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Sample records for dimorphus san joaquin

  1. California: San Joaquin Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley   ... is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected ... as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, ...

  2. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Joaquin County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Joaquin County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  3. The San Joaquin Valley: 20 years later

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The history of irrigation development and the need for disposal of saline drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley was described to provide background for the drainage water disposal problem that resulted from the closure of the Kesterson Reservoir. A 5 year study developed in Valley alternatives fo...

  4. Desegregation in the South San Joaquin Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Rodolfo G.

    Notably isolated from the large metropolitan centers by geography and predominantly agricultural in its economy, Kern County is California's third largest county in land area. About one-third of the county is situated on the flat valley floor at the extreme southern end of the San Joaquin Valley. The area relies heavily on Chicano and Black manual…

  5. San Joaquin Delta College Student Athlete Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Merrilee R.; Marcopulos, Ernest

    In spring 1988, a study was conducted of students who participated in college athletics at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC) between 1983-84 and 1987-88. Data collected on each student athlete included ethnicity, sport, place of residence, initial and current reading level, total grade point average (GPA), GPA in athletics and physical education…

  6. The San Joaquin Valley Westside Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Linneman, J. Christopher; Tanji, Kenneth K.

    2006-03-27

    Salt management has been a challenge to westside farmerssince the rapid expansion of irrigated agriculture in the 1900 s. Thesoils in this area are naturally salt-affected having formed from marinesedimentary rocks rich in sea salts rendering the shallow groundwater,and drainage return flows discharging into the lower reaches of the SanJoaquin River, saline. Salinity problems are affected by the importedwater supply from Delta where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Riverscombine. Water quality objectives on salinity and boron have been inplace for decades to protect beneficial uses of the river. However it wasthe selenium-induced avian toxicity that occurred in the evaporationponds of Kesterson Reservoir (the terminal reservoir of a planned but notcompleted San Joaquin Basin Master Drain) that changed public attitudesabout agricultural drainage and initiated a steady stream ofenvironmental legislation directed at reducing non-point source pollutionof the River. Annual and monthly selenium load restrictions and salinityand boron Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) are the most recent of thesepolicy initiatives. Failure by both State and Federal water agencies toconstruct a Master Drain facility serving mostly west-side irrigatedagriculture has constrained these agencies to consider only In-Valleysolutions to ongoing drainage problems. For the Westlands subarea, whichhas no surface irrigation drainage outlet to the San Joaquin River,innovative drainage reuse systems such as the Integrated Farm DrainageManagement (IFDM) offer short- to medium-term solutions while morepermanent remedies to salt disposal are being investigated. Real-timesalinity management, which requires improved coordination of east-sidereservoir releases and west-side drainage, offers some relief toGrasslands Basin farmers and wetland managers - allowing greater salinityloading to the River than under a strict TMDL. However, currentregulation drives a policy that results in a moratorium on all

  7. 33 CFR 117.191 - San Joaquin River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Joaquin River. 117.191 Section 117.191 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.191 San Joaquin River. (a) The...

  8. 33 CFR 117.191 - San Joaquin River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Joaquin River. 117.191 Section 117.191 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.191 San Joaquin River. (a) The...

  9. 33 CFR 117.191 - San Joaquin River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Joaquin River. 117.191 Section 117.191 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.191 San Joaquin River. (a) The...

  10. 33 CFR 117.191 - San Joaquin River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Joaquin River. 117.191 Section 117.191 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.191 San Joaquin River. (a) The draw of the Port of Stockton railroad bridge,...

  11. 33 CFR 117.191 - San Joaquin River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Joaquin River. 117.191 Section 117.191 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.191 San Joaquin River. (a) The...

  12. San Joaquin-Tulare Conjunctive Use Model: Detailed model description

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-03-01

    The San Joaquin - Tulare Conjunctive Use Model (SANTUCM) was originally developed for the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program to evaluate possible scenarios for long-term management of drainage and drainage - related problems in the western San Joaquin Valley of California. A unique aspect of this model is its coupling of a surface water delivery and reservoir operations model with a regional groundwater model. The model also performs salinity balances along the tributaries and along the main stem of the San Joaquin River to allow assessment of compliance with State Water Resources Control Board water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River. This document is a detailed description of the various subroutines, variables and parameters used in the model.

  13. 77 FR 60168 - Environmental Impact Statement: San Joaquin and Stanislaus Counties, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: San Joaquin and Stanislaus Counties, CA... pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327. Caltrans, in cooperation with San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties, is rescinding... 29-167L) in San Joaquin County to 0.16 km (0.1 mile) west of the San Joaquin Bridge (Bridge 38-45)...

  14. Transport of diazinon in the San Joaquin River Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the application of the organophosphate insecticide diazinon in the San Joaquin River Basin occurs in winter to control wood-boring insects in dormant almond orchards. A federal-state collaborative study found that diazinon accounted for most of the observed toxicity of San Joaquin River water in February 1993. Previous studies focused mainly on west-side inputs to the San Joaquin River. In this 1994 study, the three major east-side tributaries to the San Joaquin River - the Merced, Tuolumne, and Stanislaus rivers - and a downstream site on the San Joaquin River were sampled throughout the hydrographs of a late January and an early February storm. In both storms, the Tuolumne River had the highest concentrations of diazinon and transported the largest load of the three tributaries. The Stanislaus River was a small source in both storms. On the basis of previous storm sampling and estimated travel times, ephemeral west-side creeks probably were the main diazinon source early in the storms, whereas the Tuolumne and Merced rivers and east-side drainages directly to the San Joaquin River were the main sources later. Although 74 percent of diazinon transport in the San Joaquin River during 1991-1993 occurred in January and February, transport during each of the two 1994 storms was only 0.05 percent of the amount applied during preceding dry periods. Nevertheless, some of the diazinon concentrations in the San Joaquin River during the January storm exceeded 0.35 ??g/L, a concentration shown to be acutely toxic to water fleas. On the basis of this study and previous studies, diazinon concentrations and streamflow are highly variable during January and February storms, and frequent sampling is required to evaluate transport in the San Joaquin River Basin.

  15. Landslide oil field, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, B.P.; March, K.A.; Caballero, J.S.; Stolle, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    The Landslide field, located at the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 by a partnership headed by Channel Exploration Company, on a farm out from Tenneco Oil Company. Initial production from the Tenneco San Emidio 63X-30 was 2064 BOPD, making landslide one of the largest onshore discoveries in California during the past decade. Current production is 7100 BOPD from a sandstone reservoir at 12,500 ft. Fifteen wells have been drilled in the field, six of which are water injectors. Production from the Landslide field occurs from a series of upper Miocene Stevens turbidite sandstones that lie obliquely across an east-plunging structural nose. These turbidite sandstones were deposited as channel-fill sequences within a narrowly bounded levied channel complex. Both the Landslide field and the larger Yowlumne field, located 3 mi to the northwest, comprise a single channel-fan depositional system that developed in the restricted deep-water portion of the San Joaquin basin. Information from the open-hole logs, three-dimensional surveys, vertical seismic profiles, repeat formation tester data, cores, and pressure buildup tests allowed continuous drilling from the initial discovery to the final waterflood injector, without a single dry hole. In addition, the successful application of three-dimensional seismic data in the Landslide development program has helped correctly image channel-fan anomalies in the southern Maricopa basin, where data quality and severe velocity problems have hampered previous efforts. New exploration targets are currently being evaluated on the acreage surrounding the Landslide discovery and should lead to an interesting new round of drilling activity in the Maricopa basin.

  16. Paleohydrogeology of the San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.M.; Garven, G.; Boles, J.R.

    1999-03-01

    Mass transport can have a significant effect on chemical diagenetic processes in sedimentary basins. This paper presents results from the first part of a study that was designed to explore the role of an evolving hydrodynamic system in driving mass transport and chemical diagenesis, using the San Joaquin basin of California as a field area. The authors use coupled hydrogeologic models to establish the paleohydrogeology, thermal history, and behavior of nonreactive solutes in the basin. These models rely on extensive geological information and account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, tectonic uplift, sediment compaction, and clay dehydration. In the numerical simulations, tectonic uplift and ocean regression led to large-scale changes in fluid flow and composition by strengthening topography-driven fluid flow and allowing deep influx of fresh ground water in the San Joaquin basin. Sediment compaction due to rapid deposition created moderate overpressures, leading to upward flow from depth. The unusual distribution of salinity in the basin reflects influx of fresh ground water to depths of as much as 2 km and dilution of saline fluids by dehydration reactions at depths greater than {approximately}2.5 km. Simulations projecting the future salinity of the basin show marine salinities persisting for more than 10 m.y. after ocean regression. Results also show a change from topography- to compaction-driven flow in the Stevens Sandstone at ca. 5 Ma that coincides with an observed change in the diagenetic sequence. Results of this investigation provide a framework for future hydrologic research exploring the link between fluid flow and diagenesis.

  17. Transport of diazinon in the San Joaquin River basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the application of the organophosphate insecticide diazinon in the San Joaquin River Basin occurs in winter to control wood boring insects in dormant almond orchards. A federal-state collaborative study found that diazinon accounted for most of the observed toxicity of San Joaquin River water to water fleas in February 1993. Previous studies focussed mainly on west-side inputs to the San Joaquin River. In this 1994 study, the three major east-side tributaries to the San Joaquin River, the Merced, Tuolumne, and Stanislaus Rivers, and a downstream site on the San Joaquin River were sampled throughout the hydrographs of a late January and an early February storm. In both storms, the Tuolumne River had the highest concentrations of diazinon and transported the largest load of the three tributaries. The Stanislaus River was a small source in both storms. On the basis of previous storm sampling and estimated traveltimes, ephemeral west-side creeks were probably the main diazinon source early in the storms, while the Tuolumne and Merced Rivers and east-side drainage directly to the San Joaquin River were the main sources later. Although 74 percent of diazinon transport in the San Joaquin River during 199193 occurred in January and February, transport during each of the two 1994 storms was only 0.05 percent of the amount applied during preceeding dry periods. Nevertheless, some of the diazinon concentrations in the San Joaquin River during the January storm exceeded 0.35 micrograms per liter, a concentration shown to be acutely toxic to water fleas. Diazinon concentrations were highly variable during the storms and frequent sampling was required to adequately describe the concentration curves and to estimate loads.

  18. Cenozoic evolution of San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bartow, J.A.

    1988-03-01

    The Neogene San Joaquin basin in the southern part of the 700-km long Great Valley of California is a successor to a late Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary forearc basin. The transition from forearc basin to the more restricted Neogene marine basin occurred principally during the Paleogene as the plate tectonic setting changed from oblique convergence to normal convergence, and finally to the initiation of tangential (transform) movement near the end of the Oligocene. Regional-scale tectonic events that affected the basin include: (1) clockwise rotation of the southernmost Sierra Nevada, and large-scale en echelon folding in the southern Diablo Range, both perhaps related to Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary right slip on the proto-San-Andreas fault; (2) regional uplift of southern California in the Oligocene that resulted from the subduction of the Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge: (3) extensional tectonism in the Basin and Range province, particularly in the Miocene; (4) wrench tectonism adjacent to the San Andreas fault in the Neogene; (5) northeastward emplacement of a wedge of the Franciscan complex at the west side of the Sierran block, with associated deep-seated thrusting in the late Cenozoic; and (6) the accelerated uplift of the Sierra Nevada beginning in the late Miocene. Neogene basin history was controlled principally by the tectonic effects of the northwestward migration of the Mendocino triple junction along the California continental margin and by the subsequent wrench tectonism associated with the San Andreas fault system. East-west compression in the basin, resulting from extension in the Basin and Range province was an important contributing factor to crustal shortening at the west side of the valley. Analysis of the sedimentary history of the basin, which was controlled to some extent by eustatic sea level change, enables reconstruction of the basin paleogeography through the Cenozoic.

  19. 40 CFR 81.165 - San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.165 San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San...: Fresno County, Kings County, Madera County, Merced County, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County,...

  20. 40 CFR 81.165 - San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.165 San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San...: Fresno County, Kings County, Madera County, Merced County, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County,...

  1. 40 CFR 81.165 - San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.165 San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San...: Fresno County, Kings County, Madera County, Merced County, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County,...

  2. 40 CFR 81.165 - San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.165 San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San...: Fresno County, Kings County, Madera County, Merced County, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County,...

  3. 40 CFR 81.165 - San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.165 San Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San...: Fresno County, Kings County, Madera County, Merced County, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County,...

  4. Geological literature on the San Joaquin Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, J.C.; Trollman, W.M.; Denman, J.M.

    1973-01-01

    The following list of references includes most of the geological literature on the San Joaquin Valley and vicinity in central California (see figure 1) published prior to January 1, 1973. The San Joaquin Valley comprises all or parts of 11 counties -- Alameda, Calaveras, Contra Costa, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare (figure 2). As a matter of convenient geographical classification the boundaries of the report area have been drawn along county lines, and to include San Benito and Santa Clara Counties on the west and Mariposa and Tuolumne Counties on the east. Therefore, this list of geological literature includes some publications on the Diablo and Temblor Ranges on the west, the Tehachapi Mountains and Mojave Desert on the south, and the Sierra Nevada Foothills and Mountains on the east.

  5. Environmental setting of the San Joaquin-Tulare basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gronberg, JoAnn A.; Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Brown, Larry R.; Burow, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program for the San Joaquin- Tulare Basins began in 1991 to study the effects of natural and anthropogenic influences on the quality of ground water, surface water, biology, and ecology. The San Joaquin-Tulare Basins study unit, which covers approximately 31,200 square miles in central California, is made up of the San Joaquin Valley, the eastern slope of the Coast Ranges to the west, and the western slope of the Sierra Nevada to the east. The sediments of the San Joaquin Valley can be divided into alluvial fans and basin deposits. The San Joaquin River receives water from tributaries draining the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges, and except for streams discharging directly to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, is the only surface- water outlet from the study unit. The surface-water hydrology of the San Joaquin-Tulare Basins study unit has been significantly modified by development of water resources. Almost every major river entering the valley from the Sierra Nevada has one or more reservoirs. Almost every tributary and drainage into the San Joaquin River has been altered by a network of canals, drains, and wasteways. The Sierra Nevada is predominantly forested, and the Coast Ranges and the foothills of the Sierra Nevada are predominately rangeland. The San Joaquin Valley is dominated by agriculture, which utilized approximately 14.7 million acre-feet of water and 597 million pounds active ingredient of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers in 1990, and 88 million pounds active ingredient of pesticides in 1991. In addition, the livestock industry contributed 318 million pounds active ingredient of nitrogen and phosphorus from manure in 1987. This report provides the background information to assess the influence of these and other factors on water quality and to provide the foundation for the design and interpretation of all spatial data. These characterizations provide a basis for comparing the influences of human activities

  6. 78 FR 53038 - Interim Final Determination to Stay and Defer Sanctions; California; San Joaquin Valley

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 69896), we published a partial approval and partial disapproval of the San Joaquin Valley... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Interim Final Determination to Stay and Defer Sanctions; California; San Joaquin... imposition of highway sanctions based on a proposed approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley...

  7. 77 FR 70707 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley and South Coast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley and... Ambient Air Quality Standards in the San Joaquin Valley and the South Coast Air Basin. These technical...) in the San Joaquin Valley and South Coast (Los Angeles) Air Basin and included provisions of...

  8. Foraminifera and paleoenvironments in the Etchegoin and lower San Joaquin Formations, west-central San Joaquin valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lagoe, M.B.; Tenison, J.A.; Buehring, R. )

    1991-02-01

    The Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations preserve a rich stratigraphic record of paleoenvironments, deposition, and tectonics during the late Miocene-Pliocene development of the San Joaquin basin. The distribution of foraminifera within these formations can help constrain this record, which includes final filling of the basin, facies responses to sea level changes, and active movement on the San Andreas fault system. The distribution of foraminifera in core samples is analyzed from seven wells along the west-central San joaquin basin - four from Buena Vista oil field, one from western Elk Hills oil field, and two from an area just south of South Belridge oil field. A model of modern, shallow- to marginal-marine foraminiferal biofacies is used to interpret the Etchegoin-San Joaquin faunal distributions. This modern model distinguishes marsh, tidal channel, intertidal, lagoonal, littoral, and shallow sublittoral environments. Ongoing work calibrating this foraminiferal record to the lithologic and macrofossil records in addition to interpreted depositional systems within these formations will further define relationships between paleoenvironments, relative sea level, and tectonics.

  9. SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY AEROSOL HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH CENTER (SAHERC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    All studies in the SAHERC were being undertaken within the primary theme of ‘ambient particulate matter and resulting health effects in the San Joaquin Valley‘. Below is a chart outlining the relationship between the center’s five projects. All five research projects were...

  10. Water supply issues of the San Joaquin Valley in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The San Joaquin Valley of California is undoubtedly one of the most productive agricultural regions of the United States, and of the world. The valley was a Miocene epicontinental sea bounded by the Sierra Nevada igneous arc in the east and the Coast Range accretionary terrane in the west. It is now...

  11. PROJECT 3 -- INHALATION EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT OF SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We will identify the composition and size fraction of the airborne particles that cause adverse health effects in the San Joaquin Valley. The source origin of these unhealthy particles will be determined using source apportionment calculations. These findings will support an i...

  12. PATHOGENIC PHYTOPHTHORA SPECIES IN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY IRRIGATION WATER SOURCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface sources of irrigation water including the Kings River and three canals were assayed for Phytophthora spp. at six locations in the San Joaquin Valley within 30 km of Hanford, CA. Four nylon-mesh bags, each containing three firm, green pear fruits (separated by Styrofoam blocks) as bait for Ph...

  13. Evaluation Report: San Joaquin Delta College. Accreditation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Joaquin Delta Coll., Stockton, CA.

    This report represents the findings of the evaluation team that visited San Joaquin Delta College on March 25-28, 1996 for the purpose of validating the college's application for reaffirmation of accreditation. Overall, the team was impressed with the high level of quality inherent throughout the college. However, the team identified a number of…

  14. Regulation of agricultural drainage to San Joaquin River

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, G.E.; Watkins, D.A. )

    1989-02-01

    A technical committee reported on: (1) proposed water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River Basin; (2) proposed effluent limitations for agricultural drainage discharges in the basin to achieve these objectives; and (3) a proposal to regulate these discharges. The costs and economic impact of achieving various alternative water quality objectives were also evaluated. The information gathered by the technical committee will be used by the Regional Board along with other information in their review of the San Joaquin River Basin Water Quality Control Plan and their actions to regulate agricultural drainage in the San Joaquin Valley. The results of the Technical Committee's efforts as reported in Regulation of Agricultural Drainage to the San Joaquin River, August 1987. Based on the available information, the improvement in water quality resulting from implementation of the interim selenium objective and long-term objectives for salts, molybdenum and boron is necessary to provide reasonable protection to beneficial uses. The costs needed to implement these objectives seem reasonable. However, data on the: (1) concentrations of selenium that protect aquatic ecosystems in the basin; (2) concentrations of selenium that protect human consumers of fish and wildlife; and (3) drainage flows and quality produced in and upgradient of the drainage study area need to be developed and reviewed before a long-term selenium water quality objective is implemented. 16 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Planning for the Future at San Joaquin Delta College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Joaquin Delta Coll., Stockton, CA.

    This planning document provides data on current operations as of January 1994 and goals for the future at San Joaquin Delta College, in California. Section I, presents the context for planning at the college, describing the following major factors shaping the college's future: (1) the population is rapidly expanding; (2) fee increases and…

  16. Master Contract: San Joaquin Delta College Teachers Association/CTA/NEA and San Joaquin Delta Community College District, July 1987-June 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Joaquin Delta Community Coll. District, CA.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the San Joaquin Delta Community College District Board of Trustees and the San Joaquin Delta College Teachers Association/California Teachers Association/National Education Association is presented. This contract, covering the period from July 1987 through June 1990, deals with the following topics:…

  17. 77 FR 74355 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; Attainment Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley... Quality Standards in the San Joaquin Valley. This technical amendment corrects the CFR to properly codify the California Air Resources Board's commitment to update the air quality modeling in the San...

  18. Middle Miocene tectonic uplift of southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, D.P.; Glazner, A.F.

    1986-08-01

    Calculations of the tectonic component of the subsidence history of California's southern San Joaquin basin indicate 200-400 m of abrupt tectonic uplift during the Relizian, about 15 Ma. This uplift can be explained as an isostatic response to the movement of thin, young lithosphere south of the subducted Mendocino fracture zone to a position under the basin. The calculated uplift cannot be a result of extension and subsidence caused by instability of the Mendocino triple junction, but earlier (early Miocene) subsidence of the basin may have resulted from triple-junction-related extension. Marine strata deposited in the San Joaquin basin during the middle Miocene are rich sources of petroleum, so the inferred uplift and facies shifts may have important implications for exploration. 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. Designing and managing the San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarias, J.S.; Sylte, W.W. )

    1991-09-01

    The field measurement phase of the San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study, which was conducted in the summer of 1990, was the largest and most sophisticated study of its kind ever conducted in this country. The San Joaquin Valley has the nation's second worst overall air quality problem and is using the study results to conduct regional modeling to refine its control strategies. The study began in 1985 and will continue into the mid-1990s. The origins of the study, and the manner in which it is being funded and administered, reflect a unique and highly successful collaboration among several levels of government and the private sector. The temporary organizational structure formed to manage the study sets an interesting precedent for how political-level leaders can work effectively with the scientific community to conduct a long term technical study.

  20. Inventory of San Joaquin kit fox on BLM lands in southern and southwestern San Joaquin Valley. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.; McCue, P.; Sauls, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide the Bureau of Land Management, Bakersfield District, with information on the distribution of the San Joaquin kit fox, an endangered species, on public lands in the southern and southwestern San Joaquin Valley of California, and to develop information essential for designating kit fox critical habitats on lands under their jurisdiction as outlined by the Endangered Species Act and its amendments. A total of 31,860 acres of BLM lands were surveyed using line transects at a density of 8 per linear mile. Observations were recorded on: (1) kit fox dens, tracks, scats, and remains of their prey; (2) vegetation associations; (3) topography; (4) evidence of human activities; (5) species composition and abundance of wildlife seen, especially lagomorphs; (6) presence of Eriogonum gossypinum, a plant of special interest; and (7) presence of the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, another endangered species.

  1. 76 FR 33778 - Notice of Intent To Collect Fees on Public Land in the San Joaquin River Gorge Special Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Bureau of Land Management, Notice of Intent To Collect Fees on Public Land in the San Joaquin River Gorge... proposes to begin collecting fees in fiscal year 2011 at the San Joaquin River Gorge (SJRG) Special... INFORMATION: The San Joaquin River Gorge Management Area is a popular recreation area offering...

  2. Potential of public lands in California's central valley as habitat for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox. [Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; McCue, P.; Sauls, M.L.; Kato, T.

    1982-01-01

    As part of an assessment of the impacts of their activities on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat, the Department of Energy and Bureau of Land Management investigated the potential of public lands in the San Joaquin Valley as suitable habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox. (ACR)

  3. 76 FR 45212 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this action, we are proposing to approve San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... the environment. San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District SJVUAPCD is an...

  4. 76 FR 76046 - Interim Final Determination To Defer Sanctions, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD or... May 11, 2010 (75 FR 26102), we finalized a limited approval and limited disapproval of San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (``SJVUAPCD'' or ``District'') Rules 2020 (Exemptions)...

  5. 77 FR 65305 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley Unified Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley... (SIP) revision for the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (District) portion of... detailed discussion of District Rule 2410, please refer to our proposed approval. See 77 FR 32493 (June...

