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Sample records for dip cracks opened

  1. Analytical prediction of the location of ductility dip cracking in the trans-varestraint test

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, I.; Kroenke, W.; Cola, M.

    1997-05-01

    Some NiCrFe weld metals exhibit decreased ductility over a temperature range known as the {open_quotes}ductility dip{close_quotes} temperature (DDT) range. Ductility dip cracking (DDT) is a phenomenon which occurs in a zone bounded by the DDT range on its sides and a threshold plastic strain on its bottom as shown in figure 1. Figure 1 illustrates how ductility varies as weld metal cools from the solidus temperature for materials with and without a ductility dip. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the ability to predict the location of the DDC in a Trans-Varestraint Test (TVT) for a specimen machined from a weld deposited EN52 plate. The DDC predictions require a combination of Trans-Varestraint testing and finite element analysis. The test provides the threshold value of externally applied nominal strain below which DDC does not occur. The analysis provides the corresponding threshold local or peak strain. The threshold local plastic strain level and the DDT range are used to predict the location of the DDC. The ultimate purpose of this work is to evaluate susceptibility of highly constrained, component welds to DDC. Test results for Trans-Varestraint Testing for a weld deposited EN52 plate are reported in reference. The ability to predict the location of the DDC in the Trans-Varestraint Test using the techniques reported herein is demonstrated by showing good comparison between the analytical results and the test data.

  2. Ductility dip cracking susceptibility of Inconel Filler Metal 52 and Inconel Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Kikel, J.M.; Parker, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 have become the materials of choice for commercial nuclear steam generator applications in recent years. Filler Metal 52 exhibits improved resistance to weld solidification and weld-metal liquation cracking as compared to other nickel-based filler metals. However, recently published work indicates that Filler Metal 52 is susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC) in highly restrained applications. Susceptibility to fusion zone DDC was evaluated using the transverse varestraint test method, while heat affected zone (HAZ) DDC susceptibility was evaluated using a newly developed spot-on-spot varestraint test method. Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 cracking susceptibility was compared to the DDC susceptibility of Alloy 600, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625. In addition, the effect of grain size and orientation on cracking susceptibility was also included in this study. Alloy 690, Filler Metal 82, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625 were found more susceptible to fusion zone DDC than Alloy 600. Filler Metal 52 and Alloy 690 were found more susceptible to HAZ DDC when compared to wrought Alloy 600, Filler Metal 82 and Filler Metal 625. Filler Metal 52 exhibited the greatest susceptibility to HAZ DDC of all the weld metals evaluated. The base materials were found much more resistant to HAZ DDC in the wrought condition than when autogenously welded. A smaller grain size was found to offer greater resistance to DDC. For weld metal where grain size is difficult to control, a change in grain orientation was found to improve resistance to DDC.

  3. Opening Up Without Cracking Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Maggie

    In recognition of the fact that there are individual differences and preferences among teachers, the teachers at the Las Posas School in Camarillo, California were given the opportunity to use the methods they found most comfortable. This resulted in a variety of open classroom situations, with alternatives for parents, students, and teachers.…

  4. Opening and closing of cracks at high cyclic strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1986-01-01

    The closure behavior of cracks of different length and at different cyclic strain levels (ranging from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains) was studied to observe the effect of residual crack-tip plasticity on crack closure. Cracks were initiated either naturally or artificially (from electric discharge machining pits) in uniaxial test specimens of strengthened alloy steel AISI 4340 with a grain size of 0.016 mm. It was found that, at high strains, cracks closed only when the lowest stress level in the cycle was approached. The stress or the strain opening level depended upon the exact point along the crack length where the observations were made. As the plastic deformation increased, the relative crack opening level was found to decrease and approach the value of stress ratio R. The experimental results were compared with those of three analytical models of crack closure and opening, demonstrating the limitations of the currently available elastic-plastic crack growth analysis.

  5. Effect of Crack Opening on Penetrant Crack Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Devin

    2009-01-01

    Results: From the testing we were able to determine all the cracks within the test range were detectable or better with developer. Many of the indications after development lost their linearity and gave circular indications. Our tests were performed in a laboratory and our procedure would be difficult in an industrial setting. Conclusions: The "V" did not significantly affect our ability to detect the POD cracks with fluorescent penetrant. Conduct same experiment with more cracks. The 0.025 and 0.050 POD specimens are clean and documented with the SEM. Conduct water-wash fluorescent penetrant test at EAFB. The poppet cracks are tighter than the POD specimen cracks. Flight FCV poppets: 0.01 mils (0.3 microns) Langley fatigue cracked poppets: 0.02 mils (0.5 microns) POD specimen (post 5 mils): 0.05 mils (1.4 microns) We could not detect cracks in Langley fatigue-cracked poppets with fluorescent penetrant. Investigate inability of penetrant to wet the poppet surface.

  6. Optical and analytical electron microscopy of ductility-dip cracking in Ni-base filler metal 52 -- Initial studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, M.J.; Teter, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    Microcharacterization studies were performed on weld-metal microstructures of a Ni-base filler metal. Specimens were taken from the fusion zone and the weld-metal heat-affected zone of transverse- and spot-Varestraint welds. The filler metal was first deposited onto a steel substrate by hot-wire, gas tungsten arc welding before specimen removal. Optical microscopy indicates the crack morphology is intergranular and is along high-angle, migrated grain boundaries. At low magnifications, scanning electron microscopy reveals a relatively smooth fracture surface. However, at higher magnifications the grain faces exhibit microductility. Analytical electron microscopy reveals high-angle, migrated grain boundaries decorated with MC (Ti, Cr) and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr, Ni, Fe) precipitates ranging from 10 to 200 n. Auger electron spectroscopy of pre-strained Gleeble specimens fractured in situ revealed internal ductility-dip cracks decorated with magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel particles (1,000 nm).

  7. The effect of a capillary bridge on the crack opening of a penny crack.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuqian; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2016-02-01

    Young's relation is based on the equilibrium of horizontal components of surface tensions for a liquid droplet on a "rigid" substrate without addressing the substrate deformation induced by the net vertical component of surface tensions. Upon realizing the importance of wetting in controlling the integrity of flexible structures and electronics, the effect of a capillary bridge or a liquid droplet on the crack opening of a penny crack under the action of a far-field tensile stress is analyzed. Closed-form solutions are derived for both the crack opening and the stress intensity factor, which are functions of the size of the capillary bridge or the droplet, surface tension, and the contact angle. Both the capillary bridge and the droplet can introduce the crack closure. The minimum far-field tensile stresses needed for complete crack opening, i.e. no crack closure, are obtained analytically. The net vertical component of the surface tensions introduces the formation of a surface ridge on the crack face at the edge of the droplet for an open crack. The amplitude of the surface ridge increases with the increase of the net vertical component of the surface tensions and the decrease of the breadth width. PMID:26660422

  8. Crack opening stretch in a plate of finite width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of a uniaxially stressed plate of finite width containing a centrally located damage zone is considered. It is assumed that the flaw may be represented by a part-through crack perpendicular to the plate surface, the net ligaments in the plane of the crack and through-the-thickness narrow strips ahead of the crack ends are fully yielded, and in the yielded sections the material may carry only a constant normal traction with magnitude equal to the yield strength. The problem is solved by neglecting the bending effects and the crack opening stretches at the center and the ends of the crack are obtained. Some applications of the results are indicated by using the concepts of critical crack opening stretch and constant slope plastic instability.

  9. Crack opening stretch in a plate of finite width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of a uniaxially stressed plate of finite width containing a centrally located damage zone is considered. It is assumed that the flaw may be represented by a part-through crack perpendicular to the plate surface, the net ligaments in the plane of the crack and through-the-thickness narrow strips ahead of the crack ends are fully yielded, and in the yielded sections the material may carry only a constant normal traction with magnitude equal to the yield strength. The problem is solved by neglecting the bending effects and the crack opening stretches at the center and the ends of the crack are obtained. Some applications of the results are indicated by using the concepts of critical crack opening stretch and constant slope plastic instability.

  10. Recent evaluations of crack-opening-area in circumferentially cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Miura, N.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. The leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of the through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section XI. The objectives of this study were to review, evaluate, and refine current predictive models for performing crack-opening-area analyses of circumferentially cracked pipes. The results from twenty-five full-scale pipe fracture experiments, conducted in the Degraded Piping Program, the International Piping Integrity Research Group Program, and the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program, were used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess quantitatively the accuracy of the predictive models. The evaluation also involved finite element analyses for determining the crack-opening profile often needed to perform leak-rate calculations.

  11. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    SciTech Connect

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L{sub r} greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L{sub r} values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L{sub r} values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities.

  12. Stress Ratio Effects on Crack Opening Loads and Crack Growth Rates in Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio (R) and crack opening behavior on fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 were investigated using constant-delta K testing, closure measurements, and fractography. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained for a range of delta K and stress ratios. Results show that constant delta K fatigue crack growth for R ranging from near 0 to 1 is divided into three regions. In Region 1, at low R, da/dN increases with increasing R. In Region 2, at intermediate R, fatigue crack growth rates are relatively independent of R. In Region 3, at high R, further increases in da/dN are observed with increasing R.

  13. CRACK TIP OPENING DISPLACEMENT AND ANGLE FOR A GROWING CRACK IN CARBON STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    LAM, POH-SANG

    2005-01-18

    The crack tip opening displacements and angles (CTOD/CTOA) are calculated with finite element method based on the test data of a set of constraint-dependent J-R curves for A285 carbon steel. The values of the CTOD/CTOA are initially high at initiation, but rapidly decrease to a nearly constant value. When the common practice is adopted by using only the constant part of CTOD/CTOA as the fracture criterion, the crack growth behavior is shown to be severely underestimated. However, with a bilinear form of CTOD/CTOA fracture criterion which approximates the initial non-constant portion, the experimental load vs. crack extension curves can be closely predicted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the CTOD/CTOA is crack tip constraint dependent. The values of CTOD/CTOA for specimens with various ratios of crack length to specimen width (a/W) are reflected by the J-R curves and their slopes.

  14. On the lithium dip in the metal poor open cluster NGC 2243

    SciTech Connect

    François, P.; Pasquini, L.; Palsa, R.; Biazzo, K.; Bonifacio, P.

    2014-05-02

    Lithium is a key element for studying the mixing mechanisms operating in stellar interiors. It can also be used to probe the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Measuring the abundance of Lithium in stars belonging to Open Clusters (hereafter OC) allows a detailed comparison with stellar evolutionary models. NGC 2243 is particularly interesting thanks to its relative low metallicity ([Fe/H]=−0.54 ± 0.10 dex). We performed a detailed analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object facility FLAMES at the VLT 8.2m telescope. Lithium abundance has been measured in 27 stars. We found a Li dip center of 1.06 M{sub ⊙}, which is significantly smaller than that observed in solar metallicity and metal-rich clusters. This finding confirms and strengthens the conclusion that the mass of the stars in the Li dip strongly depends on stellar metallicity. The mean Li abundance of the cluster is log n(Li) = 2.70 dex, which is substantially higher than that observed in 47 Tue. We derived an iron abundance of [Fe/H]=−0.54±0.10 dex for NGC 2243, in agreement (within the errors) with previous findings.

  15. Crack-tip-opening angle measurements and crack tunneling under stable tearing in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The stable tearing behavior of thin sheets 2024-T3 aluminum alloy was studied for middle crack tension specimens having initial cracks that were: flat cracks (low fatigue stress) and 45 degrees through-thickness slant cracks (high fatigue stress). The critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) values during stable tearing were measured by two independent methods, optical microscopy and digital image correlation. Results from the two methods agreed well. The CTOA measurements and observations of the fracture surfaces showed that the initial stable tearing behavior of low and high fatigue stress tests is significantly different. The cracks in the low fatigue stress tests underwent a transition from flat-to-slant crack growth, during which the CTOA values were high and significant crack tunneling occurred. After crack growth equal to about the thickness, CTOA reached a constant value of 6 deg and after crack growth equal to about twice the thickness, crack tunneling stabilized. The initial high CTOA values, in the low fatigue crack tests, coincided with large three-dimensional crack front shape changes due to a variation in the through-thickness crack tip constraint. The cracks in the high fatigue stress tests reach the same constant CTOA value after crack growth equal to about the thickness, but produced only a slightly higher CTOA value during initial crack growth. For crack growth on the 45 degree slant, the crack front and local field variables are still highly three-dimensional. However, the constant CTOA values and stable crack front shape may allow the process to be approximated with two-dimensional models.

  16. Refinement and evaluation of crack-opening-area analyses for circumferential through-wall cracks in pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Wilkowski, G.; Choi, Y.H. |; Moberg, F.; Brickstad, B. |

    1995-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. These leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of a through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses, which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section 11. This study was requested by the NRC to review, evaluate, and refine current analytical models for crack-opening-area analyses of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks. Twenty-five pipe experiments were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the predictive models. Several practical aspects of crack-opening such as; crack-face pressure, off-center cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, cracks in thickness transition regions, weld residual stresses, crack-morphology models, and thermal-hydraulic analysis, were also investigated. 140 refs., 105 figs., 41 tabs.

  17. Finite-element analysis of initiation, stable crack growth and instability using a crack-tip-opening displacement criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An elastic-plastic (incremental and small strain) finite element analysis was used with a crack growth criterion to study crack initiation, stable crack growth, and instability under monotonic loading to failure of metallic materials. The crack growth criterion was a critical crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) at a specified distance from the crack tip, or equivalently, a critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA). Whenever the CTOD (or CTOA) equaled or exceeded a critical value, the crack was assumed to grow. Single values of critical CTOD were used in the analysis to model crack initiation, stable crack growth, and instability for 7075-T651 and 2024-T351 aluminum alloy compact specimens. Calculated and experimentally measured CTOD values at initiation agreed well for both aluminum alloys. These critical CTOD values were also used to predict failure loads on center-crack tension specimens and a specially-designed three-hole-crack tension specimen made of the two aluminum alloys and of 304 stainless steel. All specimens were 12.7 mm thick. Predicted failure loads for 7075-T651 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel specimens were generally within + or - 15 percent of experimental failure loads, whereas the predicted failure loads for 2024-T351 aluminum alloy specimens were generally within + or - 5 percent of the experimental loads.

  18. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  19. Variation of crack-opening stresses in three-dimensions - Finite thickness plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chermahini, R. G.; Blom, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D elastic-plastic finite-element analysis is conducted to study crack-growth behavior of thin and thick center-cracked specimens under constant-amplitude loading conditions. The numerical analysis and the specimen configuration and loading are described for both the thin and thick conditions. Stabilized crack-opening stresses of interior and exterior regions are given as are the closure and opening profiles of the crack-surface plane after the tenth cycle. The effect of thickness is discussed with respect to the crack-opening stress levels and the plastic zones of the interior and exterior regions. A load-reduced-displacement technique allows the calculation of the crack-opening stresses at three locations on the crack surface plane. The constraint effect related to thickness gives a lower stabilized crack-opening stress level for the thick specimens.

  20. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  1. Investigation on the Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of the Butt Weld Welded with ENiCrFe-7 Nickel-Base Alloy-Covered Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Wang, Huang; He, Guo

    2015-03-01

    The weld metal of the ENiCrFe-7 nickel-based alloy-covered electrodes was investigated in terms of the microstructure, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Besides the dendritic gamma-Ni(Cr,Fe) phase, several types of precipitates dispersed on the austenitic matrix were observed, which were determined to be the Nb-rich MC-type carbides with "Chinese script" morphology and size of approximately 3 to 10 µm, the Mn-rich MO-type oxides with size of approximately 1 to 2 µm, and the spherical Al/Ti-rich oxides with size of less than 1 µm. The discontinuous Cr-rich M23C6-type carbides predominantly precipitate on the grain boundaries, which tend to coarsen during reheating but begin to dissolve above approximately 1273 K (1000 °C). The threshold strain for DDC at each temperature tested shows a certain degree of correlation with the grain boundary carbides. The DDC susceptibility increases sharply as the carbides coarsen in the temperature range of 973 K to 1223 K (700 °C to 950 °C). The growth and dissolution of the carbides during the welding heat cycles deteriorate the grain boundaries and increase the DDC susceptibility. The weld metal exhibits the minimum threshold strain of approximately 2.0 pct at 1323 K (1050 °C) and the DTR less than 873 K (600 °C), suggesting that the ENiCrFe-7—covered electrode has less DDC susceptibility than the ERNiCrFe-7 bare electrode but is comparable with the ERNiCrFe-7A.

  2. Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement of a Dugdale crack interacting with a coated circular inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoh, H. J.; Xiao, Z. M.; Luo, J.

    2010-09-01

    An analytical investigation on the plastic zone size of a crack near a coated circular inclusion under three different loading conditions of uniaxial tension, uniform tension and pure shear was carried out. Both the crack and coated circular inclusion are embedded in an infinite matrix, with the crack oriented along the radial direction of the inclusion. In the solution procedure, the crack is simulated as a continuous distribution of edge dislocations. With the Dugdale model of small-scale yielding [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 8 (1960) p. 100], two thin strips of yielded plastic zones are introduced at both crack tips. Using the solution for a coated circular inclusion interacting with a single dislocation as the Green's function, the physical problem is formulated into a set of singular integral equations. Using the method of Erdogan and Gupta [Q. J. Appl. Math. 29 (1972) p. 525] and iterative numerical procedures, the singular integral equations are solved numerically for the plastic zone sizes and crack tip opening displacement.

  3. Significance of crack opening monitoring for determining the growth behavior of hydrofractures

    SciTech Connect

    Hashida, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kazushi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1993-01-28

    A method for determining the size of a crack induced by hydraulic fracturing is presented. The procedure is based on the measurement of the crack opening displacement and the fracture mechanics approach. The proposed method has been tested by conducting laboratory small-scale hydraulic fracturing tests on a granite. It is shown from the preliminary tests that the method provides a reasonable prediction of experimentally observed crack sizes.

  4. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  5. Evaluating Hydrogen Stress Cracking of Line Pipe Steels under Cathodic Protection Using Crack Tip Opening Displacement Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Naoto; Meyer, Michel

    Crack tip opening displacement (CTOD, δ) tests were carried out for line pipe steels in buffer solutions, sand, and clay to evaluate initiation of hydrogen stress cracking (HSC) at surface defects in buried pipelines under cathodic protection. Four series of line pipe steels and two series of seam welds showed a similar tendency in cathodic current density (i) versus the critical CTOD (δc) curves, irrespective of types, pH and water content of the soils; δc showed a minimum (δHSC) when i>ith (ith=1mA/cm2) in all the testing conditions. δHSC increased with the increasing fracture toughness of the steel. Fluctuation of cathodic current density influenced δc when the maximum value of cathodic current density (imax) was larger than ith. HSC could be initiated at surface defects in pipelines only when imax>ith and δ≥δHSC.

  6. The Effect of Opening on Eddy Current Probe Response for an Idealized through Crack

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Fangwei; Bowler, J. R.; Theodoulidis, T. P.

    2006-03-06

    A structure representing an idealized through crack was formed by placing two coplanar aluminum rectangular plates next to one another with their edges separated by a small distance. The coil impedance variation with position was measured as a coil was moved over the adjacent plate edges. An analytical theory is used to evaluate the coil impedance change due to the gap between the plates. This theory is based on the truncated region eigenfunction expansion method. The difference between the eddy current probe signal due to a notch compared with that of a crack can be partly accounted for by the difference in the opening. We have investigated the effect of varying the opening of the simulated crack and shown theoretically and experimentally how the coil impedance changes with position, opening and frequency.

  7. On the variation in crack-opening stresses at different locations in a three-dimensional body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chermahini, R. G.; Blom, Anders F.

    1990-01-01

    Crack propagation and closure behavior of thin, and thick middle crack tension specimens under constant amplitude loading were investigated using a three dimensional elastic plastic finite element analysis of fatigue crack propagation and closure. In the thin specimens the crack front closed first on the exterior (free) surface and closed last in the interior during the unloading portion of cyclic loading; a load reduced displacement technique was used to determine crack opening stresses at specified locations in the plate from the displacements calculated after the seven cycle. All the locations were on the plate external surface and were located near the crack tip, behind the crack tip, at the centerline of the crack. With this technique, the opening stresses at the specified points were found to be 0.52, 0.42, and 0.39 times the maximum applied stress.

  8. A Relationship Between Constraint and the Critical Crack Tip Opening Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William M.; James, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Of the various approaches used to model and predict fracture, the Crack Tip Opening Angle (CTOA) fracture criterion has been successfully used for a wide range of two-dimensional thin-sheet and thin plate applications. As thicker structure is considered, modeling the full three-dimensional fracture process will become essential. This paper investigates relationships between the local CTOA evaluated along a three-dimensional crack front and the corresponding local constraint. Previously reported tunneling crack front shapes were measured during fracture by pausing each test and fatigue cycling the specimens to mark the crack surface. Finite element analyses were run to model the tunneling shape during fracture, with the analysis loading conditions duplicating those tests. The results show an inverse relationship between the critical fracture value and constraint which is valid both before maximum load and after maximum load.

  9. Identification of multiple open and fatigue cracks in beam-like structures using wavelets on deflection signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreaus, Ugo; Casini, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for damage detection of multi-cracked beam-like structures by analyzing the static deflection is presented. The damage incurred produces a change in the stiffness of the beam. This causes a localized singularity which can be identified by a wavelet analysis of the displacement response. The existence and location of the cracks can be revealed by positions of the peaks in the continuous wavelet transform (CWT). To achieve this, the static profile of beams is analyzed with Gauss2 wavelet to identify the cracks. Beams under some ideal boundary and prescribed load conditions are considered. The deflected shape of the beam with open and fatigue cracks has been simulated under static loading using lumped crack models adopted from fracture mechanics and involving various degrees of complexity. The deflection of cracked beam in closed form for several cases of loads, crack sizes, and crack locations is calculated, and an explicit expression for the damage index (DI), based on CWT, is developed; it is demonstrated that the proposed damage index does not depend on mechanical properties of a homogeneous beam, and that the DI of one crack does not depend on the size and location of other cracks in a multiple cracked beam. Hence, the obtained expression for the DI can be used to find the size of each crack independently. Numerical results show that the method can detect cracks of small depth and is also applicable under the presence of measurement noise.

  10. Determination of the residual stress-crack opening relationship of SFRC flexural members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaklauskas, Gintaris; Gribniak, Viktor; Meskenas, Adas; Rimkus, Arvydas; Kaklauskas, Arturas; Kupliauskas, Rimantas

    2013-10-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) has become widespread material in building areas such as underground shotcrete structures or industrial floors. However, due to the absence of universally accepted guidelines for SFRC, application fields of this material are still limited. This paper deals with assessment of the residual stresses of tensile SFRC. An adequate method for determination of residual stress-crack opening relation, based on test data of three-point bending beams is proposed. To verify the analysis results a numerical modelling is utilized employing a nonlinear finite element analysis program. Simulated load-crack width curves were compared with the experimental data validating adequacy of the proposed model.

  11. Open crack depth sizing by laser stimulated infrared lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedala, Y.; Streza, M.; Roger, J.-P.; Tessier, G.; Boué, C.

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in infrared imaging have made active thermography an interesting non destructive technique for sub-surface defect detection. Here, we present a method for the estimation of the depth of open surface defects by infrared lock-in thermography, based on the relation between the crack depth and the Laplacian of the surface temperature distribution induced by a local heating using a laser. A comparison to numerical finite element modelling for different depths allows an accurate determination of fatigue crack depth in Inconel alloy test blocks.

  12. Nondestructive estimation of depth of surface opening cracks in concrete beams

    SciTech Connect

    Arne, Kevin; In, Chiwon; Kurtis, Kimberly; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-02-18

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and thus assessment of damage in concrete structures is of the utmost importance from both a safety point of view and a financial point of view. Of particular interest are surface opening cracks that extend through the concrete cover, as this can expose the steel reinforcement bars underneath and induce corrosion in them. This corrosion can lead to significant subsequent damage in concrete such as cracking and delamination of the cover concrete as well as rust staining on the surface of concrete. Concrete beams are designed and constructed in such a way to provide crack depths up to around 13 cm. Two different types of measurements are made in-situ to estimate depths of real surface cracks (as opposed to saw-cut notches) after unloading: one based on the impact-echo method and the other one based on the diffuse ultrasonic method. These measurements are compared to the crack depth visually observed on the sides of the beams. Discussions are given as to the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  13. Nondestructive estimation of depth of surface opening cracks in concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arne, Kevin; In, Chiwon; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Kurtis, Kimberly; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-02-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and thus assessment of damage in concrete structures is of the utmost importance from both a safety point of view and a financial point of view. Of particular interest are surface opening cracks that extend through the concrete cover, as this can expose the steel reinforcement bars underneath and induce corrosion in them. This corrosion can lead to significant subsequent damage in concrete such as cracking and delamination of the cover concrete as well as rust staining on the surface of concrete. Concrete beams are designed and constructed in such a way to provide crack depths up to around 13 cm. Two different types of measurements are made in-situ to estimate depths of real surface cracks (as opposed to saw-cut notches) after unloading: one based on the impact-echo method and the other one based on the diffuse ultrasonic method. These measurements are compared to the crack depth visually observed on the sides of the beams. Discussions are given as to the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  14. Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of Circumferential Multipass Dissimilar Weld Between 20MND5 and Z2CND18-12NS with Ni-Base Filler Metal 52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Duan, Zhaoling; He, Guo

    2013-10-01

    The large circumferential multipass dissimilar weld between 20MND5 steel and Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel welded with FM52 filler material was investigated in terms of the diluted composition, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility of the weld. The diluted composition of the weld is composed of 37 to 47 pct Ni, 21 to 24 pct Cr, and 28 to 40 pct Fe, which are inhomogeneous along the depth and over the width of the deep weld. The carbon content has a distribution in the region of the surface weld from a high level (~0.20 pct) in the zone near 20MND5 steel to a normal level (~0.03 pct) in the zone near Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel. The carbon distribution is corresponding to the grain boundary carbides. The minimum threshold strains for DDC occur in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1323 K (950 °C to 1050 °C), which are 0.5, 0.35, and 0.4 pct for the root weld, middle region, and the surface weld, respectively. The dissimilar weld has the largest susceptibility to the DDC compared to the filler metal 52 and the Inconel 690.

  15. A continuous vibration theory for rotors with an open edge crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Alireza; Heydari, Mahdi; Behzad, Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    In this paper a new continuous model for flexural vibration of rotors with an open edge crack has been developed. The cracked rotor is considered in the rotating coordinate system attached to it. Therefore, the rotor bending can be decomposed in two perpendicular directions. Two quasi-linear displacement fields are assumed for these two directions and the strain and stress fields are calculated in each direction. Then the final displacement and stress fields are obtained by composing the displacement and stress fields in the two directions. The governing equation of motion for the rotor has been obtained using the Hamilton principle and solved using a modified Galerkin method. The free vibration has been analyzed and the critical speeds have been calculated. Results are compared with the finite element results and an excellent agreement is observed.

  16. Pre-curving analysis of an opening crack in a magnetoelectroelastic strip under in-plane impact loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Keqiang; Chen, Zengtao

    2012-12-01

    An opening crack in a magnetoelectroelastic strip under in-plane mechanical, electric, and magnetic impact loadings is considered for magneto-electrically impermeable and permeable crack surface boundary conditions. Laplace and Fourier transforms are applied to reduce the mixed boundary value problem of the crack to dual integral equations, which are expressed in terms of Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. The asymptotic fields near the crack tip are obtained in explicit form and the corresponding field intensity factors are defined. The crack curving phenomena are investigated by applying the criterion of maximum hoop stress intensity factors. Numerical results show that the hoop stress intensity factors are influenced by the electric and magnetic loadings and the geometric size ratios.

  17. Stress-intensity factors and crack-opening displacements for round compact specimens. [fracture toughness of metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional, boundary collocation stress analysis was used to analyze various round compact specimens. The influence of the round external boundary and of pin-loaded holes on stress intensity factors and crack opening displacements was determined as a function of crack-length-to-specimen-width ratios. A wide-range equation for the stress intensity factors was developed. Equations for crack-surface displacements and load-point displacements were also developed. In addition, stress intensity factors were calculated from compliance methods to demonstrate that load-displacement records must be made at the loading points and not along the crack line for crack-length-to-specimen-width ratios less than about 0.4.

  18. DIP: The Database of Interacting Proteins

    DOE Data Explorer

    The DIP Database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. By interaction, the DIP Database creators mean that two amino acid chains were experimentally identified to bind to each other. The database lists such pairs to aid those studying a particular protein-protein interaction but also those investigating entire regulatory and signaling pathways as well as those studying the organisation and complexity of the protein interaction network at the cellular level. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. It is a relational database that can be searched by protein, sequence, motif, article information, and pathBLAST. The website also serves as an access point to a number of projects related to DIP, such as LiveDIP, The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) and JDIP. Users have free and open access to DIP after login. [Taken from the DIP Guide and the DIP website] (Specialized Interface) (Registration Required)

  19. Apparent-Dip Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, R. B.; Lamar, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews methods of determining apparent dip and highlights the use of a device which consists of a nomogram printed on a protractor. Explains how the apparent-dip calculator-protractor can be constructed and outlines the steps for its operation. (ML)

  20. Prediction of stable tearing of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy using the crack-tip opening angle approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) approach was incorporated into a damage growth finite element program, MADGIC (Micromechanics Analysis and Damage Growth in Composites), and was used to predict stable tearing in a middle-crack tension 2024-T3 aluminum alloy specimen. The MADGIC code is a displacement based finite element program implemented with an incremental elastic-plastic algorithm used to model elastic-plastic behavior and a nodal splitting and nodal force relaxation algorithm used to generate crack surfaces. Predictions of the applied stress as a function of crack extension and applied stress as a function of load-line displacement were in good agreement with experiments and with similar predictions made using an existing finite element program, ZIP2D. In addition, path integrals, namely, the J-integral and T*-integral, were also evaluated and compared with the CTOA approach. There appears to be a weak relationship between the CTOA and the T*-integral evaluated on a specific integration path during crack extension beyond maximum applied stress. This study further verifies that the CTOA can be used as an effective elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter to predict crack growth.

  1. CTOD-based acceptance criteria for heat exchanger head staybolts. [Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD)

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.; Barnes, D.M.; Awadalla, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    The primary coolant piping system of the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors contains twelve heat exchangers to remove the waste heat from the nuclear materials production. A large break at the inlet or outlet heads of the heat exchangers would occur if the restraint members of the heads become inactive. The heat exchanger head is attached to the tubesheet by 84 staybolts. The structural integrity of the heads is demonstrated by showing the redundant capacity of the staybolts to restrain the head at design conditions and under seismic loadings. The beat exchanger head is analyzed with a three- dimensional finite element model. The restraint provided by the staybolts is evaluated for several postulated cases of inactive or missing staybolts, that is, bolts that have a flaw exceeding the ultrasonic testing (UT) threshold depth of 25% of the bolt diameter. A limit of 6 inactive staybolts is reached with a fracture criterion based on the maximum allowable local displacement at the active staybolts which corresponds to the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) of 0.032 inches. An acceptance criteria methodology has been developed to disposition flaws reported in the staybolt inspections while ensuring adequate restraint capacity of the staybolts to maintain integrity of the heat exchanger heads against collapse. The methodology includes an approach for the baseline and periodic inspections of the staybolts. A total of up to 6 staybolts, reported as containing flaws with depths at or exceeding 25% would be acceptable in the heat exchanger.

  2. A comparison of pure mode I and mixed mode I-III cracking of an adhesive containing an open knit cloth carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripling, E. J.; Crosley, P. B.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Static and fatigue tests were carried out on two commercial modified epoxy film adhesives with a wide open knit polyester carrier in order to compare crack resistance in mode I and mixed mode I-III loading. The carrier cloth is found to have a significant influence on the cracking behavior of the adhesives. The open air net carrier used in this study separates from the adhesive in mode I cracking but shreds during mixed-mode crack extension. This decreases the opening mode toughness but increases the mixed-mode toughness as compared with results obtained earlier using a heavier knit carrier. The results suggest that the type of carrier may have a far larger influence on crack resistance than is generally recognized.

  3. Effects of Microstructure on Tensile, Charpy Impact, and Crack Tip Opening Displacement Properties of Two API X80 Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang Yong

    2013-06-01

    The effects of microstructure on tensile, Charpy impact, and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) properties of two API X80 pipeline steels were investigated in this study. Two API X80 pipeline steels consisting of acicular ferrite and granular bainite, and a small amount of hard phases such as martensite and secondary phases have elongated grains along the rolling direction, so that they show different mechanical properties as the specimens' directions change. The 90 deg specimens have high tensile strength due to the low stress concentration on the fine hard phases and the high loads for the deformation of the elongated grains. In contrast, the 30 deg specimens have less elongated grains and larger hard phases such as martensite, with the size of about 3 μm, than the 90 deg specimens. Hence, the 30 deg specimens have low tensile strength because of the high stress concentration on the large hard phases and the low loads to deform grains. In the 90 deg specimen, brittle crack propagation surfaces are even since cracks propagate in a straight line along the elongated grain structure. In the 30 deg specimen, however, brittle crack propagation surfaces are uneven, and secondary cracks are observed, because of the zigzag brittle crack propagation path. In the CTOD properties, the 90 deg specimens have maximum forces of higher magnitude than the 30 deg specimens, because of the elongated grain structure. However, CTODs of the 90 deg specimens are lower than those of the 30 deg specimens because of the low plastic deformation areas by the elongated grains in the 90 deg specimens.

  4. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  5. Experimental study of opening-mode crack growth in rock. Progress report and renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The objective is to relate fracture toughness to rock microstructure. Crack propagation measurements are made on samples of stockbridge marble and Stony Creek granite. Force-displacement curves are recorded and the texture of the fracture surfaces observed. (ACR)

  6. Results of the second Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on crack closure measurement and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, E.P.

    1993-11-01

    A second experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the crack opening load in fatigue crack growth tests has been completed by the ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. Fourteen laboratories participated in the testing of aluminum alloy compact tension specimens. Opening-load measurements were made at three crack lengths during constant Delta K, constant stress ratio tests by most of the participants. Four participants made opening-load measurements during threshold tests. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimens compliance behavior, where the displacement/strain was measured either at the crack mouth or the mid-height back face location. The Round Robin data were analyzed for opening load using two non-subjective analysis methods: the compliance offset and the correlation coefficient methods. The scatter in the opening load results was significantly reduced when some of the results were excluded from the analysis population based on an accept/reject criterion for raw data quality. The compliance offset and correlation coefficient opening load analysis methods produced similar results for data populations that had been screened to eliminate poor quality data.

  7. Results of the Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the opening load in fatigue crack growth tests was conducted on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. The Round Robin evaluated the current level of consistency of opening load measurements among laboratories and to identify causes for observed inconsistency. Eleven laboratories participated in the testing of compact and middle-crack specimens. Opening-load measurements were made for crack growth at two stress-intensity factor levels, three crack lengths, and following an overload. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimen compliance data. When all of the results reported (from all participants, all measurement methods, and all data analysis methods) for a given test condition were pooled, the range of opening loads was very large--typically spanning the lower half of the fatigue loading cycle. Part of the large scatter in the reported opening-load results was ascribed to consistent differences in results produced by the various methods used to measure specimen compliance and to evaluate the opening load from the compliance data. Another significant portion of the scatter was ascribed to lab-to-lab differences in producing the compliance data when using nominally the same method of measurement.

  8. Results of the second Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on crack closure measurement and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    A second experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the crack opening load in fatigue crack growth tests has been completed by the ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. Fourteen laboratories participated in the testing of aluminum alloy compact tension specimens. Opening-load measurements were made at three crack lengths during constant Delta K, constant stress ratio tests by most of the participants. Four participants made opening-load measurements during threshold tests. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimens compliance behavior, where the displacement/strain was measured either at the crack mouth or the mid-height back face location. The Round Robin data were analyzed for opening load using two non-subjective analysis methods: the compliance offset and the correlation coefficient methods. The scatter in the opening load results was significantly reduced when some of the results were excluded from the analysis population based on an accept/reject criterion for raw data quality. The compliance offset and correlation coefficient opening load analysis methods produced similar results for data populations that had been screened to eliminate poor quality data.

  9. Small-crack test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  10. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Poindexter, Allan M.; Ricks, Herbert E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and or wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities.

  11. Experimental study of opening-mode crack growth in rock. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    Measurements of fracture strength have been made on rocks containing a wide range of minerals and microstructures. Elastic moduli determined from data recorded during the fracture experiments were used in the computation of the strain energy release rate. Measured steady-state fracture energies range from about 40 J/m/sup 2/ (Portland sandstone) to about 280 J/m/sup 2/ (Barre granite). While the energy of crack initiation and crack propagation depends on the strength of the constituent minerals, each is controlled primarily by the microstructure of the rock. The density of pores and microcracks and the degree to which they are interconnected are most important. The weakest rocks are those that have either a weak structural component that forms nearly continuous, non-branching surfaces within the microstructure (as in the Salem limestone) or a very high porosity (as in the Portland sandstone). The strongest rocks are polymineralic and have connected microcrack networks that permit formation of multiple crack paths through the structure (as in the granites). The fracture energy depends on crack speed and chemical environment. Water weakening ranges from a reduction of more than 50% of the strength in the Portland sandstone to nil in diabase, marble, and the Cardium sandstone.

  12. Dynamic fracture-toughness evaluation by measurement of CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, W.N.; Douglas, A.S.; Shapiro, J.M.

    1988-03-15

    Quantification of the dynamic fracture toughness of structural materials is essential to a wide range of problems - from nuclear accidents to ordnance applications. However, the difficulties associated with accurate measurements of cracks under dynamic loading are considerable. Thus there are no standardized procedures and few reliable results. This work describes a systematic study of the dynamic fracture toughness of SAE-01 tool steel, 4340 and HY100 steels and a tungsten, using the ISDG (Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage) system which has very-high-frequency resolution. The major advantage of the method is that information is obtained very close to the crack tip, so that stress wave loading effects are accounted for. A detailed error analysis gives an uncertainty of -10% to +20% in the determination of fracture toughness, which compares with + or - 20% for published work.

  13. Dipping Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 May 2004 The central peak of Oudemans Crater, located at the edge of the Labyrinthus Noctis trough system, consists of steeply-dipping rock layers that were uplifted and tilted by the meteor impact that formed the crater. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example. The banded features are layers of light-toned, possibly sedimentary, rock that were brought to the surface and uplifted by the impact process that formed the crater and its central peak. Oudemans Crater's central peak serves as a means for probing the nature of rock that lies beneath the plains cut by the Labyrinthus Noctis troughs, which are part of the vast Valles Marineris system. This March 2004 picture is located near 10.2oS, 92.0oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  14. Analysis and Test of Deep Flaws in Thin Sheets of Aluminum and Titanium. Volume 2: Crack Opening Displacement and Stress-Strain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Static fracture tests were performed on surface flawed specimens of aluminum and titanium alloys. A simulated proof overload cycle was applied prior to all of the cyclic tests. Variables included in each test series were flaw shapes and thickness. Additionally, test temperature was a variable for the aluminum test series. The crack opening displacement and stress-strain data obtained are presented.

  15. Application of critical COD and plastic instability concepts to fracture of shells. [Crack Opening Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Ratwani, M.

    1974-01-01

    The paper deals with the initiation, growth, and possible arrest of fracture in shell structures containing initial defects which may be approximated by an isolated part-through crack. The main study is restricted to the structures in which the net section of the shell wall around the defect zone is fully yielded. The problem is solved by using an 8th order shallow shell theory with a conventional plastic strip model to account for the plastic deformations. Using the critical COD or the plastic instability as fracture criterion, the results are applied to the fracture propagation and arrest in shells. The calculated results are then compared with those obtained from the experiments on zircaloy, aluminum, and steel pipes.

  16. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  17. Opening the doors a crack wider: palliative care research data in the public domain

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Olav; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Fürst, Carl Johan; Tishelman, Carol

    2016-01-01

    This report builds further on OPCARE9, an EU 7th framework project aiming to identify knowledge gaps in care provision in the last days of life. This study began with curiosity about new ways of generating research questions to meet future challenges in palliative care (PC) and how to better engage disciplines not generally included in PC research. We here describe an innovative methodological approach to generating data; put data relevant for PC research in the public domain; and raise issues about open access in PC research. We aimed to compile research questions from different disciplines, based on raw data consisting of approximately 1000 descriptions of non-pharmacological caregiving activities (NPCAs), generated through previous research. 53 researchers from different fields were sent the full list of NPCAs and asked to generate research questions from their disciplinary perspective. Responses were received from 32 researchers from 9 countries, generating approximately 170 research topics, questions, reflections and ideas, from a wide variety of perspectives, which are presented here. Through these data, issues related to death and dying are addressed in several ways, in line with a new public health approach. By engaging a broader group of disciplines and facilitating availability of data in the public domain, we hope to stimulate more open dialogue about a wider variety of issues related to death and dying. We also introduce an innovative methodological approach to data generation, which resulted in a response rate at least equivalent to that in our Delphi survey of professionals in OPCARE9. PMID:26781808

  18. Opening the doors a crack wider: palliative care research data in the public domain.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Olav; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Fürst, Carl Johan; Tishelman, Carol

    2016-03-01

    This report builds further on OPCARE9, an EU 7th framework project aiming to identify knowledge gaps in care provision in the last days of life. This study began with curiosity about new ways of generating research questions to meet future challenges in palliative care (PC) and how to better engage disciplines not generally included in PC research. We here describe an innovative methodological approach to generating data; put data relevant for PC research in the public domain; and raise issues about open access in PC research. We aimed to compile research questions from different disciplines, based on raw data consisting of approximately 1000 descriptions of non-pharmacological caregiving activities (NPCAs), generated through previous research. 53 researchers from different fields were sent the full list of NPCAs and asked to generate research questions from their disciplinary perspective. Responses were received from 32 researchers from 9 countries, generating approximately 170 research topics, questions, reflections and ideas, from a wide variety of perspectives, which are presented here. Through these data, issues related to death and dying are addressed in several ways, in line with a new public health approach. By engaging a broader group of disciplines and facilitating availability of data in the public domain, we hope to stimulate more open dialogue about a wider variety of issues related to death and dying. We also introduce an innovative methodological approach to data generation, which resulted in a response rate at least equivalent to that in our Delphi survey of professionals in OPCARE9. PMID:26781808

  19. Evaluation of the irreversible dimensions of radial-circular cracks opened in rock subjected to hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Vouk, A.A.; Beloivan, A.F.; Mikhalyuk, A.V.; Voitenko, Y.I.

    1986-02-01

    The authors propose a method to determine the parameters of radial-circular cracks on the basis of analysis of the interaction between a viscoelastic fluid and an elastobrittle rock under impulse-injection conditions. They examine the horizontal fracture of rock at a depth characteristic for geotechnological wells, where the effect of structural nonuniformities of the rock is insignificant, owing to the presence of a field of compressive stresses, and an initial crack of the required dimensions which initiates the failure is created by familiar technical methods. The viscous flow of fluid in the crack is a basic factor that slows crack development in the absence of vigorous seepage of fluid. In the case of hydraulic fracturing with a fluid having a high viscosity with other conditions equal, the authors expect that the radius of the crack will be smaller than that during fracturing with a low-viscosity fluid.

  20. Interferometric monitoring of dip coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Alexandre F.; Menegotto, Thiago; Horowitz, Flavio

    2004-02-01

    Dip-coated films, which are widely used in the coating industry, are usually measured by capacitive methods with micrometric precision. For the first time to our knowledge, we have applied an interferometric determination of the evolution of thickness in real time to nonvolatile Newtonian mineral oils with several viscosities and distinct dip withdrawing speeds. The evolution of film thickness during the process depends on time as t-1/2, in accordance with a simple model. Comparison with measured results with an uncertainty of +/-0.007 μm) showed good agreement after the initial steps of the process had been completed.

  1. Nature-oriented open coal mining technologies using mined-out space in an open-pit. Part II: A method for selecting rational sequence of mining flat dipping stratified deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Molotilov, S.G.; Norri, V.K.; Cheskidov, V.I.; Mattis, A.R.

    2007-01-15

    A method is proposed for selecting a rational mining sequence with internal dumping for flat stratified deposits, using new principles of the open-pit process-space formation and development. The main criteria for substantiating the mining sequence are geometrical form and development direction of the open-pit space, structure of the working wall and transportation network, internal dumping capacities and mining earthworks volumes.

