Science.gov

Sample records for dioxide effects research

  1. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Carbon Dioxide Research Progress Report, fiscal year 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlman, R. C.; Gross, T.; Machta, L.; Elliott, W.; MacCracken, M.

    1980-04-01

    Research on the global carbon cycle and the effects of increased carbon dioxide on the global climate system is reported. Environmental and societal effects related to CO/sub 2/ and environmental control technology for CO/sub 2/ are also discussed. Lists of research projects and reports and publications of the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program are included. An expanded CO/sub 2/ monitoring network is providing increased coverage for interpretation of patterns of sources and sinks seasonal variability, and documentation of the global growth of CO/sub 2/. Modeling studies emphasized that knowledge of the transport and mixing of surface ocean waters is important in understanding deep oceanic circulation. Initial studies in the equatorial Pacific are helping quantify estimates of the amount of outgassing CO/sub 2/ from tropical waters. During fiscal year 1979, there was a substantial increase in appreciation of the role of the ocean in controlling not only atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations but also the climatic response to changes in concentration. Model simulations of the effect of doubled CO/sub 2/ concentration carried out with fixed ocean temperatures a situation that is possible during perhaps the next 20 years, showed relatively small summer heating over land areas. On the other hand, simulations in which the oceanic temperatures could come into instantaneous equilibrium with atmospheric conditions continued to show global temperature increases of 3 +- 1.5/sup 0/C, accentuated at high latitudes. To improve understanding of possible regional climate changes, there were increased efforts to reconstruct regional climatic patterns prevailing during past warm periods that might serve as analogs of future climatic conditions. Particular attention was directed to the climates of the United States and other countries bordering the North Atlantic Ocean during the warm period 5000 to 7000 years ago.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program: Proceedings of the carbon dioxide and climate research program conference

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, L E

    1980-12-01

    Papers presented at the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program Conference are included in this volume. Topics discussed are: the carbon cycle; modeling the carbon system; climatic response due to increased CO2; climate modeling; the use of paleoclimatic data in understanding climate change; attitudes and implications of CO2; social responses to the CO2 problem; a scenario for atmospheric CO2 to 2025; marine photosynthesis and the global carbon cycle; and the role of tropical forests in the carbon balance of the world. Separate abstracts of nine papers have been prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  3. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. A comprehensive plan. Part I. The global carbon cycle and climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, David H.

    1980-08-01

    Initial plans for research of the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) and climate issue were prepared in 1978 and were reviewed extensively at that time by federal agencies and members of the scientific community. Since then the plans have been used to guide early phases of the Department of Energy's and the nation's efforts related to this issue. This document represents a revision of the 1978 plan to (a) reflect recent ideas and strategies for carbon cycle research, and (b) expand the scope of research on climatic responses to increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO/sub 2/. The revised plan takes into account a number of investigations already being supported by various agencies, and it attempts to build on or add to existing research where there is a crucial need for information directly related to the CO/sub 2/ issue. It should be recognized that this document is the first section of a comprehensive plan on the overall consequences of increasing concentrations of CO/sub 2/, and includes guidelines for research on the Global Carbon Cycle and Climatic Effects of Increasing CO/sub 2/.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2//sup -/ induced climate change: a research agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    In adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, mankind is unintentionally conducting a great biological and geophysical experiment. This experiment can be expected to increase scientific understanding of ecological systems and of the processes in the ocean and the atmosphere that partially determine world climate. But from the standpoint of governments and peoples, the major problem to be solved is to understand the nature of the impacts on societies of rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), with the objective of avoiding or ameliorating unfavorable impacts and gaining most benefit from favorable impacts. The research program proposed herein is designed to provide the understanding needed to achieve this objective. It is based on a recognition of the distinctive characteristics of the CO/sub 2/ problem. It is concluded that three kinds of research on the consequences of rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and possible climatic changes are called for: assessment of risks; research to enhance beneficial effects and lessen harmful ones, where this is possible, and to slow down rates of carbon dioxide emission; and study of potential social and institutional responses to projected climatic changes.

  5. Carbon dioxide research plan. A summary

    SciTech Connect

    Trivelpiece, Alvin W.; Koomanoff, F. A.; Suomi, Verner E.

    1983-11-01

    The Department of Energy is the lead federal agency for research related to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Its responsibility is to sponsor a program of relevant research, and to coordinate this research with that of others. As part of its responsibilities, the Department of Energy has prepared a research plan. The plan documented in this Summary delineated the logic, objectives, organization, background and current status of the research activities. The Summary Plan is based on research subplans in four specific areas: global carbon cycle, climate effects, vegetative response and indirect effects. These subplans have emanated from a series of national and international workshops, conferences, and from technical reports. The plans have been peer reviewed by experts in the relevant scientific fields. Their execution is being coordinated between the responsible federal and international government agencies and the involved scientific community.

  6. Enhanced research program on the long-range climatic effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and sulfate aerosols. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.

    1997-04-01

    Consistent with the objectives to extract as much as possible from existing models on the role of the oceans in the greenhouse effect and to improve various aspects of the coupled system, the authors made significant progress in three areas. (1) In a series of manuscripts, they documented how the El Nino-Southern Oscillation operates in the model and how it is enhanced with increased carbon dioxide. (2) In studies with collaborators Branstator, Karoly, and Karl, they explored the possible carbon dioxide ``fingerprint`` in zonal mean temperatures, the effects of changes in extratropical teleconnections, and the regional effects of low-frequency variability and climate change. (3) They experimented with an advanced version of the NCAR community climate model (CCM0) that also includes the Ramanathan and Collins cirrus albedo feedback mechanism. This model was run with a mixed layer and was tested with the 1{degree} 20-level Semtner and Chervin ocean model. The latter includes the Arctic Ocean and dynamic sea ice, both showing realistic results. The authors completed the coupling of the advanced models. The dynamic ocean model was a 1{degree}x1{degree} version of the Semtner-Chervin 1/2{degree}x1/2{degree} ocean model with 20 vertical levels. The 1{degree}x1{degree} version of the Semtner-Chervin model used in this research explicitly resolved some aspects of the mesoscale eddies as did the parent model. The new coupled model system for greenhouse gas simulations on climate change was tested on multidecadal runs.

  7. Enhanced research program on the long-range climatic effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide: A continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) research during 1988 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has been concentrated in four areas: (1) the publication of three experiments (1 {times} CO{sub 2}, 2 {times} CO{sub 2}, and transient) with fully coupled atmospheric and oceanic general circulation models (GCMs); (2) the involvement in the DOE-sponsored intercomparison of GCMs; (3) the analysis of the coupled control run to study El Nino and La Nina, and (4) the continuing development of multitasked versions of atmospheric and oceanic GCMs.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. The role of temperate zone forests in the world carbon cycle: problem definition and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Amentano, T.V.; Hett, J.

    1980-02-01

    The continuing rise in the CO/sub 2/ content of the atmosphere has produced concern that in the next half-century, climatic, ecological and societal effects may occur throughout the world which will not easily be reversed. This prospect has encouraged a critical assessment of the many elements of the global carbon cycle and the influence of man on it. The role of the terrestrial biosphere has been underscored by recent evidence that reduction of the world's biota may be adding as much or more carbon to the atmosphere as combustion of fossil fuels. The diversity of world ecosystems, and the lack of data on carbon content in many of them, have led to different interpretations of how much the terrestrial biosphere contributes to carbon accumulation in the atmosphere. A detailed review is needed of the principal elements of biospheric influence on the carbon cycle, of where the accumulating atmospheric carbon is originating, and of the options there may be to control it. The Office of Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment of the US Department of Energy has funded The Institute of Ecology to evaluate three terrestrial biospheric components which may be important in the world carbon cycle. These components are: the temperate zone forest, particularly over the past 100 years; organic soils of the world; and freshwater systems subject to eutrophication. From 10 to 12 researchers have participated in each panel. Data review, problem definition and recommendations for research have been the focus in each workshop. The results reported here cover the temperate forest component.

  9. Effects of carbon dioxide on Penicillium chrysogenum: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, A.G.; Ho, C.S.

    1988-06-20

    Previous research has shown that dissolved carbon dioxide causes significant changes in submerged penicillin fermentations, such as stunted, swollen hyphae, increased branching, lower growth rates, and lower penicillin productivity. Influent carbon dioxide levels of 5 and 10% were shown through the use of autoradiography to cause an increase in chitin synthesis in submerged cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. At an influent 5% carbon dioxide level, chitin synthesis is ca. 100% greater in the subapical region of P. chrysogenum hyphae than that of the control, in which there was no influent carbon dioxide. Influent carbon dioxide of 10% caused an increase of 200% in chitin synthesis. It is believed that the cell wall must be plasticized before branching can occur and that high amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide cause the cell to lose control of the plasticizing effect, thus the severe morphological changes occur.

  10. CHLORINE DIOXIDE FOR DRINKING WATER RESEARCH DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the trihalomethane regulation, many drinking water utilities have had to alter their treatment methods. ne option available to these utilities is to use a disinfectant other than chlorine such as chlorine dioxide. ith chlorine dioxide disinfection, trihalo...

  11. Enhanced research program on the long-range climatic effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide -- A continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    In the past year, the authors have reached several important milestones in the modeling and analysis of increased greenhouse-gas-caused climate change. Some of this work was highlighted in the recent update of the 1992 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. The milestones are (1) analysis of the ongoing control and transient experiments out to 70 years, (2) development and testing of a new-generation coupled model, (3) analysis of natural variability and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate change, (4) examination of the role of cirrus albedo in global climate sensitivity, (5) participation in various model intercomparisons, and (6) assistance with an exhibit on the greenhouse effect at the Franklin Institute Museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Although this latter activity was not part of the planned research, they felt that the contribution to the exhibit would benefit science education).

  12. Thermodynamical effects during carbon dioxide release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Böttcher, N.; Görke, U.-J.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-04-01

    Pruess [1] investigated the risk of carbon dioxide leakage from shallow storage sites by modeling scenarios. Such a fluid release is associated with mechanical work performed by formation fluid against expansion without taking heat from ambient environment. Understanding of heat related to mechanical work is essential to predict the temperature at the leak. According to the first law of thermodynamics, internal energy of working fluid decreases with an amount which is equivalent to this work hence, working fluid lost its own heat. Such kind of heat loss depends strongly on whether the expansion process is adiabatic or isothermal. Isothermal expansion allows the working fluid to interact thermally with the solid matrix. Adiabatic expansion is an isenthalpic process that takes heat from the working fluid and the ambient environment remains unchanged. This work is part of the CLEAN research project [6]. In this study, thermodynamic effects of mechanical work during eventual carbon dioxide leakage are investigated numerically. In particular, we are interested to detect the temperature at leakage scenarios and its deviation with different thermodynamic processes. Finite element simulation is conducted with a two-dimensional rectangular geometry representing a shallow storage site which bottom was located at -300m below the land surface. A fully saturated porous medium is assumed where the pore space is filled completely with carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide accumulated in the secondary trap at 30 Bar and 24 °C is allowed to leak from top right point of rectangle with atmospheric pressure. With (i) adiabatic and (ii) isothermal compressibility factors, temperature around leakage area has been calculated which show a significant difference. With some simplification, this study detects leak temperature which is very close with [1]. Temporal evaluation at the leaky area shows that the working fluid temperature can be reduced to -20 °C when the leakage scenario is performed

  13. Carbon dioxide and climate: Summaries of research in FY 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    This report describes the activities and products of the Carbon Dioxide Research (CDR) Program in fiscal year 1987. Project descriptions are categorized according to program areas: energy systems, climate systems, agro-ecosystems, resource analysis, scientific interface, and integration and evaluation. (ACR)

  14. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust. Research report, January 1984-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.

    1990-02-01

    The hypothesis tested in the project was that rats with preexisting experimentally-induced pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of exposure to NO(sub 2) or diesel exhaust. Rats were exposed by inhalation seven hr/day, five day/wk, for 24 months to NO(sub 2) at 9.5 ppm, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/cu m, or to clean air. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of elastase, six weeks before exposures. Nonneoplastic endpoints were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. Nitrogen dioxide exposure of normal rats caused mild epithelial hyperplasia and inflammation in proximal alveoli. Significant interactions between the influences of emphysema and nitrogen dioxide were demonstrated to be additive for four parameters (out of 61 parameters). Diesel-exhaust exposure of normal rats caused progressive, focal inflammation, and epithelial proliferation. The final soot lung burden was only one-third of that in nonemphysematous lungs.

  15. Master index for the carbon dioxide research state-of-the-art report series

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, M P

    1987-03-01

    Four State of the Art (SOA) reports, ''Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle,'' ''Direct Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide on Vegetation,'' ''Detecting the Climatic Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide,'' and ''Projecting the Climatic Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide,'' and two companion reports, ''Characterization of Information Requirements for Studies of CO/sub 2/ Effects: Water Resources, Agriculture, Fisheries, Forests and Human Health'' and ''Glaciers, Ice Sheets, and Sea Level: Effect of a CO/sub 2/-Induced Climatic Change,'' were published by the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division. Considerable information on atmospheric carbon dioxide and its possible effects on world climate is summarized in these six volumes. Each volume has its own index, but to make the information that is distributed throughout the six volumes more accessible and usable, comprehensive citation and subject indexes have been compiled. The subject indexes of the individual volumes have been edited to provide a uniformity from volume to volume and also to draw distinctions not needed in the separate volumes' indexes. Also, the comprehensive subject index has been formatted in a matrix arrangement to graphically show the distribution of subject treatment from volume to volume. Other aids include cross references between the scientific and common names of the animals and plants referred to, a glossary of special terms used, tables of data and conversion factors related to the data, and explanations of the acronyms and initialisms used in the texts of the six volumes. The executive summaries of the six volumes are collected and reproduced to allow the readers interested in the contents of one volume to rapidly gain information on the contents of the other volumes.

  16. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. [and other research projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1974-01-01

    Research projects for the period ending September 15, 1973 are reported as follows: (1) the abundances of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and the processes by which it is released from carbonate deposits in the earth and then transferred to organic material by photosynthesis; the pathways for movement of carbon and oxygen through the atmosphere; (2) space science computation assistance by PDP computer; the performance characteristics and user instances; (3) OGO-6 data analysis studies of the variations of nighttime ion temperature in the upper atmosphere.

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant'Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant'Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. )

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  18. Review of carbon dioxide research staffing and academic support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. B.; Howard, L.; Stevenson, W.; Trice, J.

    1985-04-01

    More than 60 percent of the staff on Carbon Dioxide Research Division (CDRD) projects were university affiliated, and over one third of project scientists and engineers also had university teaching responsibilities. Almost 20 percent of project staff were students. CO2 research is unlikely to affect the general labor market for scientists and engineers because it uses such a small portion of the total pool. On the other hand, anticipated tight labor markets in some disciplines important to CO2 research may make it advantageous for CDRD to expand its support of university faculty, students, and staff to ensure that competent, knowledgeable researchers and managers are available for eventual policy decisions on CO2 issues. Options for academic support that lend themselves readily to the diffuse nature of CO2 research, while providing flexibility in the identification and accomplishment of specific programmatic objectives, include modifying procurement procedures for research contracts to enhance academic involvement, sponsoring summer institutes tailored to specific participants and focused on issues of interest to CDRD, and supporting traveling lecture programs designed to bring information of concern to CDRD to technical and nontechnical audiences.

  19. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-04-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who - like other scientists - rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005-2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  20. Effects of stoichiometry on the defect clustering in uranium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ngayam-Happy, Raoul; Krack, Matthias; Pautz, Andreas

    2015-11-18

    This study addresses the on-going topic of point defects and point defect clusters in uranium dioxide. Molecular statics simulation using an extended pair potential model that accounts for disproportionation equilibrium as charge compensation has been applied to assess the effect of disproportionation on structural properties and clustering in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The defective structures are scanned in minute detail using a powerful and versatile analysing tool, called ASTRAM, developed in-house for the purpose. Unlike pair potential models ignoring disproportionation effects, our model reproduces volume changes observed experimentally in non-stoichiometric UO2-x and UO2+x. The oxygen defect energetics computed is in good agreement with data in the literature. The model is used to assess the clustering that occurs in bulk samples of non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. This study confirms the generation of split-interstitial clusters as the dominant defect type in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. A new key mechanism for defect clustering in hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide is proposed that is based on the progressive aggregation of primitive blocks identified as 1-vacancy split-interstitial clusters. PMID:26471388

  1. Effects of stoichiometry on the defect clustering in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngayam-Happy, Raoul; Krack, Matthias; Pautz, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the on-going topic of point defects and point defect clusters in uranium dioxide. Molecular statics simulation using an extended pair potential model that accounts for disproportionation equilibrium as charge compensation has been applied to assess the effect of disproportionation on structural properties and clustering in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The defective structures are scanned in minute detail using a powerful and versatile analysing tool, called ASTRAM, developed in-house for the purpose. Unlike pair potential models ignoring disproportionation effects, our model reproduces volume changes observed experimentally in non-stoichiometric ~\\text{U}{{\\text{O}}\\text{2-\\text{x}}} and ~\\text{U}{{\\text{O}}\\text{2+x}} . The oxygen defect energetics computed is in good agreement with data in the literature. The model is used to assess the clustering that occurs in bulk samples of non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. This study confirms the generation of split-interstitial clusters as the dominant defect type in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. A new key mechanism for defect clustering in hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide is proposed that is based on the progressive aggregation of primitive blocks identified as 1-vacancy split-interstitial clusters.

  2. Effect of gaseous anaesthesia on blood carbon dioxide measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, R. R.; Howie, G. F. A.

    1965-01-01

    The present study of the effect of two common anaesthetic gases on blood acid-base parameters shows that the micro-Astrup measurement of carbon dioxide tension is not invalidated by the presence of nitrous oxide. This result was anticipated from the theoretical aspect of this technique. The mean error involved in estimating plasma carbon dioxide content in the presence of nitrous oxide using the volumetric Van Slyke apparatus without absorption of carbon dioxide by sodium hydroxide can be of the order of 25%. No such effect was measurable in estimating carbon dioxide contents in the presence of halothane. The degree of respiratory alkalosis during anaesthesia reported in earlier papers (Walker, Morgan, Breckenridge, Watt, Ogilvie, and Douglas, 1963; Morgan, Ogilvie, and Walker, 1963) was greater than had been originally appreciated. A `false' increase in carbon dioxide content will also falsely increase buffer base or `base excess' as calculated from standard nomograms (Singer and Hastings, 1948; Davenport, 1958; Siggaard-Andersen, 1963). PMID:14304255

  3. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Workshop on environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The Workshop was part of a process of elucidating areas of uncertainty where research is needed before meaningful forecasts and sound decisions can be made about the CO/sub 2/ issue. The conferees were divided into five panels dealing with the ocean and the cryosphere: the less managed biosphere; the managed biosphere (chiefly agricultural, forest, and grazing lands); the ways society and its institutions might respond to climate changes; and issues involving the economic and geopolitical consequences of CO/sub 2/ build-up. Also, 28 papers or discussion drafts dealing with a wide variety of topics were contributed to the conference.

  4. Effect of Gadolinium Doping on the Air Oxidation of Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2004-12-04

    Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigated the effects of gadolinia concentration on the air oxidization of gadolinia-doped uranium dioxide using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry to determine if such doping could improve uranium dioxide's stability as a nuclear fuel during potential accident scenarios in a nuclear reactor or during long-term disposal. We undertook this study to determine whether the resistance of the uranium dioxide to oxidation to the orthorhombic U3O8 with its attendant crystal expansion could be prevented by addition of gadolinia. Our studies found that gadolinium has little effect on the thermal initiation of the first step of the reported two-step air oxidation of UO2; however, increasing gadolinia content does stabilize the initial tetragonal or cubic product allowing significant oxidation before the second expansive step to U3O8 begins.

  5. REMOTE SENSING OF SULFUR DIOXIDE EFFECTS ON VEGETATION: SPECTRORADIOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote measurements of spectral reflectance were made in a laboratory to study sulfur dioxide (SO2) effects on the foliage of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants. The relationship between spectral reflectance and foliar injury from SO2 was...

  6. EFFECTS OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE ON THE DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male and female Long-Evans rat pups, exposed to an oral dose of 14 mg chlorine dioxide C102)/kg/d (postnatal d 10), were examined for effects on brain development and for changes in thyroid activity. ody weight reductions were observed on postnatal (pn) d 11, 21, and 35. orebrain...

  7. The photocatalytic and cytotoxic effects of titanium dioxide particles used in sunscreen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampaul, Ashti

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used in sunscreens to reflect UV radiation from the skin. However, titanium dioxide as anatase and rutile crystal forms is a well-known photocatalyst. The nanoparticles are surface coated with inert inorganic oxides such as silica and alumina or organics such as organosilanes or silicone polymers and more recently, have been doped with manganese oxide. These modifications to the titanium dioxide particles are purported to prevent the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. A range of sunscreens was tested with crystal form and modification type identified via XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, XPS and SSNMR. The particle modification and crystal form determined whether the particles were inert or rapidly degraded methylene blue dye, and killed or protected cultured human epithelium cells. Novel solid state Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis showed that the greatest amount of superoxide anions was formed during UVA irradiation of the mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms coated with an organosilane. These particles also degraded methylene blue at a similar rate to Degussa P25, a standard uncoated titanium dioxide powder and produced an increase in UVA induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes. Double Stranded Breaks were observed extensively in cells exposed to UVA irradiated mixed anatase and rutile titanium dioxide with organosilane. A new apoptotic-like cell death mechanism may have been recognised during the UVA irradiation of animal and human cells in the presence of titanium dioxide. This research concludes that mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms of titanium dioxide coated with organosilane or dimethicone may not be safe to use in sunscreen lotions. A less harmful alternative for sunscreen formulations is the manganese doped rutile particles or the alumina coated rutile powders, both of which exhibited a protective effect on cultured epithelial cells.

  8. Electrochemical effects of isolated voids in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.-R.; El-Azab, Anter; Manuel, Michele

    2014-04-01

    We present a model to study the electrochemical effects of voids in oxide materials under equilibrium conditions and apply this model to uranium dioxide. Based on thermodynamic arguments, we claim that voids in uranium dioxide must contain oxygen gas at a pressure that we determine via a Kelvin equation in terms of temperature, void radius and the oxygen pressure of the outside gas reservoir in equilibrium with the oxide. The oxygen gas within a void gives rise to ionosorption and the formation of a layer of surface-charge on the void surface, which, in turn, induces an influence zone of space charge into the matrix surrounding the void. Since the space charge is carried in part by atomic defects, it is concluded that, as a part of the thermodynamic equilibrium of oxides containing voids, the off-stoichiometry around the void is different from its remote bulk value. As such, in a uranium dioxide solid with a void ensemble, the average off-stoichiometry level in the material differs from that of the void-free counterpart. The model is applied to isolated voids in off-stoichiometric uranium dioxide for a wide range of temperature and disorder state of the oxide.

  9. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  10. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  11. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. xcystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. zone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine an...

  12. Sulfur dioxide and ozone effects on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, R.G. ); Kress, L. )

    1990-04-01

    In order to determine if exposure to O{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} in combination produce greater-than-additive effects on yields of economically important crops, corn, wheat, soybean, alfalfa, and a mixed forage crop of timothy and red clover were exposed to SO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} using open-top chambers in six separate experiments during three field seasons. In five of the six studies changes in physiology and/or growth were also assessed to help determine short-term responses of the plants to the exposures. Monitoring of several physiological responses of the crops provided a means of assessing short term effects of the SO{sub 2} exposures on the crops and helped in interpretation of the effects on yields. 4 refs., 46 figs., 49 tabs.

  13. Effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bioleaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal, S.; Dahlstrom, D. ); Oolman, T. )

    1993-02-20

    The effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied in continuous-flow reactors. Steady-state operation with two feed slurry densities, 6 wt% and 16wt% solids, were tested for the effect of carbon dioxide concentration. Bacterial growth rates were estimated via the measurement of carbon dioxide consumption rates. Aqueous-phase carbon dioxide concentrations in excess of 10 mg/L were found to be inhibitory to bacterial growth.

  14. Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on penicillin fermentations: mycelial growth and penicillin production. [Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.S.; Smith, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum was examined experimentally. The dissolved carbon dioxide was found to inhibit the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate when the aerated submerged penicillin fermentation was exposed to influent gases of 12.6 and 20% carbon dioxide, respectively. Upon exposure to influent gases of 3 and 5% carbon dioxide, no pronounced metabolic inhibition was noted.

  15. Protective effect of drugs on bronchoconstriction induced by sulphur dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W C; Cripps, E; Douglas, N; Sudlow, M F

    1982-01-01

    The response to inhaled sulphur dioxide in eight normal, seven atopic, and 22 asthmatic subjects was studied by measuring thoracic gas volume and airway resistance in a whole-body plethysmograph. The fall in specific airway conductance in relation to the concentration of sulphur dioxide inhaled (0-20 ppm) was determined in all three groups. The specific airway conductance fell significantly in the atopic and asthmatic subjects but not in the normal group. In a double-blind study prior inhalation of disodium cromoglycate caused a significant reduction in the response to sulphur dioxide inhalation in atopic and asthmatic subjects. Prior treatment with inhaled ipratropium bromide blocked the response in the atopic subjects, but the effect was variable in the patients with asthma. Previous treatment with inhaled clemastine also reduced the response in patients with asthma, without causing a change in baseline specific conductance. We conclude that non-allergic bronchial hyperreactivity was increased in the atopic and the asthmatic subjects and that mediator release, in addition to a vagal reflex, has a role in such bronchoconstriction. PMID:6218648

  16. Exposure of Research Personnel to Carbon Dioxide during Euthanasia Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Amparan, Ashlee A; Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 is one of the most commonly used euthanasia agents for laboratory animals. Considerable research has gone into the effect of the agent on animals, but little has been done to examine potential human exposure during these procedures. In this study, we examine the CO2 concentrations to which personnel are exposed while euthanizing rodents with CO2. To examine the environmental levels of CO2 generated during euthanasia, we examined several variables including flow rate, inclusion of a cage in the euthanasia chamber, inversion of the euthanasia chamber, chamber size, distance from the euthanasia chamber, and room size. Under all conditions, CO2 concentrations in the room temporarily increased significantly to 600 to 4000 ppm. The results of this study show that, under several testing scenarios, occupational levels of CO2 did not exceed governmentally mandated allowable exposure limits during routine rodent euthanasia procedures. PMID:25199093

  17. Effect of germanium dioxide on growth of Spirulina platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ji-Xiang

    1996-12-01

    This study on the effect of different concentrations of germanium dioxide (GeO2) on the specific growth rate (SGR), pigment contents, protein content and amino acid composition of Spirulina platensis showed that Ge was not the essential element of this alga; that GeO2 could speed up growth and raise protein content of S. platensis, and could possibly influence the photosynthesis system. The concentration range of GeO2 beneficial to growth of S. platensis is from 5 100mg/l. GeO2 is proposed to be utilized to remove contamination by Chlorella spp. usually occurring in the cultivation of Spirulina.