  6. Diazinon concentrations in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and San Francisco Bay, California, February 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution and possible biological effects of a dormant spray pesticide, diazinon, were examined by measuring pesticide concentrations and estimating toxicity using bioassays at a series of sites in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and San Francisco Bay. Pulses of diazinon were observed in early February 1993 in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers after heavy rains, with elevated concentrations measured for a few days to weeks at a time. The pulse of diazinon in the Sacramento River was followed from Sacramento through Suisun Bay, the eastward embayment of San Francisco Bay. In the central delta, well-defined pulses of diazinon were not observed at the Old and Middle River sites; instead, the concentrations steadily increased throughout February. Ceriodaphnia dubia mortality was 100% in water samples collected for 12 consecutive days (February 8-19) from the San Joaquin River at Vernalis. The bioassay mortality corresponded with the peak diazinon concentrations. Conversely, no toxicity was observed in water collected before or after peaks of diazinon concentration. Other pesticides present also could contribute to the toxicity.

  7. Early Eocene uplift of southernmost San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Cox, B.F.

    1989-04-01

    Stratigraphic studies in the southern San Joaquin basin and in the El Paso Mountains of the southwestern Great Basin corroborate a hypothesized early Eocene regional uplift event. Eocene uplift and erosion of the southernmost San Joaquin basin south of Bakersfield were recently proposed because an early Paleogene fluviodeltaic sequence in the El Paso Mountains (Goler Formation) apparently had no seaward counterpart to the southwest. New microfossil data (coccoliths) indicate that marine deposits near the top of the Goler Formation are uppermost Paleocene (nannofossil zone CP8) rather than lower Eocene, as reported previously. These data (1) confirm that the oldest known Tertiary strata south of Bakersfield (Eocene Tejon Formation) are younger than the uppermost Goler Formation and (2) seem to restrict uplift to the earliest Eocene. The authors propose that the uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene deposits were eroded and the Mushrush trough was cut and filled mainly in response to earliest Eocene uplift. The uplift was transverse to the northwest-trending forearc basin. Thus, it was distinct from late early Eocene (pre-Comengine Formation) regional tilting and uplift, which produced northwest-trending structures. Early Eocene uplift probably played only a minor role in the southward termination of pre-Maastrichtian parts of the forearc basin, which they instead attribute to massive uplift of the southernmost Sierra Nevada during the early(.) Late Cretaceous.

  8. Sustainability of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    PubMed Central

    Schoups, Gerrit; Hopmans, Jan W.; Young, Chuck A.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Tanji, Ken K.; Panday, Sorab

    2005-01-01

    The sustainability of irrigated agriculture in many arid and semiarid areas of the world is at risk because of a combination of several interrelated factors, including lack of fresh water, lack of drainage, the presence of high water tables, and salinization of soil and groundwater resources. Nowhere in the United States are these issues more apparent than in the San Joaquin Valley of California. A solid understanding of salinization processes at regional spatial and decadal time scales is required to evaluate the sustainability of irrigated agriculture. A hydro-salinity model was developed to integrate subsurface hydrology with reactive salt transport for a 1,400-km2 study area in the San Joaquin Valley. The model was used to reconstruct historical changes in salt storage by irrigated agriculture over the past 60 years. We show that patterns in soil and groundwater salinity were caused by spatial variations in soil hydrology, the change from local groundwater to snowmelt water as the main irrigation water supply, and by occasional droughts. Gypsum dissolution was a critical component of the regional salt balance. Although results show that the total salt input and output were about equal for the past 20 years, the model also predicts salinization of the deeper aquifers, thereby questioning the sustainability of irrigated agriculture. PMID:16230610

  9. Pesticide transport in the San Joaquin River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubrovsky, N.M.; Kratzer, C.R.; Panshin, S.Y.; Gronberg, J.A.M.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    Pesticide occurrence and concentrations were evaluated in the San Joaquin River Basin to determine potential sources and mode of transport. Land use in the basin is mainly agricultural. Spatial variations in pesticide occurrence were evaluated in relation to pesticide application and cropping patterns in three contrasting subbasins and at the mouth of the basin. Temporal variability in pesticide occurrence was evaluated by fixed interval sampling and by sampling across the Hydrograph during winter storms. Four herbicides (simazine, metolachlor, dacthal, and EPTC) and two insecticides (diazinon and chlorpyrifos) were detected in more than 50 percent of the samples. Temporal, and to a lesser extent spatial, variation in pesticide occurrence is usually consistent with pesticide application and cropping patterns. Diazinon concentrations changed rapidly during winter storms, and both eastern and western tributaries contributed diazinon to the San Joaquin River at concentrations toxic to the water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia at different times during the hydrograph. During these storms, toxic concentrations resulted from the transport of only a very small portion of the applied diazinon.

  10. Chemical analyses for selected wells in San Joaquin County and part of Contra Costa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeter, Gail L.

    1980-01-01

    The study area of this report includes the eastern valley area of Contra Costa County and all of San Joaquin County, an area of approximately 1,600 square miles in the northern part of the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. Between December 1977 and December 1978, 1,489 wells were selectively canvassed. During May and June in 1978 and 1979, water samples were collected for chemical analysis from 321 of these wells. Field determinations of alkalinity, conductance, pH, and temperature were made, and individual constituents were analyzed. This report is the fourth in a series of baseline data reports on wells in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. (USGS)

  11. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: San Joaquin Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    San Joaquin, the name given to the southern portion of California's vast Central Valley, has been called the world's richest agricultural valley. In this perspective view generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and an enhanced Landsat image, we are looking toward the southwest over a checkerboard pattern of agricultural fields. Mt. Pinos, a popular location for stargazing at 2,692 meters (8,831 feet) looms above the valley floor and is visible on the left side of the image. The productive southern San Joaquin is in reality a desert, averaging less than 12.7 cm (5 inches) of rain per year. Through canals and irrigation, the region nurtures some two hundred crops including grapes, figs, apricots, oranges, and more than 4,047 square-km (1,000,000 acres) of cotton. The California Aqueduct, transporting water from the Sacramento River Delta through the San Joaquin, runs along the base of the low-lying Wheeler Ridge on the left side of the image. The valley is not all agriculture though. Kern County, near the valley's southern end, is the United States' number one oil producing county, and actually produces more crude oil than Oklahoma. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors, from Landsat data, approximate natural color.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200 feet)long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U

  12. Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration features images of southern California and southwestern Nevada acquired on January 3, 2001 (Terra orbit 5569), and includes data from three of MISR's nine cameras. The San Joaquin Valley, which comprises the southern extent of California's Central Valley, covers much of the viewed area. Also visible are several of the Channel Islands near the bottom, and Mono and Walker Lakes, which stand out as darker patches near the top center, especially in the vertical and backward oblique images. Near the lower right of each image is the Los Angeles Basin, with the distinctive chevron shape of the Mojave Desert to its north.

    The Central Valley is a well-irrigated and richly productive agricultural area situated between the Coast Range and the snow-capped Sierra Nevadas. During the winter, the region is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected sunlight, dramatic differences in the MISR images are apparent as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, the pervasive haze that fills most of the valley is only slightly visible in the vertical view. At the oblique angles, the haze is highly distinguishable against the land surface background, particularly in the forward-viewing direction. Just above image center, the forward view also reveals bluish-tinged plumes near Lava Butte in Sequoia National Forest, where the National Interagency Coordination Center reported an active forest fire.

    The changing surface visibility in the multi-angle data allows us to derive the amount of atmospheric haze. In the lower right quadrant is a map of haze amount determined from automated processing of the MISR imagery. Low amounts of haze are shown in blue, and a variation in hue through shades of green, yellow, and red indicates progressively larger amounts of airborne particulates. Due to the

  13. Faulting caused by groundwater level declines, San Joaquin Valley, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 230mm of aseismic vertical offset of the land surface across the Pond-Poso Creek fault in the San Joaquin Valley, California, probably is related to groundwater withdrawal for crop irrigation. The scarp is approximately 3.4km long and occurs in an area where the land subsided more than 1.5m from 1926 to 1970. Modern faulting postdates the beginning of water level declines and associated subsidence. Movement detected by precise leveling surveys from February 1977 to March 1979 was seasonal, occurring during periods of water level decline. The modern movement probably is caused by localized differential compaction induced by differential water level declines across the preexisting fault. -Author

  14. Arsenic in benthic bivalves of San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johns, C.; Luoma, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations were determined in fine-grained, oxidized, surface sediments and in two benthic bivalves, Corbicula sp. and Macoma balthica, within San Francisco Bay, the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta, and selected rivers not influenced by urban or industrial activity. Arsenic concentrations in all samples were characteristic of values reported for uncontaminated estuaries. Small temporal fluctuations and low arsenic concentrations in bivalves and sediments suggest that most inputs of arsenic are likely to be minor and arsenic contamination is not widespread in the Bay.

  15. 78 FR 39597 - Safety Zone; Hilton Fourth of July Fireworks, San Joaquin River, Venice Island, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Hilton Fourth of July Fireworks, San Joaquin River... Port, San Francisco area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is... notice, call or email Lieutenant Junior Grade William Hawn, U.S. Coast Guard Sector San...

  16. Transport of sediment-bound organochlorine pesticides to the San Joaquin River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the application of the organophosphate insecticide diazinon in the San Joaquin River Basin occurs in winter to control wood boring insects in dormant almond orchards. A federal-state collaborative study found that diazinon accounted for most of the observed toxicity of San Joaquin River water to water fleas in February 1993. Previous studies focused mainly on west-side inputs to the San Joaquin River. In this 1994 study, the three major east-side tributaries to the San Joaquin River, the Merced, Tuolumne, and Stanislaus Rivers, and a downstream site on the San Joaquin River were sampled throughout the hydrographs of a late January and an early February storm. In both storms, the Tuolumne River had the highest concentrations of diazinon and transported the largest load of the three tributaries. The Stanislaus River was a small source in both storms. On the basis of previous storm sampling and estimated traveltimes, ephemeral west-side creeks probably were the main diazinon source early in the storms, whereas the Tuolumne and Merced Rivers and east-side drainages directly to the San Joaquin River were the main sources later. Although 74 percent of diazinon transport in the San Joaquin River during 1991-1993 occurred in January and February, transport during each of the two 1994 storms was only 0.05 percent of the amount applied during preceding dry periods. Nevertheless, some of the diazinon concentrations in the San Joaquin River during the January storm exceeded 0.35 micrograms per liter, a concentration shown to be acutely toxic to water fleas. Diazinon concentrations were highly variable during the storms and frequent sampling was required to adequately describe the concentration curves and to estimate loads.

  17. 78 FR 6833 - Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for the San Joaquin River...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ...The Bureau of Reclamation and the San Joaquin River Exchange Contractors Water Authority have prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for a 25-Year Water Transfer Program, 2014-2038. The proposed new program would provide for the transfer and/or exchange of up to 150,000 acre-feet of substitute water from the San Joaquin River Exchange Contractors......

  18. Diazinon and chlorpyrifos loads in the San Joaquin River basin, California, January and February 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Zamora, Celia; Knifong, Donna L.

    2002-01-01

    The application of diazinon and chlorpyrifos on dormant orchards in 2000 in the San Joaquin River Basin was less than 21 percent of application in 1993 and 1994. A total of 13 sites were sampled weekly during nonstorm periods and more frequently during two storm periods. The sites included five major river and eight minor tributary sites. The highest concentrations of diazinon and chlorpyrifos occurred during the storm periods. Four samples from major river sites (Tuolumne River and two San Joaquin River sites) had diazinon concentrations greater than 0.08 microgram per liter, the concentration being considered by the state of California as its criterion maximum concentration for the protection of aquatic habitat. One sample from a major river site (San Joaquin River) exceeded the equivalent State guideline of 0.02 microgram per liter for chlorpyrifos. At the eight minor tributary sites, 24 samples exceeded the diazinon guideline and four samples exceeded the chlorpyrifos guideline. The total diazinon load in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis during January and February 2000 was 19.6 pounds active ingredient; of this, 8.17 pounds active ingredient was transported during two storms. In 1994, 27.4 pounds active ingredient was transported during two storms. The total chlorpyrifos load in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis during January and February 2000 was 5.68 pounds active ingredient; of this, 2.17 pounds active ingredient was transported during the two storms. During the frequently sampled February 2000 storm, the main sources of diazinon in the San Joaquin River Basin were the San Joaquin River near Stevinson Basin (25 percent), Tuolumne River Basin (14 percent), and the Stanislaus River Basin (10 percent). The main sources of chlorpyrifos in the San Joaquin River Basin were the San Joaquin River near Stevinson Basin (17 percent), Tuolumne River Basin (13 percent), and the Merced River Basin (11 percent). The total January and February diazinon load in the

  19. Reservoir geology of Landslide field, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Tucker, R.D.; Singleton, M.T. )

    1991-02-01

    The Landslide field, which is located on the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 and consists of 13 producers and six injectors. Cumulative production as of mid-1990 was approximately 10 million bbl of oil with an average daily production of 4700 BOPD. Production is from a series of late Miocene turbidite sands (Stevens Sand) that were deposited as a small constructional submarine fan (less than 2 mi in diameter). Based on interpretation of wireline logs and engineering data, deposition of the fan and of individual lobes within the fan was strongly influenced by preexisting paleotopography and small syndepositional slump features. Based on mapping of individual depositional units and stratigraphic dipmeter analysis, transport direction of the sand was to the north-north across these paleotopographic breaks in slope. Dipmeter data and pressure data from individual sands are especially useful for recognition and mapping of individual flow units between well bores. Detailed engineering, geophysical and geological studies have increased our understanding of the dimensions, continuity, geometry, and inherent reservoir properties of the individual flow units within the reservoir. Based on the results of these studies a series of water isolation workovers and extension wells were proposed and successfully undertaken. This work has increased recoverable reserves and arrested the rapid production decline.

  20. South Belridge fields, Borderland basin, U. S. , San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.D. ); McPherson, J.G. )

    1991-03-01

    South Belridge is a giant field in the west San Joaquin Valley, Kern County. Cumulative field production is approximately 700 MMBO and 220 BCFG, with remaining recoverable reserves of approximately 500 MMBO. The daily production is nearly 180 MBO from over 6100 active wells. The focus of current field development and production is the shallow Tulare reservoir. Additional probable diatomite reserves have been conservatively estimated at 550 MMBO and 550 BCFG. South Belridge field has two principal reservoir horizons; the Mio-Pliocene Belridge diatomite of the upper Monterey Formation, and the overlying Plio-Pleistocene Tulare Formation. The field lies on the crest of a large southeast-plunging anticline, sub-parallel to the nearby San Andreas fault system. The reservoir trap in both the Tulare and diatomite reservoir horizons is a combination of structure, stratigraphic factors, and tar seals; the presumed source for the oil is the deeper Monterey Formation. The diatomite reservoir produces light oil (20-32{degree} API gravity) form deep-marine diatomite and diatomaceous shales with extremely high porosity (average 60%) and low permeability (average 1 md). In contrast, the shallow ({lt}1000 ft (305 m) deep) overlying Tulare reservoir produces heavy oil (13-14{degree} API gravity) from unconsolidated, arkosic, fluviodeltaic sands of high porosity (average 35%) and permeability (average 3000 md). The depositional model is that of a generally prograding fluviodeltaic system sourced in the nearby basin-margin highlands. More than 6000 closely spaced, shallow wells are the key to steamflood production from hundreds of layered and laterally discontinuous reservoir sands which create laterally and vertically discontinuous reservoir flow units.

  1. Chinese mitten crab surveys of San Joaquin River basin and Suisun Marsh, California, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) are known to use both brackish and freshwater habitats as rearing areas. The objectives of this study were to examine the habitat use and potential effects of mitten crabs in the freshwater habitats of the San Joaquin River drainage up-stream of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. After several unsuccessful attempts to catch or observe mitten crabs by trapping, electrofishing, and visual observations, the study was redirected to determine the presence of crabs in the San Joaquin River (in the vicinity of Mossdale) and Suisun Marsh. Monthly surveys using baited traps in the San Joaquin River were done from June through November 2000 and in the Suisun Marsh from August through October 2000. No mitten crabs were caught in the San Joaquin River Basin and only one mitten crab was caught in Suisun Marsh. Surveys were conducted at 92 locations in the San Joaquin River Basin by deploying 352 traps for 10,752 hours of trapping effort; in Suisun Marsh, 34 locations were investigated by deploying 150 traps for 3,600 hours of trapping effort. The baited traps captured a variety of organisms, including catfishes (Ictularidae), yellowfin gobies (Acantho-gobius flavimanus), and crayfish (Decapoda). It is unclear whether the failure to capture mitten crabs in the San Joaquin River Basin and Suisun Marsh was due to ineffective trapping methods, or repre-sents a general downward trend in populations of juvenile mitten crabs in these potential rearing areas or a temporary decline related to year-class strength. Available data (since 1998) on the number of mitten crabs entrained at federal and state fish salvage facilities indicate a downward trend in the number of crabs, which may indicate a declining trend in use of the San Joaquin River Basin by juvenile mitten crabs. Continued monitoring for juvenile Chinese mitten crabs in brackish and freshwater portions of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basins is needed to better assess the

  2. Biofacies zonation of middle Miocene benthic foraminifera, southeastern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.C.

    1987-05-01

    The quantitative distribution of benthic foraminifera across the middle Miocene margin of the southeastern San Joaquin basin constitutes a useful tool in applying benthic biofacies zonation to the interpretation of marine paleoenvironments. A middle Miocene transect (near the Luisian/Relizian boundary) was completed across the margin of the southeastern San Joaquin basin near Bakersfild, California. Surface and subsurface fauna encompass strandline through bathyal environments. Quantitative analyses of these fauna result in a useful biofacies zonation for the middle Miocene which can be applied to the interpretation of middle Miocene paleobathymetric and paleogeographic reconstructions, basin analysis, and subsidence histories of the San Joaquin basin. In addition, these data suggest that vertical faunal migration of continental slope fauna has occurred between the middle Miocene and Recent. During the early and middle Miocene, marine temperatures were warmer than today and lower latitudinal gradients prevailed. Stepwise climatic cooling since the middle Miocene has been accompanied by the latitudinal adjustment of surface isotherms, strengthening of the permanent thermocline, and the associated migration of temperature-sensitive planktonic and benthic biofacies. Sedimentologic and seismic evidence in the southeastern San Joaquin basin suggests that present-day lower bathyal biofacies may have been at shallower depths during the middle Miocene. Such migrations would have a significant impact on paleoenvironmental interpretations. Middle Miocene faunal transects from the southeastern San Joaquin basin are compared with equivalent Holocene transects from the eastern Pacific, and differences are discussed in light of this proposal.

  3. 75 FR 71145 - San Joaquin River Restoration Program: Reach 4B, Eastside Bypass, and Mariposa Bypass Channel and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Bureau of Reclamation San Joaquin River Restoration Program: Reach 4B, Eastside Bypass, and Mariposa... the San Joaquin River Restoration Program. The original notice of intent was published in the Federal Register on September 9, 2009 (74 FR 46453). This revised proposal would include measures for...

  4. Climate change and other stressors change modeled population size and hybridization potential for San Joaquin kit fox

    EPA Science Inventory

    The San Joaquin kit fox was once widely distributed across the southern San Joaquin Valley, but agriculture and development have replaced much of the endangered subspecies’ habitat. We modeled impacts of climate change, land-use change, and rodenticide exposure on kit fox p...

  5. Isotopic Evidence of Nitrate Sources and its Relationship to Algae in the San Joaquin River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Borglin, S. E.; Kratzer, C. R.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Schmidt, C.; Rollog, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    Many competing demands have been placed on the San Joaquin River including deep water shipping, use as agricultural and drinking water, transport of agricultural and urban runoff, and recreation. These long-established demands limit the management options and increase the importance of understanding the river dynamics. The relationships among sources of water, nitrate, and algae in the San Joaquin River must be understood before management decisions can be made to optimize aquatic health. Isotopic analyses of water samples collected along the San Joaquin River in 2005-2007 have proven useful in assessing these relationships: sources of nitrate, the productivity of the San Joaquin River, and the relationship between nitrate and algae in the river. The San Joaquin River receives water locally from wetlands and agricultural return flow, and from three relatively large tributaries whose headwaters are in the Sierra Nevada. The lowest nitrate concentrations occur during periods of high flow when the proportion of water from the Sierra Nevada is relatively large, reflecting the effect of dilution from the big tributaries and indicating that a large fraction of the nitrate is of local origin. Nitrogen isotopes of nitrate in the San Joaquin River are relatively high (averaging about 12 per mil), suggesting a significant source from animal waste or sewage and/or the effects of denitrification. The d15N of nitrate varies inversely with concentration, indicating that these high isotopic values are also a local product. The d15N values of nitrate from most of the local tributaries is lower than that in the San Joaquin suggesting that nitrate from these tributaries does not account for a significant fraction of nitrate in the river. The source of the non-tributary nitrate must be either small unmeasured surface inputs or groundwater. To investigate whether groundwater might be a significant source of nitrate to the San Joaquin River, groundwater samples are being collected

  6. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds significantpromise

  7. Estimating Natural Flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Kadir, T.; Chung, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta under predevelopment vegetative conditions, if and when reconstructed, can serve as a useful guide to establish minimum stream flows, restoration targets, and a basis for assessing impacts of global warming in the Bay-Delta System. Daily simulations of natural Delta flows for the period 1922-2009 were obtained using precipitation-snowmelt-runoff models for the upper watersheds that are tributaries to the California's Central Valley, and then routing the water through the Central Valley floor area using a modified version of the California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) for water years 1922 through 2009. Daily stream inflows from all major upper watersheds were simulated using 23 Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) models. Historical precipitation and reference evapotranspiration data were extracted from the SIMETAW2 with the 4km gridded meteorological data. The Historical natural and riparian vegetation distributions were compiled from several pre-1900 historical vegetation maps of the Central Valley. Wetlands were dynamically simulated using interconnected lakes. Flows overtopping natural levees were simulated using flow rating curves. New estimates of potential evapotranspiration from different vegetative classes under natural conditions were also used. Sensitivity simulations demonstrate that evapotranspiration estimates, native vegetation distribution, surface-groundwater interaction parameters, extinction depth for groundwater uptake, and other physical processes play a key role in the magnitude and timing of upstream flows arriving at the Delta. Findings contradict a common misconception that the magnitude of inflows to the Delta under natural vegetative conditions is greater than those under the historical agricultural and urban land use development. The developed models also enable to study the impacts of global warming by modifying meteorological and

  8. PM10 source apportionment in California's San Joaquin valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Solomon, Paul A.; Magliano, Karen L.; Ziman, Steven D.; Willard Richards, L.

    A PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 10 μm) aerosol study was carried out at six sites in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV) from 14 June 1988 to 9 June 1989, as part of the 1988-1989 Valley Air Quality Study (VAQS). Concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameters equal to or less than 2.5 μm) mass, organic and elemental carbon, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium and elements were determined in 24-h aerosol samples collected at three urban (Stockton, Fresno, Bakersfield) and three non-urban (Crows Landing, Fellows, Kern Wildlife Refuge) locations during this period. The sources which contributed to ambient concentrations of PM10 were determined by applying the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model using the source profiles determined specifically for that study area. The VAQS data indicates the federal 24-h PM10 standard of 150 μg m -3 was exceeded at four out of the six sites and for reasons which differ by season and by spatial region of influence. The annual average source contributions to the PM10 at Bakersfield, the site with the highest annual average, were 54% from primary geological material, 15% from secondary ammonium nitrate, 10% from primary motor vehicle exhaust, 8% from primary construction; the remaining 4% was unexplained. The results of the source apportionment at all sites show that geological contributions (fugitive dust from tilling, roadways and construction) are largest in summer and fall months, while secondary ammonium nitrate contributions (deriving from direct emissions of ammonia and oxides of nitrogen from agricultural activities and engine exhaust) are largest during winter months.

