of tubulovillous adenomas and 11.2% of villous adenomas. A GNAS mutation was found in 9.7% of the benign portion of carcinoma with residual adenoma, but in none of 86 carcinomas. A similar trend was seen for KRAS mutation across the five groups of tumors. GNAS mutations may function as an important driver mutation during certain phases of colorectal carcinogenesis, but may then be lost once the biological advantage gained by the mutated gene is no longer necessary to sustain or advance tumor development. PMID:27186325

  13. Autophagy in colorectal cancer: An important switch from physiology to pathology

    PubMed Central

    Burada, Florin; Nicoli, Elena Raluca; Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Uscatu, Daniel Constantin; Ioana, Mihai; Gheonea, Dan Ionut

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in both men and women worldwide. Among the factors and mechanisms that are involved in the multifactorial etiology of CRC, autophagy is an important transformational switch that occurs when a cell shifts from normal to malignant. In recent years, multiple hypotheses have been considered regarding the autophagy mechanisms that are involved in cancer. The currently accepted hypothesis is that autophagy has dual and contradictory roles in carcinogenesis, but the precise mechanisms leading to autophagy in cancer are not yet fully defined and seem to be context dependent. Autophagy is a surveillance mechanism used by normal cells that protects them from the transformation to malignancy by removing damaged organelles and aggregated proteins and by reducing reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial abnormalities and DNA damage. However, autophagy also supports tumor formation by promoting access to nutrients that are critical to the metabolism and growth of tumor cells and by inhibiting cellular death and increasing drug resistance. Autophagy studies in CRC have focused on several molecules, mainly microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, beclin 1, and autophagy related 5, with conflicting results. Beneficial effects were observed for some agents that modulate autophagy in CRC either alone or, more often, in combination with other agents. More extensive studies are needed in the future to clarify the roles of autophagy-related genes and modulators in colorectal carcinogenesis, and to develop potential beneficial agents for the prognosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:26600927

  14. Circulating miR-182 is a biomarker of colorectal adenocarcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Perilli, Lisa; Vicentini, Caterina; Agostini, Marco; Pizzini, Silvia; Pizzi, Marco; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Mammano, Enzo; Rugge, Massimo; Nitti, Donato; Scarpa, Aldo; Fassan, Matteo; Zanovello, Paola

    2014-08-30

    MiR-182 expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization in 20 tubular adenomas, 50 colorectal carcinoma (CRC), and 40 CRC liver metastases. Control samples obtained from patients with irritable bowel syndrome, or tumor-matched normal colon mucosa were analyzed (n=50). MiR-182 expression increased progressively and significantly along with the colorectal carcinogenesis cascade, and in CRC liver metastases. The inverse relation between miR-182 and the expression of its target gene ENTPD5 was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. We observed that normal colocytes featured a strong ENTPD5 cytoplasmic expression whereas a significantly and progressively lower expression was present along with dedifferentiation of the histologic phenotype. Plasma samples from 51 CRC patients and controls were tested for miR-182 expression. Plasma miR-182 concentrations were significantly higher in CRC patients than in healthy controls or patients with colon polyps at endoscopy. Moreover, miR-182 plasma levels were significantly reduced in post-operative samples after radical hepatic metastasectomy compared to preoperative samples. Our results strengthen the hypothesis of a central role of miR-182 dysregulation in colon mucosa transformation, demonstrate the concomitant progressive down-regulation of ENTPD5 levels during colon carcinogenesis, and indicate the potential of circulating miR-182 as blood based biomarker for screening and monitoring CRC during the follow-up. PMID:25115394

  15. Circulating miR-182 is a biomarker of colorectal adenocarcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Marco; Pizzini, Silvia; Pizzi, Marco; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Mammano, Enzo; Rugge, Massimo; Nitti, Donato; Scarpa, Aldo; Fassan, Matteo; Zanovello, Paola

    2014-01-01

    MiR-182 expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization in 20 tubular adenomas, 50 colorectal carcinoma (CRC), and 40 CRC liver metastases. Control samples obtained from patients with irritable bowel syndrome, or tumor-matched normal colon mucosa were analyzed (n=50). MiR-182 expression increased progressively and significantly along with the colorectal carcinogenesis cascade, and in CRC liver metastases. The inverse relation between miR-182 and the expression of its target gene ENTPD5 was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. We observed that normal colocytes featured a strong ENTPD5 cytoplasmic expression whereas a significantly and progressively lower expression was present along with dedifferentiation of the histologic phenotype. Plasma samples from 51 CRC patients and controls were tested for miR-182 expression. Plasma miR-182 concentrations were significantly higher in CRC patients than in healthy controls or patients with colon polyps at endoscopy. Moreover, miR-182 plasma levels were significantly reduced in post-operative samples after radical hepatic metastasectomy compared to preoperative samples. Our results strengthen the hypothesis of a central role of miR-182 dysregulation in colon mucosa transformation, demonstrate the concomitant progressive down-regulation of ENTPD5 levels during colon carcinogenesis, and indicate the potential of circulating miR-182 as blood based biomarker for screening and monitoring CRC during the follow-up. PMID:25115394

  16. Xenovaccinotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Seledtsov, Victor I; Niza, Natalya A; Felde, Mariya A; Shishkov, Alexey A; Samarin, Denis M; Seledtsova, Galina V; Seledtsov, Dmitriy V

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this phase I-II trial were to assess the toxicity, immunological and clinical responses induced in 37 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer by the subcutaneous administration of a xenogenic polyantigenic vaccine (XPV) prepared from disrupted murine melanoma (B16) and carcinoma (LLC) cells. An inducing course of vaccinotherapy consisted of 10 immunizations (5 at weekly and 5 at fortnight intervals). Twenty-four hours later each of first 5 vaccinations the patient was subcutaneously given a low dose of the recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2). A consolidating course of vaccinotherapy consisted of monthly vaccinations. No grade III or IV toxicities, but also laboratory and clinical signs of developing systemic autoimmune disorders were noted in any XPV-treated patient. A significant increase in cell-mediated immunoreactivity to both LLC and B16 antigens (Ags) occurred in the patients after inducing vaccinations, as determined by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reactions, as well as by blood lymphocyte proliferation responses. Vaccinations also led to increased cell-mediated reactivity to murine non-tumor, spleen cell (SC)-associated Ags. This reactivity, however, was not as significant as that to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). XPV was also found to capable of generating IgG antibody-mediated responses. With immunotherapy concentrations of both interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) detectably elevated in patients' sera, suggesting intensification of T helper 1-/T helper 2-mediated responses in the XPV-treated patients. The average survival of the XPV-treated patients was noticeably superior than was that of the clinically comparable control patients (17 vs 7 months). Collectively the results suggest that xenogenic TAAs are safe to use, able to induce measurable cellular and humoral immune responses, and may be clinically effective in certain colorectal cancer patients. PMID:17258887

  17. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme

    2010-01-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model. PMID:18955295

  18. Carcinogenesis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Precursor Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gnoni, Antonio; Licchetta, Antonella; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Simone, Gianni; Nardulli, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Aieta, Michele; Delcuratolo, Sabina; Silvestris, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma displays a variety of molecular changes that evolve exponentially with time and lead cancer cells not only to survive, but also to invade the surrounding tissues and metastasise to distant sites. These changes include: genetic alterations in oncogenes and cancer suppressor genes; changes in the cell cycle and pathways leading to apoptosis; and also changes in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The most common alterations involve the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, the HER2 gene, and the K-ras gene. In particular, the loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in this tumor, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. However, other molecular events involved in pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathogenesis contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically epigenetic events. In fact, key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in pancreatic adenocarcinoma may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Indeed, factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. This review summarizes current knowledge of pancreatic carcinogenesis from its initiation within a normal cell until the time that it has disseminated to distant organs. In this scenario, highlighting these molecular alterations could provide new clinical tools for early diagnosis and new effective therapies for this malignancy. PMID:24084722

  19. Impaired glucose metabolism treatment and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    MATYSZEWSKI, ARTUR; CZARNECKA, ANNA; KAWECKI, MACIEJ; KORZEŃ, PIOTR; SAFIR, ILAN J.; KUKWA, WOJCIECH; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism disorders increase the risk of carcinogenesis. Diabetes mellitus alters numerous physiological processes that may encourage cancer growth. However, treating impaired glucose homeostasis may actually promote neoplasia; maintaining proper glucose plasma concentrations reduces metabolic stresses, however, certain medications may themselves result in oncogenic effects. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that metformin reduces the cancer risk. However, the use of sulfonylurea derivatives correlates with an increased risk of developing a malignancy. Another form of treatment, insulin therapy, involves using various forms of insulin that differ in pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Previous studies have indicated that certain insulin variants also affect the cancer risk. The results from analyses that address the safety of long-lasting insulin types raise the most concern regarding the increased risk of malignancy. Rapid development of novel diabetic medications and their widespread use carries the risk of potentially increased rates of cancer, unnoticeable in limited, randomized, controlled trials. In the present review, the results of clinical and epidemiological studies are evaluated to assess the safety of anti-hyperglycemic medications and their effect on cancer risk and outcomes. PMID:26622538

  20. Role of RUNX2 in Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wysokinski, Daniel; Blasiak, Janusz; Pawlowska, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    RUNX2 is a transcription factor playing the major role in osteogenesis, but it can be involved in DNA damage response, which is crucial for cancer transformation. RUNX2 can interact with cell cycle regulators: cyclin-dependent kinases, pRB and p21Cip1 proteins, as well as the master regulator of the cell cycle, the p53 tumor suppressor. RUNX2 is involved in many signaling pathways, including those important for estrogen signaling, which, in turn, are significant for breast carcinogenesis. RUNX2 can promote breast cancer development through Wnt and Tgfβ signaling pathways, especially in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative cases. ERα interacts directly with RUNX2 and regulates its activity. Moreover, the ERα gene has a RUNX2 binding site within its promoter. RUNX2 stimulates the expression of aromatase, an estrogen producing enzyme, increasing the level of estrogens, which in turn stimulate cell proliferation and replication errors, which can be turned into carcinogenic mutations. Exploring the role of RUNX2 in the pathogenesis of breast cancer can lead to revealing new therapeutic targets. PMID:26404249

  1. Chemical carcinogenesis studies in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Shozo; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P.; Adamson, Richard H.

    2008-01-01

    This review covers chemical carcinogenesis studies in nonhuman primates performed by the National Cancer Institute, USA, to provide hitherto unavailable information on their susceptibility to compounds producing carcinogenic effects in rodents. From autopsy records of 401 breeders and untreated controls, incidences of spontaneous malignant tumors were found to be relatively low in cynomolgus (1.9%) and rhesus monkeys (3.8%), but higher in African green monkeys (8%). Various chemical compounds, and in particular 6 antineoplastic agents, 13 food-related compounds including additives and contaminants, 1 pesticide, 5 N-nitroso compounds, 3 heterocyclic amines, and 7 “classical” rodent carcinogens, were tested during the 34 years period, generally at doses 10∼40 times the estimated human exposure. Results were inconclusive in many cases but unequivocal carcinogenicity was demonstrated for IQ, procarbazine, methylnitrosourea and diethylnitrosamine. Furthermore, negative findings for saccharine and cyclamate were in line with results in other species. Thus susceptibility to carcinogens is at least partly shared by nonhuman primates and rodents. PMID:18941297

  2. Complement activation promotes colitis-associated carcinogenesis through activating intestinal IL-1β/IL-17A axis.

    PubMed

    Ning, C; Li, Y-Y; Wang, Y; Han, G-C; Wang, R-X; Xiao, H; Li, X-Y; Hou, C-M; Ma, Y-F; Sheng, D-S; Shen, B-F; Feng, J-N; Guo, R-F; Li, Y; Chen, G-J

    2015-11-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) is the most serious complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Excessive complement activation has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. However, its role in the development of CAC is largely unknown. Here, using a CAC model induced by combined administration of azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), we demonstrated that complement activation was required for CAC pathogenesis. Deficiency in key components of complement (e.g., C3, C5, or C5a receptor) rendered tumor repression in mice subjected to AOM/DSS. Mechanistic investigation revealed that complement ablation dramatically reduced proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β levels in the colonic tissues that was mainly produced by infiltrating neutrophils. IL-1β promoted colon carcinogenesis by eliciting IL-17 response in intestinal myeloid cells. Furthermore, complement-activation product C5a represented a potent inducer for IL-1β in neutrophil, accounting for downregulation of IL-1β levels in the employed complement-deficient mice. Overall, our study proposes a protumorigenic role of complement in inflammation-related colorectal cancer and that the therapeutic strategies targeting complement may be beneficial for the treatment of CAC in clinic. PMID:25736459

  3. Discovery of a Novel Immune Gene Signature with Profound Prognostic Value in Colorectal Cancer: A Model of Cooperativity Disorientation Created in the Process from Development to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Ning; Shi, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yueming; Lv, Ning; Feng, Lin; Di, Xuebing; Han, Naijun; Wang, Guiqi

    2015-01-01

    Immune response-related genes play a major role in colorectal carcinogenesis by mediating inflammation or immune-surveillance evasion. Although remarkable progress has been made to investigate the underlying mechanism, the understanding of the complicated carcinogenesis process was enormously hindered by large-scale tumor heterogeneity. Development and carcinogenesis share striking similarities in their cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms. The association between embryonic development and carcinogenesis makes embryonic development a viable reference model for studying cancer thereby circumventing the potentially misleading complexity of tumor heterogeneity. Here we proposed that the immune genes, responsible for intra-immune cooperativity disorientation (defined in this study as disruption of developmental expression correlation patterns during carcinogenesis), probably contain untapped prognostic resource of colorectal cancer. In this study, we determined the mRNA expression profile of 137 human biopsy samples, including samples from different stages of human colonic development, colorectal precancerous progression and colorectal cancer samples, among which 60 were also used to generate miRNA expression profile. We originally established Spearman correlation transition model to quantify the cooperativity disorientation associated with the transition from normal to precancerous to cancer tissue, in conjunction with miRNA-mRNA regulatory network and machine learning algorithm to identify genes with prognostic value. Finally, a 12-gene signature was extracted, whose prognostic value was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis in five independent datasets. Using the log-rank test, the 12-gene signature was closely related to overall survival in four datasets (GSE17536, n = 177, p = 0.0054; GSE17537, n = 55, p = 0.0039; GSE39582, n = 562, p = 0.13; GSE39084, n = 70, p = 0.11), and significantly associated with disease-free survival in four

  4. Discovery of a Novel Immune Gene Signature with Profound Prognostic Value in Colorectal Cancer: A Model of Cooperativity Disorientation Created in the Process from Development to Cancer.

    PubMed

    An, Ning; Shi, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yueming; Lv, Ning; Feng, Lin; Di, Xuebing; Han, Naijun; Wang, Guiqi; Cheng, Shujun; Zhang, Kaitai

    2015-01-01

    Immune response-related genes play a major role in colorectal carcinogenesis by mediating inflammation or immune-surveillance evasion. Although remarkable progress has been made to investigate the underlying mechanism, the understanding of the complicated carcinogenesis process was enormously hindered by large-scale tumor heterogeneity. Development and carcinogenesis share striking similarities in their cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms. The association between embryonic development and carcinogenesis makes embryonic development a viable reference model for studying cancer thereby circumventing the potentially misleading complexity of tumor heterogeneity. Here we proposed that the immune genes, responsible for intra-immune cooperativity disorientation (defined in this study as disruption of developmental expression correlation patterns during carcinogenesis), probably contain untapped prognostic resource of colorectal cancer. In this study, we determined the mRNA expression profile of 137 human biopsy samples, including samples from different stages of human colonic development, colorectal precancerous progression and colorectal cancer samples, among which 60 were also used to generate miRNA expression profile. We originally established Spearman correlation transition model to quantify the cooperativity disorientation associated with the transition from normal to precancerous to cancer tissue, in conjunction with miRNA-mRNA regulatory network and machine learning algorithm to identify genes with prognostic value. Finally, a 12-gene signature was extracted, whose prognostic value was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in five independent datasets. Using the log-rank test, the 12-gene signature was closely related to overall survival in four datasets (GSE17536, n = 177, p = 0.0054; GSE17537, n = 55, p = 0.0039; GSE39582, n = 562, p = 0.13; GSE39084, n = 70, p = 0.11), and significantly associated with disease-free survival in four

  5. Meat, vegetables and genetic polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Skjelbred, Camilla F; Sæbø, Mona; Hjartåker, Anette; Grotmol, Tom; Hansteen, Inger-Lise; Tveit, Kjell M; Hoff, Geir; Kure, Elin H

    2007-01-01

    Background The risk of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is mainly associated with lifestyle factors, particularly dietary factors. Diets high in red meat and fat and low in fruit and vegetables are associated with an increased risk of CRC. The dietary effects may be modulated by genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of dietary factors in combination with genetic factors in the different stages of colorectal carcinogenesis in a Norwegian population. Methods We used a case-control study design (234 carcinomas, 229 high-risk adenomas, 762 low-risk adenomas and 400 controls) to test the association between dietary factors (meat versus fruit, berries and vegetables) genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX1 Tyr113His and EPHX1 His139Arg), and risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated by binary logistic regression. Results A higher ratio of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake was positively associated with both high and low-risk adenomas, with approximately twice the higher risk in the 2nd quartile compared to the lowest quartile. For the high-risk adenomas this positive association was more obvious for the common allele (Tyr allele) of the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism. An association was also observed for the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism in the low-risk adenomas, although not as obvious. Conclusion Although, the majority of the comparison groups are not significant, our results suggest an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in individuals for some of the higher ratios of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake. In addition the study supports the notion that the biotransformation enzymes GSTM1, GSTP1 and EPHX1 may modify the effect of dietary factors on the risk of developing colorectal carcinoma and adenoma. PMID:18093316

  6. NDRG4 stratifies the prognostic value of body mass index in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianyong; Li, Yunming; Zhu, Shaojun; Li, Jipeng; Zhao, Qingchuan; Ji, Gang; Wang, Weizhong; Chu, Dake

    2016-01-12

    NDRG4 is a novel candidate tumor suppressor and can inhibit PI3K/AKT signal which is related with energy balance and related carcinogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether NDRG4 status could modify the association of obesity with clinical outcome of colorectal cancer. For this purpose, a hospital-based prospective study cohort of 226 colorectal cancer patients was involved. NDRG4 mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. Association of NDRG4 mRNA expression with disease-free and overall survival was studied first. Then, the association of obesity with clinical outcome was determined according to NDRG4 level. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to compute hazard ratio, adjusting for covariates including microsatellite instability, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutation. Results showed that NDRG4 mRNA expression was decreased in tumor specimens and significantly correlated with tumor differentiation, invasion and metastasis. Patients with tumor of reduced NDRG4 mRNA level had unfavorable disease-free and overall survival. Obesity was found to be adversely associated with disease-free and overall survival in tumors with reduced NDRG4 level, not in preserved NDRG4 level group, in both univariate and multivariate analysis. These data provided the first evidence that NDRG4 level in colorectal cancer could effectively stratify the prognostic value of obesity, which would better the understanding of the prognostic role of obesity in colorectal cancer. Our results also support the notion that the host-tumor interactions in colorectal cancer might influence tumor aggressiveness. PMID:26515606

  7. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer. PMID:26566853

  8. NDRG4 stratifies the prognostic value of body mass index in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jianyong; Li, Yunming; Zhu, Shaojun; Li, Jipeng; Zhao, Qingchuan; Ji, Gang; Wang, Weizhong; Chu, Dake

    2016-01-01

    NDRG4 is a novel candidate tumor suppressor and can inhibit PI3K/AKT signal which is related with energy balance and related carcinogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether NDRG4 status could modify the association of obesity with clinical outcome of colorectal cancer. For this purpose, a hospital-based prospective study cohort of 226 colorectal cancer patients was involved. NDRG4 mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. Association of NDRG4 mRNA expression with disease-free and overall survival was studied first. Then, the association of obesity with clinical outcome was determined according to NDRG4 level. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to compute hazard ratio, adjusting for covariates including microsatellite instability, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutation. Results showed that NDRG4 mRNA expression was decreased in tumor specimens and significantly correlated with tumor differentiation, invasion and metastasis. Patients with tumor of reduced NDRG4 mRNA level had unfavorable disease-free and overall survival. Obesity was found to be adversely associated with disease-free and overall survival in tumors with reduced NDRG4 level, not in preserved NDRG4 level group, in both univariate and multivariate analysis. These data provided the first evidence that NDRG4 level in colorectal cancer could effectively stratify the prognostic value of obesity, which would better the understanding of the prognostic role of obesity in colorectal cancer. Our results also support the notion that the host-tumor interactions in colorectal cancer might influence tumor aggressiveness. PMID:26515606

  9. Genetic ancestry is associated with colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas in Latino populations.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Sanabria, Maria Carolina; Serrano, Marta; Herran, Oscar F; Perez, Jesus; Plata, Jose L; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Tenesa, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer rates in Latin American countries are less than half of those observed in the United States. Latin Americans are the resultant of generations of an admixture of Native American, European, and African individuals. The potential role of genetic admixture in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been examined. We evaluate the association of genetic ancestry with colorectal neoplasms in 190 adenocarcinomas, 113 sporadic adenomas and 243 age- and sex-matched controls enrolled in a multicentric case-control study in Colombia. Individual ancestral genetic fractions were estimated using the STRUCTURE software, based on allele frequencies and assuming three distinct population origins. We used the Illumina Cancer Panel to genotype 1,421 sparse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Northern and Western European ancestry, LWJ and Han Chinese in Beijing, China populations from the HapMap project as references. A total of 678 autosomal SNPs overlapped with the HapMap data set SNPs and were used for ancestry estimations. African mean ancestry fraction was higher in adenomas (0.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.11-0.15) and cancer cases (0.14, 95% CI=0.12-0.16) compared with controls (0.11, 95% CI=0.10-0.12). Conditional logistic regression analysis, controlling for known risk factors, showed a positive association of African ancestry per 10% increase with both colorectal adenoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.12, 95% CI=0.97-1.30) and adenocarcinoma (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.05-1.35). In conclusion, increased African ancestry (or variants linked to it) contributes to the increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer in admixed Latin American population. PMID:24518838

  10. Luteolin inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 and 2 in azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, A K; Dharmalingam, P; Sadagopan, S K A; Ganapasam, S

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation deals with the antimetastatic role of luteolin (LUT) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and -2 in azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis in Balb/C mice. Animals received AOM at a dosage of 15 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally once a week for 3 weeks. AOM-induced mice was treated with LUT (1.2 mg of LUT/kg body weight/day orally). After the experimental period, the tumor markers such as γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT), 5' nucleotidase (5'ND), cathepsin-D (Cat-D), and carcinoembroyonic antigen (CEA) were elevated upon induction with AOM. Subsequent treatment with LUT results in the reduction of the tumor markers was recorded. The expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence methods. The expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 were increased during AOM induction and upon treatment with LUT reduced the expressions. RT-PCR analysis of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 was limited during AOM-induced colorectal cancer (CRC). Supplementation of LUT increased the expression of TIMP-2. To conclude, LUT acts as an antimetastatic agent by suppressing MMP-9 and MMP-2 productions and upregulating TIMP-2 expression, thereby suggesting that LUT can be a chemotherapeutic agent against CRC. PMID:24532706

  11. Polymorphisms for aromatic amine metabolism in humans: relevance for human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kadlubar, F F; Butler, M A; Kaderlik, K R; Chou, H C; Lang, N P

    1992-01-01

    The metabolic pathways associated with carcinogenic aromatic amines in humans provide an excellent example of polymorphisms that appear to be relevant to human carcinogenesis. In this regard, the N-acetylation of arylamines and the O-acetylation of their N-hydroxy metabolites are catalyzed preferentially by a genetically polymorphic acetyltransferase, high activity of which has been correlated with decreased risk for urinary bladder cancer and increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Cytochrome P450IA2, the principal liver enzyme involved in aromatic amine N-oxidation, exhibits a wide interindividual variation that appears trimodal in several populations and is clearly inducible by cigarette smoking and probably other host factors as well. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases, which catalyze the N-glucuronidation of N-hydroxyarylamines and are likely to be responsible for their transport to the colon, show widely varied but unimodal distributions in humans. In contrast, human liver sulfotransferase activity for N-hydroxyarylamines, which would be expected to decrease their transport through the circulation, is catalyzed by a polymorphic enzyme(s) that is expressed at higher levels in blacks, as compared to whites, and could contribute to their relatively lower incidence of urinary bladder cancer. Peroxidative activation of aromatic amines can also occur, especially from prostaglandin H synthase in the urinary bladder and myeloperoxidase in the lungs of cigarette smokers, and both show considerable individual variability, apparently due to the extent of tissue inflammation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1486865

  12. Laparoscopic Colorectal Training Gap in Colorectal and Surgical Residents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mark; Williamson, Paul; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an established safe procedure with demonstrated benefits. Proficiency in this specialty correlates with the volume of cases. We examined training in this surgical field for both general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents to determine whether the number of cases needed for proficiency is being realized. Methods: We examined the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Colorectal Surgeons (ABCRS) operative statistics for graduating general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents. Results: Although the number of advanced laparoscopy cases had increased for general surgery residents, there was still a significant gap in case volume between the average number of laparoscopic colorectal operations performed by graduating general surgery residents (21.6) and those performed by graduating colon and rectal surgery residents (81.9) in 2014. Conclusion: There is a gap between general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residency training for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. General surgery residents are not meeting the volume of cases necessary for proficiency in colorectal surgery. This deficit represents a structural difference in training. PMID:27493468

  13. Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by polyethylene glycol: suppression of epithelial proliferation via modulation of SNAIL/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Roy, Hemant K; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Hart, John; Kim, Young L; Liu, Yang; Bissonnette, Marc; Goldberg, Michael; Backman, Vadim; Wali, Ramesh K

    2006-08-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is one of the most potent chemopreventive agents against colorectal cancer; however, the mechanisms remain largely unexplored. In this study, we assessed the ability of PEG to target cyclin D1-beta-catenin-mediated hyperproliferation in the azoxymethane-treated rat model and the human colorectal cancer cell line, HT-29. Azoxymethane-treated rats were randomized to AIN-76A diet alone or supplemented with 5% PEG-8000. After 30 weeks, animals were euthanized and biopsies of aberrant crypt foci and uninvolved crypts were subjected to immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. PEG markedly suppressed both early and late markers of azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis (fractal dimension by 80%, aberrant crypt foci by 64%, and tumors by 74%). In both azoxymethane-treated rats and HT-29 cells treated with 5% PEG-3350 for 24 hours, PEG decreased proliferation (45% and 52%, respectively) and cyclin D1 (78% and 56%, respectively). Because beta-catenin is the major regulator of cyclin D1 in colorectal cancer, we used the T-cell factor (Tcf)-TOPFLASH reporter assay to show that PEG markedly inhibited beta-catenin transcriptional activity. PEG did not alter total beta-catenin expression but rather its nuclear localization, leading us to assess E-cadherin expression (a major determinant of beta-catenin subcellular localization), which was increased by 73% and 71% in the azoxymethane-rat and HT-29 cells, respectively. We therefore investigated the effect of PEG treatment on levels of the negative regulator of E-cadherin, SNAIL, and observed a 50% and 75% decrease, respectively. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, a molecular mechanism through which PEG imparts its antiproliferative and hence profound chemopreventive effect. PMID:16928827

  14. The impact of RNA binding motif protein 4-regulated splicing cascade on the progression and metabolism of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated splicing of pre-messenger (m)RNA is considered a molecular occasion of carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is complex and remains to be investigated. Herein, we report that the upregulated miR-92a reduced the RNA-binding motif 4 (RBM4) protein expression, leading to the imbalanced expression of the neuronal polypyrimidine tract-binding (nPTB) protein through alternative splicing-coupled nonsense mediated decay (NMD) mechanism. Increase in nPTB protein enhances the relative level of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc (FGFR2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) transcripts which contribute to the progression and metabolic signature of CRC cells. Expression profiles of RBM4 and downstream alternative splicing events are consistently observed in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. These results constitute a mechanistic understanding of RBM4 on repressing the carcinogenesis of colorectal cells. PMID:26506517

  15. Mechanisms Linking Excess Adiposity and Carcinogenesis Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Hernández, Ana I.; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in post-menopausal women, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15–20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: (i) inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; (ii) insulin resistance development; and (iii) adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases. PMID:24829560

  16. Mechanisms linking excess adiposity and carcinogenesis promotion.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Ana I; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in post-menopausal women, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15-20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: (i) inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; (ii) insulin resistance development; and (iii) adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases. PMID:24829560

  17. Blueberry Husks and Probiotics Attenuate Colorectal Inflammation and Oncogenesis, and Liver Injuries in Rats Exposed to Cycling DSS-Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, Åsa; Bränning, Camilla; Molin, Göran; Adawi, Diya; Hagslätt, Marie-Louise; Jeppsson, Bengt; Nyman, Margareta; Ahrné, Siv