  18. Assessing Effects of Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels on Ocean Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Veronica P.

    2009-07-01

    Carbon Productivity Responses to Increased Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentrations in Surface Ocean: Exploring the Feasibility of an in Situ Mesoscale Carbon Addition Experiment; Palisades, New York, 23-24 March 2009; To assess the effects of future elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on ocean biogeochemistry and ecosystems, it is desirable to mimic such an environment in nature. A workshop to explore an in situ open ocean mesoscale CO2 perturbation experiment that would simulate the oceanic conditions expected toward the end of this century was held at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University (LDEO). The objectives were to evaluate the current understanding of the potential effects on open ocean ecosystems and biogeochemical cycling resulting from carbon chemistry and pH changes in response to increased atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and to examine the scientific justification and logistical feasibility of an in situ open ocean mesoscale CO2/pH perturbation experiment. The 15 participants represented fields of modeling and physical, geochemical, and biological oceanography.

  19. Research issues and supporting research of the National Program on Carbon Dioxide, Environment and Society, fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This report outlines and summarizes the research conducted in the United States under the auspices of the CO/sub 2/ program. The Program encompasses six primary categories which, in turn, are divided into 18 research subcategories and 51 research issues. The research program was designed to describe the research which should be conducted regardless of institutional or even national sponsorship. Project descriptions have been collected and classified according to the research issue to which they most directly apply and have been inserted immediately following the applicable issue description. This provides, for the first time, a detailed view of the nation's effort in addressing the carbon dioxide question in FY 1980.

  20. Corrosive effects of supercritical carbon dioxide and cosolvents on metals

    SciTech Connect

    Russick, E.M.; Poulter, G.A.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1994-06-01

    With the eventual phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons, and restrictive regulations concerning the use of cleaning solvents such as hydrochlorofluorocarbons, and other volatile organic compounds, it is essential to seek new, environmentally acceptable cleaning processes. In the DOE Complex and in industry, an environmentally sound process for precision cleaning of machined metal parts is one of the issues that needs to be addressed. At Sandia, we are investigating the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as an alternative cleaning solvent for this application. Carbon dioxide is nontoxic, recyclable, and relatively inexpensive. Supercritical CO{sub 2} has been demonstrated as a solvent for many nonpolar organic compounds, including hydrocarbon-based machining and lubricating oils. The focus of this work is to investigate any corrosive effects of supercritical CO{sub 2} cleaning on metals. Sample coupons of several common metals were statically exposed to pure supercritical CO{sub 2}, water saturated supercritical CO{sub 2}, and 10 wt % methanol/CO{sub 2} cosolvent at 24,138 kPa (3500 psi) and 323K (50C) for 24 hours. Gravimetric analysis and magnified visual inspection of the coupons were performed before and after the exposure tests. Electron microprobe, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron surface analyses were done as needed where visual and gravimetric changes in the samples were evident. Results are reported.

  1. Effects of Acute Exposures to Carbon Dioxide Upon Cognitive Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, R. R.; Alexander, D. J.; Ryder, V. E.; Lam, C. W.; Statish, U.; Basner, M.

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) originate from human metabolism and typically, within spacecraft, remain about 10-fold higher in concentration than at the earth's surface. There have been recurring complaints by crew members of episodes of "mental viscosity" adversely affecting their performance, and there is evidence from the International Space Station (ISS) that associates CO2 levels with reports of headaches by crewmembers. Additionally, there is concern that CO2 may contribute to vision impairment and intracranial pressure that has been observed in some crewmembers. Consequently, flight rules have been employed to control the level of CO2 below 4 mm Hg, which is well below the existing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) of 10 mm Hg for 24-hour exposures, and 5.3 mm Hg for exposures of 7 to 180 days. However, the flight rule imposed limit, which places additional demands upon resources and current technology, still exceeds the lower bound of the threshold range for reportable headaches (2 - 5 mm Hg). Headaches, while sometime debilitating themselves, are also symptoms that can provide evidence that physiological defense mechanisms have been breached. The causes of the headaches may elicit other subtle adverse effects that occur at CO2 levels well below that for headaches. The concern that CO2 may have effects at levels below the threshold for headaches appears to be substantiated in unexpected findings that CO2 at concentrations below 2 mm Hg substantially reduced some cognitive functions that are associated with the ability to make complex decisions in conditions that are characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity, and delayed feedback. These are conditions that could be encountered by crews in off-nominal situations or during the first missions beyond low earth orbit. If findings of the earlier study are confirmed in crew-like subjects, our findings would provide additional evidence that CO2 may need to be

  2. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who like other scientists rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005 2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  3. Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight and the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Respresentatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session. (No. 119).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    Increased levels of carbon dioxide have contributed to the problematic phenomenon known as the greenhouse effect. Evidence has indicated that the rise in carbon dioxide levels could be accurately correlated with a rise in the Earth's mean temperature, a shrinking of the polar icecaps, and a resulting rise in the Earth's mean sea level. The…

  4. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. Proceedings of the International Meeting on Stable Isotopes in Tree-Ring Research, New Paltz, New York, May 22-25, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, G

    1980-12-01

    Information about the past and present concentrations of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere and variations in climate can be obtained from measurements of stable isotopes in tree rings; specifically carbon-13, oxygen-18 and deuterium. The analysis of these stable isotopes in tree rings is a relatively new and rapidly developing field. This proceedings volume contains most of the papers presented at the meeting. The first paper gives an overview of the status of carbon-13 research. Papers relating to carbon-13 are in section I and grouped separately from the contributions on carbon-14. Although the meeting was primarily concerned with stable isotopes, all carbon isotopic analysis may be helpful in understanding the carbon-13 record in tree rings. The papers on hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies are in sections II and III respectively. The remaining sections contain papers that consider more than one isotope at a time, general topics related to isotopes, atmospheric changes and tree growth, and methods of isotopic analysis.

  5. Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect: A Problem Evaluation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Carol A.; Beiswenger, Jane M.

    1993-01-01

    Describes exercises to examine the global carbon cycle. Students are asked to predict consequences of increased carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and to suggest ways to mitigate problems associated with these higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A comparison modeling exercise examines some of the variables related to the success…

  6. Carbon Dioxide: Surprising Effects on Decision Making and Neurocognitive Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2013-01-01

    The occupants of modern submarines and the International Space Station (ISS) have much in common as far as their air quality is concerned. Air is polluted by materials offgassing, use of utility compounds, leaks of systems chemicals, and anthropogenic sources. The primary anthropogenic compound of concern to submariners and astronauts has been carbon dioxide (CO2). NASA and the US Navy rely on the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRC-COT) to help formulate exposure levels to CO2 that are thought to be safe for exposures of 3-6 months. NASA calls its limits Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). Years of experience aboard the ISS and a recent publication on deficits in decision making in ground-based subjects exposed briefly to 0.25% CO2 suggest that exposure levels that have been presumed acceptable to preserve health and performance need to be reevaluated. The current CO2 exposure limits for 3-6 months set by NASA and the UK Navy are 0.7%, and the limit for US submariners is 0.5%, although the NRC-COT recommended a 90-day level of 0.8% as safe a few years ago. NASA has set a 1000-day SMAC at 0.5% for exploration-class missions. Anecdotal experience with ISS operations approaching the current 180-day SMAC of 0.7% suggest that this limit is too high. Temporarily, NASA has limited exposures to 0.5% until further peer-reviewed data become available. In the meantime, a study published last year in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives (Satish U, et al. 2012) demonstrated that complexdecision- making performance is somewhat affected at 0.1% CO2 and becomes "dysfunctional" for at least half of the 9 indices of performance at concentrations approaching 0.25% CO2. The investigators used the Strategic Management Simulation (SMS) method of testing for decisionmaking ability, and the results were so surprising to the investigators that they declared that their findings need to be independently confirmed. NASA has responded to the

  7. EFFECT OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND ITS METABOLITES IN DRINKING WATER ON FETAL DEVELOPMENT IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorination of surface waters is known to form trihalomethanes. Therefore, chlorine dioxide (CIO2) is being considered as an alternative disinfectant. This study was designed to determine the effect of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites, chlorite (CIO2) and chlorate (CIO3)...

  8. Distinguishing the Photothermal and Photoinjection Effects in Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Gao, Hanwei

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has drawn significant attention for its unique metal-to-insulator transition. The high electrical resistivity below the transition temperature is a result of the strong electron correlation with the assistance of lattice distortion. Theoretical calculations indicated that the strong inter-electron interactions might induce intriguing optoelectronic phenomena, such as the multiple exciton generation. However, the resistivity of VO2 is temperature sensitive. Therefore, the light-induced conductivity in VO2 has often been attributed to the photothermal effects. In this work, we distinguished the photothermal and photoinjection effects in VO2 nanowires by varying the chopping frequency of the optical illumination. In our VO2 nanowires, the relatively slow photothermal processes can be well suppressed when the chopping frequency >2 kHz, whereas the fast photoinjection component (direct photo-excitation of charge carriers) remains constant at all chopping frequencies. By separating the photothermal and photoinjection processes, our work set the basis for further studies of carrier dynamics under optical excitations in strongly correlated materials. This work is supported by the Start-Up Funds and the First-Year Assistant Professor Award from the Florida State University.

  9. Acute hematologic and hemorheologic effects of sulfur dioxide inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Baskurt, O.K.

    1988-09-01

    Fifty male rats were exposed to 0.87 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 24 hr. Hematologic and hemorheologic parameters measured in this group were compared with the results of a control group of 51 male rats. Hematocrit values were found to be higher (p less than .005) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (43.55 +/- 0.41%, mean +/- standard error), when compared to the control group value (41.97 +/- 0.35%). Sulfhemoglobin values were also higher (p less than .0001) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (0.60 +/- 0.08%) than the control group (0.08 +/- 0.02%). Osmotic hemolysis ratio was slightly increased (p less than .05) in the 0.55% sodium chloride solution. However, whole blood and packed cell viscosities were lower in the SO/sub 2/-treated animals, while there was no significant difference in the plasma viscosities. The mechanism of these effects could not be clarified completely, but structural and functional effects of SO2 inhalation on peripheral erythrocytes were discussed.

  10. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of chlorine dioxide for high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, and multilayer of ethylene viny...

  11. EXPERIENCE WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AT DENVER'S REUSE PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers at Denver's reuse demonstration plant found that the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide treatment is critically dependent on the performance of the generator. Because high chlorine dioxide yields can be obtained even when excessive concentrations of undesirable by-prod...

  12. Unsaturated zone carbon dioxide flux, mixing, and isotopic composition at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Haase, K.; Moreo, M. T.; Walvoord, M. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of tritium, radiocarbon, and volatile organic compounds at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site, adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, have stimulated research on factors affecting transport of these contaminants. This research includes an examination of unsaturated zone carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, mixing, and isotopic composition, which can help in understanding these factors. In late April 2015 we collected 76 soil-gas samples in multi-layer foil bags from existing 1.5-m deep tubes, both inside and outside the low-level waste area, as well as from two 110-m-deep multilevel gas-sampling boreholes and a distant background site. These samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide concentration and isotopic composition by direct injection into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Graphical analysis of results indicates mixing of CO2 characteristic of the root zone (δ13C -18 ‰ VPDB), deep soil gas of the capillary fringe (-20‰), and CO2 produced by microbial respiration of organic matter disposed in the waste area trenches (-28‰). Land-surface boundary conditions are being constrained by the application of a novel non-dispersive infrared sensor and traditional concentration and flux measurements, including discrete CO2 flux data using a gas chamber method to complement continuous data from surface- and tower-based CO2 sensors. These results shed light on radionuclide and VOC mobilization and transport mechanisms from this and similar waste disposal facilities.

  13. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21

    Objectives of this project was to understand asphaltene precipitation in General and carbon dioxide induced precipitation in particular. To this effect, thermodynamic and kinetic experiments with the Rangely crude oil were conducted and thermodynamic and reservoir models were developed.

  14. Tested Demonstrations: Visualization of Buffer Action and the Acidifying Effect of Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a buffer demonstration which features visualization of the effects of carbon dioxide on pH. Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and a discussion of results obtained are included. (JN)

  15. Potential climate engineering effectiveness and side effects during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario.

    PubMed

    Keller, David P; Feng, Ellias Y; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The realization that mitigation efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions have, until now, been relatively ineffective has led to an increasing interest in climate engineering as a possible means of preventing the potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change. While many studies have addressed the potential effectiveness of individual methods there have been few attempts to compare them. Here we use an Earth system model to compare the effectiveness and side effects of afforestation, artificial ocean upwelling, ocean iron fertilization, ocean alkalinization and solar radiation management during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario. We find that even when applied continuously and at scales as large as currently deemed possible, all methods are, individually, either relatively ineffective with limited (<8%) warming reductions, or they have potentially severe side effects and cannot be stopped without causing rapid climate change. Our simulations suggest that the potential for these types of climate engineering to make up for failed mitigation may be very limited. PMID:24569320

  16. Potential climate engineering effectiveness and side effects during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario

    PubMed Central

    Keller, David P.; Feng, Ellias Y.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The realization that mitigation efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions have, until now, been relatively ineffective has led to an increasing interest in climate engineering as a possible means of preventing the potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change. While many studies have addressed the potential effectiveness of individual methods there have been few attempts to compare them. Here we use an Earth system model to compare the effectiveness and side effects of afforestation, artificial ocean upwelling, ocean iron fertilization, ocean alkalinization and solar radiation management during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario. We find that even when applied continuously and at scales as large as currently deemed possible, all methods are, individually, either relatively ineffective with limited (<8%) warming reductions, or they have potentially severe side effects and cannot be stopped without causing rapid climate change. Our simulations suggest that the potential for these types of climate engineering to make up for failed mitigation may be very limited. PMID:24569320

  17. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  18. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  19. Direct effects of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide on crop yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) in this century will alter crop yield quantity and quality. It is important to understand the magnitude of the expected changes and the mechanisms involved in crop responses to elevated CO2 in order to adapt our food systems to the committed chan...

  20. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON PULMONARY FUNCTION IN HUMAN SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty human subjects with asthma and chronic bronchitis and ten normal, healthy adults were exposed to 0.5 ppm of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for two hours in an environmental chamber. They engaged in one 15-minute, light to medium-exercise stint on a bicycle ergometer during this pe...

  1. The effect of chlorine dioxide on polymeric packaging materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2), with its high oxidizing capacity and broad disinfecting property, is used frequently as a disinfectant in many applications. As a biocide in food applications, it showed a microbial inactivating capacity against many important pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, located ...

  2. Effect of a magnetic field on the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglitskii, N.N.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kul'skii, L.A.; Rubezhanskii, K.A.; Zhantalai, B.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper gives an account of an investigation into the effect of a magnetic field on the rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The CO/sub 2/ pressure in the system was maintained by a Hoffer valve. The method used for studying the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions is described. The specific rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in solutions exposed to a magnetic field is lower than in solutions not so exposed. There is a tendency for the equilibrium solubility of CO/sub 2/ to increase in solutions exposed to a magnetic field.

  3. Effective Schools Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Daniel U.; Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    Research studies that have focused on identifying the characteristics or correlates of elementary and secondary schools that are unusually effective are reviewed, concentrating on the "effective schools" movement. Research on effective schools supports the conclusion that they rank high on certain characteristics frequently referred to as…

  4. The vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of kerosene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin-Hu; Wang, Su; Zhang, Sheng-Tao; Yue, Lian-Jie; Fan, Bing-Cheng; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Cui, Ji-Ping

    2014-08-01

    In ground tests of hypersonic scramjet, the high-enthalpy airstream produced by burning hydrocarbon fuels often contains contaminants of water vapor and carbon dioxide. The contaminants may change the ignition characteristics of fuels between ground tests and real flights. In order to properly assess the influence of the contaminants on ignition characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels, the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the ignition delay times of China RP-3 kerosene was studied behind reflected shock waves in a preheated shock tube. Experiments were conducted over a wider temperature range of 800-1 500K, at a pressure of 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentration of 20%. Ignition delay times were determined from the onset of the excited radical OH emission together with the pressure profile. Ignition delay times were measured for four cases: (1) clean gas, (2) gas vitiated with 10% and 20% water vapor in mole, (3) gas vitiated with 10% carbon dioxide in mole, and (4) gas vitiated with 10% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide, 20% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide in mole. The results show that carbon dioxide produces an inhibiting effect at temperatures below 1 300 K when ϕ = 0.5, whereas water vapor appears to accelerate the ignition process below a critical temperature of about 1 000 K when ϕ = 0.5. When both water vapor and carbon dioxide exist together, a minor inhibiting effect is observed at ϕ = 0.5, while no effect is found at ϕ = 1.0. The results are also discussed preliminary by considering both the combustion reaction mechanism and the thermophysics properties of the fuel mixtures. The current measurements demonstrate vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of China RP-3 kerosene at air-like O2 concentration. It is important to account for such effects when data are extrapolated from ground testing to real flight conditions.

  5. Carbon dioxide and temperature effects on pima cotton development

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Hodges, H.F.; McKinion, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Predicting plant responses to changing atmospheric CO{sub 2} and to the possible global warming are important concerns. Effects of CO{sub 2} on developmental events are poorly documented, as is the interaction of CO{sub 2} and other major climate variables on crop development. This experiment examines the effects of an altered CO{sub 2} environment and interactions of CO{sub 2} and temperature on pima cotton developmental rates. Pima cotton was grown from seed in sun-lit plant growth chambers. Air temperatures were controlled form 20/12 to 40/32{degrees}C (day/night) in 5-degree increments. Daytime CO{sub 2} was maintained at 350 or 700 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1}. In a second experiment, the temperature was maintained at 30/22{degrees}C day/night and the plants were grown in 350, 450, or 700 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1} CO{sub 2}. Rates of mainstem node formation and the time required to produce the first square and first flower were not sensitive to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, but were very sensitive to temperature. Prefruiting branch nodal positions required longer to develop than nodes with fruiting branches. Carbon dioxide levels did not affect the time required to produce nodes. Number of branches produced was sensitive to both temperature and CO{sub 2}. The larger number of bolls set on the lower branches of plants grown at high CO{sub 2} provided a larger sink for photosynthate than plants grown at low CO{sub 2} (possibly explaining reduction in number of fruit at the upper nodes of high-CO{sub 2}-grown plants). More bolls and squares were produced and retained on plants grown in high-CO{sub 2} environments, except that none were produced at 40/32{degrees}C. Results indicate high-temperature-tolerant cotton cultivars would be more productive in the present-day CO{sub 2} world, and they would be essential in the future if global temperature increases. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticle toxicity in plants: A review of current research.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ashley; Venkatachalam, P; Sahi, Shivendra; Sharma, Nilesh

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have become widely used in recent years for many manufacturing and medical processes. Recent literature suggests that many metallic nanomaterials including those of silver (Ag) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) cause significant toxic effects in animal cell culture and animal models, however, toxicity studies using plant species are limited. This review examines current progress in the understanding of the effect of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on plant species. There are many facets to this ongoing environmental problem. This review addresses the effects of NPs on oxidative stress-related gene expression, genotoxicity, seed germination, and root elongation. It is largely accepted that NP exposure results in the cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to both positive and negative effects on plant growth. However, factors such as NP size, shape, surface coating and concentration vary greatly among studies resulting in conflicting reports of the effect at times. In addition, plant species tend to differ in their reaction to NP exposure, with some showing positive effects of NP augmentation while many others showing detrimental effects. Seed germination studies have shown to be less effective in gauging phytotoxicity, while root elongation studies have shown more promise. Given the large increase in nanomaterial applications in consumer products, agriculture and energy sectors, it is critical to understand their role in the environment and their effects on plant life. A closer look at nanomaterial-driven ecotoxicity is needed. Ecosystem-level studies are required to indicate how these nanomaterials transfer at the critical trophic levels affecting human health and biota. PMID:27288991

  7. Effect of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on ICR mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC(50) values were determined for male ICR mice exposed to different concentration of carbon monoxide for 30 min and of nitrogen dioxide for 10 min in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The data indicate that ICR mice are more resistant to these two toxicants than Swiss albino mice. The carbon monoxide LC(50) for a 30-min exposure was about 8,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to 3,570 ppm for Swiss albino mice. The nitrogen dioxide LC(50) for a 10-min exposure was above 2,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to about 1,000 ppm for Swiss albino mice.

  8. Effect of doping on the photocatalytic, electronic and mechanical properties of sol-gel titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtoglu, Murat

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis has been an active research area over the last decade as a promising solution for energy generation and environmental problems which has led to promising applications from air and water purification systems, self-cleaning and self-sterilizing surfaces to solar cells and hydrogen production from water dissociation reaction. Titanium dioxide (TiO2), an abundant material with a high photocatalytic efficiency and chemical stability, is undoubtedly the most widely studied and used among all photocatalytic materials. Although titanium dioxide has been used in powder form, its immobilized form (film) is necessary from practical application standpoint. However, there are several shortcomings of titanium dioxide films that need to be addressed to realize a wide range of successful applications: lack of visible light activity, poisoning of the catalytic performance by the substrate and the low surface area compared to powder forms. In addition, mechanical properties of such films have not been investigated thoroughly, which may be critical when abrasion and weathering resistance are necessary. To address each of these issues, a systematic experimental and theoretical investigation of doping titanium dioxide films with a variety of elements were conducted. Utilizing theoretical calculations to filter elements for experimental studies as well as interpretation of the experimental results, several dopant or dopant combinations were found to remedy some of the issues of photocatalytic titanium dioxide films. Doping with 32 metals, nitrogen and 11 metal-nitrogen combinations are investigated theoretically and the results are used as guideline for the experimental studies. Particular attention is given to certain metal dopants such as Cr, V, Mo, Ta and Ga not just because of their relatively modest cost but also their non-toxicity and wide availability of their compatible compounds for sol-gel synthesis. While metal-dopants improved the overall

  9. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  10. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  11. Effects of doubled carbon dioxide on rainfall responses to radiative processes of water clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Li, Tingting; Lou, Lingyun

    2014-12-01

    The effects of doubled carbon dioxide on rainfall responses to radiative processes of water clouds are investigated in this study. Two groups of two-dimensional cloud-resolving model sensitivity experiments with regard to pre-summer heavy rainfall around the summer solstice and tropical rainfall around the winter solstice are conducted and their five-day averages over the model domain are analyzed. In the presence of radiative effects of ice clouds, doubled carbon dioxide changes pre-summer rainfall from the decrease associated with the enhanced atmospheric cooling to the increase associated with the enhanced infrared cooling as a result of the exclusion of radiative effects of water clouds. Doubled carbon dioxide leads to the reduction in tropical rainfall, caused by the removal of radiative effects of water clouds through the suppressed infrared cooling. In the absence of radiative effects of ice clouds, doubled carbon dioxide changes pre-summer rainfall from the increase associated with the strengthened atmospheric warming to the decrease associated with the weakened release of latent heat caused by the elimination of radiative effects of water clouds. The exclusion of radiative effects of water clouds increases tropical rainfall through the strengthened infrared cooling, which is insensitive to the change in carbon dioxide.

  12. Comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J A; Schaefer, P W; Romero, J M; Rabinov, J D; Sanelli, P C; Manchikanti, L

    2014-09-01

    The goal of comparative effectiveness research is to improve health care while dealing with the seemingly ever-rising cost. An understanding of comparative effectiveness research as a core topic is important for neuroradiologists. It can be used in a variety of ways. Its goal is to look at alternative methods of interacting with a clinical condition, ideally, while improving delivery of care. While the Patient-Centered Outcome Research initiative is the most mature US-based foray into comparative effectiveness research, it has been used more robustly in decision-making in other countries for quite some time. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence of the United Kingdom is a noteworthy example of comparative effectiveness research in action. PMID:24874531

  13. Susceptibility to virus infection with exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Research report, January 1984-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Clements, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) exposure and human susceptibility to respiratory virus infection was investigated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, blinded trial conducted in an environmentally controlled research chamber. Healthy, nonsmoking volunteers, 18 to 35 years old, who were seronegative to influenza A/Korea/82 (H/sub 3/N/sub 2/) virus, breathed either filtered air or NO/sub 2/ for two hours a day for three consecutive days. Live, attenuated cold-adapted influenza A/Korea/82 reassortant virus was administered intranasally to all subjects after the second day of exposure. No adverse changes in pulmonary function or nonspecific airway reaction to methacholine were observed after NO/sub 2/ exposure, virus infection, or both. Although the differences were not statistically significant, the groups exposed to NO/sub 2/ in year 3 became infected more often (91%) than those exposed only to air (71%).

  14. Carbon Dioxide Flooding Technology Research and Field Test in Liuzan North Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanshi; Luo, Pingya; Sun, Lei; Fu, Zhijun

    2014-12-01

    The fault roots of Liuzan north block in Jidong oilfield of China have been long-term explored by solution gas drive. Recently, oil production declined rapidly because of shortage of formation energy and needing high water injection pressure. Carbon dioxide injection pressure is found to be generally low, and CO2 has good solubility in crude oil to supply formation energy and achieve high oil recovery efficiency. In this work, a pilot program of CO2 EOR technology was carried out. The slim tube test results showed that the minimal miscible pressure of Liuzan north block was 28.28 MPa. The injection parameters were optimized by numerical simulation method: the injection method was continuous, the slug size was 0.2 HCPV and the EOR efficiency was 7.23%. After two months of gas injection field test, the formation pressure of two gas injectors just increased by 14.02 MPa and 2.98 MPa, respectively, indicating that carbon dioxide could supply the formation energy effectively. 16 months after gas injection, the CO2 injection amount was 14640 t, and the oil increment was 16424 t. The present work demonstrates the potential applicability of CO2 flooding technology from high water injection reservoirs.

  15. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M. ); Sherwood, S.I. )

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO[sub 2] gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  16. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO2) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO2 gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  17. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 14. Research needed to determine the present carbon balance of northern ecosystems and the potential effect of carbon-dioxide-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.C.

    1982-10-01

    Given the potential significance of northern ecosystems to the global carbon budget it is critical to estimate the current carbon balance of these ecosystems as precisely as possible, to improve estimates of the future carbon balance if world climates change, and to assess the range of certainty associated with these estimates. As a first step toward quantifying some of the potential changes, a workshop with tundra and taiga ecologists and soil scientists was held in San Diego in March 1980. The first part of this report summarizes the conclusions of this workshop with regard to the estimate of the current areal extent and carbon content of the circumpolar arctic and the taiga, current rates of carbon accumulation in the peat in the arctic and the taiga, and predicted future carbon accumulation rates based on the present understanding of controlling processes and on the understanding of past climates and vegetation. This report presents a finer resolution of areal extents, standing crops, and production rates than was possible previously because of recent syntheses of data from the International Biological Program and current studies in the northern ecosystems, some of which have not yet been published. This recent information changes most of the earlier estimates of carbon content and affects predictions of the effect of climate change. The second part of this report outlines research needed to fill major gaps in the understanding of the role of northern ecosystems in global climate change.