  9. Particulate carbon measurements in California's San Joaquin Valley.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Chen, L-W Antony; Magliano, Karen L

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol carbon sampling methods and biases were evaluated during the California Regional PM10/PM2.5 Air Quality Study (CRPAQS) and Fresno Supersite programs. PM2.5 sampling was conducted using Desert Research Institute (DRI) sequential filter samplers (SFS) from December 1999 through February 2001 at two urban sites (Fresno and Bakersfield), one regional transport site (Angiola), and two boundary sites (Bethel Island and Sierra Nevada Foothills) during CRPAQS in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Additional filter-based sampling was done in Fresno as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Supersites program. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations were higher during winter (December-February) than summer (June-August) and this trend was most pronounced at Fresno and Bakersfield. OC and EC displayed similar diurnal trends during winter and summer at Fresno and during winter at Angiola. The diurnal pattern at Angiola reflected the transport of secondary pollutants to the site. Collocated measurements of OC and EC on undenuded quartz-fiber filters were made at Fresno with the DRI SFS and the Andersen FRM and RAAS samplers. All average differences in OC between samplers were less than their respective measurement uncertainties. Positive and negative OC biases were evaluated at Fresno using the Andersen RAAS sampler with carbon-denuded and undenuded channels with Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filter pairs. Differences between the denuded particle OC and that obtained by subtracting the quartz-behind-Teflon or quartz-behind-quartz OC from the undenuded quartz-fiber front filter were less than twice their measurement uncertainties in most cases. Particulate OC in the denuded channel agreed most closely with the difference between undenuded front and backup quartz-fiber OC. PMID:15990153

  10. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C. T.; Jurgens, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Starn, J. J.; Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Esser, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification using a novel approach of multi-model residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The residence time distribution approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H, 14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variance than produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3- and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that these rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 reduction and denitrification were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Results indicate that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that, because of the correlations, relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to measure.

  11. Geologic logs of geotechnical cores from the subsurface Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, Katherine L.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Tinsley, John C., III; Gatti, Emma; Pagenkopp, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This report presents and summarizes descriptive geologic logs of geotechnical cores collected from 2009–12 in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California, by the California Department of Water Resources. Graphic logs are presented for 1,785.7 ft of retained cores from 56 borehole sites throughout the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Most core sections are from a depth of ~100–200 feet. Cores primarily contain mud, silt, and sand lithologies. Tephra (volcanic ash and pumice), paleosols, and gravels are also documented in some core sections. Geologic observations contained in the core logs in this report provide stratigraphic context for subsequent sampling and data for future chronostratigraphic subsurface correlations.

  12. Floc Depositional Characteristics within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Andrew; Schoellhamer, David

    2015-04-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) is where the rivers of the Central Valley of California merge to become the San Francisco Estuary. The rivers deliver sediment from the Central Valley watershed (approximately 96,000 km2) to the Delta. One of the major drivers of sediment transport and turbidity in the Delta is the supply of fine sediment from the watersheds, particularly the Sacramento River. Deposited sediment helps create and sustain the landscape in the Delta, including desirable habitats such as tidal marsh, shoals, and floodplains. Massive sediment supply during the period of hydraulic mining in the late 1800s caused deposition in Sacramento Valley rivers, the Delta, and San Francisco Bay. Today, a key management question is whether the existing Delta landscape can be sustained as sea level rises. The erosion and deposition processes are strongly dependent on the local sediment properties, particularly when cohesion and flocculation are important, as they are in the Delta. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects data that supports the development, calibration, and validation of numerical models of sediment transport and turbidity in the Delta. Research questions include: How much flocculation of sediment particles occurs in the Delta, and what are the settling velocities of the flocs? How do floc settling properties vary spatially and temporally? To address these questions, a Co-operative Agreement was established between the USGS and HR Wallingford (UK). This abstract presents preliminary findings from measurements of floc depositional properties throughout the Delta during 2010-2011. Individual floc properties and dynamics were measured with the LabSFLOC-1 instrument; a high resolution video-based device. Thirty-one floc population samples were obtained from 21 sites within the Delta. Flocculated particles were observed throughout the Delta including in freshwater. Suspended-sediment concentrations in the near-bed region ranged from 4-52 mg

  13. Sequence stratigraphy of a Pliocene delta complex deposited in an active margin setting, Etchegoin and San Joaquin gas sands, San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Prolific gas sands of the Pliocene Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations of the southern San Joaquin basin, California, are part of a 1300-m thick succession of deltaic sediments that record the final regression of the Pacific Ocean from a tectonically active, restricted basin associated with the California transform margin. Individual field studies, lacking a regional framework and based primarily on electric log data, correlate these gas sands to the extent that individual sands maintain the same stratigraphic level within the succession. However, a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, constructed from recent 3D-seismic data and detailed well log correlations on the Bakersfield Arch area of the basin, indicates that the Pliocene succession is part of a south/southwest prograding delta complex. Therefore, sands climb up-section in the landward direction and grade laterally from deep-water to shallow-water facies. Because lithofacies boundaries cross chronostratigraphic surfaces, previous interpretations of the reservoir architecture are inaccurate. This model increases predictability of reservoir facies by constraining lithofacies mapping and enables interpretation of the effects on deposition of the integrated and inter-related controls of tectonics, eustatic sea-level change, and sediment supply. With this understanding, a well-defined model of the stratal architecture of the Pliocene succession of the southern San Joaquin basin is now possible.

  14. Sequence stratigraphy of a Pliocene delta complex deposited in an active margin setting, Etchegoin and San Joaquin gas sands, San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C. )

    1996-01-01

    Prolific gas sands of the Pliocene Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations of the southern San Joaquin basin, California, are part of a 1300-m thick succession of deltaic sediments that record the final regression of the Pacific Ocean from a tectonically active, restricted basin associated with the California transform margin. Individual field studies, lacking a regional framework and based primarily on electric log data, correlate these gas sands to the extent that individual sands maintain the same stratigraphic level within the succession. However, a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, constructed from recent 3D-seismic data and detailed well log correlations on the Bakersfield Arch area of the basin, indicates that the Pliocene succession is part of a south/southwest prograding delta complex. Therefore, sands climb up-section in the landward direction and grade laterally from deep-water to shallow-water facies. Because lithofacies boundaries cross chronostratigraphic surfaces, previous interpretations of the reservoir architecture are inaccurate. This model increases predictability of reservoir facies by constraining lithofacies mapping and enables interpretation of the effects on deposition of the integrated and inter-related controls of tectonics, eustatic sea-level change, and sediment supply. With this understanding, a well-defined model of the stratal architecture of the Pliocene succession of the southern San Joaquin basin is now possible.

  15. Estimation of Contaminant Loads from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    David, N; Gluchowski, D C; Leatherbarrow, J E; Yee, D; McKee, L J

    2015-04-01

    Contaminant concentrations from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River watershed were determined in water samples mainly during flood flows in an ongoing effort to describe contaminant loads entering San Francisco Bay, CA, USA. Calculated PCB and total mercury loads during the 6-year observation period ranged between 3.9 and 19 kg/yr and 61 and 410 kg/yr, respectively. Long-term average PCB loads were estimated at 7.7 kg/yr and total mercury loads were estimated at 200 kg/yr. Also monitored were PAHs, PBDEs (two years of data), and dioxins/furans (one year of data) with average loads of 392, 11, and 0.15/0.014 (OCDD/OCDF) kg/yr, respectively. Organochlorine pesticide loads were estimated at 9.9 kg/yr (DDT), 1.6 kg/yr (chlordane), and 2.2 kg/yr (dieldrin). Selenium loads were estimated at 16 300 kg/yr. With the exception of selenium, all average contaminant loads described in the present study were close to or below regulatory load allocations established for North San Francisco Bay. PMID:26462078

  16. Reconciliation Ecology, Rewilding and the San Joaquin River Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus-Polk, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent events, perhaps reaching their climactic convergence in the current drought, have exposed the fragility and imbalances of the socioecological system of the San Joaquin river. We see that our triumphant march of progress onfolds on a thin, and unstable crust. What lies below is lava. Our agricultural systems progress only while extracting an ever-untenable social and ecological debt. Our successive regimes of accumulation by appropriation have brought us to the brink of ecological exhaustion. Have we reached our day of reckoning? This is not the first time this question has been asked of this particular system of irrigated agriculture? "Insurmountable" ecological barriers have been eyed down and promptly obliterated through magnificent features of physical and social engineering. But lets us consider for a moment that we have at last reached some sort of edge, a threshold past which we experience a sudden socioecological regime shift. Staring out over this edge can we begin to come to terms with the fallacies of our stories, our ignorance, our foolishness? We need an acknowledgement of the needs of the agriculture systems, it's connections and dependencies. What desperate measures are we willing to take in order to sustain this system? How much further can we go? How far is too far? Is there another way to produce and distribute food? We then turn to the past. We imagine the ecosystem as it once was. The pelagic fish species that formed the biological connection between this river system, the delta, the Ocean, the Mountains. What would it mean to restore this diversity and repair these relationships? What would it take to cede control to the non-human forces that sustain these connections? How do we reconcile restraint and the cessation of control with the human needs of the system? How do we rewild our river in such a way that our needs are met in a way that is more resilient and equitable? We will need systems of agriculture and flood control that serve

  17. Releases of exotic parasitoids of Bemisia tabaci in San Joaquin Valley, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1991, Bemisia tabaci was reported in the southern San Joaquin Valley infesting crops outside of greenhouses for the first time. From 1994 to 1996, 24 species/ strains of imported aphelinids, primarily species of Eretmocerus, were released in urban and agricultural settings for control of this whi...

  18. Conjunctive management of groundwater and surface water resources in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-01-01

    The San Joaquin-Tulare Conjunctive Use Model (SANTUCM) was developed to evaluate possible long-term scenarios for long term management of drainage and drainage related problems in the western San Joaquin Valley of California. The unique aspect of the conjunctive use model is its coupling of a surface water delivery operations model with a regional groundwater model. A salinity model has been added to utilize surface water model output and allow assessment of compliance with State Water Resources Control Board water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River. The results of scenario runs, performed to data, using the SANTUCM model show table lowering and consequent drainage reduction can be achieved through a combination of source control, land retirement and regional groundwater pumping. The model also shows that water transfers within the existing distribution system are technically feasible and might allow additional releases to be made from Friant Dam for water quality maintenance in the San Joaquin River. However, upstream of Mendota Pool, considerable stream losses to the aquifer are anticipated, amounting to as much as 70% of in-stream flow.

  19. 76 FR 56132 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ...EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from polyester resin operations. We are approving a local rule that regulates these emission sources under the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA or the......

  20. Satellite-assisted monitoring of vegetable crop evapotranspiration in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reflective bands of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper satellite imagery were used to facilitate the estimation of basal crop evapotranspiration (ETcb), or productive water use, in San Joaquin Valley during 2008. A ground-based digital camera measured green fractional cover (Fc) of 49 commercial fields plan...

  1. Epidemiology of almond leaf scorch disease in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond leaf scorch (ALS) disease has been present in California for more than 60 years. This disease is caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, which causes several other important plant diseases, including Pierce’s disease of grapes. The epidemiology of ALS in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  2. HYDROLOGIC SENSITIVITIES OF THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN RIVER BASIN, CA TO GLOBAL WARMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrologic sensitivities of four medium-sized mountainous catchments in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins to long-term global warming were analyzed. he hydrologic response of these catchments, all of which are dominated by spring snowmelt runoff, were simulated by t...

  3. Growing more with less in the Westlands Water District in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disposal of saline drainage water is a problem for irrigated agricultural throughout the world. In California the Westlands Water District in the San Joaquin Valley had its drainage service eliminated because of selenium contamination in the Kesterson Reservoir. A five-year study developed alternati...

  4. Comparison of two remote sensing approaches for ET estimation in the San Joaquin Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract. Two approaches that use satellite or aerial imagery to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) from land surfaces are surface energy balance techniques (eg: Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL)) and indirect methods based on vegetation indices. Field data collected in the San Joaquin...

  5. 77 FR 58078 - Withdrawal of Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... San Joaquin Valley (SJV) extreme ozone nonattainment area. 75 FR 10420. The California Air Resources... the 1-hour ozone NAAQS effective May 17, 2004. 69 FR 20550 (April 16, 2004).\\1\\ The SIP revisions that...-hour ozone standard in the SJV area. See 75 FR 10420, 10421 (March 8, 2010). \\1\\ EPA established a...

  6. 76 FR 76112 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans, State of California, San Joaquin Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... (75 FR 26102), we finalized a limited approval and limited disapproval of San Joaquin Valley Unified... sources in Rule 2201, or by submitting the State law provisions as a SIP revision. See 75 FR at 26106 (May... on May 11, 2010 (75 FR 26102). The amended versions of Rule 2020, adopted by the District on...

  7. 77 FR 12651 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; Attainment Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... standards (NAAQS) in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). See 76 FR 57846. California developed this SIP to provide... implementation rule.\\1\\ \\1\\ See 40 CFR part 51, subpart X and 69 FR 23951 (April 30, 2004) and 70 FR 71612... and reductions by the District and CARB.\\4\\ 76 FR 57846, 57867. \\3\\ See letter, James...

  8. Epidemiology of xylellae diseases in the San Joaquin Valley of California: the role of alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pierce’s disease of grape and almond leaf scorch disease are both caused by various stains of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa. The pathogen is vectored by xylem feeding insects. Within the San Joaquin Valley of California, the green sharpshooter (Draeculacephala Minerva) is one of the mos...

  9. 33 CFR 162.205 - Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA. 162.205 Section 162.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.205 Suisun Bay,...

  10. 33 CFR 162.205 - Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA. 162.205 Section 162.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.205 Suisun Bay,...

  11. 76 FR 16696 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... November 5, 2010 (75 FR 68294), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP....

  12. 76 FR 40660 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... to Implement the 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard--Phase 2,'' 70 FR 71612 (November.... SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District... an earlier version of Rule 4103 into the SIP on November 10, 2009 (74 FR 57907). The SJVUAPCD...

  13. 76 FR 298 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation......... 12/17/92 08/24/07 On September 17, 2007, the submittal for San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution... December 13, 1994 (59 FR 64132), EPA approved into the SIP a previous version of Rule 4402, SJVUAPCD...

  14. 76 FR 69135 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... 16, 2011 (76 FR 35167), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP....

  15. 77 FR 66548 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District... Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On April 26, 2012 (77 FR 24883), EPA proposed to approve the...

  16. 76 FR 56134 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... (75 FR 3996) we finalized a limited approval of versions of Rules 4401 and 4605 that were...

  17. 76 FR 68103 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Action On June 30, 2011 (76 FR 38340), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California...

  18. 75 FR 57862 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control.... Proposed Action On March 26, 2010 (75 FR 14545), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into...

  19. 76 FR 68106 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Action On August 23, 2011 (76 FR 52623), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the...

  20. 76 FR 53640 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Action On June 24, 2011 (76 FR 37044), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California...

  1. 75 FR 1715 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control.... Proposed Action On August 14, 2009 (74 FR 41104), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into...

  2. 76 FR 33181 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve a revision to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735,...

  3. 75 FR 2796 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District portion... On June 16, 2009 (74 FR 28467), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California SIP... topcoats; and that Ventura County Air Pollution Control District's (VCAPCD) rule has more stringent...

  4. 77 FR 50021 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this action, EPA is finalizing approval of San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Defer Sanctions On July 28, 2011 (76 FR 45212), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into...

  5. 75 FR 28509 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...), 57 FR 55620, November 25, 1992. 2. ``Issues Relating to VOC Regulation Cutpoints, Deficiencies,...

  6. 76 FR 37044 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...? We approved an earlier version of Rule 4354 into the SIP on August 17, 2006 (72 FR 41894)....

  7. 77 FR 35327 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... earlier version of Rule 4682 into the SIP on June 13, 1995 (60 FR 31086). The SJVUAPCD adopted...

  8. 77 FR 35329 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... before formal EPA review. B. Are there other versions of these rules? On July 7, 2011 (76 FR 39777),...

  9. 76 FR 5276 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... and Executive Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On August 2, 2010 (75 FR 45080), EPA proposed...

  10. 75 FR 10690 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD... Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On December 18, 2009 (74 FR 67154), EPA proposed to approve the... and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an...

  11. 77 FR 25384 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Preamble for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990,'' 57 FR 13498 (April 16... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

  12. 76 FR 26609 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On May 21, 2010 (75 FR 28509), EPA proposed to approve the...

  13. 76 FR 56706 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Air Quality Standard,'' 70 FR 71612, Nov. 29, 2005. 6. Letter from William T. Hartnett to Regional Air... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

  14. 76 FR 47076 - Revision to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of a revision to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Action On June 8, 2011 (76 FR 33181), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California...

  15. 77 FR 745 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) Correction In rule document 2011-33660 appearing on...

  16. 77 FR 214 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control... Action On July 11, 2011 (76 FR 132), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California...

  17. 76 FR 45199 - Interim Final Determination To Defer Sanctions, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    .... Background On January 13, 2010 (75 FR 1716), EPA published a final limited approval and limited disapproval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of... 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), this action is not a ``significant regulatory action''...

  18. 77 FR 2228 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On September 14, 2011 (76 FR 56706),...

  19. 76 FR 70886 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On September 12, 2011 (76 FR 56134), EPA proposed to approve...

  20. 77 FR 64427 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... June 13, 2012 (77 FR 35329), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California SIP....

  1. 78 FR 6740 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley United Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley United Air Pollution Control... FR 66429), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP. Local agency Rule...

  2. 75 FR 24408 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... FR 3680), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP. Rule Rule title...

  3. 75 FR 2079 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... and Executive Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On July 14, 2009 (74 FR 33948), EPA proposed a limited... facilities. Also, please see our response to CPF comment 3. B. San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control.... Executive Order 13132, Federalism Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999) revokes and replaces...

  4. Subtropical Fruit Fly Invasions into Temperate Fruit Fly Territory in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subtropical fruit fly species including peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders); melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett); oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel); and Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, have been detected in the past decade in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  5. Trace elements in bed sediments of the San Joaquin River and its tributary streams, California, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, D.G.; Gilliom, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Bed sediments were sampled at 24 sites on the San Joaquin River, California and its tributaries in October 1985 to assess the distribution of trace elements and factors affecting their concentrations. The proportion of less than 62-micrometer sediment was significantly (alpha = 0.05) correlated with organic-carbon concentrations. Bed sediments from tributaries originating in the Sierra Nevada were much coarser than sediments in streams draining the Coast Range and western valley. Selenium concentrations in water have been measured. Interrelations among trace elements were examined using principal component analysis. 57% of the variance was accounted for in the first two principal components, which together show a distinct separation between sites dominated by Coast Range sediments and sites dominated by Sierra Nevada sediments. The third and fourth components accounted for 21% of the variance and distinguished the mixed-source sediments of the intermittent upper San Joaquin River from other parts of the river system. Generally, elements in bed sediments of the San Joaquin River and its tributaries were similar in concentration to elements in San Joaquin Valley soils, and concentrations were far below hazardous waste criteria. Concentrations were lower than in sediments from some polluted urban rivers and water more comparable to other rural agricultural rivers. 35 refs., 3 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Aquatic biology of the San Joaquin-Tulare basins, California; analysis of available data through 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Larry R.

    1996-01-01

    Available data through 1992 on aquatic biota in the San Joaquin-Tulare Basins study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program were analyzed to provide a conceptual framework to guide study design. The analysis included information on the biology of fish, aquatic macroinvertebrates, aquatic algae, and concentrations of trace elements and organic pesticides in aquatic biota.

  7. Evaluation of the San Joaquin Delta College Basic Skills Program, Spring 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Mary Ann; And Others

    In spring 1985, a study was conducted to evaluate the basic skills program of San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC). The study focused on student demographics, skill growth, the effects of basic skills classes on performance in other classes, retention rates, self-confidence, assessment scores related to course selection/performance, and re-entry…

  8. Biological assessment: water hyacinth control program for the Sacramento/ San Joaquin River Delta of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A detailed Biological Assessment was developed for the proposed Areawide Water Hyacinth Control Program to outline the procedures that will be used to control this invasive aquatic plant in the Sacramento/ San Joaquin River Delta, and to help determine if this action is expected to threaten endanger...

  9. Recommended Financial Plan for the Construction of a Permanent Campus for San Joaquin Delta College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortolazzo, Julio L.

    The financial plan for the San Joaquin Delta College (California) permanent campus is presented in a table showing the gross square footage, the unit cost (including such fixed equipment as workbenches, laboratory tables, etc.), and the estimated total cost for each department. The unit costs per square foot vary from $18.00 for warehousing to…

  10. A Rural New Town for the West Side of the San Joaquin Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshner, Edward M.; And Others

    There are three major phases in the process of community development projected for the San Joaquin Valley's west side. The first phase involves agricultural experiments using different kinds of crops, agricultural techniques, and ownership arrangements. Beginning when enough people have returned to the land to create a demand for an expanded town,…

  11. 78 FR 58266 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; California; San Joaquin Valley, South...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 81 Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; California; San Joaquin... standard. DATES: The proposed rule published on August 27, 2009 (74 FR 43654) is withdrawn with respect to...-4102, israels.ken@epa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 27, 2009 (74 FR 43654), EPA...

  12. The "Roar of Chatter" in the Library at San Joaquin Delta College. Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Richard B.

    Quiet signs and verbal cautioning by library staff do not decrease library noise levels as revealed by two tests using sound measuring equipment at San Joaquin Delta College. The levels in fact increased, confirming previous opinions that signs and staff intervention have little effect on patron behavior. Test methods, data, and five references…

  13. Site Response in the San Joaquin/Sacramento River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. B.; Boatwright, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta lies on the western edge of the Great Valley and contains a system of levees that are thought to be prone to catastrophic failure from a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay area or on faults along the western border of the Great Valley. To assess this risk we deployed digital recorders and broadband sensors in late 2006 and 2007 at 3 levee sites in the Delta (each site had a top and base sensor) and at one reference site to the west. Cone penetrometer data show that at the base, the soils have low S-wave velocities of 170 to 240 m/s. Upper soil layers are typically peats and aeolian sands. During the nine months of deployment, we recorded 3 local events (45km

  14. Middle Cenozoic depositional, tectonic, and sea level history of southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Decelles, P.G.

    1988-11-01

    As a prolific producer of hydrocarbons, the San Joaquin basin in south-central California has been the subject of geological research since the late nineteenth century. Much of this research has focused on the subsurface Eocene to lower Miocene succession because of its attractive reservoir potential. Although seismic and well-log data are available in profuse quantities, the complex sedimentary architecture of the basin fill, the application of local and inconsistent stratigraphic nomenclature, and the inherent limitations of subsurface data have led to much confusion concerning the middle Cenozoic history of the basin. This paper presents a sedimentological analysis of the depositional systems in the Eocene to lower Miocene strata of the San Emigdio and Tehachapi Mountains. The various depositional systems are considered within the contexts of encompassing depositional sequences to reconstruct the middle Cenozoic depositional, tectonic, and sea level history of the southern San Joaquin basin. 14 figures, 1 table.