  2. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  3. 9 CFR 72.25 - Dipping methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dipping methods. 72.25 Section 72.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... CATTLE § 72.25 Dipping methods. Dipping is accomplished by thoroughly wetting the entire skin by...

  4. 9 CFR 72.25 - Dipping methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dipping methods. 72.25 Section 72.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.25 Dipping methods. Dipping...

  5. 9 CFR 72.25 - Dipping methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dipping methods. 72.25 Section 72.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.25 Dipping methods. Dipping...

  6. 9 CFR 72.25 - Dipping methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dipping methods. 72.25 Section 72.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... CATTLE § 72.25 Dipping methods. Dipping is accomplished by thoroughly wetting the entire skin by...

  7. Crack-closure and crack-growth measurements in surface-flawed titanium alloy Ti6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1975-01-01

    The crack-closure and crack-growth characteristics of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were determined experimentally on surface-flawed plate specimens. Under cyclic loading from zero to tension, cracks deeper than 1 mm opened at approximately 50 percent of the maximum load. Cracks shallower than 1 mm opened at higher loads. The correlation between crack-growth rate and the total stress-intensity range showed a lower threshold behavior. This behavior was attributed to the high crack-opening loads at short cracks because the lower threshold was much less evident in correlations between the crack-growth rates and the effective stress-intensity range.

  8. Elevated Temperature Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  9. DIPS Space Exploration Initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Terry E.

    The Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystem has been identified for potential applications for the Space Exploration Initiative. A qualitative safety assessment has been performed to demonstrate the overall safety adequacy of the Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystem for these applications. Mission profiles were defined for reference lunar and Martian flights. Accident scenarios were qualitatively defined for all mission phases. Safety issue were then identified. The safety issues included radiation exposure, fuel containment, criticality, diversion, toxic materials, heat flux to the extravehicular mobility unit, and disposal. The design was reviewed for areas where safety might be further improved. Safety would be improved by launching the fuel separate from the rest of the subsystem on expendable launch vehicles, using a fuel handling tool during unloading of the hot fuel canister, and constructing a cage-like structure around the reversible heat removal system lithium heat pipes. The results of the safety assessment indicate that the DIPS design with minor modifications will produce a low risk concept.

  10. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  11. Liquid sodium dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Richard L.; Meacham, Sterling A.

    1980-01-01

    A system for spraying liquid sodium onto impurities associated with liquid dip seals of nuclear reactors. The liquid sodium mixing with the impurities dissolves the impurities in the liquid sodium. The liquid sodium having dissolved and diluted the impurities carries the impurities away from the site thereby cleaning the liquid dip seal and surrounding area. The system also allows wetting of the metallic surfaces of the dip seal thereby reducing migration of radioactive particles across the wetted boundary.

  12. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  13. Dip-slope and Dip-slope Failures in Taiwan - a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.

    2011-12-01

    Taiwan is famous for dip-slope and dip-slope slides. Dip-slopes exist at many places in the fold-and-thrust belt of Taiwan. Under active cutting of stream channels and man-made excavations, a dip-slope may become unstable and susceptible for mass sliding. Daylight of a bedding parallel clay seam is the most dangerous type for dip-slope sliding. Buckling or shear-off features may also happen at toe of a long dip-slope. Besides, a dip-slope is also dangerous for shallow debris slides, if the slope angle is between 25 to 45 degrees and the debris (colluvium or slope wash) is thick (>1m). These unstable slopes may slide during a triggering event, earthquake or typhoon storm; or even slide without a triggering event, like the 2010 Tapu case. Initial buckling feature had been found in the dip-slope of the Feitsui arch dam abutment after detailed explorations. Shear-off feature have also been found in dip-slope located in right bank of the Nahua reservoir after field investigation and drilling. The Chiufengerhshan slide may also be shear-off type. On the other hand, the Tapu, the Tsaoling slides and others are of direct slide type. The Neihoo Bishan slide is a shallow debris slide on dip-slope. All these cases demonstrate the four different types of dip-slope slide. The hazard of a dip-slope should be investigated to cover these possible types of failure. The existence of bedding parallel clay seams is critical for the stability of a dip-slope, either for direct slide or buckling or shear-off type of failure, and is a hot point during investigation. Because, the stability of a dip-slope is changing with time, therefore, detailed explorations to including weathering and erosion rates are also very necessary to ensure the long-term stability of a dip-slope.

  14. Lock-in thermography, penetrant inspection, and scanning electron microscopy for quantitative evaluation of open micro-cracks at the tooth-restoration interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Hodisan, I.; Prejmerean, C.; Boue, C.; Tessier, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of a dental restoration in a non-invasive way is of paramount importance in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the minimum detectable open crack at the cavity-restorative material interface by the lock-in thermography technique, at laser intensities which are safe for living teeth. For the analysis of the interface, 18 box-type class V standardized cavities were prepared on the facial and oral surfaces of each tooth, with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in dentine. The preparations were restored with the Giomer Beautifil (Shofu) in combination with three different adhesive systems. Three specimens were randomly selected from each experimental group and each slice has been analysed by visible, infrared (IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Lock-in thermography showed the most promising results in detecting both marginal and internal defects. The proposed procedure leads to a diagnosis of micro-leakages having openings of 1 µm, which is close to the diffraction limit of the IR camera. Clinical use of a thermographic camera in assessing the marginal integrity of a restoration becomes possible. The method overcomes some drawbacks of standard SEM or dye penetration testing. The results support the use of an IR camera in dentistry, for the diagnosis of micro-gaps at bio-interfaces.

  15. Characterization of cobalt-dipped nickel electrodes with fibrex substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngman, Carolyn A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Nickel electrodes using fibrous substrates have poorer initial utilization of the active material than those using conventional nickel sinter substrates. Previous investigators had shown that utilization can be dramatically improved by dipping these electrodes in a cobalt solution immediately after the electrochemical impregnation, before formation and cycling is carried out. The present study looked at the gas evolution behavior of dipped and undipped electrodes, impedance curves, and the charge-discharge curves to try to understand the reasons for the improvement in utilization. Impedance measurements under open circuit conditions indicate that some of the improvement is due to a reduction in the ohmic resistance of the surface layer of the particles, in agreement with earlier work. The charge-discharge curves suggest that there may also be an additional increase in the ohmic resistance of the surface layer of the undipped electrode during charging.

  16. Characterization and Prediction of Cracks in Coated Materials: Direction and Length of Crack Propagation in Bimaterials.

    PubMed

    Pruncu, C I; Azari, Z; Casavola, C; Pappalettere, C

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of materials is governed by the surrounding environment. The contact area between the material and the surrounding environment is the likely spot where different forms of degradation, particularly rust, may be generated. A rust prevention treatment, like bluing, inhibitors, humidity control, coatings, and galvanization, will be necessary. The galvanization process aims to protect the surface of the material by depositing a layer of metallic zinc by either hot-dip galvanizing or electroplating. In the hot-dip galvanizing process, a metallic bond between steel and metallic zinc is obtained by immersing the steel in a zinc bath at a temperature of around 460°C. Although the hot-dip galvanizing procedure is recognized to be one of the most effective techniques to combat corrosion, cracks can arise in the intermetallic δ layer. These cracks can affect the life of the coated material and decrease the lifetime service of the entire structure. In the present paper the mechanical response of hot-dip galvanized steel submitted to mechanical loading condition is investigated. Experimental tests were performed and corroborative numerical and analytical methods were then applied in order to describe both the mechanical behaviour and the processes of crack/cracks propagation in a bimaterial as zinc-coated material. PMID:27347531

  17. Characterization and Prediction of Cracks in Coated Materials: Direction and Length of Crack Propagation in Bimaterials

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Z.; Pappalettere, C.

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of materials is governed by the surrounding environment. The contact area between the material and the surrounding environment is the likely spot where different forms of degradation, particularly rust, may be generated. A rust prevention treatment, like bluing, inhibitors, humidity control, coatings, and galvanization, will be necessary. The galvanization process aims to protect the surface of the material by depositing a layer of metallic zinc by either hot-dip galvanizing or electroplating. In the hot-dip galvanizing process, a metallic bond between steel and metallic zinc is obtained by immersing the steel in a zinc bath at a temperature of around 460°C. Although the hot-dip galvanizing procedure is recognized to be one of the most effective techniques to combat corrosion, cracks can arise in the intermetallic δ layer. These cracks can affect the life of the coated material and decrease the lifetime service of the entire structure. In the present paper the mechanical response of hot-dip galvanized steel submitted to mechanical loading condition is investigated. Experimental tests were performed and corroborative numerical and analytical methods were then applied in order to describe both the mechanical behaviour and the processes of crack/cracks propagation in a bimaterial as zinc-coated material. PMID:27347531

  18. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to...

  19. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to...

  20. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to...

  1. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to...

  2. Modeling of crack bridging in a unidirectional metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1992-01-01

    The effective fatigue crack driving force and crack opening profiles were determined analytically for fatigue tested unidirectional composite specimens exhibiting fiber bridging. The crack closure pressure due to bridging was modeled using two approaches: the fiber pressure model and the shear lag model. For both closure models, the Bueckner weight function method and the finite element method were used to calculate crack opening displacements and the crack driving force. The predicted near crack tip opening profile agreed well with the experimentally measured profiles for single edge notch SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite specimens. The numerically determined effective crack driving force, Delta K(eff), was calculated using both models to correlate the measure crack growth rate in the composite. The calculated Delta K(eff) from both models accounted for the crack bridging by showing a good agreement between the measured fatigue crack growth rates of the bridged composite and that of unreinforced, unbridged titanium matrix alloy specimens.

  3. Surface characterization of hot-dip Galfan coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bluni, S.T.; Marder, A.R.; Goldstein, J.I. . Materials Science Engineering Dept.)

    1994-09-01

    The surface of a hot dipped Galfan (Zn-5wt.%Al-mischmetal) coating on sheet steel was characterized with the use of various microscopy techniques. Surface depressions, or dents, were found to occur at eutectic nodule boundaries and triple points, and were typically 10--15 [mu]m deep. The surface characteristics of the Galfan coating were reproduced by the solidification of Zn-5%Al-mischmetal alloy samples on an inert substrate, implying that surface depressions are not caused by substrate interactions. Chemical analyses of both the coating and the alloy samples indicate that impurities, particularly lead, are strongly segregated to eutectic nodule boundaries and triple points. Based on these observations, a mechanism for denting and cracking in Galfan coatings is suggested.

  4. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  5. Three-dimensional measurements of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, S. K.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and retardation experiments conducted in polycarbonate test specimen are described. The transparent test material allows optical interferometry measurements of the fatigue crack opening (and closing) profiles. Crack surface displacements are obtained through the specimen thickness and three dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure are discussed.

  6. Dip-separated structural filtering using seislet transform and adaptive empirical mode decomposition based dip filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangkang

    2016-07-01

    The seislet transform has been demonstrated to have a better compression performance for seismic data compared with other well-known sparsity promoting transforms, thus it can be used to remove random noise by simply applying a thresholding operator in the seislet domain. Since the seislet transform compresses the seismic data along the local structures, the seislet thresholding can be viewed as a simple structural filtering approach. Because of the dependence on a precise local slope estimation, the seislet transform usually suffers from low compression ratio and high reconstruction error for seismic profiles that have dip conflicts. In order to remove the limitation of seislet thresholding in dealing with conflicting-dip data, I propose a dip-separated filtering strategy. In this method, I first use an adaptive empirical mode decomposition based dip filter to separate the seismic data into several dip bands (5 or 6). Next, I apply seislet thresholding to each separated dip component to remove random noise. Then I combine all the denoised components to form the final denoised data. Compared with other dip filters, the empirical mode decomposition based dip filter is data-adaptive. One only needs to specify the number of dip components to be separated. Both complicated synthetic and field data examples show superior performance of my proposed approach than the traditional alternatives. The dip-separated structural filtering is not limited to seislet thresholding, and can also be extended to all those methods that require slope information.

  7. Dip-separated structural filtering using seislet transform and adaptive empirical mode decomposition based dip filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangkang

    2016-04-01

    The seislet transform has been demonstrated to have a better compression performance for seismic data compared with other well-known sparsity promoting transforms, thus it can be used to remove random noise by simply applying a thresholding operator in the seislet domain. Since the seislet transform compresses the seismic data along the local structures, the seislet thresholding can be viewed as a simple structural filtering approach. Because of the dependence on a precise local slope estimation, the seislet transform usually suffers from low compression ratio and high reconstruction error for seismic profiles that have dip conflicts. In order to remove the limitation of seislet thresholding in dealing with conflicting-dip data, I propose a dip-separated filtering strategy. In this method, I first use an adaptive empirical mode decomposition based dip filter to separate the seismic data into several dip bands (5 or 6). Next, I apply seislet thresholding to each separated dip component to remove random noise. Then I combine all the denoised components to form the final denoised data. Compared with other dip filters, the empirical mode decomposition based dip filter is data-adaptive. One only need to specify the number of dip components to be separated. Both complicated synthetic and field data examples show superior performance of my proposed approach than the traditional alternatives. The dip-separated structural filtering is not limited to seislet thresholding, and can also be extended to all those methods that require slope information.

  8. COD measurements at various positions along a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Su, X.

    1988-01-01

    Load versus crack-opening-displacement (COD) was measured at various positions along the border of a fatigue crack as it grew from a small surface crack on the edge of an aluminum specimen into a through-the-thickness crack. Displacements were measured with a laser-based interferometric system with a gage length of 70 microns and a resolution of 0.01 micron. These load-COD curves can be used to determine opening loads and thereby investigate the effect of closure on the growth of small cracks. In general, the opening loads decrease as the crack grows.

  9. Large Capacity SMES for Voltage Dip Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatani, Yu; Saito, Fusao; Ito, Toshinobu; Shimada, Mamoru; Ishida, Satoshi; Shimanuki, Yoshio

    Voltage dips of power grids due to thunderbolts, snow damage, and so on, cause serious damage to production lines of precision instruments, for example, semiconductors. In recent years, in order to solve this problem, uninterruptible power supply systems (UPS) are used. UPS, however, has small capacity, so a great number of UPS are needed in large factories. Therefore, we have manufactured the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system for voltage dip compensation able to protect loads with large capacity collectively. SMES has advantages such as space conservation, long lifetime and others. In field tests, cooperating with CHUBU Electric Power Co., Inc. we proved that SMES is valuable for compensating voltage dips. Since 2007, 10MVA SMES improved from field test machines has been running in a domestic liquid crystal display plant, and in 2008, it protected plant loads from a number of voltage dips. In this paper, we report the action principle and components of the improved SMES for voltage dip compensation, and examples of waveforms when 10MVA SMES compensated voltage dips.

  10. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  11. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  12. Compliance matrices for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, R.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which can be used to develop compliance matrices for cracked bodies. The method relies on the numerical solution of singular integral equations with Cauchy-type kernels and provides an efficient and accurate procedure for relating applied loadings to crack opening displacements. The algorithm should be of interest to those performing repetitive calculations in the analysis of experimental results obtained from fracture specimens.

  13. Experimental discovery of charge-exchange-caused dips in spectral lines from laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Leboucher-Dalimier, E; Oks, E; Dufour, E; Sauvan, P; Angelo, P; Schott, R; Poquerusse, A

    2001-12-01

    We report the first experimental observation of charge-exchange-caused dips (also called x dips) in spectral lines of multicharged ions in laser-produced plasmas. Specifically, in the process of a laser irradiation of targets made out of aluminum carbide, we observed two x dips in the Ly(gamma) line of Al XIII perturbed by fully stripped carbon. From the practical point of view, this opens up a way to experimentally produce not-yet-available fundamental data on charge exchange between multicharged ions, virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. From the theoretical viewpoint, the results are important because the x dips are the only one signature of charge exchange in profiles of spectral lines emitted by plasmas and they are the only one quasimolecular phenomenon that could be observed at relatively "low" densities of laser-produced plasmas. PMID:11736229

  14. 78 FR 21159 - Additional Requirements for Special Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 1-2012 (77 FR... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Additional Requirements for Special Dipping and Coating... Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)). DATES: Comments must be submitted...

  15. Effect of Fatigue Crack on Static Strength: 2014-T6, 2024-T4, 6061-T6, 7075-T6 Open-Hole Monobloc Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordmark, Glenn E.; Eaton, Ian D.

    1957-01-01

    Static tensile test results are presented for specimens of 2014-T6, 2024-T4, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy containing fatigue cracks. The results are found to be in good agreement with the results reported for similar tests from other sources. The results indicate that the presence of a fatigue crack reduced the static strength, in all cases, by an amount larger than the corresponding reduction in net area; the 6061-T6 alloy specimens were least susceptible to the crack and the 7075-T6 alloy specimens were most susceptible. It is indicated that a 7075-T6 specimen may develop as little as one-third of the expected static tensile strength when the fatigue crack was consumed only one-fourth of the original area. It was found that the static strength was substantially higher for specimens which had stop holes drilled at the end of the fatigue crack.

  16. Dip-coated sheet silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Zook, J. D.; Scott, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    A cost-effective method is being developed for producing solar cell quality sheet silicon by dip coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large grain silicon. Mullite (Aluminum Silicate) ceramic substrates coated with a thin layer of graphite have been dipped into molten silicon to produce 20-150 micron thick layers having grain sizes as large as .4 cm x 4 cm. With these silicon layers photovoltaic diodes have been fabricated with measured and inherent conversion efficiencies of 4% and 7%, respectively.

  17. Axial crack propagation and arrest in pressurized fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosai, M.; Shimamoto, A.; Yu, C.-T.; Walker, S. I.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Tan, P.

    1994-01-01

    The crack arrest capability of a tear strap in a pressurized precracked fuselage was studied through instrumented axial rupture tests of small scale models of an idealized fuselage. Upon pressurization, rapid crack propagation initiated at an axial through crack along the stringer and immediately kinked due to the mixed modes 1 and 2 state caused by the one-sided opening of the crack flap. The diagonally running crack further turned at the tear straps. Dynamic finite element analysis of the rupturing cylinder showed that the crack kinked and also ran straight in the presence of a mixed mode state according to a modified two-parameter crack kinking criterion.

  18. Finite element microscopic stress analysis of cracked composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper considers the stress concentration problems of two types of cracked composite systems: (1) a composite system with a broken fiber (a penny-shaped crack problem), and (2) a composite system with a cracked matrix (an annular crack problem). The cracked composite systems are modeled with triangular and trapezoidal ring finite elements. Using NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) finite element computer program, the stress and deformation fields in the cracked composite systems are calculated. The effect of fiber-matrix material combination on the stress concentrations and on the crack opening displacements is studied.

  19. On Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Newman, James, Jr.; Forman, Royce G.

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth threshold, defining crack growth as either very slow or nonexistent, has been traditionally determined with standardized load reduction methodologies. These experimental procedures can induce load history effects that result in crack closure. This history can affect the crack driving force, i.e. during the unloading process the crack will close first at some point along the wake or blunt at the crack tip, reducing the effective load at the crack tip. One way to reduce the effects of load history is to propagate a crack under constant amplitude loading. As a crack propagates under constant amplitude loading, the stress intensity factor range, Delta K, will increase, as will the crack growth rate. da/dN. A fatigue crack growth threshold test procedure is experimentally validated that does not produce load history effects and can be conducted at a specified stress ratio, R. The authors have chosen to study a ductile aluminum alloy where the plastic deformations generated during testing may be of the magnitude to impact the crack opening.

  20. 75 FR 17162 - Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Secretary of Labor's Order No. 5-2007 (72 FR 31160). Signed at Washington, DC, on March 30, 2010. David... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) Standard; Extension of... collection requirement specified in its Standard on Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR...

  1. A comparison of stress in cracked fibrous tissue specimens with varied crack location, loading, and orientation using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, John M; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-04-01

    Cracks in fibrous soft tissue, such as intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus and knee meniscus, cause pain and compromise joint mechanics. A crack concentrates stress at its tip, making further failure and crack extension (fracture) more likely. Ex vivo mechanical testing is an important tool for studying the loading conditions required for crack extension, but prior work has shown that it is difficult to reproduce crack extension. Most prior work used edge crack specimens in uniaxial tension, with the crack 90° to the edge of the specimen. This configuration does not necessarily represent the loading conditions that cause in vivo crack extension. To find a potentially better choice for experiments aiming to reproduce crack extension, we used finite element analysis to compare, in factorial combination, (1) center crack vs. edge crack location, (2) biaxial vs. uniaxial loading, and (3) crack-fiber angles ranging from 0° to 90°. The simulated material was annulus fibrosus fibrocartilage with a single fiber family. We hypothesized that one of the simulated test cases would produce a stronger stress concentration than the commonly used uniaxially loaded 90° crack-fiber angle edge crack case. Stress concentrations were compared between cases in terms of fiber-parallel stress (representing risk of fiber rupture), fiber-perpendicular stress (representing risk of matrix rupture), and fiber shear stress (representing risk of fiber sliding). Fiber-perpendicular stress and fiber shear stress concentrations were greatest in edge crack specimens (of any crack-fiber angle) and center crack specimens with a 90° crack-fiber angle. However, unless the crack is parallel to the fiber direction, these stress components alone are insufficient to cause crack opening and extension. Fiber-parallel stress concentrations were greatest in center crack specimens with a 45° crack-fiber angle, either biaxially or uniaxially loaded. We therefore recommend that the 45° center crack case be

  2. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Norberto J.; Jia, Ruirui; Ma, Jun; Bah, Fatoumata Binta; Sah, Rajiv Kumar; Li, Dan; Wang, Daji; Bah, Fatoumata Binta Maci; Togo, Jacques; Jin, Honghong; Ban, Luying; Feng, Xuechao; Zheng, Yaowu

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected (disco)-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles. PMID:26605542

  3. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqing; Mabwi, Humphrey A; Palange, Norberto J; Jia, Ruirui; Ma, Jun; Bah, Fatoumata Binta; Sah, Rajiv Kumar; Li, Dan; Wang, Daji; Bah, Fatoumata Binta Maci; Togo, Jacques; Jin, Honghong; Ban, Luying; Feng, Xuechao; Zheng, Yaowu

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected (disco)-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles. PMID:26605542

  4. Fatigue crack growth with single overload - Measurement and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Dexter, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares experiments with an analytical model of fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude. The stereoimaging technique was used to measure displacements near the tips of fatigue cracks undergoing simple variations in load amplitude-single overloads and overload/underload combinations. Measured displacements were used to compute strains, and stresses were determined from the strains. Local values of crack driving force (Delta-K effective) were determined using both locally measured opening loads and crack tip opening displacements. Experimental results were compared with simulations made for the same load variation conditions using Newman's FAST-2 model. Residual stresses caused by overloads, crack opening loads, and growth retardation periods were compared.

  5. Statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the use of plasticity theory to characterize the inelastic behavior of solids is to represent the flaws by statistical methods. We have taken such an approach to study fragmentation because it offers a number of advantages. Foremost among these is that, by considering the effects of flaws, it becomes possible to address the underlying physics directly. For example, we have been able to explain why rocks exhibit large strain-rate effects (a consequence of the finite growth rate of cracks), why a spherical explosive imbedded in oil shale produces a cavity with a nearly square section (opening of bedding cracks) and why propellants may detonate following low-speed impact (a consequence of frictional hot spots).

  6. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  7. Current research on fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Jono, M.; Komai, K.

    1987-01-01

    This first volume of CJMR (Current Japanese Materials Research), contains thirteen chapters concerning the above three themes of fatigue cracks. Each chapter is not a single paper as appearing in many academic journals and transactions, but a systematic review of the current achievement by each author with the emphasis on important points. The common feature is that the elaborated experimental techniques and theoretical approaches, some of which are quite unique, are introduced by respective authors to make clear the difficulty arising in the observation of small cracks and analysis of data. Theoretical models are proposed from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics to link the two thresholds of fatigue limit and crack growth, and intensive discussions are made for further development of the theory. Threshold stress intensity factors and the growth rate of medium and long sized cracks are also discussed, together with their opening behavior. The influencing factors are plastic zone size, the stress ratio and residual stress distribution occurring in welded joints. Mode II crack growth is of great significance since the initial fatigue cracks propagate mainly in shear mode. The problems of fatigue crack growth in corrosive environment is highly important since its retardation and enhancement take place in structural steels affected by the variety of factors. Life prediction in such environments poses another important problem. These are systematically discussed in this book.

  8. Restructuring That Lasts: Managing the Performance Dip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwood, Kenneth W.; Louis, Karen Seashore

    1992-01-01

    School improvement literature focuses on the early stages of the change process and neglects actions to ensure its permanence. This article reviews research on institutionalization and the management of change in schools and develops a model for managing performance dips. Change facilitators must create administrative support and understanding,…

  9. Crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-W.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research on fatigue crack growth is summarized. Topics discussed include the use of the differential stress intensity factor to characterize crack tip deformation, the use of the unzipping model to study the growth of microcracks and the fatigue crack growth in a ferritic-martensitic steel, and the development of a model of fatige crack growth threshold. It is shown that in the case of small yielding, the differential stress intensity factor provides an adequate description of cyclic plastic deformation at the crack tip and correlates well with the crack growth rate. The unzipping model based on crack tip shear decohesion process is found to be in good agreement with the measured crack growth and striation spacing measurements. The proposed model of crack growth threshold gives correct predictions of the crack growth behavior in the near-threshold region.

  10. Application of the V(R) resistance curve method to fracture of various crack configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Mcneill, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The fracture resistance curve method of Newman (1985), based on the crack-tip-opening displacement, V(R), for a 'stationary' crack, was applied to various crack configurations in 2024-T351 and 7075-T651 aluminum alloys tested at room temperature. Using a stationary crack solution, the crack-tip-displacement was calculated at the current crack length for the crack configurations which included compact, middle-crack, single-edge-crack, and three-hole-crack tension specimens. The results showed that the V(R) resistance curves are insensitive to crack length, specimen width, and specimen type up to maximum load. After the maximum load is reached, the V(R) remains nearly constant; this constant depends only on specimen type, specimen width, and crack length. The V(R) resistance curve method can be used with the strip-yield analyses to accurately predict stable crack growth and instability of cracked metallic materials.

  11. Matrix cracking in ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Shetty, D.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Matrix cracking in ceramic-matrix composites with unbonded frictional interface has been studied using fracture mechanics theory. The critical stress for extension of a fiber-bridged crack has been analyzed using the stress-intensity approach. The analysis uses a new shear-lag formulation of the crack-closure traction applied by the bridging fibers based on the assumption of a constant sliding friction stress over the sliding length of the fiber-matrix interface. The new formulation satisfies two required limiting conditions: (a) when the stress in the bridging fiber approaches the far-field applied stress, the crack-opening displacement approaches a steady-state upper limit that is in agreement with the previous formulations; and (b) in the limit of zero crack opening, the stress in the bridging fiber approaches the far-field fiber stress. This lower limit of the bridging stress is distinctly different from the previous formulations. For all other conditions, the closure traction is a function of the far-field applied stress in addition to the local crack-opening displacement, the interfacial sliding friction stress, and the material properties. Numerical calculations using the stress-intensity approach indicate that the critical stress for crack extension decreases with increasing crack length and approaches a constant steady-state value for large cracks. The steady-state matrix-cracking stress agrees with a steady-state energy balance analysis applied to the continuum model, but it is slightly less than the matrix-cracking stress predicted by such theories of steady-state cracking as that of Aveston, Cooper, and Kelly. The origin of this difference and a method for reconciliation of the two theoretical approaches are discussed.

  12. Crack Healing in Quartz: Influence of Crack Morphology and pOH-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, J. A.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Popp, R. K.; Lamb, W. M.

    2004-12-01

    Crack healing in quartz has been investigated by optical microscopy and interferometry of rhombohedral r-cleavage cracks in polished Brazilian quartz prisms that were hydrothermally annealed. Quartz prisms were pre-cracked at room temperature and then annealed at temperatures T of 250° and 400° C for 2.4 to 240 hours, fluid pressure Pf = 41 MPa (equal to confining pressure Pc), and varying pOH- (from 5.4 to 1.2 at 250° C for fluids consisting of distilled water and NaOH solutions). Crack morphologies before and after annealing were recorded for each sample in plane light digital images and apertures were determined from interference fringes recorded using transmitted monochromatic light (λ = 598 nm). As documented in previous studies (Smith and Evans, 1984; Brantley et al., 1990; Beeler and Hickman, 1996), crack healing of quartz is driven by reductions in surface energy and healing rates appear to be limited by diffusional solute transport; sharply defined crack tips become blunted and break up into fluid-filled tubes and inclusions. However, fluid inclusion geometries are also observed with nonequilibrium shapes that depend on initial surface roughness. Crack healing is significant at 400° C after short run durations (24 hr) with healing rates reaching 10-5 mm/s. Crack healing is also observed at T=250° C, but only for smooth cracks with apertures < 0.6 μ m or for cracks subject to low pOH-. The extent of crack healing is sensitive to crack aperture and to hackles formed by fine-scale crack branching during crack growth. Initial crack apertures appear to be governed by the presence of fine particles, often found in the vicinity of hackles, which maintain the separation of crack surfaces. Where rough cracks exhibit healing, hackles are sites of either enhanced or reduced loss of fluid-solid interface depending on slight mismatches and sense of twist of opposing crack surfaces. Hackles of open r-cleavage cracks are replaced either by (1) healed curvilinear

  13. Semi-empirical crack tip analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Ben Ouezdon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimentally observed crack opening displacements are employed as the solution of the multiple crack interaction problem. Then the near and far fields are reconstructed analytically by means of the double layer potential technqiue. Evaluation of the effective stress intensity factor resulting from the interaction of the main crack and its surrounding crazes in addition to the remotely applied load is presented as an illustrative example. It is shown that crazing (as well as microcracking) may constitute an alternative mechanism to Dugdale-Berenblatt models responsible for the cancellation of the singularity at the crack tip.

  14. On the dip angle of subducting plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsui, Albert T.; Tang, Xiao-Ming; Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1990-01-01

    A new approximate analytic model is developed for the thermal structure of a subducting plate with a finite length. This model provides the capability of easily examining the thermal and mechanical structure of a subducting plate with different lengths and at different angles. Also, the torque balance of a descending plate can be examined, and effects such as the leading edge effect, the adiabatic compression effect, and the phase change effect can be incorporated. A comparison with observed data indicates that short slabs are likely under torque equilibrium at present, while long slabs are probably dominated by their gravitational torques such that their dip angles are transient, moving toward a steeper dip angle similar to that of the Mariana slab.

  15. Spike-dip transformation of Setaria viridis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Prasenjit; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Traditional method of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation through the generation of tissue culture had limited success for Setaria viridis, an emerging C4 monocot model. Here we present an efficient in planta method for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of S. viridis using spike dip. Pre-anthesis developing spikes were dipped into a solution of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL1 harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter to standardize and optimize conditions for transient as well as stable transformations. A transformation efficiency of 0.8 ± 0.1% was obtained after dipping of 5-day-old S3 spikes for 20 min in Agrobacterium cultures containing S. viridis spike-dip medium supplemented with 0.025% Silwet L-77 and 200 μm acetosyringone. Reproducibility of this method was demonstrated by generating stable transgenic lines expressing β-glucuronidase plus (GUSplus), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed) reporter genes driven by either CaMV35S or intron-interrupted maize ubiquitin (Ubi) promoters from three S. viridis genotypes. Expression of these reporter genes in transient assays as well as in T1 stable transformed plants was monitored using histochemical, fluorometric GUS activity and fluorescence microscopy. Molecular analysis of transgenic lines revealed stable integration of transgenes into the genome, and inherited transgenes expressed in the subsequent generations. This approach provides opportunities for the high-throughput transformation and potentially facilitates translational research in a monocot model plant. PMID:26932666

  16. Crack-face displacements for embedded elliptic and semi-elliptical surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the crack-face displacements of an embedded elliptic crack in infinite solid subjected to arbitrary tractions are obtained. The tractions on the crack faces are assumed to be expressed in a polynomial form. These displacements expressions complete the exact solution of Vijayakumar and Atluri, and Nishioki and Atluri. For the special case of an embedded crack in an infinite solid subjected to uniform pressure loading, the present displacements agree with those by Green and Sneddon. The displacement equations derived were used with the finite-element alternating method (FEAM) for the analysis of a semi-elliptic surface crack in a finite solid subjected to remote tensile loading. The maximum opening displacements obtained with FEAM are compared to those with the finite-element method with singularity elements. The maximum crack opening displacements by the two methods showed good agreement.

  17. Scaling of crack propagation in rubber sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Zhang, H. P.; Niemczura, J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Marder, M.

    2011-11-01

    We have conducted experiments and numerical simulations to investigate supersonic cracks. The experiments are performed at 85 °C to suppress strain-induced crystallites that complicate experiments at lower temperature. Calibration experiments were performed to obtain the parameters needed to compare with a theory including viscous dissipation. We find that both experiments and numerical simulations support supersonic cracks, and we discover a transition from subsonic to supersonic as we plot experimental crack speed curves vs. extension ratio for different sized samples. Both experiments and simulations show two different scaling regimes: the speed of subsonic cracks scales with the elastic energy density while the speed of supersonic cracks scales with the extension ratio. Crack openings have qualitatively different shapes in the two scaling regimes.

  18. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes during fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Hudak, S. J.; Dexter, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanics of fatigue crack growth under constant-amplitudes and variable-amplitude loading were examined. Critical loading histories involving relatively simple overload and overload/underload cycles were studied to provide a basic understanding of the underlying physical processes controlling crack growth. The material used for this study was 7091-T7E69, a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy. Local crack-tip parameters were measured at various times before, during, and after the overloads, these include crack-tip opening loads and displacements, and crack-tip strain fields. The latter were useed, in combination with the materials cyclic and monotonic stress-strain properties, to compute crack-tip residual stresses. The experimental results are also compared with analytical predictions obtained using the FAST-2 computer code. The sensitivity of the analytical model to constant-amplitude fatigue crack growth rate properties and to through-thickness constrain are studied.

  19. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M.

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  20. An elastic-plastic finite element analysis of crack initiation, stable crack growth, and instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to develop efficient techniques to simulate crack extension and to examine various local and global fracture criteria. Of the considered criteria, the crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) or displacement (CTOD) at a specified distance from the crack tip was shown to be most suited for modeling stable crack growth and instability during the fracture process. The results obtained in a number of studies show the necessity for studying different crack configurations when assessing the validity of any fracture criteria. One of the objectives of the present investigation is related to a critical evaluation of the CTOD growth criterion using an elastic-plastic finite element analysis under monotonic loading to failure. The analysis was found to predict three stages of crack growth behavior under monotonic loading to failure. Calculated CTOD values agreed well with experimental values for crack growth initiation.

  1. Stability analysis of bridged cracks in brittle matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Muju, Sandeep

    1991-01-01

    The bridging of matrix cracks by fibers is an important toughening mechanism in fiber reinforced brittle matrix composites. This paper presents the results of a nonlinear finite element analysis of the Mode-I propagation of a bridged matrix crack in a finite size specimen. The composite is modeled as an orthotropic continuum and the bridging due to the fibers is modeled as a distribution of tractions which resist crack opening. A critical stress intensity factor criterion is employed for matrix crack propagation while a critical crack opening condition is used for fiber failure. The structural response of the specimen (load-deflection curves) as well as the stress intensity factor of the propagating crack are calculated for various constituent properties and specimen configurations for both tensile and bending loading. By controlling the length of the bridged crack results are obtained which highlight the transition from stable to unstable behavior of the propagating crack.

  2. Contact of nonflat crack surfaces during fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Sehitoglu, H.; Garcia, A.M.

    1999-07-01

    A model has been developed to predict crack opening and closure behavior for propagating fatigue cracks which are nonflat and undergo significant sliding displacements. Crack surfaces were characterized by a random distribution of asperity heights, density of asperities, and asperity radii. The propagating crack was subdivided into ligaments and each ligament was treated as a contact problem between two randomly rough surfaces. The far-field tensile stresses were varied in a cyclic manner for R = 0.1 and {minus}1 loading conditions. The contact stresses at the minimal load were determined by analyzing the local crushing of the asperities. Then, upon loading the crack opening, stresses were computed when the contact stresses were overcome. The results of crack opening stresses were correlated with CTOD/{sigma}{sub 0} where CTOD is the crack-tip opening displacement and {sigma}{sub 0} is the average asperity height. The asperity effects on closure were compared with plasticity-induced closure results from the literature for identification of conditions when one mechanism dominates the other.

  3. Analyses of Fatigue Crack Growth and Closure Near Threshold Conditions for Large-Crack Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A plasticity-induced crack-closure model was used to study fatigue crack growth and closure in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold testing procedures. Two methods of calculating crack-opening stresses were compared. One method was based on a contact-K analyses and the other on crack-opening-displacement (COD) analyses. These methods gave nearly identical results under constant-amplitude loading, but under threshold simulations the contact-K analyses gave lower opening stresses than the contact COD method. Crack-growth predictions tend to support the use of contact-K analyses. Crack-growth simulations showed that remote closure can cause a rapid rise in opening stresses in the near threshold regime for low-constraint and high applied stress levels. Under low applied stress levels and high constraint, a rise in opening stresses was not observed near threshold conditions. But crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) were of the order of measured oxide thicknesses in the 2024 alloy under constant-R simulations. In contrast, under constant-K(sub max) testing the CTOD near threshold conditions were an order-of-magnitude larger than measured oxide thicknesses. Residual-plastic deformations under both constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold simulations were several times larger than the expected oxide thicknesses. Thus, residual-plastic deformations, in addition to oxide and roughness, play an integral part in threshold development.

  4. Dip-coating of yield stress fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, M.; Bleyer, J.; Andrieux, A. L.; Boujlel, J.; Coussot, P.

    2016-05-01

    We review and discuss the characteristics of dip-coating of yield stress fluids on the basis of theoretical considerations, numerical simulations of the flow in the bath, and experimental data with different materials. We show that in general, due to the yield stress, viscous dissipations are sufficiently large for capillary effects to be negligible in the process. Dip-coating with yield stress fluids is thus essentially governed by an equilibrium between viscous and gravity effects. In contrast with simple liquids, the coated thickness is uniform and remains fixed to the plate. At low velocities, it appears to tend to a value significantly smaller than the Derjaguin and Levi prediction [B. V. Derjaguin and S. M. Levi, Film Coating Theory (The Focal Press, London, 1964)], i.e., critical thickness of stoppage of a free surface flow along a vertical plate. We show that this comes from the fact that in the bath only a relatively small layer of fluid is in its liquid regime along the moving plate, while the rest of the material is in a solid regime. From numerical simulations, we describe the general trends of this liquid layer, and in particular, its thickness as a function of the rheological characteristics and plate velocity. We finally propose a model for the dip-coating of yield stress fluid, assuming that the solid volume of fluid finally fixed to the plate results from the mass flux of the liquid layer in the bath minus a mass flux due to some downward flow under gravity in the transition zone. A good agreement between this model and experimental data is found for a fluid with a yield stress larger than 20 Pa.

  5. Dip-molded t-shaped cannula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1978-01-01

    Cannula, fabricated out of polyetherurethane, has been designed for long-term service. Improved cannula is T-shaped to collect blood from both directions, thus replacing two conventional cannulas that are usually required and eliminating need for large surgical wound. It is fabricated by using dip-molding process that can be adapted to other elastomeric objects having complex shapes. Dimensions of cannula were chosen to optimize its blood-flow properties and to reduce danger of excessive clotting, making it suitable for continuous service up to 21 days in vein or artery of patient.

  6. Dips in the diffuse supernova neutrino background

    SciTech Connect

    Farzan, Yasaman; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio E-mail: Sergio.Palomares.Ruiz@ific.uv.es

    2014-06-01

    Scalar (fermion) dark matter with mass in the MeV range coupled to ordinary neutrinos and another fermion (scalar) is motivated by scenarios that establish a link between radiatively generated neutrino masses and the dark matter relic density. With such a coupling, cosmic supernova neutrinos, on their way to us, could resonantly interact with the background dark matter particles, giving rise to a dip in their redshift-integrated spectra. Current and future neutrino detectors, such as Super-Kamiokande, LENA and Hyper-Kamiokande, could be able to detect this distortion.

  7. Temperature effects in dip-tube manometry

    SciTech Connect

    Keisch, B; Suda, S

    1980-01-01

    A simple mathematical treatment of the temperature dependence of manometric data for dip-tubes is described. It is shown that the pressure probe measurement is a function of the mass, temperature, and liquid level heights below and above the effective tip of the probe. The resulting equations explain why, for example, high- and low-level probes exhibit temperature sensitivity that is opposite in sign to one another. The derived equations are successful in the prediction of actual data obtained for two differently-shaped vessels containing two different liquids.

  8. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  9. Mechanics of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Elber, Wolf (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on plasticity induced crack closure, crack closure in fatigue crack growth, the dependence of crack closure on fatigue loading variables, and a procedure for standardizing crack closure levels. Also considered are a statistical approach to crack closure determination, the crack closure behavior of surface cracks under pure bending, closure measurements on short fatigue cracks, and crack closure under plane strain conditions. Other topics include fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios, the use of acoustic waves for the characterization of closed fatigue cracks, and the influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure.

  10. Crack, crack house sex, and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A

    1995-06-01

    Limited attention has been focused on HIV risk behaviors of crack smokers and their sex partners, yet there is evidence that the crack house and the crack-using life-style may be playing significant roles in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The purposes of this research were to study the attributes and patterns of "sex for crack" exchanges, particularly those that occurred in crack houses, and to assess their potential impact on the spread of HIV. Structured interviews were conducted with 17 men and 35 women in Miami, Florida, who were regular users of crack and who had exchanged sex for crack (or for money to buy crack) during the past 30 days. In addition, participant observation was conducted in 8 Miami crack houses. Interview and observational data suggest that individuals who exchange sex for crack do so with considerable frequency, and through a variety of sexual activities. Systematic data indicated that almost a third of the men and 89% of the women had had 100 or more sex partners during the 30-day period prior to study recruitment. Not only were sexual activities anonymous, extremely frequent, varied, uninhibited (often undertaken in public areas of crack houses), and with multiple partners but, in addition, condoms were not used during the majority of contacts. Of the 37 subjects who were tested for HIV and received their test results 31% of the men and 21% of the women were HIV seropositive. PMID:7611845

  11. Internal state variable approach for predicting stiffness reductions in fibrous laminated composites with matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, D. H.; Harris, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model utilizing the internal state variable concept is proposed for predicting the upper bound of the reduced axial stiffnesses in cross-ply laminates with matrix cracks. The axial crack opening displacement is explicitly expressed in terms of the observable axial strain and the undamaged material properties. A crack parameter representing the effect of matrix cracks on the observable axial Young's modulus is calculated for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy material systems. The results show that the matrix crack opening displacement and the effective Young's modulus depend not on the crack length, but on its ratio to the crack spacing.

  12. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm2, which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10−11 cm−1 absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10−23 cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed. PMID:27263858

  13. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm(2), which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10(-11) cm(-1) absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10(-23) cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed. PMID:27263858

  14. Hydrodynamically Driven Colloidal Assembly in Dip Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca2/3/Bo<0.7, where Ca and Bo are the capillary and Bond numbers, respectively. An analytical model and numerical simulations are presented for the case of two-dimensional flow with circular particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  15. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm2, which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10‑11 cm‑1 absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10‑23 cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed.

  16. Improvement of hot-dip zinc coating by enriching the inner layers with iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibli, S. M. A.; Manu, R.

    2006-02-01

    The performance of hot-dip galvanic coating formed on steel not only depends on the alloy composition of the superficial layer but also significantly, on the composition of the inner alloy layers at the coating/substrate interface. Further, the presence of barrier oxide layers, if any can also improve the performance of galvanic coating. In the present work, the effect of inner iron oxide barrier layer formed prior to hot-dip galvanization was investigated. A continuous and adherent iron oxide layer was formed on steel by anodic oxidation of the steel substrate. Although the wettability of oxide surface by liquid zinc was initially poor, the increase in dipping time and the transition of the oxide layer to unstable form due to the presence of Cl - ion in the flux facilitated localized growth of Fe-Zn alloy phases. The inhibitive nature of the oxide layer was temporary, since the presence of Cl - induces micro cracks on the oxide surface thereby facilitating better zinc diffusion. The modification of the substrate structure during galvanization was found to influence the galvanizing process significantly. The present study predicts scope for application of this process for protection of rusted steel specimens too.