  18. The effect of increased carbon dioxide concentrations on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughner, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence on ozone of an increased carbon dioxide concentration, for which a measurable growth has been observed in the recent past. Increased carbon dioxide can indirectly affect ozone by perturbing atmospheric temperatures, which will alter ozone production, whose rate displays a fairly strong temperature dependence. This paper presents one-dimensional model results for the steady state ozone behavior when the CO2 concentration is twice its ambient level; the results account for coupling between chemistry and temperature. When the CO2 level doubled, the total ozone burden increased in relation to the ambient burden by 1.2-2.5%, depending on the vertical diffusion coefficient used. Above 30 km, ozone concentrations were larger than the ambient values, a maximum increase of 16% being reached at 43 km. In this region the relative variations were insensitive to the choice of diffusion coefficient. Below 30 km, ozone concentrations were smaller than the unperturbed values and were sensitive to the vertical diffusion profile in this region (10-30 km).

  19. Research of fiber carbon dioxide sensing system based laser absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Yanfang; Zhao, Yanjie; Wang, Chang; Liu, Tongyu

    2012-02-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the important gas need to be detected in coal mine safety. In the mine limited ventilation environment, Concentration of carbon dioxide directly affects the health of coal miners. Carbon dioxide is also one of important signature Gas in spontaneous combustion forecasting of coal goaf area, it is important to accurately detect concentration of carbon dioxide in coal goaf area. This paper proposed a fiber carbon dioxide online sensing system based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy. The system used laser absorption spectroscopy and optical fiber sensors combined, and a near-infrared wavelength 1608nm fiber-coupled distributed feedback laser (DFB) as a light source and a 7cm length gas cell, to achieve a high sensitivity concentration detection of carbon dioxide gas. The technical specifications of sensing system can basically meet the need of mine safety.

  20. Concentrating Carbon Dioxide - What Do We Know from Power Plant Capture Research?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aines, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic materials, basically calcium or magnesium-rich rocks, can provide much of the thermodynamic driving force for distributed carbon capture from air - if we can work out appropriate processes. One apparent challenge is that the rate of reaction is slower than we would like it to be. This rate is a combination of the mineralization rate (forming calcite from solution) and, since the reactions are much faster in water, the rate at which carbon dioxide can be added to solution, providing a more concentrated source of CO2(aq) for reaction. This latter problem of mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is addressed in power plant capture schemes through increasing the chemical driving force, catalytic formation of dissolved CO2 via carbonic anhydrase and its analogues, and simple increases of surface area. An important learning from that body of research is that surface area is critically important - no amount of catalysis or chemical driving force can make up for simple transfer area. This talk will relate those learnings in power plant capture studies to the issue of accumulating CO2 to react with rocks for permanent sequestration. Not only is it important to create surface area for the reactive rocks, such as by grinding or fracturing, but it is equally valuable to increase the concentration of CO2(aq) by rapid transfer across the gas-water interface. Successful future carbon dioxide management schemes will have to take advantage of every kinetic advantage possible, in order to make good use of the thermodynamic advantage that geologic materials present for controlling atmospheric carbon levels.

  1. Music Teacher Effectiveness Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Manny

    Although relatively few studies exist, a review of the research reveals some common characteristics of an effective music teacher. Effective music teachers tend to be extroverted, enthusiastic, and care sincerely for their students. Such teachers are competent in musicianship (particularly in diagnosing and correcting musical errors and in using…

  2. HEALTH EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM INHALATION OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE AND OZONE MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of single and multiple daily 3-hour exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) mixtures on the resistance to streptococcal pneumonia were investigated. The concentrations of NO2 ranged from 1.5 to 5.0 ppm, and those of O3, from 0.05 to 0.5 ppm. The effect of a...

  3. Effect of phosphorus nutrition on growth and physiology of cotton under ambient and elevated carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorous deficiency in soil limits crop growth and productivity in the majority of arable lands worldwide and may moderate the growth enhancement effect of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration. To evaluate the interactive effect of these two factors on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum...

  4. Nitrogen, Tillage, and Crop Rotation Effects On Carbon Dioxide and Methane Fluxes from Irrigated Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term effects of tillage intensity, N fertilization, and crop rotation on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) flux from semiarid irrigated soils are poorly understood. We evaluated effects of: a) tillage intensity [no-till (NT) and moldboard plow tillage (CT)] in a continuous corn rotation; b...

  5. Fabric compatibility and cleaning effectiveness of drycleaning with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.B.; Laintz, K.E.; Spall, W.D.; bustos, L.; Taylor, C.

    1996-04-01

    Liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) offers an environmentally sound replacement solvent to the currently used drycleaning solvent, perchloroethylene (PERC). In addition to the health and safety benefits of a CO{sub 2} based cleaning system, large savings in solvent costs provide an incentive for conversion to the new system. Lower operating costs for the new technology provide further incentive. Experimental studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} in both small scale and pilot scale test systems in order to address fabric compatibility with this alternative cleaning method. Results from these tests show that fabric shrinkage using CO{sub 2} is controlled to the same level as current drycleaning methods. In addition, tests to evaluate the cleaning performance of liquid CO{sub 2} drycleaning were also conducted. These results show the prototype liquid CO{sub 2} cleaning system to be better than PERC at soil removal, and worse than PERC at inorganic salt removal.

  6. Effect of water treatment chemicals on limestone/sulfur dioxide reaction in flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    A simple laboratory test has been developed which simulates the reaction between limestone/water and sulfur dioxide in flue gas desulfurization systems. By adding various chemicals, in differing concentrations, to the limestone/water mixture, the quantitative impact on the sulfur dioxide/limestone reaction can be qualified and quantified. This paper will present the impact of several water treatment chemicals on the reaction of limestone and sulfur dioxide. An attempt has been made to predict the effect through mathematical correlations. All of the additive chemicals tend to decrease the rate of dissolution of limestone to various degrees. Some of the chemicals retard crystal growth thus adversely impacting solids separation in the thickener. The physical appearance of the crystal growth retarded limestone absorber slurry approaches a colloidal suspension.

  7. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, L. M.; Diette, G. B.; Scott, M.; McCormack, M. C.; Matsui, E. C.; Curtin-Brosnan, J.; Williams, D. L.; Kidd-Taylor, A.; Shea, M.; Breysse, P. N.; Hansel, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placement of air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and carbon filters. Home inspection and NO2 monitoring were conducted at 1 week pre-intervention and at 1 week and 3 months post-intervention. Stove replacement resulted in a 51% and 42% decrease in median NO2 concentration at 3 months of follow-up in the kitchen and bedroom, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.01); air purifier placement resulted in an immediate decrease in median NO2 concentration in the kitchen (27%, P < 0.01) and bedroom (22%, P = 0.02), but at 3 months, a significant reduction was seen only in the kitchen (20%, P = 0.05). NO2 concentrations in the kitchen and bedroom did not significantly change following ventilation hood installation. Replacing unvented gas stoves with electric stoves or placement of air purifiers with HEPA and carbon filters can decrease indoor NO2 concentrations in urban homes. PMID:24329966

  8. Research and Teacher Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David

    This paper presents one researcher's premise that the most important variable in determining classroom effectiveness is the congruence of the delivered curriculum with the desired outcomes or, that students be given the opportunity to learn what is expected of them. This theory presupposes that curriculum expectations be made clear to students,…

  9. A synergic effect of sodium on the phase transition of tungsten-doped vanadium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiang; Gong, Weitao; Ning, Guiling; Mehdi, Hassan; Zhang, Guiqi; Ye, Junwei; Lin, Yuan

    2014-05-21

    A synergic effect of sodium on the metal-insulator transition temperature reduction of tungsten-doped vanadium dioxide is noted. With the assistance of sodium, doping with tungsten yields an extra depression in phase temperature of 6-12 °C over that of 20-26 °C per at% of tungsten. PMID:24691489

  10. Influences of packaging design on antimicrobial effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is an effective surface disinfectant, for it has the ability to reach and inactivate bacterial cells in biofilms which are attached to inaccessible sites on produce surfaces. One of the most promising applications of gaseous ClO2 is to be included in the headspace of foo...

  11. COMBINED EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE AND OZONE ON SOYBEAN WHOLE-PLANT WATER USE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing atmospheric concentrations of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and ozone, a critical issue is how these changes will affect agricultural hydrologic cycles. To address an important part of this question, a study was undertaken to test the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon diox...

  12. EFFECTS OF 0.1 PPM NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON AIRWAYS OF NORMAL AND ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been reported that inhalation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) will enhance the bronchial reactivity of asthmatics. This study was designed to evaluate the respiratory effect of a 1-h exposure of normal subjects and of atopic asthmatics to 0.1 parts per million (ppm) NO2. Fifteen...

  13. Synergistic effects of exposure to concentrated ambient fine pollution particles and nitrogen dioxide in humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to single pollutants such as ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects. It is unclear, however, if simultaneous exposure to multiple air pollutants (e.g. PM and ozone or nitrogen dioxide), a more real world scenario, results in non-additiv...

  14. Effects of carbon dioxide and phosphorus supply on potato dry matter allocation and canopy morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) generally exhibit a positive growth response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) and require high amounts of phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Despite its prominence as a world-wide staple crop, there is little data that quantifies effects of P, and n...

  15. REMOTE SENSING OF SULFUR DIOXIDE EFFECTS ON VEGETATION. VOLUME I. SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three techniques for detecting and mapping sulfur dioxide (SO2) effects on the foliage of sensitive crops and trees near large, coal-fired power plants were tested and evaluated. These techniques were spectroradiometry, photometric analysis of aerial photographs, and computer ana...

  16. REMOTE SENSING OF SULFUR DIOXIDE EFFECTS ON VEGETATION. FINAL REPORT. VOLUME I: SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three techniques for detecting and mapping sulfur dioxide (SO sub 2 ) effects on the foliage of sensitive crops and trees near large, coal-fired power plants were tested and evaluated. These techniques were spectroradiometry, photometric analysis of aerial photographs, and comput...

  17. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change: volume II, part I. Response of the West Antarctic ice sheet to CO/sub 2/-induced climatic warming

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.

    1982-04-01

    The paper proposes a research plan to deal with the question of what the response of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet would be to a rise in global temperatures caused by an anthropogenic CO/sub 2/ buildup in the atmosphere. The plan is designed to answer the following questions: (1) how fast is the ice mass changing now, and why; (2) how will the boundary conditions that affect the ice sheet respond to an atmospheric temperature change and how are those boundary conditions changing now; (3) what will be the response of the ice sheet to changes in boundary conditions; and (4) what can be learned by analogy with what has happened in the past. (ACR)

  18. The effect of supercritical carbon dioxide sterilization on the anisotropy of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nicholas; Rives, Alain; Pelletier, Matthew H; Wang, Tian; Walsh, William R

    2015-03-01

    Bone allografts are used to replace bone that has been removed or to augment bone tissue in a number of clinical scenarios. In order to minimize the risk of infection and immune response, the bone is delipidated and terminally sterilized prior to implantation. The optimal method for bone graft sterilization has been the topic of considerable research and debate. Recently, supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) treatments have been shown to terminally sterilize bone against a range of bacteria and viruses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of these SCCO(2) treatments on the anisotropic mechanical properties of cortical bone. Adult bovine cortical cubes were prepared and treated using SCCO(2) and a range of common processing additives (ethanol, peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide). The bone was mechanically tested in uniaxial compression in the axial, radial and tangential orientations. Ultimate stress, strain, elastic modulus, energy and stiffness were evaluated. This study found that SCCO(2) treatment without additive did not alter the ultimate stress, stiffness or energy to failure depreciably in any orientation. The addition of sterilants peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide also preserved mechanical function, with no deleterious effect on stress or stiffness. This study highlights the expediency of SCCO(2) treatment for bone allograft processing as terminal sterilization can be achieved while maintaining the intrinsic mechanical properties of the graft. PMID:24737303

  19. Potential climate change effects on rice: Carbon dioxide and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.T.; Boote, K.J.; Allen, L.H. Jr. |

    1995-12-31

    The projected doubling of current levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration [CO{sub 2}] during the next century, along with increases in other radiatively active gases, has led to predictions of increases in global air temperature and shifts in precipitation patterns. Since 1987, several [CO{sub 2}] and temperature experiments have been conducted on rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. IR-30) in outdoor, naturally-sunlit, environmentally-controlled, plant growth chambers. The objectives of this chapter are to summarize some of the major findings of these experiments. In these experiments, season-long [CO{sub 2}] treatments ranged from 160 to 900 {micro}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1} air, while temperature treatments ranged from 25/18/21 to 40/33/37 C (daytime dry bulb air temperature/nighttime dry bulb air temperature/constant paddy water temperature). Total growth duration was shortened by 10 to 12 d as [CO{sub 2}] increased across a [CO{sub 2}] range from 160 to 500 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}, due mainly to a shortened vegetative phase of development and a reduction in the number of mainstem leaves formed prior to panicle initiation. Photosynthesis, growth, and final grain yield increased with [CO{sub 2}] from 160 to 500 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}, but were very similar from 500 to 900 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. Carbon dioxide enrichment from 330 to 660 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} increased grain yield mainly by increasing the number of panicles per plant, and increasing temperature treatment above 28/21/25 C resulted in decreased grain yield, due largely to a decline in the number of filled grain per panicle. Evapotranspiration decreased and water-use efficiency increased with increasing [CO{sub 2}] treatment, while the reverse trends were found with increasing temperature treatment. 60 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Phototoxic effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Charles M.

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanomaterials in the world. Studies have demonstrated the mechanism of acute toxicity in TiO2-NP to be the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and mortality in exposed organisms. It has also been demonstrated that the anatase crystalline conformation is capable of catalyzing the cleavage of water molecules to further increase the concentration of ROS in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. This photoenhanced toxicity significantly lowers the toxicity threshold of TiO2-NP to environmentally relevant concentrations (ppb). The goal of this study was to determine whether dietary uptake and accumulation of TiO2-NP in the aquatic filter feeder Daphnia magna resulted in photoenhanced toxicity. D. magna and S. caprincornatum were exposed to aqueous solutions of 20ppm and 200ppm TiO2-NP for 24hrs and then transferred to clean moderately hard water. Samples were taken at various time points, dried, and TiO 2 quantified using ICP-MS. Toxicity assays were run on D. magna using three TiO2-NP (20ppm, 200ppm) exposure protocols and two ultraviolet radiation treatments. The first exposure group was exposed to aqueous solutions of TiO2-NP for the duration of the test. The second exposure group was exposed to TiO2-NP for an hour and then transferred to clean water. The third exposure group was fed S. capricornatum that had been allowed to adsorb TiO2-NP. All samples were then placed in an outdoor UV exposure system and exposed to either full spectrum sunlight (with UV) or filtered sunlight (no UV). Here we show that TiO2 uptake peaked at one hour of exposure likely due to sedimentation of the particles out of suspension, thus decreasing bioavailability for the duration of the test. Interestingly, when D. magna were moved to clean water, aqueous concentrations of TiO2 increase as a result of depuration from the gut tract. Data also suggests these excreted particles

  1. A Review of Cognitive and Behavioral Effects of Increased Carbon Dioxide Exposure in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, Aleksandra; Alexander, David; Oman, Charles M.; Schneiderman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Existing research has reliably demonstrated the respiratory and cardiovascular effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation at moderately increased levels, with documented physiological changes to heart rate, blood pressure, tissue pH, and blood solubility (for a review of the human health risks of acute elevated CO2 exposure, see Rice, 2004). Studies of indoor air quality have linked increased levels of ambient CO2 with physiological symptoms such as headache, fatigue, and sore throat (Apte et al., 2000; Seppanen et al., 1999; Wargocki et al., 2000). High levels of CO2 (35%) have reliably resulted in activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and subjective anxiety responses in healthy individuals (Argyropoulos et al., 2002), as well as panic attack-like symptoms (Colasanti et al., 2008; Griez et al., 2007) and experiences of physiological stress (Consolazio & Fisher, 1947; Kaye et al., 2004). While significant neurological findings correspond to high levels of CO2 exposure, less clinically significant cognitive effects may occur at a much lower level. These cognitive changes and the exposure thresholds at which they occur are less well established than their physiological counterparts; this paper, therefore, reviews the existing literature on the cognitive, neurological, and psychomotor effects of increased CO2 exposure, with the objective of identifying research areas in which further investigation remains necessary. In particular, this investigation is motivated by the chronic exposure to elevated ambient CO2 concentrations experienced by astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS), and the CO2 exposure-related symptoms that have been reported by astronauts on orbit (James, 2007; Law & Watkins, 2009). Such exposure may negatively affect crew health and operations, including mission safety and the successful completion of scientific goals.

  2. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on the toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Mauderly, J L; Bice, D E; Cheng, Y S; Gillett, N A; Henderson, R F; Pickrell, J A; Wolff, R K

    1989-10-01

    This project examined the influence of preexisting, experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema on the adverse health effects in rats of chronic inhalation exposure to either nitrogen dioxide or automotive diesel-engine exhaust. Previous reports indicated that humans with chronic lung disease were among those most severely affected by episodic exposures to high concentrations of airborne toxicants. There were no previous reports comparing the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to components of automotive emissions in emphysematous and normal animals. The hypothesis tested in this project was that rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of the toxicant exposures. Young adult rats were housed continuously in inhalation exposure chambers and exposed seven hours per day, five days per week, for 24 months to nitrogen dioxide at 9.5 parts per million (ppm)2, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as control animals. These concentrations were selected to produce mild, but distinct, effects in rats with normal lungs. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of the proteolytic enzyme elastase six weeks before the toxicant exposures began. Health effects were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. The measurements included respiratory function, clearance of inhaled radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses to instilled antigen, biochemistry and cytology of airway fluid, total lung collagen, histopathology, lung morphometry, and lung burdens of diesel soot. The significance of influences of emphysema and toxicant exposure, and interactions between influences of the two treatments, were evaluated by analysis of variance. The elastase treatment resulted in pulmonary emphysema that was manifested by enlarged alveoli and alveolar ducts, and by ruptured alveolar septa. There was no accompanying inflammation and no

  3. Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Methane Concentrations in Railroad Valley, Nevada to Support GOSAT Satellite Validation and Global Flux Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, K. A.; Iraci, L. T.; Loewenstein, M.; Yates, E.; Sheffner, E.; NASA Arc Railroad Valley 2010 Research Team

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide and methane contribute to global warming and are spatially distributed throughout the atmosphere. Although there is a general understanding of the natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of both gases, their fluxes must be more thoroughly quantified to better forecast and mitigate global climate change. Quantifying these fluxes from local to global scales requires a network of ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements. Developing high-precision satellite sensors is imperative to global scale research by allowing for a more complete spatial analysis. In the summer of 2010, researchers from NASA Ames Research Center joined a multi-institute team on a playa in Railroad Valley, Nevada to acquire ground-based observations supporting measurements from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). A cavity ring down, near infrared instrument collected data every two seconds for 1.5 hours before and after each GOSAT overpass on four separate days near summer solstice. Observed data show unexpected spikes in carbon dioxide concentration throughout the daily data sets, whereas methane concentrations remain relatively constant. There is no discernible correlation between the instrumental data and the meteorological data that explain these spikes in concentration; nor has any instrumental performance error been detected. The Ames team has since been investigating the relationship between concentration variability and atmospheric dynamics, identifying possible nearby sources, and working to prove or disprove the possibility that carbon dioxide is being emitted from a microbial subsurface of the playa.

  4. Robust direct effect of carbon dioxide on tropical circulation and regional precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bony, Sandrine; Bellon, Gilles; Klocke, Daniel; Sherwood, Steven; Fermepin, Solange; Denvil, Sébastien

    2013-06-01

    Predicting the response of tropical rainfall to climate change remains a challenge. Rising concentrations of carbon dioxide are expected to affect the hydrological cycle through increases in global mean temperature and the water vapour content of the atmosphere. However, regional precipitation changes also closely depend on the atmospheric circulation, which is expected to weaken in a warmer world. Here, we assess the effect of a rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on tropical circulation and precipitation by analysing results from a suite of simulations from multiple state-of-the-art climate models, and an operational numerical weather prediction model. In a scenario in which humans continue to use fossil fuels unabated, about half the tropical circulation change projected by the end of the twenty-first century, and consequently a large fraction of the regional precipitation change, is independent of global surface warming. Instead, these robust circulation and precipitation changes are a consequence of the weaker net radiative cooling of the atmosphere associated with higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, which affects the strength of atmospheric vertical motions. This implies that geo-engineering schemes aimed at reducing global warming without removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere would fail to fully mitigate precipitation changes in the tropics. Strategies that may help constrain rainfall projections are suggested.

  5. Experimental analysis on effective factors affecting carbon dioxide storage as hydrate in a consolidated sedimentary rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, T.; Lee, J.; Park, C.; Jang, I.

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigated the reservoir properties and the injection rate affecting carbon dioxide storage as hydrate, which observed pressure and temperature at both formation and equilibrium conditions. One of typical issues was leakage to accomplish permanent carbon dioxide storage in underground geological formations. The sequestration of carbon dioxide as hydrate could settle down this matter because of its rigid lattice of cages. Two different experiments were carried out; first was isochoric experiments to analyze the effects of water saturation and pore size distribution on forming the hydrate. The other was isobaric to examine the injection rate of carbon dioxide. Three kinds of consolidated Berea sandstone were used with different water saturation(39~80%) and pore size distribution(5~10μm). The isochoric experiments were carried out under the ranges of pressure and temperature, from 15 to 35 bar and from 263 to 285 Kelvin, respectively. The experimental conditions of the isobaric were the constant pressure 24.7±0.6 bar, the temperature ranged from 271 to 301 Kelvin, and the injection rate varied from 10 to 275 sccm/min. At the viewpoint of reservoir properties, the isochoric experiments showed that the higher initial-water-saturation and the smaller average pore-size could play an inhibitor on forming the hydrate. The effect of water saturation was negligible below 274 Kelvin. Both of them were insignificant at the equilibrium condition. In the case of injection-related property, the isobaric experiments showed that the higher injection rate could make it difficult to form the hydrate. These results confirmed that the prevention of hydrate plugging near wellbore required the higher water saturation and injection rate. This experimental study could be useful to determine the adequate places for carbon dioxide disposal taking advantages of hydrate cap and also to set the operational strategy without any hydrate plugging near wellbore.

  6. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  7. Synergistic geometric and electronic effects for electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using gold-copper bimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyung; Resasco, Joaquin; Yu, Yi; Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Yang, Peidong

    2014-09-01

    Highly efficient and selective electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide represents one of the biggest scientific challenges in artificial photosynthesis, where carbon dioxide and water are converted into chemical fuels from solar energy. However, our fundamental understanding of the reaction is still limited and we do not have the capability to design an outstanding catalyst with great activity and selectivity a priori. Here we assemble uniform gold-copper bimetallic nanoparticles with different compositions into ordered monolayers, which serve as a well-defined platform to understand their fundamental catalytic activity in carbon dioxide reduction. We find that two important factors related to intermediate binding, the electronic effect and the geometric effect, dictate the activity of gold-copper bimetallic nanoparticles. These nanoparticle monolayers also show great mass activities, outperforming conventional carbon dioxide reduction catalysts. The insights gained through this study may serve as a foundation for designing better carbon dioxide electrochemical reduction catalysts.

  8. Synergistic geometric and electronic effects for electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using gold-copper bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyung; Resasco, Joaquin; Yu, Yi; Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Yang, Peidong

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient and selective electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide represents one of the biggest scientific challenges in artificial photosynthesis, where carbon dioxide and water are converted into chemical fuels from solar energy. However, our fundamental understanding of the reaction is still limited and we do not have the capability to design an outstanding catalyst with great activity and selectivity a priori. Here we assemble uniform gold-copper bimetallic nanoparticles with different compositions into ordered monolayers, which serve as a well-defined platform to understand their fundamental catalytic activity in carbon dioxide reduction. We find that two important factors related to intermediate binding, the electronic effect and the geometric effect, dictate the activity of gold-copper bimetallic nanoparticles. These nanoparticle monolayers also show great mass activities, outperforming conventional carbon dioxide reduction catalysts. The insights gained through this study may serve as a foundation for designing better carbon dioxide electrochemical reduction catalysts. PMID:25208828

  9. Microwave Effect for Glycosylation Promoted by Solid Super Acid in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Hinou, Hiroshi; Saito, Naohiro; Ogawa, Masato; Maeda, Takahiko; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    The effects of microwave irradiation (2.45 GHz, 200 W) on glycosylation promoted by a solid super acid in supercritical carbon dioxide was investigated with particular attention paid to the structure of the acceptor substrate. Because of the symmetrical structure and high diffusive property of supercritical carbon dioxide, microwave irradiation did not alter the temperature of the reaction solution, but enhanced reaction yield when aliphatic acceptors are employed. Interestingly, the use of a phenolic acceptor under the same reaction conditions did not show these promoting effects due to microwave irradiation. In the case of aliphatic diol acceptors, the yield seemed to be dependent on the symmetrical properties of the acceptors. The results suggest that microwave irradiation do not affect the reactivity of the donor nor promoter independently. We conclude that the effect of acceptor structure on glycosylation yield is due to electric delocalization of hydroxyl group and dielectrically symmetric structure of whole molecule. PMID:20054471

  10. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangjian; Wang, Yun; Zhuo, Lin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Lin; Luan, Xianguo; Wang, Haifang; Jia, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been widely used in various consumer products, especially food and personal care products. Compared to the well-characterized adverse cardiovascular effect of inhaled ambient ultrafine particles, research on the health response to orally administrated TiO2 NPs is still limited. In our study, we performed an in vivo study in Sprague-Dawley rats to understand the cardiovascular effect of TiO2 NPs after oral intake. After daily gastrointestinal administration of TiO2 NPs at 0, 2, 10, 50 mg/kg for 30 and 90 days, heart rate (HR), blood pressure, blood biochemical parameters and histopathology of cardiac tissues was assessed to quantify cardiovascular damage. Mild and temporary reduction of HR and systolic blood pressure as well as an increase of diastolic blood pressure was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 30 days. Injury of cardiac function was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 90 days as reflected in decreased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH) and creatine kinase (CK). Increased white blood cells count (WBC) and granulocytes (GRN) in blood as well as increased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the serum indicated inflammatory response initiated by TiO2 NPs exposure. It was hypothesize that cardiac damage and inflammatory response are the possible mechanisms of the adverse cardiovascular effects induced by orally administrated TiO2 NPs. Data from our study suggested that even at low dose of TiO2 NPs can induce adverse cardiovascular effects after 30 days or 90 days of oral exposure, thus warranting concern for the dietary intake of TiO2 NPs for consumers. PMID:26387441

  11. Sulfur dioxide effects on petunia pollen germination and seed set

    SciTech Connect

    Linskens, H.F.; van Megen, Y.; Pfahler, P.L.; Wilcox, M.