  15. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Modesto Area, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Hevesi, Joseph A.; Weissmann, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeologic characterization was done to develop an understanding of the hydrogeologic setting near Modesto by maximizing the use of existing data and building on previous work in the region. A substantial amount of new lithologic and hydrologic data are available that allow a more complete and updated characterization of the aquifer system. In this report, geologic units are described, a database of well characteristics and lithology is developed and used to update the regional stratigraphy, a water budget is estimated for water year 2000, a three-dimensional spatial correlation map of aquifer texture is created, and recommendations for future data collection are summarized. The general physiography of the study area is reflected in the soils. The oldest soils, which have low permeability, exist in terrace deposits, in the interfan areas between the Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers, at the distal end of the fans, and along the San Joaquin River floodplain. The youngest soils have high permeability and generally have been forming on the recently deposited alluvium along the major stream channels. Geologic materials exposed or penetrated by wells in the Modesto area range from pre-Cretaceous rocks to recent alluvium; however, water-bearing materials are mostly Late Tertiary and Quaternary in age. A database containing information from more than 3,500 drillers'logs was constructed to organize information on well characteristics and subsurface lithology in the study area. The database was used in conjunction with a limited number of geophysical logs and county soil maps to define the stratigraphic framework of the study area. Sequences of red paleosols were identified in the database and used as stratigraphic boundaries. Associated with these paleosols are very coarse grained incised valley-fill deposits. Some geophysical well logs and other sparse well information suggest the presence of one of these incised valley-fill deposits along and adjacent to the

  16. A brief history of oil and gas exploration in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California: Chapter 3 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takahashi, Kenneth I.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The Golden State got its nickname from the Sierra Nevada gold that lured so many miners and settlers to the West, but California has earned much more wealth from so-called “black gold” than from metallic gold. The San Joaquin Valley has been the principal source for most of the petroleum produced in the State during the past 145 years. In attempting to assess future additions to petroleum reserves in a mature province such as the San Joaquin Basin, it helps to be mindful of the history of resource development. In this chapter we present a brief overview of the long and colorful history of petroleum exploration and development in the San Joaquin Valley. This chapter relies heavily upon the work of William Rintoul, who wrote extensively on the history of oil and gas exploration in California and especially in the San Joaquin Valley. No report on the history of oil and gas exploration in the San Joaquin Valley would be possible without heavily referencing his publications. We also made use of publications by Susan Hodgson and a U.S. Geological Survey Web site, Natural Oil and Gas Seeps in California (http://seeps.wr.usgs.gov/seeps/index.html), for much of the material describing the use of petroleum by Native Americans in the San Joaquin Valley. Finally, we wish to acknowledge the contribution of Don Arnot, who manages the photograph collection at the West Kern Oil Museum in Taft, California. The collection consists of more than 10,000 photographs that have been scanned and preserved in digital form on CD-ROM. Many of the historical photographs used in this paper are from that collection. Finally, to clarify our terminology, we use the term “San Joaquin Valley” when we refer to the geographical or topographical feature and the term “San Joaquin Basin” when we refer to geological province and the rocks therein.

  17. 75 FR 20815 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment and to Conduct San Joaquin River Chinook...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ...NMFS announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) to analyze the potential impacts of the proposed reintroduction of spring-run Chinook salmon to the mainstem of the San Joaquin...

  18. Miocene temblor formation and related basin evolution, southwestern San Joaquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    The southwestern San Joaquin basin is an area of great importance for the energy industry and academic basin analysts. Understanding basin evolution is a key concern for explorationists in this essentially pristine province. Temblor Formatio is exposed in an east-west-trending belt that comprises the north flank of the San Emigdio Mountains. Field and subsurface evidence were used to elucidate the geology, depositional environments, and age of the Temblor Formation. The formation represents sand-rich borderland sedimentation in a predominantly deep-marine setting. Deposition of Temblor clastics reflects deformation due to the impingement of the Farallon Pacific ridge with the California-North American plate margin during the middle Oliocene. As a result, severe uplift along the margins of the southern San Joaquin basin, reinforced by a lowstand of global seal level, caused large volumes of coarse, immature clastics to be shed into the rapidly subsiding deep-marine depocenter. Deposition of the Temblor was thus concurrent with the transformation from a convergent margin tectonic regime to one of dextral strike-slip. This transformation was marked by an episode of transform-extension indicated by volcanism, rapid subsidence, and marine transgression during the early Miocene. The Maricopa trough or oceanic connection from the San Joaquin basin to the Pacific Ocean is inferred to have existed between Recruit Pass and Maricopa. The age of the Temblor Formation is late Oligocene to early Miocene. Petroleum production is limited to the upper member in small oil fields flanking the northern Sam Emigdio Mountains.

  19. The Use of Radar to Improve Rainfall Estimation over the Tennessee and San Joaquin River Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Felix, Mariana; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation provides an overview of the collaborative radar rainfall project between the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Von Braun Center for Science & Innovation (VCSI), NASA MSFC and UAHuntsville. Two systems were used in this project, Advanced Radar for Meteorological & Operational Research (ARMOR) Rainfall Estimation Processing System (AREPS), a demonstration project of real-time radar rainfall using a research radar and NEXRAD Rainfall Estimation Processing System (NREPS). The objectives, methodology, some results and validation, operational experience and lessons learned are reviewed. The presentation. Another project that is using radar to improve rainfall estimations is in California, specifically the San Joaquin River Valley. This is part of a overall project to develop a integrated tool to assist water management within the San Joaquin River Valley. This involves integrating several components: (1) Radar precipitation estimates, (2) Distributed hydro model, (3) Snowfall measurements and Surface temperature / moisture measurements. NREPS was selected to provide precipitation component.

  20. Inputs of the Dormant-Spray Pesticide, Diazinon, to the San Joaquin River, California, February 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Kratzer, Charles R.

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey is to describe the status and trends of the Nation's water quality with respect to natural features of the environment and human activities or land-use. Pesticides are a major water-quality issue in the San Joaquin Valley of California (fig. 1), and pesticide residues may be transported to rivers and streams in agricultural runoff following winter storms. Three sites in the western San Joaquin Valley were monitored during and after two February 1993 storms. The storms occurred after extensive spraying of organophosphate insecticides, mostly diazinon, on almond and other stone-fruit orchards.

  1. Porosity evolution in reservoir sandstones in the West-Central San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.A. Jr.; McCullough, P.T.; Houghton, B.D.; Pennell, D.A.; Dunwoody, J.A. III; Menzie, R.J. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Miocene reservoir sands (feldspathic and lithic arenites) in central San Joaquin basin oil fields show similar trends in porosity development despite differences in depositional environment, pore-fluid chemistry, and burial history. Burial and tectonic compaction caused grain rotation, deformation of altered lithics, and extensive fracturing of brittle grains, thereby eliminating most primary porosity. Diagenetic fluids, infiltrating along fractures in grains, reacted with freshly exposed mineral surfaces causing extensive leaching of framework components. All major grain types were affected but preferential removal of feldspars and lithics resulted in changes in QFL ratios. With continued compaction angular remnants of partially disolved grains were rotated and rearranged while secondary intergranular and moldic porosity collapsed to form secondary intergranular porosity. This resulted in reservoir sands that are less well sorted, more angular, and mineralogically more mature than they were at deposition. Such changes appear to widespread in the San Joaquin basin and may be more important than is generally acknowledged.

  2. Cotton yield losses and ambient ozone concentrations in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Kats, G.; Reagan, C.; Hake, S.

    1993-01-01

    Based on controlled experiments and simulation modeling, ozone air pollution has been estimated to cause significant yield losses to cotton. The study reported here was conducted to verify losses for Acala cotton (Gossypium hirsutum SJ2) along a gradient of ambient ozone (O3) concentrations across the San Joaquin Valley in California. Cotton was grown in nonfiltered (NF) and charcoal-filtered (CF) open-top chambers at four sites during the 1988-1989 summer growing seasons. Cotton yields were reduced in NF compared to CF air in general proportion to O3 concentrations across all sites and years. Greatest cotton yield losses were at Dinuba on the east side of the San Joaquin Valley and lowest were on the west side of the valley. Ozone injury symptoms on cotton were most noticeable in areas with greatest yield losses.

  3. Assessment of remaining recoverable oil in selected major oil fields of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Klett, Timothy R.; Verma, Mahendra K.; Ryder, Robert T.; Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.; Le, Phoung A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an estimate of volumes of technically recoverable, conventional oil that could eventually be added to reserves in nine selected major oil fields in the San Joaquin Basin in central California. The mean total volume of potential oil reserves that might be added in the nine fields using improved oil-recovery technologies was estimated to be about 6.5 billion barrels of oil.

  4. Chemical quality of ground water in San Joaquin and part of Contra Costa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical water-quality conditions were investigated in San Joaquin and part of Contra Costa Counties by canvassing available wells and sampling water from 324 representative wells. Chemical water types varied, with 73 percent of the wells sampled containing either calcium-magnesium bicarbonate, or calcium-sodium bicarbonate type water. Substantial areas contain ground water exceeding water-quality standards for boron, manganese, and nitrate. Trace elements, with the exception of boron and manganese, were present in negligible amounts. (USGS)

  5. Particulate matter formation in the San Joaquin Valley: Modeling of a winter episode

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduwela, A.P.; Hughes, V.M.; Hackney, R.J.; Jackson, B.J.; Magliano, K.L.; Ranzieri, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    The gaseous and particulate matter concentrations in the San Joaquin Valley simulated using UAM-AERO for the January 4--6, 1996 winter episode are presented and compared with the measurements made during this period. The emphasis here is on the formation of secondary aerosols. The sensitivity of modeled results to input data such as initial/boundary conditions, emissions, and meteorological conditions is also described.

  6. Emissions of organic carbon and methane from petroleum and dairy operations in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, D. R.; Ford, T. B.; Guha, A.; Boulanger, K.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.; Atlas, E.; Lonneman, W. A.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Beaver, M. R.; St. Clair, J. M.; Wennberg, P. O.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Markovic, M. Z.; Murphy, J. G.; Harley, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Petroleum and dairy operations are prominent sources of gas-phase organic compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley. It is essential to understand the emissions and air quality impacts of these relatively understudied sources, especially for oil/gas operations in light of increasing US production. Ground site measurements in Bakersfield and regional aircraft measurements of reactive gas-phase organic compounds and methane were part of the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) project to determine the sources contributing to regional gas-phase organic carbon emissions. Using a combination of near-source and downwind data, we assess the composition and magnitude of emissions, and provide average source profiles. To examine the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley, we developed a statistical modeling method using ground-based data and the FLEXPART-WRF transport and meteorological model. We present evidence for large sources of paraffinic hydrocarbons from petroleum operations and oxygenated compounds from dairy (and other cattle) operations. In addition to the small straight-chain alkanes typically associated with petroleum operations, we observed a wide range of branched and cyclic alkanes, most of which have limited previous in situ measurements or characterization in petroleum operation emissions. Observed dairy emissions were dominated by ethanol, methanol, acetic acid, and methane. Dairy operations were responsible for the vast majority of methane emissions in the San Joaquin Valley; observations of methane were well correlated with non-vehicular ethanol, and multiple assessments of the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley highlight the dominance of dairy operations for methane emissions. The petroleum operations source profile was developed using the composition of non-methane hydrocarbons in unrefined natural gas associated with crude oil. The observed source profile is

  7. Concentrations of organic contaminants detected during managed flow conditions, San Joaquin River and Old River, California, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of organic contaminants were determined in water samples collected at six surface-water sites located along the San Joaquin and Old Rivers during April through June 2001. Water samples were collected, coincident with salmon smolt caging studies conducted by researchers from the Bodega Marine Laboratory at the University of California at Davis to characterize exposure of the salmon smolt to organic contaminants. Sampling occurred prior to, during, and following the implementation of managed streamflow conditions on the San Joaquin and Old Rivers as part of the Vernalis Adaptive Management Plan. Thirteen pesticides were detected in water samples collected during this study, and at least five pesticides were detected in each sample. The total number of pesticide detections varied little between river systems and between sites, but the maximum concentrations of most pesticides occurred in San Joaquin River samples. The total number of pesticides detected varied little over the three time periods. However, during the period of managed streamflow, the fewest number of pesticides were detected at their absolute maximum concentration. Nine wastewater compounds were detected during this study. Suspended-sediment concentrations were similar for the San Joaquin and Old Rivers except during the period of managed streamflow conditions, when suspended-sediment concentration was higher at sites on the San Joaquin River than at sites on the Old River. Values for water parameters (pH, specific conductance, and hardness) were lowest during the period of managed flows.

  8. Organic chemicals in the environment: Pesticides in the San Joaquin River, California: Inputs from dormant sprayed orchards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Dubrovsky, N.M.; Kratzer, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    Rainfall-induced runoff mobilized pesticides to the San Joaquin River and its tributaries during a 3.8-cm rainstorm beginning the evening of 7 February and lasting through the morning of 8 Feb. 1993. Two distinct peaks of organophosphate pesticide concentrations were measured at the mouth of the San Joaquin River. These two peaks were attributed to contrasts between the soil texture, basin size, pesticide-use patterns, and hydrology of the eastern and western San Joaquin Valley. The fine soil texture and small size of the western tributary basins contributed to rapid runoff. In western valley streams, diazinon concentrations peaked within hours of the rainfall's end and then decreased because of a combination of dilution with pesticide- free runoff from the nearby Coast Ranges and decreasing concentrations in the agricultural runoff. Peak concentrations for the Merced River, a large tributary of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, occurred at least a day later than those of the western tributary streams. That delay may be due to the presence of well-drained soils in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, the larger size of the Merced River drainage basin, and the management of surface-water drainage networks. A subsequent storm on 18 and 19 February resulted in much lower concentrations of most organophosphate pesticides suggesting that the first storm had mobilized most of the pesticides that were available for rainfall-induced transport.

  9. Adaptive Management Methods to Protect the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    2016-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply, conveying water from Northern to Southern California agriculture and communities while supporting important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in the Delta. Changes in climate, long-term drought, water quality changes, and expansion of invasive aquatic plants threatens ecosystems, impedes ecosystem restoration, and is economically, environmentally, and sociologically detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California and local governments to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and waterway managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes. The team provides a comprehensive understanding of agricultural and urban land use in the Delta and the major water sheds (San Joaquin/Sacramento) supplying the Delta and interaction with drought and climate impacts on the environment, water quality, and weed growth. The team recommends conservation and modified land-use practices and aids local Delta stakeholders in developing management strategies. New remote sensing tools have been developed to enhance ability to assess conditions, inform decision support tools, and monitor management practices. Science gaps in understanding how native and invasive plants respond to altered environmental conditions are being filled and provide critical biological response parameters for Delta-SWAT simulation modeling. Operational agencies such as the California Department of Boating and Waterways provide testing and act as initial adopter of decision support tools. Methods developed by the project can become routine land and water management tools in complex river delta systems.

  10. Estimates of suspended sediment entering San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta, San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Lester J.; Ganju, Neil K.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2006-05-01

    This study demonstrates the use of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) data collected at Mallard Island as a means of determining suspended-sediment load entering San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento and San Joaquin River watersheds. Optical backscatter (OBS) data were collected every 15 min during water years (WYs) 1995-2003 and converted to SSC. Daily fluvial advective sediment load was estimated by combining estimated Delta outflow with daily averaged SSC. On days when no data were available, SSC was estimated using linear interpolation. A model was developed to estimate the landward dispersive load using velocity and SSC data collected during WYs 1994 and 1996. The advective and dispersive loads were summed to estimate the total load. Annual suspended-sediment load at Mallard Island averaged 1.2±0.4 Mt (million metric tonnes). Given that the average water discharge for the 1995-2003 period was greater than the long -term average discharge, it seems likely that the average suspended-sediment load may be less than 1.2±0.4 Mt. Average landward dispersive load was 0.24 Mt/yr, 20% of the total. On average during the wet season, 88% of the annual suspended-sediment load was discharged through the Delta and 43% occurred during the wettest 30-day period. The January 1997 flood transported 1.2 Mt of suspended sediment or about 11% of the total 9-year load (10.9 Mt). Previous estimates of sediment load at Mallard Island are about a factor of 3 greater because they lacked data downstream from riverine gages and sediment load has decreased. Decreasing suspended-sediment loads may increase erosion in the Bay, help to cause remobilization of buried contaminants, and reduce the supply of sediment for restoration projects.

  11. Estimates of suspended sediment entering San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta, San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, L.J.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) data collected at Mallard Island as a means of determining suspended-sediment load entering San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento and San Joaquin River watersheds. Optical backscatter (OBS) data were collected every 15 min during water years (WYs) 1995-2003 and converted to SSC. Daily fluvial advective sediment load was estimated by combining estimated Delta outflow with daily averaged SSC. On days when no data were available, SSC was estimated using linear interpolation. A model was developed to estimate the landward dispersive load using velocity and SSC data collected during WYs 1994 and 1996. The advective and dispersive loads were summed to estimate the total load. Annual suspended-sediment load at Mallard Island averaged 1.2??0.4 Mt (million metric tonnes). Given that the average water discharge for the 1995-2003 period was greater than the long -term average discharge, it seems likely that the average suspended-sediment load may be less than 1.2??0.4 Mt. Average landward dispersive load was 0.24 Mt/yr, 20% of the total. On average during the wet season, 88% of the annual suspended-sediment load was discharged through the Delta and 43% occurred during the wettest 30-day period. The January 1997 flood transported 1.2 Mt of suspended sediment or about 11% of the total 9-year load (10.9 Mt). Previous estimates of sediment load at Mallard Island are about a factor of 3 greater because they lacked data downstream from riverine gages and sediment load has decreased. Decreasing suspended-sediment loads may increase erosion in the Bay, help to cause remobilization of buried contaminants, and reduce the supply of sediment for restoration projects. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dissolved pesticide concentrations entering the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, California, 2012-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; McWayne, Megan; Sanders, Corey; Hladik, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Surface-water samples were collected from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers where they enter the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey for a suite of 99 current-use pesticides and pesticide degradates. Samples were collected twice per month from May 2012 through July 2013 and from May 2012 through April 2013 at the Sacramento River at Freeport, and the San Joaquin River near Vernalis, respectively. Samples were analyzed by two separate laboratory methods by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Method detection limits ranged from 0.9 to 10.5 nanograms per liter (ng/L). A total of 37 pesticides and degradates were detected in water samples collected during the study (18 herbicides, 11 fungicides, 7 insecticides, and 1 synergist). The most frequently detected pesticides overall were the herbicide hexazinone (detected in 100 percent of the samples); 3,4-dichloroaniline (97 percent), which is a degradate of the herbicides diuron and propanil; the fungicide azoxystrobin (83 percent); and the herbicides diuron (72 percent), simazine (66 percent), and metolachlor (64 percent). Insecticides were rarely detected during the study. Pesticide concentrations varied from below the method detection limits to 984 ng/L (hexazinone). Twenty seven pesticides and (or) degradates were detected in Sacramento River samples, and the average number of pesticides per sample was six. The most frequently detected compounds in these samples were hexazinone (detected in 100 percent of samples), 3,4-dichloroaniline (97 percent), azoxystrobin (88 percent), diuron (56 percent), and simazine (50 percent). Pesticides with the highest detected maximum concentrations in Sacramento River samples included the herbicide clomazone (670 ng/L), azoxystrobin (368 ng/L), 3,4-dichloroaniline (364 ng/L), hexazinone (130 ng/L), and propanil (110 ng/L), and all but hexazinone are primarily associated with

  13. Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2004-12-20

    The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

  14. Irrigation water supply and demand data for 1976, 1980, and 1984 for the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templin, W.E.; Haltom, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the irrigation water supply and demand data for 1976, 1980, and 1984 for 32 water districts in the western San Joaquin Valley, California. Data are provided for each water district or each of the three years if the data were available. The complete data base is given by water district or each township, range, and section in the rectangular system for the subdivision of public lands. These data were complied for use in a ground- water-flow model, compilation of a water-budget, and use by the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program in a study of water management in the western San Joaquin Valley, California. The data are presented in a computer-readable format to improve data utilization and to condense the information so that it can be more readily distributed to users.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitten, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    In response to increasing demand on water supplies and declining water levels in San Joaquin County, the U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Joaquin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, is evaluating the potential for artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, California. Through a well canvass and analyses of existing data on geology, soils, and drillers logs, this study (phase one of three phases) resulted in identification of 20 sites for exploratory test drilling in areas potentially favorable for artificial recharge. Ten of the sites are in areas adjacent to the Mokelumne River, six are in areas adjacent to the Calaveras River and Mormon Slough, and four are north of Littlejohns Creek. (USGS)

  16. Ramp-style deposition of Oligocene Marine Vedder formation, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, R.B.

    1986-04-01

    The Oligocene Vedder formation consists of well-sorted medium to fine-grained marine sand and shale in the subsurface of the eastern San Joaquin Valley. Updip, this formation interfingers with nonmarine/lagoonal facies known as the Walker Formation. This relationship appears to be transgressive because the marine Vedder generally overlies the Walker Formation. Downdip, the Vedder sands interfinger with middle to lower bathyal shale in a progradational manner, forming upward-coarsening patterns in well logs. Depositional water depths for the shale were determined from benthic foraminifera assemblages. The Vedder formation is approximately 750 ft thick along its updip part, and gradually thickens to 1500 ft downdip. Overall deposition geometry, determined from well-log correlations and seismic data, is generally parallel and downlapping. A prominent shelf-slope break is not evident. Rather, depositional surfaces are tabular or broadly lobate, with a depositional slope of 5/sup 0/-10/sup 0/. This geometry of constant slope between nonmarine and deep marine water depth is termed a ramp. The depositional style and geometry are similar to that of the Oligocene upper Pleito Formation, which crops out in the San Emigdio Mountains on the southern margin of the San Joaquin Valley. The Vedder formation was deposited subsequent to a period of rapid subsidence (about 50 cm/1000 years), as determined from geohistory analysis of well data on the Bakersfield arch. This rapid subsidence may have induced deposition in a ramp geometry, rather than a shelf-slope configuration.

  17. Testing Total Ammonia Levels in the Sacramento- San Joaquin Valley Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaser, C.; Harris, A.; Miller, K.

    2014-12-01

    Northern California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is surrounded by many agricultural fields, making is susceptible to increased ammonia levels from nutrient rich fertilizer runoff. Last year we noticed a large bloom of Water Hyacinth, an invasive species from South America, throughout many channels of the delta which led us to believe that there was an abundance of ammonia in the water. We hypothesized this with the prior knowledge that Water Hyacinth feeds on ammonia and thrives in places with high levels of ammonia in the water. Because there are no current regulation standards for ammonia levels in the Delta, we decided to test eight points around the delta to see whether or not the ammonia levels exceed regulatory standards of nearby waters. After determining the ammonia levels of each of our eight samples, we compared the data that we collected to the maximum levels of ammonia allowed in the Central San Francisco Bay, which is 0.16 ppm. We discovered that each point that we tested in the delta had ammonia levels much lower than 0.16 ppm. With these results we concluded that unusually high levels of ammonia is not a concern in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

  18. Sources of High-Chloride Water to Wells, Eastern San Joaquin Ground-Water Subbasin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Metzger, Loren F.; McPherson, Kelly R.; Everett, Rhett; Bennett, George L.

    2006-01-01

    As a result of pumping and subsequent declines in water levels, chloride concentrations have increased in water from wells in the Eastern San Joaquin Ground-Water Subbasin, about 80 miles east of San Francisco (Montgomery Watson, Inc., 2000). Water from a number of public-supply, agricultural, and domestic wells in the western part of the subbasin adjacent to the San Joaquin Delta exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) for chloride of 250 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (fig. 1) (link to animation showing chloride concentrations in water from wells, 1984 to 2004). Some of these wells have been removed from service. High-chloride water from delta surface water, delta sediments, saline aquifers that underlie freshwater aquifers, and irrigation return are possible sources of high-chloride water to wells (fig. 2). It is possible that different sources contribute high-chloride water to wells in different parts of the subbasin or even to different depths within the same well.

  19. Pyrethroid insecticide concentrations and toxicity in streambed sediments and loads in surface waters of the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Weston, D.P.; Zhang, M.; Hladik, M.