  17. An Evaluation of the Plasticity-Induced Crack-Closure Concept and Measurement Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of the plasticity-induced crack-closure concept is made, in light of some of the questions that have been raised on the validity of the concept, and the assumptions that have been made concerning crack-dp damage below the crack-opening stress. The impact of using other crack-tip parameters, such as the cyclic crack-tip displacement, to model crack-growth rate behavior was studied. Crack-growth simulations, using a crack-closure model, showed a close relation between traditional Delta K eff, and the cyclic crack-tip displacement (Delta eff) for an aluminum alloy and a steel. Evaluations of the cyclic hysteresis energy demonstrated that the cyclic plastic damage below the crack-opening stress was negligible in the Paris crack-growth regime. Some of the standard and newly proposed remote measurement methods to determine the 'effective' crack-tip driving parameter were evaluated on middle-crack tension specimens. A potential source of the Kmax effect on crack-growth rates was studied on an aluminum alloy. Results showed that the ratio of Kmax to Kc had a strong effect on crack-growth rates at high stress ratios and at low stress ratios for very high stress levels. The crack-closure concept and the traditional crack-growth rate equations were able to correlate and predict crack-growth rates under these extreme conditions.

  18. Stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two basic forms of analysis, one treating stresses around arbitrarily loaded circular cracks, the other treating stresses due to loads arbitrarily distributed on the surface of a half space, are united by a boundary-point least squares method to obtain analyses for stresses from surface cracks in places or bars. Calculations were for enough cases to show how effects from the crack vary with the depth-to-length ratio, the fractional penetration ratio, the obliquity of the load, and to some extent the fractional span ratio. The results include plots showing stress intensity factors, stress component distributions near the crack, and crack opening displacement patterns. Favorable comparisons are shown with two kinds of independent experiments, but the main method for confirming the results is by wide checking of overall satisfaction of boundary conditions, so that external confirmation is not essential. Principles involved in designing analyses which promote dependability of the results are proposed and illustrated.

  19. A thermomechanical cohesive zone model for bridged delamination cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattiangadi, Ashwin; Siegmund, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The coupled thermomechanical numerical analysis of composite laminates with bridged delamination cracks loaded by a temperature gradient is described. The numerical approach presented is based on the framework of a cohesive zone model. A traction-separation law is presented which accounts for breakdown of the micromechanisms responsible for load transfer across bridged delamination cracks. The load transfer behavior is coupled to heat conduction across the bridged delamination crack. The coupled crack-bridging model is implemented into a finite element framework as a thermomechanical cohesive zone model (CZM). The fundamental response of the thermomechanical CZM is described. Subsequently, bridged delamination cracks of fixed lengths are studied. Values of the crack tip energy release rate and of the crack heat flux are computed to characterize the loading of the structure. Specimen geometries are considered that lead to crack opening through bending deformation and buckling delamination. The influence of critical mechanical and thermal parameters of the bridging zone on the thermomechanical delamination behavior is discussed. Bridging fibers not only contribute to crack conductance, but by keeping the crack opening small they allow heat flux across the delamination crack to be sustained longer, and thereby contribute to reduced levels of thermal stresses. The micro-mechanism based cohesive zone model allows the assessment of the effectiveness of the individual mechanisms contributing to the thermomechanical crack bridging embedded into the structural analysis.

  20. Material transport in dip-pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Liao, Xing; He, Shu; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2014-06-01

    Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is a useful method for directly printing materials on surfaces with sub-50 nm resolution. Because it involves the physical transport of materials from a scanning probe tip to a surface and the subsequent chemical interaction of that material with the surface, there are many factors to consider when attempting to understand DPN. In this review, we overview the physical and chemical processes that are known to play a role in DPN. Through a detailed review of the literature, we classify inks into three general categories based on their transport properties, and highlight the myriad ways that DPN can be used to perform chemistry at the tip of a scanning probe.

  1. Dips and rims in dried colloidal films.

    PubMed

    Parneix, C; Vandoolaeghe, P; Nikolayev, V S; Quéré, D; Li, J; Cabane, B

    2010-12-31

    We describe a spatial pattern arising from the nonuniform evaporation of a colloidal film. Immediately after the film deposition, an obstacle is positioned above its free surface, minimizing evaporation at this location. In a first stage, the film dries everywhere but under the obstacle, where a liquid region remains. Subsequently, this liquid region evaporates near its boundaries with the dry film. This loss of water causes a flow of liquid and particles from the center of the obstructed region to its periphery. The final film has a dip surrounded by a rim whose diameter is set by the obstacle. This turns out to be a simple technique for structuring films of nanometric thickness. PMID:21231686

  2. Piezoresistive pens for dip-pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, A. K.; Fragala, J.; Shile, R.; Simao, P.

    2013-03-01

    The conventional approach to measurement of the deflection of microfabricated cantilevers centers on the use of an optical lever. The use of optical lever technology increases the size, complexity, and cost of systems using microfabricated cantilevers. Occasionally, piezoresistors have been used to sense deflection. But, for atomic force microscope applications in particular, topographical sensitivity has demanded the higher sensitivity of the optical lever. For dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) microfabricated cantilevers do not require the same degree of deflection sensitivity. So, for these applications, piezoresistors can be used to sense deflection. In this work, we present a novel approach to an integrated DPN pen. Piezoresistive silicon stress sensors are integrated into a silicon nitride cantilever. The device design, process design, and fabrication methods for building these sensors, and sensor-actuators, are demonstrated. Integration of heaters, along with the piezoresistors, is also demonstrated.

  3. Magnetic dips in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrowolny, M.; Bavassano, B.; Mariani, F.; Ness, N.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1978-01-01

    Using magnetic data from the HELIOS 1 fluxgate magnetometer, with a 0.2 sec resolution, the structures of several interplanetary discontinuities involving magnetic dips and rotations of the magnetic field vector were investigated. A minimum variance analysis illustrates the behavior of the magnetic field through the transition in the plane of its maximum variation. Using this analysis, quite different structures have been individuated and, in particular, narrow transitions resembling almost one dimensional reconnected neutral sheets. For the thinner cases (scale lengths of the magnetic rotation of the order or smaller than 1,000 km), results show the observed structures could be the nonlinear effect of a resistive tearing mode instability having developed on an originally one dimensional neutral sheet at the solar corona.

  4. Ocular Dipping in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, Sara; Gonzalo, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Sánchez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background Ocular dipping (OD), or inverse ocular bobbing, consists of slow, spontaneous downward eye movements with rapid return to the primary position. It has been mainly reported following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, but has also been described in association with other types of diffuse or multifocal encephalopathies and structural brainstem damage. Case Report We report the case of a previously asymptomatic 66-year-old woman who presented with confusion, recent memory disturbances, and abnormal involuntary movements, followed by a coma. Abnormal spontaneous vertical eye movements consistent with OD developed from the fourth day after admission, and the patient died 20 days later. The pathological examination of the brain confirmed the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Conclusions The precise location of damage causing OD is unknown. In contrast to ocular bobbing, OD has no localizing value itself, but structural brainstem damage is likely when it appears combined with other spontaneous vertical eye movements. PMID:24829603

  5. Evaluation of teat dips with excised teats.

    PubMed

    Watts, J L; Boddie, R L; Pankey, J W; Nickerson, S C

    1984-09-01

    Thirty-eight teat dip formulations were evaluated for germicidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae with an excised teat model. Twenty-six of 27 iodophor products provided log reductions greater than 3 against Staphylococcus aureus, but only 13 against Streptococcus agalactiae. Log reductions obtained with two .2% quaternary ammonium and .5% cetylpyridium chloride products were greater than 4 against both organisms. A 1% benzyl alcohol formulation provided log reductions of 3.86 and 4.30 against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. Germicidal activities of six novel formulations containing sodium chlorite were determined. Two products were effective against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae with log reductions greater than 4. One product provided a log reduction of 3; three products were ineffective. PMID:6386907

  6. Subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Akihiro; Sugawara, Azusa; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To accurately measure closed crack length, we proposed an imaging method using a subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic waves (SAW SPACE) with water immersion. We applied SAW SPACE to the hole specimen in a fundamental array (FA) image. The hole was imaged with high resolution. Subsequently, SAW SPACE was applied to fatigue crack and stress corrosion crack (SCC) specimens. A fatigue crack was imaged in FA and subharmonic array (SA) images, and the length of this particular fatigue crack measured in the images was almost the same as that measured by optical observation. The SCC was imaged and its length was accurately measured in the SA image, whereas it was underestimated in the FA image and by optical observation. Thus, we demonstrated that SAW SPACE with water immersion is useful for the accurate measurement of closed crack length and for imaging the distribution of open and closed parts of cracks with high resolution.

  7. The noncontinuum crack tip deformation behavior of surface microcracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, W. L.

    1980-07-01

    The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) of small surface fatigue cracks (lengths of the grain size) in Al 2219-T851 depends upon the location of a crack relative to the grain boundaries. Both CTOD and crack tip closure stress are greatest when the crack tip is a large distance from the next grain boundary in the direction of crack propagation. Contrary to behavioral trends predicted by continuum fracture mechanics, crack length has no detectable effect on the contribution of plastic deformation to CTOD. It is apparent from these observations that the region of significant plastic deformation is confined by the grain boundaries, resulting in a plastic zone size that is insensitive to crack length and to external load.

  8. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  9. Dipping longwalls in semi-steep seams

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Delcruzel, J.

    1982-07-01

    Use of high productivity equipment designed for level seams gives encouraging results in the semi-steep seams of the Lorraine Basin. In the Lorraine coal basin, this type of coal seam has been mined by ascending horizontal slices with back filling, using two basic methods: (1) multiple front faces in a stepped pattern using drilling, blasting, and timber support. (2) longwall mining to the rise, which is usable in favorable conditions of seam width and ground stability. This method gives face productivities up to 15 metric tons per manshift. The technical progress that has been made in recent years in the area of support, coal cutting, and coal clearance has allowed the mechanization of steep and semi-steep seams. A new method was started in 1981 at the Simon colliery. A caving longwall mining method is used. The dip of the seam averages 33/sup 0/. A two-entry retreat system was selected. The first longwalls were worked at heights of 3 to 3.5 meters (10 to 11 feet). Most of the equipment is similar to that used for mining flat seams. High performance four-leg, self-advancing chock supports are used. In order to meet certain requirements imposed by the dip, the supports have the following particular features: (1) The shields are positioned close to each other to increase support. Also, to reduce caving dangers, side flaps are mounted on the canopy, the rear shield, and the base. (2) The shields are advanced in a staggered fashion to maintain proper roof support after shearing. (3)Telescopic front shields can be brought down onto the spill plates of the conveyor to isolate the face line from the travel way. This provides extra protection against falling materials while giving access to the face.

  10. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  11. A nonlinear fracture mechanics approach to the growth of small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model of crack closure is used to study the crack growth and closure behavior of small cracks in plates and at notches. The calculated crack opening stresses for small and large cracks, together with elastic and elastic plastic fracture mechanics analyses, are used to correlate crack growth rate data. At equivalent elastic stress intensity factor levels, calculations predict that small cracks in plates and at notches should grow faster than large cracks because the applied stress needed to open a small crack is less than that needed to open a large crack. These predictions agree with observed trends in test data. The calculations from the model also imply that many of the stress intensity factor thresholds that are developed in tests with large cracks and with load reduction schemes do not apply to the growth of small cracks. The current calculations are based upon continuum mechanics principles and, thus, some crack size and grain structure exist where the underlying fracture mechanics assumptions become invalid because of material inhomogeneity (grains, inclusions, etc.). Admittedly, much more effort is needed to develop the mechanics of a noncontinuum. Nevertheless, these results indicate the importance of crack closure in predicting the growth of small cracks from large crack data.

  12. Assessment of anti-Salmonella activity of boot dip samples.

    PubMed

    Rabie, André J; McLaren, Ian M; Breslin, Mark F; Sayers, Robin; Davies, Rob H

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of pathogens from the external environment into poultry houses via the boots of farm workers and visitors presents a significant risk. The use of boot dips containing disinfectant to help prevent this from happening is common practice, but the effectiveness of these boot dips as a preventive measure can vary. The aim of this study was to assess the anti-Salmonella activity of boot dips that are being used on poultry farms. Boot dip samples were collected from commercial laying hen farms in the UK and tested within 24 hours of receipt at the laboratory to assess their anti-Salmonella activity. All boot dip samples were tested against a field strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis using three test models: pure culture, paper disc surface matrix and yeast suspension model. Of the 112 boot dip samples tested 83.6% were effective against Salmonella in pure culture, 37.3% in paper disc surface matrix and 44.5% in yeast suspension model. Numerous factors may influence the efficacy of the disinfectants. Disinfectants used in the dips may not always be fully active against surface or organic matter contamination; they may be inaccurately measured or diluted to a concentration other than that specified or recommended; dips may not be changed regularly or may have been exposed to rain and other environmental elements. This study showed that boot dips in use on poultry farms are frequently ineffective. PMID:25650744

  13. Closure of fatigue cracks at high strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic strains under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The strain levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high strains, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high strain is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.

  14. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  15. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  16. Crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.M.; Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for estimating the decrease in crack-initiation toughness, from a reference plane strain value, due to positive straining along the crack front of a circumferential flaw in a reactor pressure vessel is presented in this study. This method relates crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions with material failure at points within a distance of a few crack-tip-opening displacements ahead of a crack front, and involves the formulation of a micromechanical crack-initiation model. While this study is intended to address concerns regarding the effects of positive out-of- plane straining on ductile crack initiation, the approach adopted in this work can be extended in a straightforward fashion to examine conditions of macroscopic cleavage crack initiation. Provided single- parameter dominance of near-tip fields exists in the flawed structure, results from this study could be used to examine the appropriateness of applying plane strain fracture toughness to the evaluation of circumferential flaws, in particular to those in ring-forged vessels which have no longitudinal welds. In addition, results from this study could also be applied toward the analysis of the effects of thermal streaming on the fracture resistance of circumferentially oriented flaws in a pressure vessel. 37 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Fatigue crack growth in unidirectional metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The weight function method was used to determine the effective stress intensity factor and the crack opening profile for a fatigue tested composite which exhibited fiber bridging. The bridging mechanism was modeled using two approaches; the crack closure approach and the shear lag approach. The numerically determined stress intensity factor values from both methods were compared and correlated with the experimentally obtained crack growth rates for SiC/Ti-15-3 (0)(sub 8) oriented composites. The near crack tip opening profile was also determined for both methods and compared with the experimentally obtained measurements.

  18. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  19. Modeling of crack bridging in a unidirectional metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1991-01-01

    The effective fatigue crack driving force and crack opening profiles were determined analytically for fatigue tested unidirectional composite specimens exhibiting fiber bridging. The crack closure pressure due to bridging was modeled using two approaches; the fiber pressure model and the shear lag model. For both closure models, the Bueckner weight function method and the finite element method were used to calculate crack opening displacements and the crack driving force. The predicted near crack tip opening profile agreed well with the experimentally measured profiles for single edge notch SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite specimens. The numerically determined effective crack driving force, Delta K(sup eff), was calculated using both models to correlate the measure crack growth rate in the composite. The calculated Delta K(sup eff) from both models accounted for the crack bridging by showing a good agreement between the measured fatigue crack growth rates of the bridged composite and that of unreinforced, unbridged titanium matrix alloy specimens.

  20. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  1. Crack propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budarapu, P. R.; Javvaji, B.; Sutrakar, V. K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Zi, G.; Rabczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    The crack initiation and growth mechanisms in an 2D graphene lattice structure are studied based on molecular dynamics simulations. Crack growth in an initial edge crack model in the arm-chair and the zig-zag lattice configurations of graphene are considered. Influence of the time steps on the post yielding behaviour of graphene is studied. Based on the results, a time step of 0.1 fs is recommended for consistent and accurate simulation of crack propagation. Effect of temperature on the crack propagation in graphene is also studied, considering adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Total energy and stress fields are analyzed. A systematic study of the bond stretching and bond reorientation phenomena is performed, which shows that the crack propagates after significant bond elongation and rotation in graphene. Variation of the crack speed with the change in crack length is estimated.

  2. The Signature of Shearing Driven By Hydraulic Opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic-fracture microseismicity in layered rock often exhibits fairly uniform source mechanisms characterized by one of the nodal planes aligned vertical and striking close (~10°) to the principal stress direction. Typically, displacements are dip slip and/or strike slip. When combined with precise source locations, the events sometimes form simple linear trends and distinct depth bands separated by aseismic intervals. The simple geometry and observed shearing on planes with little or no expected in-situ shear stress suggest that the signal generation is closely associated with the near-field stress and strain conditions of hydraulic-fracture opening. Further, the distinct depth bands suggest the seismic failure is controlled by the mechanical stratigraphy. Based on the analog of natural tensile joint structures observed in layered rock, I interpret the aligned strike-slip and dip-slip mechanisms in terms of en echelon fringe cracks and bedding-plane slip on step-over features, respectively. Dip-slip mechanisms are common in shales, and may represent slip on bedding surfaces if the alternate, horizontal nodal plane is considered the fault plane. Modeling studies of bedding-plane slip and the formation of jogs or step overs of a tensile fracture along bedding suggest that the fracture growth is controlled by crack tip stresses and the mechanical properties of the layer interfaces. The observation of strike-slip events aligned in horizontal bands could be similarly associated with tensile joint behavior at layer interfaces where the parent tensile crack can break up into a set of en echelon cracks in response to local stress rotations. Breakdown into en echelon cracks is initiated by strike-slip shearing parallel to the tensile parent fracture, representing a mode III deformation. In this interpretation, of critical failure associated with bedding plane slip and fringe fracture break up, the microseismicity provides a direct picture of tensile fracture growth

  3. Opportunity's First Dip into Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity entered Victoria Crater during the rover's 1,291st Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 11, 2007). The rover team commanded Opportunity to drive just far enough into the crater to get all six wheels onto the inner slope, and then to back out again and assess how much the wheels slipped on the slope. The driving commands for the day included a precaution for the rover to stop driving if the wheels were slipping more than 40 percent. Slippage exceeded that amount on the last step of the drive, so Opportunity stopped with its front pair of wheels still inside the crater. The rover team planned to assess results of the drive, then start Opportunity on an extended exploration inside the crater.

    This wide-angle view taken by Opportunity's front hazard-identification camera at the end of the day's driving shows the wheel tracks created by the short dip into the crater. The left half of the image looks across an alcove informally named 'Duck Bay' toward a promontory called 'Cape Verde' clockwise around the crater wall. The right half of the image looks across the main body of the crater, which is 800 meters (half a mile) in diameter.

  4. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions...

  5. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions...

  6. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions...

  7. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions...

  8. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions...

  9. Germicidal persistence of teat dips by modified excised teat procedure.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A L; Oliver, S P; Fydenkevez, M E

    1985-01-01

    An excised teat protocol was modified to evaluate persistence of germicidal activity of teat dips over 8 h. Five teat dip formulations, iodophor (1%), chlorhexidine gluconate (.55%), linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (1.94%), sodium chlorite-lactic acid in a water base, and sodium chlorite-lactic acid in a gel base were tested against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca. Iodophor and chlorhexidine had high germicidal activity throughout 8 h, whereas dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid had little activity. Germicidal activity of both sodium chlorite-lactic acid teat dips was high initially but declined with time. The gel base dip, however, remained more germicidal than the water base dip. Results were similar for either organism for most teat dips. However, chlorhexidine was less effective and the gel base dip more effective against Klebsiella oxytoca than Escherichia coli. Standard errors often appeared higher for Klebsiella oxytoca than for Escherichia coli. These assays may prove useful for laboratory screening of teat dips to determine germicidal persistence over time. PMID:3884679

  10. Crack-mouth displacements for semielliptical surface cracks subjected to remote tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Atluri, Satya N.

    1992-01-01

    The exact analytical solution for an embedded elliptical crack in an infinite body subjected to arbitrary loading was used in conjunction with the finite element alternating method to obtain crack-mouth-opening displacements (CMOD) for surface cracks in finite plates subjected to remote tension. Identical surface-crack configurations were also analyzed with the finite element method using 20-noded element for plates subjected to both remote tension and bending. The CMODs from these two methods generally agreed within a few percent of each other. Comparisons made with experimental results obtained from surface cracks in welded aluminum alloy specimens subjected to tension also showed good agreement. Empirical equations were developed for CMOD for a wide range of surface-crack shapes and sizes subjected to tension and bending loads. These equations were obtained by modifying the Green-Sneddon exact solution for an elliptical crack in an infinite body to account for finite boundary effects. These equations should be useful in monitoring surface-crack growth in tests and in developing complete crack-face-displacement equations for use in three-dimensional weight-function methods.

  11. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  12. Short crack growth behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A.K.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have re-evaluated short crack growth behavior using concepts developed recently, and they show that these concepts provide a unified framework that can explain both short and long crack growth behavior without resorting to the crack closure effect. They consider that the behavior of long cracks, including the effects of load ratio, R, is fundamental. they had shown previously that, since fatigue is at least a two-parameter problem in that at least two load parameters are required for an unambiguous description, there are two critical driving forces required simultaneously for fatigue cracks to grow. In extending this analysis to the growth of short cracks, they reject the current notion of the lack of similitude for short cracks and express the similitude as a fundamental postulate that, for a given crack growth mechanism, equal crack tip driving forces result in equal crack growth rates. Short crack growth behavior confirms the concept that two parameters are required to define fatigue; consequently, for fatigue cracks to grow, two thresholds need to be satisfied simultaneously. The authors present examples from the literature to illustrate the concepts discussed.

  13. Wide range weight functions for the strip with a single edge crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    A closed form expression for the weight function for a strip with a single edge crack is presented. The expression is valid for relative crack lengths from zero to unity. It is based on the assumption that the shape of an opened edge crack can be approximated by a conic section. The results agree well with published values for weight functions, stress intensity factors, and crack mouth opening displacements.

  14. Investigation of eddy current examination on OD fatigue crack for steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yuying; Ding, Boyuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Jinhong; Chen, Huaidong; Meyendorf, Norbert G.

    2015-03-01

    The opening width of fatigue crack was very small, and conventional Bobbin probe was very difficult to detect it in steam generator tubes. Different sizes of 8 fatigue cracks were inspected using bobbin probe rotating probe. The analysis results showed that, bobbin probe was not sensitive for fatigue crack even for small through wall crack mixed with denting signal. On the other hand, the rotating probe was easily to detect all cracks. Finally, the OD phase to depth curve for fatigue crack using rotating probe was established and the results agreed very well with the true crack size.

  15. Matrix cracking in brittle-matrix composites with tailored interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Chao, L.Y.; Shetty, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    Matrix cracking from controlled through cracks with bridging filaments was studied in a model unidirectional composite of SiC filaments in an epoxy-bonded alumina matrix. An unbonded, frictional interface was produced by moderating the curing shrinkage of the epoxy with the alumina filler and coating the filaments with a releasing agent. Uniaxial tension test specimens (2.5 x 25 x 125 mm) with filament-bridged through cracks were fabricated by a novel two-step casting technique involving casting, precracking and joining of cracked and uncracked sections. Distinct matrix-cracking stresses, corresponding to the extension of the filament-bridged cracks, were measured in uniaxial tension tests using a high-sensitivity extensometer. The crack-length dependence of the matrix-cracking stress was found to be in good agreement with the prediction of a fracture-mechanics analysis that employed a new crack-closure force-crack-opening displacement relation in the calculation of the stress intensity for fiber-bridged cracks. The prediction was based on independent experimental measurements of the matrix fracture toughness (K{sub cm}), the interfacial sliding friction stress ({tau}) and the residual stress in the matrix ({sigma}{sub m}{sup I}). The matrix-cracking stress for crack lengths (2a) greater than 3 mm was independent of the crack length and agreed with the prediction of the steady-state theory of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans. Tests on specimens without the deliberately introduced cracks indicated a matrix-cracking stress significantly higher than the steady-state stress.

  16. Crack-tip chemistry modeling of stage I stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1991-10-01

    Stage I stress corrosion cracking usually exhibits a very strong K dependence with Paris law exponents of up to 30. 2 Model calculations indicate that the crack velocity in this regime is controlled by transport through a salt film and that the K dependence results from crack opening controlled salt film dissolution. An ionic transport model that accounts for both electromigration through the resistive salt film and Fickian diffusion through the aqueous solution was used for these predictions. Predicted crack growth rates are in excellent agreement with measured values for Ni with P segregated to the grain boundaries and tested in IN H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at +900 mV. This salt film dissolution may be applicable to stage I cracking of other materials.

  17. DIP2A functions as a FSTL1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Noriyuki; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Ohashi, Koji; Higuchi, Akiko; Sono-Romanelli, Saki; Oshima, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth

    2010-03-01

    FSTL1 is an extracellular glycoprotein whose functional significance in physiological and pathological processes is incompletely understood. Recently, we have shown that FSTL1 acts as a muscle-derived secreted factor that is up-regulated by Akt activation and ischemic stress and that FSTL1 exerts favorable actions on the heart and vasculature. Here, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates the cellular actions of FSTL1. We identified DIP2A as a novel FSTL1-binding partner from the membrane fraction of endothelial cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a direct physical interaction between FSTL1 and DIP2A. DIP2A was present on the cell surface of endothelial cells, and knockdown of DIP2A by small interfering RNA reduced the binding of FSTL1 to cells. In cultured endothelial cells, knockdown of DIP2A by small interfering RNA diminished FSTL1-stimulated survival, migration, and differentiation into network structures and inhibited FSTL1-induced Akt phosphorylation. In cultured cardiac myocytes, ablation of DIP2A reduced the protective actions of FSTL1 on hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis and suppressed FSTL1-induced Akt phosphorylation. These data indicate that DIP2A functions as a novel receptor that mediates the cardiovascular protective effects of FSTL1. PMID:20054002

  18. Dip coated silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite films.

    PubMed

    Hijón, Natalia; Victoria Cabañas, M; Peña, Juan; Vallet-Regí, María

    2006-09-01

    Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatites have been deposited onto Ti6Al4V substrates by sol-gel technology. The Ca(10)(PO(4))(6-x-y)(SiO(4))(x)(CO(3))(y)(OH)(2-x+y) coatings obtained, with silicon contents up to x=1 (2.8 wt.%), show a homogeneous and crack-free surface composed of particles smaller than 20 nm. The silicon enters into the apatite structure in the form of SiO(4)(4-) groups that partially substitute the PO(4)(3-) groups. The Si content and the Ca/P molar ratio of the coatings agree with those originally introduced in the sols. Layers with thicknesses around 600 nm show adhesion strengths superior to 20 MPa as determined by a pull-out test. The formation of an apatite layer onto these coatings after immersion in a simulated body fluid is enhanced by the presence of silicon. PMID:16828579

  19. Graphene dip coatings: An effective anticorrosion barrier on aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianhua; Hua, Lei; Li, Songmei; Yu, Mei

    2015-02-01

    The properties of graphene coating prepared via dip coating route as an effective anticorrosion barrier on aluminum in 0.5 M NaCl solutions were studied. The Raman spectra analysis indicated that the graphene dip coatings were spread consecutively and uniformly on Al substrates. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicated that the graphene dip coatings were a barrier layer between corrosive medium and Al substrate with a highly protection effective. The corrosion resistance efficiency of the substrate with the coatings was three orders of magnitude higher than that without the coatings.

  20. Analysis of fatigue crack growth from countersunk fastener hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Jungjun

    This research dealt with fatigue cracks that form at countersunk open holes and mainly focused on obtaining stress intensity factor solutions for countersunk holes employing both experimental and computational approaches. Cracks developing from countersunk holes are an extremely important issue for ensuring the structural integrity of many types of aircraft components, and are crucial to aircraft safety. Four different crack shapes (single knee crack, single corner crack, two non-symmetric knee cracks and two non-symmetric corner cracks) were studied in this research. The locations of the cracks were chosen to represent the previous numerical and experimental study by C. Y. Park. A stress ratio (R = sigmamin/sigmamax), 0.3 was used for all the specimens tested to minimize the crack closure effect. The use of transparent PMMA polymer specimens allowed for direct observation of changes in crack size and shape. The stress intensity factor ranges along the crack front were determined using the back calculation method proposed by James and Anderson. Then, the stress intensity factor ranges were normalized as geometric factors to obtain non-dimensional stress intensity factors. The geometric factors for a total of 36 crack fronts are determined for the single crack experiments, and the geometric factors for a total of 76 crack fronts are obtained for the two non-symmetric experiments. The geometric factors obtained in this research can apply to structural metals since the geometric factors only depend on crack geometry and not on material properties. One of the objectives of this research was to assess the validity of finite element predictions of stress intensity factors. Thus, computational approach was conducted with StressCheck. Generally, StressCheck results agree reasonably well with the experimental results. The average percent differences in geometric factor are within 9.1% compared to the experimental results.

  1. A fracture criterion for widespread cracking in thin-sheet aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis was used with a critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion to model stable crack growth in thin-sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy panels with single and multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks. Comparisons were made between critical angles determined from the analyses and those measured with photographic methods. Calculated load against crack extension and load against crack-tip displacement on single crack specimens agreed well with test data even for large-scale plastic deformations. The analyses were also able to predict the stable tearing behavior of large lead cracks in the presence of stably tearing MSD cracks. Small MSD cracks significantly reduced the residual strength for large lead cracks.

  2. Comninou contact zones for a crack parallel to an interface

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, P.F.; Gadi, K.S.; Erdogen, F.

    1995-12-31

    One of the interesting features in studying the state of stress in elastic solids near singular points, is the so called complex singularity that gives rise to an apparent local oscillatory behavior in the stress and displacement fields. The region in which this occurs is very small, much smaller than any plastic zone would be, and therefore the oscillations can be ignored in practical applications. Nevertheless, it is a matter of interesting theoretical investigation. The Comninou model of a small contact zone near the crack tip appears to correct for this anomaly within the framework of the linear theory. This model seems to make sense out of a {open_quotes}solution{close_quotes} that violates the boundary conditions. Erdogan and Joseph, showed (to themselves anyway) that the Comninou model actually has a physical basis. They considered a crack parallel to an interface where the order of the singularity is always real. With great care in solving the singular integral equations, it was shown that as the crack approaches the interface, a pinching effect is observed at the crack tip. This pinching effect proves that in the limit as the crack approaches the interface, the correct way to handle the problem is to consider crack surface contact. In this way, the issue of {open_quotes}oscillations{close_quotes} is never encountered for the interface crack problem. In the present study, the value of h/a that corresponds to crack closure (zero value of the stress intensity factor) will be determined for a given material pair for tensile loading. An asymptotic numerical method for the solution of singular integral equations making use of is used to obtain this result. Results for the crack opening displacement near the tip of the crack and the behavior of the stress intensity factor for cracks very close to the interface are presented. Among other interesting issues to be discussed, this solution shows that the semi-infinite crack parallel to an interface is closed.

  3. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  4. Do we Expect a Multiple Dip Structure at Lhc Energies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazal-E-Aleem; Rashid, Haris; Afzal Tahir, Sohail

    2011-06-01

    Besides other parameters, measurements are also planned for differential cross section at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Shrinkage of the diffraction peak and dip structure in the differential cross section are amongst the agenda of measurements at TOTEM Experiment. Many theoretical models predict multiple dip structure at LHC energy. We briefly review the status of shrinkage phenomena and possibility or otherwise of a multiple dip structure in the light of Geometrical models. A comparison has been made with the predictions of other models. We have also undertaken the role of rho (ρ) in the appearance or otherwise of multiple structure. In order to have a better understanding of the evolution of dip structure, we will also include the measurements from PP2PP at RHIC.

  5. CRACK MODELLING FOR RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Napierala, L.

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  6. Crack Modelling for Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Napierała, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  7. Thermal cracking of butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Duisters, H.A.M. )

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the thermal cracking of butadiene in a pilot plant, under conditions representative of industrial operation. The product distribution of pure-butadiene cracking is shown. Results from cocracking experiments in naphtha and C[sub 4]-raffinate are also presented. It is shown that butadiene cracking can be an interesting outlet for the increasing butadiene overcapacity in steam crackers. Some aspects of coke formation during butadiene pyrolysis are addressed as well.

  8. A study on fatigue crack growth behavior subjected to a single tensile overload: Part II. Transfer of stress concentration and its role in overload-induced transient crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K; An, Ke; Hubbard, Camden R

    2011-01-01

    The combined effects of overload-induced enlarged compressive residual stresses and crack tip blunting with secondary cracks are suggested to be responsible for the observed changes in the crack opening load and resultant post-overload transient crack growth behavior [Lee SY, Liaw PK, Choo H, Rogge RB, Acta Mater 2010;59:485-94]. In this article, in situ neutron diffraction experiments were performed to quantify the influence of the combined effects by investigating the internal-stress evolution at various locations away from the crack tip. In the overload-retardation period, stress concentration occurs in the crack blunting region (an overload point) until a maximum crack arrest load is reached. The stress concentration is then transferred from the blunting region to the propagating crack tip (following the overload), requiring a higher applied load, as the closed crack is gradually opened. The transfer phenomena of the stress concentration associated with a crack opening process account for the nonlinearity of strain response in the vicinity of the crack tip. The delaying action of stress concentration at the crack tip is understood in conjunction with the concept of a critical stress (i.e. the stress required to open the closed crack behind the crack tip). A linear relationship between {Delta}{var_epsilon}{sub eff} and {Delta}K{sub eff} provides experimental support for the hypothesis that {Delta}K{sub eff} can be considered as the fatigue crack tip driving force.

  9. Social Support and Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping is a better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality than resting BP measurements. Studies have reported associations between social support, variously defined, and BP dipping. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was conducted to investigate associations of functional and structural social support with nocturnal BP dipping assessed over a minimum of 24 hours. RESULTS A total of 297 articles were identified. Of these, 11 met criteria for inclusion; all studies were cross-sectional in design and included adult participants only (mean age = 19 to 72 years). Evidence was most consistent for an association between functional support and BP dipping, such that 5 of 7 studies reported statistically (or marginally) significant positive associations with BP dipping. Statistically significant functional support–BP dipping associations were moderate (standardized effect size (d) = 0.41) to large (d = 2.01) in magnitude. Studies examining structural support were fewer and relatively less consistent; however, preliminary evidence was observed for associations of marital status and social contact frequency with BP dipping. Statistically significant structural support findings were medium (d = 0.53) to large (d = 1.13) in magnitude. CONCLUSIONS Overall, findings suggest a link between higher levels of functional support and greater nocturnal BP dipping; preliminary evidence was also observed for the protective effects of marriage and social contact frequency. Nonetheless, the relatively small number of studies conducted to date and the heterogeneity of findings across meaningful subgroups suggest that additional research is needed to substantiate these conclusions. PMID:23382479

  10. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  11. Openings.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  12. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  13. SAS 3 observations of Cygnus X-1 - The intensity dips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Canizares, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    In general, the dips are observed to occur near superior conjunctions of the X-ray source, but one pair of 2-minute dips occurs when the X-ray source is closer to the observer than is the supergiant companion. The dips are analyzed spectrally with the aid of seven energy channels in the range 1.2-50 keV. Essentially, there is no change in the spectral index during the dips. Reductions in the count rates are observed at energies exceeding 6 keV for some of the dips, but the dip amplitude is always significantly greater in the 1.2-3 keV band. It is believed that absorption by partially ionized gas may best explain these results, since the observations of Pravdo et al. (1980) rule out absorption by unionized material. Estimates for the intervening gas density, extent, and distance from the X-ray source are presented. Attention is also given to the problems confronting the models for the injection of gas through the line of sight, believed to be inclined by approximately 30 deg from the binary pole.

  14. Three-dimensional dip analysis of offset VSP data

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, J.H.; Jacewitz, C.A.; Lin, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    Often offset VSP data are available from only a few source positions. This creates difficulties with many standard imaging techniques. Using geometric ideas, a simple imaging technique is presented which is similar to a velocity spectra analysis of 2-D seismic data. The method involves a coherency measurement over the data along a traveltime curve corresponding to a specific dip and depth. The result for that dip and depth is placed appropriately (imaged). This coherency measurement is repeated for a range of dips at a specific depth. All depths are searched. This enables the construction of a dip spectrum of reflectors near a borehole. The dip spectrum contains information pertaining to the coordinates of source image points of reflectors. By the correlation study of coordinates of source image points obtained from a few source positions, the dip and strike of reflectors may be determined. This procedure locates the reflector in three dimensions if three source positions are available which do not lie on a straight line. 6 referenes, 19 figures.

  15. Generalization of the Gluckstern formulas II: Multiple scattering and non-zero dip angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentan, M.; Regler, M.; Frühwirth, R.

    2009-07-01

    The first rules-of-thumb for the uncertainties in track momentum and direction of tracking detectors under inclusion of multiple scattering, as developed by Gluckstern [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 24 (1963) 381] in the times of the bubble chamber, were limited to tracks with low curvature and equidistant measurement points with equal accuracy. The extension to strongly curved tracks with nonvanishing incident angle, arbitrary detector configuration and accuracy was published recently [M. Regler, R. Frühwirth, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 589 (2008) 109]. However, this extension is restricted to the (symmetry) plane with tracks with zero dip angle, perpendicular to the magnetic field, and does not treat multiple scattering. The present study extends the analytical approximate formulas for the calculation of uncertainties in track momentum and direction of “barrel” detectors to non-zero dip angles, including multiple scattering. The dip angle dependence of all terms of the error matrix is calculated. The results of a comparison with a linear least-squares fit are presented, showing excellent agreement. An open source implementation of the exact covariance matrices is described.

  16. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  17. Modeling growth paths of interacting crack pairs in elastic media.

    PubMed

    Ghelichi, Ramin; Kamrin, Ken

    2015-10-28

    The problem of predicting the growth of a system of cracks, each crack influencing the growth of the others, arises in multiple fields. We develop an analytical framework toward this aim, which we apply to the 'En-Passant' family of crack growth problems, in which a pair of initially parallel, offset cracks propagate nontrivially toward each other under far-field opening stress. We utilize boundary integral and perturbation methods of linear elasticity, linear elastic fracture mechanics, and common crack opening criteria to calculate the first analytical model for curved En-Passant crack paths. The integral system is reduced under a hierarchy of approximations, producing three methods of increasing simplicity for computing crack paths. The last such method is a major highlight of this work, using an asymptotic matching argument to predict crack paths based on superposition of simple, single-crack fields. Within the corresponding limits of the three methods, all three are shown to agree with each other. We provide comparisons to exact results and existing experimental data to verify certain approximation steps. PMID:26330342

  18. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  19. Short fatigue crack behavior in notched 2024-T3 aluminum specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. J.; Sharpe, W. N., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single-edge, semi-circular notched specimens of Al 2024-T3, 2.3 mm thick, were cyclicly loaded at R-ratios of 0.5, 0.0, -1.0, and -2.0. The notch roots were periodically inspected using a replica technique which duplicates the bore surface. The replicas were examined under an optical microscope to determine the initiation of very short cracks and to monitor the growth of short cracks ranging in length from a few tens of microns to the specimen thickness. In addition to short crack growth measurements, the crack opening displacement (COD) was measured for surface cracks as short as 0.035 mm and for through-thickness cracks using the Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage (ISDG), a laser-based optical technique. The growth rates of short cracks were faster than the long crack growth rates for R-ratios of -1.0 and -2.0. No significant difference between short and long crack growth rates was observed for R = 0.0. Short cracks had slower growth rates than long cracks for R = 0.5. The crack opening stresses measured for short cracks were smaller than those predicted for large cracks, with little difference appearing for positive R-ratios and large differences noted for negative R-ratios.

  20. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation in particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianku.

    1989-01-01

    Consequences of the interaction of cracks with SiC particles are examined with emphasis on micromechanisms influencing fatigue crack propagation in high strength aluminum alloy matrix composites. Fatigue crack propagation is found to show three distinct regimes; each accompanied by growth mechanisms reflecting different roles of SiC particles. At near-threshold levels, SiC particles impeded fatigue crack growth by deflecting the crack to promote roughness-induced crack closure and by acting as crack traps along the crack front. A two-dimensional crack trapping analysis based on the interaction of a finite crack with a SiC particle indicates that a limiting criterion for fatigue crack growth in SiC{sub p}/Al composites can be established, which requires that the maximum plastic-zone size exceed the effective mean particle size or that the tensile stress in the matrix beyond the particle on the crack front exceed the yield strength of the material. Implications of crack closure and crack trapping to near-threshold crack growth, including load-ration and particle-size dependence of fatigue thresholds, are discussed in terms of contributions from each mechanism. At higher stress intensities, limited fracture of SiC particles ahead of the crack tip leads to the development of uncracked ligaments along the crack length, resulting in a reduced crack-tip stress intensity from ligament bridging. Micromechanical models are developed for such bridges induced by both overlapping cracks and co-planar ligaments, based on the notion of a limiting crack opening displacement or limiting strain in the ligament. The predicted reduction in crack tip stress intensity is shown to be consistent with experimental observations.

  1. Multiple Cracks Propagate Simultaneously in Polymer Liquids in Tension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian; Alvarez, Nicolas J; Shabbir, Aamir; Hassager, Ole

    2016-08-19

    Understanding the mechanism of fracture is essential for material and process design. While the initiation of fracture in brittle solids is generally associated with the preexistence of material imperfections, the mechanism for initiation of fracture in viscoelastic fluids, e.g., polymer melts and solutions, remains an open question. We use high speed imaging to visualize crack propagation in entangled polymer liquid filaments under tension. The images reveal the simultaneous propagation of multiple cracks. The critical stress and strain for the onset of crack propagation are found to be highly reproducible functions of the stretch rate, while the position of initiation is completely random. The reproducibility of conditions for fracture points to a mechanism for crack initiation that depends on the dynamic state of the material alone, while the crack profiles reveal the mechanism of energy dissipation during crack propagation. PMID:27588883

  2. Deuterium permeation through erbium oxide coatings on RAFM steels by a dip-coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikada, Takumi; Naitoh, Shunya; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Tanaka, Teruya; Muroga, Takeo

    2013-11-01

    A tritium permeation barrier is a promising solution for the problems of tritium loss and radiological safety in fusion blanket systems. In recent years, erbium oxide coatings have shown remarkable permeation reduction factors. One of the remaining issues for the coatings is the establishment of plant-scale fabrication. In this study, erbium oxide thin films have been fabricated by a dip-coating technique, which has the potential to coat a complex-shaped substrate, and deuterium permeation behavior in the coatings has been examined. Crack-free coatings were formed on a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel F82H substrate by use of a withdrawal speed of 1.0-1.4 mm s-1 and a heat-treatment process in hydrogen with moisture. In deuterium permeation experiments, a 0.2-μm-thick coating on both sides of the substrate showed a reduction factor of 600-700 in comparison with a F82H substrate below 873 K; however, the coating degraded at above 923 K because of crack formation. A double-coated sample indicated a reduction factor of up to 2000 and did not degrade at up to 923 K. The driving pressure dependence of the deuterium permeation flux indicated that the permeation tended to be limited by surface reactions at low temperatures. Optimization of the number of layers has the possibility to reduce degradation at high temperatures while maintaining high permeation reduction factors.

  3. The Relationship Between Crack-Tip Strain and Subcritical Cracking Thresholds for Steels in High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibur, Kevin A.; Somerday, Brian P.; Marchi, Chris San; Foulk, James W.; Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Sofronis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. Thresholds for crack extension under rising displacement, K THi, for crack extension under constant displacement, K_{{THi}}^{*} , and for crack arrest under constant displacement K THa, were identified. These values were not found to be equivalent, i.e. K THi < K THa < K_{{THi}}^{*} . The hydrogen assisted fracture mechanism was determined to be strain controlled for all of the alloys in this study, and the micromechanics of strain controlled fracture are used to explain the observed disparities between the different threshold measurements. K THa and K THi differ because the strain singularity of a stationary crack is stronger than that of a propagating crack; K THa must be larger than K THi to achieve equivalent crack tip strain at the same distance from the crack tip. Hydrogen interacts with deformation mechanisms, enhancing strain localization and consequently altering both the nucleation and growth stages of strain controlled fracture mechanisms. The timing of load application and hydrogen exposure, i.e., sequential for constant displacement tests and concurrent for rising displacement tests, leads to differences in the strain history relative to the environmental exposure history and promotes the disparity between K_{{THi}}^{*} and K THi. K THi is the only conservative measurement of fracture threshold among the methods presented here.