    1985-05-01

    Information pertaining to SO/sub 2/ effects on sexual reproduction is extremely limited even though this complex process is critical especially in annual species. This study reports the SO/sub 2/ effect on both in vitro and in vivo pollen germination characteristics and in vivo seed set in Petunia hybrida Vilm.

  12. Projecting the climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M C; Luther, F M

    1985-12-01

    This report presents the current knowns, unknowns, and uncertainties regarding the projected climate changes that might occur as a result of an increasing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. Further, the volume describes what research is required to estimate the magnitude and rate of a CO/sub 2/-induced clamate change with regional and seasonal resolution. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  13. Detecting the climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M C; Luther, F M

    1985-12-01

    This report documents what is known about detecting the CO2-induced changes in climate, and describes the uncertainties and unknowns associated with this monitoring and analysis effort. The various approaches for detecting CO2-induced climate changes are discussed first, followed by a review of applications of these strategies to the various climatic variables that are expected to be changing. Recommendations are presented for research and analysis activities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  14. The combined effects of elevated carbon dioxide and ozone on crop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Heagle, A.S.; Shafer, S.R.; Heck, W.W. |

    1994-12-31

    Concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) in the troposphere have risen in the last century due to industrialization. Current levels of tropospheric O{sub 3} suppress growth of crops and other plants, and O{sub 3} concentrations may continue to rise with changes in global climate. On the other hand, projected increases in atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the next 50 to 100 years are expected to cause significant increases in growth of most species. Since elevated concentrations of these gases will co-occur, it is important to understand their joint action. Until recently, however, the combined effects of O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} have received little attention. Most publications on combined CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} effects have described experiments conducted in greenhouse or controlled-environment facilities. To date, data on responses of agricultural species to the combined gases have come from experiments with radish, tomato, white clover, tobacco, or wheat. In most cases, CO{sub 2} stimulated and O{sub 3} suppressed growth of the plant tissues studied, and CO{sub 2} usually attenuated development of O{sub 3}-induced visible injury. Some data have indicated a tendency for CO{sub 2}, in concentrations up to double the current ambient level, to attenuate effects of O{sub 3} on growth, but statistical analyses of such data often have not supported such a conclusion. In this paper, the results of a recent field experiment with soybean are reported, and the results are compared to other similar research with elevated atmospheric concentrations of both O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}.

  15. TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORITE AND CHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Review of the available literature obtained from both acute and chronic experiments utilizing rats, mice and chickens treated with Cl02, Cl02 and Cl03 in drinking water has demonstrated alterations in hematologic parameters in all species tested. The effects were usually dose rel...

  16. Interdigitated gate electrode field effect transistor for the selective detection of nitrogen dioxide and diisopropyl methylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesar, E.S. Jr.; Wiseman, J.M. )

    1989-11-01

    An interdigitated gate electrode field effect transistor (IGE-FET) coupled to an electron beam evaporated copper phthalocyanine thin film was used to selectively detect part-per-billion concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP). The sensor is excited with a voltage pulse, and the time- and frequency-domain responses are measured. The envelopes of the magnitude of the normalized difference frequency spectrums reveal features that unambiguously distinguish NO{sub 2} and DIMP exposures.

  17. Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Huppmann, T. Leonhardt, S. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Krampe, E. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Wintermantel, E.; Yatsenko, S. Radovanovic, I. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de; Bastian, M. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de

    2014-05-15

    To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO{sub 2} for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO{sub 2} coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO{sub 2} particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO{sub 2} P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO{sub 2}-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

  18. Cytotoxic effect of uranium dioxide on rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Tasat, D.R.; de Rey, B.M.

    1987-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchial lavage were used to assess the response of these cells to cultivation in media containing increasing concentrations of particulate UO/sub 2/. The characteristic time course of uranium effects on alveolar macrophages was determined by analyzing cell viability and incorporation of uranium particles. This study reveals the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize uranium particles despite the high toxicity the metal exerts on cell membranes. However, lethal effects soon become evident. Ultrastructural analysis showed uranium particles confined within membrane bound vacuoles or free in the cytoplasm. Marked ultrastructural alterations consistent with cell death were frequently observed. The elimination of the first biological barrier hinders the scavenging of particulate contaminants in alveolar spaces, thus favoring the translocation to target organs.

  19. Solar cycle effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; Rust, B.W.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a causal time-series model for the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 record which supersedes a mathematical model consisting of four effects represented by exponential and sine functions. One effect is a 142-month oscillation which trails the sunspot numbers by exactly a quarter-cycle. This suggests that solar activity affects the rate of change in the atmospheric CO2 abundance. The new model replaces the mathematical functions with four measured time series representing proposed physical causes and reduces the number of adjustable parameters from 13 to 5 with no significant deterioration in the fit. The authors present evidence that solar activity affects the CO2 abundance through variations in ocean temperature or circulation.

  20. Effect of Diffusion on Lithium Intercalation in Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudriachova, Marina V.; Harrison, Nicholas M.; de Leeuw, Simon W.

    2001-02-01

    A new model of Li intercalation into rutile and anatase structured titania has been developed from first principles calculations. The model includes both thermodynamic and kinetic effects and explains the observed differences in intercalation behavior and their temperature dependence. The important role of strong local deformations of the lattice and elastic screening of interlithium interactions is demonstrated. In addition, a new phase of LiTiO2 is reported.

  1. Effect of Trichodesma indicum extract on cough reflex induced by sulphur dioxide in mice.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, K; Murugesan, T; Kumar, Ch Anil; Suba, V; Das, A K; Sinha, S; Arunachalam, G; Manikandan, L

    2002-01-01

    The effect of methanol extract of whole plants of Trichodesma indicum R. Br. has been investigated on sulphur dioxide (SO2) induced cough reflex in Swiss albino mice. The extract has demonstrated significant (p < 0.001) inhibition in frequency of cough in all the tested doses when compared with untreated control group. The effect persisted up to 90 min of its oral administration and also comparable to that of the effect exhibited by the standard drug (Codeine phosphate). This study confirmed the traditional use of this plant in the treatment of cough. Determination of underlying mechanism of beneficial effect is major topic requiring further comprehensive investigation. PMID:11924768

  2. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D

    1985-12-01

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  3. Effects of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide on bacterial growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Mckay, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    While it is generally thought that the bactericidal effects of NO and NO2 derive from their reaction with water to form nitrous and nitric acids (Shank et al., 1962), this appears to be true only at high concentrations. The data presented here suggest that at low NO and NO2 concentrations, acids are not present in high enough concentrations to act as toxic agents. Reference is made to a study by Grant et al. (1979), which found that exposing acid forest soil to 1 ppm of NO2 did not cause the soil pH to drop. The results presented here show that at low concentrations of NO and NO2, the NO is bacteriostatic for some organisms and not for others, whereas NO2 may protect some bacteria from the inhibitory effects of NO. Since it has been shown that bacteria can divide while airborne (Dimmick et al., 1979), the present results suggest that NO at the low concentrations found in the atmosphere can select for resistant bacteria in the air and affect the viable airborne bacterial population.

  4. Effect of humic acid source on humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Erhayem, Mohamed; Sohn, Mary

    2014-02-01

    In many studies, different humic acid (HA) sources are used interchangeably to evaluate the effect of organic matter on geochemical processes in the environment. This research looks more specifically at the effect of HA source on HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2 and how HA adsorption affects the fate and transport of nano-TiO2. In this study, six humic acids (HAs) were studied which were derived from soils (SLHA), or from sediments (SDHA) all originating from the state of Florida. Humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and the sedimentation of HA-coated and uncoated nano-TiO2 were monitored by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. Synchronous scan fluorescence (SSF) spectroscopy was used to complement the study of HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2. Phosphate buffer was found to reduce the amount of HA adsorbed onto nano-TiO2 relative to solutions of NaCl of the same pH and ionic strength. Adsorption constant values (Kads) for HAs varied in the order SLHA>FSDHA (freshwater sedimentary HA)>ESDHA (estuarine sedimentary HA). SSF results suggested that the more highly conjugated fractions of HA, which are more prevalent in SLHAs versus SDHAs, were preferentially adsorbed. In order to better understand the relationship between adsorption and aggregation, sedimentation studies were conducted and it was found that the percentage of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was preferentially enhanced in the order of the presence of SLHA>FSDHA>ESDHA. The extent of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was decreased with increasing HA concentration. TEM imaging of nano-TiO2 confirmed that nano-TiO2 was aggregated in the presence of HAs. The findings in this study suggest that HAs from different sources influence the fate and transport of nano-TiO2 in the environment differently. PMID:24140685

  5. EFFECT OF SULFUR DIOXIDE ON THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZODIOXIN AND DIBENZOFURAN IN MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of sulfur dioxide on the formation mechanism of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) in the postcombustion, downstream region (500-300 °C) of a municipal waste combustor (MWC) was investigated. Laboratory experiments simulating t...

  6. Steric effects and preferential interactions in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Saquing, C.D.; Lucien, F.P.; Foster, N.R

    1998-10-01

    Solubility data are presented for a mixture of o-hydroxybenzoic acid (o-HBA) and m-HBA in supercritical CO{sub 2} doped with 3.5 mol% methanol. The data were measured at 318 and 328 K and for pressures in the range of 101--201 bar. Some new data for the solubility of pure m-HBA in methanol-doped supercritical CO{sub 2} are also presented. The solubilities of the HBA isomers are enhanced considerably with the addition of methanol to supercritical CO{sub 2}. However, the solubility enhancement is strongly affected by the spatial arrangement of their functional groups (steric effect). There appears to be preferential interaction between the solutes and the cosolvent in the quaternary system, and this phenomenon is consistent with thermodynamic modeling of the system.

  7. Core-hole effect on XANES and electronic structure of minor actinide dioxides with fluorite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chikashi; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Nakada, Masami; Akabori, Mitsuo; Hirata, Masaru; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    The authors investigated theoretically core-hole effects on X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) of Np and Am LIII in neptunium dioxide (NpO2) and americium dioxide (AmO2) with CaF2-type crystal lattices using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method. The peak creation mechanism of XANES was shown by examining the electronic structures of these oxides, which indicated that core-hole screening was more marked for AmO2 than for NpO2 because of the difference in the charge transfer between these oxides. Furthermore, the results of charge density analysis suggested that the white line was assigned to the quasi-bound state composed of the localized Np d or Am d components and O components, and that the tail structure was created as a result of delocalized standing waves between the Np or Am atoms.

  8. Theoretical Study of Sodium Effect on the Gasification of Carbonaceous Materials with Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Lucas A; Garza, Jorge; Espinal, Juan F

    2015-12-24

    The effect of sodium on the thermodynamics and kinetics of carbon gasification with carbon dioxide was studied by using quantum chemistry methods. Specifically, in the density functional context, two exchange-correlation functionals were used: B3LYP and M06. Some results obtained by these exchange-correlation functionals were contrasted with those obtained by the CCSD(T) method. It was found that density functional theory gives similar conclusions with respect to the coupled-cluster method. As one important conclusion we can mention that the thermodynamics of carbon monoxide desorption is not favored by the sodium presence. However, the presence of this metal induces: (a) an easier formation of one semiquinone group, (b) the dissociation of carbon dioxide, and PMID:26618667

  9. Evaluation of doped phthalocyanines and a chemically-sensitive field effect transistor for detecting nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas J.

    1989-12-01

    The design and fabrication of an integrated circuit microsensor for the detection of nitrogen dioxide is examined. Metal-doped phthalocyanine compounds were evaluated as a candidate chemically sensitive membrane, and their performance was compared with respect to sensitivity, reversibility, and specificity. The microsensor consisted of the integration of an array of 9 sensing elements with amplifiers, a reference amplifier, and an analog multiplexer. The 9 individual sensing elements used an interdigitated gate electrode field effect transistor (IGEFET) coupled to a serially connected pair of inverting amplifiers using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors(MOSFETs). The interdigitated gate electrodes were coated with thin films of cobalt (II) phthalocyanine (CoPc), copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), lead phthalocyanine (PbPc), nickel (II) phthalocyanine (NiPc), and (undoped) phthalocyanine (Pc). An excitation signal was applied to the integrated circuit, and the multiplexed electrical response was measured in the time-domain and the frequency-domain. The electrical response was evaluated upon exposure to 20-, 80-, and 320-ppb of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) using filtered room air (less than 5 percent relative humidity) as the diluent. The electrical response was evaluated for film thickness of approximately 1500 A and 500 A. The rank ordering of the sensitivity of the materials to nitrogen dioxide from the most to least sensitive was: CoPc, NiPc, CuPc, PbPc, and then (undoped) Pc.

  10. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    -sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

  11. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide effects on cotton plant residue decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Torbert, H.A.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.

    1995-09-01

    Assessing the impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration on the global environment is hampered due to a lack of understanding of global C cycling. Carbon fixed within plant biomass ultimately enters the soil via plant residues, but the effects of elevated-CO{sub 2}-grown plant material on decomposition rates and long-term soil C storage are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the decomposition rate of plant residues grown under an elevated CO{sub 2} environment as affected by soil type. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. `Delta Pine 77`) samples were collected from a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (550 {mu}L L{sup -1}) experiment. The plant residues were incubated under ambient CO{sub 2} conditions to determine decomposition rates of leaves, stems, and roots and potential N and P mineralization-immobilization in three soil series. No significant difference was observed between plant residue grown under CO{sub 2} enrichment vs. ambient CO{sub 2} conditions for soil respiration or P mineralization-immobilization. Significantly greater net N immobilization was observed during the incubation in all soil types for plant residue grown at elevated CO{sub 2}. These results indicate that while decomposition of plant residue may not be reduced by CO{sub 2} enrichment, N dynamics may be markedly changed. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Effect of elevated carbon dioxide on nutritional quality of tomato.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Mackowiak, C L; Stutte, G W; Yorio, N C; Berry, W L

    1997-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cvs. Red Robin (RR) and Reimann Philipp (RP) were grown hydroponically for 105 d with a 12 h photoperiod, 26 degrees C/22 degrees C thermoperiod, and 500 micromol m-2 s-1 PPF at either 400, 1200, 5000, or 10,000 micromol mol-1 (0.04, 0.12, 0.50, 1.00 kPa) CO2. Harvested fruits were analyzed for proximate composition, total dietary fiber, nitrate, and elemental composition. No trends were apparent with regard to CO2 effects on proximate composition, with fruit from all treatments and both cultivars averaging 18.9% protein, 3.6% fat, 10.2% ash, and 67.2% carbohydrate. In comparison, average values for field-grown fruit are 16.6% protein, 3.8% fat, 8.1% ash, and 71.5% carbohydrate (Duke and Atchely, 1986). Total dietary fiber was highest at 10,000 micromol mol-1 (28.4% and 22.6% for RR and RP) and lowest at 1000 micromol mol-1 (18.2% and 15.9% for RR and RP), but showed no overall trend in response to CO2. Nitrate values ranged from 0.19% to 0.35% and showed no trend with regard to CO2. K, Mg, and P concentrations showed no trend in response to CO2, but Ca levels increased from 198 and 956 ppm in RR and RP at 400 micromol mol-1, to 2537 and 2825 ppm at 10,000 micromol mol-1. This increase in Ca caused an increase in fruit Ca/P ratios from 0.07 and 0.37 for RR and RP at 400 micromol mol-1 to 0.99 and 1.23 for RR and RP at 10,000 micromol mol-1, suggesting that more dietary Ca should be available from high CO2-grown fruit. PMID:11542578

  13. Effect of Elevated Carbon Dioxide on Nutritional Quality of Tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Berry, W. L.

    1997-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cvs. Red Robin (RR) and Reimann Philipp (RP) were grown hydroponically for 105 d with a 12 h photoperiod, 26 C/22 C thermoperiod, and 500 micromol/ sq m/s PPF at either 400, 1200, 5000, or 10,000 micromol/mol (0.04, 0.12, 0.50, 1.00 kPa) CO2. Harvested fruits were analyzed for proximate composition, total dietary fiber, nitrate, and elemental composition. No trends were apparent with regard to CO2 effects on proximate composition, with fruit from all treatments and both cultivars averiging 18.9 % protein, 3.6 % fat, 10.2 % ash, and 67.2 % carbohydrate. In comparison, average values for field-grown fruit are 16.6 % protein, 3.8 % fat, 8.1 % ash, and 71.5 % carbohydrate (Duke and Atchely, 1986). Total dietary fiber was highest at 10,000 micromol/mol (28.4 % and 22.6 % for RR and RP) and lowest at 1000 micromol/mol (18.2 % and 15.9 % for RR and RP), but showed no overall trend in response to CO2. Nitrate values ranged from 0.19 % to 0.35 % and showed no trend with regard to CO2. K, Mg, and P concentrations showed no trend in response to CO2, but Ca levels increased from 198 and 956 ppm in RR and RP at 400 micromol/mol, to 2537 and 2825 ppm at 10,000 micromol/mol. This increase in Ca caused an increase in fruit Ca/P ratios from 0.07 and 0.37 for RR and RP at 400 micromol/molto 0.99 and 1.23 for RR and RP at 10,000 micromol/mol suggesting that more dietary Ca should be available from high CO2-grown fruit.

  14. Effect of elevated carbon dioxide on nutritional quality of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Berry, W. L.

    1997-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cvs. Red Robin (RR) and Reimann Philipp (RP) were grown hydroponically for 105 d with a 12 h photoperiod, 26 degC/22 degC thermoperiod, and 500 mumol.m^-2 .s^-1 PPF at either 400, 1200, 5000, or 10,000 mumol.mol^-1 (0.04, 0.12, 0.50, 1.00 kPa) CO_2. Harvested fruits were analyzed for proximate composition, total dietary fiber, nitrate, and elemental composition. No trends were apparent with regard to CO_2 effects on proximate composition, with fruit from all treatments and both cultivars averaging 18.9 % protein, 3.6 % fat, 10.2 % ash, and 67.2 % carbohydrate. In comparison, average values for field-grown fruit are 16.6 % protein, 3.8 % fat, 8.1 % ash, and 71.5 % carbohydrate (Duke and Atchely, 1986). Total dietary fiber was highest at 10,000 mumol.mol^-1 (28.4 % and 22.6 % for RR and RP) and lowest at 1000 mumol.mol^-1 (18.2 % and 15.9 % for RR and RP), but showed no overall trend in response to CO_2. Nitrate values ranged from 0.19 % to 0.35 % and showed no trend with regard to CO_2. K, Mg, and P concentrations showed no trend in response to CO_2, but Ca levels increased from 198 and 956 ppm in RR and RP at 400 mumol.mol^-1, to 2537 and 2825 ppm at 10,000 mumol.mol^-1. This increase in Ca caused an increase in fruit Ca/P ratios from 0.07 and 0.37 for RR and RP at 400 mumol.mol^-1 to 0.99 and 1.23 for RR and RP at 10,000 mumol.mol^-1, suggesting that more dietary Ca should be available from high CO_2-grown fruit.

  15. Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles in sunscreens: focus on their safety and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Smijs, Threes G; Pavel, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Sunscreens are used to provide protection against adverse effects of ultraviolet (UV)B (290–320 nm) and UVA (320–400 nm) radiation. According to the United States Food and Drug Administration, the protection factor against UVA should be at least one-third of the overall sun protection factor. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) minerals are frequently employed in sunscreens as inorganic physical sun blockers. As TiO2 is more effective in UVB and ZnO in the UVA range, the combination of these particles assures a broad-band UV protection. However, to solve the cosmetic drawback of these opaque sunscreens, microsized TiO2 and ZnO have been increasingly replaced by TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (<100 nm). This review focuses on significant effects on the UV attenuation of sunscreens when microsized TiO2 and ZnO particles are replaced by NPs and evaluates physicochemical aspects that affect effectiveness and safety of NP sunscreens. With the use of TiO2 and ZnO NPs, the undesired opaqueness disappears but the required balance between UVA and UVB protection can be altered. Utilization of mixtures of micro- and nanosized ZnO dispersions and nanosized TiO2 particles may improve this situation. Skin exposure to NP-containing sunscreens leads to incorporation of TiO2 and ZnO NPs in the stratum corneum, which can alter specific NP attenuation properties due to particle–particle, particle–skin, and skin–particle–light physicochemical interactions. Both sunscreen NPs induce (photo)cyto- and genotoxicity and have been sporadically observed in viable skin layers especially in case of long-term exposures and ZnO. Photocatalytic effects, the highest for anatase TiO2, cannot be completely prevented by coating of the particles, but silica-based coatings are most effective. Caution should still be exercised when new sunscreens are developed and research that includes sunscreen NP stabilization, chronic exposures, and reduction of NPs’ free-radical production

  16. Effects of 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation and ethnicity on face memory

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Angela S.; Catling, Jon C.; Kwong, Alex S.F.; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately verify facial identity has important forensic implications, but this ability is fallible. Research suggests that anxiety at the time of encoding can impair subsequent recall, but no studies have investigated the effects of anxiety at the time of recall in an experimental paradigm. This study addresses this gap using the carbon dioxide (CO2) model of anxiety induction. Thirty participants completed two inhalations: one of 7.5% CO2-enriched air and one of medical air (i.e., placebo). Prior to each inhalation, participants were presented with 16 facial images (50% own-ethnicity, 50% other-ethnicity). During the inhalation they were required to identify which faces had been seen before from a set of 32 images (16 seen-before and 16 novel images). Identification accuracy was lower during CO2 inhalation compared to air (F[1,29] = 5.5, p = .026, ηp2 = .16), and false alarm rate was higher for other-ethnicity faces compared to own-ethnicity faces (F[1,29] = 11.3, p = .002, ηp2 = .28). There was no evidence of gas by ethnicity interactions for accuracy or false alarms (ps > .34). Ratings of decision confidence did not differ by gas condition, suggesting that participants were unaware of differences in performance. These findings suggest that anxiety, at the point of recognition, impairs facial identification accuracy. This has substantial implications for eyewitness memory situations, and suggests that efforts should be made to attenuate the anxiety in these situations in order to improve the validity of identification. PMID:25890273

  17. Effects of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide on mercury oxidation and reduction under homogeneous conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yongxin Zhao; Michael D. Mann; Edwin S. Olson; John H. Pavlish; Grant E. Dunham

    2006-05-15

    This paper is particularly related to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation and divalent mercury (Hg{sup 2+} reduction under simulated flue gas conditions in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). As a powerful oxidant and chlorinating reagent, Cl{sub 2} has the potential for Hg oxidation. However, the detailed mechanism for the interactions, especially among chlorine (Cl)-containing species, SO{sub 2}, NO, as well as H{sub 2}O, remains ambiguous. Research described in this paper therefore focused on the impacts of SO{sub 2} and NO on Hg{sup 0} oxidation and Hg{sup 2+} reduction with the intent of unraveling unrecognized interactions among Cl species, SO{sub 2}, and NO most importantly in the presence of H{sub 2}O. The experimental results demonstrated that SO{sub 2} and NO had pronounced inhibitory effects on Hg{sup 0} oxidation at high temperatures when H{sub 2}O was also present in the gas blend. Such a demonstration was further confirmed by the reduction of Hg{sup 2+} back into its elemental form. Data revealed that SO{sub 2} and NO were capable of promoting homogeneous reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} with H{sub 2}O being present. However, the above inhibition or promotion disappeared under homogeneous conditions when H{sub 2}O was removed from the gas blend. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on virus growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, G A

    1977-01-01

    Inhalation of ozone and sulfur dioxide inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose of mice. Ozone inhalation caused the more pronounced inhibition of influenza virus growth: 0.6 ppm ozone for 3 hours post-virus exposure almost completely inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose, whereas sulfur dioxide (6 ppm for 7 days) causes only partial inhibition of influenza growth in the nose. Neither gas altered the propagation of influenza virus in the lungs of mice. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) growth was either unaffected by exposure to ozone (0.9 ppm for 3 hours) or, when ozone exposure preceeded VSV exposure, the virus may have grown to slightly higher titer. The inhibitory effect of ozone and sulfur dioxide on influenza virus growth in nasal epithelium suggests a competitive interaction between the chemical inhalant, the virus, and host tissues, with net consequences for the pathogenesis of this disease. If the effcts of these inhalants are to be properly interpreted, they should be determined for all major regions of virus growth and inhalant deposition. PMID:189703

  19. Sulphur dioxide emissions in Europe 1880 1991 and their effect on sulphur concentrations and depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylona, Sophia

    1996-11-01

    A historical emission inventory for sulphur dioxide has been compiled for Europe covering the period 1880 1991. The estimated emissions have been used as input to the sulphur module of the EMEP/MSC-W acid deposition model. The aim was to show the way and the extent to which the historical development of anthropogenic sulphur dioxide emissions alone has affected the concentration and deposition fields of oxidised sulphur in Europe. Although acknowledged, effects exerted by the meteorological variability and the changing oxidising capacity of the atmosphere over the years have not been taken into consideration. Long-term emission estimates reveal that combustion of coal was the dominant emission source before World War II in all countries and combustion of liquid fuels thereafter in most. Releases from industrial processes were relatively small. National sulphur dioxide emissions peaked mainly in the 1960s and 1970s, whilst emission control measures resulted in gradual reductions in most countries in the 1980s. In Europe as a whole, coal combustion remained the major emission source throughout the century. Total anthropogenic releases increased by a factor of 10 between the 1880 s and 1970s when they peaked at approximately 55 million tonnes of sulphur dioxide, followed by a 30% decline in the 1980s. Uncertainties in national emission estimates due to uncertain sulphur contents in fossil fuels are within ± 30% for 22 out of 28 countries and ± 45% for the rest. The location of emission sources in Europe has shown over the years a progressive detachment from the coalfields towards a widespread distribution, accompanied in the last decades by considerable emission reductions over north-western and parts of central Europe and substantial increases in the south and south-east. Modelled air concentrations and depositions reflect to a great extent the emission pattern, revealing two- to six-fold increases between the 1880 s and 1970s. Maximum sulphur loadings are confined

  20. Carbon dioxide and climate. [Appendix includes names and addresses of the Principal Investigators for the research projects funded in FY1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO{sub 2} Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration.