    2012-01-01

    Long-term colonic inflammation promotes carcinogenesis and histological abnormalities of the liver, and colorectal tumours frequently arise in a background of dysplasia, a precursor of adenomas. Altered colonic microbiota with an increased proportion of bacteria with pro-inflammatory characteristics, have been implicated in neoplastic progression. The composition of the microbiota can be modified by dietary components such as probiotics, polyphenols and dietary fibres. In the present study, the influence of probiotics in combination with blueberry husks on colorectal carcinogenesis and subsequent liver damage was evaluated. Colorectal tumours were induced in rats by cyclic treatment with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Blueberry husks and a mixture of three probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium infantis DSM 15159, Lactobacillus gasseri, DSM 16737 and Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 15313) supplemented a basic diet fortified with oats. The condition of the rats was monitored using a disease activity index (DAI). A qualitative and quantitative histological judgement was performed on segments of distal colon and rectum and the caudate lobe of the liver. The formation of short-chain fatty acids, bacterial translocation, the inflammatory reaction and viable count of lactobacilli and Enterobaceriaceae were addressed. Blueberry husks with or without probiotics significantly decreased DAI, and significantly reduced the number of colonic ulcers and dysplastic lesions. With a decreased proportion of blueberry husk in the diet, the probiotic supplement was needed to achieve a significant decrease in numbers of dysplastic lesions. Probiotics decreased faecal viable count of Enterobacteriaceae and increased that of lactobacilli. Blueberry husks with or without probiotics lowered the proportion of butyric acid in distal colon, and decreased the haptoglobin levels. Probiotics mitigated hepatic injuries by decreasing parenchymal infiltration and the incidence of stasis and translocation

  18. Insights into endometrial serous carcinogenesis and progression.

    PubMed

    Fadare, Oluwole; Zheng, Wenxin

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial serous carcinomas (ESC) constitute only approximately 10% of endometrial cancers, but have a substantially higher case-fatality rate than their more common endometrioid counterparts. The precise composite of factors driving endometrial serous carcinogenesis and progression remain largely unknown, but we attempt to review the current state of knowledge in this report. ESC probably do not evolve through a single pathway, and their underlying molecular events probably occur early in their evolution. TP53 gene mutations occur in 22.7 to 96% of cases, and p53 protein overexpression is seen in approximately 76%. By gene expression profiling, p16 is upregulated in ESC significantly above both normal endometrial cells and endometrioid carcinomas, and 92-100% of cases display diffuse expression of the p16 protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Together, these findings suggest dysregulation of both the p16(INKA)/Cyclin D-CDK/pRb-E2F and the ARF-MDM2-p53 cell cycle pathways in ESC. By IHC, HER2/neu is overexpressed (2+ or 3+) in approximately 32.1% of ESC, and approximately 54.5% of cases scored as 2+ or 3+ by IHC display c-erbB2 gene amplification as assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Genetic instability, typically manifested as loss of heterozygosity in multiple chromosomes, is a common feature of ESC, and one study found loss of heterozygosity at 1p32-33 in 63% of cases. A subset of ESC display protein expression patterns that are characteristic of high grade endometrial carcinomas, including loss of the metastasis suppressor CD82 (KAI-1) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation, the latter manifested as E-cadherin downregulation, P-cadherin upregulation, and expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation-related molecules such as zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) and focal adhesion kinase. Preliminary data suggests differential patterns of expression in ESC of some isoforms of claudins, proteases, the tumor invasiveness and

  19. The multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene polymorphism G-rs3789243-A is not associated with disease susceptibility in Norwegian patients with colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer; a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Vibeke; Agerstjerne, Lene; Jensen, Dorte; Østergaard, Mette; Sæbø, Mona; Hamfjord, Julian; Kure, Elin; Vogel, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    Background Smoking, dietary factors, and alcohol consumption are known life style factors contributing to gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Genetic variations in carcinogen handling may affect cancer risk. The multidrug resistance 1(MDR1/ABCB1) gene encodes the transport protein P-glycoprotein (a phase III xenobiotic transporter). P-glycoprotein is present in the intestinal mucosal lining and restricts absorption of certain carcinogens, among these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Moreover, P-glycoprotein transports various endogenous substrates such as cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation, and may thereby affect the risk of malignity. Hence, genetic variations that modify the function of P-glycoprotein may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have previously found an association between the MDR1 intron 3 G-rs3789243-A polymorphism and the risk of CRC in a Danish study population. The aim of this study was to investigate if this MDR1 polymorphism was associated with risk of colorectal adenoma (CA) and CRC in the Norwegian population. Methods Using a case-control design, the association between the MDR1 intron 3 G-rs3789243-A polymorphism and the risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas in the Norwegian population was assessed in 167 carcinomas, 990 adenomas, and 400 controls. Genotypes were determined by allelic discrimination. Odds ratio (OR) and 95 confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated by binary logistic regression. Results No association was found between the MDR1 polymorphism (G-rs3789243-A) and colorectal adenomas or cancer. Carriers of the variant allele of MDR1 intron 3 had odds ratios (95% CI) of 0.97 (0.72–1.29) for developing adenomas, and 0.70 (0.41–1.21) for colorectal cancer, respectively, compared to homozygous wild type carriers. Conclusion The MDR1 intron 3 (G-rs3789243-A) polymorphism was not associated with a risk of colorectal adenomas or carcinomas in the present Norwegian study group. Thus, this

  20. MUSTARD GAS EXPOSURE AND CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-khalili, Alireza; Haines, David D; Modirian, Ehsan; Soroush, Mohammadreza; Khateri, Shahriar; Joshi, Rashmi; Zendehdel, Kazem; Ghanei, Mostafa; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is an alkylating compound used as a chemical weapon in World War I and by Iraqi forces against Iranians and indigenous Iraqi Kurds during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. Although SM is a proven carcinogen there are conflicting views regarding the carcinogenicity of a single exposure. The present study characterizes lung cancers formed in mustard gas victims from the Iran-Iraq War. Methods and Materials Demographic information and tumor specimens were collected from 20 Iranian male lung cancer patients with single high-dose SM exposures during the Iran-Iraq war. Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded lung cancers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for p53 protein. In addition, DNA was extracted from the tissues, PCR amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the p53 and KRAS genes associated with SM exposure. Results A relatively early age of lung cancer onset (ranging from 28 to 73 with a mean of 48) in mustard gas victims, particularly those in the non-smoking population (mean age of 40.7), may be an indication of a unique etiology for these cancers. Seven of the 20 patients developed lung cancer before the age of 40. Five of 16 cancers from which DNA sequence data was obtainable provided information on eight p53 mutations (within exons 5–8). These mutations were predominately G to A transitions; a mutation consistent with the DNA lesion caused by SM. Two of the lung cancers had multiple p53 point mutations, similar to results obtained from factory workers chronically exposed to mustard agent. No mutations were detected in the KRAS gene. Discussion The distinguishing characteristics of lung carcinogenesis in these mustard gas victims suggest that a single exposure may increase the risk of lung cancer development in some individuals. PMID:19559099

  1. Catecholestrogen sulfation: possible role in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adjei, Araba A; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2002-03-29

    A growing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that estrogens can be carcinogens as a result of their conversion to genotoxins after biotransformation to form the catecholestrogens (CEs) 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2), 4-hydroxyestrone (4-OHE1) and 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2). CEs can then undergo further metabolism to form quinones that interact with DNA to form either stable or depurinating adducts. These events could potentially be interrupted by the sulfate conjugation of both the parent estrogens and/or the CEs. We set out to determine whether CEs can serve as substrates for sulfate conjugation, and-if so-which of the growing family of human sulfotransferase (SULT) isoforms are capable of catalyzing those reactions. We determined apparent K(m) values for 10 recombinant human SULT isoforms, as well as the three most common allozymes for SULT1A1 and SULT1A2, with 2-OHE1, 2-OHE2, 4-OHE1, and 4-OHE2, and with the endogenous estrogens, estrone (E1) and 17beta-estradiol (E2), as substrates. With the exception of SULT1B1, SULT1C1, and SULT4A1, all of the human SULTs studied catalyzed the sulfate conjugation of CEs. SULT1E1 had the lowest apparent K(m) values, 0.31, 0.18, 0.27, and 0.22 microM for 4-OHE1, 4-OHE2, 2-OHE1, and 2-OHE2, respectively. These results demonstrate that SULTs can catalyze the sulfate conjugation of CEs, and they raise the possibility that individual variation in this pathway for estrogen and CE metabolism as a result of common genetic polymorphisms could represent a risk factor for estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis. PMID:11906176

  2. [Tumor markers for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Miyake, Y; Noura, S; Ogawa, M; Yasui, M; Ikenaga, M; Sekimoto, M; Monden, M

    2001-09-01

    CEA and CA19-9 are the two most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer that are currently utilized clinically. The positive rate of CEA is 40-60% and that of CA19-9 is 30-50%. Simultaneous use of the two markers is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect and monitoring the recurrence of advanced colorectal cancer. Surgical specimens may also provide useful information for the appropriate treatment of patients. Using surgically resected lymph nodes, we examined micrometastasis to assess the spread of the cancer cells and the malignant potential of colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis using anti-cytokeratin antibody revealed no significant impact of micrometastasis on patient prognosis, while RT-PCR assay using CEA as a genetic marker suggested a positive value in predicting a rapid recurrence. Among various molecular markers, we found that CDC25B phosphatase was a powerful prognostic factor for colorectal cancer. Diagnosis of the existence and malignant potential of cancer cells, together with serum tumor marker levels, may help to construct a more useful system for the better treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:11579645

  3. Association of a genetic variant in microRNA-146a with risk of colorectal cancer: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yingying; Li, Yingjun; Jing, Fangyuan; Cai, Shaofang; Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Qilong; Ma, Xinyuan; Wang, Jianbing; Jin, Mingjuan; Chen, Kun

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate target gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Although recent studies have indicated that miR-146a is involved in the tumorigenesis of various types of malignancies, few studies have investigated its role in colorectal cancer. In the current study, we examined the expression of miR-146a in colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent normal controls using publicly available expression profiling data. We then conducted a population-based case-control study which included 554 colorectal cancer cases and 566 matched healthy controls to assess the association of a genetic variant (rs2910164) in miR-146a with colorectal cancer susceptibility. We observed decreased expression of miR-146a in rectal cancer tissue compared with adjacent normal controls (P < 0.001). Association between miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphism and risk of colorectal cancer was detected with effect modification by alcohol drinking status (P for interaction = 0.010). Among non-alcohol drinkers, individuals with CC/CG genotype had an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer compared with those carrying GG genotype (odds ratio (OR) = 1.63, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.07 ∼ 2.47). Our findings indicate an association between miR-146a dysregulation and colorectal cancer, and suggest that miR-146a may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Further large population-based prospective studies as well as mechanistic investigations are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:24740563

  4. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  5. Inflammation-induced S100A8 activates Id3 and promotes colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Ai, Feiyan; Li, Xiayu; She, Xiaoling; Li, Nan; Tang, Anliu; Qin, Zailong; Ye, Qiurong; Tian, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Shen, Shourong; Ma, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The aberrant expression of S100A8 and S100A9 is linked to nonresolving inflammation and ultimately to carcinogenesis, whereas the underlying mechanism that allows inflammation to progress to specific cancer types remains unknown. Here, we report that S100A8 was induced by inflammation and then promoted colorectal tumorigenesis downstream by activating Id3 (inhibitor of differentiation 3). Using gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry, we found that both S100A8 and S100A9 were upregulated in the chemically-induced colitis-associated cancer mouse model and in human colorectal cancer specimens. Furthermore, we showed that S100A8 and S100A9 acted as chemoattractant proteins by recruiting macrophages, promoting the proliferation and invasion of colon cancer cell, as well as spurring the cycle that culminates in the acceleration of cancer metastasis in a nude mouse model. S100A8 regulated colon cancer cell cycle and proliferation by inducing Id3 expression while inhibiting p21. Id3 expression was regulated by Smad5, which was directly phosphorylated by Akt1. Our study revealed a novel mechanism in which inflammation-induced S100A8 promoted colorectal tumorigenesis by acting upstream to activate the Akt1-Smad5-Id3 axis. PMID:26135667

  6. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and retinoid X receptor expression in human colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, K F; Langman, M J; Williams, G R

    1995-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (D3) protects against colorectal carcinogenesis. Animal and in vitro studies show an antiproliferative effect of D3 in a variety of tumours including those of large bowel origin. D3 actions are mediated by D3 receptors (VDR) alone or by VDR in conjunction with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in all D3 responsive tissues. The expression of mRNAs encoding VDR and RXRs in normal and malignant human colorectum was determined. Full length VDR (4.6 kB), RXR alpha (5.5 kB), and RXR gamma (3.5 and 7 kB) mRNAs were expressed in all tissues, but RXR beta mRNA was not expressed in any. VDR expression was reduced in 12 carcinomas relative to paired normal mucosa, and RXR alpha expression was reduced in nine. There was no correlation between VDR or RXR alpha expression and the site, grade of differentiation, or Dukes's staging of the tumour. The finding of persistent VDR and RXR coexpression in all colorectal tumours provides a rational basis for exploring a role for D3 in the treatment of colorectal malignancy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7883226

  7. 2-Deoxyglucose Reverses the Promoting Effect of Insulin on Colorectal Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Chuan; Sun, Ye; Zhu, Chunyan; Wang, Fengzhen; Sun, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of colorectal cancer is related to the development of metabolic syndromes including hyperglycemia, and hyperinsulinemia. The high circulatory levels of glucose and/or insulin or the application of exogenous insulin may promote carcinogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis, which can be attributed to the Warburg effect or aerobic glycolysis. We attempted to resolve these existing questions by applying the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). According to the in vitro studies we performed, the glycolysis of colorectal cancer cells could be interrupted by 2DG as it decreased the cellular productions of ATP and lactate. In addition, 2DG induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. Since insulin can stimulate the cellular uptake of hexose, including 2DG, the combination of 2DG and insulin improved the cytotoxicity of 2DG and meanwhile overcame the cancer-promoting effects of insulin. This in vitro study provided a viewpoint of 2DG as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer, especially for patients with concomitant hyperinsulinemia or treated with exogenous insulin. PMID:26939025

  8. Immunohistochemical Expression of Dual-Specificity Protein Phosphatase 4 in Patients with Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jongmin; Yi, Kijong; Kim, Hyunsung; Ahn, Hyein; Chung, Yumin; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Lee, Kang Hong; Jang, Kiseok; Paik, Seung Sam

    2015-01-01

    The role of dual-specificity protein phosphatase 4 (DUSP4) appears to vary with the type of malignant tumors and is still controversial. The purpose of our study was to clarify the exact role of DUSP4 expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma. We constructed tissue microarrays and investigated DUSP4 expression by immunohistochemistry. DUSP4 was more frequently expressed in adenocarcinomas and lymph node/distant metastases compared to that in normal colorectal tissues and tubular adenomas (P < 0.001). Mean DUSP4 expression score was significantly higher in malignant tumors than in benign lesions (P < 0.001). DUSP4 expression was significantly correlated with older age (P = 0.017), male gender (P = 0.036), larger tumor size (P = 0.014), nonmucinous tumor type (P = 0.023), and higher T stage (P = 0.040). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant effect of DUSP4 expression on both overall survival and disease-free survival in AJCC stage I (P = 0.008 and P = 0.003, resp., log-rank test) and male gender (P = 0.017 and P = 0.049, resp., log-rank test). DUSP4 protein is frequently upregulated in colorectal adenocarcinoma and may play an important role in carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may be a marker of adverse prognosis. PMID:25688264

  9. Analysis of Candidate Genes in Occurrence and Growth of Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Olschwang, Sylviane; Vernerey, Déwi; Cottet, Vanessa; Pariente, Alexandre; Nalet, Bernard; Lafon, Jacques; Faivre, Jean; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire; Bonaiti-Pellié, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Predisposition to sporadic colorectal tumours is influenced by genes with minor phenotypic effects. A case-control study was set up on 295 patients treated for a large adenoma matched with polyp-free individuals on gender, age, and geographic origin in a 1 : 2 proportion. A second group of 302 patients treated for a small adenoma was also characterized to distinguish effects on adenoma occurrence and growth. We focussed the study on 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) encompassing 14 genes involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. Effect of SNPs was tested using unconditional logistic regression. Comparisons were made for haplotypes within a given gene and for biologically relevant genes combinations using the combination test. The APC p.Glu1317Gly variant appeared to influence the adenoma growth (P = .04, exact test) but not its occurrence. This result needs to be replicated and genome-wide association studies may be necessary to fully identify low-penetrance alleles involved in early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:19888426

  10. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  11. Marine n-3 and saturated fatty acids in relation to risk of colorectal cancer in Singapore Chinese: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Lesley M.; Wang, Renwei; Koh, Woon-Puay; Stern, Mariana C.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yu, Mimi C.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental data support multiple roles for fatty acids in colorectal carcinogenesis. We examined dietary fatty acids and incidence of colorectal cancer, and evaluated effect modification by sex and stage of disease among a population-based cohort of 61,321 Singapore Chinese that was established between 1993 and 1998. As of December 31, 2005, 961 incident colorectal cancers were diagnosed. Presented hazard ratios (HRs) are for highest versus lowest quartiles with adjustment for potential confounders. Among women, we observed a dose-dependent, positive association between saturated fat and localized colorectal cancer (Dukes A or B) [(HR = 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08–2.63, p for trend = 0.01)]. No such associations were noted in men (p for interaction by sex = 0.04). Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake was positively associated with advanced disease (Dukes C or D) (HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.05–1.70, p for trend = 0.01), regardless of sex. The association with marine n-3 PUFAs was strongest among those with the shortest (≤5 years) duration of follow-up (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.00–2.21, p for trend = 0.04). In contrast, we observed a small, albeit imprecise, inverse association with marine n-3 PUFAs for localized colorectal cancer among those with the longest duration of follow-up (>10 years) (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.29–1.34, p for trend = 0.55). Our findings suggest that subtypes of fatty acids may differentially influence risk of colorectal cancer of a specified stage. PMID:18973226

  12. Semaphorin-3F functions as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer due to regulation by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xuesong; Tang, Chong; Shi, Wen; Feng, Shichun; Qin, Weiyan; Jiang, Tian; Sun, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin-3F (SEMA3F) is a member of the class III semaphorin family, and is seen as a candidate tumor suppressor gene. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of SEMA3F in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, and to explore the mechanism for that SEMA3F suppresses tumor progression and metastasis. The expression levels of SEMA3F in the colorectal cancer tissues and corresponding non-tumor colorectal tissues were determined by Western blotting and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). In addition, we evaluate the effects of SEMA3F on CRC cell migration and colony formation in vitro. Subsequently, quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to detect the DNA methylation status in the CpG islands of SEMA3F gene promoter in normal colon and colorectal cancer cell lines, colorectal cancer tissues and corresponding non-tumor colorectal tissues. We found that SEMA3F was downregulated in the protein (P < 0.01) and mRNA (P < 0.001) levels in CRC tissues as compared to matched adjacent non-tumor tissues. Moreover, MSP assay showed high levels of SEMA3F gene promoter methylation in the CpG islands in some CRC cell lines and tissue samples. Furthermore, SEMA3F expression was reactivated in CRC cell lines after treatment with 5-Aza-CdR, demethylation of SW620 cells resulted in cell colony formation and invasion inhibition. These findings suggest DNA methylation of promoter CpG island-mediated silencing of the tumor suppressor SEMA3F gene plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of CRC. PMID:26722466

  13. Inhibitory effects of low-dose aloe-emodin on the development of colorectal tumors in min mice.

    PubMed

    Shimpo, Kan; Chihara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takaaki; Beppu, Hidehiko; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Shinzato, Masanori; Yukitake, Jun; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE), a natural anthraquinone compound, has been reported to exhibit anticancer activity in various cancer cell lines and anti-inflammatory effects in murine macrophages. In the present study, we investigated the cancer chemopreventive effects of AE in an Apc-deficient Min mouse model. In the first experiment, male Min mice were fed a basal diet or diets containing 5 ppm AE and 10 ppm AE for 12 weeks. The dietary administration of 5 ppm AE significantly reduced the number of colorectal tumors. In a second experiment, we investigated the effects of AE on colitis-related colon carcinogenesis in Min mouse treated with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Female Min mice were administered 1% DSS in their drinking water for 7 days. AE was given to mice in their diet at a dose of 5 or 50 ppm for 5 weeks. Feeding with AE significantly reduced the number of colorectal tumors. When proliferation of cells in normal-appearing colonic mucosa was assessed by monoclonal anti-rat Ki-67 antibody (MIB-5) immunohistochemistry in experiments 1 and 2, the AE treatment significantly decreased the mean MIB-5-labeling index. These results suggest that the dietary administration of low-dose AE may have chemopreventive effects against development of colorectal tumors in Min mice, possibly in part by reducing cell proliferation in colorectal mucosa. PMID:25081669

  14. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Non-coding RNAs Functioning in Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Daniele; Barraco, Nadia; Listì, Angela; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis of the presence of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs) has received a considerable support. This model suggested the existence of CSCs which, thanks to their self-renewal properties, are able to drive the expansion and the maintenance of malignant cell populations with invasive and metastatic potential in cancer. Increasing evidence showed the ability of such cells to acquire self-renewal, multipotency, angiogenic potential, immune evasion, symmetrical and asymmetrical divisions which, along with the presence of several DNA repair mechanisms, further enhance their oncogenic potential making them highly resistant to common anticancer treatments. The main signaling pathways involved in the homeostasis of colorectal (CRC) stem cells are the Wnt, Notch, Sonic Hedgehog, and Bone Morfogenic Protein (BMP) pathways, which are mostly responsible for all the features that have been widely referred to stem cells. The same pathways have been identified in colorectal cancer stem cells (CRCSCs), conferring a more aggressive phenotype compared to non-stem CRC cells. Recently, several evidences suggested that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) may play a crucial role in the regulation of different biological mechanisms in CRC, by modulating the expression of critical stem cell transcription factors that have been found active in CSCs. In this chapter, we will discuss the involvement of ncRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), in stemness acquisition and maintenance by CRCSCs, through the regulation of pathways modulating the CSC phenotype and growth, carcinogenesis, differentiation, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:27573896

  16. Selected micronutrient intake and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraroni, M.; La Vecchia, C.; D'Avanzo, B.; Negri, E.; Franceschi, S.; Decarli, A.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between estimated intake of selected micronutrients and the risk of colorectal cancer was analysed using data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy. The study was based on 828 patients with colon cancer, 498 with rectal cancer and 2,024 controls in hospital for acute, non-neoplastic, non-digestive tract diseases. Relative risks (RRs) of intake quintiles were computed after allowance for age, sex and other major potential confounding factors, including an estimate of total energy intake. No apparent trend in risk across intake quintiles was evident for retinol, vitamin D, methionine and calcium. For beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, vitamin E and folate there was a trend of a protective effect with increasing consumption: the RR for the highest versus the lowest quintile was 0.32 for beta-carotene, 0.40 for ascorbic acid, 0.60 for vitamin E and 0.52 for folate. These inverse associations were similar for colon and rectal cancer, and consistent across strata of sex and age. When simultaneous allowance was made for all these micronutrients, besides other covariates, the only persistent protective effects were for beta-carotene (RR = 0.38 for the highest quintile) and ascorbic acid (RR = 0.52). Whether this reflects a specific, or stronger, effect of these micronutrients, rather than problems of collinearity between micronutrients or other limitations of the data, remains open to discussion. Still, this study suggests that specific micronutrients may exert an independent protective effect against colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:7981067

  17. Selected micronutrient intake and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferraroni, M; La Vecchia, C; D'Avanzo, B; Negri, E; Franceschi, S; Decarli, A

    1994-12-01

    The relationship between estimated intake of selected micronutrients and the risk of colorectal cancer was analysed using data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy. The study was based on 828 patients with colon cancer, 498 with rectal cancer and 2,024 controls in hospital for acute, non-neoplastic, non-digestive tract diseases. Relative risks (RRs) of intake quintiles were computed after allowance for age, sex and other major potential confounding factors, including an estimate of total energy intake. No apparent trend in risk across intake quintiles was evident for retinol, vitamin D, methionine and calcium. For beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, vitamin E and folate there was a trend of a protective effect with increasing consumption: the RR for the highest versus the lowest quintile was 0.32 for beta-carotene, 0.40 for ascorbic acid, 0.60 for vitamin E and 0.52 for folate. These inverse associations were similar for colon and rectal cancer, and consistent across strata of sex and age. When simultaneous allowance was made for all these micronutrients, besides other covariates, the only persistent protective effects were for beta-carotene (RR = 0.38 for the highest quintile) and ascorbic acid (RR = 0.52). Whether this reflects a specific, or stronger, effect of these micronutrients, rather than problems of collinearity between micronutrients or other limitations of the data, remains open to discussion. Still, this study suggests that specific micronutrients may exert an independent protective effect against colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:7981067

  18. Epigenetic regulation of LSD1 during mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic regulation is integral to the dynamic control of gene expression under different stimuli for cellular homeostasis and disease progression. Histone methylation is a common and important type of chromatin modification. LSD1, the first known histone lysine-specific demethylase, operates as a key component of several corepressor complexes during development and in disease states. In this review, we focus on the regulation of LSD1 in mammary carcinogenesis. LSD1 plays a role in promoting mammary tumor metastasis and proliferation and in maintaining mammary cancer stem cells. Therefore, LSD1 represents a viable therapeutic target for effective treatment of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:27308339

  19. The Hamster Buccal Pouch Model of Oral Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram; Kowshik, Jaganathan

    2016-01-01

    The hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model is one of the most well-characterized animal tumor models used as a prelude to investigate multistage oral carcinogenesis and to assess the efficacy of chemointervention. Hamster buccal pouch carcinomas induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) show extensive similarities to human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The HBP model offers a number of advantages including a simple and predictable tumor induction procedure, easy accessibility for examination and follow-up of lesions, and reproducibility. This model can be used to test both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27246045

  20. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN BINDING OF TRIVALENT ARSENICALS IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS AND TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three of the most plausible biological theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are protein binding, oxidative stress and altered DNA methylation. This review presents the role of trivalent arsenicals binding to proteins in arsenic carcinogenesis. Using vacuum filtration based receptor...

  1. Gut Microbiome and Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Keku, Temitope O.

    2015-01-01

    The trillions of bacteria that naturally reside in the human gut collectively constitute the complex system known the gut microbiome, a vital player for the host’s homeostasis and health. However, there is mounting evidence that dysbiosis, a state of pathological imbalance in the gut microbiome is present in many disease states. In this review, we present recent insights concerning the gut microbiome’s contribution to the development of colorectal adenomas and the subsequent progression to colorectal cancer (CRC). In the United States alone, CRC is the second leading cause of cancer deaths. As a result, there is a high interest in identifying risk factors for adenomas, which are intermediate precursors to CRC. Recent research on CRC and the microbiome suggest that modulation of the gut bacterial composition and structure may be useful in preventing adenomas and CRC. We highlight the known risk factors for colorectal adenomas and the potential mechanisms by which microbial dysbiosis may contribute to the etiology of CRC. We also underscore novel findings from recent studies on the gut microbiota and colorectal adenomas along with current knowledge gaps. Understanding the microbiome may provide promising new directions towards novel diagnostic tools, biomarkers, and therapeutic interventions for CRC. PMID:24855012

  2. Minilaparoscopic Colorectal Resections: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Bona, S.; Molteni, M.; Montorsi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal resections have been shown to provide short-term advantages in terms of postoperative pain, general morbidity, recovery, and quality of life. To date, long-term results have been proved to be comparable to open surgery irrefutably only for colon cancer. Recently, new trends keep arising in the direction of minimal invasiveness to reduce surgical trauma after colorectal surgery in order to improve morbidity and cosmetic results. The few reports available in the literature on single-port technique show promising results. Natural orifices endoscopic techniques still have very limited application. We focused our efforts in standardising a minilaparoscopic technique (using 3 to 5 mm instruments) for colorectal resections since it can provide excellent cosmetic results without changing the laparoscopic approach significantly. Thus, there is no need for a new learning curve as minilaparoscopy maintains the principle of instrument triangulation. This determines an undoubted advantage in terms of feasibility and reproducibility of the procedure without increasing operative time. Some preliminary experiences confirm that minilaparoscopic colorectal surgery provides acceptable results, comparable to those reported for laparoscopic surgery with regard to operative time, morbidity, and hospital stay. Randomized controlled studies should be conducted to confirm these early encouraging results. PMID:22548166

  3. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  5. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for colorectal cancer What’s new in colorectal cancer research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  6. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Nicole R.; Hauch, Adam T.; Hu, Tian; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Robotic approaches have become increasingly used for colorectal surgery. The aim of this study is to examine the safety and efficacy of robotic colorectal procedures in an adult population. Study Design: A systematic review of articles in both PubMed and Embase comparing laparoscopic and robotic colorectal procedures was performed. Clinical trials and observational studies in an adult population were included. Approaches were evaluated in terms of operative time, length of stay, estimated blood loss, number of lymph nodes harvested, and perioperative complications. Mean net differences and odds ratios were calculated to examine treatment effect of each group. Results: Two hundred eighteen articles were identified, and 17 met the inclusion criteria, representing 4,342 patients: 920 robotic and 3,422 in the laparoscopic group. Operative time for the robotic approach was 38.849 minutes longer (95% confidence interval: 17.944 to 59.755). The robotic group had lower estimated blood loss (14.17 mL; 95% confidence interval: –27.63 to –1.60), and patients were 1.78 times more likely to be converted to an open procedure (95% confidence interval: 1.24 to 2.55). There was no difference between groups with respect to number of lymph nodes harvested, length of stay, readmission rate, or perioperative complication rate. Conclusions: The robotic approach to colorectal surgery is as safe and efficacious as conventional laparoscopic surgery. However, it is associated with longer operative time and an increased rate of conversion to laparotomy. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted to examine the cost-effectiveness of robotic colorectal surgery before it can be adopted as the new standard of care. PMID:25489216

  7. Lysyl Oxidase Gene G473A Polymorphism and Cigarette Smoking in Association with a High Risk of Lung and Colorectal Cancers in a North Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoli; Shen, Yanqing; Cheng, Guang; Bo, Haimei; Lin, Jia; Zheng, Maogen; Li, Jianmin; Zhao, Yinzhi; Li, Wande

    2016-01-01

    The relationship among the lysyl oxidase (LOX) G473A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), cigarette smoking and lung, colorectal, colon and rectum cancer susceptibility was studied in 200 cases of lung cancer, 335 cases of colorectal cancer including 130 cases of colon cancer and 205 cases of rectum cancer, and 335 healthy people in Tangshan, China. Peripheral blood DNA samples were collected, DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) performed, followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. In comparison to LOX473GG genotype carriers, individuals with LOX473AA exhibited a higher susceptibility to lung, colon-rectum, colon, and rectum cancers with OR values amounting to 3.84-, 2.74-, 2.75-, and 2.74-fold of the control, respectively. In the LOX 473AA-positive population, females were more susceptible than males to carcinogenesis with OR values (female vs. male): 5.25 vs. 3.23, 2.29 vs. 1.51, 2.27 vs. 1.45, and 2.25 vs. 1.53, respectively, for lung, colon-rectum combined, colon, and rectum cancers. LOX G473A polymorphism apparently elevated human sensitivity to cigarette smoking carcinogens for eliciting cancers in the lung and colon only. Thus, LOX G473A polymorphism positively correlates with carcinogenesis and it may be used as an ideal intrinsic biomarker for prediction or diagnosis of carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:27367711

  8. OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A POSSIBLE MODE OF ACTION FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, but few theories have a substantial mass of supporting data. Three stronger theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are production of chromosomal abnormalities, promotion of carcinogenesis and oxidati...