  4. Through-the-thickness fatigue crack closure behavior in an aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The variation in fatigue crack closure behavior across the thickness of aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. The specimen geometries examined were the middle crack tension M(T) and compact tension C(T). The fatigue crack closure behavior was determined using remote displacement and strain gages, near tip strain gages, and fatigue striations. A hybrid experimental/numerical method was also used to infer the crack opening loads. The results indicate a variation in crack opening load, of 0.2 in the specimen interior to 0.4 to 0.5 at the surface.

  5. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  6. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  7. Application of laser ultrasonic technique for non-contact detection of structural surface-breaking cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Jianghua; Sun, Guangkai; Wang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Based on the finite element method (FEM), the surface-breaking cracks have been investigated by using the laser-generated Rayleigh wave. The features of laser-generated Rayleigh wave interaction with cracks are analyzed in time and frequency domain. The simulation results show that the surface acoustic wave induced by the pulsed laser is sensitive to the surface-breaking cracks. As the crack depth increases, the transmission coefficients almost linearly decrease and the reflection coefficients show a dip. The corresponding experimental results have verified the feasibility of numerical calculation and reached a good agreement with simulation results. The research findings would provide a potential application for testing surface-breaking cracks of aircraft parts.

  8. Crack bridging by uncracked ligaments during fatigue-crack growth in SiC-reinforced aluminum-alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jian Ku; Ritchie, R. O.

    1989-05-01

    Micro-mechanisms of crack-tip shielding associated with the growth of fatigue cracks in metalmatrix composites are examined with specific emphasis on the role of crack bridging by uncracked ligaments. Simple analytical models are developed for such bridging induced by both overlapping cracks and by coplanar ligaments in the wake of the crack tip; the models are based on respective notions of a critical tensile strain or critical crack-opening displacement in the ligament. The predicted degree of shielding derived from these mechanisms is not large, but is found to be consistent with experimental observations in high-strength P/M aluminum alloys reinforced with 15 to 20 vol pct of SiC particulate.

  9. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis of shallow cracks in single-edge-crack-tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional, elastic-plastic, finite element results are presented for single-edge crack-tension specimens with several shallow crack-length-to-width ratios (0.05 less than or equal to a/W less than or equal to 0.5). Results showed the need to model the initial yield plateau in the stress-strain behavior to accurately model deformation of the A36 steel specimens. The crack-tip-opening-displacement was found to be linearly proportional to the crack-mouth-opening displacement. A new deformation dependent plastic-eta factor equation is presented for calculating the J-integral from test load-displacement records. This equation was shown to be accurate for all crack lengths considered.

  10. Incubation time for sub-critical crack propagation in SiC-SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the time for sub-critical crack propagation is SiC-SiC composites at high temperatures. The effects of fiber thermal creep on the relaxation of crack bridging tractions in SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is considered in the present work, with the objective of studying the time-to propagation of sub-critical matrix cracks in this material at high temperatures. Under the condition of fiber stress relaxation in the bridiging zone, it is found that the crack opening and the stress intensity factor increase with time for sub-critical matrix cracks. The time elapsed before the stress intensity reaches the critical value for crack propagation is calculated as a function of the initial crack length, applied stress and temperature. Stability domains for matrix cracks are defined, which provide guidelines for conducting high-temperature crack propagation experiments.

  11. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, W.J.; Gokhale, A.M.; Antolovich, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  12. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, W. J.; Gokhale, Arun M.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measures of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. Our objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such as height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scaledependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  13. Winter evaluation of a postmilking powdered teat dip.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J J; Murdough, P A; Howard, A B; Drechsler, P A; Pankey, J W; Ledbetter, G A; Day, L L; Day, J D

    1994-03-01

    A powdered teat dip designed for winter usage was evaluated for bacteriological efficacy and teat conditioning qualities. A positive control, natural exposure field trial was conducted for 3 mo on 509 lactating cows. Two sets of cows, primiparous and multiparous, were used. The trial compared efficacy of a powdered teat dip with a teat dip of 1% iodine plus 10% glycerin. Bacteriological efficacy among primiparous cows was equivalent for all major mastitis pathogens, environmental pathogens, and streptococci other than Streptococcus agalactiae. Efficacy was not equivalent against coagulase-negative staphylococci and all mastitis pathogens. Results suggested that the positive control product was more efficacious. Among multiparous cows, efficacy was equivalent against environmental mastitis pathogens and bacteriologically negative, clinical mastitis. The products were not equivalent against Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, or all major mastitis pathogens, once again suggesting that the positive control product was more efficacious. Data indicated that germicidal activity of the powdered dip was not sufficient to reduce the incidence of new IMI caused by contagious or minor pathogens normally associated with teat skin. Application of a powdered postmilking teat dip during 3 winter mo in Idaho resulted in improved teat end condition among primiparous and multiparous dairy cows. Teat skin condition improved among primiparous but not among multiparous cows. PMID:8169283

  14. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  15. Short fatigue crack characterization and detection using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM)

    SciTech Connect

    Varvani-Farahani, A.; Topper, T.H.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a new technique for studying the growth and morphology of fatigue cracks. The technique allows short fatigue crack growth, crack depth, aspect ratio (crack depth/half crack length), and crack front configuration to be measured using a Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM). CSLM measurements of the initial stage of crack growth in Al 2024-T351 revealed that microstructurally short fatigue cracks grew initially along a plane inclined to the applied stress. The angle of the inclined plane (Stage I crack growth) was found to be about 45 degrees to the axis of the applied tensile load. Aspect ratio and the angle of maximum shear plane (Mode II), obtained using the CSLM technique, showed a good agreement with those obtained using a Surface Removal (SR) technique. The aspect ratios obtained using the CSLM technique were found to remain constant with increasing crack length in Al 2024-T351 and SAE 1045 Steel at 0.83 and 0.80, respectively. Optical sectioning along the length of a crack revealed that the crack front in the interior of the materials has a semi-elliptical shape. These results are in good agreement with results obtained using the SR technique. The CSLM technique was employed to characterize the fracture surface of fatigue cracks in an SAE 1045 Steel. CSLM image processing of the fracture surface near the crack tip constructed a three dimensional profile of fracture surface asperities. The heights of asperities were obtained from this profile. Optical sectioning from a post-image-processed crack provided crack depth and crack mouth width at every point along the crack length for each load level. The crack opening stress was taken as the stress level at which the crack depth stopped increasing with increases in a lied stress. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-04-29

    The octane number of a cracked naphtha can be significantly improved in a catalytic cracking unit, without significant decrease in naphtha yield, by maintaining certain critical concentrations of metals on the catalyst, suitably by blending or adding a heavy metals-containing component to the gas oil feed. Suitably, in a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking reactor (Zone) at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regenerator (Regeneration zone) by burning coke off the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the reactor and regenerator, sufficient of a metals-containing heavy feedstock is admixed, intermittantly or continuously, with the gas oil feed to deposit metals on said catalyst and raise the metals-content of said catalyst to a level of from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million, preferably from about 2500 to about 4000 parts per million expressed as equivalent nickel, base the weight of the catalyst, and said metals level is maintained on the catalyst throughout the operation by withdrawing high metals-containing catalyst and adding low metals-containing catalyst to the regenerator.

  17. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds.

    PubMed

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Odeen, Anders

    2005-09-22

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory. PMID:17148194

  18. Modelling of hydride cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Glinka, G.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium alloys may be susceptible to hydride formation under certain service conditions, due to hydrogen diffusion and precipitation in the presence of stress concentrations and temperature gradients. The inhomogeneous brittle hydride platelets that form are modeled as plane defects of zero thickness, with fracture toughness less than that of the matrix. A fracture criterion based on sufficient energy and stress is proposed for either delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under constant loading conditions, or hydride cracking at rising loads, such as in a fracture toughness test. The fracture criterion is validated against available experimental data concerning initiation of hydride fracture in smooth specimens, and DHC in cracked specimens under various loading and temperature conditions.

  19. Fabrication of Luminescent Nanostructures by Dip-Pen Nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A; Miller, A E; Klare, J E; Weeks, B L; Woods, B W; DeYoreo, J J

    2002-06-25

    We used a combination of dip-pen nanolithography and scanning optical confocal microscopy to fabricate and visualize luminescent nanoscale patterns of various materials on glass substrates. We show that this method can be used successfully to push the limits of dip-pen nanolithography down to controlled deposition of single molecules. We also demonstrate that this method is able to create and visualize protein patterns on surfaces. Finally, we show that our method can be used to fabricate polymer nanowires of controlled size using conductive polymers. We also present a kinetic model that accurately describes the deposition process.

  20. Analysis of dip coating processing parameters by double optical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Flavio; Michels, Alexandre F

    2008-05-01

    Double optical monitoring is applied to determine the influence of main process parameters on the formation of sulfated zirconia and self-assembled mesoporous silica solgel films by dip coating. In addition, we analyze, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the influence of withdrawal speed, temperature, and relative humidity on refractive-index and physical thickness variations (uncertainties of +/-0.005 and +/-7 nm) during the process. Results provide insight into controlled production of single and multilayer films from complex fluids by dip coating. PMID:18449244

  1. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  2. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  3. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  4. Crack-growth analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianca, C.; Creager, M.

    1976-01-01

    Flexible, adaptable, integrative routine, computer program incorporates Collipriest-Ehret and Paris-Forman equations. Calculates growth from initial defect size and terminates calculation when crack is sufficiently large for critical condition. Wheeler, Willenborg, and Grumman Closure models are available.

  5. Thermal cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

    1988-09-01

    Knowledge of thermal cracking of hydrocarbons is important in understanding and modeling petroleum maturation. We have reviewed the literature on the thermal cracking of pure hydrocarbons and mixtures of hydrocarbons, with particular attention given to dependence of the kinetics on temperature, pressure, and phase. Major uncertainties remain with regard to pressure dependence. Based on this review, we developed a simple, four-component, three-reaction model for oil-cracking. We also developed a simple, kerogen-maturation, kinetic model that incorporates hydrogen and carbon balance and includes the most important oil- and gas-forming reactions: kerogen pyrolysis, three oil-cracking reactions, and three coke-pyrolysis reactions. Tentative stoichiometry parameters are given for lacustrine and marine kerogens. 35 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  7. Crack propagation, arrest and statistics in heterogeneous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kierfeld, J.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Dortmund Univ. of Technology

    2008-04-01

    We investigate theoretically statistics and thermally activated dynamics of crack nucleation and propagation in a two-dimensional heterogeneous material containing quenched randomly distributed defects. We consider a crack tip dynamics accounting for dissipation, thermal noise and the random forces arising from the elastic interactions of the crack opening with the defects. The equation of motion is based on the generalized Griffith criterion and the dynamic energy release rate and gives rise to Langevin-type stochastic dynamics in a quenched disordered potential. For different types of quenched random forces, which are characterized (a) by the range of elastic interactions with the crack tip and (b) the range of correlations between defects, we derive a number of static and dynamic quantities characterizing crack propagation in heterogeneous materials both at zero temperature and in the presence of thermal activation. In the absence of thermal fluctuations we obtain the nucleation and propagation probabilities, typical arrest lengths, the distribution of crack lengths and of critical forces. For thermally activated crack propagation we calculate the mean time to fracture. Depending on the range of elastic interactions between crack tip and frozen defects, heterogeneous material exhibits brittle or ductile fracture. We find that aggregations of defects generating long-range interaction forces (e.g. clouds of dislocations) lead to anomalously slow creep of the crack tip or even to its complete arrest. We demonstrate that heterogeneous materials with frozen defects contain a large number of arrested microcracks and that their fracture toughness is enhanced to the experimentally accessible timescales.

  8. The kinked interface crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzer, Joerg

    1992-05-01

    Two methods for the numerical solution of the integral equation describing the kinked interface crack, one proposed by Erdogan et al. (1973) and the other by Theokaris and Iokimidis (1979), are examined. The method of Erdogan et al. is then used to solve the equation in order to determine the kinking angle of the interface crack. Results are presented for two material combinations, aluminum/epoxy and glass/ceramic, under uniaxial tension in the direction normal to the interface.

  9. Influence of alternating loads on nonlinear vibration characteristics of cracked blade in rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang; Chu, Fulei

    2015-09-01

    As important causes of fatigue and crack failure, alternating loads also affect vibration characteristics of cracked blades in rotor system and probably influence formulation of diagnostic rule. This work carried out analysis of nonlinear vibration of cracked blade in rotor system with crack breathing effects and alternating loads taken into account. Firstly, equations of motion are formed with Finite Element Method (FEM), and breathing crack is modeled with cracked hexahedral element (CHE) where the breathing behavior is load-dependent. Secondly, displacement responses of cracked blade are obtained, and the results with CHE and contact element are identical. The stiffness of the cracked blade is obtained with CHE and proved to be time-varying and dependent on the alternating loads. Thirdly, natural frequencies of cracked blade in stationary condition are analyzed including normal model, linear model (open crack) and nonlinear model (breathing crack), and the requirement of the inclusion of breathing effects in blades with fatigue crack is proved. Finally, influence of alternating loads on critical frequency of cracked blade in rotating condition is compared. The results show that the critical frequency is significantly affected due to the co-effects of the rotating speed and alternating loads. The proposed method can estimate nonlinear vibration characteristics of crack blade which is beneficial for the formulation of the diagnostic rule.

  10. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  11. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  12. Psychopathology and Incest: A DIPS Code Type Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory-Bills, Therese; Vincent, Ken

    The Diagnostic Inventory of Personality and Symptoms (DIPS) was used to examine psychopathology in 30 therapy outpatients with histories of incest. Subjects also responded to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Correlations were used to examine characteristics of the sample and to identify circumstances of their experiences of incest which…

  13. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permitted dips and procedures. 72.13 Section 72.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BOVINE...

  14. Topology of desiccation crack patterns in clay and invariance of crack interface area with thickness.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Tajkera; Dutta, Tapati; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2015-08-01

    We study the crack patterns developed on desiccating films of suspensions of three different clays-bentonite, halloysite nanoclay and laponite on a glass substrate. Varying the thickness of the layer, h gives the following new and interesting results: i) We can identify a critical thickness h c for bentonite and halloysite, above which isolated cracks join each other to form a fully connected network. ii) A topological analysis involving the Euler number is shown to be useful for characterising the patterns. iii) We find, further, that the total vertical surface area of the clay A v, which has opened up due to cracking, and the total area of the glass substrate A s, exposed by the hierarchical sequence of cracks are constant, independent of the layer thickness for a certain range of h. These results are shown to be consistent with a simple energy conservation argument, neglecting dissipative losses. Finally we show that if the crack pattern is viewed at successively finer resolution, the total cumulative area of cracks visible at a certain resolution scales with the layer thickness. PMID:26248703

  15. Fatigue crack growth behavior and overload effect of AISI 304 stainless steel in different atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelestemur, Mehmet Halidun

    1998-12-01

    acceleration right after the overload application was observed. However, the acceleration was not detected on the interior of the material along the crack tip. Only the surface in which the plane stress was effective showed crack propagation in acceleration zone. This result were explained by strain hardening and plastic deformation of grains at the overload zone. Discontinuous crack closure occurred following the overload. In other words, at the overload position, fracture surfaces on which stretching occurred came into contact at high stress intensity factor values and far away from the overload position. As a result of discontinuous crack closure, crack opening or closing data were very high although the fatigue crack growth rate reached its original value.

  16. CIRCUMFERENTIAL MFL IN-LINE INSPECTION FOR CRACKS IN PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Nestleroth

    2003-06-01

    Circumferential MFL is a new implementation of a widely used technology that has potential to provide improved detection and quantification of axially oriented defects such as cracks, seam weld defects, mechanical damage, and groove corrosion. This implementation works by orienting the magnetic field around the pipe rather that along the axis. By orienting the magnetic field around the pipe (the circumferential direction), the axial defects that were magnetically transparent can disrupt more of the magnetic field and can be more easily detected. Initial implementations of circumferential MFL have found that flux leakage from cracks at the interior of the pipe is small, and the signals from cracks are difficult to detect. The objective of this project is to improve detection of cracks by changing the implementation along with using data from overlapping and complementary inspection techniques. Two technology enhancements were investigated: Combining high- and low-magnetization technology for stress detection; and Combining axial and circumferential MFL methods. Although a method combining high- and low-magnetization technology showed promise for characterizing gouges cause by third party excavation equipment, its commercial development was not successful for two reasons. First, the stress diminishes the crack signal, while the opening of the crack increases the signal. The stress-induced changes in flux leakage around cracks were small and any critical information on the severity of cracks and crack-like defects is difficult to distinguish from changes caused by the crack opening and other inspection variables. Second, it is difficult to magnetize pipe material in the circumferential direction. A relatively low, non-uniform magnetization level produced by the circumferential magnetizer makes detection of changes due to stress extremely difficult. This project also examined combining axial and circumferential MFL to improve crack detection and distinguish cracks for

  17. Fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, C. Christopher; Carman, C. Davis; Hillberry, Ben M.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack delay behavior at high stress ratio caused by single peak overloads was investigated in two thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy. Closure measurements indicated no closure occurred before or throughout the overload plastic zones following the overload. This was further substantiated by comparing the specimen compliance following the overload with the compliance of a low R ratio test when the crack was fully open. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that crack tunneling and possibly reinitiation of the crack occurred, most likely a result of crack-tip blunting. The number of delay cycles was greater for the thinner mixed mode stress state specimen than for the thicker plane strain stress state specimen, which is similar to low R ratio test results and may be due to a larger plastic zone for the mixed mode cased.

  18. Crack growth in a welded microalloyed steel under sulfide stress cracking conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Albarran, J.L.; Martinez, L.; Lopez, H.F.

    1998-12-01

    In this work, the hydrogen sulfide stress-corrosion cracking (SSC) susceptibility of a welded API X-80 pipeline was investigated. For this purpose, steel welding was carried out normal to the rolling direction using a 60{degree} single V-joint design. After welding, compact modified-wedge opening loading (M-WOL) fracture mechanics specimens were machined and loaded to an applied stress intensity factor, K{sub 1}, of 27 to 53 MPa {radical}m. This was followed by specimen exposure to H{sub 2}S saturated synthetic seawater. Each of the M-WOL specimens contained the typical microstructures developed during welding, such as the weld metal (WM), base metal (BM), and heat affected zone (HAZ). No attempt was made to establish a unique K{sub ISCC} for crack arrest because its significance was not clear. Qualitatively, the experimental outcome indicated that in mode I loading under a K{sub 1} of 40.3 MPa {radical}m only the base metal region underwent SSC. Apparently, active anodic dissolution of the crack tip started the growth process, but it was followed by a transition to hydrogen induced cracking. At an applied K{sub 1} of 55 MPa {radical}m and under similar exposure times, crack growth in the base metal was discontinuous and tended to follow the grain boundaries. Moreover, the HAZ exhibited the least SSC susceptibility as inferred from the relatively short crack propagation lengths (0.829 mm). In this case, it was found that the crack lengths of up to 4.2 mm developed. In this case, the presence of a relatively coarse dendritic structure coupled with interdendritic segregation provided a weak path for crack propagation.

  19. The effect of fatigue cracks on fastener flexibility, load distribution, and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Zachary Layne

    Fatigue cracks typically occur at stress risers such as geometry changes and holes. This type of failure has serious safety and economic repercussions affecting structures such as aircraft. The need to prevent catastrophic failure due to fatigue cracks and other discontinuities has led to durability and damage tolerant methodologies influencing the design of aircraft structures. Holes in a plate or sheet filled with a fastener are common fatigue critical locations in aircraft structure requiring damage tolerance analysis (DTA). Often, the fastener is transferring load which leads to a loading condition involving both far-field stresses such as tension and bending, and localized bearing at the hole. The difference between the bearing stress and the tensile field at the hole is known as load transfer. The ratio of load transfer as well as the magnitude of the stresses plays a significant part in how quickly a crack will progress to failure. Unfortunately, the determination of load transfer in a complex joint is far from trivial. Many methods exist in the open literature regarding the analysis of splices, doublers and attachment joints to determine individual fastener loads. These methods work well for static analyses but greater refinement is needed for crack growth analysis. The first fastener in a splice or joint is typically the most critical but different fastener flexibility equations will all give different results. The constraint of the fastener head and shop end, along with the type of fastener, affects the stiffness or flexibility of the fastener. This in turn will determine the load that the fastener will transfer within a given fastener pattern. However, current methods do not account for the change in flexibility at a fastener as the crack develops. It is put forth that a crack does indeed reduce the stiffness of a fastener by changing its constraint, thus lessening the load transfer. A crack growth analysis utilizing reduced load transfer will result in

  20. Recent advances in the modelling of crack growth under fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekoning, A. U.; Tenhoeve, H. J.; Henriksen, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth associated with cyclic (secondary) plastic flow near a crack front is modelled using an incremental formulation. A new description of threshold behaviour under small load cycles is included. Quasi-static crack extension under high load excursions is described using an incremental formulation of the R-(crack growth resistance)- curve concept. The integration of the equations is discussed. For constant amplitude load cycles the results will be compared with existing crack growth laws. It will be shown that the model also properly describes interaction effects of fatigue crack growth and quasi-static crack extension. To evaluate the more general applicability the model is included in the NASGRO computer code for damage tolerance analysis. For this purpose the NASGRO program was provided with the CORPUS and the STRIP-YIELD models for computation of the crack opening load levels. The implementation is discussed and recent results of the verification are presented.

  1. Comparison of experiment and theory for elastic-plastic plane strain crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, L; Rice, J R

    1980-02-01

    Recent theoretical results on elastic-plastic plane strain crack growth, and experimental results for crack growth in a 4140 steel in terms of the theoretical concepts are reviewed. The theory is based on a recent asymptotic analysis of crack surface opening and strain distributions at a quasi-statically advancing crack tip in an ideally-plastic solid. The analysis is incomplete in that some of the parameters which appear in it are known only approximately, especially at large scale yielding. Nevertheless, it suffices to derive a relation between the imposed loading and amount of crack growth, prior to general yielding, based on the assumption that a geometrically similar near-tip crack profile is maintained during growth. The resulting predictions for the variation of J with crack growth are found to fit well to the experimental results obtained on deeply cracked compact specimens.

  2. Refinery ring groove cracking experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmke, E.F.

    1982-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a questionnaire on the problem of ring groove cracking in reactors. The results were found to be inconclusive in providing any information on correcting the problem. One report pertaining to a ring groove crack on a 24-inch reactor nozzle served as a warning that cracks may progress beyond the overlay, through it is not known if the base metal can easily crack at low temperatures. The results did not indicate at what point the cracks occurred, but what was common to almost all cracks was that the flange had been in high-temperature, high-pressure hydrogen suggesting that dissolved hydrogen or environmental hydrogen assisted the cracking. The type of stress that contributes in the cracking has not been determined. It is indicated that many cracks were found after the questionnaire was done.

  3. LDCM TIRS: Cracking open the chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at Goddard Space Flight Center inspect and move the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) after two months of testing in the thermal vacuum chamber. TIRS completed its first round of thermal vac...

  4. Analysis of crack-induced-craze in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, B. N.; Hou, H. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic boundary element method is used to estimate the opening displacement and the envelope stress on the surface of an isolated crack-induced-craze system. To predict the propagation history of both the crack and the craze in a polymer sheet, the material properties of the glassy polymers are represented by a generalized linear viscoelastic model. Results are compared with the theoretical micromechanics predictions. Good agreements are obtained.

  5. Nonlinear frequency-mixing photoacoustic imaging of a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigarev, N.; Zakrzewski, J.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2009-08-01

    We present a technique for nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of cracks by laser excitation with intensity modulation at two fundamental frequencies combined with detection at mixed frequencies. By exploiting the strong dependence of the photoacoustic emission efficiency on the state—open or closed—of the contacts between the crack faces, remarkably enhanced image contrast is observed, ˜20 times higher than in linear photoacoustic images at the highest of the fundamental frequencies.

  6. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  7. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Withers, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  8. Residual strength of thin panels with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1994-01-01

    The previous design philosophies involving safe life, fail-safe and damage tolerance concepts become inadequate for assuring the safety of aging aircraft structures. For example, the failure mechanism for the Aloha Airline accident involved the coalescence of undetected small cracks at the rivet holes causing a section of the fuselage to peel open during flight. Therefore, the fuselage structure should be designed to have sufficient residual strength under worst case crack configurations and in-flight load conditions. Residual strength is interpreted as the maximum load carrying capacity prior to unstable crack growth. Internal pressure and bending moment constitute the two major components of the external loads on the fuselage section during flight. Although the stiffeners in the form of stringers, frames and tear straps sustain part of the external loads, the significant portion of the load is taken up by the skin. In the presence of a large crack in the skin, the crack lips bulge out with considerable yielding; thus, the geometric and material nonlinearities must be included in the analysis for predicting residual strength. Also, these nonlinearities do not permit the decoupling of in-plane and out-of-plane bending deformations. The failure criterion combining the concepts of absorbed specific energy and strain energy density addresses the aforementioned concerns. The critical absorbed specific energy (local toughness) for the material is determined from the global specimen response and deformation geometry based on the uniaxial tensile test data and detailed finite element modeling of the specimen response. The use of the local toughness and stress-strain response at the continuum level eliminates the size effect. With this critical parameter and stress-strain response, the finite element analysis of the component by using STAGS along with the application of this failure criterion provides the stable crack growth calculations for residual strength predictions.

  9. Elastic-plastic analysis of growing cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J.R.; Drugan, W.J.; Sham, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    The elastic-plastic stress and deformation fields at the tip of a crack which grow in an ideally plastic solid under plane strain, small-scale yielding conditions is discussed. Asymptotic analysis suggests a crack-tip stress state similar to that of the classical Prandtl field, but containing elastic unloading between the centered fan region and the trailing constant stress plastic region. The near tip expression for the rate of opening displacement delta at distance r from the growing tip is found to have the same form suggested by Rice and Sorensen, delta = ..cap alpha..J/sigma/sub 0/ + ..beta..(sigma/sub 0//E)a ln (R/r), but now the presence of the elastic wedge causes ..beta.. to have the revised value of 5.08 (for Poisson ratio ..nu.. = 0.3). Here, a = crack length, sigma/sub 0/ = yield strength, E = elastic modulus, and J denotes the far-field value (1 - ..nu../sup 2/) K/sup 2//E for the small scale yielding conditions considered. The parameters ..cap alpha.. and R cannot be determined from the asymptotic analysis, but ..cap alpha.. is approximately the same for stationary and growing cracks, and R scales approximately with the size of the plastic zone, being about 15 to 30% larger. For large scale yielding, a similar form applies with possible variations in ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.., at least in cases which maintain triaxial constraint at the crack tip, but in the fully yielded case R is expected to be proportional to the dimension of the uncracked ligament. The model crack growth criterion of Rice and Sorensen, requiring a critical delta at some fixed r from the tip, is reexamined. Results suggest that the J versus ..delta..a relation describing growth will be dependent on the extent of yielding, although it is suggested that this dependency might be small for highly ductile materials, provided that a similar triaxial constraint is maintained in all cases.

  10. Metal crack propagation monitoring by photoluminescence enhancement of quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziming; Luan, Weiling; Yin, Shaofeng; Brandner, Juergen J

    2015-07-20

    A visualization method for monitoring minor metal crack propagation is presented in this paper. Through CdS@ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) enhanced emission of photoluminescence (PL), this crack detection method provides a visualization signal in real time and through a noncontact fashion. The crack of the CdS@ZnS core-shell QDs-epoxy resin kept a synchronous propagation with the metal crack. Detection of the tip growth in the film layers demonstrated that the actual crack propagation on the metal surface could be deduced from the tips in the film layers. The fluorescence peak tended to increase along the crack from the initial opening to the tip. Crack width as small as 10 μm can be detected with a precision of 0.1 μm and the minimum crack tip width of the QDs-epoxy resin was measured as 0.72 μm. PMID:26367834

  11. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives were to create a capability to simulate curvilinear crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage and to validate with tests. Analysis methodology and software program (FRANC3D/STAGS) developed herein allows engineers to maintain aging aircraft economically, while insuring continuous airworthiness, and to design more damage-tolerant aircraft for the next generation. Simulations of crack growth in fuselages were described. The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained from laboratory tests, was used to predict fracture behavior of fuselage panel tests. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element crack growth analyses were conducted. Comparisons of stress distributions, multiple stable crack growth history, and residual strength between measured and predicted results were made to assess the validity of the methodology. Incorporation of residual plastic deformations and tear strap failure was essential for accurate residual strength predictions. Issue related to predicting crack trajectory in fuselages were also discussed. A directional criterion, including T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy, was developed. Curvilinear crack growth was simulated in coupon and fuselage panel tests. Both T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy were essential to predict the observed crack paths. Flapping of fuselages were predicted. Measured and predicted results agreed reasonable well.

  12. On Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Crack Propagation Under Sustained Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Somerday, Brian p.; Schembri, Philip E.; Sofronis, Petros; Foulk, James W.; Nibur, Kevin A.; Balch, Dorian K.

    2014-08-01

    The failure of hydrogen containment components is generally associated with subcritical cracking. Understanding subcritical crack growth behavior and its dependence on material and environmental variables can lead to methods for designing structural components in a hydrogen environment and will be beneficial in developing materials resistant to hydrogen embrittlement. In order to identify the issues underlying crack propagation and arrest, we present a model for hydrogen-induced stress-controlled crack propagation under sustained loading. The model is based on the assumptions that (I) hydrogen reduces the material fracture strength and (II) crack propagation takes place when the opening stress over the characteristic distance ahead of a crack tip is greater than the local fracture strength. The model is used in a finite-element simulation of crack propagation coupled with simultaneous hydrogen diffusion in a model material through nodal release. The numerical simulations show that the same physics, i.e., diffusion-controlled crack propagation, can explain the existence of both stages I and II in the velocity versus stress intensity factor ( V- K) curve.

  13. Crack detection by mobile photothermal probe

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnar, J.L.; Egee, M.; Menu, C.; Blanc, A. le; Besnard, R.; Sellier, J.Y.

    1994-12-31

    Within the frame of a previous study, encouraging results were obtained regarding the detection of microcracks by Photo Thermal Radiometry under sinusoidal excitation. However, the used method was too slow for an industrial application. It was therefore necessary to consider faster means of analysis. Such is the object of the present study. The authors show that, by using a mobile photothermal probe displaced relatively to the sample, it is possible to rapidly detect opened or non opened cracks, of a few tens of micrometers wide, and a few hundred of micrometers deep.

  14. Efficacy evaluations on five chlorhexidine teat dip formulations.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, P A; O'Neil, J K; Murdough, P A; Lafayette, A R; Wildman, E E; Pankey, J W

    1993-09-01

    Three developmental postmilking teat dip formulations containing chlorhexidine digluconate were evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in sequential experimental exposure trials. Two additional commercial chlorhexidine digluconate teat dip products were evaluated in natural exposure trials. Under conditions of experimental challenge, the developmental formulations were efficacious against Staph. aureus but did not significantly reduce incidence of new IMI by Strep. agalactiae. None of the three formulations of a conventional germicide used as teat sanitizers effectively reduced incidence of new Strep. agalactiae IMI under experimental challenge conditions. In the natural exposure trials with negative controls, a .35% chlorhexidine teat sanitizer had efficacy of 88.7% against Staph. aureus and 51.4% against Strep. agalactiae. The .5% chlorhexidine product reduced Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae IMI by 86 and 56%, respectively. PMID:8227681

  15. Optimizing microfluidic ink delivery for dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debjyoti; Amro, Nabil A.; Fragala, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This work demonstrates the design optimization, fabrication process development, process optimization and testing of a microfluidic ink delivery apparatus (called "Inkwells") for simultaneously coating an array of DPN pens with different inks. The objective of this work is to deliver between 4 and 10 different inks from reservoirs into appropriately spacd microwell array. A tips of the multi-pen array are coated with different inks by dipping them into the microwell array. The reservoirs, microwells and their connecting micro-channels were etched in silicon wafers using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Fluid actuation was achieved by capillary wicking. The optimum layouts for different applications were selected with respect to the volume requirement of inks, the efficacy of ink-well filling, to obviate the problem of bubble formation, and to test the operations of dipping and writing with a parallel array of pens.

  16. Optimizing microfluidic ink delivery for dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debjyoti; Amro, Nabil A.; Fragala, Joe

    2003-12-01

    This work demonstrates the design optimization, fabrication process development, process optimization and testing of a microfluidic ink delivery apparatus (called "Inkwells") for simultaneously coating an array of DPN pens with different inks. The objective of this work is to deliver between 4 and 10 different inks from reservoirs into appropriately spacd microwell array. A tips of the multi-pen array are coated with different inks by dipping them into the microwell array. The reservoirs, microwells and their connecting micro-channels were etched in silicon wafers using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Fluid actuation was achieved by capillary wicking. The optimum layouts for different applications were selected with respect to the volume requirement of inks, the efficacy of ink-well filling, to obviate the problem of bubble formation, and to test the operations of dipping and writing with a parallel array of pens.

  17. The status of chemical sensors for hot-dip galvanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    1996-09-01

    Alloying elements are added to the zinc used in the hot-dip galvanization of sheet steel to control the properties and appearance of the resulting coating. For example, aluminum is added to improve the corrosion resistance and adherence of the coating. Other additions, such as antimony, are added to control the grain size and, thus, the appearance of the coating. The concentrations of these alloying elements may change during the process, either deliberately according to product specifications or due to factors such as preferential oxidation. These changes may require replenishment of a depleted alloying element or adjustments in other processing parameters to maintain optimal efficiency. Intelligent adjustments require knowledge of the alloy composition, which requires inline measurement of the concentrations of alloying elements. This article presents recent developments in chemical sensors for use in hot-dip galvanization. In particular, electrochemical sensors for measuring the concentrations of aluminum and antimony in molten zinc are reviewed.

  18. Applying diffuse ultrasound under dynamic loading to improve closed crack characterization in concrete.

    PubMed

    Payan, C; Quiviger, A; Garnier, V; Chaix, J F; Salin, J

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies show the ability of diffuse ultrasound to characterize surface breaking cracks in concrete. However, derived parameters are sensitive to the presence of partially opened zones along the crack whose pattern may differ from one sample to another. The aim of this letter is to study the variation of diffuse ultrasound parameters while the sample is driven by a low frequency bending load which alternatively opens and closes the crack, allowing to access supplementary information about its morphology. The results show the sensitivity of the method for various crack depths and highlight its potential for concrete nondestructive evaluation. PMID:23927227

  19. [A case of pulmonary asbestosis with slightly increased serum IgE concentration and histopathological changes resembling DIP].

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Y; Asai, S; Mashimoto, H; Shimokawa, I; Iwasaki, K; Matsuo, T; Ikeda, T; Minami, H

    1993-02-01

    A 68-year-old male presented with cough and sputum. He had suffered from these symptoms for ten years prior to admission. Chest roentgenogram revealed reticulonodular shadows in the lower fields of both lungs. CT scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern in the lower field of both lungs. Honeycombing and bullous pattern were also present in the subpleural area. The patient had a history of dust and asbestos inhalation while working as an electrician. Eosinophilia of the peripheral blood and BALF, and a slightly increased serum IgE concentration were noted. Open lung biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis with intra-alveolar macrophage accumulation and asbestos bodies. The histopathological features resembled UIP and DIP, although DIP is uncommon in pulmonary asbestosis. The slightly increased serum IgE concentration was considered to be an additional effect of asbestos. This is a case of pulmonary asbestosis with intriguing immunological and histopathological features. PMID:8515602

  20. Analytic crack solutions for tilt fields around hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.

    2000-01-05

    The recent development of downhole tiltmeter arrays for monitoring hydraulic fractures has provided new information on fracture growth and geometry. These downhole arrays offer the significant advantages of being close to the fracture (large signal) and being unaffected by the free surface. As with surface tiltmeter data, analysis of these measurements requires the inversion of a crack or dislocation model. To supplement the dislocation models of Davis [1983], Okada [1992] and others, this work has extended several elastic crack solutions to provide tilt calculations. The solutions include constant-pressure 2D, penny-shaped, and 3D-elliptic cracks and a 2D-variable-pressure crack. Equations are developed for an arbitrary inclined fracture in an infinite elastic space. Effects of fracture height, fracture length, fracture dip, fracture azimuth, fracture width and monitoring distance on the tilt distribution are given, as well as comparisons with the dislocation model. The results show that the tilt measurements are very sensitive to the fracture dimensions, but also that it is difficult to separate the competing effects of the various parameters.

  1. A dipping, thick Farallon slab below central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Gurnis, M.; Saleeby, J.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that much of the Laramide orogeny was caused by dynamic effects induced by an extensive flat slab during a period of plateau subduction. A particularly thick block containing the Shatsky Rise conjugate, now in the mid-mantle, left a distinctive deformation footprint from southern California to Denver, Colorado. Thus mid-mantle, relic slabs can provide fundamental information about past subduction and the history of plate tectonics if properly imaged. Here we find clear evidence for a northeastward dipping (35° dip), slab-like, but fat (up to 400-500 km thick) seismic anomaly within the top of the lower mantle below the central United States. Using a deep focus earthquake below Spain with direct seismic paths that propagate along the top and bottom of the anomaly, we find that the observed, stacked seismic waveforms recorded with the dense USArray show multi-pathing indicative of sharp top and bottom surfaces. Plate tectonic reconstructions in which the slab is migrated back in time suggest strong coupling of the slab to North America. In combination with the reconstructions, we interpret the structure as arising from eastward dipping Farallon subduction at the western margin of North America during the Cretaceous, in contrast with recent interpretations. The slab could have been fattened through a combination of pure shear thickening during flat-slab subduction and a folding instability during penetration into the lower mantle.

  2. Anti-double dipping rules for federal tax incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Ing, E.T.C.

    1997-12-31

    Political as well as technological changes are now reshaping the electric utility industry. While accommodating these changes, state legislative and regulatory agencies have the opportunity to promote public policies. In this regard, various state entities are evaluating appropriate incentives for renewable energy development so as to introduce greater competition in electric generation. For example, the California legislature is considering a supplemental production payment and the State of Iowa has instituted a low-interest loan program for wind and other alternative energy generation. By complementing the existing federal tax incentives, state incentives can spur the wind industry`s growth. If structured in the wrong way, however, state assistance programs will undercut the value of the federal tax incentives. The federal anti-double dipping rules apply to certain state programs. If a developer utilizes the wrong type of state assistance for a wind project, the anti-double dipping rules will reduce the federal tax incentives and this in turn will decrease the project`s profitability. Rather than suffer these results, very few if any developer will use the state program. Despite the time and effort a state may expend to enact a program for alternative energy development, the state assistance will be ineffectual. This paper reviews the counterproductive results which state assistance can have on a wind project because of the federal anti-double dipping rules.

  3. Design of multihundredwatt DIPS for robotic space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Geng, S. M.; Schreiber, J. G.; Withrow, C. A.; Schmitz, P. C.; Mccomas, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Design of a dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) general purpose heat source (GPHS) and small free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to SEI precursor missions. These are multihundredwatt missions. The incentive for any dynamic system is that it can save fuel which reduces cost and radiological hazard. However, unlike a conventional DIPS based on turbomachinery converions, the small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled to multihundred watt unit size while preserving size and weight competitiveness with RTG's. Stirling conversion extends the range where dynamic systems are competitive to hundreds of watts (a power range not previously considered for dynamic systems). The challenge of course is to demonstrate reliability similar to RTG experience. Since the competative potential of FPSE as an isotope converter was first identified, work has focused on the feasibility of directly integrating GPHS with the Stirling heater head. Extensive thermal modeling of various radiatively coupled heat source/heater head geometries were performed using data furnished by the developers of FPSE and GPHS. The analysis indicates that, for the 1050 K heater head configurations considered, GPHS fuel clad temperatures remain within safe operating limits under all conditions including shutdown of one engine. Based on these results, preliminary characterizations of multihundred watt units were established.

  4. Structural and optical characterisation of tin dioxide thin films by sol-gel dip coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekshmy, S. Sujatha; Berlin, I. John; Maneeshya, L. V.; Anitha; Joy, K.

    2015-02-01

    Tin oxide (SnO2) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using sol-gel dip coating technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern indicated that the film annealed in air at 350°C was amorphous in nature, whereas, the films annealed in oxygen atmosphere at 350°C showed crystalline phase. The films were further annealed in oxygen atmosphere at 450°C and 550°C. All the diffraction peaks can be indexed to the tetragonal phase of SnO2 The surface morphology (SEM) showed that surface of all films were continuous and without micro cracks. The Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) spectra indicated an increase in the concentration of oxygen content with increase in annealing temperature. The energy band gap value for the film annealed in air was 3.88 eV. The optical band gap increased to 4.05 eV when annealed in O2 atmosphere. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the presence of emission peaks in UV region and visible region of the electromagnetic spectra. Transparent oxide semiconductor SnO2 film finds potential application as an active channel layer for transparent thin film transistor.

  5. Surface crack problems in plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1989-01-01

    The mode I crack problem in plates under membrane loading and bending is reconsidered. The purpose is to examine certain analytical features of the problem further and to provide some new results. The formulation and the results given by the classical and the Reissner plate theories for through and part-through cracks are compared. For surface cracks the three-dimensional finite element solution is used as the basis of comparison. The solution is obtained and results are given for the crack/contact problem in a plate with a through crack under pure bending and for the crack interaction problem. Also, a procedure is developed to treat the problem of subcritical crack growth and to trace the evolution of the propagating crack.

  6. EFFECT OF UNBROKEN LIGAMENTS ON STRESS CORROSION CRACKING BEHAVIOR OF ALLOY 82H WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J. and Brown, C.M.

    2003-02-20

    Previously reported stress corrosion cracking (SCC) rates for Alloy 82H gas-tungsten-arc welds tested in 360 C water showed tremendous variability. The excessive data scatter was attributed to the variations in microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stresses that are common in welds. In the current study, however, re-evaluation of the SCC data revealed that the large data scatter was an anomaly due to erroneous crack growth rates inferred from crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) measurements. Apparently, CMOD measurements provided reasonably accurate SCC rates for some specimens, but grossly overestimated rates in others. The overprediction was associated with large unbroken ligaments that often form in welds in the wake of advancing crack fronts. When ligaments were particularly large, they prevented crack mouth deflection, so apparent crack incubation times (i.e. period of time before crack advance commences) based on CMOD measurements were unrealistically long. During the final states of testing, ligaments began to separate allowing the crack mouth to open rather quickly. This behavior was interpreted as a rapid crack advance, but it actually reflects the ligament separation rate, not the SCC rate. Revised crack growth rates obtained in this study exhibit substantially less scatter than that previously reported. The effects of crack orientation and fatigue flutter loading on SCC rates in 82H welds are also discussed.

  7. Cracking the Credit Hour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit hour. If…

  8. Catalytic cracking process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  9. Preparation of uniform TiO 2 nanostructure film on 316L stainless steel by sol-gel dip coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, N.; Sani, M. A. Faghihi; Ghasemi, H.; Sadeghian, Z.; Mirhoseini, S. M. M.

    2009-07-01

    Sol was prepared by the mixing of tetra-η-butyle titanat, ethyl aceto acetate, and ethanol in an optimized condition. Polished 316L specimens were coated with the sol by dip-coating method. The influences of drying condition, withdrawal speed, calcination temperature, addition of dispersant, and pH of sol on TiO 2 nanostructure coating were investigated. Choosing of alcohol as drying atmosphere hindered the crack formation. The relation between coating thickness and withdrawal speed was evaluated. The optimum temperature to create a uniform distribution of nanoparticles of anatase was derived as 400 °C. Average roughness of coating was found about 10.61 nm by AFM analysis. Dispersant addition promoted formation of a uniform film as well as prevention of agglomeration. Acidic sol provided smaller particles than neutral sol.