  1. Effects of Nano-Titanium Dioxide on Freshwater Algal Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kulacki, Konrad J.; Cardinale, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    To make predictions about the possible effects of nanomaterials across environments and taxa, toxicity testing must incorporate not only a variety of organisms and endpoints, but also an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie nanoparticle toxicity. Here, we report the results of a laboratory experiment in which we examined how titanium dioxide nanoparticles impact the population dynamics and production of biomass across a range of freshwater algae. We exposed 10 of the most common species of North American freshwater pelagic algae (phytoplankton) to five increasing concentrations of n-TiO2 (ranging from controls to 300 mg n-TiO2 L−1). We then examined the effects of n-TiO2 on the population growth rates and biomass production of each algal species over a period of 25 days. On average, increasing concentrations of n-TiO2 had no significant effects on algal growth rates (p = 0.376), even though there was considerable species-specific variation in responses. In contrast, exposure to n-TiO2 tended to increase maximum biomass achieved by species in culture (p = 0.06). Results suggest that titanium dioxide nanoparticles could influence certain aspects of population growth of freshwater phytoplankton, though effects are unlikely at environmentally relevant concentrations. PMID:23071735

  2. CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    NHEERL's research in this area focuses on ecological effects of bioaccumulative chemicals, such as PCBs. The research is designed with recognition that sites of different size and complexity require bioaccumulation models with correspondingly complex and/or extensive data requir...

  3. Carbon Dioxide - Our Common "Enemy"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Health effects of brief and prolonged exposure to carbon dioxide continue to be a concern for those of us who manage this pollutant in closed volumes, such as in spacecraft and submarines. In both examples, considerable resources are required to scrub the atmosphere to levels that are considered totally safe for maintenance of crew health and performance. Defining safe levels is not a simple task because of many confounding factors, including: lack of a robust database on human exposures, suspected significant variations in individual susceptibility, variations in the endpoints used to assess potentially adverse effects, the added effects of stress, and the fluid shifts associated with micro-gravity (astronauts only). In 2007 the National Research Council proposed revised Continuous Exposure Guidelines (CEGLs) and Emergency Exposure Guidelines (EEGLs) to the U.S. Navy. Similarly, in 2008 the NASA Toxicology Group, in cooperation with another subcommittee of the National Research Council, revised Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). In addition, a 1000-day exposure limit was set for long-duration spaceflights to celestial bodies. Herein we examine the rationale for the levels proposed to the U.S. Navy and compare this rationale with the one used by NASA to set its limits. We include a critical review of previous studies on the effects of exposure to carbon dioxide and attempt to dissect out the challenges associated with setting fully-defensible limits. We also describe recent experiences with management of carbon dioxide aboard the International Space Station with 13 persons aboard. This includes the tandem operations of the Russian Vozduk and the U.S. Carbon Dioxide Removal System. A third removal system is present while the station is docked to the Shuttle spacecraft, so our experience includes the lithium hydroxide system aboard Shuttle for the removal of carbon dioxide. We discuss strategies for highly-efficient, regenerable removal of carbon

  4. Effect of azelastine on sulphur dioxide induced impairment of ciliary motility in airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Chiyotani, A; Sakai, N; Takeyama, K; Konno, K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The effect of azelastine on airway mucociliary transport function was studied by measuring ciliary motility of human bronchial epithelium in vitro with a photoelectric method. METHOD--Bronchial epithelial cells were obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, mounted in a Rose chamber, and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. The preparations were placed on a microscope stage equipped with an illuminator, and the variations of light intensity caused by ciliary beating were detected by a photometer. RESULTS--The addition of azelastine to the perfusate increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in a dose dependent manner without ciliary discoordination. The mean (SE) maximal increase from the baseline value and the concentration required to produce a half maximal effect were 27.0 (4.2)% and 9.2 x 10(-6) mol/l, respectively. Exposure of the cells to the perfusate containing 3 ppm sulphur dioxide rapidly decreased CBF by 59.2 (5.0)%, and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels from 38.1 (4.3) to 10.1 (2.4) pmol/mg protein. This effect was prevented by pretreatment of cells with azelastine in a dose dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS--Azelastine not only stimulates ciliary motility of airway epithelium and hence mucociliary transport function, but may also protect against sulphur dioxide induced ciliary dysfunction, probably by inhibiting intracellular cyclic AMP loss. PMID:8322244

  5. Possible greenhouse effects of tetrafluoromethane and carbon dioxide emitted from aluminum production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Ralph E.

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) is an extremely stable gas which strongly absorbs infrared radiation at ˜ 8 μm, and therefore is capable of influencing the greenhouse effect. No natural sources have been identified, and the major anthropogenic source appears to be the electrolytic smelting of alumina to produce aluminum. Measurements of CF 4 concentrations in the atmosphere are reviewed, and these are combined with aluminum production rates to provide an estimate of 1.3-3.6 kg of CF 4 emitted per ton of aluminum produced for the period up to ˜ 1985. Aluminum production also requires large amounts of electrical energy, leading to the emission of as much as 22 tons of carbon dioxide per ton of aluminum due to fossil fuel combustion in power plants. The present day contribution of hydroelectric power reduces this figure to about 14 tons of carbon dioxide per ton of aluminum. An estimate of the relative radiative trapping of CF 4 and CO 2 emitted in aluminum production during this same period (1900-1985) indicates that the effect of CF 4 is about one-third that of the CO 2 formed by aluminum production. However, the emission of fluorocarbons from modem aluminum electrolysis cells is much lower than previous estimates indicate, and this factor is considered in estimating potential long-term global warming effects of CF 4 and CO 2 from aluminum production. Possible processes leading to removal of CF 4 from the atmosphere are described.

  6. Further studies on the effect of nitrogen dioxide on mast cells: The effect of the metabolite, nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Ozawa, Masashi ); Bissonnette, E.; Befus, A.D. )

    1993-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen dioxide exposure and the development of allergic diseases, the effects of nitrite as a chemical product of inhaled nitrogen dioxide on mast cell functions were investigated. We have studied nitride-induced histamine release from two functionally distinct mast cell populations, namely peritoneal mast cells (PMC) and intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMC) of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats. High concentrations of nitrite alone (10, 20, and 50 mM) induced histamine release from IMMC, but not from PMC. Moreover, histamine release from PMC and IMMC stimulated with sensitizing antigen was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with 50 mM nitrite or nitrate. No differences in histamine release from nitrite-treated and control PMC were seen below 1 mM. To investigate the effect of nitrite on tumor cell cytotoxic activity, PMC were incubated with various concentrations of nitrite. Pretreatment with 5 and 50 mM nitrite markedly depressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha]-dependent natural cytotoxicity of PMC for the tumor target WEHI-164. Thus, high concentrations of nitrite enhanced mast cell histamine release, but depressed TNF-[alpha]-dependent cytotoxicity. However, low concentrations of nitrite (<1 mM) that would normally be produced by short-term atmospheric exposure to nitrogen dioxide may have no significant effects on mast cell functions. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water.

  8. Responses of susceptible subpopulations to nitrogen dioxide. Research report, June 1983-January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Utell, M.J.

    1989-02-01

    Symptom responses and changes in pulmonary function were investigated in people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exposed to 0.3 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) for four hours. Nonrespiratory-impaired (normal) subjects of comparable ages constituted the control groups. All exposures included periods of exercise and pulmonary function measurements. No significant symptomatic or physiological responses to NO{sub 2} could be detected in either the young or elderly control group. The asthmatic group did not manifest significant reductions in lung function after exposure to 0.3 ppm NO{sub 2}, compared to their preexposure baseline data or to their responses after a comparable four-hour exposure to air. During light exercise, subjects with COPD were progressively responsive to 0.3 ppm NO{sub 2}. Subgroup analyses within the asthmatic, COPD, and elderly normal subject groups and intergroup comparisons yielded significant findings and associations.

  9. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Adam; Blumsack, Seth A; Apt, Jay; Lave, Lester B; Morgan, M Granger

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO2 emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO2 emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO2 emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO2 emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO2 emissions that has been shown in earlier workto stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO2 reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. PMID:18522086

  10. Thermally driven analog of the Barkhausen effect at the metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Huber-Rodriguez, Benjamin; Ji, Heng; Chen, Chih-Wei; Kwang, Siu Yi; Hardy, Will J.; Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-09-29

    The physics of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide remains a subject of intense interest. Because of the complicating effects of elastic strain on the phase transition, there is interest in comparatively strain-free means of examining VO{sub 2} material properties. We report contact-free, low-strain studies of the MIT through an inductive bridge approach sensitive to the magnetic response of VO{sub 2} powder. Rather than observing the expected step-like change in susceptibility at the transition, we argue that the measured response is dominated by an analog of the Barkhausen effect, due to the extremely sharp jump in the magnetic response of each grain as a function of time as the material is cycled across the phase boundary. This effect suggests that future measurements could access the dynamics of this and similar phase transitions.

  11. The effects of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide on shoot-root nitrogen and water signaling

    PubMed Central

    Easlon, Hsien Ming; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial higher plants are composed of roots and shoots, distinct organs that conduct complementary functions in dissimilar environments. For example, roots are responsible for acquiring water and nutrients such as inorganic nitrogen from the soil, yet shoots consume the majority of these resources. The success of such a relationship depends on excellent root–shoot communications. Increased net photosynthesis and decreased shoot nitrogen and water use at elevated CO2 fundamentally alter these source–sink relations. Lower than predicted productivity gains at elevated CO2 under nitrogen or water stress may indicate shoot–root signaling lacks plasticity to respond to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The following presents recent research results on shoot–root nitrogen and water signaling, emphasizing the influence that rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are having on these source–sink interactions. PMID:23983674

  12. The effect of plutonium dioxide water surface coverage on the generation of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, Douglas K.; Berg, John M.; Crowder, Mark L.

    2012-06-20

    The conditions for the production of oxygen during radiolysis of water adsorbed onto plutonium dioxide powder are discussed. Studies in the literature investigating the radiolysis of water show that both oxygen and hydrogen can be generated from water adsorbed on high-purity plutonium dioxide powder. These studies indicate that there is a threshold in the amount of water below which oxygen is not generated. The threshold is associated with the number of monolayers of adsorbed water and is shown to occur at approximately two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water. Material in equilibrium with 50% relative humidity (RH) will be at the threshold for oxygen generation. Using two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water as the threshold for oxygen production, the total pressure under various conditions is calculated assuming stoichiometric production of hydrogen and oxygen. The specific surface area of the oxide has a strong effect on the final partial pressure. The specific surface areas resulting in the highest pressures within a 3013 container are evaluated. The potential for oxygen generation is mitigated by reduced relative humidity, and hence moisture adsorption, at the oxide surface which occurs if the oxide is warmer than the ambient air. The potential for oxygen generation approaches zero as the temperature difference between the ambient air and the material approaches 6 C.

  13. The effect of phosphorus on the formation of tungsten dioxide: A novel morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, E.; Neugebauer, J.

    1999-02-19

    The industrial production of tungsten is based on the hydrogen reduction of tungsten oxides, ammonium paratungstate (APT) or ammonium tungsten oxide bronze (ATOB). Hydrogen reduction is applied when high purity tungsten is required and when the addition of other elements or compounds (dopants) is desired for modification of the properties of the metal powder. The first stage of the reduction is finished when WO{sub 2} is formed and it seems that the efficient incorporation of the additives starts mainly at this reduction step. The study reported here was undertaken to investigate the effect of phosphorus dope on the morphology of the intermediate tungsten dioxide and analyze its influence on the grain size of the final tungsten metal powder. The authors observed star shaped morphology of WO{sub 2}, a structure which has not been describe in the literature. Contrary to the well-known cauliflower shaped tungsten dioxide, these starlets are not pseudomorphic to the initial ATOB particles; they grow separately and have a great influence on the grain size of the final metal powder.

  14. Calculation of the transport properties of carbon dioxide. II. Thermal conductivity and thermomagnetic effects.

    PubMed

    Bock, Steffen; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S; Vesovic, Velisa

    2004-05-01

    The transport properties of pure carbon dioxide have been calculated from the intermolecular potential using the classical trajectory method. Results are reported in the dilute-gas limit for thermal conductivity and thermomagnetic coefficients for temperatures ranging from 200 K to 1000 K. Three recent carbon dioxide potential energy hypersurfaces have been investigated. Since thermal conductivity is influenced by vibrational degrees of freedom, not included in the rigid-rotor classical trajectory calculation, a correction for vibration has also been employed. The calculations indicate that the second-order thermal conductivity corrections due to the angular momentum polarization (< 2%) and velocity polarization (< 1%) are both small. Thermal conductivity values calculated using the potential energy hypersurface by Bukowski et al. (1999) are in good agreement with the available experimental data. They underestimate the best experimental data at room temperature by 1% and in the range up to 470 K by 1%-3%, depending on the data source. Outside this range the calculated values, we believe, may be more reliable than the currently available experimental data. Our results are consistent with measurements of the thermomagnetic effect at 300 K only when the vibrational degrees of freedom are considered fully. This excellent agreement for these properties indicates that particularly the potential surface of Bukowski et al. provides a realistic description of the anisotropy of the surface. PMID:15267716

  15. Effect of carbon dioxide on in vitro susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria to erythromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Sutter, V L; Kwok, Y Y; Lewis, R P; Finegold, S M

    1981-01-01

    The activity of erythromycin against 317 strains of anaerobic bacteria, including 133 strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group, was tested by the agar dilution method in an anaerobic atmosphere with two different concentrations of carbon dioxide and without CO2. The effect of the atmosphere of incubation on the agar surface pH was also determined. All strains grew well in the GasPak (GP) environment. However, 3.5 and 30.3% of strains failed to grow in the 2 and 0% CO2 environments, respectively. The quality of growth was best in the GP environment and poorest in the 0% CO2 environment. Minimal inhibitory concentrations in the GP and 2% CO2 environments were frequently the same or one dilution lower in the 0% than in the GP environment. In the 0% CO2 atmosphere, minimal inhibitory concentrations were usually two to three dilutions lower than in the GP environment. Consequently, only 24% of B. fragilis strains were susceptible to erythromycin in the GP environment, whereas 77% were susceptible in the 0% CO2 environment. For Fusobacterium species, 12% were susceptible to erythromycin in the GP environment, and 73% were susceptible in the 0% CO2 environment. There was a comparable decrease in pH in all three atmospheres tested. In vitro susceptibility testing of erythromycin against anaerobic bacteria should be performed in an atmosphere containing carbon dioxide. PMID:6798927

  16. Associations between personal exposures and ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide: A quantitative research synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Q. Y.; Svendsgaard, D.; Kotchmar, D. J.; Pinto, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    Although positive associations between ambient NO2 concentrations and personal exposures have generally been found by exposure studies, the strength of the associations varied among studies. Differences in results could be related to differences in study design and in exposure factors. However, the effects of study design, exposure factors, and sampling and measurement errors on the strength of the personal-ambient associations have not been evaluated quantitatively in a systematic manner. A quantitative research synthesis was conducted to examine these issues based on peer-reviewed publications in the past 30 years. Factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations across the studies were also examined with meta-regression. Ambient NO2 was found to be significantly associated with personal NO2 exposures, with estimates of 0.42, 0.16, and 0.72 for overall pooled, longitudinal and daily average correlation coefficients based on random-effects meta-analysis. This conclusion was robust after correction for publication bias with correlation coefficients of 0.37, 0.16 and 0.45. We found that season and some population characteristics, such as pre-existing disease, were significant factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations. More meaningful and rigorous comparisons would be possible if greater detail were published on the study design (e.g. local and indoor sources, housing characteristics, etc.) and data quality (e.g., detection limits and percent of data above detection limits).

  17. The antibacterial effects of silver, titanium dioxide and silica dioxide nanoparticles compared to the dental disinfectant chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans using a suite of bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Metal-containing nanomaterials have the potential to be used in dentistry for infection control, but little is known about their antibacterial properties. This study investigated the toxicity of silver (Ag), titanium dioxide and silica nanoparticles (NPs) against the oral pathogenic species of Streptococcus mutans, compared to the routine disinfectant, chlorhexidine. The bacteria were assessed using the minimum inhibitory concentration assay for growth, fluorescent staining for live/dead cells, and measurements of lactate. All the assays showed that Ag NPs had the strongest antibacterial activity of the NPs tested, with bacterial growth also being 25-fold lower than that in chlorhexidine. The survival rate of bacteria under the effect of 100 mg l−1 Ag NPs in the media was 2% compared to 60% with chlorhexidine, while the lactate concentration was 0.6 and 4.0 mM, respectively. Silica and titanium dioxide NPs had limited effects. Dialysis experiments showed negligible silver dissolution. Overall, Ag NPs were the best disinfectant and performed better than chlorhexidine. Improvements to the MIC assay are suggested. PMID:23092443

  18. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on the toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Wolff, R.K. )

    1989-10-01

    This project examined the influence of preexisting, experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema on the adverse health effects in rats of chronic inhalation exposure to either nitrogen dioxide or automotive diesel-engine exhaust. Previous reports indicated that humans with chronic lung disease were among those most severely affected by episodic exposures to high concentrations of airborne toxicants. There were no previous reports comparing the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to components of automotive emissions in emphysematous and normal animals. The hypothesis tested in this project was that rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of the toxicant exposures. Young adult rats were housed continuously in inhalation exposure chambers and exposed seven hours per day, five days per week, for 24 months to nitrogen dioxide at 9.5 parts per million (ppm)2, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as control animals. These concentrations were selected to produce mild, but distinct, effects in rats with normal lungs. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of the proteolytic enzyme elastase six weeks before the toxicant exposures began. Health effects were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. The measurements included respiratory function, clearance of inhaled radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses to instilled antigen, biochemistry and cytology of airway fluid, total lung collagen, histopathology, lung morphometry, and lung burdens of diesel soot. The significance of influences of emphysema and toxicant exposure, and interactions between influences of the two treatments, were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  19. Protective effect of beta-carotene against titanium dioxide nanoparticles induced apoptosis in mouse testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Orazizadeh, M; Daneshi, E; Hashemitmar, M; Absalan, F; Khorsandi, L

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the effects of beta-carotene (BC) on testicular germ cell apoptosis arising from titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NTiO2 ) have been evaluated. In NTiO2 -treated mice, expression of apoptotic related genes including Bid, FasL, caspase-3 and p38MAPK was significantly increased. Measurement apoptosis using TUNEL method showed significant increase in apoptotic index of germ cells in NTiO2 -treated mice (P < 0.05). TUNEL assessments showed that the increase of apoptotic index of testicular germ cells in NTiO2 -treated mice was reversed by BC. Beta-carotene pre-treatment could also effectively attenuate the expression of apoptotic related genes. The application of BC may serve as a beneficial medication to protect germ cells against apoptosis induced by nanoparticles and be helpful for male fertility. PMID:25278478

  20. Bisphosphine dioxides

    SciTech Connect

    Moloy, K.G.

    1990-02-20

    A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  1. Bisphosphine dioxides

    DOEpatents

    Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1990-01-01

    A process for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  2. Research status on the sequestration of carbon dioxide by direct aqueous mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Rush, Gilbert E.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    Direct aqueous mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable, solid final form. The process utilizes a solution of distilled water, or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), sodium chloride (NaCl), and water, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, by diffusion through the surface and gas dispersion within the aqueous phase. The process includes dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) in a single unit operation. Mineral reactivity has been increased by pretreatment of the minerals. Thermal activation of serpentine can be achieved by heat pretreatment at 630 C. Carbonation of the thermally activated serpentine, using the bicarbonate-bearing solution, at T=155 C, PCO2=185 atm, and 15% solids, achieved 78% stoichiometric conversion of the silicate to the carbonate in 30 minutes. Recent studies have investigated mechanical activation as an alternative to thermal treatment. The addition of a high intensity attrition grinding step to the size reduction circuit successfully activated both serpentine and olivine. Over 80% stoichiometric conversion of the mechanically activated olivine was achieved in 60 minutes, using the bicarbonate solution at T=185 C, PCO2=150 atm, and 15% solids. Significant carbonation of the mechanically activated minerals, at up to 66% stoichiometric conversion, has also been achieved at ambient temperature (25 C) and PCO2 ={approx}10 atm.

  3. Effect of bath temperature on electrochemical properties of the anodically deposited manganese dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, M.; Biglari, Z.; Binder, L.

    The effect of bath temperature on the electrochemical properties of electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) was studied. EMD was produced by anodic deposition from acidic aqueous solution of manganese sulfate at different bath temperatures in the range of 60-120°C. At temperatures above the boiling point of water, the electrolysis was carried out in an autoclave. The EMD produced at 120°C was of gamma type, identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the materials produced at 115 and 120°C were quality-controlled by cycling a sample as cathode mix in small size RAM-cells and by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated an increase in cyclic charge/discharge performance and an improvement of crystallization conditions of EMD produced at elevated temperature when compared to data of commercially available γ-MnO 2.

  4. The effect of a mouthrinse containing chlorine dioxide in the clinical reduction of volatile sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Soares, Leo Guimaraes; Guaitolini, Roberto Luiz; Weyne, Sergio de Carvalho; Falabella, Marcio Eduardo Vieira; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; da Silva, Denise Gomes

    2013-07-01

    This study sought to evaluate the clinical effect of a mouthrinse containing 0.3% chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in reducing oral volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Halitosis was induced by L-cysteine in 11 volunteers, and 4 solutions were compared: a test solution containing 0.3% ClO2, 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and 0.05% sodium fluoride; a placebo; a solution containing 0.05% CPC; and a control solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX). VSC levels were assessed using a Halimeter, and 6 measurements were made from baseline to 3 hours postrinse. The VSC reduction rate of the test mouthrinse was superior to the placebo and the CPC solution. There was no difference between the test solution and the CHX solution in VSC reduction rates immediately postrinse, or at 2 and 3 hours postrinse; both solutions were statistically superior to the placebo and the CPC solution. PMID:23823344

  5. The impact of sulfur dioxide on plant sexual reproduction: in vivo and in vitro effects compared

    SciTech Connect

    DuBay, D.T.; Murdy, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    In Lepidium virginicum L., exposure of pollen to 0.6 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 4 h reduced pollen germination in vitro 94% from the control, whereas exposure to 0.6 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 2, 4, and 8 h during flowering reduced pollen germination in vivo 50% from the control, but did not affect seed set.An interaction between SO/sub 2/ and water may have caused the inhibition of pollen germination in a liquid culture medium, as well as on the moist surface of an intact stigma. However, the results suggest that the use of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in vitro to asses the direct effects of SO/sub 2/ on plant sexual reproduction in vivo is not valid.

  6. Effect of ingested titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the digestive gland cell membrane of terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Valant, Janez; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find out whether ingested titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO(2)) cause cell membrane damage by direct contact or by lipid peroxidation. We assessed lipid peroxidation and digestive gland cell membrane stability of animals fed on food dosed with nano-TiO(2). Conventional toxicity measures were completed to determine if cellular effects are propagated to higher levels of biological complexity. An invertebrate model organism (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea) was fed with food containing nanosized TiO(2) and the result confirmed that at higher exposure concentrations after 3 d exposure, nano-TiO(2) destabilized cell membranes but lipid peroxidation was not detected. Oxidative stress as evidenced by lipid peroxidation was observed at longer exposure durations and high exposure doses. These data suggest that cell membranes are destabilized by direct interactions between nanoparticles and cell membrane, not solely via oxidative stress. PMID:22189379

  7. Effects of microstructure and nonstoichiometry on electrical properties of vanadium dioxide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusano, Eiji; Theil, Jeremy A.

    1989-01-01

    Voided growth structures of sputter-deposited films affect strongly their optical and electrical properties. Vanadium dioxide is an interesting material to study effects of film microstructure and nonstoichiometry on electrical properties because its phase transition makes it possible to investigate electrical behavior both in a semiconducting phase and in a metallic phase. Vanadium oxide films were deposited with different vanadium oxygen ratios for substrate temperatures between 250 and 550 C by dc reactive magnetron sputtering. The resistivity ratios between a semiconducting phase and a metallic phase are limited to 1000 order by voided boundaries and oxygen vacancies. The voided boundaries are defined by columnar structure and agglomerated grain growth. The results emphasize the necessity of a combination of deposition to obtain the film with a favorable structure and postdeposition annealing to control the film stoichiometry.

  8. Effect of Ethanol, Sulfur Dioxide and Glucose on the Growth of Wine Spoilage Yeasts Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Mahesh; Oro, Inês; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the effect of three factors, sulfur dioxide, ethanol and glucose, on the growth of wine spoilage yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Seventeen central composite rotatable design (CCRD) trials were designed for each test yeast using realistic concentrations of the factors (variables) in premium red wine. Polynomial regression equations were fitted to experimental data points, and the growth inhibitory conditions of these three variables were determined. The overall results showed Sa. ludwigii as the most resistant species growing under high ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations, i.e., 15% (v/v)/20 mg L-1, 14% (v/v)/32 mg L-1 and 12.5% (v/v)/40 mg L-1, whereas other yeasts did not survive under the same levels of ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations. The inhibitory effect of ethanol was primarily observed during longer incubation periods, compared with sulfur dioxide, which showed an immediate effect. In some CCRD trials, Sa. ludwigii and S. cerevisiae showed growth recovery after a short death period under the exposure of 20–32 mg L-1 sulfur dioxide in the presence of 11% (v/v) or more ethanol. However, Sc. pombe and Z. bailii did not show such growth recovery under similar conditions. Up to 10 g L-1 of glucose did not prevent cell death under the sulfur dioxide or ethanol stress. This observation demonstrates that the sugar levels commonly used in wine to sweeten the mouthfeel do not increase wine susceptibility to spoilage yeasts, contrary to the anecdotal evidence. PMID:26107389

  9. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  10. Effects of sulfur dioxide and ozone on yield and quality of potatoes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pell, E.J.; Pearson, N.S.; Vinten-Johansen, C.; McGruer, G.; Yang, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop an outdoor fumigation facility designed to expose plants to ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) and to conduct experiments that would examine the impact of the two gases alone and in combination on field grown potato plants. Two systems of dispensing and monitoring pollutants were contrasted, one using miniature solenoid valves and the other using critical orifices. Both systems provided excellent pollutant control. The orifices were relatively inexpensive and required less maintenance than did the solenoid valve system. Two field experiments were conducted, one in 1985 and and the other in 1986. Potato plants were exposed to charcoal filtered air, nonfiltered air, nonfiltered air supplemented with O3 at levels which resulted in 1.33, 1.66 or 1.99 times ambient O3 concentrations or charcoal filtered air plus 0.14, 0.28 or 0.56 ppM SO2. There were additional treatments combining the two pollutant regimes. Ozone induced a linear reduction in yield reflected by decreases in weight and number of tubers > 6.35 cm in diameter. In general effects on number and weight of smaller tubers were not detected. Ozone also induced a decrease in the percent dry matter and reducing sugar content of potato tubers. Sulfur dioxide affected number of Grade One tubers in both years and percent dry matter and sucrose content in 1986 only. While dose-response curves for all SO2 effects fit quadratic curves the impact of SO2 doses used in these experiments were stimulatory. No important interactions were observed between O3 and SO2. 36 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  11. The combined toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and bisphenol A on zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollutants co-exist and exhibit interaction effects that are different from those associated with a single pollutant. As one of the more commonly manufactured nanomaterials, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are most likely to bind to other contaminants in water. In this paper, we aimed to study the combined toxicological effects of TiO2-NPs and bisphenol A (BPA) on organism. First, in vitro adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorptive interaction between TiO2-NPs and BPA. Second, zebrafish embryo toxicity tests were performed to monitor for changes in the toxicological effects associated with the two chemicals. The study results demonstrated that adsorptive interactions exist between the two chemicals and increased toxicity effects which included an advanced toxicological effect time, decreased survival, increased morphological abnormalities, and delayed embryo hatching. Also, we suggest that the mode of combined action has a synergistic effect. Based on this, we postulate that concomitant exposure to TiO2-NPs and BPA increased BPA bioavailability and uptake into cells and organisms. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of interactions of this mixture. PMID:25177222

  12. Interspecific differences in the effects of sulfur dioxide on angiosperm sexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    DuBay, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to test the potential direct effects of SO/sub 2/ on sexual reproduction in several plant species with different reproductive structures and processes. In marked contrast to the sensitivity to SO/sub 2/ reported by other investigators for pollen germination and pollen tube growth in vitro, and recorded for Lepidium virginicum in this study, 4 of 5 species tested were tolerant with respect to fruit and seed set after exposure to 0.6 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 8 hours during flowering. Seed set in the one sensitive species, Geranium carolinianum, was reduced 40% from the control after exposure to SO/sub 2/, but only when relative humidity (RH) was at or above 90%. The effect of SO/sub 2/ on Lepidium pollen germination in vitro was greater than the effect of SO/sub 2/ on sexual reproduction in vivo. Sulfur dioxide reduced pollen germination in vitro 94% from the control. The same concentration of SO/sub 2/, at 90% Rh, reduced pollen germination in vivo 50% from the control, but had no effect on seed set. Predictions of effects of SO/sub 2/ on reproduction in vivo based on effects of SO/sub 2/ on pollen germination and pollen tube growth in vitro are not valid.