  9. Role of CDK8 and beta-catenin in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong-Og; Han, Song Iy; Lim, Sung-Chul

    2010-07-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays an important role in colon cancers. However, relatively little is known about the regulatory mechanism of beta-catenin in colon cancers. CDK8 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) member of the mediator complex that couples transcriptional regulators to the basal transcriptional machinery, and is implicated in the transcriptional regulation of key pathways involved in colon cancers. To determine the relationship between CDK8 and beta-catenin expressions, a population-based study was conducted for immunohistochemical staining analysis of tumor tissues, and Western blot analysis and CDK8 interference studies of colon cancer cell lines. The hypothesis that colorectal cancers with CDK8 expression have distinct clinical, prognostic and molecular attributes was tested. Among 127 colorectal cancers, CDK8 expression was detected in 96 (76%) tumors by immunohistochemistry. CDK8 and beta-catenin expression had significant positive correlation with carcinogenesis, tumor progression and patient survival. Immunohistochemically, CDK8 expression in colorectal cancer was independently associated with beta-catenin activation (P=0.0002). However, beta-catenin expression was not completely suppressed by CDK8 interference in the colon cancer cell lines HCT-116, HT-29 and SNU-C5. These data support a potential link between CDK8 and beta-catenin, and suggest that CDK8 may identify a subset of colon cancer patients with a poor prognosis. However, control of CDK8 is not an effective therapeutic strategy through beta-catenin regulation of general colon cancer. PMID:20514474

  10. Aberrant Gene Promoter Methylation Associated with Sporadic Multiple Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Victoria; Lozano, Juan José; Muñoz, Jenifer; Balaguer, Francesc; Pellisé, Maria; de Miguel, Cristina Rodríguez; Andreu, Montserrat; Jover, Rodrigo; Llor, Xavier; Giráldez, M. Dolores; Ocaña, Teresa; Serradesanferm, Anna; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Jimeno, Mireya; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Sendino, Oriol; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Castells, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) multiplicity has been mainly related to polyposis and non-polyposis hereditary syndromes. In sporadic CRC, aberrant gene promoter methylation has been shown to play a key role in carcinogenesis, although little is known about its involvement in multiplicity. To assess the effect of methylation in tumor multiplicity in sporadic CRC, hypermethylation of key tumor suppressor genes was evaluated in patients with both multiple and solitary tumors, as a proof-of-concept of an underlying epigenetic defect. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined a total of 47 synchronous/metachronous primary CRC from 41 patients, and 41 gender, age (5-year intervals) and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors. Exclusion criteria were polyposis syndromes, Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. DNA methylation at the promoter region of the MGMT, CDKN2A, SFRP1, TMEFF2, HS3ST2 (3OST2), RASSF1A and GATA4 genes was evaluated by quantitative methylation specific PCR in both tumor and corresponding normal appearing colorectal mucosa samples. Overall, patients with multiple lesions exhibited a higher degree of methylation in tumor samples than those with solitary tumors regarding all evaluated genes. After adjusting for age and gender, binomial logistic regression analysis identified methylation of MGMT2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.97; p = 0.008) and RASSF1A (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.01 to 4.13; p = 0.047) as variables independently associated with tumor multiplicity, being the risk related to methylation of any of these two genes 4.57 (95% CI, 1.53 to 13.61; p = 0.006). Moreover, in six patients in whom both tumors were available, we found a correlation in the methylation levels of MGMT2 (r = 0.64, p = 0.17), SFRP1 (r = 0.83, 0.06), HPP1 (r = 0.64, p = 0.17), 3OST2 (r = 0.83, p = 0.06) and GATA4 (r = 0.6, p = 0.24). Methylation in normal appearing colorectal mucosa from patients with multiple

  11. Anti-Outer membrane protein C antibodies in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kohoutova, D; Drahosova, M; Cihak, M; Moravkova, P; Bures, J

    2016-07-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) represents an enormous problem worldwide. Large intestinal microbiota play an important role in the colorectal carcinogenesis. The aim of the study was to investigate anti-Outer membrane protein C (anti-OmpC) antibodies, aimed at porin C, which is embedded in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, in patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA), CRC and controls. The study included 22 patients with CRA (11 men, 11 women, aged 26-79, mean 65 ± 12), 11 patients with CRC (9 men, 2 women, aged 50-83, mean 66 ± 11) and 45 controls, blood donors (24 men, 21 women, aged 20-58, mean 38 ± 10). Serum anti-OmpC antibodies were investigated by means of ELISA. Values of 0-20 U/mL were considered to be negative; values >25 U/mL were assessed as positive. A total of 9/11 (82 %) patients with CRC had positive anti-OmpC antibodies. Anti-OmpC antibodies were negative or grey-zone in 37/45 (82 %) controls. Serum anti-OmpC were found to be significantly higher in patients with CRC (median 42.4, interquartile range (IQR) 22.2) compared to controls (median 18.3, IQR 12.4), p < 0.001. No statistically significant difference in anti-OmpC was found between controls (median 18.3, IQR 12.4) and CRA patients (median 17.7, IQR 16.5), p = 0.326. Anti-OmpC were significantly higher in patients with CRC (median 42.4, IQR 22.2) compared to patients with CRA (median 17.7, IQR 16.5), p = 0.011. Positivity of anti-OmpC antibodies was found in patients with CRC, which supports the contribution of gram-negative large intestinal microbiota to the pathogenesis of CRC. PMID:26612659

  12. Redefining the roles of apoptotic factors in carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjian; He, Yujun; Li, Fang; Huang, Qian; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Hall, Russell P.; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a recent study we reported that mammalian cells exposed to stress such as ionizing radiation can survive with activation of caspase-3 or caspase-7. We found that sublethal activation of the executioner caspases promotes chemical- and radiation-induced genetic instability and carcinogenesis, in contrast to their perceived roles as tumor suppressors. PMID:27314073

  13. PROPICONAZOLE-INDUCED CARCINOGENESIS: ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a systemic foliar fungicide with a broad range of activity. Rodents fed with propiconazole at high dose resulted in diminished body weight, increased liver weight of adults and pups, and eventually liver carcinogenesis. In order to unravel the toxic processes inv...

  14. The genetic/metabolic transformation concept of carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Renty B.

    2014-01-01

    The carcinogenesis process is poorly understood and subject to varying concepts and views. A rejuvenated interest has arisen regarding the role of altered cellular intermediary metabolism in the development and progression of cancer. As a result, differing views of the implications of altered metabolism in the development of cancer exist. None of the concepts recognize and incorporate the principles of cell metabolism to cell activity, which are applicable to all cells including the carcinogenesis process. This presentation incorporates a novel concept of carcinogenesis that includes a “genetic/metabolic” transformation that encompasses these principles of cell metabolism to cell activity. The intermediary metabolism transformation is essential to provide the bioenergetic/ synthetic, growth/proliferation, and migration/invasive events of malignancy. The concept invokes an “oncogenetic transformation” for the development of neoplastic cells from their precursor normal cells; and a required “genetic/metabolic” transformation for facilitation of the development of the neoplastic cells to malignant cells with the manifestation of the malignant process. Such a concept reveals stages and events of carcinogenesis that provide approaches for the identification of biomarkers and for development of therapeutic agents. The presentation discusses the contemporary application of genetics and proteomics to altered cellular metabolism in cancer; and underscores the importance of proper integration of genetics and proteomics with biochemical and metabolic studies, and the consequences of inappropriate studies. PMID:22109079

  15. Biomarkers and chemopreventives in oral carcinogenesis and its prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sonalee; Kaur, Manpreet

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the predominant type of oral malignancy and is a result of oral carcinogenesis. Oral carcinogenesis is a mutifactorial and complex process related to the sequential occurrence of alterations in genetic structures, promoting inhibitory or excitatory effects of the tumor oncogenes and gene suppressors, compromising the histophysiology of the division, differentiation and cell death; and therefore, methods to prevent, detect, or treat it in the best way is constantly being searched for. Biomarkers reveal the genetic and molecular changes related to early, intermediate and late endpoints in the process of oral carcinogenesis. Thereby, they are likely to not only refine our ability to predict the biologic course of oral cancer and distinguish individuals at high and/or low risk of oral cancer development; but, also they will also reveal the genetic and molecular changes related to various endpoints of oral carcinogenesis. Chemopreventives are chemicals of natural or synthetic origin, which reduce the incidence of fatal diseases such as cancer before clinical symptoms occur. Chemopreventives are agents whose curative capacity is defined with help of biomarkers, as the later determine the effectiveness and safety of chemopreventives. PMID:24959040

  16. STUDIES INTO THE MECHANISMS OF POTASSIUM BROMATE INDUCED THYROID CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies into the Mechanisms of Potassium Bromate Induced Thyroid Carcinogenesis.

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) occurs in finished drinking water as a by-product of the ozonation disinfection process and has been found to induce thyroid follicular cell tumors in the rat after ...

  17. An evolutionary model for initiation, promotion, and progression in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, T L; Gatenby, R A

    2008-04-01

    Human carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which epithelial cells progress through a series of premalignant phenotypes until an invasive cancer emerges. Extensive experimental observations in carcinogenesis have demonstrated this process can be divided into three general eras: initiation, promotion, and progression. However, this empirically derived, tissue-level explanation of carcinogenesis has not been reconciled with the step-wise genotypic and phenotypic changes encompassed in evolutionary paradigms such as the Feoron-Vogelstein diagram. Here, we analyze an evolutionary model of cellular dynamics that defines mutual interactions of cellular and subcellular events and tissue level changes in tumor growth and morphology. Results are expressed using an adaptive landscape that illustrates the evolutionary potential of cells that allow them to adapt to specific microenvironmental selection forces. It is shown that normal epithelial cells have a novel adaptive landscape that permits coexistence of normal cellular populations but also allows invasion by mutant phenotypes. Subsequent cancer evolution is possible due to a relaxation of tissue growth constraints (as mediated by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions) and adaptations in response to perturbations in microenvironmental substrate concentrations (due to separation of evolving tumor cells from their blood supply by an intact basement membrane). Simulations, based on the dynamic model, produce three distinct stages of carcinogenesis that are consistent with the initiation, promotion, and progression stages observed experimentally. The simulations provide insight into the underlying cellular and microenvironmental dynamics that govern these empirical observations and suggest novel prevention strategies that may be tested experimentally. PMID:18360700

  18. miRNA-26b Overexpression in Ulcerative Colitis-associated Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Benderska, Natalya; Dittrich, Anna-Lena; Knaup, Sabine; Rau, Tilman T.; Neufert, Clemens; Wach, Sven; Fahlbusch, Fabian B.; Rauh, Manfred; Wirtz, Ralph M.; Agaimy, Abbas; Srinivasan, Swetha; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi; Rümmele, Petra; Rapti, Emmanouela; Gazouli, Maria; Hartmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Background: Longstanding ulcerative colitis (UC) bears a high risk for development of UC-associated colorectal carcinoma (UCC). The inflammatory microenvironment influences microRNA expression, which in turn deregulates target gene expression. microRNA-26b (miR-26b) was shown to be instrumental in normal tissue growth and differentiation. Thus, we aimed to investigate the impact of miR-26b in inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: Two different cohorts of patients were investigated. In the retrospective group, a tissue microarray with 38 samples from 17 UC/UCC patients was used for miR-26b in situ hybridization and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. In the prospective group, we investigated miR-26b expression in 25 fresh–frozen colon biopsies and corresponding serum samples of 6 UC and 15 non-UC patients, respectively. In silico analysis, Ago2-RNA immunoprecipitation, luciferase reporter assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction examination, and miR-26b mimic overexpression were employed for target validation. Results: miR-26b expression was shown to be upregulated with disease progression in tissues and serum of UC and UCC patients. Using miR-26b and Ki-67 expression levels, an UCC was predicted with high accuracy. We identified 4 novel miR-26b targets (DIP1, MDM2, CREBBP, BRCA1). Among them, the downregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase DIP1 was closely related to death-associated protein kinase stabilization along the normal mucosa-UC-UCC sequence. In silico functional pathway analysis revealed that the common cellular pathways affected by miR-26b are highly related to cancerogenesis and the development of gastrointestinal diseases. Conclusions: We suggest that miR-26b could serve as a biomarker for inflammation-associated processes in the gastrointestinal system. Because miR-26b expression is downregulated in sporadic colon cancer, it could discriminate between UCC and the

  19. IL-17 producing mast cells promote the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a mouse allergy model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowei; Churchill, Michael J.; Nagar, Karan K.; Tailor, Yagnesh H.; Chu, Timothy; Rush, Brittany S.; Jiang, Zhengyu; Wang, Edwin B.C.; Renz, Bernhard W.; Wang, Hongshan; Fung, Ming Chiu; Worthley, Daniel L.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Wang, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy can influence the development of colorectal cancer, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. While mast cells (MC) store and secrete histamine, immature myeloid cells (IMC) are the major site of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression, the enzyme responsible for histamine production. From our earlier work, we hypothesized that histamine is central to the association between allergy and colorectal carcinogenesis through its influence on the MC-MDSC axis. Here, we show that in wild type (WT) mice, ovalbumin (OVA) immunization elicits a typical TH2 response. In contrast, in HDC−/− mice, the response to OVA allergy is skewed towards infiltration by IL-17 expressing MCs. This response is inhibited by histamine treatment. The HDC−/− allergic IL-17-expressing MCs promote MDSC proliferation and upregulation of Cox-2 and Arg-1. OVA allergy in HDC−/− mice increases the growth of colon tumor cells in both the MC38 tumor cell implantation model and the AOM/DSS carcinogenesis model. Taken together, our results show that histamine represses IL-17-expressing MCs and their subsequent activation of MDSCs, attenuating the risk of colorectal cancer in the setting of food allergy. Targeting the MC-MDSC axis may be useful for cancer prevention and treatment in patients, particularly in those with food allergy. PMID:26429861

  20. IL-17 producing mast cells promote the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a mouse allergy model of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowei; Churchill, Michael J; Nagar, Karan K; Tailor, Yagnesh H; Chu, Timothy; Rush, Brittany S; Jiang, Zhengyu; Wang, Edwin B C; Renz, Bernhard W; Wang, Hongshan; Fung, Ming Chiu; Worthley, Daniel L; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Wang, Timothy C

    2015-10-20

    Food allergy can influence the development of colorectal cancer, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. While mast cells (MC) store and secrete histamine, immature myeloid cells (IMC) are the major site of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression, the enzyme responsible for histamine production. From our earlier work, we hypothesized that histamine is central to the association between allergy and colorectal carcinogenesis through its influence on the MC-MDSC axis. Here, we show that in wild type (WT) mice, ovalbumin (OVA) immunization elicits a typical TH2 response. In contrast, in HDC-/- mice, the response to OVA allergy is skewed towards infiltration by IL-17 expressing MCs. This response is inhibited by histamine treatment. The HDC-/- allergic IL-17-expressing MCs promote MDSC proliferation and upregulation of Cox-2 and Arg-1. OVA allergy in HDC-/- mice increases the growth of colon tumor cells in both the MC38 tumor cell implantation model and the AOM/DSS carcinogenesis model. Taken together, our results show that histamine represses IL-17-expressing MCs and their subsequent activation of MDSCs, attenuating the risk of colorectal cancer in the setting of food allergy. Targeting the MC-MDSC axis may be useful for cancer prevention and treatment in patients, particularly in those with food allergy. PMID:26429861

  1. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  2. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  3. Meloxicam inhibits the growth of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A P; Williams, C S; Sheng, H; Lamps, L W; Williams, V P; Pairet, M; Morrow, J D; DuBois, R N

    1998-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 has been reported to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. The effects of meloxicam (a COX-2 inhibitor) on the growth of two colon cancer cell lines that express COX-2 (HCA-7 and Moser-S) and a COX-2 negative cell line (HCT-116) were evaluated. The growth rate of these cells was measured following treatment with meloxicam. HCA-7 and Moser-S colony size were significantly reduced following treatment with meloxicam; however, there was no significant change in HCT-116 colony size with treatment. In vivo studies were performed to evaluate the effect of meloxicam on the growth of HCA-7 cells when xenografted into nude mice. We observed a 51% reduction in tumor size after 4 weeks of treatment. Analysis of COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels in HCA-7 tumor lysates revealed a slight decrease in COX-2 expression levels in tumors taken from mice treated with meloxicam and no detectable COX-1 expression. Here we report that meloxicam significantly inhibited HCA-7 colony and tumor growth but had no effect on the growth of the COX-2 negative HCT-116 cells. PMID:9886578

  4. Carcinogenesis studies with benzoyl peroxide (Panoxyl gel 5%)

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, O.H.

    1986-04-01

    Several groups of hairless mice were given UV radiation with and without pretreatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), 5% benzoyl peroxide in a gel (Panoxyl), and gel alone, in various combinations, with appropriate control groups included, in order to see whether benzoyl peroxide, which is known to enhance chemical skin carcinogenesis after a single, small dose of DMBA, also enhances UV carcinogenesis. The mice were observed for skin tumors, and all skin lesions were histologically investigated. The percentage of tumor-bearing animals with time is called the tumor rate, the total number of tumors occurring is called the tumor yield. Continual treatment with 5% benzoyl peroxide in gel twice a week, with or without a short pretreatment period of UV radiation resulted in only 2 skin carcinomas, which is remarkable, but not significant. Both Panoxyl and gel alone enhanced tumorigenicity significantly in animals pretreated with a single dose of 51.2 micrograms DMBA. There was no difference between the enhancement caused by Panoxyl and the gel as regards the tumor rate, but when measured as final tumor yield, Panoxyl was slightly more tumor-enhancing than gel alone. However, both Panoxyl and gel protected significantly against UV tumorigenesis (all tumors). There was no difference between the protective effect of the 2 types of treatment. Neither Panoxyl nor gel alone influenced significantly UV skin carcinogenesis (malignant tumors). It is concluded that under these experimental conditions both Panoxyl and gel alone tend to protect against the tumorigenicity and do not enhance the carcinogenicity of UV radiation in hairless mice, whereas both gel and Panoxyl enhance chemical carcinogenesis. The carcinogenic mechanisms may be different for UV and chemical carcinogenesis, respectively.

  5. Allelic polymorphism of GSTM1 and NAT2 genes modifies dietary-induced DNA damage in colorectal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kiss, I; Sándor, J; Ember, I

    2000-12-01

    Typically, cancer is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. In colorectal carcinogenesis, diet and nutritional habits are the most important external risk determinants. Allelic polymorphisms of certain metabolizing enzymes may have an influence on cancer risk by modifying the concentration of active carcinogenic compounds in the body. In the present study we investigated the interaction between nutritional and genetic susceptibility factors in human colon carcinogenesis. Healthy volunteers were divided into four groups, based on allelic polymorphisms of N-acetyltransferase 2 and glutathione-S-transferase M1 enzymes. Comet assay was used to determine the level of DNA strand breaks in exfoliated colorectal mucosal cells, following a 2-day vegetarian diet, and after switching to a 2-day 'high-meat' diet. The 'high-meat' diet statistically significantly increased the amount of single-strand breaks in rapid acetylators and among individuals with a GSMT1 + genotype, while it caused only a slight and not significant increase in the other groups. Our study emphasizes the importance of using susceptibility markers in cancer epidemiology, since environmental effects are strongly modified by these genetic factors. PMID:11201682

  6. Developmental genes significantly afflicted by aberrant promoter methylation and somatic mutation predict overall survival of late-stage colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Ning; Yang, Xue; Cheng, Shujun; Wang, Guiqi; Zhang, Kaitai

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is an exceedingly complicated process, which involves multi-level dysregulations, including genomics (majorly caused by somatic mutation and copy number variation), DNA methylomics, and transcriptomics. Therefore, only looking into one molecular level of cancer is not sufficient to uncover the intricate underlying mechanisms. With the abundant resources of public available data in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, an integrative strategy was conducted to systematically analyze the aberrant patterns of colorectal cancer on the basis of DNA copy number, promoter methylation, somatic mutation and gene expression. In this study, paired samples in each genomic level were retrieved to identify differentially expressed genes with corresponding genetic or epigenetic dysregulations. Notably, the result of gene ontology enrichment analysis indicated that the differentially expressed genes with corresponding aberrant promoter methylation or somatic mutation were both functionally concentrated upon developmental process, suggesting the intimate association between development and carcinogenesis. Thus, by means of random walk with restart, 37 significant development-related genes were retrieved from a priori-knowledge based biological network. In five independent microarray datasets, Kaplan–Meier survival and Cox regression analyses both confirmed that the expression of these genes was significantly associated with overall survival of Stage III/IV colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26691761

  7. Rapid induction of colorectal tumors in rats initiated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine followed by dextran sodium sulfate treatment.

    PubMed

    Onose, Jun-ichi; Imai, Toshio; Hasumura, Mai; Ueda, Makoto; Hirose, Masao

    2003-08-20

    To establish a rapid bioassay system with neoplastic end-points for detection of colorectal carcinogenesis modifiers, we evaluated the effects of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) treatment on the different stages of carcinogenesis in rats initiated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). F344 male rats were given three subcutaneous injections of DMH (40 mg/kg body weight) in a week, and were administered drinking water containing 1.0% DSS ad libitum either during or after the initiation period for a week, or both during and after initiation periods for 2 weeks. At the 10th week of the experiment, although the numbers of aberrant crypt foci were significantly decreased in all groups treated with DSS and given DMH-initiation as compared with DMH alone, dysplastic foci/adenomas/adenocarcinomas were increased. The incidences and multiplicities of these lesions were highest in rats treated with DSS after DMH-initiation period. At the 26th week, the incidences of adenocarcinomas (100 vs. 20% in DMH alone) and their multiplicities (6.6 +/- 0.8/rat vs. 0.2 +/- 0.4/rat in DMH alone) were also highest in this group. These results indicate that short-term DSS-treatment in the post-initiation period significantly accelerates DMH-induced colorectal tumor development in rats, so that this protocol may effective for establishment of a rapid bioassay system with neoplastic end-points. PMID:12957352

  8. Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 1.2015.

    PubMed

    Provenzale, Dawn; Jasperson, Kory; Ahnen, Dennis J; Aslanian, Harry; Bray, Travis; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Erwin, Deborah; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Gupta, Samir; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Klapman, Jason B; Larson, David W; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Rao, M Sambasiva; Regenbogen, Scott E; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary A; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A; Darlow, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Colorectal Cancer Screening provide recommendations for selecting individuals for colorectal cancer screening, and for evaluation and follow-up of colon polyps. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2015 NCCN Colorectal Cancer Screening panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were the state of evidence for CT colonography and stool DNA testing, bowel preparation procedures for colonoscopy, and guidelines for patients with a positive family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:26285241

  9. Transarterial Therapy for Colorectal Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Bhutiani, Neal; Martin, Robert C G

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, hepatic arterial therapies (HAT) had been used for colorectal liver metastases after failure of first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. HAT has gained greater acceptance in patients with liver-dominant colorectal metastases after failure of surgery or systemic chemotherapy. The current data demonstrate that HAT is a safe and effective option for preoperative downsizing, optimizing the time to surgery, limiting non-tumor-bearing liver toxicity, and improving overall survival after surgery in patients with colorectal liver-only metastases. The aim of this review is to present the current data for HAT in liver-only and liver-dominant colorectal liver metastases. PMID:27017870

  10. Metabonomic Profiling Reveals Cancer Chemopreventive Effects of American Ginseng on Colon Carcinogenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yu, Chunhao; Qiu, Yunping; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Yuan, Chun-Su; Jia, Wei

    2015-08-01

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines in the West. It has been reported to possess significant antitumor effects that inhibit the process of carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying its anticancer effects remain largely unresolved. In this study, we investigated the cancer chemopreventive effects of American ginseng on the progression of high fat (HF) diet-enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis with a genetically engineered Apc(Min/+) mouse model. The metabolic alterations in sera of experimental mice perturbed by HF diet intervention as well as the American ginseng treatment were measured by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) and liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) analysis. American ginseng treatment significantly extended the life span of the Apc(Min/+) mouse. Significant alterations of metabolites involving amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates were observed in Apc(Min/+) mouse in sera, which were attenuated by American ginseng treatment and concurrent with the histopathological improvement with significantly reduced tumor initiation, progression and gut inflammation. These metabolic changes suggest that the preventive effect of American ginseng is associated with attenuation of impaired amino acid, carbohydrates, and lipid metabolism. It also appears that American ginseng induced significant metabolic alterations independent of the Apc(Min/+) induced metabolic changes. The significantly altered metabolites induced by American ginseng intervention include arachidonic acid, linolelaidic acid, glutamate, docosahexaenoate, tryptophan, and fructose, all of which are associated with inflammation and oxidation. This suggests that American ginseng exerts the chemopreventive effects by anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:26136108

  11. Tumor suppressor function of Betaig-H3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we showed previously that expression of a list of genes including Betaig-h3 (induced by transforming growth factor-β) DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), p21 cip1, c-fos , Heat shock protein (HSP27) and cytokeratin 14 were differentially expressed in several independently generated, radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Our previous data further demonstrated that loss of tumor suppressor gene(s) as a likely mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. In the present study, we chose Betaig-h3 and DCC that were downregulated in tumorigenic cells for further study. Restored expression of Betaig-h3 gene, not DCC gene, by transfecting cDNA into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth. While integrin receptor α5β1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level found in control BEP2D cells after Betaig-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Betaig-h3 gene is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin α5β1 receptor. Furthermore, exogenous TGF-β1 induced expression of Betaig-h3 gene and inhibited the growth of both control and tumorigenic BEP2D cells. Therefore, downregulation of Betaig-h3 gene may results from the decreased expression of upstream mediators such as TGF-β. The findings provide strong evidence that the Betaig-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation-induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  12. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  13. Ovarian metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Birnkrant, A; Sampson, J; Sugarbaker, P H

    1986-11-01

    Controversies exist regarding the surgical treatment of the ovaries in women with primary colorectal cancer. A review of the authors' experience and the surgical literature reveals an incidence of ovarian metastases from colorectal cancer of approximately 6 percent. This problem may occur somewhat more frequently in premenopausal women. Resection of the ovaries at the time of colectomy is unlikely to affect survival. Removal of the ovaries at the time of bowel resection will prevent repeat laparotomy to resect an ovarian mass in approximately 2 percent of women with large bowel cancer. Oophorectomy should be performed in all postmenopausal females at the time of primary resection. Oophorectomy should be performed in premenopausal women if any gross abnormality of the ovary is detected or if peritoneal implants are seen at the time of primary resection. PMID:3533472

  14. Telomere function in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Frías, Cristina; Morán, Alberto; de Juan, Carmen; Ortega, Paloma; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio José; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Benito, Manuel; Iniesta, Pilar

    2009-10-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world. Tumour cells acquire the hallmarks of cancer during the carcinogenic selection process. Cell immortality is one of the principal features acquired during this process which involves the stabilization of telomere length. It is achieved mainly, by telomerase activation. Thus, the discovery of telomeres and telomerase allowed an understanding of the mechanisms by which cells can become immortalized. Different studies have shown that tumour cells have shorter telomeres than nontumour cells and have detected telomerase activity in the majority of tumours. Survival studies have determined that telomere maintenance and telomerase activity are associated with poor prognosis. Taking into account all the results achieved by different groups, quantification and evaluation of telomerase activity and measurement of telomere length may be useful methods for additional biologic and prognostic staging of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:21160767

  15. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  16. Subnuclear Proteomics in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; de Wit, Meike; Mongera, Sandra; Carvalho, Beatriz; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we established the reproducibility of the entire work flow. In a reproducibility analysis of three nuclear matrix fractions independently isolated from the same colon tumor homogenate, 889 of 1,047 proteins (85%) were reproducibly identified at high confidence (minimally two peptides per protein at 99% confidence interval at the protein level) with an average coefficient of variance for the number of normalized spectral counts per protein of 30%. This indicates a good reproducibility of the entire work flow from biochemical isolation to nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Second, using spectral counting combined with statistics, we identified proteins that are significantly enriched in the nuclear matrix fraction relative to two earlier fractions (the chromatin-binding and intermediate filament fractions) isolated from six colorectal tissue samples. The total data set contained 2,059 non-redundant proteins. Gene ontology mining and protein network analysis of nuclear matrix-enriched proteins revealed enrichment for proteins implicated in “RNA processing” and “mRNA metabolic process.” Finally, an explorative comparison of the nuclear matrix proteome in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissues revealed many proteins previously implicated in oncogenesis as well as new candidates. A subset of these differentially expressed proteins also exhibited a corresponding change at the mRNA level

  17. IL-32α suppresses colorectal cancer development via TNFR1-mediated death signaling.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Han, Sang Bae; Yoon, Do Young; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-04-20

    Inflammation is associated with cancer-prone microenvironment, leading to cancer. IL-32 is expressed in chronic inflammation-linked human cancers. To investigate IL-32α in inflammation-linked colorectal carcinogenesis, we generated a strain of mice, expressing IL-32 (IL-32α-Tg). In IL-32α-Tg mice, azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer incidence was decreased, whereas expression of TNFR1 and TNFR1-mediated apoptosis was increased. Also, IL-32α increased ROS production to induce prolonged JNK activation. In colon cancer patients, IL-32α and TNFR1 were increased. These findings indicate that IL-32α suppressed colon cancer development by promoting the death signaling of TNFR1. PMID:25909160

  18. Detection of miRNA as Non-Invasive Biomarkers of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Albert; Dong, Yujuan; Tsoi, Ho; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the deadliest cancers—ranking as the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. It is such a deadly disease because it is largely asymptomatic until the latter stages—oftentimes when the cancer has metastasized. Thus, a huge emphasis of cancer treatment is placed on early detection. Currently, there is a lack of a noninvasive, reliable, and cost-effective screening method for CRC. In recent years, microRNA (miRNA) diagnostic markers have been suggested as a viable new screening method for CRC. miRNAs play an important role in carcinogenesis, and has been observed to be dysregulated in many cancers including CRC. This review examines the diagnostic potential of circulatory and fecal miRNA markers in relation to CRC, as well as current techniques to detect them. PMID:25633103

  19. Dietary Iron and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Review of Human Population Studies.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Joseph H; Rogers, Connie J; Kelleher, Shannon L; Lesko, Samuel M; Hartman, Terryl J

    2016-04-25

    Iron is an essential micronutrient that is involved in many redox processes and serves as an integral component in various physiological functions. However, excess iron can cause tissue damage through its pro-oxidative effects, potentiating the development of many diseases such as cancer through the generation of reactive oxidative species. The two major forms of iron in the diet are heme and nonheme iron, both of which are found in several different foods. In addition to natural food sources, intake of nonheme iron may also come from fortified foods or in supplement form. This review summarizes the results of human population studies that have examined the role of dietary iron (heme and nonheme), heme iron alone, and iron from supplements in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25574701

  20. Simultaneous fingerprint and high-wavenumber Raman endoscopy for in vivo diagnosis of colorectal precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kan; Wang, Jianfeng; Sylvest Bergholt, Mads; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Hongzhi; Ren, Jian-lin; Yu Ho, Khek; Teh, Ming; Guan Yeoh, Khay; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    This work aims to apply a fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy technique for in vivo assessment of adenomatous polyps during clinical colonoscopy. We have developed a fiber-optic Raman endoscopic technique capable of simultaneously acquiring both the fingerprint (FP) (i.e., 800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber (HW) (i.e., 2800-3600 cm-1) Raman spectra for real-time assessment of colorectal carcinogenesis. Simultaneous FP/HW Raman endoscopy provides a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 83.3% for differentiating adenoma from hyperplastic polyps, which is superior to either the FP or HW Raman technique alone. This study shows that simultaneous FP/HW Raman spectroscopy has the potential for improving early diagnosis of adenomatous polyps in vivo during colonoscopic examination.