    2010-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticide use in California, USA, is growing, and there is a need to understand the fate of these compounds in the environment. Concentrations and toxicity were assessed in streambed sediment of the San Joaquin Valley of California, one of the most productive agricultural regions of the United States. Concentrations were also measured in the suspended sediment associated with irrigation or storm-water runoff, and mass loads during storms were calculated. Western valley streambed sediments were frequently toxic to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, with most of the toxicity attributable to bifenthrin and cyhalothrin. Up to 100% mortality was observed in some locations with concentrations of some pyrethroids up to 20 ng/g. The western San Joaquin Valley streams are mostly small watersheds with clay soils, and sediment-laden irrigation runoff transports pyrethroid insecticides throughout the growing season. In contrast, eastern tributaries and the San Joaquin River had low bed sediment concentrations (<1 ng/g) and little or no toxicity because of the preponderance of sandy soils and sediments. Bifenthrin, cyhalothrin, and permethrin were the most frequently detected pyrethroids in irrigation and storm water runoff. Esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, and resmethrin were also detected. All sampled streams contributed to the insecticide load of the San Joaquin River during storms, but some compounds detected in the smaller creeks were not detected in the San Joaquin River. The two smallest streams, Ingram and Hospital Creeks, which had high sediment toxicity during the irrigation season, accounted for less than 5% of the total discharge of the San Joaquin River during storm conditions, and as a result their contribution to the pyrethroid mass load of the larger river was minimal. ?? 2010 SETAC.

  20. Water quality in the San Joaquin-Tulare basins, California, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Brown, Larry R.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.; Burow, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to summarize major findings that emerged between 1992 and 1995 from the water-quality assessment of the San Joaquin-Tulare Basins Study Unit and to relate these findings to water-quality issues of regional and national concern. The information is primarily intended for those who are involved in water-resource management. Yet, the information contained here may also interest those who simply wish to know more about the quality of water in the rivers and aquifers in the area where they live.

  1. Emissions of organic carbon and methane from petroleum and dairy operations in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, D. R.; Ford, T. B.; Guha, A.; Boulanger, K.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.; Atlas, E.; Lonneman, W. A.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Beaver, M. R.; St. Clair, J. M.; Wennberg, P. O.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Markovic, M. Z.; Murphy, J. G.; Harley, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-10-01

    Petroleum and dairy operations are prominent sources of gas-phase organic compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley. Ground site measurements in Bakersfield and aircraft measurements of reactive gas-phase organic compounds were made in this region as part of the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) project to determine the sources contributing to regional gas-phase organic carbon emissions. Using a combination of near-source and downwind data, we assess the composition and magnitude of emissions from these prominent sources that are relatively understudied compared to motor vehicles We also developed a statistical modeling method with the FLEXPART-WRF transport and meteorological model using ground-based data to assess the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley. We present evidence for large sources of paraffinic hydrocarbons from petroleum extraction/processing operations and oxygenated compounds from dairy (and other cattle) operations. In addition to the small straight-chain alkanes typically associated with petroleum operations, we observed a wide range of branched and cyclic alkanes that have limited previous in situ measurements or characterization in emissions from petroleum operations. Observed dairy emissions were dominated by ethanol, methanol, and acetic acid, and methane. Dairy operations were responsible for the vast majority of methane emissions in the San Joaquin Valley; observations of methane were well-correlated with non-vehicular ethanol, and multiple assessments of the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley highlight the dominance of dairy operations for methane emissions. The good agreement of the observed petroleum operations source profile with the measured composition of non-methane hydrocarbons in unrefined natural gas associated with crude oil suggests a fugitive emissions pathway during petroleum extraction, storage, or processing with negligible

  2. Accumulation of selenium in benthic bivalves and fine-grained sediments of San Francisco Bay, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, and selected tributaries, 1984-1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johns, C.; Luoma, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    Fine-grained, oxidized, surface sediments and two benthic bivalves (Corbicula sp., a suspension-feeding freshwater clam, and Macoma balthica, a deposit-feeding brackish water clam) were used to examine spatial distributions of selenium within San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta and to compare riverine with local inputs of biologically available selenium to this large, complex, urbanized estuary. Selenium concentrations in Corbicula were elevated in the western Delta and northern reach of San Francisco Bay compared to concentrations in Corbicula from river systems not enriched in selenium. Biologically available selenium did not appear to enter the southern Delta or northern reach of the Bay from the San Joaquin River, a possible source, in levels that could measurably influence bioaccumulation by Corbicula. Selenium concentrations in Macoma balthica also were elevated in southern South San Francisco Bay and near the western edge of Suisun Bay.

  3. Habitat evaluation using GIS a case study applied to the San Joaquin Kit Fox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerrard, R.; Stine, P.; Church, R.; Gilpin, M.

    2001-01-01

    Concern over the fate of plant and animal species throughout the world has accelerated over recent decades. Habitat loss is considered the main culprit in reducing many species' abundance and range, leading to numerous efforts to plan and manage habitat preservation. Our work uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data and modeling to define a spatially explicit analysis of habitat value, using the San Joaquin Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) of California (USA) as an example. Over the last 30 years, many field studies and surveys have enhanced our knowledge of the life history, behavior, and needs of the kit fox, which has been proposed as an umbrella or indicator species for grassland habitat in the San Joaquin Valley of California. There has yet been no attempt to convert much of this field knowledge into a model of spatial habitat value useful for planning purposes. This is a significant omission given the importance and visibility of the imperiled kit fox and increasing trends toward spatially explicit modeling and planning. In this paper we apply data from northern California to derive a small-cell GIS raster of habitat value for the kit fox that incorporates both intrinsic habitat quality and neighborhood context, as well the effects of barriers such as roads. Such a product is a useful basis for assessing the presence and amounts of good (and poor) quality habitat and for eventually constructing GIS representations of viable animal territories that could be included in future reserves. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Thermal history of rocks in southern San Joaquin Valley, California: evidence from fission-track analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, N.D.; Naeser, C.W.; McCulloh, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Fission-track analysis has been used to study the thermal and depositional history of the subsurface Tertiary sedimentary rocks on both sides of the active White Wolf reverse fault in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The distinctly different thermal histories of the rocks in the two structural blocks are clearly reflected in the apatite fission-track data, which suggest that rocks in the rapidly subsiding basin northwest of the fault have been near their present temperature for only about 1 m.y. compared with about 10 m.y. for rocks southeast of the fault. These estimates of heating time agree with previous estimates for these rocks. Zircon fission-track data indicate that the Tertiary sediments were derived from parent rocks of more than one age. However, from at least the Eocene to late Miocene or Pliocene, the major sediment source was rocks related to the youngest Sierra Nevada Mesozoic intrusive complexes, which are presently exposed east and south of the southern San Joaquin Valley. -from Authors

  5. Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, as of 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ireland, R.L.; Poland, J.F.; Riley, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    Land subsidence due to ground-water overdraft in the San Joaquin Valley began in the mid-1920 's and continued at alarming rates until surface was imported through major canals and aqueducts in the 1950 's and late 1960's. In areas where surface water replaced withdrawal of ground-water, water levels in the confined system rose sharply and subsidence slowed. In the late 1960 's and early 1970 's water levels in wells recovered to levels of the 1940 's and 1950 's throughout most of the western and southern parts of the Valley, in response to the importation of surface water through the California aqueduct. During the 1976-77 drought data collected at water-level and extensometer sites showed the effect of heavy demand on the ground-water resevoir. With the ' water of compaction ' gone, artesian head declined 10 to 20 times as fast as during the first cycle of long-term drawdown that ended in the late 1960's. In the 1978-79 water levels recovered to or above the 1976 pre-drought levels. The report suggests continued monitoring of land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley. (USGS)

  6. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Farming and their effect on San Joaquin Valley Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. R.; Yang, M.; Meinardi, S.; Krauter, C.; Rowland, F. S.

    2009-05-01

    The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District of California issued a report identifying dairies as a main source of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). A dairy study funded by the California Air Resources Board commenced shortly after the report was issued. Our University of California Irvine group teamed with California State University Fresno to determine the major sources of VOCs from various dairy operations and from a variety of dairy types. This study identified ethanol and methanol as two gases produced in major quantities throughout the dairies in the San Joaquin valley as by-products of yeast fermentation of silage. Three different types of sampling protocols were employed in order to determine the degree of enhancement of the target oxygenates in the valley air shed. Their sources, emission profiles, and emission rates were determined from whole air samples collected at various locations at the six dairies studied. An assessment of the impact of dairy emissions in the valley was achieved by using data obtained on low altitude NASA DC-8 flights through the valley, and from ground level samples collected though out the valley in a grid like design. Our data suggest that a significant amount of O3 production in the valley may come from methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde (a photochemical by-product ethanol oxidation). Our findings indicate that improvement to valley air quality may be obtained by focusing on instituting new silage containment practices and regulations.

  7. San Joaquin kit fox Vulpes macrotis mutica program, Camp Roberts, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    Camp Roberts is a California Army National Guard Training Site located in central California. The San Joaquin kit fox, an endangered subspecies of kit fox, has been known to occur at Camp Roberts since 1960. The population of foxes began to increase in the early 1970's when use of rodenticides decreased. In 1987 the California Army National Guard contracted EG G Energy Measurements to conduct a 3-year study to assess the effects of Camp Roberts activities on the kit fox population. The major objective of the Camp Roberts Environmental Studies Program is to prepare a comprehensive Biological Assessment of the effects of all NGB-authorized activities (includes military training, anticipated construction projects, repair and maintenance activities, and all NGB-authorized non-military activities such as hunting and fishing programs, grazing leases, etc.) on San Joaquin kit fox. The program also provides NGB with the scientific expertise necessary to insure compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Environmental Studies Program made during Fiscal Years 1989 and 1990 (FY89/90). 32 refs., 9 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) program, Camp Roberts, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Military training activities, new construction projects, and routine repair and maintenance activities conducted at Camp Roberts could adversely affect the endangered San Joaquin kit fox population. The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (as amended) states that all Federal agencies are to ensure that any actions authorized, funded, or carried out by the agency are not likely to have any detrimental effects on endangered species or their habitat. The major objective of the Camp Roberts Environmental Studies Program was to prepare a comprehensive Biological Assessment of the effects of all NGB-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (military training, anticipated construction projects, repair and maintenance activities, and all NGB-authorized non-military activities such as a hunting and fishing program, grazing leases, etc.). The program also provided NGB with the scientific expertise necessary to ensure compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The objective of this report is to summarize the progress and results of the Environmental Studies Program during Fiscal Years 1991 and 1992 (FY91/92).

  9. An emission inventory of agricultural internal combustion engines for California`s San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, D.; Chinkin, L.; Reiss, R.

    1996-12-31

    Previous work concluded that stationary agricultural internal combustion (IC) engines are a substantial source of criteria pollutants the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). However, due to time and resource restrictions, earlier work did not include a rigorous survey of engine users. Instead, emission estimates were based on interviews with a few knowledgeable experts (e.g., Department of Agricultural Engineering at U.C. Davis, the Agriculture Extension office of U.C. Davis, Farm Bureau, and Water District offices) or were extrapolated from data designed for other purposes. The purpose of the current study, which was sponsored by the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District, was to improve the estimate of emissions from this source category by conducting a more comprehensive inventory of this source type based on data collected via a telephone survey of engine users. These survey data were then used to estimate and seasonally allocate emissions for this source category. The findings of this current work show that these emissions are much lower than previously estimated.

  10. Understanding Particulate Matter Dynamics in the San Joaquin Valley during DISCOVER-AQ, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, G.; Zhang, X.; Kim, H.; Parworth, C.; Pusede, S. E.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Zhang, Q.; Cappa, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Air quality in the California San Joaquin Valley (SJV) during winter continues to be the worst in the state, failing EPA's 24-hour standard for particulate matter. Despite our improved understanding of the sources of particulate matter (PM) in the valley, air-quality models are unable to predict PM concentrations accurately. We aim to characterize periods of high particulate matter concentrations in the San Joaquin Valley based on ground and airborne measurements of aerosols and gaseous pollutants, during the DISCOVER-AQ campaign, 2013. A highly instrumented aircraft flew across the SJV making three transects in a repeatable pattern, with vertical spirals over select locations. The aircraft measurements were complemented by ground measurements at these locations, with extensive chemically-speciated measurements at a ground "supersite" at Fresno. Hence, the campaign provided a comprehensive three-dimensional view of the particulate and gaseous pollutants around the valley. The vertical profiles over the different sites indicate significant variability in the concentrations and vertical distribution of PM around the valley, which are most likely driven by differences in the combined effects of emissions, chemistry and boundary layer dynamics at each site. The observations suggest that nighttime PM is dominated by surface emissions of PM from residential fuel combustion, while early morning PM is strongly influenced by mixing of low-level, above-surface, nitrate-rich layers formed from dark chemistry overnight to the surface.

  11. Real-time management of water quality in the San Joaquin River Basin, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Karkoski, J.

    1997-09-01

    In the San Joaquin River Basin, California, a realtime water quality forecasting model was developed to help improve the management of saline agricultural and wetland drainage to meet water quality objectives. Predicted salt loads from the water quality forecasting model, SJRIODAY, were consistently within +- 11 percent of actual, within +- 14 percent for seven-day forecasts, and with in +- 26 percent for 14-day forecasts for the 16-month trial period. When the 48 days dominated by rainfall/runoff events were eliminated from the data set, the error bar decreased to +- 9 percent for the model and +- 11 percent and +- 17 percent for the seven-day and 14-day forecasts, respectively. Constraints on the use of the model for salinity management on the San Joaquin River include the number of entities that control or influence water quality and the lack of a centralized authority to direct their activities. The lack of real-time monitoring sensors for other primary constituents of concern, such as selenium and boron, limits the application of the model to salinity at the present time. A case study describes wetland drainage releases scheduled to coincide with high river flows and significant river assimilative capacity for salt loads.

  12. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ALMOND LEAF SCORCH DISEASE IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY OF CALIFORNIA: FACTORS AFFECTING PATHOGEN DISTRIBUTION AND MOVEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond leaf scorch disease (ALSD) has recently reemerged as a serious threat to almond production areas throughout California’s San Joaquin Valley. This disease, which is caused by the xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiousa, is vectored by xylophagous insects including sharpshooter leafhoppers ...

  13. 78 FR 6814 - Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Sacramento-San Joaquin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Islands and Levees Feasibility Study AGENCY: Department of the... Islands and Levees Feasibility Study (Delta Study). The EIS will be prepared in accordance with the... agency for compliance with NEPA. The Delta Study will evaluate alternatives to meet the study goals...

  14. 76 FR 56116 - Interim Final Determination To Stay and Defer Sanctions, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ...EPA is making an interim final determination to stay the imposition of offset sanctions and to defer the imposition of highway sanctions based on a proposed approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP) published elsewhere in this Federal Register. The revisions concern SJVUAPCD Rules......

  15. 76 FR 56114 - Interim Final Determination to Stay and Defer Sanctions, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ...EPA is making an interim final determination to stay the imposition of offset sanctions and to defer the imposition of highway sanctions based on a proposed approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP) published elsewhere in this Federal Register. The revisions concern SJVUAPCD Rule......

  16. Yield, pollination aspects and kernel qualities of almond (Prunus amygdalus Batsch) selections trialed in the Southern San Joaquin Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field trial was established in the Southern San Joaquin Valley to determine yield potential for nine almond selections grown under commercial conditions. Kernel yields were first quantified in 2008, at the end of the third growing season, and continued through the 2010 harvest. Harvested tonnage...

  17. Assessing the potential of forage alfalfa crops to serve as Xylella fastidiosa, primary inoculum sources in the San Joaquin Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for forage alfalfa to serve as a primary inoculum source of Xylella fastidiosa in the San Joaquin Valley of California was evaluated. Laboratory inoculation of fourteen cultivars of alfalfa indicated that all alfalfa cultivars tested were equally suitable hosts for X. fastidiosa. Inci...

  18. Assessment of the importance of alfalfa to the epidemiology of xylellae diseases in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of alfalfa in the epidemiology of xylellae diseases in the San Joaquin Valley of California was assessed. Alfalfa was investigated as it is a known host of Xylella fastidiosa and often harbors large populations of a native vector, Draeculacephala minerva. Laboratory inoculation of fourtee...

  19. Emissions of organic carbon and methane from petroleum and dairy operations in California’s San Joaquin Valley

    EPA Science Inventory

    Petroleum and dairy operations are prominent sources of gas-phase organic compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley. It is essential to understand the emissions and air quality impacts of these relatively understudied sources, especially for oil/gas operations in light of incr...

  20. Water quality and supply issues of irrigated agricultural regions – lessons from the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The San Joaquin Valley of California covers 4 million hectares of farmland and produces $25 billion of agricultural products annually, but its average annual rainfall ranges from only 130 mm in the south to 330 mm in the north and nearly all occur in the winter. On the east side of the valley, irrig...

  1. Factors Motivating Latino College Students to Pursue STEM Degrees on CSU Campuses in the Southern San Joaquin Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what factors were motivating Latino/a students in the southern San Joaquin Valley to pursue STEM degrees and whether these factors were specific to the Latino/a culture. A 12-question survey was administered to STEM majors at California State University, Bakersfield and California State University, Fresno…

  2. Performance of San Joaquin Delta College Freshmen Students in Reading, Writing and Math by Ethnicity, High School Status and Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Merrilee R.; And Others

    A study was conducted in fall 1985 to determine how well students at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC) were prepared in reading, writing, and mathematics, comparing students by ethnicity, high school status, and age. SJDC uses the Comparative Guidance Placement (CGP) Tests to to assess all new students who do not have an Associate of Arts degree or…

  3. Soil degradation in farmlands of California’s San Joaquin Valley resulting from drought-induced land-use changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation in California’s Central Valley (USA) has decreased significantly due to water shortages resulting from the current drought, which began in 2010. In particular, fallow fields in the west side of the San Joaquin Valley (WSJV), which is the southwest portion of the Central Valley, increased ...

  4. Biological assessment:Egeria densa control program for the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A detailed Biological Assessment was developed for the proposed Area wide Egeria densa Control Program to outline the procedures that will be used to control this submerged invasive aquatic plant in the Sacramento/ San Joaquin River Delta, and to help determine if this action is expected to threaten...

  5. California GAMA Program: Ground-Water Quality Data in the Northern San Joaquin Basin Study Unit, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Growing concern over the closure of public-supply wells because of ground-water contamination has led the State Water Board to establish the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. With the aid of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the program goals are to enhance understanding and provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where ground water is an important source of drinking water. The Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit covers an area of approximately 2,079 square miles (mi2) across four hydrologic study areas in the San Joaquin Valley. The four study areas are the California Department of Water Resources (CADWR) defined Tracy subbasin, the CADWR-defined Eastern San Joaquin subbasin, the CADWR-defined Cosumnes subbasin, and the sedimentologically distinct USGS-defined Uplands study area, which includes portions of both the Cosumnes and Eastern San Joaquin subbasins. Seventy ground-water samples were collected from 64 public-supply, irrigation, domestic, and monitoring wells within the Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit. Thirty-two of these samples were collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin study area, 17 in the Tracy Basin study area, 10 in the Cosumnes Basin study area, and 11 in the Uplands Basin study area. Of the 32 samples collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin, 6 were collected using a depth-dependent sampling pump. This pump allows for the collection of samples from discrete depths within the pumping well. Two wells were chosen for depth-dependent sampling and three samples were collected at varying depths within each well. Over 350 water-quality field parameters, chemical constituents, and microbial constituents were analyzed and are reported as concentrations and as detection frequencies, by compound classification as well as for individual constituents, for the Northern San Joaquin Basin study unit as a whole and for each individual study area

  6. Measured flow and tracer-dye data showing the anthropogenic effects on the hydrodynamics of south Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, spring 1996 and 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    Tidal flows were measured using acoustic Doppler current profilers and ultrasonic velocity meters during spring 1996 and 1997 in south Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, when (1) a temporary barrier was installed at the head of Old River to prevent the entrance of migrating San Joaquin River salmon smolts, (2) the rate of water export from the south Delta was reduced for an extended period of time, and (3) a 30-day pulse flow was created on the San Joaquin River to move salmon smolts north away from the export facilities during spring 1997. Tracer-dye measurements also were made under these three conditions.

  7. Late Cretaceous and Paleogene sedimentation along east side of San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    Depositional systems of the Late Cretaceous contrast with those of the Paleogene in the subsurface along the east side of the San Joaquin basin between Bakersfield and Fresno, California. Upper Cretaceous deposits include thick fan-delta and submarine fan facies of the Moreno and Panoche Formations, whereas the paleogene contains extensive nearshore, shelf, slope, and submarine fan deposits of the Lodo, Domengine, and Kreyenhagen Formations. These sediments were deposited on a basement surface having several west-trending ridges and valleys. West-flowing streams draining an ancestral Sierra Nevada of moderate relief formed prograding fan deltas that filled the valleys with thick wedges of nonmarine channel deposits, creating a bajada along the shoreline. Detrital material moved rapidly from the shoreline through a narrow shelf, into a complex of submarine fans in the subduction trough. During the early Eocene, a low sea level stand plus an end of Sierra Nevada uplift resulted in the erosion of the range to a peneplain. Stream-fed fan deltas were replaced by a major river system, which flowed west on about the present course of the Kern River. Following a rapid sea level increase, sand from the river system was deposited on the now broad shelf along a wide belt roughly coincident with California Highway 99. The river was also the point source for sand in a submarine fan northwest of Bakersfield. Both Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene depositional systems probably continue north along the east edge of the Great Valley. This proposed scenario for the east side of the San Joaquin is analogous to forearc deposits in the San Diego area, including the Cretaceous Rosario fan-delta and submarine fan system and the Eocene La Jolla and Poway nearshore, shelf, and submarine fan systems.

  8. Characterization of VOC Emissions from Various Components of Dairy Farming and their effect on San Joaquin Valley Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M. M.; Meinardi, S.; Krauter, C.; Blake, D.

    2008-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley Air Basin in Central California is classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a serious non-attainment area for health-based eight-hour federal ozone (smog) standard (1). In August 2005, the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District issued a report identifying dairies as a main source of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter in the valley (2). Among these compounds, we have found that ethanol, methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde are produced in major quantities throughout the San Joaquin valley as by-products of yeast fermentation of silage and photochemical oxidation. These oxygenates, especially ethanol, play an important role in ozone (O3) formation within the valley. Three different types of sampling protocols were employed in order to determine the degree of enhancement of the four oxygenates in the valley air shed, as well as to determine their sources, emission profiles and emission rates. An assessment of the emissions of these oxygenates in the valley was achieved using data obtained on low altitude flights through the valley and from ground level samples collected thoughout the valley. The photochemical production of ozone was calculated for each of the four oxygenates and approximately one hundred other quantified VOCs. Based on the Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) scale and concentrations of each oxygenate in the atmosphere, as much as 20% of O3 production in the valley is from ethanol and its photochemical by-product acetaldehyde. Our findings suggest that improvement to the valley air quality may be obtained by focusing on instituting new silage containment practices and regulations. 1. Lindberg, J. "Analysis of the San Joaquin Valley 2007 Ozone Plan." State of California Air Resources Board. Final Draft Staff Report. 5/30/2007. 2. Crow, D., executive director/APCO. "Air Pollution Control Officer's Determination of VOC Emisison Factors for Dairies." San Joaquin Valley Air

  9. Transport of sediment-bound organochlorine pesticides to the San Joaquin River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    Suspended sediment samples were collected in westside tributaries and the main stem of the San Joaquin River, California, in June 1994 during the irrigation season and in January 1995 during a winter storm. These samples were analyzed for 15 organochlorine pesticides to determine their occurrence and their concentrations on suspended sediment and to compare transport during the irrigation season (April to September) to transport during winter storm runoff (October to March). Ten organochlorine pesticides were detected during the winter storm runoff; seven during the irrigation season. The most frequently detected organochlorine pesticides during both sampling periods were p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD, dieldrin, toxaphene, and chlordane. Dissolved samples were analyzed for three organochlorine pesticides during the irrigation season and for 15 during the winter storm. Most calculated total concentrations of p,p'-DDT, chlordane, dieldrin, and toxaphene exceeded chronic criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. At eight sites in common between sampling periods, suspended sediment concentrations and streamflow were greater during the winter storm runoff median concentration of 3,590 mg/L versus 489 mg/and median streamflow of 162 ft3/s versus 11 ft3/s. Median concentrations of total DDT (sum of p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDT), chlordane, dieldrin, and toxaphene on suspended sediment were slightly greater during the irrigation season, but instantaneous loads of organochlorine pesticides at the time of sampling were substantially greater during the winter storm. Estimated loads for the entire irrigation season exceeded estimated loads for the January 1995 storm by about 2 to 4 times for suspended transport and about 3 to 11 times for total transport. However, because the mean annual winter runoff is about 2 to 4 times greater than the runoff during the January 1995 storm, mean winter transport may be similar to irrigation season transport. This conclusion

  10. Social Disparities in Drinking Water Quality in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, I.; Balazs, C.; Hubbard, A.; Morello-Frosch, R.