  13. The combined toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and bisphenol A on zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Lin, Bencheng; Hu, Chuanlu; Zhang, Huashan; Lin, Zhiqing; Xi, Zhuge

    2014-08-01

    Environmental pollutants co-exist and exhibit interaction effects that are different from those associated with a single pollutant. As one of the more commonly manufactured nanomaterials, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are most likely to bind to other contaminants in water. In this paper, we aimed to study the combined toxicological effects of TiO2-NPs and bisphenol A (BPA) on organism. First, in vitro adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorptive interaction between TiO2-NPs and BPA. Second, zebrafish embryo toxicity tests were performed to monitor for changes in the toxicological effects associated with the two chemicals. The study results demonstrated that adsorptive interactions exist between the two chemicals and increased toxicity effects which included an advanced toxicological effect time, decreased survival, increased morphological abnormalities, and delayed embryo hatching. Also, we suggest that the mode of combined action has a synergistic effect. Based on this, we postulate that concomitant exposure to TiO2-NPs and BPA increased BPA bioavailability and uptake into cells and organisms. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of interactions of this mixture.

  14. Effect of Same-day Sequential Exposure to Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone on Cardiac and Ventilatory Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the cardiac and ventilatory effects of sequential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and then ozone. The data show that mice exposed to both gases have increased arrhythmia and breathing changes not observed in the other groups. Although the mechanisms underlying ai...

  15. EFFECTS OF DEPLETION OF ASCORBIC ACID OR NONPROTEIN SULFYDRYLS ON THE ACUTE INHALATION TOXICITY OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE, OZONE, AND PHOSGENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of depleting lung ascorbic acid (AH2) and nonprotein sulfhydryls (NPSH) on the acute inhalation toxicity of nitrogen dioxide (N02), ozone (03), and phosgene (C0Cl2) was investigated in guinea pigs. he increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid protein (an indicator...

  16. Carbon dioxide and high temperature effects on growth of young orange trees in a humid, subtropical environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and global warming could impact growth of citrus trees. To measure CO2 and temperature effects, ARS scientists transplanted five 2-year-old Ambersweet orange trees on Swingle citrumelo rootstock to containers in two temperature-gradient greenhouses maintained ...

  17. COMPARISON OF BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE, OZONE AND THEIR COMBINATION IN MOUSE LUNG. 1. INTERMITTENT EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swiss Webster mice were exposed to either 4.8 ppm (9024 micrograms/cu.m.) nitrogen dioxide (NO2), 0.45 ppm (882 micrograms/cu.m.) ozone (O3), or their combination intermittently (8 hr daily) for 7 days, and the effects were studied in the lung by a series of physical and biochemi...

  18. Food contact surfaces coated with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide: effect on Listeria monocytogenes survival under different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Teixeira, P.; Tavares, C. J.; Azeredo, J.

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of food safety is a very important issue, and is on the basis of production and application of new/modified food contact surfaces. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and, more recently, nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO2) coatings are among the possible forms to enhance food contact surfaces performance in terms of higher hygiene and easier sanitation. In this context, the present work aimed at evaluating the bactericidal activity of an N-TiO2 coating on glass and stainless steel under two different sources of visible light - fluorescent and incandescent - and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Listeria monocytogenes was chosen as representative of major foodborne pathogens and its survival was tested on N-TiO2 coated coupons. In terms of survival percentage, good results were obtained after exposure of coated surfaces to all light types since, apart from the value obtained after exposing glass to fluorescent light (56.3%), survival rates were always below 50%. However, no effective disinfection was obtained, given that for a disinfectant or sanitizing agent to be claimed as effective it needs to be able to promote at least a 3-log reduction of the microbial load, which was not observed for any of the experimental conditions assessed. Even so, UV irradiation was the most successful on eliminating cells on coated surfaces, since the amount of bacteria was reduced to 1.49 × 106 CFU/ml on glass and 2.37 × 107 on stainless steel. In contrast, both visible light sources had only slightly decreased the amount of viable cells, which remained in the range of 8 log CFU/ml. Hence, although some bactericidal effect was accomplished under visible light, UV was the most effective light source on promoting photocatalytic reactions on N-TiO2 coated coupons and none of the experimental conditions have reached a satisfactory disinfection level. Thus, this surface coating needs further research and improvement in order to become truly effective against foodborne pathogens and

  19. The effect of photochemical dissociation on downwind chlorine dioxide plume concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowicz, R.; Alp, E.

    1997-12-31

    The pulp and paper industry handles toxic gases which may present an inherent hazard to the safety of the general public in the surrounding area. One such toxic gas that may pose a hazard is chlorine dioxide. Spills of chlorine dioxide solution result in the gassing off of toxic clouds of chlorine dioxide. Under daytime dry conditions, chlorine dioxide decomposes photolytically to form chlorine and oxygen and intermediates, chlorine trioxide and chlorine hexoxide. Air dispersion modeling of chlorine dioxide releases which does not properly account for its photochemical decomposition will lead to overly conservative hazard zone estimates. Under these conditions, risk control measures and emergency response evacuation zones based on such estimates will be unnecessarily expensive, perhaps prohibitive. This paper investigates the photolytic rate of dissociation of chlorine dioxide under various atmospheric conditions. It was found that modeling based on the decomposition of chlorine dioxide gas, resulted in downwind distances to TLV-Short Term Exposure Limits which are considerably shorter than modeling based on chlorine dioxide dispersion with no decomposition.

  20. Effects of Increasing Seawater Carbon Dioxide Concentrations on Chain Formation of the Diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis

    PubMed Central

    Barcelos e Ramos, Joana; Schulz, Kai Georg; Brownlee, Colin; Sett, Scarlett; Azevedo, Eduardo Brito

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis grown under increasing CO2 levels ranging from 320 to 3400 µatm. We show that the number of cells comprising a chain, and therefore chain length, increases with rising CO2 concentrations. We also demonstrate that while cell division rate changes with CO2 concentrations, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular quotas vary proportionally, evident by unchanged organic matter ratios. Finally, beyond the optimum CO2 concentration for growth, carbon allocation changes from cellular storage to increased exudation of dissolved organic carbon. The observed structural adjustment in colony size could enable growth at high CO2 levels, since longer, spiral-shaped chains are likely to create microclimates with higher pH during the light period. Moreover increased chain length of Asterionellopsis glacialis may influence buoyancy and, consequently, affect competitive fitness as well as sinking rates. This would potentially impact the delicate balance between the microbial loop and export of organic matter, with consequences for atmospheric carbon dioxide. PMID:24618939

  1. Ozone and sulfur dioxide effects on tall fescue. II. Alteration of quality constituents. [Festuca arundinacea

    SciTech Connect

    Flagler, R.B.; Youngner, V.B.

    1985-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine whether ozone (O/sub 3/) and sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) might alter forage quality parameters of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. Alta). Plants were exposed weekly to four O/sub 3/ treatments, 0, 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 ..mu..L L/sup -1/; with or without 0.10 ..mu..L L/sup -1/ SO/sub 2/, 6 h d/sup -1/ for 12 weeks. Ozone had a much greater impact on forage quality than did SO/sub 2/. Ozone increased protein content on a g kg/sup -1/ basis and decreased protein on a weight per plant basis. Ozone reduced crude fat, crude fiber, and total nonstructural carbohydrate contents of the forage. Crude ash content increased due to O/sub 3/ exposure. On a weight per plant basis, O/sub 3/ decreased the forage concentration of Ca, Mg, and P. Ozone increased Ca concentration of herbage. Sulfur dioxide increased ash content of the forage. Phosphorus concentration and weight per plant of Mg and P were all reduced by SO/sub 2/ Significant pollutant interactions occurred for crude fiber, crude ash, total Mg, and total P contents of forage. While treatments resulted in some apparent increases in forage quality, these were at the expense of yield. The most adverse effects on forage quality were an increase in ash content which resulted from an interaction of SO/sub 2/ with O/sub 3/, and a reduction in soluble carbohydrate content of shoots due to O/sub 3/.

  2. Effects of increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentrations on chain formation of the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis.

    PubMed

    Barcelos e Ramos, Joana; Schulz, Kai Georg; Brownlee, Colin; Sett, Scarlett; Azevedo, Eduardo Brito

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis grown under increasing CO2 levels ranging from 320 to 3400 µatm. We show that the number of cells comprising a chain, and therefore chain length, increases with rising CO2 concentrations. We also demonstrate that while cell division rate changes with CO2 concentrations, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular quotas vary proportionally, evident by unchanged organic matter ratios. Finally, beyond the optimum CO2 concentration for growth, carbon allocation changes from cellular storage to increased exudation of dissolved organic carbon. The observed structural adjustment in colony size could enable growth at high CO2 levels, since longer, spiral-shaped chains are likely to create microclimates with higher pH during the light period. Moreover increased chain length of Asterionellopsis glacialis may influence buoyancy and, consequently, affect competitive fitness as well as sinking rates. This would potentially impact the delicate balance between the microbial loop and export of organic matter, with consequences for atmospheric carbon dioxide. PMID:24618939

  3. Review of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's health effects and exposure assessment documents on nitrogen dioxide. Report of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-09

    At the request of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee conducted a review on the potential health hazards associated with exposure to 0.1 to 1.0 ppm nitrogen dioxide generated by unvented indoor combustion sources. The committee concluded that: (1) repeated peak exposures at concentrations of 0.3 ppm of nitrogen dioxide may cause health effects in some individuals; (2) the population groups that appear most sensitive to nitrogen dioxide exposure include children, chronic bronchitics, asthmatics, and individuals with emphysema; and (3) the most direct evidence regarding lung damage associated with nitrogen dioxide is obtained from animal studies.

  4. Acute effects of sono-activated photocatalytic titanium dioxide nanoparticles on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moosavi Nejad, S; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Hosseini, Hamid; Watanabe, Akiko; Endo, Hitomi; Narihira, Kyoichi; Kikuta, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuro

    2016-09-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a new treatment modality using ultrasound to activate certain chemical sensitizers for cancer therapy. In this study, effects of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on human oral squamous cell line HSC-2 were investigated. Viability of HSC-2 cells after 0, 0.1, 1, or 3s of HIFU irradiation with 20, 32, 55 and 73Wcm(-2) intensities in the presence or absence of TiO2 was measured immediately after the exposures in vitro. Immediate effects of HIFU (3s, 73Wcm(-2)) combined with TiO2 on solid tumors were also examined by histological study. Cytotoxic effect of HIFU+TiO2in vitro was significantly higher than that of TiO2 or HIFU alone with the tendency to increase for higher HIFU intensity, duration, and TiO2 concentration in the suspension. In vivo results showed significant necrosis and tissue damage in HIFU and HIFU+TiO2 treated samples. However, penetration of TiO2 nanoparticles into the cell cytoplasm was only observed in HIFU+TiO2 treated tissues. In this study, our findings provide a rational basis for the development of an effective HIFU based sonodynamic activation method. This approach offers an attractive non-invasive therapy technique for oral cancer in future. PMID:27150750

  5. Toxic effects of the interaction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with chemicals or physical factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Zhao, Jinshun

    2013-01-01

    Due to their chemical stability and nonallergic, nonirritant, and ultraviolet protective properties, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in industries such as electronics, optics, and material sciences, as well as architecture, medicine, and pharmacology. However, increasing concerns have been raised in regards to its ecotoxicity and toxicity on the aquatic environment as well as to humans. Although insights have been gained into the effects of TiO2 NPs on susceptible biological systems, there is still much ground to be covered, particularly in respect of our knowledge of the effects of the interaction of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. Studies suggest that interactions of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors may result in an increase in toxicity or adverse effects. This review highlights recent progress in the study of the interactive effects of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. PMID:23901269

  6. The effect of transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) on skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Oe, Keisuke; Ueha, Takeshi; Sakai, Yoshitada; Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Koh, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Takumi; Tanaka, Masaya; Miwa, Masahiko; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} PGC-1{alpha} is up-regulated as a result of exercise such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and up-regulation of VEGF. {yields} We demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} up-regulated the gene expression of PGC-1{alpha}, SIRT1 and VEGF, and instance of muscle fiber switching. {yields} Transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} may cause similar effect to aerobic exercise in skeletal muscle. -- Abstract: In Europe, carbon dioxide therapy has been used for cardiac disease and skin problems for a long time. However there have been few reports investigating the effects of carbon dioxide therapy on skeletal muscle. Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) is up-regulated as a result of exercise and mediates known responses to exercise, such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and neovascularization via up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is also known that silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) enhances PGC-1{alpha}-mediated muscle fiber-type switching. Previously, we demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} increased blood flow and a partial increase of O{sub 2} pressure in the local tissue known as the Bohr effect. In this study, we transcutaneously applied CO{sub 2} to the lower limbs of rats, and investigated the effect on the fast muscle, tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. The transcutaneous CO{sub 2} application caused: (1) the gene expression of PGC-1{alpha}, silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) and VEGF, and increased the number of mitochondria, as proven by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, (2) muscle fiber switching in the TA muscle, as proven by isolation of myosin heavy chain and ATPase staining. Our results suggest the transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} may have therapeutic potential for muscular strength recovery resulting from disuse

  7. Retrospective on CDIAC's Activities in U.S.-China Research on the Greenhouse Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, T.A.; Cushman, R.M.; Farrell, M.P.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Kanciruk, P.; Mitchell, E.E.; Nelson, T.R.; Sepanski, R.J.

    1999-06-10

    This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center under a joint research program on the greenhouse effect conducted by the US and the People's Republic of China. The focus is on efforts in the areas of computing systems; data quality assurance, documentation, and publication; data analysis; data exchange and distribution; project summary and bibliography publication; and visitor exchange.

  8. The effect of doping titanium dioxide nanoparticles on phase transformation, photocatalytic activity and anti-bacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzby, Scott Edward

    Nanosized titanium dioxide has a variety of important applications in everyday life including a photocatalyst for pollution remediation, photovoltaic devices, sunscreen, etc. This study focuses on the various properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with various cation and anion species. Samples were produced by various methods including metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), plasma assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PA-MOCVD) and sol-gel. Numerous techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron microscopy both scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) were used for physical characterization. Photocatalytic properties were determined by the oxidation of methylene blue dye and 2-chlorophenol in water as well as gaseous formic acid with results analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultra violet - visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS). For the purpose of enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the effect of anion doping and the anatase-rutile phase ratio were studied. Although anatase, rutile and mixed crystallite phases all show some degree of activity in photocatalytic reactions, these results show that anatase is better suited for the degradation of organic compounds in an aqueous medium any advantage in photocatalytic activity gained through the enhancement in optical response from the smaller band gap by addition of rutile was overcome by the negatives associated with the rutile phase. Furthermore substitutional nitrogen doping showed significant improvement in UV photocatalysis as well as allowing for visible light activation of the catalyst. Further studies on the phase transitions in titanium dioxide nanoparticles were carried out by synthesizing various cation doped samples by sol-gel. Analysis of the phases by XRD showed an inverse relationship between dopant size and rutile percentage

  9. Effects of Carbon Dioxide Aerosols on the Viability of Escherichia coli during Biofilm Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Renu; Monnappa, Ajay K.; Hong, Seongkyeol; Mitchell, Robert J.; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    A periodic jet of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols is a very quick and effective mechanical technique to remove biofilms from various substrate surfaces. However, the impact of the aerosols on the viability of bacteria during treatment has never been evaluated. In this study, the effects of high-speed CO2 aerosols, a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2, on bacteria viability was studied. It was found that when CO2 aerosols were used to disperse biofilms of Escherichia coli, they led to a significant loss of viability, with approximately 50% of the dispersed bacteria killed in the process. By comparison, 75.6% of the biofilm-associated bacteria were viable when gently dispersed using Proteinase K and DNase I. Indirect proof that the aerosols are damaging the bacteria was found using a recombinant E. coli expressing the cyan fluorescent protein, as nearly half of the fluorescence was found in the supernatant after CO2 aerosol treatment, while the rest was associated with the bacterial pellet. In comparison, the supernatant fluorescence was only 9% when the enzymes were used to disperse the biofilm. As such, these CO2 aerosols not only remove biofilm-associated bacteria effectively but also significantly impact their viability by disrupting membrane integrity. PMID:26345492

  10. Efficient and Hysteresis-Free Field Effect Modulation of Ambipolarly Doped Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Hou, Yasen; Travaglini, Henry C.; Hellwig, Luke; Hihath, Sahar; van Benthem, Klaus; Lee, Kathleen; Liu, Weifeng; Yu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The subpicosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2 ) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors, which are based on electric-field-induced phase transition. However, the development of VO2 -based transistors lags behind, owing to inefficient and hysteretic gate modulation. Here we report ambipolar doping and strong field effects free of hysteresis in single-crystal VO2 nanowires synthesized via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The ambipolarly doped VO2 nanowires are achieved by controlling the oxygen vacancy density during the synthesis and show strong gate effects because of their relatively low doping level. Both the doping type of the nanowires and the band-bending direction at the metal-insulator domain walls are reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, as revealed by scanning photocurrent microscopy. Furthermore, we eliminate the hysteresis in gate sweep via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid-ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables electronic applications based on VO2 .

  11. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection. PMID:23591108

  12. Modeling the effects of light, carbon dioxide, and temperature on the growth of potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yandell, B. S.; Najar, A.; Wheeler, R.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effects of light, temperature and carbon dioxide on the growth of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in a controlled environment in order to ascertain the best growing conditions for potato in life support systems in space. 'Norland' and 'Russet Burbank' were grown in 6-L pots of peat-vermiculite for 56 d in growth chambers at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. Environmental factor levels included continuous light (24-h photoperiod) at 250, 400, and 550 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF; constant temperature at 16, 20, and 24 degrees C; and CO2 at approximately 400, 1000, and 1600 microliters L-1. Separate effects analysis and ridge analysis provided a means to examine the effects of individual environmental factors and to determine combinations of factors that are expected to give the best increases in yields over the central design point. The response surface of Norland indicated that tuber yields were highest with moderately low temperature (18.7 degrees C), low CO2 (400 microliters L-1) and high light (550 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF). These conditions also favored shorter stem growth. Russet Burbank tuber yields were highest at moderately low temperature (17.5 degrees C), high CO2 (1600 microliters L-1) and medium analyses will be used to project the most efficient conditions for growth of potatoes in closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) in space colonies.

  13. Effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeturu, Sravan Kumar; Acharya, Shashidhar; Urala, Arun Sreenivas; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis in orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A randomized single-center, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial was conducted among 90 subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. The subjects were randomly divided into one of the three study groups (Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, chlorine dioxide). Plaque and gingivitis were assessed using modified Silness and Loe Plaque Index and Gingival Index at baseline and at follow-up after 15 days. Paired t-test and ANOVA with post hoc Dunnett test were used. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 85 participants completed the study; among them, 40 were male and 45 were female. There was significant reduction in mean plaque and gingival scores in all the 3 groups at follow-up when compared to baseline. A significantly higher reduction (plaque and gingival scores) was found in chlorhexidine when compared with the Aloe vera group. However, no significant difference was seen between chlorhexidine and chlorine dioxide with respect to mean reduction in plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion Chlorine dioxide can be a suitable and economical alternative for chlorhexidine. Further long-term studies are recommended for evaluating their effectiveness. PMID:26937371

  14. EFFECT OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORITE, AND NITRITE ON MICE WITH LOW AND HIGH LEVELS OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (G6PD) IN THEIR ERYTHROCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice exposed to chlorine dioxide for 30 days at 100 ppm exhibited no significant differences from controls in any of the blood parameters measured. There were no additive or synergistic effects between chlorine dioxide and nitrite based on these same measurements. When A/J (high ...

  15. Effects of sulfur dioxide emissions on stream chemistry in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, D.H.; Turk, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    A 20-year record of water chemistry for seven headwater streams in the Rocky Mountain region of the western United States is compared to estimates of local and regional sulfur dioxide emissions. Emissions from smelters comprise a significant part of sulfur dioxide emissions for the 11 states upwind of acid-sensitive watersheds in the Rocky Mountains, but smelter emissions have steadily decreased since 1970. Analysis of stream chemistry indicates conservative behavior of watershed sulfate, with atmospheric deposition as the dominant source. No relation between regional stream chemistry and smelter or regional sulfur dioxide emissions is detected. Local emissions trends, however, do appear to affect sulfate concentrations in the streams. -from Authors

  16. Ozone and carbon dioxide effects on spider mites in white clover and peanut

    SciTech Connect

    Heagle, A.S.; Brandenburg, R.L.; Burns, J.C.; Miller, J.E.

    1994-11-01

    Effects of O{sub 3} and/or elevated CO{sub 2} on two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch) grown on an O{sub 3}-sensitive and an O{sub 3}-resistant clone of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) were measured in greenhouse and field experiments. Peanut (Arachis hypogeae L.) {open_quote}NC-9{close_quote} was used in one greenhouse study with O{sub 3}. In field studies, O{sub 3} treatments were charcoal filtered air (CF), nonfiltered air (NF), and two NF treatments with O{sub 3} added for 12 h d{sup {minus}1} at proportions of {approx} 1.25 and 1.50 times the ambient O{sub 3} concentration. In greenhouse studies, constant amounts of O{sub 3} were added to CF for 6 h d{sup {minus}1} to achieve mean concentrations ranging from 5 to 100 nL L{sup {minus}1}. For the greenhouse O{sub 3} x CO{sub 2} experiment, CO{sub 2} concentrations were ambient and approximately twice-ambient for 24 h d{sup {minus}1}. Plants were exposed to O{sub 3} and/or CO{sub 2} for {approx} 7 d before infestation with mites; daily exposures continued for 14 to 28 d to allow reproduction for at least two generations. Leaves were sampled to count eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults. Ozone caused more chlorosis and necrosis on the O{sub 3}-sensitive clover clone (NC-S) than on the O{sub 3}-resistant clone (NC-R). Carbon dioxide enrichment increased shoot growth of both clones by {approx}33%. Statistical analyses indicated significant O{sub 3} effects in some experiments and nonsignificant O{sub 3} effects in others. A trend toward increased mite populations with increased O{sub 3} occurred, however, on NC-S in all trials. No consistent trends occurred with NC-R. With peanut, a significant linear increase in mite population occurred with increased O{sub 3}. Carbon dioxide enrichment increased the rate of population increase on both clover clones, but more so on NC-R. 47 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide on isolated droplet combustion for sooting and non-sooting fuels in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Shinji; Furuta, Tomoya; Nagashima, Yoshiaki; Segawa, Daisuke; Kadota, Toshikazu

    The combustion behavior of ethanol, n-buthanol and n-decane droplets in high concentration of CO2 was experimentally investigated at atmospheric pressure in microgravity. Experiments were performed during a fall of the experimental setup at 1 s drop tower with the total height of 9 m. The initial droplet diameter was ranged from about 0.3 to 0.8 mm. Detail measurements of the projected image of the droplet are conducted by using a high speed video camera and the effective droplet diameter squared are calculated from the surface area of the rotating body of the projected object. Effects of ambient carbon dioxide on unsteady behavior of the instantaneous burning rate for sooting and non-sooting droplet flames were investigated. The behavior of the instantaneous burning rate clearly showed events of the initial thermal expansion, ignition and subsequent burning of the fuel droplet, and it was different from the behavior predicted by d2 law. These fundamental behaviors for ethanol, n-buthanol and n-decane were shown in air and high concentrations of ambient carbon dioxide. In the case of n-decane (sooting fuel), the change in the burning rate after ignition was great while it was small in the case of ethanol. A stepwise increase in the burning rate after ignition could be clearly seen for n-decane droplet when initial droplet diameter was large although the tendency was not observed for ethanol. However, this stepwise behavior disappeared in high concentration of ambient carbon dioxide. In high concentration of ambient carbon dioxide, non-luminous flame was formed. The mitigation of soot production by ambient carbon dioxide was clearly observed and this effect was greater for the smaller droplet.

  18. Effectiveness of pressurised carbon dioxide for inactivation of Escherichia coli isolated from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Maryam; Banks, Charles J; Heaven, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    This research explored the possible application of pressurised carbon dioxide (P CO(2)), a promising non-thermal sterilisation technique, for the treatment of sewage sludge (SS) before anaerobic digestion to inactivate pathogenic microorganisms. Escherichia coli was selected as the test organism and was isolated from SS and maintained in pure culture. The growth curve of the isolated strain was determined by measuring the optical density (OD) in liquid culture medium and relating this information to the spread plate count so that a culture of known cell density could be grown for optimisation experiments. Inactivation of E. coli was enhanced by increase in pressure (1,500, 2,000 and 2,800 kPa) and treatment time (from 0.75 to 24 h). A short exposure time at high pressure was sufficient to provide a degree of inactivation which could also be achieved by longer exposure at lower pressure. Complete inactivation (8 log(10) reduction) was possible at all three pressures. scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy studies of E. coli treated with P CO(2) revealed that the cell walls were ruptured, and the cytoplasm was unevenly distributed and had lost its density, indicating the possible leakage of intracellular substances. PMID:22546789

  19. Dispersion and stability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in aqueous suspension: effects of ultrasonication and concentration.