  1. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon cancer through the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Yongyu; Fu, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Xian; Peng, Yan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin

    2016-09-15

    The prevalence of invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) within the serrated neoplasia pathway of the proximal colon has seldom been investigated. We examined the invasive Fn and bacterial biofilms in 35 proximal hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 33 sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 48 proximal colorectal cancers (CRCs) and 10 matched metastatic lymph nodes using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples of normal mucosa, traditional adenomas (TAs), distal HPs, distal CRCs and matched lymph nodes with or without metastases were used as controls. The prevalence of invasive Fn within proximal HPs (65.7%) and SSAs (78.8%) were significantly higher than that of proximal TAs (28.9%) and distal TAs (24.4%; p < 0.05). Invasive Fn was detected in markedly more proximal CRCs (89.6%) than in distal CRCs (42.2%; p < 0.05). Moreover, invasive Fn was detected in a significantly higher proportion of matched metastatic lymph nodes (100%) than that within nonmetastatic lymph nodes (40.0%; p < 0.001). Bacterial biofilms were found on 52.1% of proximal CRCs, 55.6% of distal CRCs and 48.5% of SSAs. Biofilms were positive for Fn in 47.9% of proximal CRCs, 48.9% of distal CRCs and 27.3% of SSAs. However, the presence of Fn in biofilms was not related to invasive Fn within colorectal tissues (p = 0.415). Invasive Fn may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon developing via the serrated neoplasia pathway, but might have a less important role in the TA-carcinoma sequence. Bacterial biofilms may not contribute to the invasion of Fn into tumor tissues. PMID:27130618

  2. Systemic Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolpin, Brian M.; Mayer, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common non-cutaneous malignancy in the United States and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death. Over the past 12 years, significant progress has been made in the systemic treatment of this malignant condition. Six new chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced, increasing median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from less than 9 months with no treatment to approximately 24 months. For patients with stage III (lymph node positive) colon cancer, an overall survival benefit for fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been firmly established, and recent data have shown further efficacy for the inclusion of oxaliplatin in such adjuvant treatment programs. For patients with stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at higher risk for disease recurrence. Ongoing randomized clinical trials are evaluating how best to combine currently available therapies, while smaller studies are evaluating new agents, with the goal of continued progress in prolonging life among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and increasing cure rates among those with resectable disease. PMID:18471507

  3. Liver Metastases in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Folprecht, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Resection of colorectal liver metastases is a treatment standard because patients experience long-term disease-free survival or are even cured after undergoing this procedure. Improved surgical techniques for liver resection in combination with downsizing liver metastases by chemotherapy, interventions to induce liver hypertrophy before resection, and the use of ablative techniques have allowed us to expand the indications for liver surgery and local treatment in situations with limited metastatic colorectal cancer. Resectability and identification of patients who might benefit from liver surgery and local ablative techniques are key factors for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Despite the wide acceptance of liver surgery and ablative techniques, there are many open questions on the management of limited metastatic disease, such as which patients benefit from an aggressive surgical approach, what the indications for ablative and other local techniques are, and what the role of chemotherapy is for patients with resectable or resected disease. Unfortunately, results of randomized trials are only available for a limited number of these questions. PMID:27249722

  4. ADAMTS Expression in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Filou, Serafula; Korpetinou, Aggeliki; Kyriakopoulou, Dora; Bounias, Dimitrios; Stavropoulos, Michael; Ravazoula, Panagiota; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Vynios, Demitrios H.

    2015-01-01

    ADAMTSs are a family of secreted proteinases that share the metalloproteinase domain with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). By acting on a large panel of extracellular substrates, they control several cell functions such as fusion, adhesion, proliferation and migration. Through their thrombospondin motifs they also possess anti-angiogenic properties. We investigated whether ADAMTSs participate in colorectal cancer progression and invasion. Their expression was investigated at both mRNA and protein levels. Using RT-PCR, the expression of ADAMTS-1, -4, -5 and ADAMTS-20 was estimated in colorectal tumors of different cancer stage and anatomic site and 3 cell lines of different aggressiveness. An overexpression of ADAMTS-4 and -5 was observed, especially in tissue samples, whereas ADAMTS-1 and -20 were found to be down-regulated. Western blot analysis further supported the RT-PCR findings, revealing in addition the degradation of ADAMTS-1 and -20 in cancer. In situ expression and localization of ADAMTS-1, -4, -5 and -20 was also investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. Our data suggest a positive correlation between ADAMTS-4 and -5 expression and cancer progression, in contrast with the anti-angiogenic members of the family, ADAMTS-1 and -20, which were found to be down-regulated. Our findings support the notion that overexpression of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 in colorectal cancer might be a possible invasive mechanism of cancer cells in order to degrade proteoglycans of ECM. PMID:25786261

  5. [Maintenance therapy for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigeo; Kato, Shunsuke

    2014-08-01

    Some trials have demonstrated the benefits of maintenance chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer. In chemotherapeutic strategies for advanced colorectal cancer, chemotherapy-related toxicity prevention and quality of life(QOL)maintenance are more important than the introduction of a strong regimen, especially when additional surgery is not possible. In Japan, the combination of a folinic acid/5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin(FOLFOX)regimen and bevacizumab is a popular first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, despite its effectiveness, neuropathy or hand-foot syndrome after 5 or 6 cycles tends to lead to chemotherapy withdrawal. CAIRO3 trial reported the effectiveness of capecitabine and bevacizumab as a maintenance chemotherapy regimen. Additionally, the ML18147 trial demonstrated that bevacizumab beyond progression(BBP)prolonged overall survival(OS)and progression free survival(PFS)in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Although those trials demonstrated the effectiveness of continuous or maintenance bevacizumab administration, no trials have compared the effectiveness of cytotoxic drugs with bevacizumab as maintenance therapies. Moreover, controversy exists regarding the selection of drugs as a maintenance therapy and the identification of patients who would benefit from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132024

  6. Targeted deletion of Kif18a protects from colitis-associated colorectal (CAC) tumors in mice through impairing Akt phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Houbao; Xu, Wangyang; Zhang, Hongxin; Liu, Jianbing; Xu, Haimin; Lu, Shunyuan; Dang, Suying; Kuang, Ying; Jin, Xiaolong; Wang, Zhugang

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Kif18A is up-regulated in CAC of mouse model. •Kif18a{sup −/−} mice are protected from CAC. •Tumor cells from Kif18a{sup −/−} mice undergo more apoptosis. •Kif18A deficiency induces poor Atk phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Kinesins are a superfamily of molecular motors involved in cell division or intracellular transport. They are becoming important targets for chemotherapeutic intervention of cancer due to their crucial role in mitosis. Here, we demonstrate that the kinesin-8 Kif18a is overexpressed in murine CAC and is a crucial promoter during early CAC carcinogenesis. Kif18a-deficient mice are evidently protected from AOM–DSS-induced colon carcinogenesis. Kif18A is responsible for proliferation of colonic tumor cells, while Kif18a ablation in mice promotes cell apoptosis. Mechanistically, Kif18a is responsible for induction of Akt phosphorylation, which is known to be associated with cell survival regulation. In conclusion, Kif18a is critical for colorectal carcinogenesis in the setting of inflammation by mechanisms of increased PI3K-AKT signaling. Inhibition of Kif18A activity may be useful in the prevention or chemotherapeutic intervention of CAC.

  7. Modulation of tumorigenesis by the pro-inflammatory microRNA miR-301a in mouse models of lung cancer and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaodong; Yan, Fang; Deng, Qipan; Li, Fenge; Lu, Zhongxin; Liu, Mofang; Wang, Lisheng; Conklin, Daniel J; McCracken, James; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer and colorectal cancer account for over one-third of all cancer deaths in the United States. MicroRNA-301a (miR-301a) is an activator of both nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and Stat3, and is overexpressed in both deadly malignancies. In this work, we show that genetic ablation of miR-301a reduces Kras-driven lung tumorigenesis in mice. And miR-301a deficiency protects animals from dextran sodium sulfate-induced colon inflammation and colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. We also demonstrate that miR-301a deletion in bone marrow-derived cells attenuates tumor growth in the colon carcinogenesis model. Our findings ascertain that one microRNA—miR-301a—activates two major inflammatory pathways (NF-κB and Stat3) in vivo, generating a pro-inflammatory microenvironment that facilitates tumorigenesis. PMID:27462406

  8. MicroRNA-92a Promotes Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth and Migration by Inhibiting KLF4.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huiqing; Zhang, Zhongmin; Wang, Yaoxia; Li, Chenglin; Gong, Weihong; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy with high mortality around the world. However, the biological mechanism of CRC carcinogenesis is not completely known. In the present study, we determined the role of miR-92a in the regulation of CRC cell motility. Expression of miR-92a is aberrantly upregulated in human CRC tissues and cultured cells, as shown by RT-PCR analysis. The effects of miR-92a on the proliferation and migration of human CRC SW620 and LoVo cells were measured by CCK-8 and Transwell assay, respectively. Results showed that the proliferation and migration capacity of both SW620 and LoVo cells were significantly increased by miR-92a mimic transfection but reduced by miR-92a inhibition. Additionally, KLF4 was identified as a direct target of miR-92a in CRC cells through bioinformatics and luciferase reporter analysis. KLF4 overexpression attenuated the effects of miR-92a on the regulation of CRC cell motility. Further studies suggested that the cell cycle inhibitor p21 was aberrantly downregulated in CRC cells, whereas this inhibition was reversed by miR-92a inhibitor. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that miR-92a may play a positive role in the colorectal carcinogenesis by promoting the proliferation and migration of CRC cells through targeting KLF4 as well as downstream p21. This could be an alternative therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27131314

  9. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  10. Economic Burden of Colorectal Cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ju-Young; Oh, In-Hwan; Kim, Young Ae; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Yo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The incidence and survival rate of colorectal cancer in Korea are increasing because of improved screening, treatment technologies, and lifestyle changes. In this aging population, increases in economic cost result. This study was conducted to estimate the economic burden of colorectal cancer utilizing claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Economic burdens of colorectal cancer were estimated using prevalence data and patients were defined as those who received ambulatory treatment from medical institutions or who had been hospitalized due to colorectal cancer under the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes from C18-C21. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer were calculated as direct costs and indirect costs. Results The prevalence rate (per 100 000 people) of those who were treated for colorectal cancer during 2010 was 165.48. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer in 2010 were 3 trillion and 100 billion Korean won (KRW), respectively. Direct costs included 1 trillion and 960 billion KRW (62.85%), respectively and indirect costs were 1 trillion and 160 billion (37.15%), respectively. Conclusions Colorectal cancer has a large economic burden. Efforts should be made to reduce the economic burden of the disease through primary and secondary prevention. PMID:24744825

  11. Inflammation-driven carcinogenesis is mediated through STING

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeonghyun; Xia, Tianli; Konno, Hiroyasu; Konno, Keiko; Ruiz, Phillip; Barber, Glen N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stimulation of innate immune pathways by microbial agents or damaged tissue is known to promote inflammation-driven tumorigenesis by mechanisms that are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that mutagenic 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), cisplatin and etoposide induce nuclear DNA leakage into the cytosol that intrinsically activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent cytokine production. Inflammatory cytokine levels are subsequently augmented in a STING-dependent extrinsic manner by infiltrating phagocytes purging dying cells. Consequently, STING−/− mice, or wild-type mice adoptively transferred with STING−/− bone marrow, are almost completely resistant to DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis compared with their wild-type counterparts. Our data establish a role for STING in the control of cancer, shed significant insight into the causes of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis and may provide a basis for therapeutic strategies to help prevent malignant disease. PMID:25300616

  12. European Community research on environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sors, A I

    1993-01-01

    Within the 12 Member States of the European Community (EC), environmental policy is now formulated primarily at Community level. As a result, the EC has important regulatory responsibilities for the protection of workers, consumers, and the general public from risks that may arise from environmental chemicals, foremost among them potential carcinogens and mutagens. An important part of EC environmental research and development is intended to provide a scientific basis for these regulations as well as increasing understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in environmental carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. This paper contains a brief introduction to EC environment policy and research, followed by an overview of EC chemicals control activities that are of particular relevance to the research and development program. Community-level research on environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis is then reviewed in some detail, including the achievements of recent projects, the scientific content of the current program, and perspectives for the future. PMID:8143645

  13. Inflammatory microenvironment and human papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mangino, Giorgio; Chiantore, Maria Vincenza; Iuliano, Marco; Fiorucci, Gianna; Romeo, Giovanna

    2016-08-01

    More than 15% of the global cancer burden is attributable to infectious agents. Pathogens that cause persistent infections are strongly associated with cancer, inflammation being a major component of the chronic infections as revealed by basic, clinical and epidemiological studies. Persistent infection and viral oncoproteins induce specific cellular pathways modifications that promote tumorigenesis. Deregulated and continuous immune response leads to severe tissue and systemic damage, impaired tumor surveillance and consequent carcinogenesis promotion by selecting for metastatic and therapeutically resistant tumor phenotypes. In this review, the role of inflammatory microenvironment in the HPV-induced carcinogenesis is addressed, with a specific focus on the involvement of the immune molecules and microRNAs as well as their delivery through the microvesicle cargo. PMID:27021827

  14. Basic concepts of inflammation and its role in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maher, Stephen G; Reynolds, John V

    2011-01-01

    While the normal inflammatory cascade is self-limiting and crucial for host protection against invading pathogens and in the repair of damaged tissue, a wealth of evidence suggests that chronic inflammation is the engine driving carcinogenesis. Over a period of almost 150 years the link between inflammation and cancer development has been well established. In this chapter we discuss the fundamental concepts and mechanisms behind normal inflammation as it pertains to wound healing. We further discuss the association of inflammation and its role in carcinogenesis, highlighting the different stages of cancer development, namely tumour initiation, promotion and progression. With both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system being central to the inflammatory process, we examine the role of a number of immune effectors in contributing to the carcinogenic process. In addition, we highlight the influences of host genetics in altering cancer risk. PMID:21822817

  15. Meat processing and colon carcinogenesis: cooked, nitrite-treated, and oxidized high-heme cured meat promotes mucin-depleted foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Raphaëlle L; Vendeuvre, Jean-Luc; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Guéraud, Françoise; Viau, Michelle; Genot, Claude; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2010-01-01

    Processed meat intake is associated with colorectal cancer risk, but no experimental study supports the epidemiologic evidence. To study the effect of meat processing on carcinogenesis promotion, we first did a 14-day study with 16 models of cured meat. Studied factors, in a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 design, were muscle color (a proxy for heme level), processing temperature, added nitrite, and packaging. Fischer 344 rats were fed these 16 diets, and we evaluated fecal and urinary fat oxidation and cytotoxicity, three biomarkers of heme-induced carcinogenesis promotion. A principal component analysis allowed for selection of four cured meats for inclusion into a promotion study. These selected diets were given for 100 days to rats pretreated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Colons were scored for preneoplastic lesions: aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF). Cured meat diets significantly increased the number of ACF/colon compared with a no-meat control diet (P = 0.002). Only the cooked nitrite-treated and oxidized high heme meat significantly increased the fecal level of apparent total N-nitroso compounds (ATNC) and the number of MDF per colon compared with the no-meat control diet (P < 0.05). This nitrite-treated and oxidized cured meat specifically increased the MDF number compared with similar non nitrite-treated meat (P = 0.03) and with similar non oxidized meat (P = 0.004). Thus, a model cured meat, similar to ham stored aerobically, increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, which suggests colon carcinogenesis promotion. Nitrite treatment and oxidation increased this promoting effect, which was linked with increased fecal ATNC level. This study could lead to process modifications to make non promoting processed meat. PMID:20530708

  16. Anti-proliferative and Apoptotic Effects of Basella rubra (L.) Against 1, 2-Dimethyl Hydrazine-induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kilari, Bhanu Priya; Kotakadi, Venkata Subbaiah; Penchalaneni, Josthna

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a very prevalent diagnosed cancer. The current study was performed in order to examine the role of BRAE (Basella rubra aqueous extract) in regulating aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, cell proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis in a colon carcinogenesis model in male Wistar rats. Rats were randomly allocated into six groups. Group I served as control, and group II acted as a drug control administered BRAE (250mg/kg b.w.) orally for 30 weeks. Rats in group III-VI were given subcutaneous injections of DMH (25mg/kg b.w. weekly) for 15 weeks to initiate colon carcinogenesis. Those in group IV and VI were administered BRAE along with DMH injections. Rats in group V were administered with BRAE after cessation of DMH injection. After 30 weeks of experimental period colons were obtained from experimental groups and analyzed for ACF incidence, argyrophilic nucleolar organizing region- associated proteins (AgNOR) count, histopathological and immunohistochemical changes. Only in DMH exposed groups were ACF and AgNOR numbers increased. Administration of BRAE appreciably decreased the numbers of ACF and AgNOR in BRAE treated groups. Histopathological findings revealed a high level of dysplastic changes with decreased number of goblet cells found only in only DMH injected rats. Administration of BRAE in treated group rats reversed these changes. Expression markers for cell proliferation (PCNA and Ki67) were elevated in DMH treated rats, but reduced with BRAE treatement. This expression was reversed with apoptosis markers (p53 and Caspase-3). Thus the results results of the present study were found to be significant and confirmed the potential efficacy of BRAE against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:26838257

  17. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  18. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide induced experimental oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Vaidya, Milind M

    2006-08-01

    Human oral cancer is the sixth largest group of malignancies worldwide and single largest group of malignancies in the Indian subcontinent. Seventy percent of premalignant cancers appear from premalignant lesions. Only 8-10% of these lesions finally turn into malignancy. The appearance of these premalignant lesions is one distinct feature of human oral cancer. At present there is dearth of biomarkers to identify which of these lesions will turn into malignancy. Regional lymph node metastasis and locoregional recurrence are the major factors responsible for the limited survival of patients with oral cancer. Paucity of early diagnostic and prognostic markers is one of the contributory factors for higher mortality rates. Cancer is a multistep process and because of constrain in availability of human tissues from multiple stages of oral carcinogenesis including normal tissues, animal models are being widely used, aiming for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers. A number of chemical carcinogens like coal tar, 20 methyl cholanthrene (20MC), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) have been used in experimental oral carcinogenesis. However, 4NQO is the preferred carcinogen apart from DMBA in the development of experimental oral carcinogenesis. 4NQO is a water soluble carcinogen, which induces tumors predominantly in the oral cavity. It produces all the stages of oral carcinogenesis and several lines of evidences suggest that similar histological as well as molecular changes are observed in the human system. In the present review an attempt has been made to collate the information available on mechanisms of action of 4NQO, studies carried out for the development of biomarkers and chemopreventives agents using 4NQO animal models. PMID:16448841

  19. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  20. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Laura; Jäkel, Jörg; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53) as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  1. Alterations of Histone H1 Phosphorylation During Bladder Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Telu, Kelly H.; Abbaoui, Besma; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Zynger, Debra L.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    There is a crucial need for development of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in human bladder carcinogenesis in order to personalize preventive and therapeutic strategies and improve outcomes. Epigenetic alterations, such as histone modifications, are implicated in the genetic dysregulation that is fundamental to carcinogenesis. Here we focus on profiling the histone modifications during the progression of bladder cancer. Histones were extracted from normal human bladder epithelial cells, an immortalized human bladder epithelial cell line (hTERT), and four human bladder cancer cell lines (RT4, J82, T24, and UMUC3) ranging from superficial low-grade to invasive high-grade cancers. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling revealed a statistically significant increase in phosphorylation of H1 linker histones from normal human bladder epithelial cells to low-grade superficial to high-grade invasive bladder cancer cells. This finding was further validated by immunohistochemical staining of the normal epithelium and transitional cell cancer from human bladders. Cell cycle analysis of histone H1 phosphorylation by western blotting showed an increase of phosphorylation from G0/G1 phase to M phase, again supporting this as a proliferative marker. Changes in histone H1 phosphorylation status may further clarify epigenetic changes during bladder carcinogenesis and provide diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers or targets for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:23675690

  2. Loss of SPARC in bladder cancer enhances carcinogenesis and progression

    PubMed Central

    Said, Neveen; Frierson, Henry F.; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Brekken, Rolf A.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) has been implicated in multiple aspects of human cancer. However, its role in bladder carcinogenesis and metastasis are unclear,with some studies suggesting it may be a promoter and others arguing the opposite. Using a chemical carcinogenesis model in Sparc-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates, we found that loss of SPARC accelerated the development of urothelial preneoplasia (atypia and dysplasia), neoplasia, and metastasis and was associated with decreased survival. SPARC reduced carcinogen-induced inflammation and accumulation of reactive oxygen species as well as urothelial cell proliferation. Loss of SPARC was associated with an inflammatory phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages and fibroblasts, with concomitant increased activation of urothelial and stromal NF-κB and AP1 in vivo and in vitro. Syngeneic spontaneous and experimental metastasis models revealed that tumor- and stroma-derived SPARC reduced tumor growth and metastasis through inhibition of cancer-associated inflammation and lung colonization. In human bladder tumor tissues, the frequency and intensity of SPARC expression were inversely correlated with disease-specific survival. These results indicate that SPARC is produced by benign and malignant compartments of bladder carcinomas where it functions to suppress bladder carcinogenesis, progression, and metastasis. PMID:23321672

  3. [Molecular markers of carcinogenesis in the diagnostics of cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bedkowska, Grazyna Ewa; Ławicki, Sławomir; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most frequent disease of the reproductive organ and is the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. As it is characterized by high mortality, new diagnostic methods are needed, for example tumor markers, enabling earlier diagnosis and rapid detection of recurrence after therapy. Different tumor markers may be useful in the diagnostics of cervical cancer, for example squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag), tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA), and CYFRA 21-1, as well as some cytokines such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). About 150 genes connected with the carcinogenesis of cervical carcinoma have been identified. This paper is devoted to evaluating the diagnostic usefulness of molecular markers of carcinogenesis, especially P53, Bcl-2, Brn-3a, and MCM, and comparing the results with those of typical tumor markers or cytokines useful in diagnosing this type of cancer. It was shown that telomerase and Brn-3a proteins demonstrate usefulness in screening examination, P53 in monitoring the effectiveness of therapy, and Bcl-2 as a survival prognostic factor. In summary, it is evident that molecular makers of carcinogenesis are helpful in the diagnostics of cervical cancer, but further investigation and confirmation by a prospective study is necessary. PMID:19252468

  4. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The wingless (Wnt) signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis. PMID:27438855

  5. Mechanisms of Chemical Cooperative Carcinogenesis by Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Fraser, Juliet A.; Liao, Haihui; Golubets, Kseniya; Kucher, Cynthia L.; Zhao, Peter Y.; Filler, Renata B.; Tigelaar, Robert E.; Girardi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most prevalent invasive malignancy with metastatic potential. The epidermis is exposed to a variety of environmental DNA-damaging chemicals, principal among which are polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ubiquitous in the environment, tobacco smoke, and broiled meats. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a network of dendritic cells situated adjacent to basal, suprabasal, and follicular infundibular keratinocytes that when mutated can give rise to SCC, and LC-intact mice are markedly more susceptible than LC-deficient mice to chemical carcinogenesis provoked by initiation with the model PAH, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). LC rapidly internalize and depot DMBA as numerous membrane-independent cytoplasmic foci. Repopulation of LC-deficient mice using fetal liver LC-precursors restores DMBA-induced tumor susceptibility. LC expression of p450 enzyme CYP1B1 is required for maximal rapid induction of DNA-damage within adjacent keratinocytes and their efficient neoplastic transformation; however, effects of tumor progression also attributable to the presence of LC were revealed as CYP1B1-independent. Thus, LC make multifaceted contributions to cutaneous carcinogenesis, including via the handling and metabolism of chemical mutagens. Such findings suggest a cooperative carcinogenesis role for myeloid-derived cells resident within cancer susceptible epithelial tissues principally by influencing early events in malignant transformation. PMID:25233073

  6. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  7. Effects of Bowman-Birk inhibitor on rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R; Billings, Paul C; Wan, X Steven; Newberne, Paul M

    2002-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) could prevent colon carcinogenesis in rats treated with dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and whether there were adverse side effects associated with treatment with BBI for cancer prevention. BBI was evaluated in the forms of purified BBI (PBBI) or an extract of soybeans enriched in BBI, termed BBI concentrate (BBIC). The results demonstrate that PBBI and BBIC reduced the incidence and frequency of tumors in DMH-treated rats compared with animals treated with DMH alone. Autoclaved BBIC, in which the protease inhibitor activity of BBI was destroyed, had a weak and statistically insignificant, suppressive effect on DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats, suggesting that the protease inhibitor activity of BBI is likely to be responsible for the anticarcinogenic activity of BBIC. Soy molasses, which contains soy isoflavones, did not have an effect on colon cancer carcinogenesis in DMH-treated rats. Similar to results from previous studies (Nauss et al. JNCI 73, 915-924, 1984), the most aggressive, malignant colon adenocarcinomas developed within or in association with gut-associated lymphoid tissue aggregates. No adverse side effects on the pancreas or animal growth were observed in rats treated with PBBI or BBIC. These results demonstrate that PBBI and BBIC may be used to prevent colon cancer without significant adverse side effects. PMID:12588698

  8. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The wingless (Wnt) signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis. PMID:27438855

  9. IRAK-M Expression in Tumor Cells Supports Colorectal Cancer Progression through Reduction of Antimicrobial Defense and Stabilization of STAT3.