    2011-12-01

    Social Disparities in Drinking Water Quality in California's San Joaquin Valley Carolina Balazs, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Alan Hubbard and Isha Ray Little attention has been given to research on social disparities and environmental justice in access to safe drinking water in the USA. We examine the relationship between nitrate and arsenic concentrations in community water systems (CWS) and the ethnic and socioeconomic characteristics of their customers. We hypothesized that systems in the San Joaquin Valley that serve a higher proportion of minority (especially Latino) residents, and/or lower socioeconomic status (proxied by rates of home ownership) residents, have higher nitrate levels and higher arsenic levels. We used water quality monitoring datasets (1999-2001) to estimate nitrate as well as arsenic levels in CWS, and source location and Census block group data to estimate customer demographics. We found that percent Latino was associated with a .04 mg NO3/L increase in a CWS' estimated nitrate ion concentration (95% CI, -.08, .16) and rate of home ownership was associated with a .16 mg NO3/L decrease (95% CI, -.32, .002). We also found that each percent increase in home ownership rate was associated with a .30 ug As/L decrease in arsenic concentrations (p<.05), but our data showed no significant correlation between arsenic concentration and percent Latino. These results show that exposure disparities and compliance burdens in accordance with EPA standards fell most heavily on socio-economically disadvantaged communities. Selected References Cory DC, Rahman T. 2009. Environmental justice and enforcement of the safe drinking water act: The arizona arsenic experience. Ecological Economics 68: 1825-1837. Krieger N, Williams DR, Moss NE. 1997. Measuring social class in us public health research: Concepts, methodologies, and guidelines. Annual Review of Public Health 18(341-378). Moore E, Matalon E, Balazs C, Clary J, Firestone L, De Anda S, Guzman, M. 2011. The

  11. A multi-isotope investigation of sources and cycling of nitrate and organic matter in the San Joaquin River, Delta, and northern San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Silva, S. R.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Stringfellow, W. T.

    2008-12-01

    The San Joaquin River is a eutrophic, heavily impacted river which drains extensive agricultural areas and receives waste water discharge from rapidly growing urban areas. The Delta-San Francisco Bay region is hydrodynamically complex, drains a watershed covering approximately 40% of the area of California, and is considered to be one of the most anthropogenically altered estuaries in the world. As part of a 3-year project aimed at identifying temporal and spatial changes in sources of nutrients and organics in the San Joaquin River, the Delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, and northern San Francisco Bay, samples were collected from several dozen sites at intervals ranging from twice-weekly to quarterly. These samples were analyzed for a large suite of parameters including d15N and d18O of nitrate; d13C, d15N, and C:N of particulate organic matter; d18O and d2H of water; and d13C of dissolved organic carbon. Subsets were also analyzed for sulfate, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved oxygen, and phosphate isotopes. We find that the temporal and spatial variation in isotopic compositions provides unique insights into sources of nutrients, organics, water, and other salts that could not have been gained with standard chemical and hydrological measurements. This presentation will focus on examples of the usefulness of the isotope data for answering questions related to 2 major environmental issues in this ecosystem: low dissolved oxygen levels in the Deep Water Shipping Channel section of the lower San Joaquin River that are inhibiting salmon migration, and pelagic organism decline in the Delta and northern San Francisco Bay.

  12. Impacts of changing irrigation practices on waterfowl habitat use in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnum, D.A.; Euliss, N. H ., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    We used diurnal aerial census data to examine habitat use patterns of ducks wintering in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California from 1980-87. We calculated densities (birds/ha) for the northern pintail (Anas acuta), mallard (A. platyrhynchos), green-winged teal (A. crecca), cinnamon teal (A. cyanoptera), shoveler (A. clypeata), ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), and total ducks in each of 5 habitats. Densities of pintail and total ducks were greater in September than in other months. From October through January, density of teal and total ducks was greatest on Kern National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Densities of ruddy duck and pintail were greatest on agricultural drainwater evaporation ponds and preirrigated cropland, respectively.

  13. Optimal pumping strategies for managing shallow, poorquality groundwater, western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.; Wagner, B.; Belitz, K.

    1995-01-01

    Continued agricultural productivity in the western San Joaquin Valley, California, is threatened by the presence of shallow, poor-quality groundwater that can cause soil salinization. We evaluate the management alternative of using groundwater pumping to control the altitude of the water table and provide irrigation water requirements. A transient, three-dimensional, groundwater flow model was linked with nonlinear optimization to simulate management alternatives for the groundwater flow system. Optimal pumping strategies have been determined that substantially reduce the area subject to a shallow water table and bare-soil evaporation (that is, areas with a water table within 2.1 m of land surface) and the rate of drainflow to on-farm drainage systems. Optimal pumping strategies are constrained by the existing distribution of wells between the semiconfined and confined zones of the aquifer, by the distribution of sediment types (and associated hydraulic conductivities) in the western valley, and by the historical distribution of pumping throughout the western valley.

  14. Geohydrologic aspects of water-quality problems of the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deverel, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Salinity and selenium concentrations in shallow ground water of the western San Joaquin Valley, California, are related to the geomorphology and hydrology of the alluvial fans. High salinity and selenium concentrations are associated with ephemeral-stream deposits. Low salinity and selenium concentrations are associated with intermittent-stream deposits, which represent the major alluvial fans of the area. The highest salinity and selenium concentrations at the margins of the alluvial fans are the result of evaporation and evapotranspiration of shallow ground water, as indicated by oxygen- and hydrogen-isotopic data. The extent and direction of movement of saline ground water to drain laterals in agricultural fields are influenced by the time since installation of the drainage system, drain lateral spacing, and the regional ground-water-flow system.

  15. Biogeochemical cycling of selenium in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presser, Theresa S.; Ohlendorf, Harry M.

    1987-11-01

    Subsurface agricultural drainage waters from western San Joaquin Valley, California, were found to contain elevated concentrations of the element selenium in the form of selenate. In 1978, these drainage waters began to replace previous input to Kesterson Reservoir, a pond system within Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge; this substitution was completed by 1982. In the 1983 nesting season, unusual rates of deformity and death in embryos and hatchlings of wild aquatic birds (up to 64% of eared grebe and American coot nests) occurred at the refuge and were attributed to selenium toxicosis. Features necessary for contamination to have taken place included geologic setting, climate, soil type, availability of imported irrigation water, type of irrigation, and the unique chemical properties of selenium. The mechanisms of biogeochemical cycling raise questions about other ecosystems and human exposure.

  16. Mortality and dispersal of San Joaquin kit fox. [Vulpes macrotis matica

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, T.; O'Farrell, T.P.; McCue, P.; Evans, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    Populations of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, are known to occur on the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in the Elk Hills, California. In order to ascertain whether the maximization of oil production and associated human activity jeopardized the continued existence of the kit fox, a study of the sources of mortality and patterns of dispersal of the kit fox was conducted. Sources of mortality in disturbed and undisturbed habitat were not significantly different. Predation was the most common cause of death, while vehicle-related deaths amounted to 14% of known mortalities. Levels of disturbance did not appear to influence dispersal patterns of juvenile kit fox. (ACR)

  17. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the northern San Joaquin Basin, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 2,079 square mile Northern San Joaquin Basin (Northern San Joaquin) study unit was investigated from December 2004 through February 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 that was passed by the State of California and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Northern San Joaquin study unit was the third study unit to be designed and sampled as part of the Priority Basin Project. Results of the study provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw (untreated) groundwater, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 61 wells in parts of Alameda, Amador, Calaveras, Contra Costa, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus Counties; 51 of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based approach to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 10 of the wells were sampled to increase spatial density and provide additional information for the evaluation of water chemistry in the study unit (understanding/flowpath wells). The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) assessed in this study are defined by the depth intervals of the wells in the California Department of Public Health database for each study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource; and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors

  18. Groundwater quality in the Madera and Chowchilla subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s untreated groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Madera and Chowchilla subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley constitute one of the study units being evaluated. The Madera-Chowchilla study unit is about 860 square miles and consists of the Madera and Chowchilla groundwater subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley Basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Shelton and others, 2009). The study unit has hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 11 to 15 inches, most of which occurs between November and February. The main surface-water features in the study unit are the San Joaquin, Fresno, and Chowchilla Rivers, and the Madera and Chowchilla canals. Land use in the study unit is about 69 percent (%) agricultural, 28% natural (mainly grasslands), and 3% urban. The primary crops are orchards and vineyards. The largest urban area is the city of Madera. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifer corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. In the Madera-Chowchilla study unit, these wells typically are drilled to depths between 200 and 800 feet, consist of a solid casing from land surface to a depth of about 140 to 400 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing. Water quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer system. The primary aquifer system in the study unit consists of Quaternary-age alluvial-fan and fluvial deposits that were formed by the rivers draining the Sierra Nevada. Sediments consist of gravels, sands

  19. Biogeochemical cycling of selenium in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Subsurface agricultural drainage waters from western San Joaquin Valley, California, were found to contain elevated concentrations of the element selenium in the form of selenate. In 1978, these drainage waters began to replace previous input to Kesterson Reservoir, a pond system within Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge; this substitution was completed by 1982. In the 1983 nesting season, unusual rates of deformity and death in embryos and hatchlings of wild aquatic birds (up to 64% of eared grebe and American coot nests) occurred at the refuge and were attributed to selenium toxicosis. Features necessary for contamination to have taken place included geologic setting, climate, soil type, availability of imported irrigation water, type of irrigation, and the unique chemical properties of selenium. The mechanisms of biogeochemical cycling raise questions about other ecosystems and human exposure.

  20. Calibration of a Heterogeneous Flow Simulation of the Western San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Harter, T.

    2004-12-01

    A stochastic alluvial aquifer model was developed for the Westside of the San Joaquin Valley. Based on extensive analysis of well-logs, we determined sub-regional transition probability models of the major alluvial facies. The spatially varying geostatistical models were integrated into a non-stationary stochastic model of the aquifer structure using conditional sequential simulation. The hydraulic conductivities of the major facies are calibrated against a deterministic model representation of the regional fluxes across the land surface, of subflow across the eastern aquifer boundary, and of leakage across the bottom aquifer boundary. Weights for the individual calibration targets are assigned based on an approximation of the measurement errors underlying the calibration of the deterministic model, as well as potential modeling errors in the deterministic model. Our work addresses the overall issue of calibrating regional stochastic models to existing measurement data at relatively small scales as well as to derived data about the regional hydrologic water balance.

  1. Geomorphic Expression of a Miocene Dike Complex, San Joaquin Hills, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, R. J.; Ta, L.; Williams, D.; Werner, A.; Bernardino, M.; Peterson, R.; McCormick, C.; Escobedo, D.; Nagy, B.

    2009-12-01

    Miocene transtension during development of the North American-Pacific plate boundary in southern California coincided with extensive magmatism and emplacement of a 15-16 Ma basaltic to andesitic dike and sill complex in the San Joaquin Hills, Orange County. Intrusions cut through and altered a thick Mesozoic to Cenozoic marine and nonmarine siliciclastic sedimentary succession. Hydrothermally altered sandstone within 20 meters of the contact are cemented with secondary microcrystalline quartz and illite, and locally with calcite. Cementation plus removal of iron oxides from redbeds rendered the altered sandstones more resistant to erosion than the highly weathered dikes or unaltered sedimentary strata. These Miocene dikes exert a profound influence on modern topography due to differential susceptibilities of the dikes and altered wall rock to chemical and physical weathering. At vegetated inland sites, where chemical weathering is important, plagioclase feldspar in dolerite intrusions alter to smectitic clays, and the dikes weather to recessive, brush-covered soils on valleys and slopes. In contrast, altered and hardened sedimentary wall rocks stand up in resistant relief. Many of the wall rocks form the high ridges of the uplifted and dissected San Joaquin Hills and control the geometry of drainages by forming resistant ledges that set local base level and by offsetting stream drainages. Differential erosion of the soft weathered mafic dikes and hard, resistant wall rocks produced a sharp contrast that forms most of the steepest slopes in the study area. Coastal exposures of andesitic dikes, where physical weathering dominates, display a contrary behavior. Igneous dikes are more resistant to wave erosion and form prominent headlands jutting out into the ocean, whereas sedimentary wall rocks are more easily eroded back to form flanking cliffs or sand-covered beaches.

  2. Mercury in sport fish from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jay A; Greenfield, Ben K; Ichikawa, Gary; Stephenson, Mark

    2008-02-25

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations were determined in fillet tissue of sport fish captured in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and surrounding tributaries, a region particularly impacted by historic gold and mercury mining activity. In 1999 and 2000, mercury concentrations were measured in 767 samples from ten fish species. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), the primary target species, exhibited a median Hg concentration of 0.53 mug g(-1) (N=406). Only 23 largemouth bass (6%) were below a 0.12 mug g(-1) threshold corresponding to a 4 meals per month safe consumption limit. Most of the largemouth bass (222 fish, or 55% of the sample) were above a 0.47 mug g(-1) threshold corresponding to a 1 meal per month consumption limit. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), white catfish (Ameirus catus), and Sacramento pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus grandis) also had relatively high concentrations, with 31% or more of samples above 0.47 mug g(-1). Concentrations were lowest in redear (Lepomis microlophus) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) sunfish, with most samples below 0.12 mug g(-1), suggesting that targeting these species for sport and subsistence fishing may reduce human dietary exposure to Hg in the region. An improved method of analysis of covariance was performed to evaluate spatial variation in Hg in largemouth bass captured in 2000, while accounting for variability in fish length. Using this approach, Hg concentrations were significantly elevated in the Feather River, northern Delta, lower Cosumnes River, and San Joaquin River regions. In spite of elevated Hg concentrations on all of its tributaries, the central Delta had concentrations that were low both in comparison to safe consumption guidelines and to other locations. PMID:18063015

  3. Understanding The Correlation of San Joaquin Air Quality Monitoring With Aerosol Optical Thickness Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, M.; Newcomer, M.; Rudy, J.; Lake, S.; Sambasivam, S.; Strawa, A. W.; Schmidt, C.; Skiles, J.

    2007-12-01

    Air quality in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) has failed to meet state and federal attainment standards for Particulate Matter (PM) for several years. Air quality agencies currently use ground monitoring sites to monitor air quality in the San Joaquin Valley. This method provides accurate information at specific points but does not provide a clear indication of what is occurring over large regions. Using measurements from satellite imagery has the potential to provide valuable air quality information in a timely manner across large regions. While previous studies show good correlations between satellite derived Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and surface PM measurements on the East Coast of the United States, the data do not correlate well in the SJV. This paper compares PM2.5 ground data from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Environments (IMPROVE) sites with satellite data in an effort to understand this discrepancy. To verify satellite AOT value accuracy, ground AOT values were collected from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and from measurements using the hand-held MicroTops II Sun Photometer field instrument. We found good correlation of the AOT values between MODIS, MISR and AERONET. However, we found poor correlations between satellite- based AOT values and PM2.5 values, and consideration of aerosol speciation did not improve the correlations. Further investigation is needed to determine the causes of the poor correlation. Acquiring detailed information on the meteorological conditions and vertical profiles of the atmosphere using ground-based LIDAR or data from CALIPSO may provide better results.

  4. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Conflict: Strategic Insights for California's Policymakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazezi, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta - a major water supply source in California and a unique habitat for many native and invasive species--is on the verge of collapse due to a prolonged conflict over how to manage the Delta. There is an urgent need to expedite the resolution of this conflict because the continuation of the status quo would leave irreversible environmental consequences for the entire state. In this paper a systematic technique is proposed for providing strategic insights into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta conflict. Game theory framework is chosen to systematically analyze behavioral characteristics of decision makers as well as their options in the conflict with respect to their preferences using a formal mathematical language. The Graph Model for Conflict Resolution (GMCR), a recent game-theoretic technique, is applied to model and analyze the Delta conflict in order to better understand the options, preferences, and behavioral characteristics of the major decision makers. GMCR II as a decision support system tool based on GMCR concept is used to facilitate the analysis of the problem through a range of non-cooperative game theoretic stability definitions. Furthermore, coalition analysis is conducted to analyze the potential for forming partial coalitions among decision makers, and to investigate how forming a coalition can influence the conflict resolution process. This contribution shows that involvement of the State of California is necessary for developing an environmental-friendly resolution for the Delta conflict. It also indicates that this resolution is only achievable through improving the fragile levee systems and constructing a new water export facility.

  5. Development of an ozone forecasting model for the San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckenius, T.E.

    1998-12-31

    In an effort to limit incidences of high ambient ozone concentrations, the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District in central California developed a Spare the Air program similar to programs currently in-use or under development at a number of other districts around the country. Under this type of voluntary program, a Spare the Air alert is declared whenever weather conditions conducive to the formation of ozone levels close to or above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone are expected to occur. The alerts urge the public to take steps that reduce ozone precursor emissions and shift emissions from morning/midday hours to the late afternoon or early evening. Implementation of these types of programs requires that accurate forecasts of meteorological conditions conducive to peak ozone events be made at least one day in advance to allow sufficient time for air quality district personnel to contact major employers and alert the news media. A statistical forecast model for same day and next day peak ozone concentrations in the San Joaquin Valley was developed for this purpose. A five year historical database of ozone concentrations and associated meteorological parameters from stations throughout central and southern California and western Nevada was assembled and analyzed. Several types of statistical forecast models were fitted to these data and evaluated. These included linear and log-linear regression models, logistic regression models, and a neural network model. Models were developed for both same-day and next-day peak ozone predictions. The selected statistical models were then implemented in a Microsoft Access database program which allows the user to enter the relevant meteorological parameters, compute and output the forecast ozone levels, and store all of the relevant data for future analysis.

  6. Water quality assessment of the San Joaquin--Tulare basins, California; analysis of available data on nutrients and suspended sediment in surface water, 1972-1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    1998-01-01

    Nutrients and suspended sediment in surface water of the San Joaquin-Tulare basins in California were assessed using 1972-1990 data from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's STOrage and RETrieval database. Loads of nutrients and suspended sediment were calculated at several sites and the contributions from point and nonpoint sources were estimated. Trends in nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations were evaluated at several sites, especially at the basin outlet on the San Joaquin River. Comparisons of nutrient and suspended sediment concentrations were made among three environmental settings: the San Joaquin Valley--west side, the San Joaquin Valley--east side, and the Sierra Nevada.

  7. Measured flow and tracer-dye data for spring 1996 and 1997 for the south Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    During the spring of years when the flow of the San Joaquin River is less than 7,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) a temporary rock barrier is installed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) at the head of Old River (HOR) in the south Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to prevent out migrating salmon in the San Joaquin River from entering Old River and being drawn to the State and federal pumping facilities (Figure 1). The export rate of the pumping facilities also is reduced during these migration periods to minimize the draw of fish to the export facilities through the other channels connected to the San Joaquin River north of the HOR such as Turner Cut, Columbia Cut, and Middle River.

  8. Agriculture, irrigation, and drainage on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, California: Unified perspective on hydrogeology, geochemistry and management

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Quinn, N.W.T.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a broad understanding of water-related issues of agriculture and drainage on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley. To this end, an attempt is made to review available literature on land and water resources of the San Joaquin Valley and to generate a process-oriented framework within which the various physical-, chemical-, biological- and economic components of the system and their interactions are placed in mutual perspective.

  9. Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-20

    This project deliverable describes a number ofstate-of-the-art, telemetered, flow and water quality monitoring stationsthat were designed, instrumented and installed in cooperation with localirrigation water districts to improve water quality simulation models ofthe lower San Joaquin River, California. This work supports amulti-disciplinary, multi-agency research endeavor to develop ascience-based Total Maximum Daily Load for dissolved oxygen in the SanJoaquin River and Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel.

  10. Effects of flow diversions on water and habitat quality: Examples from California's highly manipulated Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, Nancy E.; Cloern, James E.; Burau, Jon R.

    2007-01-01

    We use selected monitoring data to illustrate how localized water diversions from seasonal barriers, gate operations, and export pumps alter water quality across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California). Dynamics of water-quality variability are complex because the Delta is a mixing zone of water from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, agricultural return water, and the San Francisco Estuary. Each source has distinct water-quality characteristics, and the contribution of each source varies in response to natural hydrologic variability and water diversions. We use simulations with a tidal hydrodynamic model to reveal how three diversion events, as case studies, influence water quality through their alteration of Delta-wide water circulation patterns and flushing time. Reduction of export pumping decreases the proportion of Sacramento- to San Joaquin-derived fresh water in the central Delta, leading to rapid increases in salinity. Delta Cross Channel gate operations control salinity in the western Delta and alter the freshwater source distribution in the central Delta. Removal of the head of Old River barrier, in autumn, increases the flushing time of the Stockton Ship Channel from days to weeks, contributing to a depletion of dissolved oxygen. Each shift in water quality has implications either for habitat quality or municipal drinking water, illustrating the importance of a systems view to anticipate the suite of changes induced by flow manipulations, and to minimize the conflicts inherent in allocations of scarce resources to meet multiple objectives.

  11. Executive Summary -- assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California, 2003: Chapter 1 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, Donald L.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; French, Christopher D.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the oil and gas resource potential of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California (fig. 1.1). The assessment is based on the geologic elements of each Total Petroleum System defined in the province, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock type and maturation and hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined five total petroleum systems and ten assessment units within these systems. Undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively estimated for the ten assessment units (table 1.1). In addition, the potential was estimated for further growth of reserves in existing oil fields of the San Joaquin Basin.