    PubMed

    Qi, J; Ye, Y Y; Wu, J J; Wang, H T; Li, F T

    2013-01-01

    The increasing applications of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles raise concerns about their potential environmental impacts. To investigate the fate and transport of TiO(2) nanoparticles in aqueous suspension, ultrasonication is widely used for the dispersion of TiO(2) nanoparticles in laboratory-scale studies. There is a pressing need for detailed information on the dispersion and stability of TiO(2) nanoparticles. This study investigated the change of size, zeta potential, and pH of TiO(2) nanoparticles aqueous suspension under different conditions of ultrasonication and concentrations. It was found that the hydrodynamic diameter of TiO(2) nanoparticles decreased with increasing suspension concentration and remained stable for more than 1 hour after sonication, which is enough for experimental research. The pH decreased with increasing nanoparticles concentration. Ultrasonication remarkably improved zeta potential to be above 15 mV for all the samples. Therefore, 20 minutes of ultrasonication (180 W) is sufficient for the dispersion of this rutile TiO(2) nanoparticles suspension, which can remain stable for more than 1 hour. However, the optimum sonication time for TiO(2) nanoparticles dispersion is influenced by many factors, such as TiO(2) nanoparticles concentration, solution chemistry, and sonicator parameters. PMID:23128632

  20. Potential Effects of Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) on Coastal Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere has steadily increased from 280 parts per million (ppm) in preindustrial times to 381 ppm today and is predicted by some models to double within the next century. Some of the important pathways whereby changes in atmospheric CO2 may impact coastal wetlands include changes in temperature, rainfall, and hurricane intensity (fig. 1). Increases in CO2 can contribute to global warming, which may (1) accelerate sea-level rise through melting of polar ice fields and steric expansion of oceans, (2) alter rainfall patterns and salinity regimes, and (3) change the intensity and frequency of tropical storms and hurricanes. Sea-level rise combined with changes in storm activity may affect erosion and sedimentation rates and patterns in coastal wetlands and maintenance of soil elevations. Feedback loops between plant growth and hydroedaphic conditions also contribute to maintenance of marsh elevations through accumulation of organic matter. Although increasing CO2 concentration may contribute to global warming and climate changes, it may also have a direct impact on plant growth and development by stimulating photosynthesis or improving water use efficiency. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are examining responses of wetland plants to elevated CO2 concentration and other factors. This research will lead to a better understanding of future changes in marsh species composition, successional rates and patterns, ecological functioning, and vulnerability to sea-level rise and other global change factors.

  1. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  2. System study of the utilization of space for carbon dioxide research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.; Vranka, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives included: compiling and selecting the Scientific Data Requirements (SDRs) pertinent to the CO2 Research Program that have the potential to be more successfully achieved by utilizing space-based sensor systems; assessment of potential space technology in monitoring those parameters which may be important first indicators of climate change due to increasing atmospheric CO2, including the behavior of the West Antarctic ice sheet; and determine the potential of space technology for monitoring those parameters to improve understanding of the coupling between CO2 and cloud cover.

  3. Antioxidant and cytotoxic effect of biologically synthesized selenium nanoparticles in comparison to selenium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Forootanfar, Hamid; Adeli-Sardou, Mahboubeh; Nikkhoo, Maryam; Mehrabani, Mitra; Amir-Heidari, Bagher; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Shakibaie, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate antioxidant and cytotoxic effect of selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) biosynthesized by a newly isolated marine bacterial strain Bacillus sp. MSh-1. An organic-aqueous partitioning system was applied for purification of the biogenic Se NPs and the purified Se NPs were then investigated for antioxidant activity using DPPH scavenging activity and reducing power assay. Cytotoxic effect of the biogenic Se NPs and selenium dioxide (SeO2) on MCF-7 cell line was assesed by MTT assay. Tranmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the purified Se NPs showed individual and spherical nanostructure in size range of about 80-220nm. The obtained results showed that, at the same concentration of 200μg/mL, Se NPs and SeO2 represented scavenging activity of 23.1±3.4% and 13.2±3.1%, respectively. However, the data obtained from reducing power assay revealed higher electron-donating activity of SeO2 compared to Se NPs. Higher IC50 of the Se NPs (41.5±0.9μg/mL) compared to SeO2 (6.7±0.8μg/mL) confirmed lower cytotoxicity of the biogenic Se NPs on MCF-7 cell line. PMID:24074651

  4. Effect of calcination conditions on the physical properties of sorbents used for sulfur dioxide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Ersoy-Mericboyu, A.; Kuecuekbayrak, S.

    1995-11-01

    The effect of calcination conditions on the physical properties of calcines produced from natural Turkish limestones and dolomites was investigated. Calcination experiments were conducted in a tube furnace at temperatures of 1,073, 1,123, 1,173, 1,273, and 1,373 K. Two different gaseous atmospheres were employed, namely, dry air (100 vol%) and a mixture consisting of CO{sub 2} (15 vol%) and dry air (85 vol%). The physical properties, which involve bulk density (g/cm{sup 3}), total pore volume (cm{sup 3}/g), and the pore size distribution of the calcines prepared under different conditions, were determined using a mercury porosimeter. It was found that the physical properties of calcines were dramatically affected by the calcination conditions. At high calcination temperatures, because of sintering and shrinking effects, a decrease in porosity, an increase in bulk density and average pore radius were observed. In addition, the calcines prepared in a mixed atmosphere of dry air and carbon dioxide had larger pore sizes than those of calcines prepared in an atmosphere of dry air.

  5. Effective inactivation of Candida albicans biofilms by using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyong Seok; Yang, Jungwoo; Choi, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-09-01

    Present sterilization methods for biofilms in medical devices have limitations. Therefore, an alternative sterilization method using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) was tested on Candida albicans biofilms. The effect of varying pressure, temperature, and treatment time on the inactivation of C. albicans spores in suspensions and in biofilms was examined. The parameters such as treatment time, pressure, and temperature that led to the complete inactivation of C. albicans biofilms ranged 5-20 min, 100-200 bar, and 35-45 °C, respectively. Notably, treatment of SC-CO2 at either 100 bar and 40 °C or 200 bar and 30 °C induced complete inactivation of spores within 5 min. Furthermore, it was found that wet biofilms (0.4 %, w/w) had higher sensitivity to SC-CO2 than dried biofilms. Finally, spore inactivation was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In this study, the use of a low-temperature SC-CO2 sterilization method was proven to be effective in fungal biofilm inactivation, and the moisture content of biofilms was revealed to be the key factor for biofilm inactivation. PMID:26109343

  6. Systemic Immune Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles after Repeated Intratracheal Instillation in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yanyun; Zhang, Yanqiu; Chang, Xuhong; Zhang, Yingjian; Ma, Shumei; Sui, Jing; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liang, Geyu

    2014-01-01

    The potential immune effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are raising concern. Our previous study verified that nano-TiO2 induce local immune response in lung tissue followed by intratracheal instillation administration. In this study, we aim to evaluate the systemic immune effects of nano-TiO2. Sprague Dawley rats were treated by intratracheal instillation with nano-TiO2 at doses of 0.5, 4, and 32 mg/kg body weight, micro-TiO2 with 32 mg/kg body weight and 0.9% NaCl, respectively. The exposure was conducted twice a week, for four consecutive weeks. Histopathological immune organs from exposed animals showed slight congestion in spleen, generally brown particulate deposition in cervical and axillary lymph node. Furthermore, immune function response was characterized by increased proliferation of T cells and B cells following mitogen stimulation and enhanced natural killer (NK) cell killing activity in spleen, accompanying by increased number of B cells in blood. No significant changes of Th1-type cytokines (IL-2 and INF-γ) and Th2-type cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) were observed. Intratracheal exposure to nano-TiO2 may be one of triggers to be responsible for the systemic immune response. Further study is needed to confirm long-lasting lymphocyte responses and the potential mechanisms. PMID:24758935

  7. Carbon dioxide emissions from Deccan volcanism and a K/T boundary greenhouse effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse warming caused by increased emissions of carbon dioxide from the Deccan Traps volcanism has been suggested as the cause of the terminal Cretaceous extinctions on land and in the sea. Total eruptive and noneruptive CO2 output by the Deccan eruptions (from 6 to 20 x 10 to the 16th moles) over a period of several hundred thousand years is estimated based on best estimates of the CO2 weight fraction of the original basalts and basaltic melts, the fraction of CO2 degassed, and the volume of the Deccan Traps eruptions. Results of a model designed to estimate the effects of increased CO2 on climate and ocean chemistry suggest that increases in atmospheric pCO2 due to Deccan Traps CO2 emissions would have been less than 75 ppm, leading to a predicted global warming of less than 1 C over several hundred thousand years. It is concluded that the direct climate effects of CO2 emissions from the Deccan eruptions would have been too weak to be an important factor in the end-Cretaceous mass extinctions.

  8. Effects of minor components in carbon dioxide capture using polymeric gas separation membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Scholes, C.; Kentish, S.; Stevens, G.

    2009-07-01

    The capture of carbon dioxide by membrane gas separation has been identified as one potential solution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In particular, the application of membranes to CO{sub 2} capture from both pre- and post-combustion strategies is of interest. For membrane technology to become commercially viable in CO{sub 2} capture, a number of factors need to be overcome, one being the role of minor components in the process on membrane performance. This review considers the effects of minor components in both pre- and post-combustion use of polymeric membranes for CO{sub 2} capture. In particular, gases such as SOx, NOx, CO, H{sub 2}S, NH3, as well as condensable water and hydrocarbons are reviewed in terms of their permeability through polymeric membranes relative to CO{sub 2}, as well as their plasticization and aging effects on membrane separation performance. A major conclusion of the review is that while many minor components can affect performance both through competitive sorption and plasticization, much remains unknown. This limits the selection process for membranes in this application.

  9. Toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lanzhou; Zhou, Lina; Liu, Yongding; Deng, Songqiang; Wu, Hao; Wang, Gaohong

    2012-10-01

    The toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on a unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were assessed by investigating the changes of the physiology and cyto-ultrastructure of this species under treatment. We found that nano-TiO2 inhibited photosynthetic efficiency and cell growth, but the content of chlorophyll a content in algae did not change, while carotenoid and chlorophyll b contents increased. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content reached maximum values after 8h exposure and then decreased to a moderately low level at 72 h. Electron microscopy images indicated that as concentrations of nano-TiO2 increased, a large number of C. reinhardtii cells were noted to be damaged: the number of chloroplasts declined, various other organelles were degraded, plasmolysis occurred, and TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be located inside cell wall and membrane. It was also noted that cell surface was surrounded by TiO2 particles, which could present an obstacle to the exchange of substances between the cell and its surrounding environment. To sum up, the effect of nano-TiO2 on C. reinhardtii included cell surface aggregation, photosynthesis inhibition, lipid peroxidation and new protein synthesis, while the response of C. reinhardtii to nano-TiO2 was a rapid process which occurs during 24 h after exposing and may relate to physiological stress system to mitigate damage. PMID:22883605

  10. In situ effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on community structure of freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Milošević, Djuradj; Piperac, Milica Stojković; Savić, Ana

    2016-06-01

    For the first time in the current literature, the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on the community structure of macroinvertebrates has been investigated in situ. Macroinvertebrates were exposed for 100 days to an environmentally relevant concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles, 25 mg kg(-1) in sediment. Czekanowski's index was 0.61, meaning 39% of the macroinvertebrate community structure was affected by the TiO2 treatment. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) visualized the qualitative and quantitative variability of macroinvertebrates at the community level among all samples. A distance-based permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) revealed the significant effect of TiO2 on the macroinvertebrate community structure. The indicator value analysis showed that the relative frequency and abundance of Planorbarius corneus and Radix labiata were significantly lower in the TiO2 treatment than in the control. Meanwhile, Ceratopogonidae, showed a significantly higher relative frequency and abundance in the TiO2 treatment than in the control. PMID:26924756

  11. Effectiveness of a high purity chlorine dioxide solution in eliminating intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Herczegh, Anna; Ghidan, Agoston; Friedreich, Dóra; Gyurkovics, Milán; Bendő, Zsolt; Lohinai, Zsolt

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in comparison to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) in the elimination of intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. Extracted human teeth were inoculated with E. faecalis. After preparation the canals were irrigated with ClO2, NaOCl, CHX or physiologic saline for control. Two and five days later bacterial samples were collected and streaked onto Columbia agar. CFU/mL were counted. The canal walls were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The gas phase was investigated in an upside down Petri dish where E. faecalis was inoculated onto blood agar. The irrigants were placed on absorbent paper into the cover. Bacteria were detectable in the control group, but not in any of the irrigants groups. There was a massive reinfection 2 or 5 days after irrigation in the control group. The lowest reinfection was found after the ClO2 treatment. These findings were confirmed by SEM images. We observed an antibacterial effect of ClO2 and NaOCl gas phases on E. faecalis growth, but not of CHX. ClO2 eliminates intracanal biofilm and keeps canal nearly free from bacteria. We suggest the use of high purity ClO2 as a root canal irrigant in clinical practice. PMID:23529300

  12. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Aerosols: Effects of Large Increases on Global Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Mathematical models indicate increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide causes an increase in surface temperature at a decreasing rate, and the rate of temperature decrease caused by increasing aerosols increases with aerosol concentration. (AL)

  13. Advances in Teacher Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Jere E.

    2010-01-01

    Classroom research on process-outcome relationships had burgeoned in recent years, revealing notable methodological advances and sensible, replicated findings. The studies of the early 1970s supporting direct instruction as particularly effective for producing achievement in basic skills in the early grades have been replicated and extended to…

  14. Optimizing the photocatalytic properties and the synergistic effects of graphene and nano titanium dioxide immobilized on cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Loghman; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad Esmail; Khajavi, Ramin; Rashidi, Abosaeed; Mirjalili, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    A new facile route based on cotton fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite is reported to produce photo-active cellulose textiles. A thin layer of graphene oxide has been produced on cotton fabrics by a dip-dry process. The graphene oxide-coated cotton fabrics were then immersed in titanium trichloride aqueous solution to yield a fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite. The photo-activity efficiency of the coated fabrics was tested by degradation of methylene blue in aqueous solution under UV and sunlight irradiations. To obtain the optimum condition, the response surface methodology (RSM) through the central composite design was applied and the role of both graphene oxide and titanium trichloride concentrations on photo-activity efficiency was investigated. The physicochemical properties of the prepared samples has been characterized by a series of techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of the application of graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite on the physical properties of the cotton fabric, such as tensile strength, bending rigidity and crease recovery angle has been analyzed. Other characteristics of treated fabrics such as antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxicity were also investigated. Cotton fabric coated with optimum concentrations of graphene oxide and titanium trichloride obtained significant photo-activity efficiency under UV and sunlight irradiations. Moreover, the graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite coated cotton samples proved low toxicity and possessed excellent antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  15. Effects of alprazolam and clonidine on carbon dioxide-induced increases in anxiety rating in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, S.W.; Krystal, J.H.; Heninger, G.R.; Charney, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate possible neurobiologic mechanisms underlying carbon dioxide-induced anxiety, the effects of oral alprazolam 0.75 mg and intravenous clonidine 2 mcg/kg on CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of subjective anxiety, pulse rate, and ventilation were measured in healthy human subjects. Pretreatment with alprazolam but not with clonidine significantly reduced the CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of anxiety. Neither drug altered CO/sub 2/-induced increases in pulse rate or ventilatory responses. Clonidine did produce potent sedative and hypotensive effects. The behavioral data suggest that the mechanisms through which CO/sub 2/ induces anxiety-like effects involve neural systems regulated by benzodiazepine receptors and, secondly, that they appear not to require normal functioning of noradrenergic systems. Carbon dioxide may provide a useful model system for identification of new drugs with anxiolytic properties.

  16. Effects of nitrogen dioxide on respiratory tract clearance in the ferret

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, R.E.; Mannix, R.C.; Oldham, M.J.; Phalen, R.F. )

    1994-01-01

    During growth and development, young children are periodically exposed to relatively high concentrations of various air contaminants, including tobacco smoke and environmental pollutants generated by fossil fuel use. The effects of these exposures on respiratory function and lung development are difficult to determine because of interindividual variation and lack of accurate dosimetry. To provide information on the effects of chronic exposure to a common indoor and outdoor pollutant during lung development, a study was performed to assess the effects of exposure to two concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO[sub 2]; 0.5 or 10 ppm) on tracer particle clearance from the airways of ferrets exposed during postnatal respiratory tract development. Separate groups of ferrets were exposed nose-only to the test atmospheres or clean air 4 h/d, 5 d/wk, for either 8 or 15 wk. Those animals exposed for 8 wk were subsequently housed in a filtered air environment until the particle clearance measurements commenced at 3 wk prior to the end of the 15-wk exposure protocol. Radiolabeled ([sup 51]Cr) tracer particles were deposited in the respiratory tract of all animals by inhalation, and the clearance rates from the head and thoracic regions were separately monitored for 18 d. No significant effects of the NO[sub 2] exposure on head airways clearance were seen. In contrast, the rates of particle clearance from the thorax of both the 8- and 15-wk groups exposed to 10 ppm NO[sub 2] were significantly reduced, and did not differ from each other. Thoracic clearance was also reduced in animals exposed to 0.5 ppm, but the rate was not significantly different from that of the clean air exposed controls. These results show that NO[sub 2] at moderate concentrations caused highly significant changes in the deep lung of the juvenile ferret, and suggest that impairment of the clearance function may be only slowly recovered after chronic exposure. 35 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Designing Effective Undergraduate Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, S.

    2010-12-01

    I present a model for designing student research internships that is informed by the best practices of the Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) Professional Development Program. The dual strands of the CfAO education program include: the preparation of early-career scientists and engineers in effective teaching; and changing the learning experiences of students (e.g., undergraduate interns) through inquiry-based "teaching laboratories." This paper will focus on the carry-over of these ideas into the design of laboratory research internships such as the CfAO Mainland internship program as well as NSF REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) and senior-thesis or "capstone" research programs. Key ideas in maximizing student learning outcomes and generating productive research during internships include: defining explicit content, scientific process, and attitudinal goals for the project; assessment of student prior knowledge and experience, then following up with formative assessment throughout the project; setting reasonable goals with timetables and addressing motivation; and giving students ownership of the research by implementing aspects of the inquiry process within the internship.

  18. Effects of alloying elements on carbon dioxide corrosion in 13% to 20% chromium-containing steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Asahi, H.; Kawakami, A.; Takahashi, A.

    2000-04-01

    Effects of alloying elements on corrosion rates were investigated for 13% to 20% chromium-containing steels in wet carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) environments without wet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) gas at 150 C to 200 C. Results showed that a reduction in carbon content and an increase in chromium, molybdenum, and nickel content improved CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance. However, corrosion rate was independent of nitrogen content. The combined additions of nickel and copper greatly improved CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance. To satisfy the criteria in which the corrosion rates became < 0.1 mm/y, the nickel content should have been > 1% and copper > 0.5% at 10 C. This level of alloying corresponded to the reduction of the Cr + 1.6% Mo index value by {approximately}6%. In the case at 200 C, nickel content was required at > 4%, and copper content at > 1%. The reason for the improvement of CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance is thought to be the combined additions of nickel and copper that made the corrosion film more stable and more protective. The equation to be satisfied with a corrosion rate < 0.1 mm/y at 180 C in 0.02% C-containing steels was indicated as Cr + 1.6% Mo {ge} 19% (copper-free steels) and Cr + 1.6% Mo {ge} 13% (combined additions of nickel and copper).

  19. Investigation of the Effect of Crystal Thickness on Free-Standing Vanadium Dioxide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasirga, Serkan; Fadlelmula, Mustafa

    The first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) that vanadium dioxide exhibits at 65 ºC has been extensively studied in the last decade thanks to the growth of single crystal nanobeams/plates smaller than characteristic domain size as well as the advances in epitaxial film growth techniques. The effect of crystal thickness has been studied extensively in epitaxially grown VO2 films yet not in free-standing nanocrystals. This is mainly due to lack of control over the crystal thickness in physical vapor transport growth of the nanocrystals. Here, we report first observations on the MIT of VO2 nanocrystals grown on oxidized silicon substrate thinned using argon-ions. Among these observations AFM measurements reveal an etch rate of 4 nm/min for 1keV Ar-ion energy. Two terminal suspended nanobeam measurements reveal an intriguing phase transition properties below a threshold thickness. This work was supported by TUBITAK (Project No. 114F273).

  20. Carbon dioxide insertion into diamines: a computational study of solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Eger, Wilhelm A; Genest, Alexander; Rieger, Bernhard; Rösch, Notker

    2012-10-01

    We studied computationally, on the model compound ethylenediamine, the insertion of carbon dioxide into diamines, yielding cyclic urea compounds. Two mechanisms were elaborated, depending on the value of the dielectric constant (DC) of the solvent. Accordingly, reaction mixtures with a high DC lead to carbamates, whereas lower DC values result in the preferred product cyclic urea. Additives behaving as "proton shuttles" act as catalysts, significantly reducing the activation barriers of insertion and ring closure to surmountable values. CO(2) insertion into diamines may also occur by autocatalysis, even without further additives, but under less favorable conditions, for example, lower yields. Amine reagents are most efficient at proton shuttling, followed by alcohols. The activation barrier of the rate-limiting step is lowered in a reaction mixture with higher values of DC, up to a critical value ε(cr) ≈ 18. Hence, in a suitably optimized reaction mixture, ring closure is suggested to occur under milder conditions than those previously applied experimentally. The two roles of the additive, that is, acting as proton shuttling agent and adjusting the effective DC of the reaction mixture, do not have to be assigned to a single compound, possibly affording a handle on process optimization. PMID:23033262

  1. Effects of 7.5% Carbon Dioxide Inhalation on Anxiety and Mood in Cigarette Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Angela S.; Ataya, Alia F.; Bailey, Jayne E.; Lightman, Stafford L.; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with elevated risk of anxiety and mood disorder. Using the 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation model of anxiety induction, we examined the effects of smoking status and abstinence from smoking on anxiety responses. Physiological and subjective responses to CO2 and medical air were compared in smokers and non-smokers (Experiment One) and in overnight abstinent and non-abstinent smokers (Experiment Two). CO2 induced greater increases in blood pressure in non-smokers compared with smokers (ps < 0.043), and greater increases in anxiety (p = 0.005) and negative affect (p = 0.054) in non-abstinent compared with abstinent smokers. CO2 increased physiological and subjective indices of anxiety. There were differences across smoking groups indicating that the CO2 inhalation model is a useful tool for examining the relationship between smoking and anxiety. The findings suggested that both acute smoking and acute abstinence may protect against anxious responding. Further investigation is needed in long-term heavy smokers. PMID:24763184

  2. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Red Clover and Its Rhizobial Symbiont.

    PubMed

    Moll, Janine; Okupnik, Annette; Gogos, Alexander; Knauer, Katja; Bucheli, Thomas D; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are in consideration to be used in plant protection products. Before these products can be placed on the market, ecotoxicological tests have to be performed. In this study, the nitrogen fixing bacterium Rhizobium trifolii and red clover were exposed to two TiO2 NPs, i.e., P25, E171 and a non-nanomaterial TiO2. Growth of both organisms individually and their symbiotic root nodulation were investigated in liquid and hydroponic systems. While 23 and 18 mg l-1 of E171 and non-nanomaterial TiO2 decreased the growth rate of R. trifolii by 43 and 23% respectively, P25 did not cause effects. Shoot length of red clover decreased between 41 and 62% for all tested TiO2 NPs. In 21% of the TiO2 NP treated plants, no nodules were found. At high concentrations certain TiO2 NPs impaired R. trifolii as well as red clover growth and their symbiosis in the hydroponic systems. PMID:27171465

  3. Sulfur dioxide and ammonium sulfate effects on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Shanty, F.; Kerr, H.D.; Farrell, B.P.; Miller, W.R.; Milman, J.H.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of exposures to 1 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and 500 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ respirable ammonium sulfate ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) was studied in 20 nonsmoking subjects to determine if a response can be measured at these atmospheric levels and if the response is additive or synergistic. Four-hour separate and combined exposures were employed. Each subject acted as his or her own control and performed two light-to-moderate exercise stints (612 kg-m/min) for 15 minutes on each day's confinement in the environmental chamber. Pulmonary function tests (body plethysmography and spirometry) and bronchial reactivity to methacholine were performed to assess the response of these exposures. No significant changes in pulmonary function or bronchial reactivity were observed in the individual exposures ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or SO/sub 2/), the combined exposure ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and SO/sub 2/), or 24 hours post-exposure. This study design and the observed results did not demonstrate any readily apparent risk to healthy subjects with these exposures. Since no significant changes were measured, it was not possible to conclude if these two pollutants in combination produce an additive or synergistic response.

  4. Effect of Surface Treated Silicon Dioxide Nanoparticles on Some Mechanical Properties of Maxillofacial Silicone Elastomer

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Sara M.; Alshimy, Ahmad M.; Fahmy, Amal E.

    2014-01-01

    Current materials used for maxillofacial prostheses are far from ideal and there is a need for novel improved materials which mimic as close as possible the natural behavior of facial soft tissues. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of adding different concentrations of surface treated silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2) on clinically important mechanical properties of a maxillofacial silicone elastomer. 147 specimens of the silicone elastomer were prepared and divided into seven groups (n = 21). One control group was prepared without nanoparticles and six study groups with different concentrations of nanoparticles, from 0.5% to 3% by weight. Specimens were tested for tear strength (ASTM D624), tensile strength (ASTM D412), percent elongation, and shore A hardness. SEM was used to assess the dispersion of nano-SiO2 within the elastomer matrix. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe test (α = 0.05). Results revealed significant improvement in all mechanical properties tested, as the concentration of the nanoparticles increased. This was supported by the results of the SEM. Hence, it can be concluded that the incorporation of surface treated SiO2 nanoparticles at concentration of 3% enhanced the overall mechanical properties of A-2186 silicone elastomer. PMID:25574170

  5. Effect of Sprayed Solution Volume on Physical Properties of Titanium Dioxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naffouti, Wafa; Ben Nasr, Tarek; Briot, Olivier; Kamoun-Turki, Najoua

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique from different solution volumes. We studied the effect of sprayed solution volume on the structural, morphological and optical properties of TiO2 films. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the presence of an anatase phase with a tetragonal structure with (101) preferred orientation. The best crystallinity was obtained in the case of a sprayed solution volume of 60 ml. Also, this film had a lower average surface roughness (RMS) as measured by atomic force microscopy. Transmission and reflection optical analysis showed interference phenomena indicating a smooth reflecting surface of the film. An indirect band gap of about 3.46 eV was found, indicating a potential use of these films in solar cell devices. Based on the optical measurements, the film thickness was determined by the envelope method, which was in agreement with the scanning electron microscopy result. Wemple-Di Domenico single oscillator and Spitzer-Fan models were used to study the optical constants of the films grown from different sprayed solution volumes. Photoluminescence emission intensity was found to increase with increasing film crystallinity, and the spectra showed ultraviolet and visible emissions corresponding to intrinsic emission and trap levels within the band gap, respectively.