  10. Hot cracking during welding and casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoping

    Aluminum welds are susceptible to liquation cracking in the partially melted zone (PMZ). Using the multicomponent Scheil model, curves of temperature vs. fraction solid (T-fS) during solidification were calculated for the PMZ and weld metals (WMs). These curves were used to predict the crack susceptibility by checking if the harmful condition of WM fS > PMZ fS exists during PMZ solidification and reduce the susceptibility by minimizing this condition. This approach was tested against full-penetration welds of alloys 7075 and 2024 and it can be used to guide the selection or development of filler metals. Liquation cracking in the PMZ in welds of Al-Si cast alloys was also investigated. The crack susceptibility was evaluated by circular-patch test, and full-penetration welds made with filler metals 1100, 4043, 4047 and 5356. Liquation cracking was significant with filler metals 1100 and 5356 but slight with filler metals 4043 and 4047. In all welds, liquation cracks were completely backfilled, instead of open as in full-penetration welds of wrought alloys 2219 and 6061. The T-fS curves showed that alloy A357 has a much higher fraction liquid for backfilling before PMZ solidification was essentially over. Hot tearing in Mg-xAl-yCa alloys was studied by constrained rod casting (CRC) in a steel mold. The hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Ca content (y) but did not change much with the Al content (x). An instrumented CRC with a steel mold was developed to detect the onset of hot tearing. The secondary phases, eutectic content, solidification path, and freezing range were examined. Hot tearing in Mg-Al-Sr alloys was also studied by CRC in a steel mold. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-1.5Sr alloys, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Al content. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-3Sr alloys, the trend was similar but not as significant. At the same Al content, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Sr

  11. Fracture Analysis of Double-Side Adhesively Bonded Composite Repairs to Cracked Aluminium Plate Using Line Spring Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yong; Su, Weiguo

    2016-06-01

    A line spring model is developed for analyzing the fracture problem of cracked metallic plate repaired with the double-sided adhesively bonded composite patch. The restraining action of the bonded patch is modeled as continuous distributed linear springs bridging the crack faces provided that the cracked plate is subjected to extensional load. The effective spring constant is determined from 1-D bonded joint theory. The hyper-singular integral equation (HSIE), which can be solved using the second kind Chebyshev polynomial expansion method, is applied to determine the crack opening displacements (COD) and the crack tip stress intensity factors (SIF) of the repaired cracked plate. The numerical result of SIF for the crack-tip correlates very well with the finite element (FE) computations based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). The present analysis approaches and mathematical techniques are critical to the successful design, analysis and implementation of crack patching.

  12. A model for the formation of fatigue striations and its relationship with small fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth process involves damage accumulation and crack extension. The two sub-processes that lead to fatigue crack extension were quantified separately in a recent model for small fatigue crack growth applicable to engineering alloys. Here, we report the results of an experimental investigation to assess the assumptions of that model. The fatigue striation formation in an aluminum alloy is modeled and it is verified that the number of cycles required for striation formation is related to the cyclic crack tip opening displacement and that the striation spacing is related to the monotonic crack tip displacement. It is demonstrated that extensive cyclic crack tip plasticity in the aluminum alloy causes a reduction in the magnitude of the slope of the fatigue crack propagation curves. The implications of these results on the fatigue crack propagation lifetime calculations are identified.

  13. Crack patterns over uneven substrates.

    PubMed

    Nandakishore, Pawan; Goehring, Lucas

    2016-02-28

    Cracks in thin layers are influenced by what lies beneath them. From buried craters to crocodile skin, crack patterns are found over an enormous range of length scales. Regardless of absolute size, their substrates can dramatically influence how cracks form, guiding them in some cases, or shielding regions from them in others. Here we investigate how a substrate's shape affects the appearance of cracks above it, by preparing mud cracks over sinusoidally varying surfaces. We find that as the thickness of the cracking layer increases, the observed crack patterns change from wavy to ladder-like to isotropic. Two order parameters are introduced to measure the relative alignment of these crack networks, and, along with Fourier methods, are used to characterise the transitions between crack pattern types. Finally, we explain these results with a model, based on the Griffith criteria of fracture, that identifies the conditions for which straight or wavy cracks will be seen, and predicts how well-ordered the cracks will be. Our metrics and results can be applied to any situation where connected networks of cracks are expected, or found. PMID:26762761

  14. Random loading fatigue crack growth: Crack closure considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Keith

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of fatigue crack growth is an important element of effective fracture control for metallic structures and mechanical components, especially in the aerospace industry. The prediction techniques available and applied today are mostly based on fatigue crack growth measurements determined in constant amplitude testing. However, while many service loadings are constant amplitude, many more loadings are random amplitude. An investigation to determine which statistics of random loadings are relevant to fatigue crack closure was conducted. The fundamentals of random processes and crack closure are briefly reviewed, then the relevance of certain random process parameters to the crack closure calculation are discussed qualitatively. A course for further research is outlined.

  15. 29 CFR 1910.123 - Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.123 Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions. (a..., electroplating, pickling, quenching, tanning, degreasing, stripping, cleaning, roll coating, flow coating,...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.126 - Additional requirements for special dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements for special dipping and coating... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.126 Additional requirements for special dipping and coating... requirements apply to flow coating? (1) You must use a direct low-pressure pumping system or a 10-gallon (38...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.124 - General requirements for dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements for dipping and coating operations... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.124 General requirements for dipping and coating operations. (a... coating operation using flammable liquids or liquids with flashpoints greater than 199.4 °F (93 °C) is:...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.124 - General requirements for dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements for dipping and coating operations... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.124 General requirements for dipping and coating operations. (a... coating operation using flammable liquids or liquids with flashpoints greater than 199.4 °F (93 °C) is:...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.124 - General requirements for dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements for dipping and coating operations... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.124 General requirements for dipping and coating operations. (a... coating operation using flammable liquids or liquids with flashpoints greater than 199.4 °F (93 °C) is:...

  20. Behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI titanium alloy sheet parent and weld metal in the presence of cracks at 20 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1971-01-01

    Through- and surface-cracked specimens of two thicknesses were tested in uniaxial tension. Surface-cracked specimens were generally found to be stronger than through-cracked specimens with the same crack length. Apparent surface-crack fracture toughness calculated using the Anderson modified Irwin equation remained relatively constant for cracks as deep as 90 percent of the sheet thickness. Subcritical growth of surface cracks was investigated. Comparison of chamber and open air welds showed chamber welds to be slightly tougher. Both methods produced welds with toughness that compared favorably with that of the parent metal. Weld efficiencies were above 94 percent.

  1. Prediction of stable crack growth and instability using the V sub R-curve method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology is presented for predicting stable crack growth and instability of cracked structural components from results of laboratory tests on metallic materials under plane-stress conditions. The methodology is based on the displacement V sub R at the tip of a stably tearing crack. Basically, the V sub R-curve method is a resistance curve approach, such as K sub R and J sub R, except that the 'crack drive' is written in terms of crack-tip displacement instead of K or J. The relationship between crack-tip-opening displacement, crack length, specimen type, and tensile properties is derived from the Dugdale model for the cracked structure of interest. This report describes the laboratory test procedure and calculations used to obtain the V sub R resistance curve from fracture tests of compact or of middle-crack tension (formally center-crack) specimens. The analysis procedure used to predict stable crack growth and instability of any through-the-thickness crack configuration made of the same material and thickness, and tested under the same environmental conditions, is presented. The various limitations of the present V sub R curve method are given. Four example calculations and predictions are shown.

  2. Thermoelastic finite element analysis of subsurface cracking due to sliding surface traction

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.S.; Komvopoulos, K.

    1997-01-01

    A linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis of subsurface crack propagation in a half-space subjected to moving thermomechanical surface traction was performed using the finite element method. The effect of frictional heating at the sliding surface on the crack growth behavior is analyzed in terms of the coefficient of friction, crack length-to-depth ratio, and Peclet number. The crack propagation characteristics are interpreted in light of results for the directions and magnitudes of the maximum shear and tensile stress intensity factor ranges, respectively. It is shown that, while frictional heating exhibits a negligible effect on the crack propagation direction, it increases the in-plane crack growth rate and reduces the critical crack length at the onset of out-of-plane crack growth at the right tip due to the tensile mechanism (kink formation). The effect of frictional heating becomes more pronounced with increasing contact friction, crack length-to-depth ratio, and Peclet number. Crack mechanism maps showing the occurrence of opening, slip, and stick regions between the crack surfaces are presented for different values of crack length-to-depth ratio, coefficient of friction, and position of thermomechanical surface traction.

  3. The influence of crack closure on fatigue crack growth thresholds in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1988-01-01

    Crack opening loads were determined in load-shedding fatigue crack growth threshold tests on 2024-T3 aluminum alloy at stress ratios R of -2, -1, 0, 0.33, 0.5, and 0.7. The effects of load-shedding procedure and rate were investigated. Values of threshold Delta-K were found to vary significantly with R, whereas values of threshold effective Delta-K did not. That is, the variation of threshold Delta-K with R was almost completely explained by accounting for the measured variation in crack opening load behavior with R. The load-shedding guidelines of ASTM Test Method for Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth (E 647) produced a threshold Delta-K value for R = 0.7 that was in agreement with the value determined using a procedure that should minimize closure effects. At both R = 0 and R = 0.7, high load-shedding rates produced high values of threshold Delta-K caused by large closure effects.

  4. Reduction of teat skin mastitis pathogen loads: differences between strains, dips, and contact times.

    PubMed

    Enger, B D; Fox, L K; Gay, J M; Johnson, K A

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to (1) assess differences in mastitis pathogen strain sensitivities to teat disinfectants (teat dips), and (2) determine the optimum time for premilking teat dips to remain in contact with teat skin to reduce pathogen loads on teat skin. Two experiments were conducted using the excised teat model. In experiment 1, the differences in mastitis pathogen strain sensitivities to 4 commercially available dips (dip A: 1% H2O2; dip B: 1% chlorine dioxide; dip C: 1% iodophor; and dip D: 0.5% iodophor) were evaluated. Four strains of 11 common mastitis pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Mycoplasma bovis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus haemolyticus) were tested. In experiment 2, the percentage log reduction of mastitis pathogens (Escherichia coli, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Klebsiella species, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) on teat skin with 3 commercially available teat dips: dip A; dip D; and dip E: 0.25% iodophor, using dip contact times of 15, 30, and 45 s, was evaluated. Experiment 1 results indicated significant differences in strain sensitivities to dips within pathogen species: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus chromogenes, and Streptococcus uberis. Species differences were also found where Mycoplasma bovis (97.9% log reduction) was the most sensitive to tested teat dips and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (71.4% log reduction) the most resistant. Experiment 2 results indicated that contact times of 30 and 45 s were equally effective in reducing recovered bacteria for dips D and E and were also significantly more effective than a 15-s contact time. No differences were seen in recovered bacteria between tested contact times after treatment with dip

  5. A Study of Failure in Small Pressurized Cylindrical Shells Containing a Crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barwell, Craig A.; Eber, Lorenz; Fyfe, Ian M.

    1998-01-01

    The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental models. The loading applied was either symmetric or unsymmetric about the crack plane, the latter being caused by structural constraints such as stringers. The objective was two fold - one, to provide the experimental results which will allow computer modeling techniques to be evaluated for deformations that are significantly different from that experienced by flat plates, and the other to examine the deformations and conditions associated with the onset of crack kinking which often precedes crack curving. The stresses which control crack growth in a cylindrical geometry depend on conditions introduced by the axial bulging, which is an integral part of this type of failure. For the symmetric geometry, both the hoop and radial strain just ahead off the crack, r = a, were measured and these results compared with those obtained from a variety of structural analysis codes, in particular STAGS [1], ABAQUS and ANSYS. In addition to these measurements, the pressures at the onset of stable and unstable crack growth were obtained and the corresponding crack deformations measured as the pressures were increased to failure. For the unsymmetric cases, measurements were taken of the crack kinking angle, and the displacements in the vicinity of the crack. In general, the strains ahead of the crack showed good agreement between the three computer codes and between the codes and the experiments. In the case of crack behavior, it was determined that modeling stable tearing with a crack-tip opening displacement fracture criterion could be successfully combined with the finite-element analysis techniques as used in structural analysis codes. The analytic results obtained in this study were very compatible with the experimental observations of crack growth

  6. Subcritical crack growth in glasses under cyclic loads: Effect of hydrodynamic pressure in aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, K.S.; Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of hydrodynamic pressure developed in the wake of a crack growing in a brittle material under cyclic loads in an aqueous environment is considered. The pressure acts in opposition to the movement of the crack faces, thus shielding the crack up from the applied loads. A general hydrodynamic fluid pressure relation based on a one-dimensional Reynolds equation, which applicable to a crack with an arbitrary crack opening profile, is developed. The model is modified to account for side flow through the thickness of the sample and cavitation near the crack tip. Both effects significantly modify the hydrodynamic pressure distribution. Finally, the resulting hydrodynamic pressure relations are combined with a fracture mechanics model to account for the change in the near-tip stress intensity. Resulting predictions of the cyclic crack-growth rate are found to be in good agreement with measured values for a borosilicate glass tested at various frequencies in a water environment.

  7. Effect of the coating properties on crack propagation in fiber-reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Singh, R.N.

    1996-12-31

    A finite element technique is used to study the effects of the coating properties on the crack propagation in fiber-reinforced materials. Crack opening stresses and energy release rates for the crack penetration and deflection have been studied in SCS6 (fiber) -C/BN (coating) - Zircon (matrix) composites. Effect of the coating thickness on crack propagation has been also studied. In general, no significant changes are found in stress ratio (ratio of hoop stresses along the crack and at the interface) and energy release rate ratio (ratio of energy release rates for the crack penetration and crack deflection), but the magnitudes of the stresses and energy release rates change substantially with the change in the coating thickness.

  8. Intrinsic fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys - The effect of gaseous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous environmental effects on intrinsic fatigue crack growth are significant for the Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090, peak aged. For both moderate Delta K-low R and low Delta K-high R regimes, crack growth rates decrease according to the environment order: purified water vapor, moist air, helium and oxygen. Gaseous environmental effects are pronounced near threshold and are not closure dominated. Here, embrittlement by low levels of H2O (ppm) supports hydrogen embrittlement and suggests that molecular transport controlled cracking, established for high Delta K-low R, is modified near threshold. Localized crack tip reaction sites or high R crack opening shape may enable the strong, environmental effect at low levels of Delta K. Similar crack growth in He and O2 eliminates the contribution of surface films to fatigue damage in alloy 2090. While 2090 and 7075 exhibit similar environmental trends, the Al-Li-Cu alloy is more resistant to intrinsic corrosion fatigue crack growth.

  9. Effects of an automatic postmilking teat dipping system on new intramammary infections and iodine in milk.

    PubMed

    Galton, D M

    2004-01-01

    A technology of automatically applying a postmilking teat dip via the milking machine prior to machine detachment was compared to manual postmilking teat dipping with a teat dip cup for effects on new IMI and iodine content in milk. One hundred twenty Holstein cows were experimentally challenged in a 22-wk trial with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus and 148 Holstein cows were experimentally challenged with Streptococcus uberis in another 22-wk trial. The bacterial suspensions were applied to teats of all of the cows after premilking udder preparation and immediately prior to milking machine attachment. In both trials, cows were divided among four treatments: no postmilking teat dipping; manual postmilking teat dipping with a proven efficacious iodophor teat dip; manual postmilking teat dipping with an iodophor teat dip formulated for an automatic postmilking teat dipping system; and automatically postmilking teat dipping via milking machines with an iodophor teat dip formulated for the automatic postmilking teat dipping system. The postmilking teat dipping treatments reduced new Staph. aureus IMI by 64.5, 76.5, and 88.2%; new Strep. agalactiae IMI by 61.5, 77.8, and 94.4%; and new Strep. uberis IMI by 63.5, 82.5, and 93.8%, respectively, against the treatment of no postmilking teat dipping. The treatment applying the postmilking teat dip automatically via milking machines had the lowest number of new IMI caused by the three pathogens. Teat end and teat skin condition were characterized as normal at the end of the study with no differences between treatments. There were no differences with regard to iodine content in milk between treatments. PMID:14765830

  10. Transient Elastodynamic Crack Growth in Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chalivendra, Vijaya B.

    2008-02-15

    A generalized elastic solution for an arbitrarily propagating transient crack in Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) is obtained through an asymptotic analysis. The shear modulus and mass density of the FGM are assumed to vary exponentially along the gradation direction. The mode-mixity due to the inclination of property gradient with respect to the propagating crack tip is accommodated in the analysis through superposition of the opening and shear modes. First three terms of out of plane displacement field and its gradients about the crack tip are obtained in powers of radial coordinates, with the coefficients depending on the time rate of change of crack tip speed and stress intensity factors. Using these displacement fields, the effect of transient stress intensity factors and acceleration on synthetic contours of constant out of plane displacement under both opening and mixed mode loading conditions has been studied. These contours show that the transient terms cause significant spatial variation on out of plane displacements around the crack tip. Therefore, in studying dynamic fracture of FGMs, it is appropriate to include the transient terms in the field equations for the situations of sudden variation of stress intensity factor or crack tip velocity.

  11. Analysis of radially cracked ring segments subject to forces and couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Strawley, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of planar boundary collocation analysis are given for ring segment (C shaped) specimens with radial cracks, subjected to combined forces and couples. Mode I stress intensity factors and crack mouth opening displacements were determined for ratios of outer to inner radius in the range 1.1 to 2.5, and ratios of crack length to segment width in the range 0.1 to 0.8.

  12. Analysis of radially cracked ring segments subject to forces and couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Results of planar boundary collocation analysis are given for ring segment (C-shaped) specimens with radial cracks, subjected to combined forces and couples. Mode I stress intensity factors and crack mouth opening displacements were determined for ratios of outer to inner radius in the range 1.1 to 2.5 and ratios of crack length to segment width in the range 0.1 to 0.8.

  13. Analyses of heterogeneous deformation and subsurface fatigue crack generation in alpha titanium alloy at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Umezawa, Osamu; Morita, Motoaki; Yuasa, Takayuki; Morooka, Satoshi; Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio

    2014-01-27

    Subsurface crack initiation in high-cycle fatigue has been detected as (0001) transgranular facet in titanium alloys at low temperature. The discussion on the subsurface crack generation was reviewed. Analyses by neutron diffraction and full constraints model under tension mode as well as crystallographic identification of the facet were focused. The accumulated tensile stress along <0001> may be responsible to initial microcracking on (0001) and the crack opening.

  14. The elasticity problem for a thick-walled cylinder containing a circumferential crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The elasticity problem for a long hollow circular cylinder containing an axisymmetric circumferential crack subjected to general nonaxisymmetric external loads is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations with the Fourier coefficients of the derivative of the crack surface displacement as density functions. The stress intensity factors and the crack opening displacement are calculated for a cylinder under uniform tension, bending by end couples, and self-equilibrating residual stresses.

  15. The elasticity problem for a thick-walled cylinder containing a circumferential crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The elasticity problem for a long hollow circular cylinder containing an axisymmetric circumferential crack subjected to general nonaxisymmetric external loads is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations with the Fourier coefficients of the derivative of the crack surface displacement as density functions. The stress intensity factors and the crack opening displacement are calculated for a cylinder under uniform tension, bending by end couples, and self-equilibrating residual stresses.

  16. Circumferential cracking of steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Karwoski, K.J.

    1997-04-01

    On April 28, 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 95-03, {open_quote}Circumferential Cracking of Steam Generator Tubes.{close_quote} GL 95-03 was issued to obtain information needed to verify licensee compliance with existing regulatory requirements regarding the integrity of steam generator tubes in domestic pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). This report briefly describes the design and function of domestic steam generators and summarizes the staff`s assessment of the responses to GL 95-03. The report concludes with several observations related to steam generator operating experience. This report is intended to be representative of significant operating experience pertaining to circumferential cracking of steam generator tubes from April 1995 through December 1996. Operating experience prior to April 1995 is discussed throughout the report, as necessary, for completeness.

  17. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

  18. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

  19. Dipping-interface mapping using mode-separated Rayleigh waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Miller, R.D.; Liu, Q.

    2009-01-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is a non-invasive geophysical technique that uses the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves to estimate a vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section is constructed by aligning 1D S-wave velocity profiles at the midpoint of each receiver spread that are contoured using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. Based on the assumption that a dipping-layer model can be regarded as stepped flat layers, high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT) has been proposed to image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy and separate modes of Rayleigh waves from a multichannel record. With the mode-separation technique, therefore, a dispersion curve that possesses satisfactory accuracy can be calculated using a pair of consecutive traces within a mode-separated shot gather. In this study, using synthetic models containing a dipping layer with a slope of 5, 10, 15, 20, or 30 degrees and a real-world example, we assess the ability of using high-resolution LRT to image and separate fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves from raw surface-wave data and accuracy of dispersion curves generated by a pair of consecutive traces within a mode-separated shot gather. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that a dipping interface with a slope smaller than 15 degrees can be successfully mapped by separated fundamental waves using high-resolution LRT. ?? Birkh??user Verlag, Basel 2009.

  20. Three-dimensional crack growth assessment by microtopographic examination

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, W.R.; Piascik, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    The initial stage of the stable tearing process in two 2.3 mm sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy M(T) specimens are analyzed using fracture surface microtopography reconstruction techniques. The local crack tip opening angles (CTOA) in the interior of the specimens are determined relative to both crack extension and through-thickness position. The microtopographic analysis of cracks grown in the L-T and T-L orientations reveal that interior CTOA is comparable to those measured on the surface using standard optical analysis methods. Similar to surface CTOA results, interior (mid-thickness) CTOA exhibit a transient behavior; CTOA transitions from high angles, at near crack initiation, to a lower steady-state value of 5 deg. and 4.2 deg. for L-T and T-L, respectively, at crack lengths greater than 1.5mm. Fracture surface topographic projection maps are used to study the evolution of crack front tunneling during the initial stage of the fracture process. Stable tearing initiates at mid-thickness followed by a crack front tunneling process to a depth of approximately 2mm. A brief discussion of the basis of the fracture process reconstruction method is provided and comments on the general utility of microtopographic fracture surface examination for general assessment of elastic-plastic and fully-plastic fracture processes are made.

  1. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  2. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. . Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  3. Replica-based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, R. S.; Willard, Scott A.; Dawicke, David S.

    2007-01-01

    A surface replica-based crack inspection method has recently been developed for use in Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hydrogen feedline flowliners. These flowliners exist to ensure favorable flow of liquid hydrogen over gimble joint bellows, and consist of two rings each containing 38 elongated slots. In the summer of 2002, multiple cracks ranging from 0.1 inches to 0.6 inches long were discovered; each orbiter contained at least one cracked flowliner. These long cracks were repaired and eddy current inspections ensured that no cracks longer than 0.075 inches were present. However, subsequent fracture-mechanics review of flight rationale required detection of smaller cracks, and was the driving force for development of higher-resolution inspection method. Acetate tape surface replicas have been used for decades to detect and monitor small cracks. However, acetate tape replicas have primarily been limited to laboratory specimens because complexities involved in making these replicas - requiring acetate tape to be dissolved with acetone - are not well suited for a crack inspection tool. More recently developed silicon-based replicas are better suited for use as a crack detection tool. A commercially available silicon-based replica product has been determined to be acceptable for use in SSME hydrogen feedlines. A method has been developed using this product and a scanning electron microscope for analysis, which can find cracks as small as 0.005 inches and other features (e.g., pits, scratches, tool marks, etc.) as small as 0.001 inches. The resolution of this method has been validated with dozens of cracks generated in a laboratory setting and this method has been used to locate 55 cracks (ranging in size from 0.040 inches to 0.004 inches) on space flight hardware. These cracks were removed by polishing away the cracked material and a second round of replicas confirmed the repair.

  4. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  5. dipSPAdes: Assembler for Highly Polymorphic Diploid Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bankevich, Anton; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract While the number of sequenced diploid genomes have been steadily increasing in the last few years, assembly of highly polymorphic (HP) diploid genomes remains challenging. As a result, there is a shortage of tools for assembling HP genomes from the next generation sequencing (NGS) data. The initial approaches to assembling HP genomes were proposed in the pre-NGS era and are not well suited for NGS projects. To address this limitation, we developed the first de Bruijn graph assembler, dipSPAdes, for HP genomes that significantly improves on the state-of-the-art assemblers for HP diploid genomes. PMID:25734602

  6. Mechanism of force mode dip-pen nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haijun E-mail: swguo@sjtu.edu.cn; Xie, Hui; Rong, Weibin; Sun, Lining; Wu, Haixia; Guo, Shouwu E-mail: swguo@sjtu.edu.cn

    2014-05-07

    In this work, the underlying mechanism of the force mode dip-pen nanolithography (FMDPN) is investigated in depth by analyzing force curves, tapping mode deflection signals, and “Z-scan” voltage variations during the FMDPN. The operation parameters including the relative “trigger threshold” and “surface delay” parameters are vital to control the loading force and dwell time for ink deposition during FMDPN. A model is also developed to simulate the interactions between the atomic force microscope tip and soft substrate during FMDPN, and verified by its good performance in fitting our experimental data.

  7. A Mixed-Mode I/II Fracture Criterion and Its Application in Crack Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Michael A.; Deng, Xiaomin; Ma, Fashang; Newman, James S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A crack tip opening displacement (CTOD)-based, mixed mode fracture criterion is developed for predicting the onset and direction of crack growth. The criterion postulates that crack growth occurs in either the Mode I or Mode II direction, depending on whether the maximum in either the opening or the shear component of CTOD, measured at a specified distance behind the crack tip, attains a critical value. For crack growth direction prediction, the proposed CTOD criterion is shown to be equivalent to seven commonly used crack growth criteria under linearly elastic and asymptotic conditions. Under elastic-plastic conditions the CTOD criterion's prediction of the dependence of the crack growth direction on the crack-up mode mixity is in excellent agreement with the Arcan test results. Furthermore, the CTOD criterion correctly predicts the existence of a crack growth transition from mode I to mode II as the mode mixity approaches the mode II loading condition. The proposed CTOD criterion has been implemented in finite element crack growth simulation codes Z1P2DL and FRANC2DL to predict the crack growth paths in (a) a modified Arcan test specimen and fixture made of AL 2024-T34 and (b) a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen made of AL 7050. A series of crack growth simulations have been carried out for the crack growth tests in the Arcan and DCB specimens and the results further demonstrate the applicability of the mixed mode CTOD fracture criterion crack growth predictions and residual strength analyses for airframe materials.

  8. Matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.

    1994-01-01

    Matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with unbonded frictional interface was studied using fracture mechanics theory. The critical stress for extension of a fiber-bridged crack was analyzed using the stress-intensity approach. The analysis used a new shear-lag formulation of the crack-closure traction applied by the bridging fibers based on the assumption of a constant sliding friction stress over the sliding length of the fiber-matrix interface. The new formulation satisfied two required limiting conditions: (1) when the stress in the bridging fiber approached the far-field applied stress, the crack-opening displacement approached a steady-state upper limit that was in agreement with the previous formulations; and (2) in the limit of zero crack opening, the stress in the bridging fiber approached the far-field fiber stress. This lower limit of the bridging stress was distinctly different from the previous formulations. Numerical calculations using the stress-intensity approach indicated that the critical stress for crack extension decreased with increasing crack length and approached a constant steady-state value for large cracks. The steady-state matrix-cracking stress agreed with a steady-state energy balance analysis applied to the continuum model, but it was slightly less than the matrix-cracking stress predicted by such theories of steady-state cracking as that of Aveston, Cooper, and Kelly (ACK). The origin of this difference and a method for reconciliation of the two theoretical approaches were discussed. The effects of residual stresses and partially bridged crack was studied and incorporated into the calculation of the critical stress for extension of matrix cracks. Matrix cracking was studied in a model, unidirectional SiC (fiber)-reinforced epoxy-alumina matrix composite. The fiber-matrix interface was tailored with coatings to achieve an unbonded frictional interface.

  9. Effective Spring Stiffness for a Planar Periodic Array of Collinear Cracks at an Interface between Two Dissimilar Isotropic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lekesiz, Huseyin; Katsube, Noriko; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.; Seghi, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the longitudinal and transverse effective spring stiffnesses of a planar periodic array of collinear cracks at the interface between two dissimilar isotropic materials; they are shown to be identical in a general case of elastic dissimilarity (the well-known open interface crack model is employed for the solution). Since the interfacial spring stiffness can be experimentally determined from ultrasound reflection and transmission analysis, the proposed expressions can be useful in estimating the percentage of disbond area between two dissimilar materials, which is directly related to the residual strength of the interface. The effects of elastic dissimilarity, crack density and crack interaction on the effective spring stiffness are clearly represented in the solution. It is shown that in general the crack interaction weakly depends on material dissimilarity and, for most practical cases, the crack interaction is nearly the same as that for crack arrays between identical solids. This allows approximate factorization of the effective spring stiffness for an array of cracks between dissimilar materials in terms of an elastic dissimilarity factor and two factors obtained for cracks in a homogeneous material: the effective spring stiffness for non-interacting (independent) cracks and the crack interaction factor. In order to avoid the effect of the crack surface interpenetration zones on the effective spring stiffness, the range of the tensile to transverse load ratios is obtained under the assumption of small-scale contact conditions. Since real cracks are often slightly open (due to prior loading history and plastic deformation), it is demonstrated that for ultrasound applications the results obtained are valid for most practical cases of small interfacial cracks as long as the mid-crack opening normalized by the crack length is at least in the order of 10−5. PMID:23710104

  10. Elastic-plastic analysis of crack in ductile adhesive joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Toru; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Akira; Munakata, Tsuyoshi

    1995-11-01

    The fracture of a crack in adhesive is important to the structural integrity of adhesive structures and composite materials. Though the fracture toughness of a material should be constant according to fracture mechanics, it is said that the fracture toughness of a crack in an adhesive joint depends on the bond thickness. In the present study, the elastic-plastic stress analyses of a crack in a thin adhesive layer are performed by the combination of the boundary element method and the finite element method. The effect of adhesive thickness on the J-integral, the Q`-factor which is a modified version of the Q-factor, and the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) are investigated. It is found from the analyses that the CTOD begins to decrease at very thin bond thickness, the Q`-factor being almost constant. The decrease of the fracture toughness at very thin adhesive layer is expected by the present analysis.

  11. Cracks and Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an odd area of the south polar region that has sets of fine, nearly parallel lines running from the northeast (upper right) toward southwest (lower left) and a darker, wider set of cracks with a major trend running almost perpendicular to the finer lines. The appearance of these features is enhanced by seasonal frost. Dark areas have no frost, bright areas still have frozen carbon dioxide ice. In summer, the ice would be gone and the cracks and lines less obvious when viewed from orbit. Although unknown, wind might be responsible for forming the fine set of lines, and perhaps freeze-thaw cycles of ground ice or structural deformation would have contributed to formation of the wider cracks. The image is located near 85.0oS, 324.0oW, and covers an area about 1.5 km (nearly 1 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  12. Prolonged in vitro exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to germicidal teat dips.

    PubMed

    Hogan, J S; Smith, K L

    1989-04-01

    Eight strains of Staphylococcus aureus were tested to determine if prolonged exposure to commercial teat dips could enhance bacterial tolerance to teat dips in vitro. All strains of S. aureus were serially plated 15 times on chemically defined agar medium containing sublethal concentrations of linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid, chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, and iodophor teat dips. Growth responses of S. aureus to chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, and iodophor were not affected by prolonged exposure to these teat dips. Isolates subcultured on agar containing .1% linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid teat dip subsequently had a greater mean growth response to .1% solution of the germicide than did controls subcultured on basal medium. Hemolytic patterns, tube coagulase, clumping factor, and protein A reactions of S. aureus were not altered by exposure to any of the teat dips tested. In general, prolonged exposure to commercial teat dips did not alter germicidal susceptibility of S. aureus. PMID:2745808

  13. Pulsed holographic microscopy as a measurement method of dynamic fracture toughness for fast propagating cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinichi; Homma, Hiroomi; Kusaka, Riichiro

    A METHOD OF pulsed holographic microscopy is applied to take instantaneous microscopic photographs of the neighborhoods of crack tips propagating through PMMA or through AISI 4340 steel specimens at a speed of several hundred meters per second. The cracks are in the opening mode. A fast propagating crack is recorded as a hologram at an instant during its propagation. A microscopic photograph of the crack is taken with a conventional microscope to magnify the reconstructed image from the hologram. From the microscopic photograph, crack opening displacement (COD) is measured along the crack in the vicinity of the crack tip. The COD is of the order often to one hundred microns, and in proportion to the square root of the distance from the crack tip. The dynamic fracture toughness KID is obtained using the formula for COD in the singular stress field of a fast propagating crack. Simultaneous KID measurement both through pulsed holographic microscopy and through the caustic method is furthermore carried out with PMMA specimens. The values of KID obtained through pulsed holographic microscopy are in agreement with those through the caustic method. Microcracks accompanied by a main crack are also photographed with the method of pulsed holographic microscopy.

  14. Interaction of shear-coupled grain boundary motion with crack: Crack healing, grain boundary decohesion, and sub-grain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramfard, Mohammad; Deng, Chuang

    2016-02-01

    Stress-driven grain boundary motion is one of the main mechanisms responsible for microstructural evolution in polycrystalline metals during deformation. In this research, the interaction of shear-coupled grain boundary motion (SCGBM) in face-centered cubic metals with crack, which is a common type of structural defects in engineering materials, has been studied by using molecular dynamics simulations in simple bicrystal models. The influences of different parameters such as metal type, temperature, grain boundary structure, and crack geometry have been examined systematically. Three types of microstructural evolution have been identified under different circumstances, namely, crack healing, grain boundary decohesion, and sub-grain formation. The underlying atomistic mechanisms for each type of SCGBM-crack interaction, particularly grain boundary decohesion and crack healing, have also been examined. It is found that crack healing is generally favoured during the SCGBM-crack interaction at relatively high temperature in metals with relatively low stacking fault energy and grain boundary structure with relatively low misorientation angles. The results of this work may open up new opportunities for healing severely damaged materials.

  15. On the Rupture Dynamics of Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting in a Stratified Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2015-04-01

    One significant feature of a shallow dip-slip earthquake is the broken symmetry of seismic motion in the proximity of the rupturing fault plane. In general, the strong motion is much larger on the hanging wall than on the footwall, but the mechanics behind this asymmetry has not been wholly understood yet. Therefore, in this contribution, based on finite difference calculations and dynamic photoelasticity, we try to deepen our understanding on the rupture dynamics of a shallow dip-slip fault plane numerically as well as experimentally. In our two-dimensional crack-like rupture models, a flat vertical or inclined fault plane is prepared in a monolithic (first model) or stratified (second model) linear elastic medium. In the basic first model, as predicted numerically by Uenishi and Madariaga (Eos 2005), the primary fault rupture approaching the horizontal free surface may induce four Rayleigh-type waves, two Rayleigh waves propagating along the free surface to the far field and the other two interface waves travelling back downwards along the ruptured fault plane. In the case of the inclined fault plane, the interaction of the interface and Rayleigh waves may generate a strong shear wave (corner wave) and cause stronger disturbances in the hanging wall. The corner wave may exist only when the fault plane is asymmetrically inclined. On the contrary, in the second model, symmetry of seismic motion may be broken even in geometrically symmetric cases if the secondary rupture is allowed at an interface between geological layers. For instance, if primary vertical fault rupture propagates from depth and interferes with a horizontal interface obeying a tensile fracture criterion, the interface segments on which the primary fault rupture produces dynamic compression (in the relatively rising hanging wall) may remain unbroken and only some interface segments in the subsiding footwall may be fractured in tension. That is, in the hanging wall, the dynamic disturbances in the

  16. Cracking and Stress-Strain Behavior of Rock-Like Material Containing Two Flaws Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Zhang, Lianyang; Wang, Weijun; Pu, Chengzhi; Wan, Wen; Tang, Jingzhou

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the cracking and stress-strain behavior, especially the local strain concentration near the flaw tips, of rock-like material containing two flaws. A series of uniaxial compression tests were carried out on rock-like specimens containing two flaws, with strain gauges mounted near the flaw tips to measure the local strain concentration under the uniaxial compressive loading. Four different types of cracks (wing cracks, anti-wing cracks, coplanar shear cracks and oblique shear cracks) and seven patterns of crack coalescences (T1 and T2; S1 and S2; and TS1, TS2 and TS3) are observed in the experiments. The type of crack coalescence is related to the geometry of the flaws. In general, the crack coalescence varies from the S-mode to the TS-mode and then to the T-mode with the increase of the rock bridge ligament angle. The stress-strain curves of the specimens containing two flaws are closely related to the crack development and coalescence process. The strain measurements indicate that the local tensile strain concentration below or above the pre-existing flaw tip causes wing or anti-wing cracks, while the local compressive strain concentration near the flaw tip is related to the shear crack. The measured local tensile strain shows a jump at the initiation of wing- and anti-wing cracks, reflecting the instant opening of the wing- and anti-wing crack propagating through the strain gauge. During the propagation of wing- and anti-wing cracks, the measured local tensile strain gradually increases with few jumps, implying that the opening deformation of wing- and anti-wing cracks occurs in a stable manner. The shear cracks initiate followed by a large and abrupt compressive strain jump and then quickly propagate in an unstable manner resulting in the failure of specimens.

  17. Bootstrapping Dip Test for PIV Outlier Identification and Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, Andree; Pun, Chan-Seng; Dabiri, Dana

    2007-11-01

    A PIV outlier detection and correction method is proposed that does not directly rely on local statistics. A bootstrapping method uses interpolation to generate a distribution of points for each vector component. Statistics are obtained by applying the Hartigan's dip test for bimodality on the distribution points to estimate the mode for each vector component. Significant difference between the estimated modes and outliers is observed; non-spurious vector components are close to the estimated modes. The bootstrapping dip test outlier detection scheme is then repeated until no more vector components are rejected. Two approaches to replace the detected vector components are considered. First, the corresponding mode values are replaced with the detected components, second the remaining vector components are used to re-interpolate the field. Validation includes parametric studies based on the number of undetections and overdetections on simulated fields to determine the optimal sets of parameters. Applications of the optimum parameters to a turbulent jet flow and a synthetic Rankine Vortex flow, both obtained from the PIV Challenge website are shown and details of this methodology is discussed.

  18. Dip-moveout processing by Fourier transform in anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.; Tsvankin, I.

    1994-12-01

    Conventional dip-moveout (DMO) processing is designed for isotropic media and cannot handle angle-dependent velocity. The authors show that Hale`s isotropic DMO algorithm remains valid for elliptical anisotropy but may lead to serious errors for non-elliptical transversely isotropic models, even if velocity anisotropy is moderate. Here, they present an extension of Hale`s constant-velocity DMO method to anisotropic media. The DMO operator, to be applied to normal-moveout (NMO) corrected data, is based on the analytic expression for NMO velocity for dipping reflectors given by Tsvankin (1995a). Since the anisotropic DMO depends on the elastic parameters of the medium, it should be preceded by an inversion procedure designed to obtain the NMO velocity as a function of ray parameter. Another complication introduced by anisotropy is the influence of nonhyperbolic moveout not accounted for in the DMO operator. However, for spreads typical in conventional acquisition design, deviations from hyperbolic moveout for P-waves are not significant. Impulse responses and synthetic examples for typical transversely isotropic models with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this DMO technique. Once the inversion step has been completed, the NMO-DMO sequence does not take any more computing time than that for the generic Hale`s method in isotropic media. Their anisotropic DMO operator is not limited to VTI media; it can be applied in the same fashion in symmetry planes of more complicated models such as orthorhombic.

  19. Formation of High Aspect Ratio Microcoil Using Dipping Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Daiji; Yamashita, Shuhei; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Setomoto, Masaru; Hattori, Tadashi

    Coils are used in many electronic devices as inductors in mobile units such as mobile phone, digital cameras, etc. Inductance and quality factor of coils are very important value of the performance. Therefore, the requests for coils are small size, high inductance, low power consumption, etc. However, coils are unsuitable for miniaturization because of its structure. Therefore, we have proposed and developed the microcoils of high aspect ratio with the dipping method and an X-ray lithography technique. In dipping method, centrifugal force and highly viscous photoresist solution were key points to evenly apply resist in the form of thick film on metal bar. The film thickness of resist on bar was achieved about 50 μm after single coating. Using these techniques, we succeeded in creating threaded groove structure with 10 μm lines and spaces on 1 mm brass bar. In this case, the aspect ratio was achieved five. It is very expected the high performance microcoil with high aspect ratio lines could be manufactured in spite of the miniature size.

  20. Cosmogenic Neutrinos Challenge the Cosmic-ray Proton Dip Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 109 GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 109 GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen–Zatsepin–Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  1. Automatic crack growth tracking of bimaterial interface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yehia, Nabil A. B.; Shephard, Mark S.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation process of an interfacial crack in composite material is studied using the modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion, NT-criterion. Some necessary assumptions have been adopted to facilitate the use of the NT-criterion in this case. The stress intensity factors at the crack tip are extracted from the complex displacement field and finite element results. A simple algorithm for automatic crack propagation is presented with an illustrative example.

  2. Sub-10-micrometer toughening and crack tip toughness of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ang, Siang Fung; Schulz, Anja; Pacher Fernandes, Rodrigo; Schneider, Gerold A

    2011-04-01

    In previous studies, enamel showed indications to occlude small cracks in-vivo and exhibited R-curve behaviors for bigger cracks ex-vivo. This study quantifies the crack tip's toughness (K(I0),K(III0)), the crack's closure stress and the cohesive zone size at the crack tip of enamel and investigates the toughening mechanisms near the crack tip down to the length scale of a single enamel crystallite. The crack-opening-displacement (COD) profile of cracks induced by Vickers indents on mature bovine enamel was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mode I crack tip toughness K(I0) of cracks along enamel rod boundaries and across enamel rods exhibit a similar range of values: K(I0,Ir)=0.5-1.6MPa m(0.5) (based on Irwin's 'near-field' solution) and K(I0,cz)=0.8-1.5MPa m(0.5) (based on the cohesive zone solution of the Dugdale-Muskhelishvili (DM) crack model). The mode III crack tip toughness K(III0,Ir) was computed as 0.02-0.15MPa m(0.5). The crack-closure stress at the crack tip was computed as 163-770 MPa with a cohesive zone length and width 1.6-10.1μm and 24-44 nm utilizing the cohesive zone solution. Toughening elements were observed under AFM and SEM: crack bridging due to protein ligament and hydroxyapatite fibres (micro- and nanometer scale) as well as microcracks were identified. PMID:21316630

  3. Heat-affected zone liquation crack on resistance spot welded TWIP steels

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Chang, InSung; Park, Yeong-Do

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the heat affected zone (HAZ) liquation crack and segregation behavior of the resistance spot welded twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel have been reported. Cracks appeared in the post-welded joints that originated at the partially melted zone (PMZ) and propagated from the PMZ through the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the base metal (BM). The crack length and crack opening widths were observed increasing with heat input; and the welding current was identified to be the most influencing parameter for crack formation. Cracks appeared at the PMZ when nugget diameter reached at 4.50 mm or above; and the liquation cracks were found to occur along two sides of the notch tip in the sheet direction rather than in the electrode direction. Cracks were backfilled with the liquid films which has lamellar structure and supposed to be the eutectic constituent. Co-segregation of alloy elements such as, C and Mn were detected on the liquid films by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) line scanning and element map which suggests that the liquid film was enrich of Mn and C. The eutectic constituent was identified by analyzing the calculated phase diagram along with thermal temperature history of finite element simulation. Preliminary experimental results showed that cracks have less/no significant effect on the static cross-tensile strength (CTS) and the tensile-shear strength (TSS). In addition, possible ways to avoid cracking were discussed. - Highlights: • The HAZ liquation crack during resistance spot welding of TWIP steel was examined. • Cracks were completely backfilled and healed with divorced eutectic secondary phase. • Co-segregation of C and Mn was detected in the cracked zone. • Heat input was the most influencing factor to initiate liquation crack. • Cracks have less/no significant effect on static tensile properties.

  4. Multiscale modeling of crack initiation and propagation at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiari, Behrouz; Miller, Ronald E.

    2016-03-01

    Fracture occurs on multiple interacting length scales; atoms separate on the atomic scale while plasticity develops on the microscale. A dynamic multiscale approach (CADD: coupled atomistics and discrete dislocations) is employed to investigate an edge-cracked specimen of single-crystal nickel, Ni, (brittle failure) and aluminum, Al, (ductile failure) subjected to mode-I loading. The dynamic model couples continuum finite elements to a fully atomistic region, with key advantages such as the ability to accommodate discrete dislocations in the continuum region and an algorithm for automatically detecting dislocations as they move from the atomistic region to the continuum region and then correctly "converting" the atomistic dislocations into discrete dislocations, or vice-versa. An ad hoc computational technique is also applied to dissipate localized waves formed during crack advance in the atomistic zone, whereby an embedded damping zone at the atomistic/continuum interface effectively eliminates the spurious reflection of high-frequency phonons, while allowing low-frequency phonons to pass into the continuum region. The simulations accurately capture the essential physics of the crack propagation in a Ni specimen at different temperatures, including the formation of nano-voids and the sudden acceleration of the crack tip to a velocity close to the material Rayleigh wave speed. The nanoscale brittle fracture happens through the crack growth in the form of nano-void nucleation, growth and coalescence ahead of the crack tip, and as such resembles fracture at the microscale. When the crack tip behaves in a ductile manner, the crack does not advance rapidly after the pre-opening process but is blunted by dislocation generation from its tip. The effect of temperature on crack speed is found to be perceptible in both ductile and brittle specimens.