  12. Age, distribution, and stratigraphic relationship of rock units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 5 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The San Joaquin Basin is a major petroleum province that forms the southern half of California’s Great Valley, a 700-km-long, asymmetrical basin that originated between a subduction zone to the west and the Sierra Nevada to the east. Sedimentary fill and tectonic structures of the San Joaquin Basin record the Mesozoic through Cenozoic geologic history of North America’s western margin. More than 25,000 feet (>7,500 meters) of sedimentary rocks overlie the basement surface and provide a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the past ~100 m.y. Further, depositional geometries and fault structures document the tectonic evolution of the region from forearc setting to strike-slip basin to transpressional margin. Sedimentary architecture in the San Joaquin Basin is complicated because of these tectonic regimes and because of lateral changes in depositional environment and temporal changes in relative sea level. Few formations are widespread across the basin. Consequently, a careful analysis of sedimentary facies is required to unravel the basin’s depositional history on a regional scale. At least three high-quality organic source rocks formed in the San Joaquin Basin during periods of sea level transgression and anoxia. Generated on the basin’s west side, hydrocarbons migrated into nearly every facies type in the basin, from shelf and submarine fan sands to diatomite and shale to nonmarine coarse-grained rocks to schist. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources and future additions to reserves in the San Joaquin Valley of California (USGS San Joaquin Basin Province Assessment Team, this volume, chapter 1). Several research aims supported this assessment: identifying and mapping the petroleum systems, modeling the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, and defining the volumes of rock to be analyzed for additional resources. To better understand the three dimensional

  13. Transport and dispersion during wintertime particulate matter episodes in the San Joaquin Valley, California.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Clinton P; McCarthy, Michael C; Dye, Timothy S; Wheeler, Neil J M; Hafner, Hilary R; Roberts, Paul T

    2006-07-01

    Data analysis and modeling were performed to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of wintertime transport and dispersion processes and the impact of these processes on particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the California San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Radar wind profiler (RWP) and radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) data collected from 18 sites throughout Central California were used to estimate hourly mixing heights for a 3-month period and to create case studies of high-resolution diagnostic wind fields, which were used for trajectory and dispersion analyses. Data analyses show that PM episodes were characterized by an upper-level ridge of high pressure that generally produced light winds through the entire depth of the atmospheric boundary layer and low mixing heights compared with nonepisode days. Peak daytime mixing heights during episodes were -400 m above ground level (agl) compared with -800 m agl during nonepisodes. These episode/nonepisode differences were observed throughout the SJV. Dispersion modeling indicates that the range of influence of primary PM emitted in major population centers within the SJV ranged from -15 to 50 km. Trajectory analyses revealed that little intrabasin pollutant transport occurred among major population centers in the SJV; however, interbasin transport from the northern SJV and Sacramento regions into the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) was often observed. In addition, this analysis demonstrates the usefulness of integrating RWP/RASS measurements into data analyses and modeling to improve the understanding of meteorological processes that impact pollution, such as aloft transport and boundary layer evolution. PMID:16878588

  14. Reevaluation of Stevens sand potential - Maricopa depocenter, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, M.M.; Parks, S.L. )

    1991-02-01

    During the upper Miocene in the Southern San Joaquin basin surrounding highlands contributed coarse material to a deep marine basin dominated by fine grained silicious bioclastic deposition. these coarse deposits became reservoirs isolated within the silicious Antelope Shale Member of the Monterey Formation. In the southern Maricopa depocenter these Stevens sands are productive at Yowlumne, Landslide, Aqueduct, Rio Viejo, San Emidio Nose, Paloma, and Midway-Sunset fields, and are major exploration targets in surrounding areas. In the ARCO Fee lands area of the southern Maricopa depocenter, Stevens sands occur as rapidly thickening lens-shaped bodies that formed as channel, levee, and lobe deposits of deep-marine fan systems. These fans were fed from a southerly source, with apparent transport in a north-northwesterly direction. Sands deflect gently around present-day structural highs indicating that growth of structures influenced depositional patterns. Correlations reveal two major fan depositional intervals bounded by regional N, O, and P chert markers. Each interval contains numerous individual fan deposits, with many lobes and channels recognizable on three-dimensional seismic data. In addition to these basinal sand plays presently being evaluated, ARCO is pursuing a relatively new trend on Fee lands along the southern basin margin, where correlation to mountain data reveals Stevens sands trend into the steeply dipping beds of the mountain front. This area, the upturned Stevens,' has large reserve potential and producing analogies at Metson, Leutholtz, Los Lobos, and Pleito Ranch fields.

  15. Factors influencing the biogeochemistry of sedimentary carbon and phosphorus in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, E.B.; Delaney, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    This study characterizes organic carbon (Corganic) and phosphorus (P) geochemistry in surface sediments of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Sediment cores were collected from five sites on a sample transect from the edge of the San Francisco Bay eastward to the freshwater Consumnes River. The top 8 cm of each core were analyzed (in 1-cm intervals) for Corganic, four P fractions, and redox-sensitive trace metals (uranium and manganese). Sedimentary Corganic concentrations and Corganic:P ratios decreased, while reactive P concentrations increased moving inland in the Delta. The fraction of total P represented by organic P increased inland, while that of authigenic P was higher bayward than inland reflecting increased diagenetic alteration of organic matter toward the bayward end of the transect. The redox indicator metals are consistent with decreasing sedimentary suboxia inland. The distribution of P fractions and C:P ratios reflect the presence of relatively labile organic matter in upstream surface sediments. Sediment C and P geochemistry is influenced by site-specific particulate organic matter sources, the sorptive power of the sedimentary material present, physical forcing, and early diagenetic transformations presumably driven by Corganic oxidation. ?? 2005 Estuarine Research Federation.

  16. Radar remote sensing for levee health assessment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Jones, C. E.; Dudas, J.; Bawden, G. W.; Deverel, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Levees and dikes form extensive flood protection infrastructure that often also serve critical water conveyance functions. We have studied the use of radar remote sensing for providing health assessment of levees, focusing on California's levee system. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which lies directly east of San Francisco Bay, is an area comprised of tidal marshland and reclaimed land in the form of ~60 islands surrounded by 1700 km of levees. Improved knowledge of subsidence across the region is needed to maintain the integrity of the Delta levee system, which protects the integrity and quality of the state's primary water supply. The western Delta is particularly critical because levee failure in this area would rapidly draw water of high salinity content into the channels conveying the fresh water supply. Here we report on a study that uses radar interferometry to measure the spatially and temporally varied levee movement and subsidence in the area, focusing particularly on Sherman Island, the westernmost island of the Delta. We use data from NASA's L-band (23.79 cm) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) collected at 6-week average interval from July 2009 through the current day. We show preliminary results for localized movement on and near the levees and for island-scale subsidence and discuss the techniques used for these measurements and how they could contribute to emergency response.

  17. Distribution of algae in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to nutrient supply, salinity and other environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Brown, L.R.; Mueller, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    1. The taxonomic composition and biomass of the phytoplankton and the taxonomic composition of the phytobenthos of the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries were examined in relation to water chemistry, habitat and flow regime. Agricultural drainage and subsurface flow contribute to a complex gradient of salinity and nutrients in this eutrophic, 'lowland type' river. 2. Because of light-limiting conditions for growth, maintenance demands of the algae exceed production during summer and autumn in the San Joaquin River where there is no inflow from tributaries. In contrast to substantial gains in concentration of inorganic nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus during the summer of normal-flow years, net losses of algal biomass (2-4 ??g L-1 day-1 chlorophyll a) occurred in a mid-river segment with no significant tributary inflow. However, downstream of a large tributary draining the Sierra Nevada, a substantial net gain in algal biomass (6-11 ??g L-1 day-1) occurred in the summer, but not in the spring (loss of 1-6 ??g L-1 day-1) or autumn (loss of 2-5 ??g L-1 day-1). 3. The phytoplankton was dominated in summer by 'r-selected' centric diatoms (Thalassiosirales), species both tolerant of variable salinity and widely distributed in the San Joaquin River. Pennate diatoms were proportionally more abundant (in biomass) in the winter, spring and autumn. Abundant taxa included the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Skeletonema cf. potamos, Cyclostephanos invisitatus, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nitzschia acicularis, N. palea and N. reversa, and the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas sp. and Scenesdesmus quadricauda. Patterns in the abundance of species indicated that assembly of the phytoplankton is limited more by light and flow regime than by nutrient supply. 4. The phytobenthos was dominated by larger, more slowly reproducing pennate diatoms. Few of the abundant species are euryhaline. The diatoms Navicula recens and Nitzschia inconspicua and cyanophytes, Oscillatoria spp

  18. Population Structure of Xylella fastidiosa Associated with Almond Leaf Scorch Disease in the San Joaquin Valley of California.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Islam, Md Sajedul; Cabrera-La Rosa, Juan C; Civerolo, Edwin L; Groves, Russell L

    2015-06-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in many commercial crops, including almond leaf scorch (ALS) disease in susceptible almond (Prunus dulcis). In this study, genetic diversity and population structure of X. fastidiosa associated with ALS disease were evaluated. Isolates obtained from two almond orchards in Fresno and Kern County in the San Joaquin Valley of California were analyzed for two successive years. Multilocus simple-sequence repeat (SSR) analysis revealed two major genetic clusters that were associated with two host cultivars, 'Sonora' and 'Nonpareil', respectively, regardless of the year of study or location of the orchard. These relationships suggest that host cultivar selection and adaptation are major driving forces shaping ALS X. fastidiosa population structure in the San Joaquin Valley. This finding will provide insight into understanding pathogen adaptation and host selection in the context of ALS disease dynamics. PMID:25807309

  19. Data for ground-water test holes in Fresno County, western San Joaquin Valley, California, June to August 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, Sherrill; Laudon, Julie

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four test holes were drilled from June 3 to August 29, 1985, in the western San Joaquin Valley, California, to provide information about groundwater hydraulics and geochemistry. The study area is in western Fresno County, west of the San Joaquin River, and east of the Coast Range. Lithologic, hydrologic, and geophysical data were collected from test holes drilled at two cluster sites and at 13 additional sites. Both cluster sites have five cased test holes. A sixth test hole was drilled at one of the cluster sites but was destroyed. Each of the 10 cased test holes is perforated at a different 10-ft depth interval. Six of the 13 additional test holes were also cased. Lithology logs were constructed from descriptions of cuttings and cores recovered during drilling. Geophysical logs were made of the deepest hole at each cluster site. Initial water level measurements were made at most sites. (Author 's abstract)

  20. 76 FR 69895 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; California; 2008 San Joaquin Valley PM2.5

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...EPA is approving in part and disapproving in part state implementation plan (SIP) revisions submitted by California to provide for attainment of the 1997 fine particulate matter (PM2.5) national ambient air quality standards in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). These SIP revisions are the SJV 2008 PM2.5 Plan (revised 2010 and 2011) and SJV-related provisions of the 2007 State......

  1. Sources and Transport of Nutrients, Organic Carbon, and Chlorophyll-a in the San Joaquin River Upstream of Vernalis, California, during Summer and Fall, 2000 and 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Zamora, Celia; Silva, Steven R.; Kendall, Carol; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Dahlgren, Randy A.

    2004-01-01

    Oxidizable materials from the San Joaquin River upstream of Vernalis can contribute to low dissolved oxygen episodes in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel that can inhibit salmon migration in the fall. The U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed samples at four San Joaquin River sites in July through October 2000 and June through November 2001, and at eight tributary sites in 2001. The data from these sites were supplemented with data from samples collected and analyzed by the University of California at Davis at three San Joaquin River sites and eight tributary sites as part of a separate study. Streamflows in the San Joaquin River were slightly above the long-term average in 2000 and slightly below average in 2001. Nitrate loads at Vernalis in 2000 were above the long-term average, whereas loads in 2001 were close to average. Total nitrogen loads in 2000 were slightly above average, whereas loads in 2001 were slightly below average. Total phosphorus loads in 2000 and 2001 were well below average. These nutrient loads correspond with the flow-adjusted concentration trends--nitrate concentrations significantly increased since 1972 (p 0.05). Loading rates of nutrients and dissolved organic carbon increased in the San Joaquin River in the fall with the release of wetland drainage into Mud Slough and with increased reservoir releases on the Merced River. During August 2000 and September 2001, the chlorophyll-a loading rates and concentrations in the San Joaquin River declined and remained low during the rest of the sampling period. The most significant tributary sources of nutrients were the Tuolumne River, Harding Drain, and Mud Slough. The most significant tributary sources of dissolved organic carbon were Salt Slough, Mud Slough, and the Tuolumne and Stanislaus Rivers. Compared with nutrients and dissolved organic carbon, the tributaries were minor sources of chlorophyll-a, suggesting that most of the chlorophyll-a was produced in the San Joaquin River

  2. Dissolved Organic Carbon Export from Sacramento and San Joaquin River Watersheds as Impacted by Precipitation and Agricultural Land Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, N.; Pallud, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the agricultural activities in California occur within the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins, where, as a consequence, water quality as well as quantity have been significantly affected over the last century. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and fluxes from the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins have received much attention because riverine DOC flux is an important part of the carbon cycle connecting terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems and because DOC concentration can influence public health as a precursor of carcinogenic disinfectant byproducts (DBPs) such as trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. Studies on the fate of DOC in watersheds and its relationship with land use are crucial to improve drinking water quality. Considering that water yield from a watershed is one of the main factors governing riverine DOC flux, it is essential to understand factors affecting riverine discharge from watersheds such as precipitation variability, wetland surface area, soil moisture content, and irrigation methods. We investigated the role of precipitation, crop species, and agricultural practices including flood irrigation on watershed water budget and DOC export from subwatersheds of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins using GIS analysis. The preliminary results indicate that agricultural practices effect on DOC fluxes may deserve further attention due to its impacts on watershed water budget, which will be critical for watershed management of DBP precursors.

  3. Evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California; Phase 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ireland, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    In response to the increasing demand on water supplies and declining water levels in eastern San Joaquin County, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Joaquin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, is evaluating the potential for artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, Calif. Phase 1 of this study evaluated the geologic and hydrological conditions in the area and selected 20 drill sites in three areas of high potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system. In phase 2, test holes were drilled. This report is on phase 2, and summarizes the data collected during the drilling and evaluates the suitability of the drilled areas for their potential for artificial recharge. Two areas seem to have a fair potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system using the basin-spreading method: (1) The flood plain area along the Mokelumne River north of Lockeford, and (2) an area northeast of Linden along the Calaveras River. (USGS)

  4. Concentrations and loads of suspended sediment-associated pesticides in the San Joaquin River, California and tributaries during storm events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, M.L.; Domagalski, J.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Current-use pesticides associated with suspended sediments were measured in the San Joaquin River, California and its tributaries during two storm events in 2008. Nineteen pesticides were detected: eight herbicides, nine insecticides, one fungicide and one insecticide synergist. Concentrations for the herbicides (0.1 to 3000 ng/g; median of 6.1 ng/g) were generally greater than those for the insecticides (0.2 to 51 ng/g; median of 1.5 ng/g). Concentrations in the tributaries were usually greater than in the mainstem San Joaquin River and the west side tributaries were higher than the east side tributaries. Estimated instantaneous loads ranged from 1.3 to 320 g/day for herbicides and 0.03 to 53 g/day for insecticides. The greatest instantaneous loads came from the Merced River on the east side. Instantaneous loads were greater for the first storm of 2008 than the second storm in the tributaries while the instantaneous loads within the San Joaquin River were greater during the second storm. Pesticide detections generally reflected pesticide application, but other factors such as physical-chemical properties and timing of application were also important to pesticide loads.

  5. Quaternary tephrochronology and deposition in the subsurface Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Katherine L.; Gatti, Emma; Wan, Elmira; Ponti, Daniel J.; Pagenkopp, Mark; Starratt, Scott W.; Olson, Holly A.; Tinsley, John C.

    2015-03-01

    We document characteristics of tephra, including facies and geochemistry, from 27 subsurface sites in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, to obtain stratigraphic constraints in a complex setting. Analyzed tephra deposits correlate with: 1) an unnamed tephra from the Carlotta Formation near Ferndale, California, herein informally named the ash of Wildcat Grade (<~1.450 to >~ 0.780 Ma), 2) the Rockland ash bed (~ 0.575 Ma), 3) the Loleta ash bed (~ 0.390 Ma), and 4) middle Pleistocene volcanic ash deposits at Tulelake, California, and Pringle Falls, Bend, and Summer Lake, Oregon, herein informally named the dacitic ash of Hood (<~0.211 to >~ 0.180 Ma). All four tephra are derived from Cascades volcanic sources. The Rockland ash bed erupted from the southern Cascades and occurs in up to > 7-m-thick deposits in cores from ~ 40 m subsurface in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Tephra facies and tephra age constraints suggest rapid tephra deposition within fluvial channel and overbank settings, likely related to flood events shortly following volcanic eruption. Such rapidly deposited tephra are important chronostratigraphic markers that suggest varying sediment accumulation rates in Quaternary deposits below the modern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. This study provides the first steps in a subsurface Quaternary stratigraphic framework necessary for future hazard assessment.

  6. 2000 yr record of Sacramento-San Joaquin river inflow to San Francisco Bay estuary, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, B.L.; Ingle, J.C.; Conrad, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotopic measurements of fossil bivalves (Macoma nasuta) contained in estuarine sediment are used to reconstruct a late Holocene record of salinity and stream flow in San Francisco Bay. Discharge into the bay is a particularly good indicator of paleoclimate in California because the bay`s influent streams drain 40% of the state. The isotopic record suggests that between about 1670 and 1900 calendar years (yr cal) B.P. inflow to the bay was substantially greater than the estimated prediversion inflow of 1100 M{sup 3}/s. An unconformity representing a 900 yr hiatus is present in the core between 1670 and 750 yr cal B.P., possibly caused by a major hydrological event. Over the past 750 yr, stream flow to San Francisco Bay has varied with a period of 200 yr; alternate wet and dry (drought) intervals typically have lasted 40 to 160 yr. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  7. A 2000 yr record of Sacramento San Joaquin River inflow to San Francisco Bay estuary, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, B.L.; Ingle, J.C.; Conrad, M.E.

    1995-10-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotopic measurements of fossil bivalves (Macoma nasuta) contained in estuarine sediment are used to reconstruct a late Holocene record of salinity and stream flow in San Francisco Bay. Discharge into the bay is a particularly good indicator of paleoclimate in California because the bay's influent streams drain 40 percent of the state, The isotopic record suggests that between about 1670 and 1900 calendar years (yr cal) B.P. inflow to the bay was substantially greater than the estimated prediversion inflow of 1100 m(3)/s, An unconformity representing a 900 yr hiatus is present in the core between 1670 and 750 yr cal B.P., possibly caused by a major hydrological event. Over the past 750 yr, stream flow to San Francisco Bay has varied with a period of 200 yr; alternate wet and dry (drought) intervals typically have lasted 40 to 160 yr.

  8. Technical Analysis of In-Valley Drainage Management Strategies for the Western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, Theresa S.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    The western San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farming areas in the United States, but salt-buildup in soils and shallow groundwater aquifers threatens this area?s productivity. Elevated selenium concentrations in soils and groundwater complicate drainage management and salt disposal. In this document, we evaluate constraints on drainage management and implications of various approaches to management considered in: *the San Luis Drainage Feature Re-Evaluation (SLDFRE) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (about 5,000 pages of documentation, including supporting technical reports and appendices); *recent conceptual plans put forward by the San Luis Unit (SLU) contractors (i.e., the SLU Plans) (about 6 pages of documentation); *approaches recommended by the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program (SJVDP) (1990a); and *other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) models and analysis relevant to the western San Joaquin Valley. The alternatives developed in the SLDFRE EIS and other recently proposed drainage plans (refer to appendix A for details) differ from the strategies proposed by the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program (1990a). The Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) in March 2007 signed a record of decision for an in-valley disposal option that would retire 194,000 acres of land, build 1,900 acres of evaporation ponds, and develop a treatment system to remove salt and selenium from drainwater. The recently proposed SLU Plans emphasize pumping drainage to the surface, storing approximately 33% in agricultural water re-use areas, treating selenium through biotechnology, enhancing the evaporation of water to concentrate salt, and identifying ultimate storage facilities for the remaining approximately 67% of waste selenium and salt. The treatment sequence of reuse, reverse osmosis, selenium bio-treatment, and enhanced solar evaporation is unprecedented and untested at the scale needed to meet plan requirements. All drainage management strategies that have been proposed

  9. Dissolved pesticide data for the San Joaquin River at Vernalis and the Sacramento River at Sacramento, California, 1991-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1995-01-01

    Water samples were collected from sites on the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, California and were analyzed for dissolved organic pesticides. This data collection and analysis are a part of an ongoing project by the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Contaminants Hydrology program to determine the fate and transport of organic pesticides that enter the San Francisco Bay Estuary. Concentrations of selected pesticides were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey organic chemistry laboratory in Sacramento.

  10. Winters-Domengine Total Petroleum System—Northern Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit of the San Joaquin Basin Province: Chapter 21 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The Northern Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit (AU) of the Winters-Domengine Total Petroleum System of the San Joaquin Basin Province consists of all nonassociated gas accumulations in Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene sandstones located north of township 15 South in the San Joaquin Valley. The northern San Joaquin Valley forms a northwest-southeast trending asymmetrical trough. It is filled with an alternating sequence of Cretaceous-aged sands and shales deposited on Franciscan Complex, ophiolitic, and Sierran basement. Eocene-aged strata unconformably overlie the thick Cretaceous section, and in turn are overlain unconformably by nonmarine Pliocene-Miocene sediments. Nonassociated gas accumulations have been discovered in the sands of the Panoche, Moreno, Kreyenhagen, andDomengine Formations and in the nonmarine Zilch formation of Loken (1959) (hereafter referred to as Zilch formation). Most hydrocarbon accumulations occur in low-relief, northwest-southeast trending anticlines formed chiefly by differential compaction of sediment and by northeast southwest directed compression during the Paleogene (Bartow, 1991) and in stratigraphic traps formed by pinch out of submarine fan sands against slope shales. To date, 176 billion cubic feet (BCF) of nonassociated recoverable gas has been found in fields within the assessment unit (table 21.1). A small amount of biogenic gas forms near the surface of the AU. Map boundaries of the assessment unit are shown in figures 21.1 and 21.2; in plan view, this assessment unit is identical to the Northern Area Nonassociated Gas play 1007 considered by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in its 1995 National Assessment (Beyer, 1996). The AU is bounded on the east by the mapped limits of Cretaceous sandstone reservoir rocks and on the west by the east flank of the Diablo Range. The southern limit of the AU is the southernmost occurrence of nonassociated thermogenic-gas accumulations. The northern limit of the AU corresponds to the

  11. Petroleum systems of the San Joaquin Basin Province -- geochemical characteristics of gas types: Chapter 10 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, Paul G.; Warden, Augusta; Claypool, George E.; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The San Joaquin Basin Province is a petroliferous basin filled with predominantly Late Cretaceous to Pliocene-aged sediments, with organic-rich marine rocks of Late Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene age providing the source of most of the oil and gas. Previous geochemical studies have focused on the origin of the oil in the province, but the origin of the natural gas has received little attention. To identify and characterize natural gas types in the San Joaquin Basin, 66 gas samples were analyzed and combined with analyses of 15 gas samples from previous studies. For the purpose of this resource assessment, each gas type was assigned to the most likely petroleum system. Three general gas types are identified on the basis of bulk and stable carbon isotopic composition—thermogenic dry (TD), thermogenic wet (TW) and biogenic (B). The thermogenic gas types are further subdivided on the basis of the δ13C values of methane and ethane and nitrogen content into TD-1, TD-2, TD-Mixed, TW-1, TW-2, and TW-Mixed. Gas types TD-1 and TD-Mixed, a mixture of biogenic and TD-1 gases, are produced from gas fields in the northern San Joaquin Basin. Type TD-1 gas most likely originated from the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene Moreno Formation, a gas-prone source rock. The biogenic component of the TD-Mixed gas existed in the trap prior to the influx of thermogenic gas. For the assessment, these gas types were assigned to the Winters- Domengine Total Petroleum System, but subsequent to the assessment were reclassified as part of the Moreno-Nortonville gas system. Dry thermogenic gas produced from oil fields in the southern San Joaquin Basin (TD-2 gas) most likely originated from the oil-prone source rock of Miocene age. These samples have low wetness values due to migration fractionation or biodegradation. The thermogenic wet gas types (TW-1, TW-2, TW-Mixed) are predominantly associated gas produced from oil fields in the southern and central San Joaquin Basin. Type TW-1 gas most likely

  12. Modeling Investigation of Spring Chinook Salmon Habitat in San Joaquin River Restoration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Ramires, J.