    PubMed

    Kesselring, Rebecca; Glaesner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Neumann, Helmut; Brunner, Stefan M; Wege, Anja K; Seebauer, Caroline; Köhl, Gudrun; Merkl, Susanne; Croner, Roland S; Hackl, Christina; Stürzl, Michael; Neurath, Markus F; Gessner, André; Schlitt, Hans-Juergen; Geissler, Edward K; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with loss of epithelial barrier integrity, which facilitates the interaction of the immunological microenvironment with the luminal microbiome, eliciting tumor-supportive inflammation. An important regulator of intestinal inflammatory responses is IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Here we investigate the compartment-specific impact of IRAK-M on colorectal carcinogenesis using a mouse model. We demonstrate that IRAK-M is expressed in tumor cells due to combined TLR and Wnt activation. Tumor cell-intrinsic IRAK-M is responsible for regulation of microbial colonization of tumors and STAT3 protein stability in tumor cells, leading to tumor cell proliferation. IRAK-M expression in human CRCs is associated with poor prognosis. These results suggest that IRAK-M may be a potential therapeutic target for CRC treatment. PMID:27150039

  10. Clonal evolution and tumor progression in 2 human colorectal adenoma-derived cell-lines invitro - the involvement of chromosome-1 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hague, A; Hanlon, K; Paraskeva, C

    1992-07-01

    Two human colorectal adenoma cell lines, S/RG and S/AN, have been continuously passaged in vitro to determine whether they would immortalize and if specific cytogenetic changes were involved in immortalization and tumor progression. At passage 7, S/RG was highly aneuploid, but had no abnormalities of chromosome 1 (Paraskeva et al, Cancer Res 49: 1282-1286, 1989). With continued passage under two independent sets of growth conditions an isochromosome Iq and derivatives of this isochromosome occurred as specific abnormalities. S/AN was near-diploid at passage 10, with a deletion in lp and monosomy 18. The karyotype at passage 44 showed no change. The cell lines are stable in that they have remained anchorage-dependent and non-tumorigenic after several years in culture and S/AN has retained a near diploid karyotype. These cell lines are therefore highly valuable for further studies of tumor progression in human colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:21584532

  11. Processed meat and colorectal cancer: a review of epidemiologic and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Raphaëlle L.; Pierre, Fabrice; Corpet, Denis E.

    2008-01-01

    Processed meat intake may be involved in the etiology of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. The epidemiologic studies published to date conclude that the excess risk in the highest category of processed meat-eaters is comprised between 20 and 50% compared with non-eaters. In addition, the excess risk per gram of intake is clearly higher than that of fresh red meat. Several hypotheses, which are mainly based on studies carried out on red meat, may explain why processed meat intake is linked to cancer risk. Those that have been tested experimentally are (i) that high-fat diets could promote carcinogenesis via insulin resistance or fecal bile acids; (ii) that cooking meat at a high temperature forms carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (iii) that carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds are formed in meat and endogenously; (iv) that heme iron in red meat can promote carcinogenesis because it increases cell proliferation in the mucosa, through lipoperoxidation and/or cytotoxicity of fecal water. Nitrosation might increase the toxicity of heme in cured products. Solving this puzzle is a challenge that would permit to reduce cancer load by changing the processes rather than by banning processed meat. PMID:18444144

  12. Exon-specific DNA hypomethylation of the p53 gene of rat colon induced by dimethylhydrazine. Modulation by dietary folate.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y. I.; Pogribny, I. P.; Salomon, R. N.; Choi, S. W.; Smith, D. E.; James, S. J.; Mason, J. B.

    1996-01-01

    Folate deficiency enhances colorectal carcinogenesis in dimethylhydrazine-treated rats. Folate is an important mediator of DNA methylation, an epigenetic modification of DNA that is known to be dysregulated in the early stages of colorectal cancer. This study investigated the effect of dimethylhydrazine on DNA methylation of the colonic p53 gene and the modulation of this effect by dietary folate. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing 0, 2, 8, or 40 mg of folate/kg of diet. Five weeks after diet initiation, dimethylhydrazine was injected weekly for fifteen weeks. Folate-depleted and folate-replete control animals did not receive dimethylhydrazine and were fed the 0- and 8-mg folate diets, respectively. The extent of p53 methylation was determined by a quantitative HpaII-polymerase chain reaction. In exons 6 and 7, significant p53 hypomethylation was observed in all dimethylhydrazine-treated rats relative to controls (P < 0.01), independent of dietary folate. In exon 8, significant p53 hypomethylation was observed only in the dimethylhydrazine-treated folate-depleted rats compared with controls (P = 0.038) and was effectively overcome by increasing levels of dietary folate (P = 0.008). In this model, dimethylhydrazine induces exon-specific p53 hypomethylation. In some exons, this occurs independent of dietary folate, and in others, increasing levels of dietary folate effectively override the induction of hypomethylation in a dose-responsive manner. This may be a mechanism by which increasing levels of dietary folate inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:8863662

  13. Characterization of Chromosomal Instability in Murine Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Glauben, Rainer; Habermann, Jens K.; Kühl, Anja A.; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Zeitz, Martin; Siegmund, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) bear an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Due to the sparsity of colitis-associated cancer (CAC) and the long duration between UC initiation and overt carcinoma, elucidating mechanisms of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis in the gut is particularly challenging. Adequate murine models are thus highly desirable. For human CACs a high frequency of chromosomal instability (CIN) reflected by aneuploidy could be shown, exceeding that of sporadic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to analyze mouse models of CAC with regard to CIN. Additionally, protein expression of p53, beta-catenin and Ki67 was measured to further characterize murine tumor development in comparison to UC-associated carcinogenesis in men. Methods The AOM/DSS model (n = 23) and IL-10−/− mice (n = 8) were applied to monitor malignancy development via endoscopy and to analyze premalignant and malignant stages of CACs. CIN was assessed using DNA-image cytometry. Protein expression of p53, beta-catenin and Ki67 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The degree of inflammation was analyzed by histology and paralleled to local interferon-γ release. Results CIN was detected in 81.25% of all murine CACs induced by AOM/DSS, while all carcinomas that arose in IL-10−/− mice were chromosomally stable. Beta-catenin expression was strongly membranous in IL-10−/− mice, while 87.50% of AOM/DSS-induced tumors showed cytoplasmatic and/or nuclear translocation of beta-catenin. p53 expression was high in both models and Ki67 staining revealed higher proliferation of IL-10−/−-induced CACs. Conclusions AOM/DSS-colitis, but not IL-10−/− mice, could provide a powerful murine model to mechanistically investigate CIN in colitis-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:21799775

  14. Genetic-based biomarkers and next-generation sequencing: the future of personalized care in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Redecca Y; Myllykangas, Samuel; Ji, Hanlee

    2013-01-01

    The past 5 years have witnessed extraordinary advances in the field of DNA sequencing technology. What once took years to accomplish with Sanger sequencing can now be accomplished in a matter of days with next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. This has allowed researchers to sequence individual genomes and match combinations of mutations with specific diseases. As cancer is inherently a disease of the genome, it is not surprising to see NGS technology already being applied to cancer research with promises of greater understanding of carcinogenesis. While the task of deciphering the cancer genomic code remains ongoing, we are already beginning to see the application of genetic-based testing in the area of colorectal cancer. In this article we will provide an overview of current colorectal cancer genetic-based biomarkers, namely mutations and other genetic alterations in cancer genome DNA, discuss recent advances in NGS technology and speculate on future directions for the application of NGS technology to colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23662107

  15. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA–RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA–miRNA and miRNA–miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA–RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27067546

  16. The Role of Chromosomal Instability and Epigenetics in Colorectal Cancers Lacking β-Catenin/TCF Regulated Transcription.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E; Kaur, Sippy; Niskakoski, Anni; Knuutila, Sakari; Järvinen, Heikki; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    All colorectal cancer cell lines except RKO displayed active β-catenin/TCF regulated transcription. This feature of RKO was noted in familial colon cancers; hence our aim was to dissect its carcinogenic mechanism. MFISH and CGH revealed distinct instability of chromosome structure in RKO. Gene expression microarray of RKO versus 7 colon cancer lines (with active Wnt signaling) and 3 normal specimens revealed 611 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the tested gene loci were susceptible to LOH in primary tumors with various β-catenin localizations as a surrogate marker for β-catenin activation. The immunohistochemistry of selected genes (IFI16, RGS4, MCTP1, DGKI, OBCAM/OPCML, and GLIPR1) confirmed that they were differentially expressed in clinical specimens. Since epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to expression changes, selected target genes were evaluated for promoter methylation in patient specimens from sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. CMTM3, DGKI, and OPCML were frequently hypermethylated in both groups, whereas KLK10, EPCAM, and DLC1 displayed subgroup specificity. The overall fraction of hypermethylated genes was higher in tumors with membranous β-catenin. We identified novel genes in colorectal carcinogenesis that might be useful in personalized tumor profiling. Tumors with inactive Wnt signaling are a heterogeneous group displaying interaction of chromosomal instability, Wnt signaling, and epigenetics. PMID:27047543

  17. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA-RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA-miRNA and miRNA-miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA-RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27067546

  18. The Role of Chromosomal Instability and Epigenetics in Colorectal Cancers Lacking β-Catenin/TCF Regulated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E.; Kaur, Sippy; Niskakoski, Anni; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    All colorectal cancer cell lines except RKO displayed active β-catenin/TCF regulated transcription. This feature of RKO was noted in familial colon cancers; hence our aim was to dissect its carcinogenic mechanism. MFISH and CGH revealed distinct instability of chromosome structure in RKO. Gene expression microarray of RKO versus 7 colon cancer lines (with active Wnt signaling) and 3 normal specimens revealed 611 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the tested gene loci were susceptible to LOH in primary tumors with various β-catenin localizations as a surrogate marker for β-catenin activation. The immunohistochemistry of selected genes (IFI16, RGS4, MCTP1, DGKI, OBCAM/OPCML, and GLIPR1) confirmed that they were differentially expressed in clinical specimens. Since epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to expression changes, selected target genes were evaluated for promoter methylation in patient specimens from sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. CMTM3, DGKI, and OPCML were frequently hypermethylated in both groups, whereas KLK10, EPCAM, and DLC1 displayed subgroup specificity. The overall fraction of hypermethylated genes was higher in tumors with membranous β-catenin. We identified novel genes in colorectal carcinogenesis that might be useful in personalized tumor profiling. Tumors with inactive Wnt signaling are a heterogeneous group displaying interaction of chromosomal instability, Wnt signaling, and epigenetics. PMID:27047543

  19. All Trans-Retinoic Acid Mediates MED28/HMG Box-Containing Protein 1 (HBP1)/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Huang, Chun-Yin; Li, Chun-I

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin A is required for normal body function, including vision, epithelial integrity, growth, and differentiation. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a family member of vitamin A, has been explored in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and other types of cancer. Dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and disrupted cadherin-catenin complex often contribute to colorectal malignancy. MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, is found highly expressed in breast and colorectal cancers. Our laboratory has also reported that MED28 regulates cell growth, migration, and invasion in human breast cancer cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of ATRA on MED28 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer. HCT116, HT29, SW480, and SW620, four human colorectal cancer cell lines representing different stages of carcinogenesis and harboring critical genetic changes, were employed. Our data indicated that regardless of genetic variations among these cells, suppression of MED28 reduced the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc, and nuclear β-catenin, but increased the expression of E-cadherin and HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) where HBP1 has been described as a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The reporter activity of an HBP1 promoter increased upon MED28 knockdown, but decreased upon MED28 overexpression. ATRA reduced the expression of MED28 and mimicked the effect of MED28 suppression in down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, ATRA can reverse the suppressive effect of MED28 on HBP1 and E-cadherin and inactivate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer, suggesting a protective effect of ATRA against colorectal cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1796-1803, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660958

  20. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) Polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 Expression in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana C.; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J. L.; Rabenhorst, Silvia H. B.; Martinez, Carlos A. R.; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  1. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J L; Rabenhorst, Silvia H B; Martinez, Carlos A R; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  2. NM23-H1 immunostaining is inversely associated with tumour staging but not overall survival or disease recurrence in colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, P. Y.; Cao, X.; Eu, K. W.; Seow-Choen, F.

    1998-01-01

    The NM23-H1 gene product has been recently identified as a potential metastasis suppressor. Studies on breast carcinomas have shown an inverse correlation between NM23-H1 status and stage of carcinogenesis and overall survival. However, in colorectal cancer, conflicting data have been reported. This study aimed to investigate whether NM23-H1 immunostaining is correlated with tumour stage, overall survival, disease recurrence, tumour differentiation, age and sex in colorectal carcinomas for the Singapore population using chi-square analysis. The staining was performed on 141 paraffin-embedded surgical specimens collected between 1991 and 1992 using a monoclonal anti-NM23-H1 antibody. Follow-up of patients was until time of death or for 5 years. There was a very significant inverse association between tumour staging and NM23-H1 status (P = 0.0004). However, NM23-H1 expression was not significantly correlated to overall 5-year survival, disease recurrence, tumour differentiation, age or sex. Thus, although NM23-H1 may be involved in suppressing metastasis, NM23-H1 immunohistochemistry has no prognostic value in colorectal cancer. This is the first report of a significant inverse association of NM23-H1 status with tumour staging in colorectal cancer which showed no correlation with overall survival or disease recurrence. Our result thus cautions against the practice of equating an inverse relation of genetic markers with tumour staging to survival or disease recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9569056

  3. EYA4 Acts as a New Tumor Suppressor Gene in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Tae, Chung Hyun; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Kim, Young-Ho

    2015-12-01

    A previous genome-wide methylation array for colorectal cancer (CRC) identified aberrant promoter methylation of eyes absent 4 (EYA4). However, the correlations between EYA4 methylation and gene expression, the role played by EYA4 protein in colorectal carcinogenesis, and results of the gene-enrichment and functional annotation analysis have not yet been established. We analyzed the EYA4 methylation status and found EYA4 promoter methylation in CRC cell lines (100%), CRC tissues (93.5%) and advanced adenoma tissues (50.7%), compared with normal mucosa (32.6%). There was a significant inverse correlation between EYA4 methylation and expression. EYA4 transfection led to inhibition of cell proliferation in colony assays and xenograft studies. On performing the gene-enrichment and functional annotation analysis, we observed that the differentially expressed genes have been associated with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that EYA4 is under epigenetic regulation in CRC. It is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that acts by inducing up-regulation of DKK1 and inhibiting the Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, EYA4 methylation may be identified in stool samples and it serves as a potential stool biomarker for detection of advanced adenoma and CRC. PMID:25620232

  4. Colorectal Cancer with Residual Polyp of Origin: A Model of Malignant Transformation.

    PubMed

    Druliner, Brooke R; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Bae, Taejeong; Vasmatzis, Nikolaos; O'Brien, Daniel; Johnson, Ruth; Felmlee-Devine, Donna; Washechek-Aletto, Jill; Basu, Nivedita; Liu, Hongfang; Smyrk, Thomas; Abyzov, Alexej; Boardman, Lisa A

    2016-08-01

    The majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise from adenomatous polyps. In this study, we sought to present the underrecognized CRC with the residual polyp of origin (CRC RPO+) as an entity to be utilized as a model to study colorectal carcinogenesis. We identified all subjects with biopsy-proven CRC RPO+ that were evaluated over 10 years at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and compared their clinical and pathologic characteristics to CRC without remnant polyps (CRC RPO-). Overall survival and disease-free survival overlap with an equivalent hazard ratio between CRC RPO+ and RPO- cases when age, stage, and grade are adjusted. The somatic genomic profile obtained by whole genome sequencing and the gene expression profiles by RNA-seq for CRC RPO+ tumors were compared with that of age -and gender-matched CRC RPO- evaluated by The Cancer Genome Atlas. CRC RPO+ cases were more commonly found with lower-grade, earlier-stage disease than CRC RPO-. However, within the same disease stage and grade, their clinical course is very similar to that of CRC RPO-. The mutation frequencies of commonly mutated genes in CRC are similar between CRC RPO+ and RPO- cases. Likewise, gene expression patterns are indistinguishable between the RPO+ and RPO- cases. We have confirmed that CRC RPO+ is clinically and biologically similar to CRC RPO- and may be utilized as a model of the adenoma to carcinoma transition. PMID:27567950

  5. Expression and clinical significance of cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Yibing; Huang, Xiaojun; Qu, Ping; Pan, Qiuzhong; Lü, Lin; Jiang, Shanshan; Su, Haichuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits encoded by mitochondrial DNA is elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the expression of nuclear DNA-encoded COX IV and its clinical significance have not yet been investigated in CRC. Material and methods We examined COX IV expression in paired CRC samples (cancer and pericancerous tissues) by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Western blot and immunohistochemical staining and analyzed its clinical significance. Results qPCR and Western blot analyses showed that COX IV expression was significantly elevated at both the mRNA (p = 0.05) and protein levels in CRC tissue samples when compared with those in paired pericancerous tissues. Immunohistochemistry also revealed that COX IV expression was significantly increased in CRC tissues (p < 0.001). Association analyses showed that there was no significant association between COX IV expression and clinical parameters of CRC patients except for gender (p = 0.017). Moreover, we did not find any association between COX IV expression and overall survival or recurrence-free survival of CRC patients. Further analysis showed no significant relationship between the expression of COX IV and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a marker of cell proliferation. Conclusions Our findings suggest that elevated COX IV expression may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, but not in progression, which warrants further investigation in future studies. PMID:26925120

  6. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T.; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J.M.; Vyas, B.R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport “synergism.” PMID:23511582

  7. Regulation of MYC gene expression by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll, Sherri; Yochum, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway controls intestinal homeostasis and mutations in components of this pathway are prevalent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs). These mutations lead to inappropriate expression of genes controlled by Wnt responsive DNA elements (WREs). T-cell factor/Lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors bind WREs and recruit the β-catenin transcriptional co-activator to activate target gene expression. Deregulated expression of the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC) by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling drives colorectal carcinogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current literature pertaining to the identification and characterization of WREs that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRCs. A common theme has emerged whereby these WREs often map distally to the MYC genomic locus and control MYC gene expression through long-range chromatin loops with the MYC proximal promoter. We propose that by determining which of these WREs is critical for CRC pathogenesis, novel strategies can be developed to treat individuals suffering from this disease. PMID:26629312

  8. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J M; Vyas, B R M

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport "synergism." PMID:23511582

  9. Association of serum cytokines with colorectal polyp number and type in adult males.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Sarah S; Xu, Diana; Hortos, Kari; Kovan, Bruce; McCaskey, Sarah; Pathak, Dorothy R; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to colorectal carcinogenesis. To determine whether serum cytokines are associated with colon polyps, 126 asymptomatic men (48-65 years) were recruited during colonoscopy. Serum cytokine concentrations were measured. Odds ratios were determined using polytomous logistic regression for polyp number and type. Men with serum monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3) or soluble interleukin-4 receptor (sIL-4R) concentrations in the highest tertile were 0.2 times less likely to have three or more polyps relative to no polyps. For each increase in serum MCP-3 or sIL-4R tertile a man was about 0.4 times less likely to have three or more polyps than to have no polyps. Men with serum concentrations of interferon-α2 (IFN-α2) or interleukin (IL)-7 in the highest tertile were three times more likely to have an adenoma than no polyps. Those with serum IL-8 concentrations in the highest tertile were four times more likely to have an adenoma than no polyps. For each increase in serum IFN-α2, IL-7, or IL-8 tertile an individual was 1.8 times more likely to have an adenoma than to have no polyps. Serum concentrations of MCP-3, sIL-4R, IFN-α2, IL-7, and IL-8 may indicate which men are more likely to have colorectal polyps. PMID:25793917

  10. RNA interference against TRIM29 inhibits migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Cao, Hua; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Sheng, Huiming

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Tripartite motif-containing 29 (TRIM29) is a member of TRIM proteins family, which plays diverse physiological and pathological roles in humans. Recent studies found that TRIM29 expressed highly in CRC and promoted cell growth in vitro. However, its function in the metastasis of CRC has not been studied. In the present study, we confirmed the previous report that TRIM29 was upregulated in CRC tissues and high levels of TRIM29 expression were associated with poor overall survival of patients. Moreover, TRIM29 knockdown significantly reduced cancer cell proliferation via notably inducing cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Silencing of TRIM29 significantly inhibited the migration and invasion ability of CRC cells. The protein levels of apoptosis‑, migration‑ and invasion‑related proteins were also changed after TRIM29 knockdown. Furthermore, phosphorylation levels of JAK2 and STAT3 were clearly reduced in TRIM29 knockdown cells, indicating a possible mechanism underlying its effects on colorectal carcinogenesis. Collectively, TRIM29 may exert oncogenic effects in CRC cells via regulating JAK2/STAT3 signaling. PMID:27430345

  11. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  12. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Nuri Faruk

    2015-02-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  13. A Prospective Study of Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Murff, Harvey J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Honglan; Dai, Qi; Kallianpur, Asha; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Wen, Wanqing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    In animal models of colon cancer, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have anti-neoplastic properties while n-6 PUFAs may promote carcinogenesis. Prior epidemiological studies have been inconsistent regarding the association of PUFAs and colorectal cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association between PUFA intake and colorectal cancer in a cohort of 73242 Chinese women who were interviewed in person at the baseline survey for the Shanghai Women’s Health Study. Dietary fatty acid consumption was derived using data collected from two food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline and 2 to 3 years later. The dietary total n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio was strongly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Compared to women in the lowest quintile group, elevated relative risks were observed for the second (RR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.00–2.32); third (RR = 2.20, 1.41–3.45); fourth (RR= 1.65, 0.99–2.75); and fifth (RR= 1.95, 1.07–3.54) quintile groups. Arachidonic acid was associated with colorectal cancer risk with elevated relative risks of 1.20Q2-Q1 (0.87–1.64), 1.44 Q3-Q1 (1.05–1.98), 1.61 Q4-Q1 (1.17–2.23), and 1.39 Q5-Q1 (0.97–1.99) (Ptrend = 0.03) with increasing dietary quintile. In a subset of 150 cancer cases and 150 controls, we found a statistically significant trend between an increasing n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio and increasing production of prostaglandin E2 as measured by urinary PGE2 metabolites (P = 0.03). These results suggest that dietary PUFA and the ratio of n-6 to n-3 PUFA intake may be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk, and this association may be mediated in part through PGE2 production. PMID:19661088

  14. Prognostic value of β1 integrin expression in colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Vassos, Nikolaos; Rau, Tilman; Merkel, Susanne; Feiersinger, Fabian; Geppert, Carol I; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenberger, Werner; Croner, Roland S

    2014-01-01

    Integrins are cell surface adhesion molecules (CAM) that regulate via intercellular and cell-matrix signaling various cellular processes including wound healing, cell differentiation, division, growth, migration and metastatic dissemination. Although a correlation between carcinogenesis and changes in integrin expression, especially β1 integrin, has been reported, its role in colorectal liver metastases remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of β1 integrin in colorectal liver metastases and to correlate the pattern of expression with clinicopathological features and to investigate the putative role of β1 integrin expression on survival of these patients. Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples of 81 patients who were operated because of colorectal liver metastases without any neoadjuvant therapy were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H & E). An immunohistochemical examination was performed using Dako, Peroxidase/DAB kit and a primary monoclonal β1 integrin (CD29, fibronectin receptor subunit beta; ab3167, Abcam plc). β1 integrin expression was evaluated according to the immunoreactive score of Remmele and Stegner and was related with clinicopathological features of prognostic significance and with disease-free and overall survival as well. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 21.0. Results: β1 integrin was overexpressed in tumor cells in 37 (48%) patients and in stromal cell in 27 (33%) patients. The β1 expression was not statistically correlated with clinicopathological features of the primary tumors but it was statistically correlated (p=0.03) with the histological grading of liver metastases. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that there is a tendency but no statistically significant correlation in disease-free and overall survival. Conclusion: Considering that expression of β1 integrin in colorectal liver metastases remains controversial, specially its relation with

  15. Smoking and risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Knekt, P.; Hakama, M.; Järvinen, R.; Pukkala, E.; Heliövaara, M.

    1998-01-01

    Tobacco smoking was studied in relation to colorectal cancer in 56 973 Finnish men and women initially free from cancer. Smoking status was determined by a health questionnaire. During a follow-up period of 28 years, from the baseline in 1966-72 to the end of 1994, 457 cases of colorectal cancer occurred. There was no significant association between baseline smoking status and colorectal cancer risk over the total follow-up period. The sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of colorectal cancer between smokers and non-smokers was 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.84-1.33). For follow-up periods of 11-20 years, however, the relative risk was 1.57 (95% confidence interval 1.09-2.24). In a subgroup in which smoking habits were assessed twice, the relative risk of colorectal cancer among persistent smokers was 1.71 (95% confidence interval 1.09-2.68) compared with others. The results of the present prospective study are consistent with the possibility that smoking increases the risk of colorectal cancer after a relatively long induction period. To clarify the role of smoking in colorectal cancer development, further cohort studies are needed with long follow-up periods and allowing for control of dietary and other potential confounding factors. PMID:9662264

  16. Chemopreventive effects of aloin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hamiza, O O; Rehman, M U; Khan, R; Tahir, M; Khan, A Q; Lateef, A; Sultana, S

    2014-02-01

    Chemoprevention opens new window in the prevention of all types of cancers including colon cancer. Aloin, an anthracycline in plant pigment, can be utilized as a protective agent in cancer induction. In the present study, we have evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of aloin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced preneoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats. DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) have been used as biomarkers of colon cancer. Efficacy of aloin against the colon toxicity was evaluated in terms of biochemical estimation of antioxidant enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation, ACF, MDF, histopathological changes, and expression levels of molecular markers of inflammation and tumor promotion. Aloin pretreatment ameliorates the damaging effects induced by DMH through a protective mechanism that involved reduction in increased oxidative stress enzymes (p < 0.001), ACF, MDF, cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression, and tumor necrosis factor-α (p < 0.001) release. From the results, it could be concluded that aloin clearly protects against chemically induced colon toxicity and acts reasonably by inducing antioxidant level, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative markers. PMID:23928829

  17. Interaction of dietary fat and route of carcinogen administration on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon tumorigenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Nauss, K M; Kaufmann, P; Newberne, P M

    1985-03-01

    Since the results of an earlier study indicating no effect of dietary fat on dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer in rats differed from those of other investigators, the present study was initiated to determine if the modulating effect of fat intake on colon tumorigenesis was dependent on the route of DMH administration. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats (160) were fed one of two nutritionally balanced diets containing 5% or 24% corn oil (CO). Following 3 weeks adaptation to their respective diets, 40 rats from each diet group were treated with five doses of DMH (30 mg/kg) by intragastric (i.g.) gavage or subcutaneous (s.c.) injection, over a 3 week period. Rats were sacrificed when they showed clinical signs of colon tumor and surviving animals were killed 51 weeks after the initial DMH treatment. The cumulative probability of death with colon carcinoma did not differ between the dietary or treatment groups. There was no effect of route of administration or dietary fat on total intestinal tumor incidence. The number of rats with colon carcinoma was: 5% CO.IG = 25; 24% CO.IG = 27; 5% CO.SC = 23; 24% CO.SC = 19. Polypoid tumor incidence was significantly higher in the 24% CO.SC group (12/40) compared to the 5% CO.SC group (3/40) (Chi-squared = 5.25; p less than 0.03) while sessile tumor incidence was the inverse. Marginally significant differences in tumor morphology were noted between the IG groups. PMID:3978750

  18. 5-ASA Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Colorectal Cells by Reversibly Activating a Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANI, M. GLORIA; CAMPREGHER, CHRISTOPH; FORTUNE, JOHN M.; KUNKEL, THOMAS A.; GASCHE, CHRISTOPH

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. Methods CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116p53−/−, HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2–96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. Results We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis. PMID:17241873

  19. Role of MCP-1 in alcohol-induced aggressiveness of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Wang, Siying; Qi, Yuanlin; Chen, Li; Frank, Jacqueline A; Yang, Xiuwei H; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In addition to promoting carcinogenesis, alcohol may also accelerate the progression of existing CRC. We hypothesized that alcohol may enhance the aggressiveness of CRC. In this study, we investigated the effect of alcohol on the migration/invasion and metastasis of CRC. Alcohol increased the migration/invasion of colorectal cancer cells (DLD1, HCT116, HT29, and SW480) in a concentration-dependent manner. Among these colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 cells were most responsive while HT29 cells were the least responsive to ethanol-stimulated cell migration/invasion. These in vitro results were supported by animal studies which demonstrated that ethanol enhanced the metastasis of colorectal cancer cells to the liver and lung. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a chemokine that plays an important role in regulating tumor microenvironment and metastasis. Alcohol increased the expression of MCP-1 and its receptor CCR2 at both protein and mRNA levels. The pattern of alcohol-induced alterations in MCP-1 expression was consistent with its effect on migration/invasion; HCT116 cells displayed the highest up-regulation of MCP-1/CCR2 in response to alcohol exposure. An antagonist of CCR2 blocked alcohol-stimulated migration. Alcohol caused an initial cytosolic accumulation of β-catenin and its subsequent nuclear translocation by inhibiting GSK3β activity. Alcohol stimulated the activity of MCP-1 gene promoter in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Furthermore, knock-down of MCP-1/CCR2 or β-catenin was sufficient to inhibit alcohol-induced cell migration/invasion. Together, these results suggested that alcohol may promote the metastasis of CRC through modulating GSK3β/β-catenin/MCP-1 pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26014148