  5. Improved load ratio method for predicting crack length

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Albrecht, P.; Wright, W.; Joyce, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    The elastic compliance from unloading/reloading sequences in a load-displacement record estimates well crack length in elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests of compact tension [C(T)] and bending type specimens. The need for partial unloading of the specimen makes it difficult to run the test under static loading and impossible under either dynamic loading or very high temperatures. Furthermore, fracture toughness testing in which crack length is determined from elastic compliance requires high precision testing equipment and highly skilled technicians. As a result, such tests are confined usually to research laboratories and seldom used under production settings. To eliminate these problems, an improved load ratio method of predicting crack length is proposed that utilizes only the recorded load versus load-line displacement curve (or load versus crack-mouth-opening displacement curve) without unloading/reloading sequences. As a result, the instrumentation is much simpler than in the elastic compliance or potential drop methods. If only a monotonic load-displacement record is to be measured the fracture toughness test becomes almost as simple to perform as a tension test. The method described here improves in three ways the ``original load ratio method`` proposed by Hu et al. First, a blunting term is added to the crack length before maximum load. Second, a strain hardening correction is included after maximum load. And, third, the initial crack length and the physical (final) crack length measured at the end of the test serve to anchor the predicted crack lengths, forcing agreement between predicted and measured values. The method predicts crack extension with excellent accuracy in specimens fabricated from A302, A508, and A533B piping and pressure vessel steels, A588 and A572 structural steels, and HY-80 ship steel.

  6. Stable tearing behavior of a thin-sheet material with multiple cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Amstutz, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture tests were conducted on 2.3mm thick, 305mm wide sheets of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with 1-5 collinear cracks. The cracks were introduced (crack history) into the specimens by three methods: (1) saw cutting; (2) fatigue precracking at a low stress range; and (3) fatigue precracking at a high stress range. For the single crack tests, the initial crack history influenced the stress required for the onset of stable crack growth and the first 10mm of crack growth. The effect on failure stress was about 4 percent or less. For the multiple crack tests, the initial crack history was shown to cause differences of more than 20 percent in the link-up stress and 13 percent in failure stress. An elastic-plastic finite element analysis employing the Crack Tip Opening Angle (CTOA) fracture criterion was used to predict the fracture behavior of the single and multiple crack tests. The numerical predictions were within 7 percent of the observed link-up and failure stress in all the tests.

  7. Asperities, Crack Front Waves and Crack Self Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajak, Pankaj; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    We have performed petascale simulations to study nanomaterial systems capable of sensing and repairing damage in high temperature/high pressure operating conditions. The system we have studied is a ceramic nanocomposite consisting of silicon carbide/silicon dioxide core/shell nanoparticles embedded in alumina. We observe that the interaction of the crack with core/shell asperities gives rise to crack-front waves. We also study crack healing by diffusion of silica into the crack as a function of nanoparticle size and inter-particle distance. Our results are well supported by experimental observations.

  8. On the Crack Bifurcation and Fanning of Crack Growth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Crack growth data obtained from ASTM load shedding method for different R values show some fanning especially for aluminum alloys. It is believed by the authors and it has been shown before that the observed fanning is due to the crack bifurcation occurs in the near threshold region which is a function of intrinsic properties of the alloy. Therefore, validity of the ASTM load shedding test procedure and results is confirmed. However, this position has been argued by some experimentalists who believe the fanning is an artifact of the test procedure and thus the obtained results are invalid. It has been shown that using a special test procedure such as using compressively pre-cracked specimens will eliminate the fanning effect. Since not using the fanned data fit can result in a significantly lower calculated cyclic life, design of a component, particularly for rotorcraft and propeller systems will considerably be impacted and therefore this study is of paramount importance. In this effort both test procedures i.e. ASTM load shedding and the proposed compressive pre-cracking have been used to study the fatigue crack growth behavior of compact tension specimens made of aluminum alloy 2524-T3. Fatigue crack growth paths have been closely observed using SEM machines to investigate the effects of compression pre-cracking on the crack bifurcation behavior. The results of this study will shed a light on resolving the existing argument by better understanding of near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior.

  9. Effect of lower and upper parabolic dips in refractive index profile on performance of coaxial fiber Raman gain amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Anup; Pramanik, Sanchita; Sarkar, Somenath

    2016-03-01

    An investigation on the effect of practically possible upper and lower parabolic dips in the refractive index profile of the inner core of the coaxial fiber Raman gain amplifier is reported using matrix method for single pump. It is seen that for lower parabolic dip, the tolerable limits of dip parameters correspond to dip depth of 0.25% and dip width of 25% of the respective parameters for ideal step index profile case and agree with the earlier predicted linear dip. However, for upper parabolic dip, one gets higher gain and better flatness at these limits. Even up to 1% of the dip depth for 25% of dip width or 75% of dip width for 0.25% of the dip depth or 0.5% of dip depth and 50% of dip width, one can expect performance as good as that of the ideal one. However, since system designers will be aimed to produce ideal profile, our recommendation is to keep tolerable limits within 0.25% of dip depth and 25% of dip width of respective parameters. But one can accept profile with upper parabolic dip if there is deviation within the above relaxation limits for such dip.

  10. Leaching from stone crap traps dipped in Fungitrol: Diesel fuel preservative

    SciTech Connect

    Barre, J.S.; Van Vleet, E.S. )

    1994-12-01

    The stone crab fishery is one of the most important commercial fishing industries in Florida. Since stone crabs are generally caught and harvested by trapping, trap construction and longevity are crucial to the success of the industry. For years, stone crab fishermen have been fishing with wooden traps. Over time, traps become infested with wood-boring animals such as shipworms and isopods, leading to the destruction of the trap. Various wood treatments have been applied to keep wood-borers from infesting the traps in an attempt to increase their longevity and reduce fishing costs. For the past several years, stone crab fishermen have been using a copper-based substance called Fungitrol[sup R] with diesel fuel as a carrier to inhibit wood-borers. Fungitrol (Huls America) is a Cu-naphthenate fungicide containing 8% Cu and is normally used to protect fibrous substrates. Initially, most fishermen dip the wood for their traps in a Fungitrol:diesel fuel mixture (1:10) for anywhere from a few minutes up to 10 days. The traps are then constructed from the treated wood and are allowed to sit outside for up to 5 months before using them for crabbing. In subsequent seasons, the traps are dipped for only 1-3 minutes, then are allowed to sit outside until the opening of the season. The concern with using diesel fuel as a carrier in the dipping process is that this refined petroleum product has been found to be more toxic to marine animal s than many crude oils. Hydrocarbons found in other petroleum products (including fuel oils and crude oils) have been shown to have both lethal and sublethal effects on crustaceans. Various studies have been conducted on wood preservatives and the changes that occur in treated wood with prolonged exposure to water. This study investigates many of the same characteristics of a leachate from marine woods as do the others; however, this particular leachate, diesel fuel, has not been studied until now. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Influence of overriding plate velocity changes on slab dip and deformation: insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Hertgen, Solenn; Martinod, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Over geological times, plate reorganization associated with mantle convection led to changes in absolute plate velocities, which may in turn have impacted the geometry of the subducting plate as well as the overriding plate regime of deformation. Indeed, previous studies have shown a very good correlation between the absolute motion of the overriding plate on one hand and slab dip and overriding plate deformation on the other hand: extension and steep slab are associated with an overriding plate moving away from the trench while shortening and shallow slab occur if the upper plate goes the other way. However, these correlations are established when subduction has reached a steady-state regime and for a constant motion of the overriding plate over the subducting plate, which may not always be the case on Earth. The response of the subduction system to changes in absolute overriding plate velocity still remain an open question. In this study, we conducted a set of 3-D mantle-scale laboratory models of subduction in which we incrementally changed the velocity of the overriding plate to reproduce changes of velocities that may arise from variations of far-field boundary conditions in Nature. We first show that strain rates in the overriding plate are correlated with overriding plate absolute velocity but also that the regime of deformation adjusts rapidly to changes of velocity. This may explain for instance why despite the subduction has been continuous beneath South America since at least the middle Jurassic, shortening along its active margin is only recorded episodically, the main phases of Andean orogeny roughly corresponding to periods of South American plate westward acceleration. We also show that slab dip adjusts to changes of overriding plate velocity but it requires several Myr before it stabilizes. It may explain why the correlation between absolute overriding plate motion and slab dip from the analysis of present-day subduction zones is only moderate, part

  12. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  13. Fatigue-Crack-Tip Locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Clendenin, C. Gerald; Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, James P.; Todhunter, Ronald G.; Simpson, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue-testing system includes automated subsystem continuously tracking location of fatigue-crack tip in metal or other highly electrically conductive specimen. Fatigue-crack-tip-locating subsystem also searches specimen to find initial fatigue crack and its tip and to trace out hidden fatigue cracks and other flaws inside specimen. Subsystem operates under overall control of personal computer, which also controls load frame applying prescribed cyclic stresses to specimen. Electromagnetic flaw detector based on eddy-current principle scanned over surface of specimen. Flaw detector described in "Electromagnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use" (LAR-15046). System provides automated control and monitoring of fatigue experiments, saving time for researchers and enabling experiments to run unattended 24 hours a day. All information on crack-tip trajectories and rates of growth of cracks recorded automatically, so researchers have access to more information.

  14. Efficacy of a barrier teat dip containing .55% chlorhexidine for prevention of bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Hogan, J S; Smith, K L; Todhunter, D A; Schoenberger, P S

    1995-11-01

    A natural exposure trial was conducted for 12 mo in a commercial herd of 125 lactating cows to compare the efficacy of an experimental barrier teat dip containing .55% chlorhexidine gluconate with the efficacy of a 1% iodophor for preventing new IMI and clinical mastitis. Teats of half of the cows were dipped in the experimental barrier product, and teats of the remaining half of the herd were dipped in the 1% iodophor product. Quarters dipped with the experimental barrier product had fewer new IMI caused by Escherichia coli, coagulase-negative staphylococci, or Gram-positive bacilli than did quarters dipped in the 1% iodophor. Incidence of new IMI caused by Serratia spp. and Pseudomonas spp. was greater for quarters dipped in the experimental barrier product than for quarters dipped in the 1% iodophor. Efficacy of the two teat dips against new IMI caused by Staphylococcus aureus, environmental streptococci, and Klebsiella spp. did not differ. Incidence of bacteriologically negative clinical cases of mastitis was greater in quarters dipped in the 1% iodophor than in quarters dipped in the experimental barrier product. Incidence of clinical mastitis cases caused by Staph. aureus, environmental streptococci, E. coli, Klebsiella spp., Serratia spp., and Pseudomonas spp. did not differ between treatment groups. PMID:8747340

  15. Evaluation of experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid by excised teat assay.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A L; Oliver, S P; Fydenkevez, M E

    1984-12-01

    An experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid, diluted in water, was evaluated by excised teat protocol. The teat dip was tested against 21 microorganisms. Included were: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Numerous strains were tested for strain differences. Environmental bacteria were included because of their increasing importance as a cause of bovine mastitis. All excised teats were dipped in a bacterial suspension containing about 1 X 10(8) cfu/ml. Negative control teats were not dipped in a germicidal compound. Positive controls were dipped in 1% iodophor. Effectiveness of the experimental teat dip was expressed as the percent reduction in mean log of bacteria recovered from dipped teats as compared to numbers recovered from control teats. The sodium chlorite - lactic acid dip caused a greater percent log reduction than iodophor for 14 of 21 strains tested. However, differences were generally slight. The experimental teat dip appeared effective against Gram-negative bacteria. Some differences in percent log reduction were observed between strains of the same species. Lowest effectiveness and greatest strain variation were observed with Staphylococcus aureus for both dips tested. PMID:6530497

  16. Review of the phenomenon of dips in spectral lines emitted from plasmas and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, E.; Dalimier, E.; Faenov, A.; Renner, O.

    2014-11-01

    The review covers theoretical and experimental studies of two kinds of dips (local depressions) in spectral line profiles emitted by plasmas: Langmuir-wave-caused dips (L-dips) and charge-exchange-caused dips (X-dips). Positions of L-dips (relative to the unperturbed wavelength of a spectral line) scale with the electron density Ne roughly as Ne1/2, while positions of X-dips are almost independent of Ne. L-dips and X-dips phenomena are interesting and important both fundamentally and practically. The fundamental interest is due to a rich physics behind each of these phenomena. As for important practical applications, they are as follows. Observation of L-dips constitutes a very accurate method to measure the electron density in plasmas - the method that does not require the knowledge of the electron temperature. L-dips also allow measuring the amplitude of the electric field of Langmuir waves - the only one spectroscopic method available for this purpose. In the most recent laser plasma experiments, L-dips were found to be a spectroscopic signature of the two-plasmon decay instability. This instability causes hot-electron generation and is a critical part in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion program. As for observations of X-dips, they serve to determine rates of charge exchange between multicharged ions. This is an important reference data virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. The rates of charge exchange are essential for magnetic fusion in tokamaks, for population inversion in the soft x-ray and VUV ranges, for ion storage devices, as well as for astrophysics (e.g., for the solar plasma and for determining the physical state of planetary nebulae).

  17. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  18. Retrofitting olefin cracking plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, C.; Fernandez-Baujin, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    This article discusses the retrofitting of liquid crackers which produce olefins so that gaseous feedstocks can be used. Naphtha and gas oil are the predominant design feedstocks for producing olefins. The price of gaseous feedstocks such as ethane, propane and butane have become economically more attractive than liquid feedstocks. Existing liquid crackers will be able to produce ethylene at 85% or higher capacity when cracking propane and butane feedstock with only minor changes. Topics considered include revamping for vacuum gas oil (VGO) feedstocks and revamping for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) feedstocks.

  19. Characteristics of seismoelectric interface responses at dipping boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, B.; Kemna, A.

    2012-04-01

    When crossing an interface between two layers with different petrophysical properties, a seismic wave generates a time-varying charge separation which acts as a dipole radiating electromagnetic energy independently of the seismic wave. If we consider a monochromatic seismic source located above a horizontal interface between such media, the seismic wave traverses the interface and causes relative displacement of ions at the matrix-fluid interface in the pore space. The resulting electric field is due to the streaming current imbalance at the interface. This is equivalent to the case of an electrical dipole oscillating in phase with the seismic wave along such boundary. As a consequence, electromagnetic disturbances are radiated away from the dipole source and can be recorded at various receiver lines. This seismic-to-electromagnetic field conversion at petrophysical boundaries in the 1st Fresnel zone is the so-called seismoelectric interface response. Conceptual field models and theoretical modelling indicate that the interface response should be a multipole electrical source. Higher-order terms will diminish more rapidly with distance and therefore will leave the dipole term to dominate. Thus, a seismoelectric interface response emanating from a horizontal boundary in a homogeneous half-space is expected to exhibit symmetry and amplitude characteristics similar to those of a vertical electric dipole (VED) centred on the interface directly below the shot point. However, no general theoretical predictions concerning the characteristics, the shape and the morphology of the VED induced by seismic waves at dipping interfaces can be found in the literature. To gain insight into the spatio-temporal occurrence and evolution of the seismoelectric interface response for dipping interfaces we run several numerical simulations using different petrophysical parameter set-ups. For the modelling, we make use of a simplified time-domain formulation of the coupled physical problem

  20. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  1. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  2. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  3. Liquid-metal dip seal with pneumatic spring

    DOEpatents

    Poindexter, Allan M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved liquid-metal dip seal for sealing the annulus between rotating plugs in the reactor vessel head of a liquid-metal fast-breeder nuclear reactor has two legs of differing widths communicating under a seal blade; the wide leg is also in communication with cover gas of the reactor and the narrow leg is also in communication with an isolated plug annulus above the seal. The annulus contains inert gas which acts as a pneumatic spring. Upon increasing cover gas pressure which depresses the level in the wide leg and greatly increases the level in the narrow leg, the pneumatic spring is compressed, and resists further level changes, thus preventing radioactive cover gas from bubbling through the seal.

  4. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability.

    PubMed

    Bougher, S; Jakosky, B; Halekas, J; Grebowsky, J; Luhmann, J; Mahaffy, P; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Larson, D; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D N; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Brain, D; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, J-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Ma, Y; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability. PMID:26542579

  5. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S.; Jakosky, B.; Halekas, J.; Grebowsky, J.; Luhmann, J.; Mahaffy, P.; Connerney, J.; Eparvier, F.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; Mitchell, D.; Schneider, N.; Zurek, R.; Mazelle, C.; Andersson, L.; Andrews, D.; Baird, D.; Baker, D. N.; Bell, J. M.; Benna, M.; Brain, D.; Chaffin, M.; Chamberlin, P.; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Clarke, J.; Collinson, G.; Combi, M.; Crary, F.; Cravens, T.; Crismani, M.; Curry, S.; Curtis, D.; Deighan, J.; Delory, G.; Dewey, R.; DiBraccio, G.; Dong, C.; Dong, Y.; Dunn, P.; Elrod, M.; England, S.; Eriksson, A.; Espley, J.; Evans, S.; Fang, X.; Fillingim, M.; Fortier, K.; Fowler, C. M.; Fox, J.; Gröller, H.; Guzewich, S.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Holsclaw, G.; Jain, S. K.; Jolitz, R.; Leblanc, F.; Lee, C. O.; Lee, Y.; Lefevre, F.; Lillis, R.; Livi, R.; Lo, D.; Ma, Y.; Mayyasi, M.; McClintock, W.; McEnulty, T.; Modolo, R.; Montmessin, F.; Morooka, M.; Nagy, A.; Olsen, K.; Peterson, W.; Rahmati, A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Russell, C. T.; Sakai, S.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Seki, K.; Steckiewicz, M.; Stevens, M.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Stiepen, A.; Stone, S.; Tenishev, V.; Thiemann, E.; Tolson, R.; Toublanc, D.; Vogt, M.; Weber, T.; Withers, P.; Woods, T.; Yelle, R.

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability.

  6. Vertical movements following a dip-slip earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    The results of finite element (FEM) computations based on elastic dislocation theory are presented. It is shown that the ratio of fault depth to the lithospheric thickness is a significant factor in the sign of the rebound. Subsidence occurs if the fault penetrates less than approximately 0.68 of the way through the lithosphere. An uplift occurs if the fault cuts deeper. The FEM employed consisted of a 546 node, 500 element grid and a quasi-plane strain algorithm. The situation modeled consisted of a 30 deg dip fault in an initially planar elastic lithosphere overlying a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. It is suggested that postseismic rebound may be measurable over a several year interval, thus providing data on lithosphere thicknesses.

  7. ''KN'' series cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klapstov, V.F.; Khlebrikova, M.A.; Maslova, A.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    The basic directions in improving high-activity zeolitic cracking catalysts at the present stage are improvements in the resistance to attrition and increases in the bulk density of the catalysts, along with a changeover to relatively waste-free catalyst manufacturing technology. Catalysts of the ''KN'' series have been synthesized recently with improved quality characteristics. Low-waste technology is used in manufacturing them. Data are presented which show that the KN catalysts are better than the other Soviet catalysts. The starting materials and reagents in preparing the KN catalysts are technical alumina, rare-earth element nitrates, a natural component (such as clay conforming to specification TU-21-25-146-75), sodium hydroxide, and granulated sodium silicate. The preparation of the KN catalysts is described and no silica gel is used in manufacturing the KN series catalyst, in contrast to the RSG-6Ts catalyst. The use of KN series catalysts in place of KMTsR in catalytic cracking units will result in an increase in the naphtha yield by at least 20% by weight, as well as a reduction of the catalyst consumption by a factor of 2-3. A changeover to the commerical production of this catalyst will make it possible to reduce saline waste by a factor of 8-10 and reduce the catalyst cost by a factor of 1.5-2.

  8. Efficacy of .18% iodine teat dip against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C

    1989-04-01

    Effective postmilking teat dip products with lower iodine concentrations are being formulated as concern increases about iodine residues in milk. Increased free iodine concentration with greater germicidal activity in teat dip products is also possible with special formulation procedures. Low iodine concentration dips are cheaper and have reduced teat irritation. A concentrated iodine teat dip containing .18% iodine and 8 ppm free iodine upon dilution was evaluated under experimental bacterial challenge to determine efficacy for prevention of new intramammary infections. The undiluted product also contained 15% collagen protein emollient as a teat skin conditioner. Efficacy of the teat dip was 93.6 and 51. 7% for Staphylococcus aureus (Newbould 305) and Streptococcus agalactiae (McDonald 44). No adverse effects of the dip on teat skin were noted. PMID:2663939

  9. An analysis of ductile rupture modes at a crack tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needleman, A.; Tvergaard, V.

    A N ELASTIC-VISCOPLASTIC model of a ductile, porous solid is used to study the influence of the nucleation and growth of micro-voids in the material near the tip of a crack. Conditions of small scale yielding are assumed, and the numerical analyses of the stress and strain fields are based on finite strain theory, so that crack tip blunting is fully accounted for. An array of large inclusions or inclusion colonies, with a relatively low strength, results in large voids near the crack tip at a rather early stage, whereas small second phase particles in the matrix material between the inclusions require large strains before cavities nucleate. Various distributions of the large inclusions, and various critical strains for nucleation of the small scale voids between the inclusions, are considered. Localization of plastic flow plays an important role in determining the failure path between the crack tip and the nearest larger void, and the path is strongly sensitive to the distribution of the large inclusions. Values of the J-integral and the crack opening displacement at fracture initiation are estimated, together with values of the tearing modulus during crack growth, and these values are related to experimental results.

  10. [Characteristics of the structural organization of the DIP1 gene in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco gene].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2007-01-01

    Molecular cloning of the DIP1 gene located in the 20A4-5 region has been performed from the following strains with the flamenco phenotype: flamSS (SS) and flamMS (MS) characterized by a high transposition rate of retrotransposon gypsy (mdg4), flampy + (P) carrying the insertion of a construction based on the P element into the region of the flamenco gene, and flamenco+. The results of restriction analysis and sequencing cloned DNA fragments has shown that strains flamSS, flamMS, flampy +(P), and flamenco+ considerably differ from one another in the structure of DIP1. Strains flamss and flamMS have no Dral restriction site at position 1765 in the coding region of the gene, specifically, in the domain determining the signal of the nuclear localization of the DIP1 protein. This mutation has been found to consist in a nucleotide substitution in the recognition site of DraI restriction endonuclease, which is transformed from TTTAAA into TTTAAG and, hence, is not recognized by the enzyme. This substitution changes codon AAA into AAG and is translationally insignificant, because both triplets encode the same amino acid, lysine. The Dral gene of strainsflamSS andflamMS has been found to contain a 182-bp insertion denoted IdSS (insertion in DIP1 strain SS); it is located in the second intron of the gene. The IdSS sequence is part of the open reading frame encoding the putative transposase of the mobile genetic element HB1 belonging to the Tcl/mariner family. This insertion is presumed to disturb the conformations of DNA and the chromosome, in particular, by forming loops, which alters the expression of DIPI and, probably, neighboring genes. In strains flamenco+ and flampy + (P), the IdSS insertion within the HB1 sequence is deleted. The deletion encompasses five C-terminal amino acid residues of the conserved domain and the entire C-terminal region of the putative HB1 transposase. The obtained data suggest that DIP1 is involved in the control of gypsy transpositions either

  11. Elastic-plastic fracture of cylindrical shells containing a part-through circumferential crack

    SciTech Connect

    Ezzat, H.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-11-01

    The problem of fatigue crack propagation and ductile fracture of a cylindrical shell containing a macroscopic circumferential flaw is considered. The main interest in the study is in applications to line pipes and other cylindrical containers under secondary axial stresses in addition to the primary stresses coming from the internal pressure. The stress intensity factor for the part-through crack used in analyzing and correlating the fatigue crack propagation rate is obtained by using a line spring model in conjunction with Reissner's shell theory. To analyze the ductile fracture instability and to correlate the experimental and theoretical results, the crack mouth opening displacement is used as the parameter. The limited data on fatigue crack propagation give the expected result, namely that the crack propagation rate in pipes may be predicted from the fatigue results performed on simpler geometries provided the stress intensity factors in pipes are calculated with sufficient accuracy. 14 references.

  12. Stress analysis and stress-intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses, and the stress-intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress-intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center-cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress-intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids

  13. Stress analysis and stress intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids.

  14. Constraints on the long-period moment-dip tradeoff for the Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Victor C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Duputel, Zacharie

    2011-10-01

    Since the work of Kanamori and Given (1981), it has been recognized that shallow, pure dip-slip earthquakes excite long-period surface waves such that it is difficult to independently constrain the moment (M0) and the dip (δ) of the source mechanism, with only the product M0 sin(2δ) being well constrained. Because of this, it is often assumed that the primary discrepancies between the moments of shallow, thrust earthquakes are due to this moment-dip tradeoff. In this work, we quantify how severe this moment-dip tradeoff is depending on the depth of the earthquake, the station distribution, the closeness of the mechanism to pure dip-slip, and the quality of the data. We find that both long-period Rayleigh and Love wave modes have moment-dip resolving power even for shallow events, especially when stations are close to certain azimuths with respect to mechanism strike and when source depth is well determined. We apply these results to USGS W phase inversions of the recent M9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and estimate the likely uncertainties in dip and moment associated with the moment- dip tradeoff. After discussing some of the important sources of moment and dip error, we suggest two methods for potentially improving this uncertainty.

  15. 29 CFR 1910.124 - General requirements for dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... least quarterly during operation; and (ii) Prior to operation after a prolonged shutdown. (2) Ensure... after a prolonged shutdown. (3) Periodically inspect all dipping and coating equipment, including...

  16. Constraints on the long-period moment-dip tradeoff for the Tohoku earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Duputel, Zacharie

    2011-01-01

    Since the work of Kanamori and Given (1981), it has been recognized that shallow, pure dip-slip earthquakes excite long-period surface waves such that it is difficult to independently constrain the moment (M0) and the dip (δ) of the source mechanism, with only the product M0 sin(2δ) being well constrained. Because of this, it is often assumed that the primary discrepancies between the moments of shallow, thrust earthquakes are due to this moment-dip tradeoff. In this work, we quantify how severe this moment-dip tradeoff is depending on the depth of the earthquake, the station distribution, the closeness of the mechanism to pure dip-slip, and the quality of the data. We find that both long-period Rayleigh and Love wave modes have moment-dip resolving power even for shallow events, especially when stations are close to certain azimuths with respect to mechanism strike and when source depth is well determined. We apply these results to USGS W phase inversions of the recent M9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and estimate the likely uncertainties in dip and moment associated with the moment- dip tradeoff. After discussing some of the important sources of moment and dip error, we suggest two methods for potentially improving this uncertainty.

  17. Constraints on the long-period moment-dip tradeoff for the Tohoku earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, V.C.; Hayes, G.P.; Duputel, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Since the work of Kanamori and Given (1981), it has been recognized that shallow, pure dip-slip earthquakes excite long-period surface waves such that it is difficult to independently constrain the moment (M0) and the dip (??) of the source mechanism, with only the product M0 sin(2??) being well constrained. Because of this, it is often assumed that the primary discrepancies between the moments of shallow, thrust earthquakes are due to this moment-dip tradeoff. In this work, we quantify how severe this moment-dip tradeoff is depending on the depth of the earthquake, the station distribution, the closeness of the mechanism to pure dip-slip, and the quality of the data. We find that both long-period Rayleigh and Love wave modes have moment-dip resolving power even for shallow events, especially when stations are close to certain azimuths with respect to mechanism strike and when source depth is well determined. We apply these results to USGS W phase inversions of the recent M9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and estimate the likely uncertainties in dip and moment associated with the moment-dip tradeoff. After discussing some of the important sources of moment and dip error, we suggest two methods for potentially improving this uncertainty. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Reciprocity principle and crack identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieux, Stéphane; Ben Abda, Amel; Duong Bui, Huy

    1999-02-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the planar crack identification problem defined by a unique complete elastostatic overdetermined boundary datum. Based on the reciprocity gap principle, we give a direct process for locating the host plane and we establish a new constuctive identifiability result for 3D planar cracks.

  19. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  20. Interface cracks in piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorukha, V.; Kamlah, M.; Loboda, V.; Lapusta, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their intrinsic electromechanical coupling behavior, piezoelectric materials are widely used in sensors, actuators and other modern technologies. It is well known that piezoelectric ceramics are very brittle and susceptible to fracture. In many cases, fracture occurs at interfaces as debonding and cracks. This leads to an undesired degradation of electrical and mechanical performance. Because of the practical and fundamental importance of the problem, interface cracks in piezoelectric materials have been actively studied in the last few decades. This review provides a comprehensive survey of recent works on cracks situated at the interface of two materials, at least one of which has piezoelectric or piezoelectromagnetic properties. Different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces are discussed. The oscillating and contact zone models for in-plane straight interface cracks between two dissimilar piezoelectric materials or between piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric ones are reviewed. Different peculiarities related to the investigation of interface cracks in piezoelectric materials for the anti-plane case, for functionally graded and thermopiezoelectric materials are presented. Papers related to magnetoelectroelastic bimaterials, to steady state motion of interface cracks in piezoelectric bimaterials and to circular arc-cracks at the interface of piezoelectric materials are reviewed, and various methods used to address these problems are discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on future research directions.

  1. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. It is assumed that the plane contains a series of collinear cracks perpendicular to the interfaces and is loaded in tension away from and perpendicular to the cracks. The problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. The singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. An interesting result found from the analysis of the latter is that for certain orthotropic material combinations the stress state at the point of intersection of a crack and an interface may be bounded whereas in isotropic materials at this point stresses are always singular. A number of numerical examples are worked out to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  2. Replica-Based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  3. What Crack Does to Babies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Janice

    1991-01-01

    Describes the effect of crack on the user and on the pregnant user's offspring. Children of the first crack addicts are now in school and exhibit an array of behavioral and cognitive difficulties. Early intervention in a supportive environment has succeeded in preparing some of these children for the classroom. (DM)

  4. Shapes Formed By Interacting Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, K.

    2014-12-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in rocks to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated stress geometries and different microscopic mechanisms, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths. We investigate the origins of this widely observed "en passant" crack pattern by fracturing a rectangular slab which is notched on two sides and then subjected to quasistatic uniaxial, biaxial, or shear strain. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until they pass each other, after which they curve and release a lens-shaped fragment. Under uniaxial strain, we find that each crack path has a universal shape and aspect ratio which is independent of the material. By changing the geometry of the applied strain, we are able to achieve different aspect ratios for the crack paths. With birefringent materials, it is possible to interpret these patterns in light of the stress geometry, and we are able to explain the origins of these universal shapes with a simple geometrical model. Since a variety of aspect ratios have similarly been observed in geological contexts, this raises the possibility of using observed crack shapes as a diagnostic for the stress conditions under which cracks were formed in nature. In particular, the shape may serve as a means to infer the boundary loading in situations where history and dynamics are inaccessible.

  5. Effects of thickness on plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure: Analysis and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.; Chan, K.K.; Yu, J.

    1999-07-01

    The crack-opening stress was measured using a strain gage technique on 7050 aluminum alloy, under constant amplitude and repeated overload. The behavior of crack-opening stress predicted by Newman's FASTRAN-II is consistent with the experimental results for repeated overload. It is also found that the FASTRAN-II program is capable of predicting crack growth on the 7050-T76 aluminum plate and 7050-T76 aluminum plate and 7050-T7452 aluminum hand forging under complex simulated flight loading which contains a significant number of compression cycles.

  6. Variations of a global constraint factor in cracked bodies under tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Bigelow, C. A.; Dawicke, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Elastic-plastic finite-element analyses were used to calculate stresses and displacements around a crack in finite-thickness plates for an elastic-perfectly plastic material. Middle- and edge-crack specimens were analyzed under tension and bending loads. Specimens were 1.25 to 20 mm thick with various widths and crack lengths. A global constraint factor alpha(sub g), an averaged normal-stress to flow-stress ratio over the plastic region, was defined to simulate three-dimensional (3D) effects in two-dimensional (2D) models. For crack lengths and uncracked ligament lengths greater than four times the thickness, the global constraint factor was found to be nearly a unique function of a normalized stress-intensity factor (related to plastic-zone size to thickness ratio) from small- to large-scale yielding conditions for various specimen types and thickness. For crack length-to-thickness ratios less than four, the global constraint factor was specimen type, crack length and thickness dependent. Using a 2D strip-yield model and the global constraint factors, plastic-zone sizes and crack-tip displacements agreed reasonably well with the 3D analyses. For a thin sheet aluminum alloy, the critical crack-tip-opening angle during stable tearing was found to be independent of specimen type and crack length for crack length-to-thickness ratios greater than 4.

  7. Fracture mechanics of propagating 3-D fatigue cracks with parametric dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akiyuki; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2013-07-01

    Propagation of 3-D fatigue cracks is analyzed using a discrete dislocation representation of the crack opening displacement. Three dimensional cracks are represented with Volterra dislocation loops in equilibrium with the applied external load. The stress intensity factor (SIF) is calculated using the Peach-Koehler (PK) force acting on the crack tip dislocation loop. Loading mode decomposition of the SIF is achieved by selection of Burgers vector components to correspond to each fracture mode in the PK force calculations. The interaction between 3-D cracks and free surfaces is taken into account through application of the superposition principle. A boundary integral solution of an elasticity problem in a finite domain is superposed onto the elastic field solution of the discrete dislocation method in an infinite medium. The numerical accuracy of the SIF is ascertained by comparison with known analytical solution of a 3-D crack problem in pure mode I, and for mixed-mode loading. Finally, fatigue crack growth simulations are performed with the Paris law, showing that 3-D cracks do not propagate in a self-similar shape, but they re-configure as a result of their interaction with external boundaries. A specific numerical example of fatigue crack growth is presented to demonstrate the utility of the developed method for studies of 3-D crack growth during fatigue.

  8. Variations of a global constraint factor in cracked bodies under tension and bending loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Bigelow, C. A.; Dawicke, D. S.

    1994-05-01

    Elastic-plastic finite-element analyses were used to calculate stresses and displacements around a crack in finite-thickness plates for an elastic-perfectly plastic material. Middle- and edge-crack specimens were analyzed under tension and bending loads. Specimens were 1.25 to 20 mm thick with various widths and crack lengths. A global constraint factor alpha(sub g), an averaged normal-stress to flow-stress ratio over the plastic region, was defined to simulate three-dimensional (3D) effects in two-dimensional (2D) models. For crack lengths and uncracked ligament lengths greater than four times the thickness, the global constraint factor was found to be nearly a unique function of a normalized stress-intensity factor (related to plastic-zone size to thickness ratio) from small- to large-scale yielding conditions for various specimen types and thickness. For crack length-to-thickness ratios less than four, the global constraint factor was specimen type, crack length and thickness dependent. Using a 2D strip-yield model and the global constraint factors, plastic-zone sizes and crack-tip displacements agreed reasonably well with the 3D analyses. For a thin sheet aluminum alloy, the critical crack-tip-opening angle during stable tearing was found to be independent of specimen type and crack length for crack length-to-thickness ratios greater than 4.

  9. Modeling Transverse Cracking in Laminates With a Single Layer of Elements Per Ply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Meer, Frans P.; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to investigate the ability of mesolevel X-FEM models with a single layer of elements per ply to capture accurately all aspects of matrix cracking. In particular, we examine whether the model can predict the insitu ply thickness effect on crack initiation and propagation, the crack density as a function of strain, the strain for crack saturation, and the interaction between delamination and transverse cracks. Results reveal that the simplified model does not capture correctly the shear-lag relaxation of the stress field on either side of a crack, which leads to an overprediction of the crack density. It is also shown, however, that after onset of delamination many of the inserted matrix cracks close again, and that the density of open cracks becomes similar to the density predicted by the detailed model. The degree to which the spurious cracks affect the global response is quantified and the reliability of the mesolevel approach with a single layer of elements per ply is discussed.

  10. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. First, the problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. Then, the singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied in some detail. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. A number of numerical examples are worked out in order to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Finally, some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  11. Hydrocarbon cracking and reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Q.N.; Schipper, P.H.; Owen, H.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a process for upgrading paraffinic naphtha to high octane fuel. It comprises: contacting a fresh naphtha feedstock stream containing a major amount of C{sub 7+} alkanes and naphthenes with medium pore acid cracking catalyst under low pressure selective cracking conditions effective to produce 4-C5 isoalkene and C4-C5 isoalkane, the cracking catalyst being substantially free of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation metal components and having an acid cracking activity less than 15; separating cracking effluent to obtain an olefinic fraction rich in C4-C5 isoalkene and a C6+ fraction; etherifying the C4-C5 isoalkene fraction by catalytic reaction with lower alkanol to produce tertiary-alkyl ether product; and reforming the C6+ fraction to provide high octane gasoline components.

  12. The effect of transverse crack upon parametric instability of a rotor-bearing system with an asymmetric disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that either the asymmetric disk or transverse crack brings parametric inertia (or stiffness) excitation to the rotor-bearing system. When both of them appear in a rotor system, the parametric instability behaviors have not gained sufficient attentions. Thus, the effect of transverse crack upon parametric instability of a rotor-bearing system with an asymmetric disk is studied. First, the finite element equations of motion are established for the asymmetric rotor system. Both the open and breathing transverse cracks are taken into account in the model. Then, the discrete state transition matrix (DSTM) method is introduced for numerically acquiring the instability regions. Based upon these, some computations for a practical asymmetric rotor system with open or breathing transverse crack are conducted, respectively. Variations of the primary and combination instability regions induced by the asymmetric disk with the crack depth are observed, and the effect of the orientation angle between the crack and asymmetric disk on various instability regions are discussed in detail. It is shown that for the asymmetric angle around 0, the existence of transverse (either open or breathing) crack has attenuation effect upon the instability regions. Under certain crack depth, the instability regions could be vanished by the transverse crack. When the asymmetric angle is around π/2, increasing the crack depth would enhance the instability regions.

  13. High speed thin plate fatigue crack monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device and method are provided which non-destructively detect crack length and crack geometry in thin metallic plates. A non-contacting vibration apparatus produces resonant vibrations without introducing extraneous noise. Resulting resonant vibration shifts in cracked plates are correlated to known crack length in plates with similar resonant vibration shifts. In addition, acoustic emissions of cracks at resonance frequencies are correlated to acoustic emissions from known crack geometries.

  14. Nonlinear analysis of flexural wave propagation through 1D waveguides with a breathing crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-05-01

    An analytical-numerical approach is presented to investigate the flexural wave propagation through a slender semi-infinite beam with a breathing edge-crack. A Fourier transform based spectral finite element method is employed in an iterative manner to analyze the nonlinear response of the cracked beam subjected to a transverse tone burst excitation. Results obtained using the spectral finite element method are corroborated using 1D finite element analysis that involves the formulation and solution of a linear complementarity problem at every time step. In both the methods, an equivalent rotational spring is used to model the local flexibility caused by an open crack and the respective damaged beam element is formulated. The effect of crack-breathing is accounted for by an intermittent contact force acting at the nodes of the damaged beam element. A parallel study involving the open crack model is performed in the same setting to facilitate a comparison between the open and the breathing crack model. An illustrative case study reveals clearly the existence of higher order harmonics originating from the crack-breathing phenomenon which are absent if the crack is assumed to remain open throughout. A thorough investigation of the wrap-around effect associated with spectral finite element method reveals that the relative strengths of the higher order harmonics are not influenced by the wrap-around effect. A brief parametric study involving the variation of crack depth is presented at the end which suggests that the magnitudes of the higher harmonic peaks increase with increasing levels of crack severity. The present study can be potentially useful in the efforts geared toward the development of damage detection/localization strategies based on the nonlinear wave-damage interaction.

  15. Prediction of fatigue crack-growth patterns and lives in three-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth patterns and lives for surface cracks, surface cracks at holes, and corner cracks at holes in three dimensional bodies were predicted using linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts that were modified to account for crack-closure behavior. The predictions were made by using stress intensity factor equations for these crack configurations and the fatigue crack-growth (delta K against rate) relationship for the material of interest. The crack configurations were subjected to constant-amplitude fatigue loading under either remote tension or bending loads. The predicted crack growth patterns and crack growth lives for aluminum alloys agreed well with test data from the literature.

  16. Germicidal activity of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip and a sodium chlorite teat dip during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    1998-08-01

    Three postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in two separate studies using experimental challenge procedures that were recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The first study evaluated a barrier teat dip product containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide as the germicidal agent, and the second study evaluated a sodium chlorite product with a barrier component as well as a sodium chlorite product without a barrier component. The chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip reduced new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 91.5% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 71.7%. The barrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae by 41.0 and 0%, respectively. The nonbarrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 65.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 39.1%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the second study; no deleterious effects among dipped quarters compared with control quarters were noted for the two sodium chlorite products. PMID:9749396

  17. On crack initiation in notched, cross-plied polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. D.; Schesser, D.; Niess, M.; Wright, P.; Mavrogordato, M. N.; Sinclair, I.; Spearing, S. M.; Cox, B. N.

    2015-05-01

    The physics of crack initiation in a polymer matrix composite are investigated by varying the modeling choices made in simulations and comparing the resulting predictions with high-resolution in situ images of cracks. Experimental data were acquired using synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) at a resolution on the order of 1 μm, which provides detailed measurement of the location, shape, and size of small cracks, as well as the crack opening and shear displacements. These data prove sufficient to discriminate among competing physical descriptions of crack initiation. Simulations are executed with a high-fidelity formulation, the augmented finite element method (A-FEM), which permits consideration of coupled damage mechanisms, including both discrete cracks and fine-scale continuum damage. The discrete cracks are assumed to be nonlinear fracture events, governed by reasonably general mixed-mode cohesive laws. Crack initiation is described in terms of strength parameters within the cohesive laws, so that the cohesive law provides a unified model for crack initiation and growth. Whereas the cracks investigated are typically 1 mm or less in length, the fine-scale continuum damage refers to irreversible matrix deformation occurring over gauge lengths extending down to the fiber diameter (0.007 mm). We find that the location and far-field stress for crack initiation are predicted accurately only if the variations of local stress within plies and in the presence of stress concentrators (notches, etc.) are explicitly computed and used in initiation criteria; stress redistribution due to matrix nonlinearity that occurs prior to crack initiation is accounted for; and a mixed-mode criterion is used for crack initiation. If these factors are not all considered, which is the case for commonly used failure criteria, predictions of the location and far-field stress for initiation are not accurate.

  18. Stable Tearing and Buckling Responses of Unstiffened Aluminum Shells with Long Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    1999-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of the nonlinear response of thin, unstiffened, aluminum cylindrical shells with a long longitudinal crack are presented. The shells are analyzed with a nonlinear shell analysis code that accurately accounts for global and local structural response phenomena. Results are presented for internal pressure and for axial compression loads. The effect of initial crack length on the initiation of stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in typical shells subjected to internal pressure loads is predicted using geometrically nonlinear elastic-plastic finite element analyses and the crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The results of these analyses and of the experiments indicate that the pressure required to initiate stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in a shell subjected to internal pressure loads decreases as the initial crack length increases. The effects of crack length on the prebuckling, buckling and postbuckling responses of typical shells subjected to axial compression loads are also described. For this loading condition, the crack length was not allowed to increase as the load was increased. The results of the analyses and of the experiments indicate that the initial buckling load and collapse load for a shell subjected to axial compression loads decrease as the initial crack length increases. Initial buckling causes general instability or collapse of a shell for shorter initial crack lengths. Initial buckling is a stable local response mode for longer initial crack lengths. This stable local buckling response is followed by a stable postbuckling response, which is followed by general or overall instability of the shell.