    2013-12-01

    As the second longest river in California, the San Joaquin River (SJR) is a vital natural resource to numerous residents and industries and provides an array of activities within Central Valley, home to some of California's most productive agricultural areas. Originating in the high Sierra Nevada, mainly from snowmelt and runoff, and passing through the middle sections including Fresno and Madera counties, eventually the SJR conjoins with the Sacramento River, constructing the largest river delta on the west coast of North America. Along with human necessities, the river used to be crucial for the propagation and survivability of Chinook salmon and other aquatic and wildlife. However, the SJR has experienced hydraulic disconnection throughout certain reaches due to extensive water diversion. Indigenous salmon populations have been degraded over the years due to insufficient flows and anthropogenic activities. In 2006, to maintain salmon and other fish populations to a point of self-sustainment, the San Joaquin River Restoration Project (SJRRP) was established to restore flows along the SJR from Friant Dam to the confluence of the Merced River by routing the original SJR in different pathways. One of the major tasks of the SJRRP, so called 'Reach 4B Project', was to modify and improve channel capacity of reach 4B, east side bypass and Mariposa bypass of the SJR. Multiple scenarios for the alteration and modification of the SJR water pathway were designed to ensure fish passage by retrofitting existing channels and to provide adequate flow throughout the study area. The goal of the SJRRP project 4B was to provide an efficient passage for adult Chinook salmon to spawning beds further upstream and a safe route for yearling to the delta. The objective of this research project is to characterize the stream properties (current velocities, depth, etc.) of each proposed alternative in Project 4B2 under the same upstream conditions using a modeling method. A depth

  13. Aerosol Composition and Variability in the San Joaquin Valley Measured during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Ziemba, L. D.; Pusede, S. E.; Nowak, J. B.; Burton, S. P.; Chen, G.; Cohen, R. C.; Duffey, K.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    The composition of aerosol in the San Joaquin Valley (central California) is unique in comparison to most of the United States; dominated by ammonia nitrate as a result of high gas-phase precursor emissions. Remote sensing aerosol measurements in this region are hindered during the winter by the existence of a very shallow boundary layer (measured at less than 500 ft in many cases) and frequent fog events. The DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality) project was designed to provide a unique dataset for determining variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties and meteorological conditions. Extensive in-situ profiling of the lower atmosphere in the San Joaquin Valley was performed during ten flights in January and February 2013. Nearly identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the campaign provide meaningful statistics for analysis. Simultaneous sampling of aerosol properties was also performed at ground sites throughout the valley and from the NASA airborne high spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL-2). Measured aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium nitrate (campaign average of 62%) and water-soluble organics (32%). During most of the DISCOVER-AQ flights, the aerosol was primarily constrained to the very shallow boundary layer with a few cases of lofted layers towards the end of the campaign. The first five flights (over a seven day period) were performed during a period of increasing aerosol loading (aerosol optical depths of 0.04 to 0.08) due to an absence of wet scavenging. A concurrent increase in aerosol size during the week suggests an increase in aerosol age. After a period of heavy rainfall, a second set of five flights was flown over eight days. Aerosol loading was again low at the beginning (aerosol optical depths of 0.033) and increased during this period. Differences were measured between the two periods

  14. Generation of hydrogen peroxide from San Joaquin Valley particles in a cell-free solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Barakat, A. I.; Anastasio, C.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects. One proposed mechanism of PM-mediated health effects is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - e.g., superoxide (•O2-), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical (•OH) - followed by oxidative stress. There are very few quantitative, specific measures of individual ROS generated from PM, but this information would help to more quantitatively address the link between ROS and the health effects of PM. To address this gap, we quantified the generation of HOOH by PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California during summer and winter from 2006 to 2009. HOOH was quantified by HPLC after extracting the PM in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). Our results show that the urban PM generally generates much more HOOH than the rural PM but that there is no apparent seasonal difference in HOOH generation. In nearly all of the samples the addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Asc greatly enhances HOOH formation, but a few of the coarse PM samples were able to generate a considerable amount of HOOH in the absence of added Asc, indicating the presence of unknown reductants. Normalized by air volume, the fine PM (PM2.5) generally makes more HOOH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm), primarily because the mass concentration of PM2.5 is much higher than that of PMcf. However, normalized by PM mass, the coarse PM typically generates more HOOH than the fine PM. The amount of HOOH produced by SJV PM is reduced on average by (78 ± 15)% when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF) is added to the extraction solution, indicating that transition metals play a dominant role in HOOH generation. By measuring calibration curves of HOOH generation from copper, and quantifying copper

  15. Formation of hydroxyl radical from San Joaquin Valley particles extracted in a cell-free solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Anastasio, C.

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the adverse health effects from ambient particulate matter (PM) are linked to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by PM. While hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most reactive of the ROS species, there are few quantitative studies of •OH generation from PM. Here we report on •OH formation from PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California. We quantified •OH in PM extracts using a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). The results show that generally the urban Fresno PM generates much more •OH than the rural Westside PM. The presence of Asc at a physiologically relevant concentration in the extraction solution greatly enhances •OH formation from all the samples. Fine PM (PM2.5) generally makes more •OH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm) normalized by air volume collected, while the coarse PM typically generates more •OH normalized by PM mass. •OH production by SJV PM is reduced on average by (97 ± 6) % when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF) is added to the extraction solution, indicating a dominant role of transition metals. By measuring calibration curves of •OH generation from copper and iron, and quantifying copper and iron concentrations in our particle extracts, we find that PBS-soluble copper is primarily responsible for •OH production by the SJV PM, while iron often makes a significant contribution. Extrapolating our results to expected burdens of PM-derived •OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily PM exposures in the San Joaquin Valley are unlikely to result in a high amount of pulmonary •OH, although high PM events could produce much higher levels of •OH, which might lead to cytotoxicity.

  16. Generation of hydrogen peroxide from San Joaquin Valley particles in a cell-free solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Barakat, A. I.; Anastasio, C.

    2010-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects. One proposed mechanism of PM-mediated health effects is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - e.g., superoxide (•O2-), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical (•OH) - followed by oxidative stress. There are very few quantitative, specific measures of individual ROS generated from PM, but this information would help to more quantitatively address the link between ROS and the health effects of PM. To address this gap, we quantified the generation of HOOH by PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California during summer and winter from 2006 to 2009. HOOH was quantified by HPLC after extracting the PM in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). Our results show that the urban PM generally generates much more HOOH than the rural PM but that there is no apparent seasonal difference in HOOH generation. In nearly all of the samples the addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Asc greatly enhances HOOH formation, but a few of the coarse PM samples were able to generate a considerable amount of HOOH in the absence of added Asc, indicating the presence of unknown reductants. Normalized by air volume, the fine PM (PM2.5) generally makes more HOOH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm), primarily because the mass concentration of PM2.5 is much higher than that of PMcf. However, normalized by PM mass, the coarse PM typically generates more HOOH than the fine PM. The amount of HOOH produced by SJV PM is reduced on average by (78±15)% when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF) is added to the extraction solution, indicating that transition metals play a dominant role in HOOH generation. By measuring calibration curves of HOOH generation from copper, and quantifying copper

  17. Provenance and stratigraphy of the Eocene Tejon Formation, Western Tehachapi Mountains, San Emigdio Mountains, and Southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critelli, S.; Nilsen, T. H.

    2000-10-01

    The Eocene Tejon Formation of the western Tehachapi and San Emigdio Mountains of California provides a unique east-west-trending outcrop belt of otherwise deeply buried strata that underlie the San Joaquin basin to the north. Its stratigraphy and framework mineralogy have been used to define offsets along the San Andreas fault, a major Neogene plate-boundary transform fault that has translated coastal California northward more than 300 km by right slip. The Tejon Formation was deposited directly on crystalline basement rocks as a result of an eastward transgression of at least 45 km from the early to the late middle Eocene, followed by a major regression in the late middle Eocene. The basal Uvas Conglomerate Member consists entirely of coarse-grained transgressive-system-tract (TST) deposits characterized by abundant current-formed sedimentary structures. It is overlain by offshore marine shales of the Liveoak Shale Member, which consist of lower TST deposits overlain by highstand-system-tract (HST) deposits. The overlying regressive Metralla Sandstone Member consists mostly of highly bioturbated fine-grained shallow-marine HST sandstones with local thin-bedded turbidites present in some western exposures. The quartzofeldspathic sandstones (grand mean Qm51±12F42±12Lt7±4) of the Tejon Formation suggest a provenance consisting of plutonic, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks such as those present in the basement of the San Emigdio and Techachapi Mountains, northwestern Mojave Desert, and southern Sierra Nevada. Petrologic parameters, however, suggest variable contributions from these source areas through time. Three distinctive petrofacies coincide with the three principal lithostratigraphic subdivisions. The shallow-marine TST sandstones from the Uvas Conglomerate Member are more quartzose than those of the HST Metralla Sandstone Member, possibly because higher-energy deposition preferentially preserved quartz. Thin-bedded turbidites in the western exposures of the

  18. Organic Carbon Trends, Loads, and Yields to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, Water Years 1980 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saleh, Dina K.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Knifong, Donna L.

    2003-01-01

    Organic carbon, nutrient, and suspended sediment concentration data were analyzed for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins for the period 1980-2000. The data were retrieved from three sources: the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Storage and Retrieval System, and the California Interagency Ecological Program's relational database. Twenty sites were selected, all of which had complete records of daily streamflow data. These data met the minimal requirements of the statistical programs used to estimate trends, loads, and yields. The seasonal Kendall program was used to estimate trends in organic carbon, nutrient, and suspended sediment. At all 20 sites, analyses showed that in the 145 analyses for the seven constituents, 95 percent of the analyses had no significant trend. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were significant only for four sites: the American River at Sacramento, the Sacramento River sites near Freeport, Orestimba Creek at River Roads near Crows Landing, and the San Joaquin River near Vernalis. Loads were calculated using two programs, ESTIMATOR and LOADEST2. The 1998 water year was selected to describe loads in the Sacramento River Basin. Organic carbon, nutrient, and suspended sediment loads at the Sacramento River sites near Freeport included transported loads from two main upstream sites: the Sacramento River at Verona and the American River at Sacramento. Loads in the Sacramento River Basin were affected by the amount of water diverted to the Yolo Bypass (the amount varies annually, depending on the precipitation and streamflow). Loads at the Sacramento River sites near Freeport were analyzed for two hydrologic seasons: the irrigation season (April to September) and the nonirrigation season (October to March). DOC loads are lower during the irrigation season then they are during the nonirrigation season. During the irrigation season, water with low

  19. 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study: Fog measurements in the Northern San Joaquin Valley - preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, J. Jr.; Bator, A.; Sherman, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical gradients in fog chemistry and physics were measured from a 430 m television broadcast tower in the northern San Joaquin Valley near Walnut Grove, California. Fog was collected on the ground and at two elevations on the tower using Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collectors Version 2 (CASCC2). Work was conducted as part of the 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study (IMS95). Results will be used to evaluate the need to make measurements aloft in future regional studies of fog processing of atmospheric particles and for testing whether vertically resolved fog models provide realistic simulations of fog physics and chemistry above the ground. Two fog/low cloud events were sampled during the tower study. Preliminary results show concentrations of major species in the fogwater typically decreasing with altitude, while liquid water contents increase. Fogwater loadings of major species, the total amount of a species in the aqueous phase per unit air volume, were observed to increase with altitude. Major species concentrations were typically quite stable at a given elevation, while significant decreases were observed over time in liquid water content. Fogwater concentrations of soluble hydroperoxides were highest near the surface and increased with time after sunrise and were observed to coexist in the high pH fog with S(IV). Time lapse video footage of the top of the fog/cloud layer revealed a very dynamic interface, suggesting entrainment of material from the clear air into the fog/cloud may be significant. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  20. 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study: Fog measurements in the Southern San Joaquin Valley - preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, J. Jr.; Bator, A.; Sherman, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Fogs were sampled at three ground-based stations in the southern portion of California`s San Joaquin Valley as part of the winter component of the 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study (IMS95). The three sampling sites included two urban locations (Bakersfield and Fresno) and one rural location (near the Kern Wildlife Refuge). Both bulk and drop size-fractionated samples were collected at each site. Several fog events were sampled, with three periods of extensive fog coverage that included all three sampling sites. Results of preliminary data analysis are presented. Fog collected at the sites was generally quite basic. Most bulk fog samples had pH values above 6 reflecting strong inputs from ammonia. Occasional strong sulfur plumes at Bakersfield, however, tended to lower the fog pH. Aside from these periods, nitrate was generally present at much higher concentrations in the fog than sulfate. Decreases in fogwater loadings of major species over the course of one extended fog episode at Fresno suggest significant deposition was occurring to the surface, consistent with observations of substantial droplet fluxes to exposed surfaces during that period. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Provenance and diagenesis of Oligocene sandstones, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.J.

    1988-03-01

    Oligocene Vedder sandstones and correlatives from the southern San Joaquin basin provide an opportunity to compare diagenesis resulting from variable provenance, depositional environment, and burial or tectonic history. Sandstones were examined from 15 cores in this basin-wide petrographic survey. Oligocene sandstones typically are fine to medium grained, moderately sorted, subangular, and quartzofeldspathic, although sandstones from the western and east-central basin are enriched in potassium feldspar and intermediate volcanic rock fragments, respectively. Detrital compositions are transitional between uplifted continental block and undissected to dissected magmatic arc on provenance diagrams. Sediment provenance included the granodioritic Sierra Nevada-Tehachapi Mountain magmatic arc complex and perhaps granitic terranes to the west. Volcanic detritus was shed from southern and eastern sources. Diagenesis varies within the basin, partly reflecting local pore-fluid evolution and detrital composition. The effects of variable geothermal gradients, sedimentation rate, and tectonism on diagenesis await evaluation. In the composite basin-wide paragenetic sequence, calcite, dolomite, siderite, and chlorite-smectite are earliest authigenic phases. Variable cement and compaction relationships indicate nonuniform depth and timing of cementation. Early cements inhibited subsequent diagenesis and compaction. With deeper burial, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, and carbonates dissolved, pore-filling kaolinite precipitated, plagioclase was albitized and zeolitized, and late-stage carbonates crystallized. Further geochemical analyses will better define composition and origin of authigenic phases and document reaction progress. Cement zones and sources may be identified and spatially and temporally linked in an attempt to constrain scales and rates of mass transfer of calcium basin wide.

  2. Reintroduction of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox onto Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivner, J.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.; Hammer, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) is situated about 42 km west of Bakersfield, California. NPR-1 is comprised of 19,120 ha and contains habitat that is important to the endangered San Joaquin kit fox. There are presently portions of NPR-1 that no longer support populations of kit foxes even though the density of dens and the relative abundance of prey appears to be comparable to areas where foxes still exist. Some of these areas appear suitable for foxes, but may be so far removed from breeding pairs of kit foxes that it may take years for young foxes to disperse to the areas and repopulate them. A project to develop reintroduction techniques was implemented and used to introduce kit foxes to areas of NPR-1 that no longer have resident foxes. The soft'' reintroduction technique was used that involved holding foxes in pens during the winter and then releasing foxes from spring to summer. Foxes were held in pens to accustom them to the release site and were released in spring and summer when prey were presumably most abundant. The overall objective of the fox relocation program is to develop techniques to reintroduce foxes onto NPR-1 and to determine the best strategy for imprinting animals to the release site. (SM)

  3. Coyote control to protect endangered San Joaquin kit foxes at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cypher, B.L.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1992-04-01

    Coyote (Canis latrans) predation is the primary cause of mortality for endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Between 1980 and 1985, the kit fox population on NPRC declined approximately 66% while an increase in coyote abundance was noted. From 1985 to 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a program to kill coyotes with the objective being to reduce predation on kit foxes and increase fox numbers. During the 5-year effort, 591 coyotes were killed by trapping, shooting, denning, and aerial gunning. Although scent-station indices indicated that coyote abundance declined during the period of control, the contribution of the control effort to this decline is unclear. Kit fox capture indices did not increase after control was initiated. Also, fox survival rates did not increase. The number of coyotes removed annually may not have been sufficient to effectively reduce coyote abundance. Food availability probably was the primary factor influencing the population dynamics of both predators. Control efforts have been deferred pending further consideration of the merits of control and its potential efficacy at NPRC.

  4. Coyote control to protect endangered San Joaquin kit foxes at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cypher, B.L.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Coyote (Canis latrans) predation is the primary cause of mortality for endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Between 1980 and 1985, the kit fox population on NPRC declined approximately 66% while an increase in coyote abundance was noted. From 1985 to 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a program to kill coyotes with the objective being to reduce predation on kit foxes and increase fox numbers. During the 5-year effort, 591 coyotes were killed by trapping, shooting, denning, and aerial gunning. Although scent-station indices indicated that coyote abundance declined during the period of control, the contribution of the control effort to this decline is unclear. Kit fox capture indices did not increase after control was initiated. Also, fox survival rates did not increase. The number of coyotes removed annually may not have been sufficient to effectively reduce coyote abundance. Food availability probably was the primary factor influencing the population dynamics of both predators. Control efforts have been deferred pending further consideration of the merits of control and its potential efficacy at NPRC.

  5. Fish communities and their associations with environmental variables, lower San Joaquin River drainage, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty sites in the lower San Joaquin River drainage, California, were sampled from 1993 to 1995 to characterize fish communities and their associations with measures of water quality and habitat quality. The feasibility of developing an Index of Biotic Integrity was assessed by evaluating four fish community metrics, including percentages of native fish, omnivorous fish, fish intolerant of environmental degradation, and fish with external anomalies. Of the thirty-one taxa of fish captured during the study, only 10 taxa were native to the drainage. Multivariate analyses of percentage data identified four site groups characterized by different groups of species. The distributions of fish species were related to specific conductance, gradient, and mean depth; however, specific conductance acted as a surrogate variable for a large group of correlated variables. Two of the fish community metrics - percentage of introduced fish and percentage of intolerant fish - appeared to be responsive to environmental quality but the responses of the other two metrics - percentage of omnivorous fish and percentage of fish with anomalies - were less direct. The conclusion of the study is that fish communities are responsive to environmental conditions, including conditions associated with human-caused disturbances, particularly agriculture and water development. The results suggest that changes in water management and water quality could result in changes in species distributions. Balancing the costs and benefits of such changes poses a considerable challenge to resource managers.

  6. Benthic invertebrate distributions in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to physical and chemical factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Fend, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    The invertebrate fauna of nontidal portions of the lower San Joaquin River and its major tributaries is described in relation to water quality and habitat using canonical correspondence analysis, autecological metrics, and indicator species analysis. A large-scale (basin-wide) pattern in community response to salinity (sulfate-bicarbonate type) was detected when standardized, stable substratum was sampled. Community structure, taxa richness, and EPT (ephemeropterans, plecopterans, and trichopterans) richness varied with dissolved solids concentration (55-1700 mg total dissolved solids. L-1), and distributions of many taxa indicated salinity optima. Distinct assemblages associated with either high or low salinity were evident over this range. Large-scale patterns in community structure were unrelated to pesticide distributions. Structure and taxa richness of invertebrate assemblages in sand substratum varied both with salinity and with microhabitat heterogeneity. The benthic fauna generally was dominated by a taxa-poor assemblage of specialized psammophilous species, contributing to a weaker relationship between community structure and water quality than was observed using standardized substratum. Habitat types and associated dominant species were characterized using indicator species analysis. Species assemblages did not vary substantially with irrigation regime or fiver discharge, indicating that structure of invertebrate communities was a conservative measure of water quality.

  7. Water-Quality Assessment of the San Joaquin-Tulare Basins--Entering a New Decade

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gronberg, Jo Ann M.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Burow, Karen R.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2004-01-01

    In 1991, the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began to address the need for consistent and scientifically sound information for managing the Nation's water resources. The long-term goals of this program are to assess the status of the quality of freshwater streams and aquifers, to describe trends or changes in water quality over time, and to provide a sound understanding of the natural and human factors that affect the quality of these resources (Hirsch and others, 1988). Investigations are being conducted within major river basins and aquifer systems, or 'study units,' throughout the Nation to provide a framework for national and regional water-quality assessments. In 2001, the NAWQA Program began its second decade of intensive water-quality assessments. Forty-two of the original 59 study units (reduced by elimination or combination) are being revisited (Gilliom and others, 2001). The San Joaquin-Tulare Basins study unit (fig. 1), located in central California, was a part of the first decadal cycle of the Program investigations and remains in the second cycle.

  8. Effects of supplemental feeding on survivorship, reproduction, and dispersal in San Joaquin kit foxes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    Previous field studies at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California indicated that a decline in tie population size of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox might be linked to declining prey abundance. To evaluate whether kit fox populations we limited by food resources; survival probabilities, sources of mortality, reproductive success, and dispersal rates were compared between foxes with access to supplemental food and foxes without access to supplemental food (controls). Of foxes born in 1988, the probabilities of supplementary fed foxes surviving to age one and age two were higher than corresponding probabilities of control foxes. Survival probabilities of fed foxes from the 1988 cohort also were higher than the average survival probabilities of foxes born in the previous eight years. Most foxes that died during their first year of life died in June, July, or August. Monthly probabilities of survival were higher for fed pups than control pups curing the months of July and August of 1988. Survival probabilities of fed foxes originally r captured as adults and fed foxes born in 1989 were not significantly different than survival probabilities of corresponding control groups. Most foxes for which a cause of death could be determined were lolled by predators. Average dispersal distances were not significantly different between fed and control groups but the two longest dispersal distances were made by control foxes. These results indicate that food availability affects survival, reproduction, and dispersal by kit foxes and provides evidence that kit fox populations may at times be limited by food abundance.

  9. High-Resolution Digital Terrain Models of the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta Region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coons, Tom; Soulard, Christopher E.; Knowles, Noah

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region Geographic Science Center, in conjunction with the USGS Water Resources Western Branch of Regional Research, has developed a high-resolution elevation dataset covering the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta region of California. The elevation data were compiled photogrammically from aerial photography (May 2002) with a scale of 1:15,000. The resulting dataset has a 10-meter horizontal resolution grid of elevation values. The vertical accuracy was determined to be 1 meter. Two versions of the elevation data are available: the first dataset has all water coded as zero, whereas the second dataset has bathymetry data merged with the elevation data. The projection of both datasets is set to UTM Zone 10, NAD 1983. The elevation data are clipped into files that spatially approximate 7.5-minute USGS quadrangles, with about 100 meters of overlap to facilitate combining the files into larger regions without data gaps. The files are named after the 7.5-minute USGS quadrangles that cover the same general spatial extent. File names that include a suffix (_b) indicate that the bathymetry data are included (for example, sac_east versus sac_east_b). These files are provided in ESRI Grid format.

  10. Mortality following cotton defoliation: San Joaquin Valley, California, 1970-1990.

    PubMed

    Ames, R G; Gregson, J

    1995-07-01

    A proportional mortality study comparing the cotton-growing areas of the San Joaquin Valley with the rest of the State of California was performed by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a continuation of earlier studies related to mercaptan-releasing pesticides. This mortality study found a pattern of increased proportion of "respiratory causes" mortality (ICD codes 460-519), statistically significant at less than the .05 probability level, for 15 of 21 years between 1970 and 1990, for the time period during and immediately following cotton defoliation. Defoliants which have the potential to produce acute symptoms include DEF and Folex, both of which release odorous butyl mercaptan gas as a degradation product. This paper tests the hypothesis that exposure to cotton defoliant breakdown products may be associated with a disproportionate increase in mortality. Prediction of the mortality proportions by pounds of DEF and Folex used was not statistically significant in the unadjusted models or in models adjusted for air pollution variables. One air pollution adjustment factor, total suspended particulates, was a statistically significant independent mortality proportion predictor. This finding suggests that total suspended particulates, not defoliants, may be related to mortality differentials during defoliation season. Possible confounding by demographic variation of the counties was not controlled in the analysis. PMID:7552465