  20. Obesity and colorectal cancer: Role of adipokines in tumor initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Riondino, Silvia; Roselli, Mario; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Della-Morte, David; Ferroni, Patrizia; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-associated diseases account for a large portion of public health challenges. Among obesity-related disorders, a direct and independent relationship has been ascertained for colorectal cancer (CRC). The evidence that adipocyte hypertrophy and excessive adipose tissue accumulation (mainly visceral) can promote pathogenic adipocyte and adipose tissue-related diseases, has led to formulate the concept of “adiposopathy”, defined as adipocyte and adipose tissue dysfunction that contributes to metabolic syndrome. Adipose tissue can, indeed, be regarded as an important and highly active player of the innate immune response, in which cytokine/adipokine secretion is responsible for a paracrine loop between adipocytes and macrophages, thus contributing to the systemic chronic low-grade inflammation associated with visceral obesity, which represents a favorable niche for tumor development. The adipocyte itself participates as a central mediator of this inflammatory response in obese individuals by secreting hormones, growth factors and proinflammatory cytokines, which are of particular relevance for the pathogenesis of CRC. Among adipocyte-secreted hormones, the most relevant to colorectal tumorigenesis are adiponectin, leptin, resistin and ghrelin. All these molecules have been involved in cell growth and proliferation, as well as tumor angiogenesis and it has been demonstrated that their expression changes from normal colonic mucosa to adenoma and adenocarcinoma, suggesting their involvement in multistep colorectal carcinogenesis. These findings have led to the hypothesis that an unfavorable adipokine profile, with a reduction of those with an anti-inflammatory and anti-cancerous activity, might serve as a prognostic factor in CRC patients and that adipokines or their analogues/antagonists might become useful agents in the management or chemoprevention of CRC. PMID:24833848

  1. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of colorectal cancer with specific mutations in KRAS and APC.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Janneke G F; de Bruijn-Geraets, Daisy; Schouten, Leo J; van Engeland, Manon; de Kok, Theo M C M; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2014-05-01

    Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in heat-treated carbohydrate-rich foods. Epidemiological studies have not shown a clear association between acrylamide intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. This may be due to the molecular heterogeneity in colorectal tumors, which was not taken into consideration before. Since the acrylamide metabolite glycidamide induces specific DNA mutations in rodents, we investigated whether acrylamide is associated with CRC risk characterized by mutations in Kirsten-ras (KRAS) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC); key genes in colorectal carcinogenesis. This case-cohort analysis, within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, was based on 7.3 years of follow-up. Acrylamide intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Mutation analysis of codons 1286-1520 in exon 15 in APC and codons 12 and 13 in exon 1 in KRAS was performed on tumor tissue of 733 cases. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Among men, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of particularly tumors with an activating KRAS mutation {HR fourth versus first quartile: 2.12 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-3.87], P trend: 0.01}. Among women, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of particularly tumors with a truncating APC mutation (fourth versus first quartile: 0.47 (95% CI: 0.23-0.94), P trend: 0.02), but only in the highest quartile of intake. This is the first study to show that acrylamide might be associated with CRC with specific somatic mutations, differentially in men and women. More research is needed to corroborate or refute these findings. PMID:24398672

  2. B-Raf inhibitors induce epithelial differentiation in BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Herr, Ricarda; Köhler, Martin; Andrlová, Hana; Weinberg, Florian; Möller, Yvonne; Halbach, Sebastian; Lutz, Lisa; Mastroianni, Justin; Klose, Martin; Bittermann, Nicola; Kowar, Silke; Zeiser, Robert; Olayioye, Monilola A; Lassmann, Silke; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    BRAF mutations are associated with aggressive, less-differentiated and therapy-resistant colorectal carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanisms for these correlations remain unknown. To understand how oncogenic B-Raf contributes to carcinogenesis, in particular to aspects other than cellular proliferation and survival, we generated three isogenic human colorectal carcinoma cell line models in which we can dynamically modulate the expression of the B-Raf(V600E) oncoprotein. Doxycyclin-inducible knockdown of endogenous B-Raf(V600E) decreases cellular motility and invasion in conventional and three-dimensional (3D) culture, whereas it promotes cell-cell contacts and induces various hallmarks of differentiated epithelia. Importantly, all these effects are recapitulated by B-Raf (PLX4720, vemurafenib, and dabrafenib) or MEK inhibitors (trametinib). Surprisingly, loss of B-Raf(V600E) in HT29 xenografts does not only stall tumor growth, but also induces glandular structures with marked expression of CDX2, a tumor-suppressor and master transcription factor of intestinal differentiation. By performing the first transcriptome profiles of PLX4720-treated 3D cultures of HT29 and Colo-205 cells, we identify several upregulated genes linked to epithelial differentiation and effector functions, such as claudin-1, a Cdx-2 target gene encoding a critical tight junction component. Thereby, we provide a mechanism for the clinically observed correlation between mutant BRAF and the loss of Cdx-2 and claudin-1. PLX4720 also suppressed several metastasis-associated transcripts that have not been implicated as targets, effectors or potential biomarkers of oncogenic B-Raf signaling so far. Together, we identify a novel facet of clinically applied B-Raf or MEK inhibitors by showing that they promote cellular adhesion and differentiation of colorectal carcinoma cells. PMID:25381152

  3. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in fixed colorectal carcinoma samples as a method for biomarker validation

    PubMed Central

    OSTASIEWICZ, BEATA; OSTASIEWICZ, PAWEŁ; DUŚ-SZACHNIEWICZ, KAMILA; OSTASIEWICZ, KATARZYNA; ZIÓŁKOWSKI, PIOTR

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have been described as the future of oncology. Modern proteomics provide an invaluable tool for the near-whole proteome screening for proteins expressed differently in neoplastic vs. healthy tissues. However, in order to select the most promising biomarkers, an independent method of validation is required. The aim of the current study was to propose a methodology for the validation of biomarkers. Due to material availability the majority of large scale biomarker studies are performed using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, therefore these were selected for use in the current study. A total of 10 genes were selected from what have been previously described as the most promising candidate biomarkers, and the expression levels were analyzed with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) using calibrator normalized relative quantification with the efficiency correction. For 6/10 analyzed genes, the results were consistent with the proteomic data; for the remaining four genes, the results were inconclusive. The upregulation of karyopherin α 2 (KPNA2) and chromosome segregation 1-like (CSE1L) in colorectal carcinoma, in addition to downregulation of chloride channel accessory 1 (CLCA1), fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1), sodium channel, voltage gated, type VII α subunit (SCN7A) and solute carrier family 26 (anion exchanger), member 3 (SLC26A3) was confirmed. With the combined use of proteomic and genetic tools, it was reported, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, that SCN7A was downregulated in colorectal carcinoma at mRNA and protein levels. It had been previously suggested that the remaining five genes served an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, however the current study provided strong evidence to support their use as biomarkers. Thus, it was concluded that combination of RT-qPCR with proteomics offers a powerful methodology for biomarker identification, which can be used to analyze

  4. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Vietnamese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bang H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Rates of colorectal cancer screening in Vietnamese Americans are lower than those in non-Hispanic whites. This paper describes rates of colorectal screening, identifies determinants, and recommends educational strategies to improve screening. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 867 Vietnamese aged 50 to 74 drawn from a sampling frame of individuals in the Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California and Harris County, Texas area telephone directories with Vietnamese surnames were interviewed in 2004. Results Colorectal screening recognition, receipt, currency, and intention rates were low. Conclusions: While the screening rates are low, Vietnamese are receptive to screening if providers recommend it. PMID:18444045

  5. Loss of expression of the double strand break repair protein ATM is associated with worse prognosis in colorectal cancer and loss of Ku70 expression is associated with CIN

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Andrew D; Domingo, Enric; McGregor, Megan; Presz, Mikael; Johnstone, Elaine; Midgley, Rachel; Kerr, David; Oukrif, Dahmane; Novelli, Marco; Abulafi, Muti; Hodgson, Shirley V; Fadhil, Wakkas; Ilyas, Mohammad; Tomlinson, Ian PM

    2012-01-01

    Repair of double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) is pivotal in maintaining normal cell division and disruption of this system has been shown to be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Loss of expression of the DSB repair proteins have previously been shown to be associated with poorer survival in colorectal cancer. We wished to ascertain the relationship of altered expression of the DSB repair proteins γ-H2AX (gamma-H2AX), ATM and Ku70 with biological and clinico-pathological features of colorectal cancer. 908 tumours from the VICTOR clinical trial of stage II/III colorectal cancer were analysed for expression of γ-H2AX, ATM and Ku70 using immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were correlated with CIN and with disease-free survival, correcting for microsatellite instability, BRAF/KRAS mutation status, Dukes stage, chemo/radiotherapy, age, gender and tumour location. Down-regulated Ku70 expression was associated with chromosomal instability (p=0.029) in colorectal cancer. Reduced ATM expression was an independent marker of poor disease-free survival (HR=1.67, 95% CI 1.11-2.50, p=0.015). For Ku70, further studies are required to investigate the potential relationship of non-homologous end joining with chromosomal instability. Loss of ATM expression might serve as a biomarker of poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. PMID:23154512

  6. Epithelial in vitro cell systems in carcinogenesis studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, C.

    1983-01-01

    The development of epithelial cells systems to study oncogenic transformation has presented a major challenge in the field of carcinogenesis. Because there exists in man a preponderance of carcinomas over sarcomas, the importance of studying oncogenic transformation in epithelial cells is of great relevance to human disease. The difficulty lies in the fact that different tissues contain epithelial cells with singular differentiated characteristics, which must be defined to assert the different nature of the cells being used. Liver cells in culture are a case in point. By careful maintenance and optimal culture conditions, one can maintain many of the differentiated characteristics of the cells for prolonged periods of time.

  7. Micronucleus analysis in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma and colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Ali; Binici, Doğan Nasır; Kabalar, Mehmet Eşref; Çalıkuşu, Züleyha

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine, by counting micronucleus (MN) frequencies, whether chromosomal or DNA damage have an effect on the pathogenesis of early colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC). METHODS: We analyzed MN frequencies in 21 patients with CRC, 24 patients with colon polyps [10 neoplastic polyps (NP) and 14 non-neoplastic polyps (NNP)] and 20 normal controls. RESULTS: MN frequency was significantly increased in CRC patients and in NP patients compared with controls (3.72 ± 1.34, 3.58 ± 1.21 vs 1.97 ± 0.81, P < 0.001). However, there was no difference in the MN frequency between CRC patients and NP patients (P > 0.05). Similarly, there was no difference in the MN frequency between NNP patients (2.06 ± 0.85) and controls (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest increased chromosome/DNA instabilities may be associated with the pathogenesis of early CRC. PMID:19058310

  8. Multiple primary colorectal cancer: Individual or familial predisposition?

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, José A; Perea, José

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most frequent cancers. Along the surface of the large bowel, several foci of CRC may appear simultaneously or over the time. The development of at least two different tumours has been defined as multiple primary CRC (MPCRC): When more than one tumour is diagnosed at the same time, it is known as synchronous CRC (SCRC), while when a second neoplasm is diagnosed some time after the resection and/or diagnosis of the first lesion, it is called metachronous CRC (MCRC). Multiple issues can promote the development of MPCRC, ranging from different personal factors, such as environmental exposure, to familial predisposition due to hereditary factors. However, most studies do not distinguish this dichotomy. High- and low-pentrance genetic variants are involved in MPCRC. An increased risk for MPCRC has been described in Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and serrated polyposis. Non-syndromic familial CRCs should also be considered as risk factors for MPCRC. Environmental factors can promote damage to colon mucosae that enable the concurrence of MPCRC. Epigenetics are thought to play a major role in the carcinogenesis of sporadic MPCRC. The methylation state of the DNA depends on multiple environmental factors (e.g., smoking and eating foods cooked at high temperatures), and this can contribute to increasing the MPCRC rate. Certain clinical features may also suggest individual predisposition for MPCRC. Different etiopathogenic factors are suspected to be involved in SCRC and MCRC, and different familial vs individual factors may be implicated. MCRC seems to follow a familial pattern, whereas individual factors are more important in SCRC. Further studies must be carried out to know the molecular basis of risks for MPCRC in order to modify, if necessary, its clinical management, especially from a preventive point of view. PMID:26688706

  9. Multiple Sporadic Colorectal Cancers Display a Unique Methylation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Victoria; Lozano, Juan Jose; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Moreira, Leticia; Muñoz, Jenifer; Pellisé, Maria; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Xicola, Rosa M.; Llor, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Carracedo, Angel; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics are thought to play a major role in the carcinogenesis of multiple sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). Previous studies have suggested concordant DNA hypermethylation between tumor pairs. However, only a few methylation markers have been analyzed. This study was aimed at describing the epigenetic signature of multiple CRC using a genome-scale DNA methylation profiling. We analyzed 12 patients with synchronous CRC and 29 age-, sex-, and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors from the EPICOLON II cohort. DNA methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina Infinium HM27 DNA methylation assay. The most significant results were validated by Methylight. Tumors samples were also analyzed for the CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP); KRAS and BRAF mutations and mismatch repair deficiency status. Functional annotation clustering was performed. We identified 102 CpG sites that showed significant DNA hypermethylation in multiple tumors with respect to the solitary counterparts (difference in β value ≥0.1). Methylight assays validated the results for 4 selected genes (p = 0.0002). Eight out of 12(66.6%) multiple tumors were classified as CIMP-high, as compared to 5 out of 29(17.2%) solitary tumors (p = 0.004). Interestingly, 76 out of the 102 (74.5%) hypermethylated CpG sites found in multiple tumors were also seen in CIMP-high tumors. Functional analysis of hypermethylated genes found in multiple tumors showed enrichment of genes involved in different tumorigenic functions. In conclusion, multiple CRC are associated with a distinct methylation phenotype, with a close association between tumor multiplicity and CIMP-high. Our results may be important to unravel the underlying mechanism of tumor multiplicity. PMID:24643221

  10. [Robotic surgery for colorectal cancer in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Wei, Ye; Xu, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    The outstanding advantages of robotic surgery include the stable and three-dimension image and the convenience of surgery manipulation. The disadvantages include the lack of factile feedback, high cost and prolonged surgery time. It was reported that robotic surgery was associated with less trauma stress and faster recovery in elderly patients(≥75 years old) when compared with open surgery. Elderly people have a higher incidence of carcinogenesis and also have more comorbidities and reduced functional reserve. Clinical data of patients over 75 years old treated by robotic surgery in Zhongshan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University from March 2011 to October 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 24 consecutive patients were included with a median age of 77.8 years old. There were 18 male and 6 female patients. Among them, 14 patients were diagnosed with descending and sigmoid colon cancers while 10 with rectal cancers; 19 had tumor size larger than 5 cm; 16 were diagnosed with ulcerative adenocarcinoma. Fourteen patients were complicated with hypertension, 6 with cardiopulmonary diseases, 4 with diabetes mellitus and 3 with cerebrovascular diseases. Twenty-two patients underwent low anterior resection and 2 abdominoperineal resection. The estimated blood loss was 85 ml; the median operation time was (123.1±45.2) min; the median number of retrieved lymph node was 12.4. Postoperative pathologic results showed that 3 patients were stage I, 10 stage II, and 11 stage III. Postoperative complication was observed in 3 patients: urinary infection in 1 case, intraperitoneal infection in 1 case and atria fibrillation in 1 case, respectively. Median time to first postoperative flatus was 2.8 days. Our results indicated that robotic surgery is safe and feasible in the elderly patients. The next generation of robotic system may make up for these deficiencies through new technologies. With the advantage of more advanced surgical simulator, robotic surgery will play a

  11. Multiple sporadic colorectal cancers display a unique methylation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Victoria; Lozano, Juan Jose; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Moreira, Leticia; Muñoz, Jenifer; Pellisé, Maria; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Carracedo, Angel; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics are thought to play a major role in the carcinogenesis of multiple sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). Previous studies have suggested concordant DNA hypermethylation between tumor pairs. However, only a few methylation markers have been analyzed. This study was aimed at describing the epigenetic signature of multiple CRC using a genome-scale DNA methylation profiling. We analyzed 12 patients with synchronous CRC and 29 age-, sex-, and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors from the EPICOLON II cohort. DNA methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina Infinium HM27 DNA methylation assay. The most significant results were validated by Methylight. Tumors samples were also analyzed for the CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP); KRAS and BRAF mutations and mismatch repair deficiency status. Functional annotation clustering was performed. We identified 102 CpG sites that showed significant DNA hypermethylation in multiple tumors with respect to the solitary counterparts (difference in β value ≥0.1). Methylight assays validated the results for 4 selected genes (p = 0.0002). Eight out of 12(66.6%) multiple tumors were classified as CIMP-high, as compared to 5 out of 29(17.2%) solitary tumors (p = 0.004). Interestingly, 76 out of the 102 (74.5%) hypermethylated CpG sites found in multiple tumors were also seen in CIMP-high tumors. Functional analysis of hypermethylated genes found in multiple tumors showed enrichment of genes involved in different tumorigenic functions. In conclusion, multiple CRC are associated with a distinct methylation phenotype, with a close association between tumor multiplicity and CIMP-high. Our results may be important to unravel the underlying mechanism of tumor multiplicity. PMID:24643221

  12. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  13. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... be acceptable screening tests for colorectal cancer: High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT). Both polyps and ... higher than that of gFOBT or FIT. Test sensitivity for adenomas is low. False-positive test results ...

  14. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  15. Unique complications of robotic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Obias, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    Robotic approaches in all surgical realms have seen tremendous growth over the previous few years. Taking advantage of 3-dimensional visualization, improved articulation, and the opportunity for an enhanced ability to suture/operate in the deep pelvis all provide theoretical and real advantages in colorectal surgery. This article reviews the potential advantages and disadvantages, current indications, future directions, and lessons learned for robotic approaches in colorectal surgery. PMID:23177076

  16. Percutaneous ablation of colorectal lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasectomy can prolong survival in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Thermal ablation offers a potential solution with similar reported survival outcomes. It has minimal effect on pulmonary function, or quality of life, can be repeated, and may be considered more acceptable to patients because of the associated shorter hospital stay and recovery. This review describes the indications, technique, reported outcomes, complications and radiologic appearances after thermal ablation of colorectal lung metastases. PMID:26697202

  17. Industrial risk factors for colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lashner, B.A.; Epstein, S.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in the United States, and its incidence rates have sharply increased recently, especially in males. Industrial exposures, both occupational and environmental, are important colorectal cancer risk factors that are generally unrecognized by clinicians. Migration studies have documented that colorectal cancer is strongly associated with environmental risk factors. The causal role of occupational exposures is evidenced by a substantial literature associating specific work practices with increased colorectal cancer risks. Industrially related environmental exposures, including polluted drinking water and ionizing radiation, have also been associated with excess risks. Currently, there is a tendency to attribute colorectal cancer, largely or exclusively, to dietary and other lifestyle factors, thus neglecting these industrially related effects. Concerted efforts are needed to recognize the causal role of industrial risk factors and to encourage government and industry to reduce carcinogenic exposures. Furthermore, cost-effective screening programs for high-risk population groups are critically needed to further reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. 143 references.

  18. Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection in Octogenarian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Minghao; Qin, Huabo; Luo, Qianxin; He, Xiaosheng; Lan, Ping; Lian, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The population older than 80 years has been increasing. A significant proportion of colorectal diseases that require colorectal resection occur in very elderly patients. However, the benefits of laparoscopy remain controversial in octogenarians. A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational study was performed to compare clinical outcomes between laparoscopic versus open colorectal resection in octogenarians. The PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases from the years 1990 to 2015 were searched for studies that compare surgical outcomes between laparoscopic and open colorectal resection in octogenarians (≥80 years old). Seven eligible studies including 528 laparoscopic and 484 open colorectal resections were identified. Laparoscopic approach was associated with lower rate of mortality (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, P = 0.03), overall complications (OR 0.54, P < 0.001), and prolonged ileus (OR 0.56, P = 0.009), quicker bowel function return (standardized mean difference [SMD] −0.50, P < 0.001), and shorter length of hospital stay (SMD −0.47, P = 0.007). No differences were found in anastomotic leak (OR 1.16, P = 0.72), respiratory complication (OR 0.60, P = 0.07), and reoperation (OR 0.85, P = 0.69). Laparoscopic colorectal resection is as safe as open approach, and the short-term outcomes appear to be more favorable in octogenarians. PMID:26496302

  19. Variation in the Association Between Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility Loci and Colorectal Polyps by Polyp Type

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Peters, Ulrike; Passarelli, Michael N.; Schwartz, Malaika R.; Upton, Melissa P.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D.; Makar, Karen W.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study of the association between subsets of colorectal polyps, including adenomas and serrated polyps, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to colorectal cancer through prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative (Seattle, Washington) aged 24–79 years who received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, donated a buccal or blood sample, and completed a structured questionnaire. We performed genotyping of 13 colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between polyps and the colorectal cancer risk allele for each SNP under a log-additive model. Analyses included 781 controls, 489 cases with adenoma, 401 cases with serrated polyps, and 188 cases with both polyp types. The following SNPs were associated with advanced adenomas: rs10936599, rs10795668, rs16892766, and rs9929218 (P < 0.05). For nonadvanced adenomas and for serrated polyps overall, only rs961253 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). These associations were in the same directions as those in prior colorectal cancer GWAS. No SNP was significantly associated with hyperplastic polyps, and only rs6983267 was significantly associated with sessile serrated polyps, but this association was opposite of that found in colorectal cancer GWAS. Our results suggest that the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs and colorectal polyps varies by polyp type. PMID:24875374

  20. Diet and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Baseline Dietary Knowledge of Colorectal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, K. J.; Fearon, K. C. H.; Buckner, K.; Richardson, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish the dietary knowledge, attitudes and potential barriers to change of patients attending a colorectal outpatient clinic. Design: Use of a semistructured interview to generate qualitative and quantitative data. Setting: A regional colorectal outpatient clinic within Edinburgh. Method: Patients attending clinic with colorectal…

  1. Progress and Challenges in Selected Areas of Tobacco Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Stephen S.

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco use continues to be a major cause of cancer in the developed world and, despite significant progress in this country in tobacco control which is driving a decrease in cancer mortality, there are still over one billion smokers in the world. This perspective discusses some selected issues in tobacco carcinogenesis focusing on progress during the 20 years of publication of Chemical Research in Toxicology. The topics covered include metabolism and DNA modification by tobacco-specific nitrosamines, tobacco carcinogen biomarkers, an unidentified DNA ethylating agent in cigarette smoke, mutations in the K-RAS and p53 gene in tobacco-induced lung cancer and their possible relationship to specific carcinogens, secondhand smoke and lung cancer, emerging issues in smokeless tobacco use, and a conceptual model for understanding tobacco carcinogenesis. It is hoped that a better understanding of mechanisms of tobacco-induced cancer will lead to new and useful approaches for prevention of lung cancer and other cancers caused by tobacco use. PMID:18052103

  2. Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunpeng; Zhu, Changjun; Chen, Hongyan; Li, Linwei; Guo, Liping; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Shih Hsin

    2010-09-01

    Microtubule (MT) kinesin motor proteins orchestrate various cellular processes (e.g. mitosis, motility and organelle transportation) and have been implicated in human carcinogenesis. Kif18A, a plus-end directed MT depolymerase kinesin, regulates MT dynamics, chromosome congression and cell division. In this study, we report that Kif18A is overexpressed in human breast cancers and Kif18A overexpression is associated with tumor grade, metastasis and poor survival. Functional analyses reveal that ectopic overexpression of Kif18A results in cell multinucleation, whereas ablation of Kif18A expression significantly inhibits the proliferative capability of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Kif18A not only affects the critical mitotic function of Kif18A but also decreases cancer cell migration by stabilizing MTs at leading edges and ultimately induces anoikis of cells with inactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway. Together, our results indicate that Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human breast cancer. PMID:20595236

  3. A Review of Molecular Events of Cadmium-Induced Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic, heavy industrial metal that poses serious environmental health hazards to both humans and wildlife. Lately, Cd and Cd containing compounds have been classified as known human carcinogens and epidemiological data show causal associations with prostate, breast and lung cancer. The molecular mechanisms involved in Cd-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood and are only now beginning to be elucidated. The effects of chronic exposure to Cd have recently become of great interest due to the development of malignancies in Cd-induced tumorigenesis in animal. Briefly, various in vitro studies demonstrate that Cd can act as a mitogen, stimulate cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and DNA repair, and induce carcinogenesis in several mammalian tissues and organs. Thus, the various mechanisms involved in chronic Cd exposure and malignant transformations warrant further investigation. In this review, we will focus on recent evidence of various leading general and tissue specific molecular mechanisms that follow chronic exposure to Cd in prostate, breast and lung transformed malignancies. In addition, this review considers less defined mechanisms such as epigenetic modification and autophagy, which are thought to play a role in the development of Cd-induced malignant transformation. PMID:25272057

  4. Carcinogenesis response modulation induced by gelonin encapsulated in liposome.

    PubMed

    Alam, Anis; Nakhuru, K S; Singha, L I

    2008-08-01

    The effectiveness of gelonin to arrest protein synthesis, thereby limiting the growth of cancer cells was studied by encapsulating it into liposomes. The protein was extracted from the seeds of Indian plant Gelonium multiflorum by ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified using cation-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Biological activity of purified gelonin was determined using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate assay in the cell-free translational experiments. Gelonin was encapsulated in conventional liposomes prepared by the dry film method in order to retain biological activity of the entrapped protein. Carcinogenesis was induced in Swiss albino mice by intravenous administration of DBN (10 mg kg(-1) body weight) at weekly intervals. Marker enzyme assays (GGT, AChE, and GST), GSH levels, cell proliferation assay, hepatocyte DNA analysis, histological examination of micro sections of liver tissues were parameters used to monitor carcinogenesis induction, and regression in mice. From the in vitro experiments conducted, it was observed that gelonin upon its encapsulation into liposome, resulted in significant destruction of the transformed liver cells by its cytotoxic effects that arrest protein synthesis. Various parameters studied to monitor regression also suggested mass cell destruction to liver upon administration of liposomal gelonin in mice exposed to DBN. PMID:18500656

  5. Histogenesis of pancreatic carcinogenesis in the hamster: ultrastructural evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Flaks, B

    1984-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinogenesis in the Syrian hamster, induced by beta-oxidized derivatives of N-nitroso-di-n-propylamine, constitutes a valuable model of human cancer of the exocrine pancreas. In both species the majority of tumors are adenocarcinomas: superficially, on the basis of their histological appearance, these appear to be ductal in origin. However, sequential analysis, by electron microscopy, of the development of pancreatic neoplasia in the hamster model indicates that acinar cells may participate in the histogenesis of "ductal" adenomas and carcinomas. Acinar cells appear to undergo changes in differentiation, including pseudoductular transformation, giving rise to a new population of cells that resemble ductular or centroacinar types. This new population may then proliferate to form, first, cystic foci and subsequently cystadenomas and adenocarcinomas. Mucous metaplasia appears to develop at late stages of tumor development. Although the participation of ductular and centroacinar cells in pancreatic carcinogenesis cannot be excluded, very few tumors arise from the ductal epithelium. It is possible that some human pancreatic adenocarcinomas may also have their origin from dysplastic acinar cells, by analogy with the hamster model: focal acinar dysplasia being common in human pancreatic cancer patients. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. PMID:6383797

  6. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review).

    PubMed

    Neagu, Monica; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Boda, Daniel; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-05-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands‑on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro‑inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro‑inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  7. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management. PMID:27126070

  8. Enhancing effect of partial gastrectomy on pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanapa, P.; Flaks, B.; Oztas, H.; Deprez, P. H.; Calam, J.; Williamson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The controversial issue of enhanced pancreatic carcinogenesis following partial gastrectomy has been explored in male Wistar rats (n = 40) weighing 250-300 g. Animals were randomised to receive either 60% distal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction or gastrotomy and resuture (control). Immediately after operation each group was further divided into two subgroups, receiving i.p. injections of either saline or azaserine (30 mg kg-1 wk-1 for 3 weeks). At 15 months blood was obtained at 0, 5, 15 and 30 min after a fatty meal for cholecystokinin (CCK) assay; rats were then killed. Pancreatic wet weight was measured, and histological sections were examined for atypical acinar cell foci (AACF), the putative precursor lesion of carcinoma. There were no significant differences in body weight or pancreatic weight between controls and rats with gastrectomy. Only azaserine-treated rats had acidophilic AACF. Partial gastrectomy substantially increased the number of acidophilic AACF per pancreas (median 26.05 vs 2.09; P less than 0.005), with a 9-fold increase in their volume (P less than 0.005). Basal and postprandial plasma CCK concentrations were higher after gastrectomy than in controls (P less than 0.05). Partial gastrectomy has an enhancing effect on azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis, probably by means of increased CCK release. PMID:1558791

  9. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN CONTEXT: HOW DO IRRADIATED TISSUES BECOME TUMORS?

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Nguyen, David H.