  19. Stable Tearing and Buckling Responses of Unstiffened Aluminum Shells with Long Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of the nonlinear response of thin, unstiffened, aluminum cylindrical shells with a long longitudinal crack are presented. The shells are analyzed with a nonlinear shell analysis code that accurately accounts for global and local structural response phenomena. Results are presented for internal pressure and for axial compression loads. The effect of initial crack length on the initiation of stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in typical shells subjected to internal pressure loads is predicted using geometrically nonlinear elastic-plastic finite element analyses and the crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The results of these analyses and of the experiments indicate that the pressure required to initiate stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in a shell subjected to internal pressure loads decreases as the initial crack length increases. The effects of crack length on the prebuckling, buckling and postbuckling responses of typical shells subjected to axial compression loads are also described. For this loading condition, the crack length was not allowed to increase as the load was increased. The results of the analyses and of the experiments indicate that the initial buckling load and collapse load for a shell subjected to axial compression loads decrease as the initial crack length increases. Initial buckling causes general instability or collapse of a shell for shorter initial crack lengths. Initial buckling is a stable local response mode for longer initial crack lengths. This stable local buckling response is followed by a stable postbuckling response, which is followed by general or overall instability of the shell.

  20. Four-beam model for vibration analysis of a cantilever beam with an embedded horizontal crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Weidong; Charalambides, Panos G.; Shao, Yimin; Xu, Yongfeng; Wu, Kai; Xiao, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    As one of the main failure modes, embedded cracks occur in beam structures due to periodic loads. Hence it is useful to investigate the dynamic characteristics of a beam structure with an embedded crack for early crack detection and diagnosis. A new four-beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the transverse vibration of a cantilever beam with an embedded horizontal crack; two separate beam segments are used to model the crack region to allow opening of crack surfaces. Each beam segment is considered as an Euler-Bernoulli beam. The governing equations and the matching and boundary conditions of the four-beam model are derived using Hamilton's principle. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of the four-beam model are calculated using the transfer matrix method. The effects of the crack length, depth, and location on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are investigated. A continuous wavelet transform method is used to analyze the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. It is shown that sudden changes in spatial variations of the wavelet coefficients of the mode shapes can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack. The first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cantilever beam with an embedded crack from the finite element method and an experimental investigation are used to validate the proposed model. Local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips can be described by the proposed four-beam model, which cannot be captured by previous methods.

  1. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  2. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  3. Hydromechanical Responses in Dipping Fractured Mudstones at the NAWC Site, West Trenton, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisz, D.; Ebenhack, J.; Tiedeman, C.; Murdoch, L.

    2008-12-01

    Hydromechanical well tests were conducted at two wells at the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in West Trenton, NJ, a site underlain by fractured mudstone, shale, and sandstone dipping from 15° to 70° NW. The wells used for this study were drilled and cored as part of an ongoing research program conducted by the USGS to further understand flow and transport of chlorinated solvents. The wells are completed in two different stratigraphic intervals, a fine-grained inter-bedded mudstone, and a coarse- grained, but well cemented sandstone. Steeply dipping fractures cut the mudstone, and a bedding plane parting occurs in core from the sandstone. The objective of this field study was to characterize the hydromechanical behavior, and aquifer properties from hydromechanical well tests in dipping fractured sedimentary rock. Fracture locations were determined in each test well from geophysical logs, cores, and video camera surveys. Fractures were then isolated with inflatable packers and suites of pressurized-air-slug and constant- rate tests were conducted with a removable borehole extensometer. The well completed in fractured mudstone, 5BR, had limited space for the packer assembly due to a rough borehole wall, resulting in two different packer configurations during hydromechanical testing; 1) typical inflation of both packers and 2) only a single top packer inflated. Slug tests were conducted with maximum head changes of 2.8 to 10.5 m. The other test well, 6BR, completed in sandstone was also tested using air-slug-tests ranging at similar pressures. A 2-hour-long constant rate test at 12.5 L/min was conducted after the slug tests in 6BR. Transient pressures and displacement responses were measured during all tests. Results indicate that T ranges from 2 to 7.5 m2/day depending on the pressure applied, or volume used in the test-low pressure, low volume tests give large relative T values, which decrease with increasing pressure or slug volume. Apparent compliance in 6

  4. Biogenic Cracks in Porous Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms growing on and inside porous rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of porous media. We designed a model porous medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the porous medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within porous medium until saturation of the porous space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and porous media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the porous sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model porous medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.

  5. Numerical simulation of dip-coating in the evaporative regime.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mohar; Doumenc, Frédéric; Guerrier, Béatrice

    2016-02-01

    A hydrodynamic model is used for numerical simulations of a polymer solution in a dip-coating-like experiment. We focus on the regime of small capillary numbers where the liquid flow is driven by evaporation, in contrast to the well-known Landau-Levich regime dominated by viscous forces. Lubrication approximation is used to describe the flow in the liquid phase. Evaporation in stagnant air is considered (diffusion-limited evaporation), which results in a coupling between liquid and gas phases. Self-patterning due to the solutal Marangoni effect is observed for some ranges of the control parameters. We first investigate the effect of evaporation rate on the deposit morphology. Then the role of the spatial variations in the evaporative flux on the wavelength and mean thickness of the dried deposit is ascertained, by comparing the 2D and 1D diffusion models for the gas phase. Finally, for the very low substrate velocities, we discuss the relative importance of diffusive and advective components of the polymer flux, and consequences on the choice of the boundary conditions. PMID:26920522

  6. Morphology development in hot-dip galvanneal coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.; Marder, A.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Hot-dip galvanized drawing quality special killed (DQSK) steel and titanium stabilized interstitial free (IF) steel substrates were annealed under varying temperature and time conditions in order to characterize the coating structure development which occurs during the annealing portion of the galvannealing process. Through the use of light optical microscopy, the coating morphology development (Fe-Zn alloy layer growth) observed in cross section on both substrates was defined in three distinct stages. The three characteristic microstructures were classified as type 0 (underalloyed), type 1 (marginally alloyed), and type 2 (overalloyed) morphologies. The morphology transitions were quantitatively defined by total iron content in the coating and by the thickness of an interfacial Fe-Zn gamma phase layer. The DQSK steel coating type 1 to type 2 morphology transition occurred at an iron content of 9 to 10 wt pct. For the titanium IF material, the same type 1 to type 2 morphology transition occurred at an iron content of 10.5 to 11.5 wt pct and at an interfacial layer thickness of approximately 1.0 [mu]m. An increased amount of aluminum in the galvanizing bath delayed the alloying reaction during galvannealing for both substrates. The overall inhibition effect of aluminum was less pronounced on the titanium stabilized IF material, indicating that its coating alloying kinetics were not as significantly influenced by bath aluminum content.

  7. Multiplexed Dip Pen Nanolithography patterning by simple desktop nanolithography platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Smetana, Alexander; Stiles, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Multiplexed patterning in the micro-scale has been required in order to accomplish functional bio-materials templating on the subcellular length scale. Multiplexed bio-material patterns can be used in several fields: high sensitivity DNA/protein chip development, cell adhesion/differentiation studies, and biological sensor applications. Especially, two or more materials' patterning in subcellular length scale is highly demanding to develop a multi-functional and highintegrated chip device. The multiplexing patterning of two or more materials is a challenge because of difficulty in an alignment and a precision of patterning. In this work, we demonstrate that multiplexed dip pen nanolithography® (DPN®) patterning up to four different material inks by means of using recently developed new generation nanolithography platform (NLP 2000™, NanoInk, Inc., Skokie, IL). Ink materials were prepared by adding different colored fluorescent dyes to matrix carrier materials, such as poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEG-DMA) and lipid material (1,2- dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, DOPC). Finally, dot-array patterns of four different inks were obtained in 50 × 50 μm2 area. This lithography platform is capable of patterning 12 separate materials within micrometer areas by efficient use of the available MEMS accessories. This number can be scaled up further with development of new accessories.

  8. Lipid dip-pen nanolithography on self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavutis, Martynas; Navikas, Vytautas; Rakickas, Tomas; Vaitekonis, Šarūnas; Valiokas, Ramūnas

    2016-02-01

    Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) with lipids as an ink enables functional micro/nanopatterning on different substrates at high process speeds. However, only a few studies have addressed the influence of the physicochemical properties of the surface on the structure and phase behavior of DPN-printed lipid assemblies. Therefore, by combining the scanning probe and optical imaging techniques in this work we have analyzed lipid microdomain formation on the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold as well-defined model surfaces that displayed hydrophilic (protein-repellent) or hydrophobic (protein-adhesive) characteristics. We have found that on the tri(ethylene glycol)-terminated SAM the lipid ink transfer was fast (~10-1 μm3 s-1), quasi-linear and it yielded unstable, sparsely packed lipid microspots. Contrary to this, on the methyl-terminated SAM the lipid transfer was ~20 times slower, nonlinear, and the obtained stable dots of ~1 μm in diameter consisted of lipid multilayers. Our comparative analysis indicated that the measured lipid transfer was consistent with the previously reported so-called polymer transfer model (Felts et al 2012, Nanotechnology 23 215301). Further on, by employing the observed distinct contrast in the DPN ink behavior we constructed confined lipid microdomains on pre-patterned SAMs, in which the lipids assembled either into monolayer or multilamellar phases. Such microdomains can be further utilized for lipid membrane mimetics in microarray and lab-on-a-chip device formats.

  9. PolDIP2 interacts with human PrimPol and enhances its DNA polymerase activities.

    PubMed

    Guilliam, Thomas A; Bailey, Laura J; Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2016-04-20

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) employs specialized DNA polymerases to bypass replication fork stalling lesions. PrimPol was recently identified as a TLS primase and polymerase involved in DNA damage tolerance. Here, we identify a novel PrimPol binding partner, PolDIP2, and describe how it regulates PrimPol's enzymatic activities. PolDIP2 stimulates the polymerase activity of PrimPol, enhancing both its capacity to bind DNA and the processivity of the catalytic domain. In addition, PolDIP2 stimulates both the efficiency and error-free bypass of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxoG) lesions by PrimPol. We show that PolDIP2 binds to PrimPol's catalytic domain and identify potential binding sites. Finally, we demonstrate that depletion of PolDIP2 in human cells causes a decrease in replication fork rates, similar to that observed in PrimPol(-/-)cells. However, depletion of PolDIP2 in PrimPol(-/-)cells does not produce a further decrease in replication fork rates. Together, these findings establish that PolDIP2 can regulate the TLS polymerase and primer extension activities of PrimPol, further enhancing our understanding of the roles of PolDIP2 and PrimPol in eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance. PMID:26984527

  10. The Dip. H.E. Coombe Lodge Report, Study Confererence 74/43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    Papers presented on the Dip. H.E., a two-year course in higher education recently developed in Britain include: the future of higher education (W. Taylor); the colleges of education perspective on the Dip. H.E. (N. Payne); the colleges of further education perspective (W. Bosley); the polytechnics perspective (A. Sandbach); validating the diploma…

  11. 21 CFR 529.1044b - Gentamicin solution for dipping eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gentamicin solution for dipping eggs. 529.1044b... Gentamicin solution for dipping eggs. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains gentamicin... concentration of 500 parts per million is recommended. Clean eggs should be held submerged in the...

  12. Everyday Discrimination and Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping in Black and White Americans

    PubMed Central

    Tomfohr, Lianne; Cooper, Denise C.; Mills, Paul J.; Nelesen, Richard A.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping is closely linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Self-reported experiences of everyday discrimination have also been associated with negative cardiovascular health outcomes. This study investigated whether an association exists between experiences of everyday discrimination and BP dipping in a biracial sample of Black and White adults. Methods Seventy-eight hypertensive and normotensive women and men (30 Black and 48 White) reported on their experiences of everyday discrimination (the Everyday Discrimination Scale) and underwent two separate 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) sessions approximately one week apart. Results Correlation analysis revealed that higher endorsement of everyday discrimination was significantly associated with less diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) dipping (p <0.05). Subsequent hierarchical regression analyses indicated that everyday discrimination explained 8-11% of the variance in SBP and DBP dipping above and beyond other demographic and lifestyle-related factors including race, age, 24-hour BP, body mass index (BMI), and current socioeconomic status (SES). The relationship between discrimination and dipping was significantly stronger on the second night of monitoring. Finally, analyses revealed that everyday discrimination mediated the relationship between race and BP dipping. Conclusions These findings suggest that experiences of everyday discrimination are associated with less nocturnal SBP and DBP dipping above and beyond the effect of known covariates. The use of multiple ABPM sessions may facilitate the detection of relationships between psychological variables and BP dipping. PMID:20124424

  13. 7 CFR 305.21 - Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. 305.21... Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. Mangoes may be treated using schedule T102-a: (a) Fruit... the treatment. (c) Water in the treatment tank must be treated or changed regularly to...

  14. PolDIP2 interacts with human PrimPol and enhances its DNA polymerase activities

    PubMed Central

    Guilliam, Thomas A.; Bailey, Laura J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2016-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) employs specialized DNA polymerases to bypass replication fork stalling lesions. PrimPol was recently identified as a TLS primase and polymerase involved in DNA damage tolerance. Here, we identify a novel PrimPol binding partner, PolDIP2, and describe how it regulates PrimPol's enzymatic activities. PolDIP2 stimulates the polymerase activity of PrimPol, enhancing both its capacity to bind DNA and the processivity of the catalytic domain. In addition, PolDIP2 stimulates both the efficiency and error-free bypass of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxoG) lesions by PrimPol. We show that PolDIP2 binds to PrimPol's catalytic domain and identify potential binding sites. Finally, we demonstrate that depletion of PolDIP2 in human cells causes a decrease in replication fork rates, similar to that observed in PrimPol−/− cells. However, depletion of PolDIP2 in PrimPol−/− cells does not produce a further decrease in replication fork rates. Together, these findings establish that PolDIP2 can regulate the TLS polymerase and primer extension activities of PrimPol, further enhancing our understanding of the roles of PolDIP2 and PrimPol in eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance. PMID:26984527

  15. 29 CFR 1910.124 - General requirements for dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements for dipping and coating operations. 1910.124 Section 1910.124 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.124...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.123 - Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 1910.123 Section 1910.123 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.123 Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions. (a) Does this rule apply to me? (1) This rule (§§ 1910.123 through 1910.126) applies when you use a...

  17. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  18. Repeated crack healing in MAX-phase ceramics revealed by 4D in situ synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sloof, Willem G.; Pei, Ruizhi; McDonald, Samuel A.; Fife, Julie L.; Shen, Lu; Boatemaa, Linda; Farle, Ann-Sophie; Yan, Kun; Zhang, Xun; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Lee, Peter D.; Withers, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    MAX phase materials are emerging as attractive engineering materials in applications where the material is exposed to severe thermal and mechanical conditions in an oxidative environment. The Ti2AlC MAX phase possesses attractive thermomechanical properties even beyond a temperature of 1000 K. An attractive feature of this material is its capacity for the autonomous healing of cracks when operating at high temperatures. Coupling a specialized thermomechanical setup to a synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy endstation at the TOMCAT beamline, we captured the temporal evolution of local crack opening and healing during multiple cracking and autonomous repair cycles at a temperature of 1500 K. For the first time, the rate and position dependence of crack repair in pristine Ti2AlC material and in previously healed cracks has been quantified. Our results demonstrate that healed cracks can have sufficient mechanical integrity to make subsequent cracks form elsewhere upon reloading after healing. PMID:26972608

  19. Repeated crack healing in MAX-phase ceramics revealed by 4D in situ synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloof, Willem G.; Pei, Ruizhi; McDonald, Samuel A.; Fife, Julie L.; Shen, Lu; Boatemaa, Linda; Farle, Ann-Sophie; Yan, Kun; Zhang, Xun; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Lee, Peter D.; Withers, Philip J.

    2016-03-01

    MAX phase materials are emerging as attractive engineering materials in applications where the material is exposed to severe thermal and mechanical conditions in an oxidative environment. The Ti2AlC MAX phase possesses attractive thermomechanical properties even beyond a temperature of 1000 K. An attractive feature of this material is its capacity for the autonomous healing of cracks when operating at high temperatures. Coupling a specialized thermomechanical setup to a synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy endstation at the TOMCAT beamline, we captured the temporal evolution of local crack opening and healing during multiple cracking and autonomous repair cycles at a temperature of 1500 K. For the first time, the rate and position dependence of crack repair in pristine Ti2AlC material and in previously healed cracks has been quantified. Our results demonstrate that healed cracks can have sufficient mechanical integrity to make subsequent cracks form elsewhere upon reloading after healing.

  20. Prediction of Crack Growth under Variable-Amplitude Loading in Thin-Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the application of a "plasticity-induced" crack closure model to study fatigue crack growth under various load histories. The model was based on the Dugdale model but modified to leave plastically deformed material in the wake of the advancing crack. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant-amplitude loading and then used to predict crack growth under variable-amplitude and spectrum loading on thin-sheet 2024- T3 aluminum alloys. Predicted crack-opening stresses agreed well with test data from the literature. The crack-growth lives agreed within a factor of two for single and repeated spike overloads/underloads and within 20 percent for spectrum loading. Differences were attributed to fretting-product-debris-induced closure and three-dimensional affects not included in the model.

  1. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  2. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  3. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  4. Evaluation of a teat dip of chlorhexidine digluconate (.5%) with glycerin (6%).

    PubMed

    Hicks, W G; Kennedy, T J; Keister, D M; Miller, M L

    1981-11-01

    Efficacy of a teat dip containing .5% chlorhexidine digluconate and 6% glycerin was tested on 46 clinically normal cows, each with functional quarters. Twice daily immediately after milking, all teats were exposed to a suspension containing 5 X 10(7) colony forming units of Staphylococcus aureus. After each exposure to the infective broth, the left teats were dipped in teat dip while the right teats remained as untreated controls. The study continued until sufficient number of infections occurred to establish efficacy. Mastitis screening followed standard procedures as established by the National Mastitis Council and identified 24 infected teats in the control group and 6 in the treated group for 75% efficacy. The tested teat dip was effective in reducing the incidence of intramammary infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus under experimental exposure. No chapping or irritation occurred with use of the teat dip. PMID:7334167

  5. Estimation of nighttime dip-equatorial E-region current density using measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kuldeep; Sekar, R.; Anandarao, B. G.; Gupta, S. P.; Chakrabarty, D.

    2016-08-01

    The existence of the possible ionospheric current during nighttime over low-equatorial latitudes is one of the unresolved issues in ionospheric physics and geomagnetism. A detailed investigation is carried out to estimate the same over Indian longitudes using in situ measurements from Thumba (8.5 ° N, 76.9 ° E), empirical plasma drift model (Fejer et al., 2008) and equatorial electrojet model developed by Anandarao (1976). This investigation reveals that the nighttime E-region current densities vary from ∼0.3 to ∼0.7 A/km2 during pre-midnight to early morning hours on geomagnetically quiet conditions. The nighttime current densities over the dip equator are estimated using three different methods (discussed in methodology section) and are found to be consistent with one another within the uncertainty limits. Altitude structures in the E-region current densities are also noticed which are shown to be associated with altitudinal structures in the electron densities. The horizontal component of the magnetic field induced by these nighttime ionospheric currents is estimated to vary between ∼2 and ∼6 nT during geomagnetically quiet periods. This investigation confirms the existence of nighttime ionospheric current and opens up a possibility of estimating base line value for geomagnetic field fluctuations as observed by ground-based magnetometer.

  6. Dip Spectroscopy of the Low Mass X-Ray Binary XB 1254-690

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, Alan P.; Church, M. J.; BalucinskaChurch, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We observed the low mass X-ray binary XB 1254-690 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 2001 May and December. During the first observation strong dipping on the 3.9-hr orbital period and a high degree of variability were observed, along with "shoulders" approx. 15% deep during extended intervals on each side of the main dips. The first observation also included pronounced flaring activity. The non-dip spectrum obtained using the PCA instrument was well-described by a two-component model consisting of a blackbody with kT = 1.30 +/- 0.10 keV plus a cut-off power law representation of Comptonized emission with power law photon index 1.10 +/- 0.46 and a cut-off energy of 5.9(sup +3.0, sub -1.4) keV. The intensity decrease in the shoulders of dipping is energy-independent, consistent with electron scattering in the outer ionized regions of the absorber. In deep dipping the depth of dipping reached 100%, in the energy band below 5 keV, indicating that all emitting regions were covered by absorber. Intensity-selected dip spectra were well-fit by a model in which the point-like blackbody is rapidly covered, while the extended Comptonized emission is progressively overlapped by the absorber, with the, covering fraction rising to 95% in the deepest portion of the dip. The intensity of this component in the dip spectra could be modeled by a combination of electron scattering and photoelectric absorption. Dipping did not occur during the 2001 December observation, but remarkably, both bursting and flaring were observed contemporaneously.

  7. Comparison of piracetam measured with HPLC-DAD, HPLC-ESI-MS, DIP-APCI-MS, and a newly developed and optimized DIP-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Claudia; Winterfeld, Gottfried A; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2016-06-01

    The direct inlet probe-electrospray ionization (DIP-ESI) presented here was based on the direct inlet probe-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DIP-APCI) developed by our group. It was coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) for the detection of more polar compounds such as degradation products from pharmaceuticals. First, the position of the ESI tip, the gas and solvent flow rates, as well as the gas temperature were optimized with the help of the statistic program Minitab® 17 and a caffeine standard. The ability to perform quantitative analyses was also tested by using different concentrations of caffeine and camphor. Calibration curves with a quadratic calibration regression of R (2) = 0.9997 and 0.9998 for caffeine and camphor, respectively, were obtained. The limit of detection of 2.5 and 1.7 ng per injection for caffeine and camphor were determined, respectively. Furthermore, a solution of piracetam was used to compare established analytical methods for this drug and its impurities such as HPLC-diode array detector (DAD) and HPLC-ESI-MS with the DIP-APCI and the developed DIP-ESI. With HPLC-DAD and 10 μg piracetam on column, no impurity could be detected. With HPLC-ESI-MS, two impurities (A and B) were identified with only 4.6 μg piracetam on column, while with DIP-ESI, an amount of 1.6 μg piracetam was sufficient. In the case of the DIP-ESI measurements, all detected impurities could be identified by MS/MS studies. Graphical Abstract Scheme of the DIP-ESI principle. PMID:27071761

  8. Microstructural evolution in bitaxial crack-seal veins: A phase-field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankit, Kumar; Urai, Janos L.; Nestler, Britta

    2015-05-01

    Bitaxial crack sealing by epitaxial crystal growth is the most common vein-forming process in Earth's crust, but the details of the microstructural processes in these are not well understood. Here we model the evolution of bitaxial crack-seal quartz veins in two and three dimensions, using the phase-field method. Our numerical simulations show the influence of different parameters, such as the obliquity of crack opening and crack location, grain size, and orientations on the evolving vein microstructure. We examine the underlying growth competition observed during epitaxial growth of quartz. Results show many similarities with natural microstructures such as stretched crystals and compare well with the previous numerical findings. As the ratio of crack aperture and matrix grain size for the present studies is chosen to be sufficiently large for growth competition to occur before complete sealing, it leads to the formation of crystal fragments along the crack-opening trajectory. We explain how such fragment trails act as potential indicators of the opening of crack-seal veins, if they are confirmed to be common in natural microstructures. Finally, we highlight the importance of accounting for the third dimension in the numerical simulations by analyzing the evolution of fluid connectivity in 2-D and 3-D during the sealing process.

  9. On the measurement of the crack tip stress field as a means of determining Delta K(sub eff) under conditions of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallhead, Ian R.; Edwards, Lyndon; Poole, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The optical method of caustics has been successfully extended to enable stress intensity factors as low as 1MPa square root of m to be determined accurately for central fatigue cracks in 2024-T3 aluminium alloy test panels. The feasibility of using this technique to study crack closure, and to determine the effective stress intensity factor range, Delta K(sub eff), has been investigated. Comparisons have been made between the measured values of stress intensity factor, K(sub caus), and corresponding theoretical values, K(sub theo), for a range of fatigue cracks grown under different loading conditions. The values of K(sub caus) and K(sub theo) were in good agreement at maximum stress, where the cracks are fully open, while K(sub caus) exceeded K(sub theo) at minimum stress, due to crack closure. However, the levels of crack closure and values of Delta K(sub eff) obtained could not account for the variations of crack growth rate with loading conditions. It is concluded that the values of Delta K(sub eff), based on caustic measurements in a 1/square root of r stress field well outside the plastic zone, do not fully reflect local conditions which control crack tip behavior.

  10. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  11. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  12. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  13. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  14. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  15. Vibrations Caused By Cracked Turbopump Bearing Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.; Dweck, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Expansion gives rise to eccentricity. Report presents analysis of dynamic effects caused by cracking of inner race of ball bearing in turbopump. Crack manifested itself via increase in vibrations synchronous with rotation and smaller increase at twice frequency of rotation. Analysis conducted to verify these increases were caused solely by crack and to understand implications for future such cracks.

  16. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  17. Shaft vibrations in turbomachinery excited by cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabowski, B.

    1982-01-01

    During the past years the dynamic behavior of rotors with cracks has been investigated mainly theoretically. This paper deals with the comparison of analytical and experimental results of the dynamics of a rotor with an artificial crack. The experimental results verify the crack model used in the analysis. They show the general possibility to determine a crack by extended vibration control.

  18. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  19. Prediction of the thermosonic signal from fatigue cracks in metals using vibration damping measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidini, Marco; Cawley, Peter; Barden, Tim; Almond, Darryl; Duffour, Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Thermosonics (also known as ultrasound stimulated thermography or sonic infrared imaging) is a potentially attractive nondestructive testing method for the detection of contacting interface-type defects such as fatigue cracks in metals and delaminations in composites. A high power acoustic horn is typically used to excite a complex vibration field, which causes the defect interfaces to rub and dissipate energy as heat. The resulting local increase in temperature at one of the specimen surfaces can then be measured by an infrared camera. In this study a set of steel beams with fatigue cracks of different depth and variable partial crack opening was tested. Each beam was instrumented with strain gages across the crack and at the back face for the measurement of both the "breathing" behavior of the cracks and the excited vibration. The heat released at the crack was predicted from the measured vibration and an experimental estimate of the additional damping introduced in the specimens by each crack. The cracks were modeled analytically as nonuniform heat sources. Hence the temperature rise expected on the monitoring surface of the specimens could be predicted and compared with the infrared camera measurements. The results show good linear correlation between predictions and measurements, thus validating the prediction algorithm. The relationship between the vibration input and the thermal output will allow, as a longer-term goal, the prediction of the general threshold level of vibration needed for reliable crack detection.

  20. Analysis of mixed-mode crack propagation using the boundary integral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.; Ghosn, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Crack propagation in a rotating inner raceway of a high speed roller bearing is analyzed using the boundary integral equation method. The method consists of an edge crack in a plate under tension, upon which varying Hertzian stress fields are superimposed. A computer program for the boundary integral equation method was written using quadratic elements to determine the stress and displacement fields for discrete roller positions. Mode I and Mode II stress intensity factors and crack extension forces G sub 00 (energy release rate due to tensile opening mode) and G sub r0 (energy release rate due to shear displacement mode) were computed. These calculations permit determination of that crack growth angle for which the change in the crack extension forces is maximum. The crack driving force was found to be the alternating mixed-mode loading that occurs with each passage of the most heavily loaded roller. The crack is predicted to propagate in a step-like fashion alternating between radial and inclined segments, and this pattern was observed experimentally. The maximum changes DeltaG sub 00 and DeltaG sub r0 of the crack extension forces are found to be good measures of the crack propagation rate and direction.

  1. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); Kelly, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  2. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K.; Kelly, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  3. Near-Neutral pH SCC Crack Initiation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebert, John

    4-Point bend studies on X-52 linepipe steel with ''natural'' surfaces (sigmamax = 95% SMYS, f = 0.001 Hz, R = 0.6) in synthetic soil solutions indicate that crack initiation and transgranular crack formation occurs more readily in C2 solutions than in C4 solutions. This increase is associated with solution compositions that increase general corrosion rates and that reduce the precipitation of carbonates. When it is assumed that relative differences in bulk solution properties are manifested at the crack tip, then these differences may promote a more favourable environment for crack tip dissolution, ion transport, and microplastic deformation. Although the results are not definitive, in these studies the development of longer and transgranular cracks appear to be associated more with differences in solution composition than with differences in surface finish. Increased corrosion and hydrogen permeation rates are associated with increased proton, carbonic acid, and bicarbonate ion concentrations and not explicitly with lower pH. Calculations show, at open circuit corrosion conditions, that FeCO3 precipitation can limit pH increases.

  4. Modeling Disk Cracks in Rotors by Utilizing Speed Dependent Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Haase, Wayne C.

    2010-03-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of vibration-based structural health monitoring for detecting disk cracks in rotor systems. The approach of interest assumes that a crack located on a rotating disk causes a minute change in the system’s center of mass due to the centrifugal force induced opening of the crack. The center of mass shift is expected to reveal itself in the vibration vector (i.e., whirl response; plotted as amplitude and phase versus speed) gathered during a spin-up and/or spin-down test. Here, analysis is accomplished by modeling a Jeffcott rotor that is characterized by analytical, numerical, and experimental data. The model, which has speed dependent eccentricity, is employed in order to better understand the sensitivity of the approach. For the experimental set-up emulated here (i.e., a single disk located mid-span on a flexible shaft), it appears that a rather sizable flaw in the form of a through-thickness notch could be detected by monitoring the damage-induced shift in center of mass. Although, identifying actual disk cracks in complex “real world” environments, where noncritical crack lengths are small and excessive mechanical and/or electrical noise are present, would prove to be rather challenging. Further research is needed in this regard.

  5. Extrinsic factors in the mechanics of bridged cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.N. )

    1991-01-01

    Calculations for single-edge notch specimens under uniform remote tension are used to demonstrate the profound influence of the extrinsic factors of specimen shape and load distribution on the propagation of bridged cracks when the bridging zone length is comparable to any of the dimensions of the crack or the specimen. The influence of the extrinsic factors is so strong that there is a grave risk of seriously nonconservative predictions of strength and reliability if standard engineering methods are used for materials exhibiting such bridged cracks. However, this difficulty can be resolved by regarding the relationship between the bridging tractions p and the crack opening displacement u as a fundamental material property. Extensive calculations are summarized for one class of relations p(u) that rise to a peak corresponding to ligament failure and then fall gradually to zero at large u. Resistance curves of great variety are displayed. The central role of the bridging length scale, the initial crack extension over which the bridging zone matures, is demonstrated. The roles of various features of p(u) in determining the transition from noncatastrophic (or ductile) failure to catastrophic (or brittle) failure are examined.

  6. Dip-dependent variations in LFE duration during ETS events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chestler, S.; Creager, K.; Ghosh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays experiment, we create a new, more spatially complete catalog of LFEs beneath the Olympic Peninsula, WA. Using stacked waveforms produced by stacking 1-minute windows of data from each array over the slowness with the greatest power [Ghosh et al., 2012], we pick out peaks in tremor activity that are consistent over multiple arrays. These peaks are potential LFE detections. Fifteen-second windows of raw data centered on each peak are scanned through time. If the waveform repeats, the detection is used as a new LFE family. Template waveforms for each family are created by stacking all windows that correlate with the initial detection. During an ETS event, activity at a given point on the plate interface (i.e. the activity of an LFE family) typically lasts for 3.5 (downdip) to 5 days (updip). Activity generally begins with a flurry of LFEs lasting 8 hours (downdip) to 20 hours (updip) followed by many short bursts of activity separated by 5 hours or more. Updip families have more bursts (5-10) than downdip families (2-5 bursts). The later bursts often occur during times of encouraging tidal shear stress, while the initial flurries have no significant correlation with tides. While updip LFE families are more active during ETS events than downdip families, they seldom light up between ETS events, which only occur every 12-14 months. On the other hand, downdip LFE families are active much more frequently during the year; the most down-dip families exhibit activity every week or so. Because updip families are rarely active between ETS events, it is possible that little stress is released updip during inter-ETS time periods. Hence during ETS events more stress needs to be released updip than downdip, consistent with the longer-duration activity of updip LFE families.

  7. Distribution of aluminum in hot-dip galvanized coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Furdanowicz, V.; Shastry, C.R.

    1999-12-01

    Hot-dip galvanized panels of low-carbon (LC) and interstitial-free (IF) steels were produced in a laboratory simulator with an average coating mass of 60 g/m{sup 2}. Three pot aluminum levels were used, viz. 0.10% (by wt), 0.15%, and 0.18%. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize coating and base steel microstructures. Wet chemical analysis and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were employed for compositional analyses. The aluminum content of the melt was found to be the predominant factor influencing the distribution of Al in the coating. At 0.18% melt aluminum, Al is partitioned between the aluminide inhibition layer at the coating-steel interface ({approximately}80%) and the zinc overlay ({approximately}20%). At 0.15%, it is partitioned among the aluminide layer ({approximately}75% to 80%), zinc-iron (FeZn{sub 13}, {zeta}) intermetallic layer ({approximately}5% to 15%), and the coating overlay ({approximately}10%). At 0.10%, the aluminum is divided almost equally between the overlay and the zinc-iron intermetallics. At the two lower aluminum levels is the distribution marginally influenced by the steel grade. The {zeta} was found to not preferentially nucleate at the ferrite grain boundaries. When both the aluminide and {zeta} occurred at the coating-steel interface, the {zeta} particles appeared near discontinuities and thinner regions in the aluminide layer. The coating, relative to the melt, is enriched in aluminum because of its concentration in the aluminide and in the zinc-iron intermetallics. This enrichment increases with melt aluminum through an increase in the aluminum content of the aluminide layer and not of its thickness.

  8. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in past users of sheep dip and other pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Christine; Poole, Jason; Palmer, Keith T; Peveler, Robert; Coggon, David

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To explore the prevalence and pattern of neuropsychiatric symptoms in past users of sheep dip and other pesticides. Methods From a postal survey of men born between 1933 and 1977 and resident in three rural areas of England and Wales (response rate 31%), data were obtained on lifetime history of work with pesticides, neurological symptoms in the past month, current mental health and tendency to be troubled by non‐neurological somatic symptoms (summarised as a somatising tendency score). Risk factors for current neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed by modified Cox regression. Results Data were available for 9844 men, including 1913 who had worked with sheep dip, 832 with other insecticides but not sheep dip and 990 with other pesticides but never with sheep dip or insecticides. Neurological symptoms were consistently 20–60% more common in past users of sheep dip than in men who had never worked with pesticides, but their prevalence was also higher in men who had worked only with pesticides other than sheep dip or insecticides. They clustered strongly within individuals, but this clustering was not specific to men who had worked with sheep dip. Reporting of three or more neurological symptoms was associated with somatising tendency (prevalence ratio (PR) 15.0, 95% CI 11.4 to 19.5, for the highest vs the lowest category of somatisation) and was more common in users of sheep dip (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.6), other insecticides (PR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.8) and other pesticides (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.7) than in non‐users. Among users of sheep dip, prevalence was higher in men who had dipped most often, but not in those who had worked with sheep dip concentrate. Past use of pesticides was not associated with current anxiety or depression. Conclusion Neurological symptoms are more common in men who have worked with sheep dip, but the association is not specific to sheep dip or insecticides. A toxic cause for the excess cannot be ruled out, but several

  9. Analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    The correlation between fatigue crack propagation and stress intensity factor is analyzed. When determining fatigue crack propagation rate, a crack increment, delta a, and its corresponding increment in load cycles, delta N, are measured. Fatigue crack propagation must be caused by a shear and/or a normal separation mode. Both of these two processes are discrete if one looks at the atomic level. If the average deformation and fracture properties over the crack increments, delta a, can be considered as homogeneous, if the characteristic discrete lengths of sigma a, if the plastic zone size is small, and if a plate is thick enough to insure a plane strain case, da/dN is proportional to delta K squared. Any deviation of empirical data from this relation must be caused by the fact that one or more of these conditions are not satisfied. The effects of plate thickness and material inhomogeneity are discussed in detail. A shear separation mode of fatigue crack propagation is described and is used to illustrate the effects of material inhomogeneity.

  10. Characterization of the Tank 19F Closure Grab and Core Samples and the Tank 18F Dip Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, R.F.

    2002-05-02

    The results of analyses of the Tank 19F closure characterization samples are included herein. The samples analyzed include the two Tank 19F grab samples (FTF-075 and FTF-077) and a Tank 18F dip sample (FTF-076) taken in September 2001 and a Tank 19F core sample (FTF-118) taken in December 2001. The FTF-075 and FTF-077 grab samples were pulled from Tank 19F and the FTF-076 dip sample was pulled from Tank 18F in September 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of Tank 19F. The samples were delivered to the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Shielded Cells on September 28, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on October 2, 2001. The samples were opened and both grab samples were found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. The samples were dark and resembled marsh muck (see Figures 1 and 2). The dip sample was also found to contain plenty of material. The sample looked like muddy water (Figure 4). The FTF-118F core sample was pulled from Tank 19F in December 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of the tank. The sample was delivered to the SRTC Shielded Cells on December 6, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on December 7, 2001. The sample was opened and found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. As evident in Figure 3, the sample resembled a somewhat drier version of the previous grab samples FTF-075 and FTF-077. A group consisting of SRTC Waste Processing Technology (WPT) section personnel and High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) personnel viewed the sample when it was opened and came to the consensus that the sample appeared to be homogeneous. The decision was made to treat the sample as a single phase and analyze accordingly. Initially, small portions were archived from the top, middle and bottom of the sample in case it is later decided to analyze the levels of the sample separately. The analytical results from the two grab samples and the core sample were all

  11. Seismic Imaging of Open Subsurface Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Matzel, E.; Aguiar, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of high-pressure fluid into the subsurface is proven to stimulate geothermal, oil, and gas production by opening cracks that increase permeability. The effectiveness of increasing permeability by high-pressure injection has been revolutionized by the introduction of "proppants" into the injected fluid to keep cracks open after the pressure of the stimulation activity ends. The network of fractures produced during stimulation is most commonly inferred by the location of micro-earthquakes. However, existing (closed) fractures may open aseismically, so the whole fracture network may not be imaged by micro-seismic locations alone. Further, whether all new fractures remain open and for how long remains unclear. Open cracks, even fluid-filled cracks, scatter seismic waves because traction forces are not transmitted across the gap. Numerical simulation confirms that an open crack with dimensions on the order of 10 meters can scatter enough seismic energy to change the coda of seismic signals. Our simulations show that changes in seismic coda due to newly opened fractures are only a few percent of peak seismogram amplitudes, making signals from open cracks difficult to identify. We are developing advanced signal processing methods to identify candidate signals that originate from open cracks. These methods are based on differencing seismograms that are recorded before and after high-pressure fluid injection events to identify changes in the coda. The origins of candidate signals are located using time-reversal techniques to determine if the signals are indeed associated with a coherent structure. The source of scattered energy is compared to micro-seismic event locations to determine whether cracks opened seismically or aseismically. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675612.

  12. A critical survey of considerations in maintaining process continuity during voltage dips while protecting motors with reclosing and bus-transfer practices

    SciTech Connect

    Mulukutla, S.S. ); Gulachenski, E.M. )

    1992-08-01

    Continuous-process plants, such as Petro-chemical Industries and Paper Mills with thermo-mechanical pulping, are being designed today with fewer and larger components arranged in single-train configurations. Maintaining operating continuity with fewer components requires high equipment reliability. Motor controls for large components are using magnetic contactors equipped with automatic undervoltage reclosing. A voltage dip where contactors drop open and reclose can be very serious because of the nature of motors and their driven loads during voltage transients. In this paper, the general nature of the problem and criteria for safe reclosing or transfer of several motors on the same bus are presented. Finally, various protective schemes against out-of-phase reclosing and transfer, as well as methods of riding through voltage dips, are discussed.

  13. Thickness effects on a cracked aluminum plate with composite patch repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubbe, Joel Jon

    Post-repair fatigue crack growth was investigated in 3.175, 4.826, and 6.35 mm thick aluminum panels (508 mm long, 153 mm wide), asymmetrically repaired with boron/epoxy composite patches bonded to the plates with FM73 sheet adhesive. Patches were uniaxial with patch to panel stiffness ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.3. Experimental fatigue tests were carried out at 120 MPa, R = 0.1, and 10 Hz (sinusoidal) to measure patched and unpatched face crack lengths, center crack opening displacements, and selected strains. Crack growth data was acquired using optical, eddy current, and post-test analysis methods. Crack growth rates were calculated using the incremental polynomial method. Test results showed increased plate thickness caused increased fatigue crack growth rates in both unrepaired and repaired panels. Thermally-induced bending due to patch bonding affects crack growth rates. Increased stiffness ratios increased life-spans and reduced crack growth anomalies such as retardation. Disbond growth is more dependent on crack size than on patch configuration and tends to accelerate when the crack grows beyond a critical length or where the patch changes thickness. A three-layer Mindlin plate finite element model was used as a two-dimensional analytical technique to predict patched and unpatched face reaction loads and displacements. This method uses a third plate layer to model the adhesive layer as a continuum. Constraint equations are used to enforce compatibility conditions along the plate-adhesive and adhesive patch interfaces. The calculated loads and displacements, in conjunction with the modified crack closure method, were used to compute stress intensity factors for the crack tips. Crack growth rates were calculated using experimentally determined material constants and the fatigue crack growth relationship (Paris Law) of the unpatched plate. Comparisons of the experimental to analytical curvatures of repaired panels showed excellent agreement for crack lengths

  14. Dual function cracking catalyst (DFCC) composition

    SciTech Connect

    Occelli, M.L.

    1986-10-07

    The patent describes a novel catalytic cracking composition comprising a cracking catalyst having high activity and, as a separate and distinct entity, a diluent comprising a substantially catalytically inactive crystalline aluminosilicte having a fresh MAT Activity below about 1. The diluent is clinoptilolite and the cracking catalyst contains a rare earth-exchanged crystalline aluminium silicate. The cracking catalyst comprises from about ten to about 60 weight percent of a zeolite having cracking characteristics dispersed in a refractory metal oxide matrix.

  15. HZ Her/Her X-1: Study of the light curve dips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igna, Ciprian Dacian

    The HZ Her/Her X-1 X-ray binary exhibits rapid and variable X-ray absorption features. These were noticed soon after the discovery of its periodic flux variations, such as X-ray pulsations and eclipses, and were named light curve dips by Giacconi et al. 1973. Their properties were analyzed, debated and documented ever since. The largest existing set of detailed observations of Her X-1 are contained in the data archive of NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). From this entire light curve, several hundred new light curve dips were documented, based on X-ray Softness Ratio (SR), making this thesis the most extensive study of HZ Her/Her X-1's dips to date. The dips were classified into 12 different categories in order to study their statistical distribution, intensity, duration, symmetry and SR evolution. Some dips properties depend on Her X-1's 35-day X-ray cycle, which is caused by the precessing disk around the neutron star. The 35-day phase of dips was determined using Turn-On (TO) times calculated from the February 1996 - December 2009 RXTE/All Sky Monitor (ASM) light curve. 147 TOs were found by cross-correlation with X-ray cycle templates, and the 22 Burst and Transient Source Experiment TOs were confirmed. Thus this study also has the longest time period yet for the analysis of the 35-day X-ray cycle. The set of 147 TOs does not correlate with 0.2 or 0.7 orbital phases, disproving the reports over the past 30 years. The ASM-based 35-day cycle lengths range from 33.2 to 36.7 days, with an average of 34.7 +/- 0.2 days. The observed timing of dips is illustrated in the 35-day phase vs. orbital phase plot, and compared to models. The current large set of dips gives much better detail than that of Crosa & Boynton 1980. A model for dips is developed here, which takes dips to be caused by blockage of the line of sight to the neutron star by the site of the accretion stream - disk collision. An extensive investigation of the model

  16. Efficacy of two barrier iodine teat dips under natural exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Foret, C; Agüero, H; Janowicz, P

    2006-06-01

    The efficacy of 2 iodine barrier teat dips was compared with a conventional iodine postmilking teat dip. The products were evaluated using a natural exposure trial on a 250-cow dairy based on the National Mastitis Council guidelines. Bacteriological samples were taken every 2 wk over 6 mo. All dips contained 1.0% available iodine and high levels of free iodine for germicidal efficacy. Barrier 1 was an experimental dip containing 14 to 20 ppm of free iodine, barrier 2 contained 8 to 14 ppm of free iodine, and the nonbarrier control contained 12 to 16 ppm of free iodine. The average free iodine for barrier 1 and barrier 2 combined was 14 ppm, which was equal to the average free iodine for the positive control. A 21% reduction of new intramammary infections (IMI) was observed for the 2 barrier dips combined when compared with the nonbarrier control. A significant reduction of 38% was observed for the clinical infection rate for barrier 1 when compared with barrier 2; however, barrier 1 did not significantly reduce the subclinical IMI when compared with barrier 2. Barrier 1 significantly reduced the combined clinical and subclinical IMI by 24% when compared with the positive control. The skin condition showed slight variation among the dips over the course of the trial, but no difference was observed at the end of the trial. Barrier 1, with the highest concentration of free iodine, gave the best efficacy results of all 3 dips. PMID:16702295

  17. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  18. Observation of Intralaminar Cracking in the Edge Crack Torsion Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Davidson, Barry D.