  6. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Red Clover and Its Rhizobial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Janine; Okupnik, Annette; Gogos, Alexander; Knauer, Katja; Bucheli, Thomas D.; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are in consideration to be used in plant protection products. Before these products can be placed on the market, ecotoxicological tests have to be performed. In this study, the nitrogen fixing bacterium Rhizobium trifolii and red clover were exposed to two TiO2 NPs, i.e., P25, E171 and a non-nanomaterial TiO2. Growth of both organisms individually and their symbiotic root nodulation were investigated in liquid and hydroponic systems. While 23 and 18 mg l-1 of E171 and non-nanomaterial TiO2 decreased the growth rate of R. trifolii by 43 and 23% respectively, P25 did not cause effects. Shoot length of red clover decreased between 41 and 62% for all tested TiO2 NPs. In 21% of the TiO2 NP treated plants, no nodules were found. At high concentrations certain TiO2 NPs impaired R. trifolii as well as red clover growth and their symbiosis in the hydroponic systems. PMID:27171465

  7. The effects of carbon dioxide on the mineralogical and geochemical alterations of phyllosilicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sookyun; Park, Eundoo; Lee, Minhee

    2014-05-01

    This study aims to identify the geochemical and mineralogical effects of carbon dioxide stored in geological formations on subsurface environments in deep rock formations. A series of autoclave experiments were conducted to simulate the interactions in the scCO2-groundwater-phyllosilicate minerals reaction systems using a high pressure and high temperature cells at 50C and 100 bar. Kaolinite and montmorillonite were used as geological materials reactive in CO2-rich acidic environments, and groundwater sampled from a 800-depth well were applied as aqueous solutions. The dissolution characteristics of phyllosilicate minerals and their geochemical and mineralogical alternations after 30-days reactions were quantitatively examined by XRD, XRF, ICP-OES and SEM/EDX investigation. Throughout experimental processes, it was observed that the acidic environments induced by the dissolution of CO2 resulted in the changes in pH and cation concentration in the aqueous phase, and, thereby, the mineral phase changes in composition and interlayer spacing. The experimental results clearly showed an enhanced dissolution of kaolinite and montmorillonite with the presence of CO2. They also suggested that geochemical processes such as dissolution/precipitation and cation exchange played major roles in physical and chemical changes in pore structure and groundwater in relevant formations and aquifers.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of the bulk temperature effect on primary radiation damage in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Sabathier, C.; Wiktor, J.; Maillard, S.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of bulk temperature on the primary damage induced by a displacement cascade was investigated in uranium dioxide using classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, the Morelon potentials were used to model the middle-range interactions between the atoms that constitute the host matrix during the radiation events. Cascades were initiated by accelerating a uranium primary knock-on atom at 10keV inside a perfect UO2 lattice at a temperature between 700K and 1800K , a range which comprises in-pile temperatures of oxide fuels in light water reactors in standard operating conditions. Cascade overlap sequences were also simulated at 700K and 1400K in order to study the radiation damage accumulation in the oxide fuel. This study reveals the maximum damage level which the material can accommodate for decreases with the temperature. Furthermore the direct formation of vacancy clusters under irradiation is considerably slowed down above 1000K , notably during cascade overlap sequences.

  9. Electron beam induced synthesis of uranium dioxide nanoparticles: Effect of solvent composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, M. C.; Keny, S. J.; Naik, D. B.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various compositions of solvents was investigated on the electron beam induced synthesis of uranium dioxide, UO2 nanoparticles. The synthesis was carried out at different pHs from 2 to 7 in the aqueous solutions containing 10 mM uranyl nitrate and 10% 2-propanol. The formation of UO2 nanoparticles was found to occur only in the pH range from 2.5 to 3.7. Experiments were also carried out in the aqueous solutions containing various other alcohols (10% v/v) such as methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol or tert-butanol as well as in solutions containing 10 mM sodium formate at pH 3.4. The formation of UO2 nanoparticles in the aqueous solutions was found to occur only in the presence of ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1-butanol. It is therefore confirmed that the electron beam induced synthesis of UO2 nanoparticles strongly depends on the solvent compositions as well as the pH of the medium.

  10. Cardiopulmonary effects of using carbon dioxide for laparoscopic surgery in cats.

    PubMed

    Beazley, Shannon G; Cosford, Kevin; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya

    2011-09-01

    The cardiopulmonary effects of capnoperitoneum were investigated in 8 spontaneously breathing, young adult female cats undergoing laparoscopic pancreatic biopsy (intra-abdominal pressure 12 mmHg). Cats were premedicated with acepromazine and hydromorphone, induced with ketamine and diazepam, and maintained using an end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.13% in 100% oxygen. Direct systemic arterial blood pressure, heart and respiratory rates, end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and isoflurane were recorded every 5 min before insufflation (baseline), during insufflation of the abdomen with CO(2), and following desufflation. Arterial blood samples were drawn at baseline, at 10 and 30 min of insufflation, and 5 min after desufflation for blood gases. The significant findings (P < 0.05) were as follows: insufflation produced an increase in heart rate (5 to 15 min and at 30 min), mean arterial blood pressure (25 to 30 min), and diastolic arterial blood pressure (10 to 30 min). After desufflation, respiratory rate increased for 15 min. The changes were within physiologically acceptable limits in these healthy, anesthetized cats despite no artificial maintenance of minute ventilation. PMID:22379196

  11. Effect of Non-ionic Surfactants and Its Role in K Intercalation in Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Avijit; Tripathy, B. C.; Subbaiah, T.; Meyrick, D.; Ionescu, Mihail; Minakshi, Manickam

    2014-09-01

    The effect of non-ionic surface active agents (surfactants) Triton X-100 (TX-100) and Tween-20 (Tw-20) and their role in potassium intercalation in electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) produced from manganese cake has been investigated. Electrosynthesis of MnO2 in the absence or presence of surfactant was carried out from acidic MnSO4 solution obtained from manganese cake under optimized conditions. A range of characterization techniques, including field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), and BET surface area/porosity studies, was carried out to determine the structural and chemical characteristics of the EMD. Galvanostatic (discharge) and potentiostatic (cyclic voltammetric) studies were employed to evaluate the suitability of EMD in combination with KOH electrolyte for alkaline battery applications. The presence of surfactant played an important role in modifying the physicochemical properties of the EMD by increasing the surface area of the material and hence, enhancing its electrochemical performance. The TEM and RBS analyses of the discharged EMD (γ-MnO2) material showed clear evidence of potassium intercalation or at least the formation of a film on the MnO2 surface. The extent of intercalation was greater for EMD deposited in the presence of TX-100. Discharged MnO2 showed products of Mn2+ intermediates such as MnOOH and Mn3O4.

  12. Percutaneous carbon dioxide mist treatment has protective effects in experimental myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takehiro; Yamazaki, Takanori; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Shiota, Masayuki; Shimada, Kenei; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Izumi, Yasukatsu

    2015-04-01

    Percutaneous treatment with carbon dioxide (CO2) mist, CO2 gas dissolved in water, contributes to improved cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI). In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated pretreatment with CO2 mist on cardiac dysfunction after MI. The CO2 mist was generated by a dry mist production unit. The whole body of rats below the axilla was wrapped in a polyethylene bag, which was sealed and filled with the CO2 mist in the draft cabinet for 30 min daily for 7 days. MI was induced by ligation of the coronary artery in untreated (UT), CO2 gas-pretreated (CG), and CO2 mist-pretreated (CM) rats. The infarct size and the increase in oxidative stress due to MI were significantly smaller in the CM rats than in the UT rats. Furthermore, the expression of inflammation-related genes, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and fibrosis-related genes, such as transforming growth factor-β1, was significantly suppressed in the CM rats. The CM rats had a better left ventricular ejection fraction than the UT rats 7 days after MI. These parameters in the CG rats were the same as in the UT group. Thus, CO2 mist preparative treatment may be potentially useful for the reduction of MI. PMID:25906762

  13. Immunomodulatory effects in the spleen-injured mice following exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xuezi; Fei, Min; Sheng, Lei; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Yu, Xiaohong; Hong, Jie; Ze, Yuguan; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Ze, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-10-01

    Immune injuries following the exposure of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂ NPs) have been greatly concerned along with the TiO₂ NPs are widely used in pharmacology and daily life. However, very little is known about the immunomodulatory mechanisms in the spleen-injured mice due to TiO₂ NPs exposure. In this study, mice were continuously exposed to 2.5, 5, or 10 TiO₂ NPs mg kg(-1) body weight for 90 days with intragastric administration to investigate the immunomodulatory mechanisms in the spleen. The findings showed that TiO₂ NPs exposure resulted in significant increases in spleen and thymus indices, and titanium accumulation, in turn led to histopathological changes and splenocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, the exposure of TiO₂ NPs could significantly increase the levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-2, Eotaxin, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interferon-γ, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-13, interferon-γ-inducible protein-10, migration inhibitory factor, CD69, major histocompatibility complex, protein tyrosine phosphatase, protein tyrosine kinase 1, basic fibroblast growth factor, Fasl, and GzmB expression, whereas markedly decrease the levels of NKG2D, NKp46, 2B4 expression involved in immune responses, lymphocyte healing and apoptosis. These findings would better understand toxicological effects induced by TiO₂ NPs exposure. PMID:24243549

  14. Media Effects: Theory and Research.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen; Walther, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes trends and commonalities among prominent theories of media effects. On the basis of exemplary meta-analyses of media effects and bibliometric studies of well-cited theories, we identify and discuss five features of media effects theories as well as their empirical support. Each of these features specifies the conditions under which media may produce effects on certain types of individuals. Our review ends with a discussion of media effects in newer media environments. This includes theories of computer-mediated communication, the development of which appears to share a similar pattern of reformulation from unidirectional, receiver-oriented views, to theories that recognize the transactional nature of communication. We conclude by outlining challenges and promising avenues for future research. PMID:26331344

  15. The Effects of Nitrogen Enrichment and a Simulated Rainfall Event on Soil Carbon Dioxide Efflux in an Annual California Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. P.; Strong, A. L.; Chiariello, N.; Field, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems and play a critical role in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have shown that enhanced precipitation (projected by climate models) and human activities (such as increased fertilizer use) may alter this cycle by enhancing soil microbial activity, although effects are often variable. Soils in semi-arid grasslands play a vital role in the global carbon cycle and may be responsive to environmental perturbations. Previous studies have demonstrated that wet-up treatments positively influence soil carbon dioxide efflux rates, which are otherwise low during dry summers. A preliminary study performed in a semi-arid annual grassland has shown that long-term nitrogen enrichment (equivalent to 70kg N per hectare) positively influences soil carbon dioxide efflux during peak biomass in the wet season. However, the combined effect and seasonal dynamics of these environmental changes is poorly understood. In order to assess this interaction, we explore the short-term response of soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in a semi-arid grassland to a combination of long-term nitrogen enrichment and a simulated 20-mm rainfall event in the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRCGE), a long-term, multi-factorial experiment in a semi-arid annual grassland located in the foothills of the Santa Cruz mountains in central California. We measured soil carbon dioxide efflux rates from pre-installed soil respiration collars for forty-eight hours after a simulated rainfall event (20mm) during the dry season in late July 2013. Both the enhanced and non-enhanced nitrogen treatments had an immediate pronounced response to the wet-up stimulation in which efflux rates increased by an average of more than six-fold. In contrast with previous studies of soil carbon dioxide efflux at JRGCE during the wet season in which N enrichment elevated efflux rates relative to controls, however, the soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in response

  16. Effects of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide on Phyllosphere Fungi from Three Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Mark E.; Dunn, Paul H.; Durall, Daniel M.

    1989-01-01

    Short-term effects of ozone (O3) on phyllosphere fungi were studied by examining fungal populations from leaves of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Buchholz) and California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.). Chronic effects of both O3 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were studied by isolating fungi from leaves of mature Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis L.) trees. In this chronic-exposure experiment, mature orange trees were fumigated in open-top chambers at the University of California, Riverside, for 4 years with filtered air, ambient air plus filtered air (1:1), ambient air, or filtered air plus SO2 at 9.3 parts per hundred million. Populations of Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler and Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fres.) de Vries, two of the four most common fungi isolated from orange leaves, were significantly reduced by chronic exposure to ambient air. In the short-term experiments, seedlings of giant sequoia or California black oak were fumigated in open-top chambers in Sequoia National Park for 9 to 11 weeks with filtered air, ambient air, or ambient air plus O3. These short-term fumigations did not significantly affect the numbers of phyllosphere fungi. Exposure of Valencia orange trees to SO2 at 9.3 parts per hundred million for 4 years reduced the number of phyllosphere fungi isolated by 75% compared with the number from the filtered-air treatment and reduced the Simpson diversity index value from 3.3 to 2.5. A significant chamber effect was evident since leaves of giant sequoia and California black oak located outside of chambers had more phyllosphere fungi than did seedlings within chambers. Results suggest that chronic exposure to ambient ozone or SO2 in polluted areas can affect phyllosphere fungal communities, while short-term exposures may not significantly disturb phyllosphere fungi. PMID:16347849

  17. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue® and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm2) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm2). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10−4 M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10−5 M (AlamarBlue® assay), and 7.6 × 10−4 M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  18. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue(®) and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm(2)) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm(2)). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10(-4) M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10(-5) M (AlamarBlue(®) assay), and 7.6 × 10(-4) M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  19. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca; Stecca, Laura

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  20. Effects of carbon dioxide, water supply, and seasonality on terpene content and emission by Rosmarinus officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Penuelas, J.; Llusia, J.

    1997-04-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. plants were grown under carbon dioxide concentrations of 350 and 700 {mu}mol (atmospheric CO{sub 2} and elevated CO{sub 2}) and under two levels of irrigation (high water and low water) from October 1, 1994 to May 31, 1996. Elevated CO{sub 2} led on increasingly larger monthly growth rates than the atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments. The increase was 9.5% in spring 1995, 23% in summer 1995, and 53% in spring 1996 in the high-water treatments, whereas in low-water treatments the growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} was constrained until the second year spring, when there was a 47% increase. The terpene concentrations was slightly larger in the elevated CO{sub 2} treatments than in atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments and reached a maximum 37% difference in spring 1996. There was no significant effect of water treatment, likely as a result of a mild low water treatment for a Mediterranean plant. Terpene concentrations increased throughout the period of study, indicating possible age effects. The most abundant terpenes were {alpha}-pinene, cineole, camphor, borneol, and verbenone, which represented about 75% of the total. No significant differences were found in the terpene composition of the plants in the different treatments or seasons. The emission of volatile terpenes was much larger in spring (about 75 {mu}g/dry wt/hr) than in autumn (about 10 {mu}g/dry wt/hr), partly because of higher temperature and partly because of seasonal effect, but no significant differences was found because of CO{sub 2} or water treatment. The main terpene emitted was {alpha}-pinene, which represented about 50% of the total. There was no clear correlation between content and emission, either quantitatively or qualitatively. More volatile terpenes were proportionally more important in the total emission than in total content and in autumn than in spring.

  1. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  2. EFFECTS OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLE EXPOSURE ON NEUROIMMUNE RESPONSES IN RAT AIRWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Scuri, Mario; Chen, Bean T.; Castranova, Vincent; Reynolds, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Victor J.; Samsell, Lennie; Walton, Cheryl; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ambient nanoparticles (defined as particulate matter [PM] having one dimension < 100 nm) is associated with increased risk of childhood and adult asthma. Nanomaterials feature a smaller aerodynamic diameter and a higher surface area per unit mass ratio compared to fine or coarse-sized particles, resulting in greater lung deposition efficiency and an increased potential for biological interaction. The neurotrophins nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are key regulatory elements of neuronal development and responsiveness of airway sensory neurons. Changes in their expression are associated with bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation. The neurogenic-mediated control of airway responses is a key pathophysiological mechanism of childhood asthma. However, the effects of nanoparticle exposure on neurotrophin-driven airway responses and their potential role as a predisposing factor for developing asthma have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, in vivo inhalation exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (12 mg/m13; 5.6 h/d for 3 d) produced upregulation of lung neurotrophins in weanling (2-wk-old) and newborn (2-d-old) rats but not in adult (12-wk-old) animals compared to controls. This effect was associated with increased airway responsiveness and upregulation of growth-related oncogene/keratine-derived chemokine (GRO/KC; CXCL1, rat equivalent of human interleukin [IL]-8) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These data show for the first time that exposure to nanoparticulate upregulates the expression of lung neurotrophins in an age-dependent fashion and that this effect is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. These results suggest the presence of a critical window of vulnerability in earlier stages of lung development, which may lead to a higher risk of developing asthma. PMID:20818535

  3. Response of vegetation to carbon dioxide - effect of elevated levels of CO{sub 2} on winter wheat under two moisture regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, U.N.; Burnett, R.B.; Kanemasu, E.T.; Kirkham, M.B.

    1987-12-31

    This report deals with the second-year (1985-86) findings of an on going experiment with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at different carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and under two moisture regimes. The results for the first year are given in the U.S. Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Research Division Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide. The purpose of the second year`s experiment was to verify the results of 1984-85. However, based on the performance and the results of 1984-85 experiments, a few modifications were made.

  4. Effect of surface fluorination on the electrochemical and photoelectrocatalytic properties of nanoporous titanium dioxide electrodes.

    PubMed

    Monllor-Satoca, Damián; Lana-Villarreal, Teresa; Gómez, Roberto

    2011-12-20

    Titanium dioxide is a widely used photocatalyst whose properties can be modified by fluoride adsorption. This work is focused on the effect of surface fluorination on the electrochemical and photoelectrocatalytic properties of TiO(2) nanoporous thin films. Surface fluorination was achieved by simple addition of HF to the working solution (pH 3.5). Open circuit potential as well as ex situ XPS measurements verify that surface modification takes place. Fluorination triggers a significant capacitance increase in the accumulation potential region, as revealed by dark voltammetric measurements for all the TiO(2) samples studied. The photoelectrocatalytic properties (measured as photocurrents under white light illumination) depend on the substrate being oxidized and, in some cases, on the nature of the TiO(2) sample. In particular, the results obtained for electrodes prepared with a mixed phase (rutile + anatase) commercial nanopowder (PI-KEM) indicate that the processes mediated by surface trapped holes, such as the photooxidation of water or methanol, are accelerated while those occurring by direct hole capture from the adsorbed state (formic acid) are retarded. The photooxidation of catechol and phenol is also enhanced upon fluorination. In such a case, the effect can be rationalized on the basis of a diminished recombination and a surface displacement of both the oxidizable organic substrates and the poisoning species formed as a result of the organics oxidation. Photoelectrochemical and in situ infrared spectroscopic measurements support these ideas. In a more general vein, the results pave the way toward a better understanding of the photocatalysis phenomena, unravelling the importance of the reactant adsorption processes. PMID:22039955

  5. The Ginkgo biloba Extract Reverses the Renal Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reynoso-Andeola, Irma Guadalupe; Jaramillo-Juárez, Fernando; Martínez-Ruvalcaba, Haydée; Posadas del Rio, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) is a commercial product used as a nutraceutic herbal remedy in Europe and US. It contains 27% of the polyphenols isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, as antioxidants. We used male adult Wistar rats (200–300 g), divided into four groups: control group (treated with 5.0 mg/kg of sodium chloride, intravenous), titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) group (5.0 mg/kg, intravenous), GbE group (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), and GbE + TiO2-NPs group (treated 24 h before with 10 mg/kg of GbE, intraperitoneal), followed, 24 h later, by 5.0 mg/kg of TiO2-NPs intravenously. The statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test for grouped data with ANOVA posttest. The GbE protected renal cells against the effects of TiO2-NPs because it reversed the increased activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase and the enzymatic activity of dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV at all times tested (0–5, 5–24, 24–48, and 48–72 h). Also it reversed the glucosuria, hypernatriuria, and urine osmolarity at three times tested (5–24, 24–48, and 48–72). Thus, we conclude that GbE has a beneficial activity in the cytoplasmic membranes of brush border cells on the renal tubules, against the adverse effects that can be produced by some xenobiotics in this case the TiO2-NPs, in experimental rats. PMID:27042354

  6. Effects of sulfur dioxide fumigation on photosynthesis, respiration, and chlorophyll content of selected lichens

    SciTech Connect

    Beekley, P.K.; Hoffman, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    Four lichens - Parmelia bolliana Mull. Arg., Physcia stellaris (L.) Nyl., Xanthoria fallax (Hepp) Arn., and Physconia grisea (Lam.) Poelt - listed in order of decreasing mesophytism, were fumigated for 4 hr at 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 2.5 ppm sulfur dioxide to determine the effects on photosynthesis, respiration, and chlorophyll content. Photosynthesis decreased after fumigation at 1.0 and 2.5 ppm, but significant decreases occurred only after fumigation at 2.5 ppm. Expressed on the basis of per unit weight chlorophyll content, photosynthesis of Physconia grisea was most sensitive followed by that of Xanthoria fallax, Physcia stellaris and Parmelia bolliana. Expressed on the basis of per unit dry weight of lichen sample, photosynthesis of Physconia grisea was most sensitive followed by Xanthoria fallax, Physcia stellaris, and Parmelia bolliana. In both cases, the more xerophytic species were more sensitive. Chlorophyll content in these species was not measurably altered by fumigation. Comparison of chlorophyll a and b absorption spectra peaks for fumigated and control samples indicated that no phaeophytinisation occurred. Insignificant and inconsistent differences in chlorophyll a/b ratios were observed. Respiration of Physcia stellaris and Parmelia bolliana decreased significantly following fumigation with 2.5 ppm SO/sub 2/; both species were more sensitive than Xanthoria fallax. Physconia grisea was not tested for respiratory response. The effects of SO/sub 2/ fumigation on measured metabolic rates differed with the species. Photosynthetic rates of the xerophytic Xanthoria fallax and Physconia gresea were more sensitive than the more mesophytic Parmelia bolliana and Physcia stellaris. In contrast, respiratory sensitivities to SO/sub 2/ fumigation were greater for P. bolliana and P. stellaris.

  7. The Ginkgo biloba Extract Reverses the Renal Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Adult Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Escárcega-González, Carlos Enrique; Reynoso-Andeola, Irma Guadalupe; Jaramillo-Juárez, Fernando; Martínez-Ruvalcaba, Haydée; Posadas Del Rio, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    The Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) is a commercial product used as a nutraceutic herbal remedy in Europe and US. It contains 27% of the polyphenols isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, as antioxidants. We used male adult Wistar rats (200-300 g), divided into four groups: control group (treated with 5.0 mg/kg of sodium chloride, intravenous), titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) group (5.0 mg/kg, intravenous), GbE group (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), and GbE + TiO2-NPs group (treated 24 h before with 10 mg/kg of GbE, intraperitoneal), followed, 24 h later, by 5.0 mg/kg of TiO2-NPs intravenously. The statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test for grouped data with ANOVA posttest. The GbE protected renal cells against the effects of TiO2-NPs because it reversed the increased activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase and the enzymatic activity of dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV at all times tested (0-5, 5-24, 24-48, and 48-72 h). Also it reversed the glucosuria, hypernatriuria, and urine osmolarity at three times tested (5-24, 24-48, and 48-72). Thus, we conclude that GbE has a beneficial activity in the cytoplasmic membranes of brush border cells on the renal tubules, against the adverse effects that can be produced by some xenobiotics in this case the TiO2-NPs, in experimental rats. PMID:27042354

  8. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on tuber yield and quality of potatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.W.; Timm, H.; Labanauskas, C.K.; Oshima, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Air pollution injury of the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L.) has been documented previously, but potato yield losses have not been estimated in replicated experiments having controlled exposures to ozone (O/sub 3/) and sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). A controlled-environment study involving the speckle-leaf-sensitive cultivar 'Centennial Russet' was conducted to examine the effects of chronic exposure to O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/ on plant growth and tuber yield and quality. Ozone, at the highest seasonal dose (44.2 ppm-h), reduced leaf dry weight 48%, root dry weight 58%, tuber number 38%, and total tuber yield 45%. Lower exposures affected these parameters in linear proportion to the O/sub 3/ dose. Mean stem (minus leaves) dry weight, tuber dry weight, tuber dry matter percentage, partitioning of dry matter to tubers, and tuber sugar concentrations were not affected. Tuber N concentration increased linearly by up to 21% as the O/sub 3/ dose increased. Plants grown outside of chambers in ambient air showed effects consistent with results obtained within the chambers. The plants grown outside received a total seasonal O/sub 3/ dose of 50.4 ppm-h and produced 58% less tuber yield than filtered air control plants.Plant responses to SO/sub 2/ exposure were much less pronounced than their responses to exposure to O/sub 3/. However, leaf symptom development in O/sub 3/-treated plants was markedly intensified by the presence of SO/sub 2/. Small reductions in tuber yield and mean tuber size, but not in tuber number, were observed in SO/sub 2/-treated plants. Tuber N concentration increased slightly in SO/sub 2/-treated plants. A significant O/sub 3/ X SO/sub 2/ interaction was observed in the case of tuber N concentration only; SO/sub 2/ accentuated the O/sub 3/-induced increase in N content.

  9. Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

    2002-04-01

    Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

  10. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 2, Topical reports: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This study, identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. The research needs that have high priority in establishing the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of large-scale capture and disposal of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants are:(1) survey and assess the capacity, cost, and location of potential depleted gas and oil wells that are suitable CO{sub 2} repositories (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (2) conduct research on the feasibility of ocean disposal, with objectives of determining the cost, residence time, and environmental effects for different methods of CO{sub 2} injection; (3) perform an in-depth survey of knowledge concerning the feasibility of using deep, confined aquifers for disposal and, if feasible, identify potential disposal locations (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (4) evaluate, on a common basis, system and design alternatives for integration of CO{sub 2} capture systems with emerging and advanced technologies for power generation; and prepare a conceptual design, an analysis of barrier issues, and a preliminary cost estimate for pipeline networks necessary to transport a significant portion of the CO{sub 2} to potentially feasible disposal locations.