    2009-01-01

    It is clear from experimental studies that genotype is an important determinant of cancer susceptibility in general, and for radiation carcinogenesis specifically. It has become increasingly clear that genotype influences not only the ability to cope with DNA damage but also influences the cooperation of other tissues, like the vasculature and immune system, necessary for the establishment of cancer. Our experimental data and that of others suggest that the carcinogenic action of ionizing radiation (IR) can also be considered a two-compartment problem: while IR can alter genomic sequence as a result of DNA damage, it can also induce signals that alter multicellular interactions and phenotypes that underpin carcinogenesis. Rather than being accessory or secondary to genetic damage, we propose that such non-targeted radiation effects create the critical context that promotes cancer development. This review focuses on experimental studies that clearly define molecular mechanisms by which cell interactions contribute to cancer in different organs, and addresses how non-targeted radiation effects may similarly act though the microenvironment. The definition of non-targeted radiation effects and their dose dependence could modify the current paradigms for radiation risk assessment since radiation non-targeted effects, unlike DNA damage, are amenable to intervention. The implications of this perspective in terms of reducing cancer risk after exposure are discussed. PMID:19820454

  10. Langerhans Cells Facilitate UVB-induced Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Freudzon, Marianna; Golubets, Kseniya; Gibson, Juliet F.; Filler, Renata B.; Girardi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) light is considered the major environmental inducer of human keratinocyte DNA mutations, including within the tumor-suppressor gene p53, and chronic exposure is associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a dendritic network within the suprabasilar epidermis, yet the role of LC in UVB-induced carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we show that LC-intact epidermis develops UVB-induced tumors more readily than LC-deficient epidermis. While levels of epidermal cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPD) following acute UVB exposure are equivalent in the presence or absence of LC, chronic UVB-induced p53 mutant clonal islands expand more readily in association with LC which remain largely intact and are preferentially found in proximity to the expanding mutant keratinocyte populations. The observed LC facilitation of mutant p53 clonal expansion is completely αβ and γδ T-cell independent, and is associated with increased intraepidermal expression of interleukin (IL)-22 and the presence of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3). These data demonstrate that LC play a key role in UVB-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis, and suggest that LC locally stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and innate immune cells that provoke tumor outgrowth. PMID:26053049

  11. Protective role of cathepsin L in mouse skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Fernando; Perez, Carlos; Blando, Jorge; Contreras, Oscar; Shen, Jianjun; Coussens, Lisa M.; Fischer, Susan M.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; DiGiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J.

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin L (CTSL) is believed to play a role in tumor progression and is considered a marker for clinically invasive tumors. Studies from our laboratory using the classical mouse skin carcinogenesis model, with 7,12-dimethyl-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) for initiation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for promotion, showed that expression of CTSL is increased in papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We also carried out carcinogenesis studies using Ctsl-deficient nackt (nkt) mutant mice on three different inbred backgrounds. Unexpectedly, the multiplicity of papillomas were significantly higher in Ctsl-deficient than in wild-type mice on two unrelated backgrounds. Topical applications of TPA or DMBA alone to the skin of nkt/nkt mice did not induce papillomas, and there was no increase in spontaneous tumors in nkt/nkt mice on any of the three inbred backgrounds. Reduced epidermal cell proliferation in Ctsl-deficient nkt/nkt mice after TPA treatment suggested that they are not more sensitive than wild-type mice to TPA promotion. We also showed that deficiency of CTSL delays terminal differentiation of keratinocytes, and we propose that decreased elimination of initiated cells is at least partially responsible for the increased papilloma formation in the nackt model. PMID:21538579

  12. Protective role of cathepsin L in mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Fernando; Perez, Carlos; Blando, Jorge; Contreras, Oscar; Shen, Jianjun; Coussens, Lisa M; Fischer, Susan M; Kusewitt, Donna F; DiGiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin L (CTSL) is believed to play a role in tumor progression and is considered a marker for clinically invasive tumors. Studies from our laboratory using the classical mouse skin carcinogenesis model, with 7,12-dimethyl-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) for initiation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for promotion, showed that expression of CTSL is increased in papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We also carried out carcinogenesis studies using Ctsl-deficient nackt (nkt) mutant mice on three different inbred backgrounds. Unexpectedly, the multiplicity of papillomas was significantly higher in Ctsl-deficient than in wild-type mice on two unrelated backgrounds. Topical applications of TPA or DMBA alone to the skin of nkt/nkt mice did not induce papillomas, and there was no increase in spontaneous tumors in nkt/nkt mice on any of the three inbred backgrounds. Reduced epidermal cell proliferation in Ctsl-deficient nkt/nkt mice after TPA treatment suggested that they are not more sensitive than wild-type mice to TPA promotion. We also showed that deficiency of CTSL delays terminal differentiation of keratinocytes, and we propose that decreased elimination of initiated cells is at least partially responsible for the increased papilloma formation in the nackt model. PMID:21538579

  13. Mitochondrial respiratory uncoupling promotes keratinocyte differentiation and blocks skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lago, CU; Nowinski, SM; Rundhaug, JE; Pfeiffer, ME; Kiguchi, K; Hirasaka, K; Yang, X; Abramson, EM; Bratton, SB; Rho, O; Colavitti, R; Kenaston, MA; Nikawa, T; Trempus, C; DiGiovanni, J; Fischer, SM; Mills, EM

    2013-01-01

    Decreased mitochondrial oxidative metabolism is a hallmark bioenergetic characteristic of malignancy that may have an adaptive role in carcinogenesis. By stimulating proton leak, mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCP1-3) increase mitochondrial respiration and may thereby oppose cancer development. To test this idea, we generated a mouse model that expresses an epidermal-targeted keratin-5-UCP3 (K5-UCP3) transgene and exhibits significantly increased cutaneous mitochondrial respiration compared with wild type (FVB/N). Remarkably, we observed that mitochondrial uncoupling drove keratinocyte/epidermal differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. This increase in epidermal differentiation corresponded to the loss of markers of the quiescent bulge stem cell population, and an increase in epidermal turnover measured using a bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-based transit assay. Interestingly, these changes in K5-UCP3 skin were associated with a nearly complete resistance to chemically-mediated multistage skin carcinogenesis. These data suggest that targeting mitochondrial respiration is a promising novel avenue for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:22266853

  14. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  15. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  16. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  17. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  18. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection./sup 3/H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

  19. DNA Methylation and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Brim, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major cancers in the world and second death-causing cancer in the US. CRC development involves genetic and epigenetic alterations. Changes in DNA methylation status are believed to be involved at different stages of CRC. Promoter silencing via DNA methylation and hypomethylation of oncogenes alter genes’ expression, and can be used as a tool for the early detection of colonic lesions. DNA methylation use as diagnostic and prognostic marker has been described for many cancers including CRC. CpG Islands Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is one of the underlying CRC mechanisms. This review aims to define methylation signatures in CRC. The analysis of DNA methylation profile in combination with the pathological diagnosis would be useful in predicting CRC tumors’ evolution and their prognostic behavior. PMID:25580099

  20. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il; Tavakkoli, Ali; Farokhzad, Omid C; Vilos, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs. PMID:27529192

  1. Translation initiation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Parsyan, Armen; Hernández, Greco; Meterissian, Sarkis

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRC) are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in high-income countries. Targeted screening programs have resulted in early treatment and a substantial decrease in mortality. However, treatment strategies for CRC still require improvement. Understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of CRC would provide tools for improving treatment of patients with this disease. It is only recently that deregulation of the protein synthesis apparatus has begun to gain attention as a major player in cancer development and progression. Among the numerous steps of protein synthesis, deregulation of the process of translation initiation appears to play a key role in cancer growth and proliferation. This manuscript discusses a fascinating and rapidly growing field exploring translation initiation as a fundamental component in CRC development and progression and summarizing CRC treatment perspectives based on agents targeting translation initiation. PMID:22418835

  2. PD-L1 expression in colorectal cancer is associated with microsatellite instability, BRAF mutation, medullary morphology and cytotoxic tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Bledsoe, Jacob R; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Huynh, Tiffany G; Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2016-09-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1) are key suppressors of the cytotoxic immune response. PD-L1 expression on tumor cells may be induced by the immune microenvironment, resulting in immune escape (adaptive immune resistance), and an adverse prognosis in many malignancies. In colorectal carcinoma the response to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibition is correlated with microsatellite instability. However, little is known about the clinicopathologic, molecular, and prognostic characteristics of colorectal carcinoma with PD-L1 expression. We performed immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 on 181 cases of colorectal carcinoma with known microsatellite instability and mutational status, and correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic features including tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte burden/immunophenotype, tumor mutational profile, and disease-specific survival. PD-L1 was expressed in tumors from 16 patients (9%) who were more often older (P=0.006) and female (P=0.035), with tumors exhibiting a larger size (P=0.013), but lower stage (P<0.001). PD-L1 expression was associated with increased CD8 and TBET-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, medullary phenotype, poor differentiation, microsatellite instability, BRAF mutation (P<0.001 for each), and a lower frequency of KRAS mutation (P=0.012). On multivariate analysis, PD-L1 expression was associated with medullary morphology and frequent CD8-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting adaptive immune resistance. PD-L1 positivity was not predictive of survival in the entire cohort, but it was associated with a lower disease-specific survival within the microsatellite-instability high cohort. PD-L1 expression in colorectal carcinoma is associated with clinicopathologic and molecular features of the serrated pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis, and is associated with a worse outcome within microsatellite-unstable tumors. These findings support the role of PD-L1 expression in providing normally immunogenic

  3. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Informed Cancer Home Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... helps pay for colorectal cancer screening. Ask Your Doctor Do I need to get a screening test ...

  4. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Colorectal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... colorectal cancer survivor What should you ask your doctor about colorectal cancer? It’s important to have frank, ... treatment? Do I need to see any other doctors or health professionals? If I’m concerned about ...

  5. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Se Hyung; Hong, Sung Noh; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Suck-Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Hyo Jong; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Now colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in males and the fourth most common cancer in females in Korea. Since most of colorectal cancers occur after the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are one of the most effective methods to prevent colorectal cancer. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish Korean guideline for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The guideline was developed by the Korean Multi-Society Take Force and we tried to establish the guideline by evidence-based methods. Parts of the statements were draw by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Herein we discussed epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea and optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations. PMID:22741131

  6. Pioglitazone hydrochloride: chemopreventive potential and development of site-specific drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Vivek Ranjan; Sethi, Shilpa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of pioglitazone hydrochloride as a promising anticancer agent and then to design and evaluate the colon-targeted delivery system. The role of pioglitazone hydrochloride as a promising anticancer agent was evaluated by in vitro cell line studies and in vivo 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. In order to deliver the drug at site of action, i.e. colon, drug embedded in matrices containing a release retarding polymer (HPMC K4M) and a polysaccharide (locust bean gum) were prepared. These matrix systems were further enteric coated with Eudragit®S100 to minimize the premature drug release in the upper segments of the GIT. In vitro dissolution studies were performed in absence and presence of rat caecal contents on selected batches and samples were analyzed using a validated RP-HPLC method. Hence, the studies led to the conclusion that successful site-specific delivery systems of pioglitazone hydrochloride were developed to improve its therapeutic efficacy in the management of colorectal cancer. PMID:24547712

  7. Colon carcinogenesis is inhibited by the TRPM8 antagonist cannabigerol, a Cannabis-derived non-psychotropic cannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Francesca; Pagano, Ester; Romano, Barbara; Panzera, Stefania; Maiello, Francesco; Coppola, Diana; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Buono, Lorena; Orlando, Pierangelo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2014-12-01

    Cannabigerol (CBG) is a safe non-psychotropic Cannabis-derived cannabinoid (CB), which interacts with specific targets involved in carcinogenesis. Specifically, CBG potently blocks transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 (TRPM8), activates TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV2 channels, blocks 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (5-HT1A) receptors and inhibits the reuptake of endocannabinoids. Here, we investigated whether CBG protects against colon tumourigenesis. Cell growth was evaluated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and 3-amino-7-dimethylamino-2-methylphenazine hydrochloride assays; apoptosis was examined by histology and by assessing caspase 3/7 activity; reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by a fluorescent probe; CB receptors, TRP and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; small hairpin RNA-vector silencing of TRPM8 was performed by electroporation. The in vivo antineoplastic effect of CBG was assessed using mouse models of colon cancer. CRC cells expressed TRPM8, CB1, CB2, 5-HT1A receptors, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV2 mRNA. CBG promoted apoptosis, stimulated ROS production, upregulated CHOP mRNA and reduced cell growth in CRC cells. CBG effect on cell growth was independent from TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV2 channels activation, was further increased by a CB2 receptor antagonist, and mimicked by other TRPM8 channel blockers but not by a 5-HT1A antagonist. Furthermore, the effect of CBG on cell growth and on CHOP mRNA expression was reduced in TRPM8 silenced cells. In vivo, CBG inhibited the growth of xenograft tumours as well as chemically induced colon carcinogenesis. CBG hampers colon cancer progression in vivo and selectively inhibits the growth of CRC cells, an effect shared by other TRPM8 antagonists. CBG should be considered translationally in CRC prevention and cure. PMID:25269802

  8. Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical profile of ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Gozde; Gurbuz, Ayse; Karateke, Ates; Kir, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinoma of the ovary is not an uncommon occurrence and ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma frequently mimic endometrioid and mucinous primary ovarian carcinoma. The clinical and pathologic features of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma involving the ovary is reviewed with particular focus on the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasm. Immunohistochemical stains that may be useful in the differential diagnosis of metastatic colorectal tumors to the ovary and primary ovarian tumors are detailed. PMID:21160859

  9. Proteomic profiling of a mouse model of acute intestinal Apc deletion leads to identification of potential novel biomarkers of human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Abeer; Song, Fei; Reed, Karen R; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Meniel, Valerie S; Watson, Alastair J M; Pritchard, D Mark; Clarke, Alan R; Jenkins, John R

    2013-10-25

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accurate non-invasive screening for CRC would greatly enhance a population's health. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene mutations commonly occur in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, leading to Wnt signalling pathway activation. Acute conditional transgenic deletion of Apc in murine intestinal epithelium (AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl)) causes phenotypic changes similar to those found during colorectal tumourigenesis. This study comprised a proteomic analysis of murine small intestinal epithelial cells following acute Apc deletion to identify proteins that show altered expression during human colorectal carcinogenesis, thus identifying proteins that may prove clinically useful as blood/serum biomarkers of colorectal neoplasia. Eighty-one proteins showed significantly increased expression following iTRAQ analysis, and validation of nine of these by Ingenuity Pathaway Analysis showed they could be detected in blood or serum. Expression was assessed in AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) small intestinal epithelium by immunohistochemistry, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR; increased nucelolin concentrations were also detected in the serum of AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) and Apc(Min)(/)(+) mice by ELISA. Six proteins; heat shock 60kDa protein 1, Nucleolin, Prohibitin, Cytokeratin 18, Ribosomal protein L6 and DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 5,were selected for further investigation. Increased expression of 4 of these was confirmed in human CRC by qPCR. In conclusion, several novel candidate biomarkers have been identified from analysis of transgenic mice in which the Apc gene was deleted in the intestinal epithelium that also showed increased expression in human CRC. Some of these warrant further investigation as potential serum-based biomarkers of human CRC. PMID:23998936

  10. Immunohistochemical Expression of Heparanase Isoforms and Syndecan-1 Proteins in Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Waisberg, J.; Theodoro, T.R.; Matos, L.L.; Brasil, F.; Serrano, R.L.; Saba, G.T.; Pinhal, M.A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The proteoglycan syndecan-1 and the endoglucuronidases heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 are involved in molecular pathways that deregulate cell adhesion during carcinogenesis. Few studies have examined the expression of syndecan-1, heparanase-1 and mainly heparanase-2 proteins in non-neoplastic and neoplastic human colorectal adenoma tissues. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation among the heparanase isoforms and the syndecan-1 proteins through immunohistochemical expression in the tissue of colorectal adenomas. Primary antihuman polyclonal anti-HPSE and anti-HPSE2 antibodies and primary anti-human monoclonal anti-SDC1 antibody were used in the immunohistochemical study. The expressions of heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 proteins were determined in tissue samples from 65 colorectal adenomas; the expression of syndecan-1 protein was obtained from 39 (60%) patients. The histological type of adenoma was tubular in 44 (67.7%) patients and tubular-villous in 21 (32.3%); there were no villous adenomas. The polyps were <1.0 cm in size in 54 (83.1%) patients and ≥1.0 cm in 11 (16.9%). The images were quantified by digital counter with a computer program for this purpose. The expression index represented the relationship between the intensity expression and the percentage of positively stained cells. The results showed that the average of heparanase-1, heparanase-2 and syndecan-1 expression index was 73.29 o.u./µm², 93.34 o.u./µm², and 55.29 o.u./µm², respectively. The correlation between the heparanase-1 and syndecan-1 expression index was positive (R=0.034) and significant (P=0.035). There was a negative (R= -0.384) and significant (P=0.016) correlation between the expression index of heparanase-1 and heparanase-2. A negative (R= -0.421) and significant (P=0.008) correlation between the expression index of heparanase-2 and syndecan-1 was found. We concluded that in colorectal adenomas, the heparanase-1 does not participate in syndecan-1 degradation; the

  11. Fish models for environmental carcinogenesis: the rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, G S; Williams, D E; Hendricks, J D

    1996-01-01

    Progress over the past 30 years has revealed many strengths of the rainbow trout as an alternative model for environmental carcinogenesis research. These include low rearing costs, an early life-stage ultrasensitive bioassay, sensitivity to many classes of carcinogen, a well-described tumor pathology, responsiveness to tumor promoters and inhibitors, and a mechanistically informative nonmammalian comparative status. Low-cost husbandry, for example, has permitted statistically challenging tumor study designs with up to 10,000 trout to investigate the quantitative interrelationships among carcinogen dose, anticarcinogen dose, DNA adduct formation, and final tumor outcome. The basic elements of the trout carcinogen bioassay include multiple exposure routes, carcinogen response, husbandry requirements, and pathology. The principal known neoplasms occur in liver (mixed hepatocellular/cholangiocellular adenoma and carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma), kidney (nephroblastoma), swim bladder (adenopapilloma), and stomach (adenopapilloma). Trout possess a complex but incompletely characterized array of cytochromes P450, transferases, and other enzymic systems for phase I and phase II procarcinogen metabolism. In general, trout exhibit only limited capacity for DNA repair, especially for removal of bulky DNA adducts. This factor, together with a high capacity for P450 bioactivation and negligible glutathione transferase-mediated detoxication of the epoxide, accounts for the exceptional sensitivity of trout to aflatoxin B1 carcinogenesis. At the gene level, all trout tumors except nephroblastoma exhibit variable and often high incidences of oncogenic Ki-ras gene mutations. Mutations in the trout p53 tumor suppressor gene have yet to be described. There are many aspects of the trout model, especially the lack of complete organ homology, that limit its application as a surrogate for human cancer research. Within these limitations, however, it is apparent that trout and other

  12. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  13. Comprehensive DNA Methylation Analysis Reveals a Common Ten-Gene Methylation Signature in Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Árpád V.; Valcz, Gábor; Hollósi, Péter; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Patai, Árpád; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Leiszter, Katalin; Tóth, Kinga; Sipos, Ferenc; Kovalszky, Ilona; Péter, Zoltán; Miheller, Pál; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Microarray analysis of promoter hypermethylation provides insight into the role and extent of DNA methylation in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) and may be co-monitored with the appearance of driver mutations. Colonic biopsy samples were obtained endoscopically from 10 normal, 23 adenoma (17 low-grade (LGD) and 6 high-grade dysplasia (HGD)), and 8 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (4 active and 4 inactive). CRC samples were obtained from 24 patients (17 primary, 7 metastatic (MCRC)), 7 of them with synchronous LGD. Field effects were analyzed in tissues 1 cm (n = 5) and 10 cm (n = 5) from the margin of CRC. Tissue materials were studied for DNA methylation status using a 96 gene panel and for KRAS and BRAF mutations. Expression levels were assayed using whole genomic mRNA arrays. SFRP1 was further examined by immunohistochemistry. HT29 cells were treated with 5-aza-2’ deoxycytidine to analyze the reversal possibility of DNA methylation. More than 85% of tumor samples showed hypermethylation in 10 genes (SFRP1, SST, BNC1, MAL, SLIT2, SFRP2, SLIT3, ALDH1A3, TMEFF2, WIF1), whereas the frequency of examined mutations were below 25%. These genes distinguished precancerous and cancerous lesions from inflamed and healthy tissue. The mRNA alterations that might be caused by systematic methylation could be partly reversed by demethylation treatment. Systematic changes in methylation patterns were observed early in CRC carcinogenesis, occuring in precursor lesions and CRC. Thus we conclude that DNA hypermethylation is an early and systematic event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and it could be potentially reversed by systematic demethylation therapy, but it would need more in vitro and in vivo experiments to support this theory. PMID:26291085

  14. [Etiological epidemiology of colorectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Cipriani, F; Geddes, M

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed the main results of colon cancer (CC) epidemiologic studies, according to data published in the 1973-1994 period, with a particular mention to dietary factors and to differences with Italian findings. Meat (mostly, red meat), animal fats and high energy intake not counterbalanced by sufficient physical activity seem to be the most consistent risk factors for CC. On the contrary, the vegetarian based diet seems to reduce the risk of CC. Although interestingly, the relevance to CC of other life-style and diet-related factors (alcohol intake, smoking habits, processing and cooking methods, occupation, drugs, personal medical and reproductive history) must be better defined and requests further investigations. More recently, genetic studies are clarifying the hereditary risk of CC. Several colon carcinogenesis hypotheses have been proposed, but general agreement on the most reliable is still lacking. Authors argue that in the next future, new acquirements could emerge from metabolic polymorphism studies, possibly reconciling the biological significance of individual susceptibility and environmental factors to CC incidence. PMID:9382427

  15. Thymus in experimental carcinogenesis of the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Yu I; Lomshakov, A A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Mayorov, A P; Larionov, P M

    2014-10-01

    We studied structural changes in the prostate gland, thymus, and lymph nodes in CBA mice after transplantation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells into the prostate gland. On experimental day 5, the number of blood and lymph vessels decreased in the gland; the percentage of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue and the number of immunoblasts in the thymus increased. On day 18, the number of blood vessels in the tumor decreased; the width of the cortex and glandular tissue increased in the thymus, while the number of immunoblasts was reduced. On day 28, tumor infiltration and increased number of lymphatic vessels in its stroma were observed; parenchyma was reduced, and the area of the connective tissue increased in the thymus. These structural changes indicated the development of accidental involution of the thymus during carcinogenesis of the prostate. PMID:25339587

  16. Key Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms in Chemical Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Sammarini, Gulia; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    DNA sequence and genetic factors alone cannot fully explain the many processes implicated in diseases initiation and development. It is now well understood that additional factors are involved in a final resulting phenotype. Epigenetic modifications, heritable changes not affecting the DNA sequence, are a key phenomenon at the basis of normal growth and differentiation. However, these can be defective leading to diseases, such as cancer. An increasing body of literature reports the environmental and occupational exposure to a mixture of natural and man-produced substances leading to epigenetic alterations. The identification of key genetic and/or epigenetic events involved in chemical carcinogenesis is an important step towards the discovery of biomarkers that can be used to evaluate the exposure, predict biological effects, and prevent adverse health consequences. Here, we focus on epidemiological studies to review the most recent advances in understanding genetic and epigenetic factors in relation to particulate matter, benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure. PMID:26500287

  17. TAK1 Regulates Hepatic Cell Survival and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Yoon Seok; Song, Jingyi; Seki, Ekihiro

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 or MAP3K7) is an intracellular hub molecule that regulates both nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that play key roles in development, cell survival, immune response, metabolism, and carcinogenesis. TAK1 activity is tightly regulated by its binding proteins, TAB1 and TAB2/TAB3, as well as by post-translational modification including ubiquitination and phosphorylation. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that TAK1 plays a role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis as a tumor prompter or tumor suppressor. Understanding of the role of TAK1 in liver physiology and diseases are required for the development of therapeutic agency targeting TAK1. In this review, we highlight the activation mechanism and pathophysiological roles of TAK1 in the liver. PMID:24443058

  18. TAK1 regulates hepatic cell survival and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Yoon Seok; Song, Jingyi; Seki, Ekihiro

    2014-02-01

    TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 or MAP3K7) is an intracellular hub molecule that regulates both nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that play key roles in development, cell survival, immune response, metabolism, and carcinogenesis. TAK1 activity is tightly regulated by its binding proteins, TAB1 and TAB2/TAB3, as well as by post-translational modification including ubiquitination and phosphorylation. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that TAK1 plays a role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis as a tumor prompter or tumor suppressor. An understanding of the role of TAK1 in liver physiology and diseases is required for the development of therapeutic agencies targeting TAK1. In this review, we highlight the activation mechanism and pathophysiological roles of TAK1 in the liver. PMID:24443058

  19. Modulatory effects of black tea polyphenols on rat forestomach carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murugan, R Senthil; Mohan, K V P Chandra; Nagini, S

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study was designed to evaluate the chemopreventive effects of black tea polyphenols (Polyphenon-B) on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced gastric carcinogenesis in Wistar rats. Intragastric administration of MNNG induced well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas that showed diminished mitochondrial lipid and protein oxidation and an increase in antioxidants. In contrast to tumor tissue, the liver mitochondria of tumor-bearing animals showed elevated lipid and protein oxidation with compromised antioxidant defenses. Dietary administration of Polyphenon-B effectively suppressed MNNG-induced stomach tumors, modulated mitochondrial lipid and protein oxidation, and enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach and liver. Our results suggest that Polyphenon-B may exert its chemopreventive effects by modulating mitochondrial cellular redox status in the tumor as well as in the host liver. PMID:20020873

  20. Regulators of carcinogenesis: emerging roles beyond their primary functions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Lan; Yang, An-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Cancers are characterized by aberrant cell signaling that results in accelerated proliferation, suppressed cell death, and reprogrammed metabolism to provide sufficient energy and intermediate metabolites for macromolecular biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the emerging "unconventional" roles of these regulators based on their newly identified interaction partners, different subcellular localizations, and/or structural variants. For example, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) regulates DNA synthesis, microRNA maturation and drug resistance by interacting with previously undescribed partners; cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) crosstalk with multiple canonical pathways by phosphorylating novel substrates or by functioning as transcriptional factors; apoptosis executioners play extensive roles in necroptosis, autophagy, and in the self-renewal of stem cells; and various metabolic enzymes and their mutants control carcinogenesis independently of their enzymatic activity. These recent findings will supplement the systemic functional annotation of cancer regulators and provide new rationales for potential molecular targeted cancer treatments. PMID:25448403

  1. Chemoprevention of heterocyclic amine-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masao; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Shibutani, Makoto; Imai, Toshio; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2002-01-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is one of the most prevalent carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in the environment, targeting the colon, prostate, pancreas, and mammary gland in rodents. Chemopreventive effects of synthetic and naturally occurring compounds on PhIP-induced rat mammary carcinogenesis were investigated in a series of experiments. In a PhIP feeding model, groups of 20-21 female F344 rats each, were treated with 0.02% PhIP alone or PhIP plus 0.5% 1-O-hexyl-2,3,5-trimethylhydroquinone (HTHQ), 1% green tea catechins, 1% alpha-tocopherol, 0.1% ellagic acid, or 1% chlorophyllin, each in the diet, or 0.1% caffeine in drinking water for 52 weeks. To assess the mechanism of HTHQ and caffeine inhibition of PhIP-induced carcinogenesis, effects of these compound on the in vitro metabolic activation of PhIP were examined in the presence of S9 mix. In the next series of experiments, the PhIP intragastric dose model was applied to allow separate investigation of the effects of chemicals during the initiation and postinitiation periods. In these experiments, female Sprague-Dawley rats were given eight intragastric doses of 100 mg/kg body weight during the first 4-8 weeks for initiation. Either during initiation or after initiation, or only after initiation, animals were treated with either corn or perilla oil at doses of 5 and 20%, conjugated fatty acid derived from safflower oil (CFA-S) or perilla oil (CFA-P) at a dose of 1%, arctiin at doses of 0.02 and 0.2% in the diet, or sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) at a dose of 0.2% in drinking water. In the PhIP feeding model, administration of PhIP alone for 52 weeks induced adenocarcinomas in 40% of rats, but the incidence was remarkably reduced to 5% by the simultaneous treatment with 0.5% HTHQ, a strong lipophilic phenolic antioxidant, or to 10% by 0.1% caffeine. Administration of 1% chlorophyllin exerted similar, albeit weaker, effects. alpha-Tocopherol at a dose of 0.5% only reduced the multiplicity of

  2. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  3. Effect of DMSO and DMBA hamster pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Hidalgo, F.; Miller, E.G.; Binnie, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The penetration of mucosal surfaces by chemical carcinogens is required for tumor induction. The effectiveness of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a carrier for carcinogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine what effect DMSO would have on the 9,10-dimethyl- 1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced carcinogenesis in the hamster cheek pouch. Thirty Syrian golden hamsters were divided into two groups: the control group received a topical application of 0.5% DMBA in mineral oil three times per week for 16 weeks, while the experimental group received a topical application of DMSO previous to each DMBA application. At autopsy, both groups had developed tumors, the tumor ratio of control to experimental was 3.5:1.9 and the average size of tumors was 2.2 to 1.9 mm sq. The results suggest that DMSO interfered with the usual DMBA induction mechanism.

  4. Studies on the multistage nature of radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.; Ley, R.D.; Grube, D.; Staffeldt, E.

    1980-01-01

    With low dose levels of ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, the number of initiation events exceeds the number of tumors that grow to a detectable size. Ionizing radiation, which is a complete carcinogen, appears to be a more effective initiator than an enhancer or promoter. However, the initiation and promotion aspects of ionizing radiation have been studied in very few organ systems. In the case of UVR, with or without photosensitizers such as psoralens, the requirement of a relatively large number of exposures for carcinogenesis suggests that the expression of the initiated cells as frank tumors requires a number of events spread out over the time of the development of the tumor. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation are, perhaps, underutilized as tools for probing the mechanism of both initiation and promotion.

  5. Reactive oxygen species: their relation to pneumoconiosis and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Shi, X; Castranova, V

    1998-10-01

    Occupational exposures to mineral particles cause pneumoconiosis and other diseases, including cancer. Recent studies have suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a key role in the mechanisms of disease initiation and progression following exposure to these particles. ROS-induced primary stimuli result in the increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators, promoting events that appear to be important in the progression of cell injury and pulmonary disease. We have provided evidence supporting the hypothesis that inhalation of insoluble particles such as asbestos, agricultural dusts, coal, crystalline silica, and inorganic dust can be involved in facilitating multiple pathways for persistent generation of ROS, which may lead to a continuum of inflammation leading to progression of disease. This article briefly summarizes some of the recent findings from our laboratories with emphasis on the molecular events by which ROS are involved in promoting pneumoconiosis and carcinogenesis. PMID:9788890

  6. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  7. Mechanisms of Caffeine-Induced Inhibition of UVB Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Conney, Allan H; Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Kawasumi, Masaoki; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Sunlight-induced non-melanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than two million cases per year. Several studies have shown an inhibitory effect of caffeine administration on UVB-induced skin cancer in mice, and these studies are paralleled by epidemiology studies that indicate an inhibitory effect of coffee drinking on non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Strikingly, decaffeinated coffee consumption had no such inhibitory effect. Mechanism studies indicate that caffeine has a sunscreen effect that inhibits UVB-induced formation of thymine dimers and sunburn lesions in the epidermis of mice. In addition, caffeine administration has a biological effect that enhances UVB-induced apoptosis thereby enhancing the elimination of damaged precancerous cells, and caffeine administration also enhances apoptosis in tumors. Caffeine administration enhances UVB-induced apoptosis by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Exploration of the p53-independent effect indicated that caffeine administration enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the UVB-induced increase in ATR-mediated formation of phospho-Chk1 (Ser345) and abolishing the UVB-induced decrease in cyclin B1 which resulted in caffeine-induced premature and lethal mitosis in mouse skin. In studies with cultured primary human keratinocytes, inhibition of ATR with siRNA against ATR inhibited Chk1 phosphorylation and enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis. Transgenic mice with decreased epidermal ATR function that were irradiated chronically with UVB had 69% fewer tumors at the end of the study compared with irradiated littermate controls with normal ATR function. These results, which indicate that genetic inhibition of ATR (like pharmacologic inhibition of ATR via caffeine) inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis support the concept that ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1 is an important target for caffeine's inhibitory effect on UVB-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23785666

  8. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sliva, Daniel; Loganathan, Jagadish; Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Lamb, John G.; Terry, Colin; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Adamec, Jiri; Sandusky, George E.; Dudhgaonkar, Shailesh

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. Methods/Principal Findings Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine [PhIP]) and inflammation (dextran sodium sulfate [DSS]) in mice. Mice were treated with 0, 100, 300 and 500 mg GLT/kg of body weight 3 times per week for 4 months. Cell proliferation, expression of cyclin D1 and COX-2 and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of GLT on XRE/AhR, PXR and rPXR was evaluated by the reporter gene assays. Expression of metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, CYP3A1 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. GLT treatment significantly suppressed focal hyperplasia, aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and tumor formation in mice exposed to PhIP/DSS. The anti-proliferative effects of GLT were further confirmed by the decreased staining with Ki-67 in colon tissues. PhIP/DSS-induced colon inflammation was demonstrated by the significant shortening of the large intestine and macrophage infiltrations, whereas GLT treatment prevented the shortening of colon lengths, and reduced infiltration of macrophages in colon tissue. GLT treatment also significantly down-regulated PhIP/DSS-dependent expression of cyclin D1, COX-2, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue. Conclusions Our data suggest that GLT could be considered as an alternative dietary approach for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:23118901

  9. Assay of lapatinib in murine models of cigarette smoke carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balansky, Roumen; Izzotti, Alberto; D’Agostini, Francesco; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Micale, Rosanna T.; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Camoirano, Anna; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Steele, Vernon E.; De Flora, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Lapatinib, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), is prescribed for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer overexpressing HER-2. Involvement of this drug in pulmonary carcinogenesis has been poorly investigated. We used murine models suitable to evaluate cigarette smoke-related molecular and histopathological alterations. A total of 481 Swiss H mice were used. The mice were exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) during the first four months of life. After 10 weeks, MCS caused an elevation of bulky DNA adducts, oxidative DNA damage and an extensive downregulation of microRNAs in lung. After four months, an increase in micronucleus frequency was observed in peripheral blood erythrocytes. After 7.5 months, histopathological alterations were detected in the lung, also including benign tumors and malignant tumors, and in the urinary tract. A subchronic toxicity study assessed the non-toxic doses of lapatinib, administered daily with the diet after weaning. After 10 weeks, lapatinib significantly attenuated the MCS-related nucleotide changes and upregulated several low-intensity microRNAs in lung. The drug poorly affected the MCS systemic genotoxicity and had modest protective effects on MCS-induced preneoplastic lesions in lung and kidney, when administered under conditions that temporarily mimicked interventions either in current smokers or ex-smokers. On the other hand, it caused some toxicity to the liver. Thus, on the whole, lapatinib appears to have a low impact in the smoke-related lung carcinogenesis models used, especially in terms of tumorigenic response. PMID:25053627

  10. One-hit models of carcinogenesis: conservative or not

    SciTech Connect

    Bailar, J.C. III; Crouch, E.A.C.; Shaikh, R.; Spiegelman, D.

    1988-12-01

    One-hit formulas are widely believed to be conservative when used to analyze carcinogenesis bioassays, in the sense that they will rarely underestimate risks of cancer at low exposures. Such formulas are generally applied to the lifetime incidence of cancer at a specific site, with risks estimated from animal data at zero dose (control), and two or more additional doses that are appreciable fractions of a maximum tolerated dose. No empirical study has demonstrated that the one-hit formula is conservative in the sense described. The Carcinogenesis Bioassay Database System contains data on 1212 separate bioassays of 308 chemical substances tested at exactly three evaluable doses. These provided sufficient data to examine 8432 specific combination of cancer site with sex, species, and chemical. For each of these they fitted a one-hit formula to the zero and maximum dose data points, then examined the relation of the fitted curve to the incidence rate observed at the mid-dose, with and without adjustment for intercurrent mortality. Both underestimates and overestimates of risk at mid-dose occurred substantially more often than expected by chance. They cannot tell whether such underestimates would occur at lower doses, but offer six biological reasons why underestimates might be expected. In a high percentage of animal bioassays, the one-hit formula is not conservative when applied in the usual way to animal data. It remains possible that the one-hit formula may indeed be conservative at sufficiently low doses (below the observational range), but the usual procedure, applied to the usual dose range, can be nonconservative in estimating the slope of the formula at such low doses. Risk assessments for regulation of carcinogens should incorporate some measure of additional uncertainty.

  11. The role of reproductive hormones in epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gharwan, Helen; Bunch, Kristen P; Annunziata, Christina M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer comprises ∼85% of all ovarian cancer cases. Despite acceptance regarding the influence of reproductive hormones on ovarian cancer risk and considerable advances in the understanding of epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis on a molecular level, complete understanding of the biologic processes underlying malignant transformation of ovarian surface epithelium is lacking. Various hypotheses have been proposed over the past several decades to explain the etiology of the disease. The role of reproductive hormones in epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis remains a key topic of research. Primary questions in the field of ovarian cancer biology center on its developmental cell of origin, the positive and negative effects of each class of hormones on ovarian cancer initiation and progression, and the role of the immune system in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. The development of the female reproductive tract is dictated by the hormonal milieu during embryogenesis. Intensive research efforts have revealed that ovarian cancer is a heterogenous disease that may develop from multiple extra-ovarian tissues, including both Müllerian (fallopian tubes, endometrium) and non-Müllerian structures (gastrointestinal tissue), contributing to its heterogeneity and distinct histologic subtypes. The mechanism underlying ovarian localization, however, remains unclear. Here, we discuss the role of reproductive hormones in influencing the immune system and tipping the balance against or in favor of developing ovarian cancer. We comment on animal models that are critical for experimentally validating existing hypotheses in key areas of endocrine research and useful for preclinical drug development. Finally, we address emerging therapeutic trends directed against ovarian cancer. PMID:26373571

  12. The Anticancer Role of Capsaicin in Experimentallyinduced Lung Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anandakumar, Pandi; Kamaraj, Sattu; Jagan, Sundaram; Ramakrishnan, Gopalakrishnan; Asokkumar, Selvamani; Naveenkumar, Chandrashekar; Raghunandhakumar, Subramanian; Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Capsaicin (CAP) is the chief pungent principle found in the hot red peppers and the chili peppers that have long been used as spices, food additives and drugs. This study investigated the anticancer potential of CAP through its ability to modify extracellular matrix components and proteases during mice lung carcinogenesis. Methods: Swiss albino mice were treated with benzo(a) pyrene (50 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil) orally twice a week for four successive weeks to induce lung cancer at the end of 14th week. CAP was administrated (10 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil) intraperitoneally. Extracellular matrix components were assayed; Masson’s trichome staining of lung tissues was performed. Western blot analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 were also carried out. Results: In comparison with the control animals, animals in which benzo(a)pyrene had induced lung cancer showed significant increases in extracellular matrix components such as collagen (hydroxy proline), elastin, uronic acid and hexosamine and in glycosaminoglycans such as hyaluronate, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate and dermatan sulfate. The above alterations in extracellular matrix components were effectively counteracted in benzo(a)pyrene along with CAP supplemented animals when compared to benzo(a) pyrene alone supplemented animals. The results of Masson’s trichome staining for collagen and of, immunoblotting analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 further supported the biochemical findings. Conclusion: The apparent potential of CAP in modulating extracellular matrix components and proteases suggests that CAP plays a chemomodulatory and anti- cancer role working against experimentally induced lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26120484

  13. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie Qu Wei; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  14. Clinicopathologic Features of Colorectal Carcinoma in HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, Carlie; Cavalcanti, Marcela S.; Daniel, Tanisha; Vakiani, Efsevia; Shia, Jinru; Sigel, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests differences in colo-rectal cancer in HIV-infected patients (HIV+) compared with HIV− patients. Microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in a subset of colorectal cancer, is present at a higher rate in certain cancers in HIV+ patients. Colorectal cancer with MSI share some characteristics with those reported for HIV+ colorectal cancer. On this premise, we studied clinical and pathologic features of HIV+ colorectal cancer and evaluated for MSI using matched HIV− colorectal cancer controls. Methods Two nested, matched cohorts were identified from a hospital-based cohort of colorectal cancer patients. HIV+ colo-rectal cancers were identified and random control patients were matched for selected characteristics. Mismatch repair protein (MMR) IHC was performed as the detection method for MSI. Variables were compared between cases and controls using fixed-effects logit modeling to account for matching. Results We included 184 colorectal cancer samples (38 HIV+, 146 HIV− control). Median patient age at colorectal cancer onset was 55. When compared with HIV− colorectal cancer, HIV+patients were more likely to have smoked (P = 0.001), have right-sided colorectal cancer (37% vs. 14%; P = 0.003), and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) above 50/10 high-power fields (21% vs. 7%). There was no difference in MMR protein expression (P = 0.6). HIV+ colorectal cancer patients had reduced overall survival (P = 0.02) but no difference in progression-free survival. Conclusions HIV+ patients developed colorectal cancer at a lower median age than population estimates, had a higher frequency of right-sided disease, and increased TILs, suggesting potential biologic differences compared with uninfected patients. Impact Clinicopathologic differences in colorectal cancer of HIV+ persons may have implications for tumor pathogenesis. PMID:27197294

  15. Multiple mucin depleted foci, high proliferation and low apoptotic response in the onset of colon carcinogenesis of the PIRC rat, mutated in Apc.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Luceri, Cristina; Soares, Paulo Victoria; Lodovici, Maura; Caderni, Giovanna

    2015-03-15

    PIRC rats (F344/NTac-Apc (am1137) ) mutated in the Apc gene spontaneously develop colon tumors thus mimicking familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) more closely than Apc-based rodent models developing tumors mostly in the small intestine. To understand whether microscopic dysplastic lesions precede the development of macroscopic tumors, PIRC rat colon was examined for the presence of mucin depleted foci (MDF), microadenomas of the rodent and human colon. Few MDF (about 4/animal) were already present in 1-month-old rats and their number rapidly increases to about 250 in 8-month-old rats. These lesions showed Wnt signaling activation (nuclear β-catenin accumulation) and were dramatically decreased by sulindac (320 ppm), a drug with chemopreventive activity (MDF/rat at 4 months: 156 ± 8 and 38 ± 6 in controls and sulindac-treated rats, respectively, means ± SE, p < 0.001). Since altered proliferation and apoptosis could underlie the early phases of carcinogenesis, we studied these processes in the apparently normal colon mucosa (NM) of 1-month-old PIRC and wt rats. Colon proliferation (PCNA expression) was significantly higher in PIRC rats. Notably, PIRC rat NM showed resistance to apoptosis since it sustained proliferation and had lower apoptosis after a cytotoxic insult with 1,2 dimethylhydrazine. Gene expression of Myc, p21, Birc5, Ogg1, Apex1 and Sod2 were significantly up-regulated in the NM of PIRC rat. The overall results put forward PIRC rat as useful model of colon carcinogenesis, either to study the process itself or to test in vivo chemopreventive agents in both short- and long-term studies. PMID:25257656

  16. Clinical utility of anti-p53 auto-antibody: Systematic review and focus on colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suppiah, Aravind; Greenman, John

    2013-01-01

    Mutation of the p53 gene is a key event in the carcinogenesis of many different types of tumours. These can occur throughout the length of the p53 gene. Anti-p53 auto-antibodies are commonly produced in response to these p53 mutations. This review firstly describes the various mechanisms of p53 dysfunction and their association with subsequent carcinogenesis. Following this, the mechanisms of induction of anti-p53 auto-antibody production are shown, with various hypotheses for the discrepancies between the presence of p53 mutation and the presence/absence of anti-p53 auto-antibodies. A systematic review was performed with a descriptive summary of key findings of each anti-p53 auto-antibody study in all cancers published in the last 30 years. Using this, the cumulative frequency of anti-p53 auto-antibody in each cancer type is calculated and then compared with the incidence of p53 mutation in each cancer to provide the largest sample calculation and correlation between mutation and anti-p53 auto-antibody published to date. Finally, the review focuses on the data of anti-p53 auto-antibody in colorectal cancer studies, and discusses future strategies including the potentially promising role using anti-p53 auto-antibody presence in screening and surveillance. PMID:23922463

  17. Effect of thymoquinone on 1,2-dimethyl-hydrazine-induced oxidative stress during initiation and promotion of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jrah-Harzallah, Hanene; Ben-Hadj-Khalifa, Sonia; Almawi, Wassim Y; Maaloul, Aya; Houas, Zohra; Mahjoub, Touhami

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated pre- and post-thymoquinone (TQ) treatment on 1,2-dimethyl-hydrazine (DMH)-induced oxidative stress during initiation and promotion of colon carcinogenesis. Wistar rats were induced with DMH (20mg/kg) for 10 or 20 weeks, and treated with TQ (5mg/kg). Following sacrifice, the colons were analysed for tumour development, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, lipid peroxidation [conjugated diene (CD) and malondialdehyde (MDA)], antioxidants [glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH)], and histological changes. Increased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation were seen during tumour initiation and promotion. All ROS-scavenging enzyme activities were increased upon shorter DMH treatment but not following longer treatment, while GSH amount was increased upon both treatments. Oxidative state perturbations were associated with moderate colon dysplasia and 30% tumour incidence at initiation and marked dysplasia and 100% tumour incidence at promotion. TQ pre-treatment restored completely DMH-induced oxidative stress at initiation and established histological changes and tumour development. It also abrogated oxidative status aggravation at promotion, and significantly reduced tumour incidence (67%). By comparison, TQ post-treatment corrected oxidative status and attenuated tumour development at initiation. It slightly reduced MDA and antioxidant level at promotion, with a slight reduction in tumour state and dysplasia degree. TQ is efficacious in protecting and curing DMH-induced initiation phase of colon cancer, while exerting a protective role at promotion. TQ effect seems to be related to its capacity in preventing DMH-induced oxidative stress. These in vivo results support the notion that TQ may be of value as a chemo-preventive alternative in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:23131834

  18. American ginseng significantly reduced the progression of high-fat-diet-enhanced colon carcinogenesis in ApcMin/+mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunhao; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Zhiyu; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wu, Xiaohui; He, Xin; Liao, Yang; Wu, Ningning; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Du, Wei; He, Tong-Chuan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Chronic gut inflammation is recognized as a risk factor for tumor development, including CRC. American ginseng is a very commonly used ginseng species in the West. Methods A genetically engineered ApcMin/+ mouse model was used in this study. We analyzed the saponin composition of American ginseng used in this project, and evaluated its effects on the progression of high-fat-diet-enhanced CRC carcinogenesis. Results After oral ginseng administration (10–20 mg/kg/d for up to 32 wk), experimental data showed that, compared with the untreated mice, ginseng very significantly reduced tumor initiation and progression in both the small intestine (including the proximal end, middle end, and distal end) and the colon (all p < 0.01). This tumor number reduction was more obvious in those mice treated with a low dose of ginseng. The tumor multiplicity data were supported by body weight changes and gut tissue histology examinations. In addition, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that compared with the untreated group, ginseng very significantly reduced the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in both the small intestine and the colon (all p < 0.01). Conclusion Further studies are needed to link our observed effects to the actions of the gut microbiome in converting the parent ginsenosides to bioactive ginseng metabolites. Our data suggest that American ginseng may have potential value in CRC chemoprevention. PMID:26199554

  19. Dietary chemoprevention of PhIP induced carcinogenesis in male Fischer 344 rats with tomato and broccoli.

    PubMed

    Canene-Adams, Kirstie; Sfanos, Karen S; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Nelson, William G; Brayton, Cory; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2013-01-01

    The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-B]pyridine (PhIP), found in meats cooked at high temperatures, has been implicated in epidemiological and rodent studies for causing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. A previous animal study using a xenograft model has shown that whole tomato and broccoli, when eaten in combination, exhibit a marked effect on tumor reduction compared to when eaten alone. Our aim was to determine if PhIP-induced carcinogenesis can be prevented by dietary consumption of whole tomato + broccoli powders. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 45) were randomized into the following treatment groups: control (AIN93G diet), PhIP (200 ppm in AIN93G diet for the first 20 weeks of the study), or tomato + broccoli + PhIP (mixed in AIN93G diet at 10% each and fed with PhIP for 20 weeks, and then without PhIP for 32 weeks). Study animals were monitored for 52 weeks and were euthanized as necessary based on a set of criteria for health status and tumor burden. Although there appeared to be some hepatic and intestinal toxicity due to the combination of PhIP and tomato + broccoli, these rodents had improved survival and reduced incidence and/or severity of PhIP-induced neoplastic lesions compared to the PhIP-alone treated group. Rats eating tomato + broccoli exhibited a marked decrease in the number and size of cribiform prostatic intraepitheilial neoplasia/carcinoma in situ (cribiform PIN/CIS) lesions and in the incidence of invasive intestinal adenocarcinomas and skin carcinomas. Although the apparent toxic effects of combined PhIP and tomato + broccoli need additional study, the results of this study support the hypothesis that a diet rich in tomato and broccoli can reduce or prevent dietary carcinogen-induced cancers. PMID:24312188

  20. Dietary Chemoprevention of PhIP Induced Carcinogenesis in Male Fischer 344 Rats with Tomato and Broccoli

    PubMed Central

    Canene-Adams, Kirstie; Sfanos, Karen S.; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Nelson, William G.; Brayton, Cory; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2013-01-01

    The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-B]pyridine (PhIP), found in meats cooked at high temperatures, has been implicated in epidemiological and rodent studies for causing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. A previous animal study using a xenograft model has shown that whole tomato and broccoli, when eaten in combination, exhibit a marked effect on tumor reduction compared to when eaten alone. Our aim was to determine if PhIP-induced carcinogenesis can be prevented by dietary consumption of whole tomato + broccoli powders. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 45) were randomized into the following treatment groups: control (AIN93G diet), PhIP (200 ppm in AIN93G diet for the first 20 weeks of the study), or tomato + broccoli + PhIP (mixed in AIN93G diet at 10% each and fed with PhIP for 20 weeks, and then without PhIP for 32 weeks). Study animals were monitored for 52 weeks and were euthanized as necessary based on a set of criteria for health status and tumor burden. Although there appeared to be some hepatic and intestinal toxicity due to the combination of PhIP and tomato + broccoli, these rodents had improved survival and reduced incidence and/or severity of PhIP-induced neoplastic lesions compared to the PhIP-alone treated group. Rats eating tomato + broccoli exhibited a marked decrease in the number and size of cribiform prostatic intraepitheilial neoplasia/carcinoma in situ (cribiform PIN/CIS) lesions and in the incidence of invasive intestinal adenocarcinomas and skin carcinomas. Although the apparent toxic effects of combined PhIP and tomato + broccoli need additional study, the results of this study support the hypothesis that a diet rich in tomato and broccoli can reduce or prevent dietary carcinogen-induced cancers. PMID:24312188

  1. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Fayez; Al Jerf, Feras; Al-Halabi, M. H. D. Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR) and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE) and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families. PMID:23737765

  2. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  3. Treatment of peritoneal metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    März, Loreen; Piso, Pompiliu

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal seedings of a colorectal tumor represent the second most frequent site of metastasis (after the liver). In the era of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-only chemotherapy, the prognosis was poor for colorectal cancer with peritoneal metastases. Within the last few years, new chemotherapeutic and targeted agents have improved the prognosis; however, the response to these treatments seems to be lower than that for liver metastases. The combination of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy have further improved both disease-free survival and overall survival. Keeping this in mind, every patient presenting with peritoneal metastases from colorectal cancer should be evaluated and receive adequate treatment, if possible in the above-mentioned combination. This paper reviews recent advancements in the therapy of peritoneal carcinomatosis. PMID:26424828

  4. The stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairudin, Nur Izzati; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. To better understand about the kinetics of cancer growth, mathematical models are used to provide insight into the progression of this natural process which enables physicians and oncologists to determine optimal radiation and chemotherapy schedules and develop a prognosis, both of which are indispensable for treating cancer. This thesis investigates the stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models. We found that continuous saturating feedback is the best available model of colorectal cancer growth. We also performed stability analysis. The result shows that cancer progress in sequence of genetic mutations or epigenetic which lead to a very large number of cells population until become unbounded. The cell population growth initiate and its saturating feedback is overcome when mutation changes causing the net per-capita growth rate of stem or transit cells exceed critical threshold.

  5. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  6. Mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Gen; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have been extensively used for the surgical management of colorectal cancer during the last two decades. Accumulating data have demonstrated that laparoscopic colectomy is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent oncologic outcomes when compared with open surgery. However, some controversies regarding the oncologic quality of mini-invasive surgery for rectal cancer exist. Meanwhile, some progresses in colorectal surgery, such as robotic technology, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, natural orifice specimen extraction, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, have been made in recent years. In this article, we review the published data and mainly focus on the current status and latest advances of mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:24589210

  7. Ablative Therapies for Colorectal Polyps and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.; Nurkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques are gaining popularity in the management of colorectal polyps and occasionally superficial cancers. While their use is in many times palliative, they have proven to be curative in carefully selected patients with polyps or malignancies, with less morbidity than radical resection. However, one should note that data supporting local and ablative therapies for colorectal cancer is scarce and may be subject to publication bias. Therefore, for curative intent, these techniques should only be considered in highly select cases as higher rates of local recurrences have also been reported. The aim of this review is to explain the different modalities of local and ablative therapies specific to colorectal neoplasia and explain the indications and circumstances where they have been most successful. PMID:25089281

  8. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Pearl, Dennis K; Erdman, John W; Moran, Nancy E; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-12-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild-type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4 to 10 weeks of age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 week after castration). Ten-week-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P < 0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared with WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P < 0.0001) compared with intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways is reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). In addition, tomato feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, whereas lycopene feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  9. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Pearl, Dennis K.; Erdman, John W.; Moran, Nancy E.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4-10 wk-of-age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone-repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 wk after castration). Ten-wk-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString®, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P<0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared to WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P<0.0001) compared to intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways are reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato-feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). Additionally, tomato-feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, while lycopene-feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early stages of prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  10. Loss of Y Chromosome in Peripheral Blood of Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Noveski, Predrag; Madjunkova, Svetlana; Sukarova Stefanovska, Emilija; Matevska Geshkovska, Nadica; Kuzmanovska, Maja; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2016-01-01

    Background Although age-related loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in normal hematopoietic cells is a well-known phenomenon, the phenotypic consequences of LOY have been elusive. However, LOY has been found in association with smoking, shorter survival and higher risk of cancer. It was suggested that LOY in blood cells could become a predictive biomarker of male carcinogenesis. Aims, Methods & Findings To investigate the association of LOY in blood cells with the risk for development of colorectal (CC) and prostate cancers (PC), we have analyzed DNA samples from peripheral blood of 101 CC male patients (mean age 60.5±11.9 yrs), 70 PC patients (mean age 68.8±8.0 yrs) and 93 healthy control males (mean age 65.8±16.6 yrs). The methodology included co-amplification of homologous sequences on chromosome Y and other chromosomes using multiplex quantitative fluorescent (QF) PCR followed by automatic detection and analysis on ABI 3500 Genetic Analyzer. The mean Y/X ratio was significantly lower in the whole group of cancer patients (0.907±0.12; p = 1.17x10-9) in comparison to the controls (1.015±0.15), as well as in CC (0.884±0.15; p = 3.76x10-9) and PC patients (0.941±0.06; p = 0.00012), when analyzed separately. Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for LOY and age showed that LOY is a more significant predictor of cancer presence than age, and that age probably does not contribute to the increased number of subjects with detectable LOY in cancer patients cohort. Conclusion In conclusion, our results support the recent findings of association of LOY in blood cells with carcinogenesis in males. PMID:26745889

  11. Cellular prion protein contributes to LS 174T colon cancer cell carcinogenesis by increasing invasiveness and resistance against doxorubicin-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Cornelius Kwang-Lee; Say, Yee-How

    2015-09-01

    As the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) has been implicated in carcinogenesis, we aimed to investigate the effects of cancer cell-specific PrP(C) overexpression from the invasion, metastasis, and apoptosis aspects, by performing cell motility assays, cell proliferation assays under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions, and apoptosis evasion when subjected to multiple anti-cancer drugs. Overexpression of PrP(C) in LS 174T was achieved by stable transfection. PrP(C) overexpression was shown to increase cell proliferation in anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent manners, as shown by more viable cells in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, more colonies formed in soft agar assay and increased resistance to anoikis in poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-coated surface. PrP(C) overexpression also increased cell motility and invasiveness of LS 174T. Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix using collagen- and fibronectin-coated surfaces revealed increased cell attachment in LS 174T cells overexpressing PrP(C). Analysis of apoptotic and necrotic cells by propidium iodide/annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate microscopy and 7-amino-actinomycin D/annexin V-phycoerythrin flow cytometry revealed that PrP(C) overexpression attenuated doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Human apoptosis antibody array with 35 apoptosis-related proteins revealed that three inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs)-survivin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP-1)-were upregulated in LS 174T cells overexpressing PrP(C) in doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the overexpression of PrP(C) could enhance the invasiveness and survival of LS 174T colorectal cancer cells, indicating that PrP(C) plays a role in colorectal cancer biology. PMID:25983001

  12. miR-486-5p attenuates tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by targeting neuropilin-2 in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengxia; Li, Ming; Hu, Yingbin; Shi, Ning; Yu, Haisheng; Liu, Haiyan; Lian, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs are associated with many important biologic processes in carcinogenesis. Despite ample research revealing the dysregualtion of miR-486-5p in various cancers, little is known about the roles of miR-486-5p in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). In this study, we investigated the biological functions and molecular mechanisms of miR-486-5p in CRC growth and invasion, discussing the potential of using miR-486-5p as a biomarker for colorectal cancers. Our data revealed that miR-486-5p was significantly downregulated in CRC tissues compared with the paracancer tissue by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and that miR-486-5p was downregulated to a greater extent in advanced stage cancer (stage III and IV) as compared to early stage cancer (stage I and II). Luciferase reporter assay verified that neuropilin-2 was a direct functional target of miR-486-5p in the CRC cells, and upregulation of miR-486-5p in CRC cells negatively correlated with the expression of neuropilin-2. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-486-5p inhibited the tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis in nude mice, which was reversed by overexpression of neuropilin-2. Taken together, our study suggested miR-486-5p might be a suppressor of CRC. PMID:27284245

  13. Expression of young HERV-H loci in the course of colorectal carcinoma and correlation with molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Bressan, Cédric; Hühns, Maja; Gock, Michael; Kühn, Florian; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-H family has been associated with colorectal carcinomas (CRC), yet no individual HERV-H locus expression has been thoroughly correlated with clinical data. Here, we characterized HERV-H reactivations in clinical CRC samples by integrating expression profiles, molecular patterns and clinical data. Expression of relevant HERV-H sequences was analyzed by qRT-PCR on two well-defined clinical cohorts (n = 139 pairs of tumor and adjacent normal colon tissue) including samples from adenomas (n = 21) and liver metastases (n = 16). Correlations with clinical and molecular data were assessed. Results CRC specific HERV-H sequences were validated and found expressed throughout CRC disease progression. Correlations b