    2013-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is evaluated to determine its suitability for measuring fracture toughness associated with mode III delamination growth onset. A series of ECT specimens with preimplanted inserts with different lengths is tested and examined using nondestructive and destructive techniques. Ultrasonic inspection of all tested specimens reveals that delamination growth occurs at one interface ply beneath the intended midplane interface. Sectioning and optical microscopy suggest that the observed delamination growth results from coalescence of angled intralaminar matrix cracks that form and extend across the midplane plies. The relative orientation of these cracks is approximately 45 deg with respect to the midplane, suggesting their formation is caused by resolved principal tensile stresses arising due to the global mode-III shear loading. Examination of ECT specimens tested to loads below the level corresponding to delamination growth onset reveals that initiation of intralaminar cracking approximately coincides with the onset of nonlinearity in the specimen's force-displacement response. The existence of intralaminar cracking prior to delamination growth onset and the resulting delamination extension at an unintended interface render the ECT test, in its current form, unsuitable for characterization of mode III delamination growth onset. The broader implications of the mechanisms observed in this study are also discussed with respect to the current understanding of shear-driven delamination in tape-laminate composites.

  19. Study on subsurface-inclined crack propagation during machining of brittle crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiawen; Chen, Jianbin; Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen

    2016-05-01

    There is an immense need to obtain high-quality surface and subsurface on brittle material owing to the advantage of its improved performance. Thus, in this paper, we proposed a mechanical and numerical study of fracture mechanics from the perspective of external loading and indentation geometry in brittle machining. Stress intensity factors are computed to analyze various impacts of external loading and indentation configuration on subsurface crack propagation. Results indicate that the main fracture mode for inclined crack is shear rather than opening and the apex angle of the indentation plays an important role in fracture behavior. As a certain external loading is exerted to the surface of the silicon, a large apex angle of indentation may lead to strong shielding effect on mode II crack propagation. A relationship between critical value of external loading to the crack propagation and the apex angle of the indentation is given in this paper that shows quantitative indication for suppression of crack growth.

  20. T{sub {epsilon}}{sup *} integral under plane stress crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, Yoshika; Ma, Leong; Kobayashi, A.S.; Okada, Hiroshi; Atluri, S.N.

    1997-12-01

    The T{sub {epsilon}}{sup *} integral values associated with stable crack growth in A606 HSLA steel single-edge-notched (SEN) specimens were determined experimentally and numerically. The displacement fields obtained through Moire interferometry and elastic-plastic finite element analysis were used to evaluate T{sub {epsilon}}{sup *} associated with the moving crack tip. T{sub {epsilon}}{sup *} decreased with the reduction in the size of the integration contour, {Gamma}{sub {epsilon}}, and continually increased with stable crack growth in this specimen. The measured and computed crack-tip opening angle (CTOA), on the other hand, was a constant 15{degree} during stable crack growth after dropping from the measured and computed initial high values of 35 and 57{degree}, respectively.

  1. Effects of Tip Mass on Stability of Rotating Cantilever Pipe Conveying Fluid with Crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, In Soo; Yoon, Han Ik; Lee, Sang Pil; Kim, Dong Jin

    In this paper, the dynamic stability of a rotating cantilever pipe conveying fluid with a crack and tip mass is investigated by numerical method. That is, the effects of the rotating the rotating angular velocity, the mass ratio, the crack and tip mass on the critical flow velocity for flutter instability of system are studied. The equations of motion of rotating pipe are derived by using the extended Hamilton's principle. The crack section of pipe is represented by a local flexibility matrix connecting two undamaged pipe segments. The crack is assumed to be in the first mode of fracture and always opened during the vibrations. Finally, the stability maps of the cracked rotating pipe system as a rotating angular velocity and mass ratio β are presented.

  2. Pilot studies on novel catalyst for sulfur removal from cracked naphthas with minimal octane loss

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, D.E. Jr.; Gripka, P.J.; Clausen, M.F.; Nelson, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    Oil companies are expecting wider mandated use of reformulated gasolines and further environmental mandates to lower sulfur contents of reformulated gasolines in the near future. Environmental agencies currently believe that lower sulfur contents will significantly upgrade the quality of automotive exhaust gases. Most of the sulfur in a typical refinery gasoline pool comes from {open_quotes}cracked naphthas,{close_quotes} e.g. from Fluid Catalyst Cracking Units (FCCU`s). Cracked naphthas also have high olefin contents, and thus, high octane numbers. Although it is relatively easy to remove sulfur from a cracked naphtha in a low severity hydrotreating operation, at the same time, significant olefin saturation and octane reduction occur. Clearly, a selective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) process with minimal olefin reduction is required to produce low sulfur, high octane cracked naphthas. 2 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. All-optical probing of the nonlinear acoustics of a crack.

    PubMed

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chigarev, Nikolay; Tournat, Vincent; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2011-09-01

    Experiments with an all-optical method for the study of the nonlinear acoustics of cracks in solids are reported. Nonlinear acoustic waves are initiated by the absorption of radiation from a pair of laser beams intensity modulated at two different frequencies. The detection of acoustic waves at mixed frequencies, absent in the frequency spectrum of the heating lasers, by optical interferometry or deflectometry provides unambiguous evidence of the elastic nonlinearity of the crack. The high contrast in crack imaging achieved by remote optical monitoring of the nonlinear acoustic processes is due to the strong dependence of the efficiency of optoacoustic conversion on the state of the crack. The highest acoustic nonlinearity is observed in the transitional state of the crack, which is intermediate between the open and the closed ones. PMID:21886240

  4. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1986-10-01

    This paper presents results on: (a) the influence of simulated BWR environments on the stress-corrosion-craking (SCC) susceptibility of Types 304, 316NG, and 347 stainless (SS); (b) fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate measurements on these materials and weld overlay specimens in different environments; and (c) residual stress measurements and metallographic evaluations of conventional pipe weldments treated by a mechanical-stress-improvement process (MSIP) as well as those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure. Crack initiation studies on Types 304 and 316NG SS under crevice and non-crevice conditions in 289/sup 0/C water containing 0.25 ppM dissolved oxygen with low sulfate concentrations indicate that SCC initiates at very low strains (<3%) in the nuclear grade material. Crack growth measurements on fracture-mechanics-type specimens, under low-frequency cyclic loading, show that the Type 316NG steel cracks at a somewhat lower rate (approx.40%) than sensitized Type 304 SS in an impurity environment with 0.25 ppM dissolved-oxygen; however, the latter material stops cracking when sulfate is removed from the water. Crack growth in both materials ceases under simulated hydrogen-water chemistry conditions (<5 ppB oxygen) even with 100 ppB sulfate present in the water. An unexpected result was obtained in the test on a weld overlay specimen in the impurity environment, viz., the crack grew to the overlay interface at a nominal rate, branched at 90/sup 0/ in both directions, and then grew at high rate (parallel to the nominal applied load). Residual stress measurements on MSIP-treated weldments and those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure indicate that these techniques produce compressive stresses over most of the inner surface near the weld and heat-affected zones.

  5. Infilling of Vector Collision-Sequence Interference Dips in Collision-Induced Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtenay Lewis, John

    2014-11-01

    The vector interference dip most clearly seen in the fundamental collision-induced band of H2 and H2 mixtures at densities upward of 20amagat, is well known to persist at densities down to 1 amagat. However, At lower densities it is not seen. Lewis and Herman gave a theory of this infilling. In this work we approach the problem from the simple statistical models for collision-induced absorption introduced by Lewis in 2000 and subsequently much elaborated. The statistical model shows infilling, but rather than a uniformly infilling dip the model shows a small central peak forming in the dip, then broadening with increasing amplitude.

  6. Assessment of the impact of dipped guideways on urban rail transit systems: Ventilation and safety requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The ventilation and fire safety requirements for subway tunnels with dipped profiles between stations as compared to subway tunnels with level profiles were evaluated. This evaluation is based upon computer simulations of a train fire emergency condition. Each of the tunnel configurations evaluated was developed from characteristics that are representative of modern transit systems. The results of the study indicate that: (1) The level tunnel system required about 10% more station cooling than dipped tunnel systems in order to meet design requirements; and (2) The emergency ventilation requirements are greater with dipped tunnel systems than with level tunnel systems.

  7. Continuous change of supersaturation and evolution of oriented structure in dipping LPE process of YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. S.; Chen, Y. Y.; Yao, X.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films was performed by vertical dipping along both the [0 0 1] and the [1 1 0] directions of (1 1 0) NdGaO3 (NGO) substrates. Remarkably, an evolution of oriented structure from c-axis to a-axis, corresponding to the supersaturation (σ) change from high to low level, was explicitly observed on a single NGO substrate. Distinctively, creeping along the [0 0 1] direction and forming a low-σ-related a-oriented film with a crack-free macrostructure, the liquid presented a strong anisotropic wettability with the NGO substrate. Most importantly, this work provides a unique method to achieve high-quality a-axis YBCO LPE films, which are potentially appropriate for Josephson junction devices.

  8. An experimental investigation of transient fatigue crack growth phenomena under elevated temperature conditions in superalloy 718 and titanium Ti-1100. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberger, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    Two transient crack growth phenomena are investigated in high temperature structural alloys. The first phenomenon examined is the growth behavior of small cracks under elastic-plastic conditions in Alloy 718 at 650 C. The second phenomenon to be investigated is the mechanism of the creep-fatigue crack growth in a new near-alpha titanium alloy, Ti-1100. Understanding these phenomena is essential for accurate fracture mechanics based residual life component management techniques. The first part of the dissertation is an experimental study of the elastic-plastic fatigue behavior of small surface cracks in Alloy 718 at 650 C conducted under conditions of total strain control. During cycling, the crack growth was continuously monitored using a direct current potential drop technique while the influence of crack closure was monitored using a laser interferometry technique measuring the crack mouth opening displacement. The crack tip plastic zone size was also measured using a post-test delta phase decoration technique. Results show that the growth rates of the small cracks correlate well with long crack data when using an appropriate elastic-plastic driving force parameter. The anomalous crack growth rates observed in some experiments were found to be experimental transients dominated by the crack initiation fracture and do not represent an intrinsic behavior of Alloy 718. The second part of this document deals with a series of crack growth experiments performed on the near-alpha titanium alloy, Ti-1100, to determine the mechanism of the creep-fatigue interaction. Based on pure creep crack growth results, the increase in the creep-fatigue crack growth rate is not amenable to separate contributions of creep crack growth and fatigue crack growth. A mechanism has been proposed to account for the increase in creep-fatigue crack growth rate based on the planar slip of titanium alloys which results in the formation of dislocation pileups at the prior beta grain boundaries.

  9. Numerical investigation on the geometry dependence of the crack growth resistance in CT specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, G. X.; Kolednik, O.; Fischer, F. D.

    1994-03-01

    The influence of the specimen thickness B and the ligament length b on the J(sub R)-curves is numerically investigated for CT specimens. The thickness effect is taken into account with 2-D analyses by dividing a plain sided specimen into a plane stress part and a plane strain part. The fracture process is controlled by experimentally determined critical values of the crack tip opening displacement for crack growth initiation (CTOD(sub i)) and the crack tip opening angle for stable crack growth (CTOA(sub C)). It is shown that for the global behavior of a plain sided specimen, the B/b ratio is essential. The difference between the geometry dependence of the initiation value of the J-integral and the geometry dependence of the slope of the J(sub R)-curves is also shown.

  10. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture

  11. 29 CFR 1910.125 - Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable or combustible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discharges to a safe location for any dip tank having: (i) A capacity greater than 150 gallons (568 L); or... overflow piping is at least 3 inches (7.6 cm) in diameter and has sufficient capacity to prevent the dip... this paragraph (f) for: (i) Any dip tank having a capacity of at least 150 gallons (568 L) or a...

  12. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.

    1990-06-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  13. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  14. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  15. Crack growth in single-crystal silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Crack growth in single-crystal silicon at room temperature in air was evaluated by double torsion (DT) load-relaxation method and monitored by acoustic emission (AE) technique. Both DT and AE methods indicated lack of subcritical crack growth in silicon. At the critical stress intensity factor, the crack front was found to be jumping several times in a 'mirror' region and then followed by fast crack growth in a 'hackle' region. Hackle marks were found to be associated with plastic deformation at the tip of the fast moving crack. No dislocation etch pits were found in the 'mirror' region, in which crack growth may result from interatomic bonds broken at the crack tip under stress without any plastic deformation. Acoustic emission appears to be spontaneously generated from both interatomic bonds broken and dislocation generation at the moving crack tip during the crack growth in single-crystal silicon.

  16. Female Reproductive Tissues Are the Primary Target of Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation by the Arabidopsis Floral-Dip Method1

    PubMed Central

    Desfeux, Christine; Clough, Steven J.; Bent, Andrew F.

    2000-01-01

    The floral-dip method for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis allows efficient plant transformation without need for tissue culture. To facilitate use with other plant species, we investigated the mechanisms that underlie this method. In manual outcrossing experiments, application of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to pollen donor plants did not produce any transformed progeny, whereas application of Agrobacterium to pollen recipient plants yielded transformants at a rate of 0.48%. Agrobacterium strains with T-DNA carrying gusA (encoding β-glucuronidase [GUS]) under the control of 35S, LAT52, or ACT11 promoters revealed delivery of GUS activity to developing ovules, whereas no GUS staining of pollen or pollen tubes was observed. Transformants derived from the same seed pod contained independent T-DNA integration events. In Arabidopsis flowers, the gynoecium develops as an open, vase-like structure that fuses to form closed locules roughly 3 d prior to anthesis. In correlation with this fact, we found that the timing of Agrobacterium infection was critical. Transformants were obtained and GUS staining of ovules and embryo sacs was observed only if the Agrobacterium were applied 5 d or more prior to anthesis. A 6-fold higher rate of transformation was obtained with a CRABS-CLAW mutant that maintains an open gynoecium. Our results suggest that ovules are the site of productive transformation in the floral-dip method, and further suggest that Agrobacterium must be delivered to the interior of the developing gynoecium prior to locule closure if efficient transformation is to be achieved. PMID:10889238

  17. Surface control and cryogenic durability of transparent CNT coatings on dip-coated glass substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuo-Jia; Kwon, Dong-Jun; Gu, Ga-Young; Devries, K Lawrence; Park, Joung-Man

    2012-11-15

    Transparent carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings were deposited on boro-silicate glass substrates by dip-coating. Ultraviolet-visible (UV) spectra, surface resistance measurement, and the wettability tests were used to investigate the optical transmittance and electrical properties of these CNT coatings. The changes in electrical and optical properties of these coatings were observed to be functions of the number of dip-coating cycles. The surface resistance of the CNT coated substrates decreased dramatically as the number of dip-coatings was increased, whereas the increases in the CNT layer thickness beyond that for the first dipping cycle had little effect on the transparent-properties. Static contact angle measurements proved to be an effective means for evaluating the surface morphology of CNT coatings. The interfacial durability of the CNT coatings on a glass substrate was much better than that of ITO coatings over the temperature range from -150°C to +150°C. PMID:22918050

  18. Seafloor sound-speed profile and interface dip angle characterization by the image source method.

    PubMed

    Pinson, S; Holland, C W

    2014-08-01

    The image source method is an efficient way to perform a sound-speed tomography for seafloor characterization. To date, however, it has been limited by a locally range-independent approximation. In other words, the layer boundary had to be parallel and flat within the Fresnel zone of the measurement system. Here the method is extended to take into account realistic variations of interface dip angles. To do so, the elliptical wavefront shape approximation of the reflected waves is used. This permits a fairly simple equation relating travel time to the sine of the dip angle, and consequently to an equation for the equivalent medium sound speed. The Radon transform is exploited to extract the dip angle. Simulations with varying layer dip angles and curvature provide insight into the strengths and limitations of the method. PMID:25096094

  19. Evaluation of linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid as a teat dip in a commercial dairy.

    PubMed

    Pankey, J W; Boddie, R L; Philpot, W N

    1984-06-01

    A postmilking teat dip containing 1.94% linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid was evaluated for approximately 6 mo on a commercial dairy farm that milked an average of 75 cows. Sixteen Staphylococcus aureus infections were diagnosed, 12 in the undipped control quarters and 4 in the dipped. Incidence of intramammary infection with Staphylococcus aureus was reduced 68.1%. Seventy-five infections were diagnosed as micrococci, 42 in control and 33 in the dipped group, a 23.6% reduction. A total of 37 Corynebacterium sp. infections were diagnosed, 21 and 16 in control and dipped groups, a 25.8% reduction. Teat skin condition did not change during the study. PMID:6747046

  20. Strike-dip determination of fractures in drill cores by an astatic-magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, M.; Furutani, N.

    1982-10-01

    The strike and dip of fractures in drillcores from Well HT-4 drilled in the Hatchobaru geothermal field, Kyushu, Japan, have been determined using an astatic-magnetometer. Since the drill cores consist mainly of younger andesite lavas, the measurements of the declination and inclination of remnant magnetism should yield the strike and dip of the fractures. The results show that they dip generally southward with angles from 40/sup 0/ to 80/sup 0/ (62.5 on the average), and strike NW-SE or NE-SW. The NW-SE trending fractures predominate in the Pleistocene series, which persists at depths shallower than 1000 m, while the NE-SW trending ones occur in the Neogene system at deeper levels, and are considered to be older than the former. The stress field can also be estimated by the strike-dip data and the direction of lineation on a slickenside.

  1. 29 CFR 1910.126 - Additional requirements for special dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (60 °C), you must prevent sparking of static electricity by: (1) Bonding and grounding all metallic... mixing with an acid if a dip tank fails. (f) What additional requirements apply to spray cleaning...

  2. Finite element solutions for crack-tip behavior in small-scale yielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracey, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The subject considered is the stress and deformation fields in a cracked elastic-plastic power law hardening material under plane strain tensile loading. An incremental plasticity finite element formulation is developed for accurate analysis of the complete field problem including the extensively deformed near tip region, the elastic-plastic region, and the remote elastic region. The formulation has general applicability and was used to solve the small scale yielding problem for a set of material hardening exponents. Distributions of stress, strain, and crack opening displacement at the crack tip and through the elastic-plastic zone are presented as a function of the elastic stress intensity factor and material properties.

  3. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  4. Crack-path effect on material toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1990-01-01

    The main features of a toughening mechanism associated with a curvilinear crack path are examined using a model consisting of a macrocrack in a brittle solid with a curvilinear segment at the crack tip. A numerical procedure for finite and semiinfinite cracks is formulated and evaluated using an example which has an exact solution (a finite crack in the form of a circular arc in a uniform stress field). It is shown that, for a relatively small amplitude of crack path oscillations, the toughening ratio can be taken equal to the ratio of the corresponding crack path lengths.

  5. Polycrystal orientation effects on microslip and mixed-mode behavior of microstructural small cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, V.; McDowell, D.L.

    1999-07-01

    There are two sources of mode mixity--on a macro level (combined loading situation), and on the micro level--that affect the propagation of small crystallographic cracks. This work explores mode mixity on the micro level by utilizing a computational model to simulate microstructural influences on driving forces for the formation and growth of small cracks. Two-dimensional computational cyclic crystal plasticity calculations are conducted to study the distribution of cyclic slip and critical plane-type fatigue parameters in a material with nominal stress-strain characteristics of 4340 steel. Cases of applied cyclic tension-compression and cyclic shear are analyzed at strain amplitudes below macroscopic yielding. Emphasis is placed on stress state and amplitude dependence of the distribution of these parameters among grains. The role of anisotropic plasticity is isolated by assuming the elastic behavior of grains to obey homogeneous, isotropic linear elasticity. All grains are of equal dimension and are assigned a random orientation distribution. It is found that the distribution of the Fatemi-Socie critical plane fatigue parameter among grains is Weibull-distributed, and it is argued that it forms an improved linkage to cyclic crack tip displacement for microstructurally small cracks. The authors also present computed crack tip opening and sliding displacements as a function of maximum applied tensile strain (from well below to just above nominal yielding) for small cracks within surface grains surrounded by a nearly random orientation distribution of grains. Multiple realizations of the local microstructure are examined for each crack length for sub-grain size cracks, with results normalized to the ratio of crack length to grain size. Key results include a very strong role of the free surface on crack tip displacement, with opening displacement being much greater than the sliding for suitably small crystallographic cracks in the surface grains. There is also a

  6. Intra-oceanic crustal seismic reflecting zone below the dipping reflectors on Lofoten margin

    SciTech Connect

    Sellevoll, M.A.; Mokhtari, M.

    1988-07-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection measurements off Lofoten, Northern Norway, show an uneven, discontinuous reflector within the crystalline oceanic crust at a depth of 7-8 s (two-way travel time). This intra-oceanic crustal reflector is observed seaward as well as beneath sub-basement dipping reflectors, which are of disputed (oceanic or continental) origin. These observations indicate that the dipping reflectors are an integrated part of the oceanic crust.

  7. Formation of inversely graded, downstream-dipping, low-angle cross-stratification by antidunes

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    Antidunes migrating upstream during aggradation produce a distinctive internal structure that results from the upstream climb of the bed form. This structure differs markedly from the upstream-dipping foresets usually ascribed to antidunes. Most studies on antidune internal structures focus on equilibrium conditions where there is no net deposition and preservation potential of structures is limited. Experiments where aggradation was induced in small coastal streams show that upstream-climbing antidunes produce low-angle, downstream-dipping, cross-stratification 1-10 mm thick. The stratification results from grain size and density segregation between the antidune trough and crest. Studies show that small, dense grains form a lag in the antidune trough while coarser, less-dense grains accumulate at the crest. The grain segregation causes inverse grading within the stratification as the antidune body and crest pass over the finer grained lag in the trough. Upstream-dipping foresets are not commonly formed by this process as there is no avalanching of grains over the bed form. Temporal variations in flow velocity may produce upstream-dipping foresets bounded by the downstream-dipping cross-stratification, but these features are subtle. The studies above suggest that antidune cross-stratification may be more common in fluvial deposits than previously thought. Deposits along the Toutle River in southern Washington show numerous examples of inversely graded, downstream-dipping, low-angle (up to 15) cross-stratification 1-5 cm thick, quite similar to antidune cross-stratification produced experimentally. Local upstream-dipping cross-stratification bounded by the downstream-dipping strata strengthens the interpretation.

  8. The Microstructure and Hardness of Hot Dip Galvanized Steel During Wire Drawing

    SciTech Connect

    Klmaku, Snukn; Syla, Nairn; Dilo, Teuta

    2010-01-21

    The steel wire samples are hot-dip-galvanized. The zinc coating is preformed using the standard method. To recognize the behavior of the zinc coated steel wire during the submission to deformation, the wire samples are drawn on a machine designed for this aim and then investigated. In this research is represented the phase structure of the zinc coated samples. Afterwards the thickness of the layer and the hardness of the hot-dip galvanized steel depending on the drawing is represented.

  9. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul; Castel, Arnaud

    2014-02-15

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied.

  10. Key results for the NRC`s Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Brust, F.

    1995-04-01

    The overall objective of the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program is to verify and improve engineering analyses to predict the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe under quasi-static loading with particular attention to crack lengths typically used in LBB or flaw evaluation criteria. The USNCRC program at Battelle was initiated in March 1990 and is scheduled to be completed in December 1994. This paper discusses key results from the overall program with particular emphasis on the efforts since the last WRSIM meeting. The program consists of eight technical tasks as listed below: task 1 short through-wall-cracked (TWC) pipe evaluations; task 2 short surface-cracked (SC) pipe evaluations; task 3 bi-metallic weld crack evaluations; task 4 dynamic strain aging and crack instabilities; task 5 fracture evaluations of anisotropic pipe; task 6 crack-opening-area evaluations; task 7 NRCPIPE code improvements; task 8 additional efforts. Task 8 is a collection of new efforts initiated during the coarse of the program. A list of the full-scale pipe experiments in this program is given in Table 1. All of the experiments have been completed. The most recent accomplishments in each of the tasks listed above are discussed below. The details of all the results in the eight tasks are published in the semiannual reports as well as topical reports from the program.

  11. Application of fiber bridging models to fatigue crack growth in unidirectional titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Several fiber bridging models were reviewed and applied to study the matrix fatigue crack growth behavior in center notched (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and (0)(sub 4) SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V laminates. Observations revealed that fatigue damage consisted primarily of matrix cracks and fiber matrix interfacial failure in the (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates. Fiber-matrix interface failure included fracture of the brittle reaction zone and cracking between the two carbon rich fiber coatings. Intact fibers in the wake of the matrix cracks reduce the stress intensity factor range. Thus, an applied stress intensity factor range is inappropriate to characterize matrix crack growth behavior. Fiber bridging models were used to determine the matrix stress intensity factor range in titanium metal matrix composites. In these models, the fibers in the wake of the crack are idealized as a closure pressure. An unknown constant frictional shear stress is assumed to act along the debond or slip length of the bridging fibers. The frictional shear stress was used as a curve fitting parameter to available data (crack growth data, crack opening displacement data, and debond length data). Large variations in the frictional shear stress required to fit the experimental data indicate that the fiber bridging models in their present form lack predictive capabilities. However, these models provide an efficient and relatively simple engineering method for conducting parametric studies of the matrix growth behavior based on constituent properties.

  12. Intrinsic fatigue crack growth rates for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Slavik, D.C.; Gangloff, R.P.; Starke, E.A. Jr ); Blankenship, C.P. Jr )

    1993-08-01

    The influences of microstructure and deformation mode on inert environment intrinsic fatigue crack propagation were investigated for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys AA2090, AA8090, and X2095 compared to AA2024. The amount of coherent shearable [delta][prime] (Al[sub 3]Li) precipitates and extent of localized planar slip deformation were reduced by composition (increased Cu/Li in X2095) and heat treatment (double aging of AA8090). Intrinsic growth rates, obtained at high constant K[sub max] to minimize crack closure and in vacuum to eliminate any environmental effect, were alloy dependent; da/dN varied up to tenfold based on applied [Delta]K or [Delta]K/E. When compared based on a crack tip cyclic strain or opening displacement parameter ([Delta]K/([sigma][sub ys]E)[sup 1/2]), growth rates were equivalent for alloys except X2095-T8 which exhibited unique fatigue crack growth resistance. Tortuous fatigue crack profiles and large fracture surface facets were observed for each Al-Li alloy independent of the precipitates present, particularly [sigma][prime], and the localized slip deformation structure. Reduced fatigue crack propagation rates for X2095 in vacuum are not explained by either residual crack closure or slip reversibility arguments; the origin of apparent slip band facets in a homogeneous slip alloy is unclear. Better understanding of crack tip damage accumulation and fracture surface facet crystallography is required for Al-Li alloys with varying slip localization.

  13. An ultrasonic method for dynamic monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth.

    PubMed

    Mi, Bao; Michaels, Jennifer E; Michaels, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Attached ultrasonic sensors can detect changes caused by crack initiation and growth if the wave path is directed through the area of critical crack formation. Dynamics of cracks opening and closing under load cause nonlinear modulation of received ultrasonic signals, enabling small cracks to be detected by stationary sensors. A methodology is presented based upon the behavior of ultrasonic signals versus applied load to detect and monitor formation and growth of cracks originating from fastener holes. Shear wave angle beam transducers operating in through transmission mode are mounted on either side of the hole such that the transmitted wave travels through the area of expected cracking. Time shift is linear with respect to load, and is well explained by path changes due to strain combined with wave speed changes due to acoustoelasticity. During subsequent in situ monitoring with unknown loads, the measured time of flight is used to estimate the load, and behavior of the received energy as a function of load is the basis for crack detection. Results are presented from low cycle fatigue tests of several aluminum specimens and illustrate the efficacy of the method in both determining the applied load and monitoring crack initiation and growth. PMID:16454266

  14. Salinity effects on cracking morphology and dynamics in 3-D desiccating clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, Keita F.; Shokri, Nima

    2014-04-01

    Saline conditions induce not only chemical but physical changes in swelling clays, and have a significant influence on the crack dynamics and morphology of desiccating clays. In this study, we used X-ray microtomography to experimentally investigate the effects of sodium chloride on the morphology and dynamics of desiccation cracks in three-dimensional mixtures of sand-bentonite slurry under varying rheological conditions. Rectangular glass containers were packed with slurries of different salt concentrations, with the top boundary exposed to air for evaporation. The growth and propagation of the cracking network that subsequently formed was visualized in 3-D at multiple intervals. The characterization of cracking and branching behavior shows a high extent of localized surficial crack networks at low salinity, with a transition to less extensive but more centralized crack networks with increased salinity. The observed behavior was described in the context of the physicochemical properties of the montmorillonite clay, where shifts from an "entangled" (large platelet spacing, small pore structure) to a "stacked" (small platelet spacing, open pore structure) network influence fluid distribution and thus extent of cracking and branching behavior. This is further corroborated by vertical profiles of water distribution, which shows localized desiccation fronts that shift to uniform desaturation with increasing salt concentration. Our results provide new insights regarding the formation, dynamics, and patterns of desiccation cracks formed during evaporation from 3-D saline clay structures, which will be useful in hydrological applications including water management, land surface evaporation, and subsurface contaminant transport.

  15. Scattering of elastic waves by a 2-D crack using the Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Vai, Rossana; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.

    2005-09-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by cracks is an old problem and various ways to solve it have been proposed in the last decades. One approach is using dual integral equations, another useful and common formulation is the Boundary Element Method (BEM). With the last one, the boundary conditions of the crack lead to hyper-singularities and particular care should be taken to regularize and solve the resulting integral equations. In this work, instead, the Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) is applied to study problems of zero-thickness 2-D cracks. The IBEM yields the Crack Opening Displacement (COD) which is used to evaluate the solution away from the crack. We use a multiregional approach which consists of splitting a boundary S into two identical boundaries S+ and S- chosen such that the cracks lie in the interface. The resulting integral equations are not hyper-singular and wave propagation within media that contain zero-thickness cracks can be rigorously solved. In order to validate the method, we deal with the scalar case, namely the scattering of antiplane SH waves by a 2-D crack. We compare results against a recently published analytic solution, obtaining an excellent agreement. This comparison gives us confidence to study cases where no analytic solutions exist. Some examples of incidence of P- or SV waves are depicted and the salient aspects of the method are also discussed.

  16. Microtopographic Analysis of Part-Through Crack Growth in Alloy 304L Plate-type Tension Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Lloyd; E. D. Steffler; J. H. Jackson

    2003-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) used their microtopography analysis method to examine the fracture process in two Type 304 stainless steel, part-through crack, plate-type specimens. The two specimens had different initial defect geometries – one being nearly semicircular and moderately deep, the other being longer and shallower. The microtopographic analysis allowed determination of parameters such as: the crack tip opening displacement at initiation; the crack tip opening angle during ductile tearing; the crack mouth opening at through-thickness penetration; and, the incremental crack front profiles throughout the crack growth process. In essence, these data provide a nearly complete description of the entire ductile fracture process for the two cases examined. We describe the microtopographic analysis procedure as it was applied to these two specimens. Crack growth profiles predicted by the microtopography analysis are compared with those shown by heat tinting of the actual fracture subsurface, showing excellent agreement. Several areas of ductile crack growth theory relevant to the microtopographic method of analysis are discussed, including possible effects on the accuracy of the analyses. The accuracy of the resultant data is reviewed, and found acceptable or better. Areas for additional development of the microtopography method to improve accuracy in three-dimensional ductile fracture analysis are identified.

  17. Why do drying films crack?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai Peng; Routh, Alexander F

    2004-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which films fail during drying is the first step in controlling this natural process. Previous studies have examined the spacing between cracks with predictions made by assuming a balance between elastic energy released with a surface energy consumed. We introduce a new scaling for the spacing between cracks in drying dispersions. The scaling relates to the distance that solvent can flow, to relieve capillary stresses, as a film fails. The scaling collapses data for a range of evaporation rates, film thicknesses, particle sizes, and materials. This work identifies capillary pressures, induced by packed particle fronts travelling horizontally across films, as responsible for the failure in dried films. PMID:15518466

  18. Monitoring fatigue cracks in gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalpiaz, G.; Meneghetti, U.

    1991-12-01

    Vibration analysis is the most common means of gear monitoring and diagnostics. Gear vibration is affected by faults but the signal is usually picked up at the case, where it is also affected by the structural response. An appropriate filtering function is therefore proposed to recover the torsional gear vibration from the case vibration signal. The restored gear vibration can then be used with greater confidence than case vibration both for particular diagnostics purposes like crack detection and for more general objectives. This technique and its possible advantages in fatigue crack detection are illustrated in the paper.

  19. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  20. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  1. ASCA Observation of the Dipping X-Ray Source X1916-053

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Makai, Koji; Smale, Alan P.; White, Nick E.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of timing and spectral studies of the dipping X-ray source X1916-053, observed by ASCA during its Performance Verification phase. The detected dipping activity is consistent with previous observations, with a period of 3008s and an intermittent secondary dip observed roughly 0.4 out of phase with the primary dip. The energy spectra of different intensity states are fitted with a power law with partial covering fraction absorption and interstellar absorption. The increase in the hardness ratio during the primary and secondary dips, and the increase in the covering fraction and column density with decreasing X-ray intensity, all imply that the dipping is caused by the photo-absorbing materials which have been suggested to be where the accreted flow hits the outer edge of the disk materials. The spectra at all intensity levels show no apparent evidence for Fe or Ne emission lines. This may be due to the low metal abundance in the accretion flow. Alternatively, the X-ray luminosity of the central source may be too weak to excite emission lines, which are assumed to be produced by X-ray photoionization of the disk materials.

  2. DipM links peptidoglycan remodeling to outer membrane organization in Caulobacter

    PubMed Central

    Goley, Erin D.; Comolli, Luis R.; Fero, Katherine E.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cell division in Gram-negative organisms requires coordinated invagination of the multi-layered cell envelope such that each daughter receives an intact inner membrane (IM), peptidoglycan (PG) layer, and outer membrane (OM). Here, we identify DipM, a putative LytM endopeptidase in Caulobacter crescentus, and show that it plays a critical role in maintaining cell envelope architecture during growth and division. DipM localized to the division site in an FtsZ-dependent manner via its peptidoglycan binding LysM domains. Although not essential for viability, ΔdipM cells exhibited gross morphological defects, including cell widening and filamentation, indicating a role in cell shape maintenance and division that we show requires its LytM domain. Strikingly, cells lacking DipM also showed OM blebbing at the division site, at cell poles, and along the cell body. Cryo electron tomography of sacculi isolated from cells depleted of DipM revealed marked thickening of the peptidoglycan as compared to wild type, which we hypothesize leads to loss of trans-envelope contacts between components of the Tol-Pal complex. We conclude that DipM is required for normal envelope invagination during division and to maintain a sacculus of constant thickness that allows for maintenance of OM connections throughout the cell envelope. PMID:20497504

  3. Progressive damage and residual strength of notched composite laminates: A new effective crack growth model

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, L.; Afaghi-Khatibi, A.; Mai, Y.W.

    1997-12-31

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the residual strength of fiber reinforced metal laminates (FRMLs) and polymer matrix composite laminates (PMCLs) with a circular hole or sharp notch using an effective crack growth model (ECGM). Damage is assumed to initiate when the local normal stress at the hole edge/notch tip reaches the tensile strength or yield strength of the composite and metal layers, respectively. The damage in the constituent materials was modelled by fictitious cracks with cohesive stress acting on the crack surfaces, and the damage growth was simulated by extension of the fictitious cracks step by step and reduction of the cohesive stress with crack opening. The apparent fracture energy of composite layers and fracture toughness of metal layers were used to define the relationships between the tensile/yield strength and the critical crack opening. Based on the global equilibrium, an iterative technique was developed to evaluate the applied load required to produce the damage growth. The residual strength of notched composite laminates was defined by instability of the applied load and damage growth. The effect of hole/notch size on the residual strength was studied and the stress redistribution with damage growth was discussed. The residual strength simulated from ECGM correlated well with experimental data in the open literature.

  4. Interface crack between a compressible elastomer and a rigid substrate with finite slippage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, Tamran H.; Qi, Yuan; Schiavone, Peter; Long, Rong

    2016-05-01

    We study the deformation of a crack between a soft elastomer and a rigid substrate with finite interfacial slippage. It is assumed that slippage occurs when the interfacial shear traction exceeds a threshold. This leads to a slip zone ahead of the crack tip where the shear traction is assumed to be equal to the constant threshold. We perform asymptotic analysis and determine closed-form solutions describing the near-tip crack opening displacement and the corresponding stress distributions. These solutions are consistent with numerical results based on finite element analysis. Our results reveal that slippage can significantly affect the deformation and stress fields near the tip of the interface crack. Specifically, depending on the direction of slippage, the crack opening profile may appear more blunted or sharpened than the parabola arising from for the case of zero interfacial shear traction or free slippage. The detailed crack opening profile is determined by the constant shear traction in the slip zone. More importantly, we find that the normal stress perpendicular to the interface can increase or decrease when slippage occurs, depending on the direction of slippage and the shear traction in the slip zone.

  5. [Prevention of intramammary infections in dairy cows by the use of a premilking teat dip method with a foaming iodophor dip agent].

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, U; Tenhagen, B A; Baumgärtner, B; Heuwieser, W

    2002-10-01

    In this study we investigated the efficacy of premilking teat dipping with a foaming iodophor teat dip in a negative controlled field study. Incidence of new intramammary infections (IMI), incidence of clinical mastitis, influence on somatic cell count (SCC) and the characteristics of udder tissue and teats were used as parameters to evaluate clinical efficacy. Predipping was compared with a negative control using a split-udder experimental design. Right teats were predipped with a foaming disinfectant containing 0.27% iodine while left teats served as controls. The latter were conventionally cleaned with damp cloth towels and dried manually with disposable paper towels ("best cleaning practice"). All teats were dipped after milking with the same dip. There were no differences between treated and control quarters with respect to incidence of new IMI during the study period (treated quarters: 6.6% vs. untreated: 6.95%), incidence of clinical mastitis (30 cases in the treatment group vs. 39 cases in the control group) and geometric mean of SCC of quarter milk samples. Spectrum of detected pathogens was also comparable. Condition of udder tissue and teat ducts did not differ between treated and control quarters. PMID:12448971

  6. A direct traction boundary integral equation method for three-dimension crack problems in infinite and finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guizhong; Zhang, Jianming; Huang, Cheng; Lu, Chenjun; Li, Guangyao

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a direct traction boundary integral equation method (TBIEM) for three-dimensional crack problems. The TBIEM is based on the traction boundary integral equation (TBIE). The TBIE is collocated on both the external boundary and one of the crack surfaces. The displacements and tractions are used as unknowns on the external boundary and the relative crack opening displacements (CODs) are introduced as unknowns on the crack surface. In our implementation, all the surfaces of the considered structure are discretized into discontinuous elements to satisfy the continuity requirement for the existence of finite-part integrals, and special crack-front elements are constructed to capture the crack-tip behavior. To calculate the finite-part integrals, an adaptive singular integral technique is proposed. The stress intensity factors (SIFs) are computed through a modified COD extrapolation method. Numerical examples of SIFs computation are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our method.

  7. Oppositely dipping thrusts and transpressional imbricate zone in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Wahed, Mohamed A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper documents the 40-60 km wide ENE-WSW trending Mubarak-Barramiya shear belt (MBSB) in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt by examining its structural styles, kinematics and geometry. Our study revealed the existence of prevalent dextral and minor sinistral conjugate shear zones. The MBSB is metamorphic belt (greenschist-amphibolite) characterized by at least three post-collisional (740-540 Ma) ductile Neoproterozoic deformation events (D1, D2 and D3) followed by a brittle neotectonic deformation (D4). D1 event produced early top-to-the-northwest thrust displacements due to NW-SE shortening. D2 produced discrete zones of NNW-trending upright folds and culminated in initiation of major NW-trending sinistral shear zones of the Najd Fault System (NFS, at c. 640-540 Ma ago) as well as steeply dipping S2 foliation, and shallowly plunging L2 lineation. NW-to NNW-trending F2 folds are open to steep and vary in plunge from horizontal to vertical. D2 deformational fabrics are strongly overprinted by D3 penetrative structures. D3 is characterized by a penetrative S3 foliation, steeply SE- to NW-plunging and shallowly NE-plunging stretching lineations (L3), asymmetric and sheath folds (F3) consistent with dextral sense of movement exhibited by delta- and sigma-type porphyroclast systems and asymmetric boudinage fabrics. D2-D3 represent a non-coaxial progressive event formed in a dextral NE- over NW-sinistral shear zone during a partitioned transpression in response to E-W-directed compression during oblique convergence between East and West Gondwana developed due to closure of the Mozambique Ocean and amalgamation of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in Cryogenian-early Ediacaran time.

  8. Automatic inspection of pavement cracking distress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Huang, Y.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents the image-processing algorithm customized for high-speed, real-time inspection of pavement cracking. In the algorithm, a pavement image is divided into grid cells of 8x8 pixels and each cell is classified as a non-crack or crack cell using the grayscale information of the border pixels. Whether a crack cell can be regarded as a basic element (or seed) depends on its contrast to the neighboring cells. A number of crack seeds can be called a crack cluster if they fall on a linear string. A crack cluster corresponds to a dark strip in the original image that may or may not be a section of a real crack. Additional conditions to verify a crack cluster include the requirements in the contrast, width and length of the strip. If verified crack clusters are oriented in similar directions, they will be joined to become one crack. Because many operations are performed on crack seeds rather than on the original image, crack detection can be executed simultaneously when the frame grabber is forming a new image, permitting real-time, online pavement survey. The trial test results show a good repeatability and accuracy when multiple surveys were conducted at different driving conditions.

  9. A pilot study on the effect of telmisartan & ramipril on 24 h blood pressure profile & dipping pattern in type 1 diabetes patients with nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, R.; Bhansali, Anil; Bhadada, Sanjay K.; Kohli, Harbir S.; Walia, Rama; Shanmugasundar, G.; Jayaprakash, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been used to normalize the blood pressure and the dipping pattern in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and nephropathy. However, there are no data on the effect of the dual blockade on the dipping pattern in these subjects. We therefore, carried out this study to evaluate the effect of administrating an ACEI followed by ARB in the optimum doses in T1DM patients with nephropathy on 24 h blood pressure (BP) profile and nocturnal dipping pattern. Methods: An open label interventional pilot study was done during a one year period involving 30 consecutive patients who were treated with telmisartan 80 mg (0800-1000 h) for eight weeks followed by addition of ramipril 10 mg (1200-1400 h) for the next eight weeks. Ambulatory BP, dipping pattern and albumin excretion rate were studied after each phase. Twenty patients were hypertensive and 10 patients had macro- and 20 patients had microalbuminuria. Results: Telmisartan produced a fall in the clinic BP by 4/1.3 mm Hg (P<0.05 and P<0.362, respectively), 2/1.9 mm Hg in the mean 24 h BP, 1.4/1.1 mm Hg in the day BP and 3.7/3 mm Hg in the trough BP. Addition of ramipril to telmisartan produced a further reduction of 6.3/5.9 mm Hg in the clinic BP (P<0.001 for both), 4.3/4.2 mm Hg in the mean 24 h BP (P<0.01 and P<0.0001, respectively), 5.8/3.9 mm Hg in the day BP (P<0.01 for both), 4.2/2.5 mm Hg in the trough BP, with a reduction of clinic SBP and DBP of 10.3/7.2 mm Hg from the baseline. Telmisartan restored normal systolic dipping pattern in 33.3 per cent of the nondippers (P<0.01) but addition of ramipril was not complimentary. Hyperkalamia (>5.5 mmol/l) was observed only in 2 patients towards the end of the study. Interpretation & conclusions: The dual blockade with telmisartan and ramipril had complimentary effect on lowering of the BP, however, similar beneficial effect on the nocturnal dipping

  10. Process and performance of hot dip zinc coatings containing ZnO and Ni-P under layers as barrier protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Z. Abdel; Aal, A. Abdel; Hassan, H. B.; Shaaban, A.

    2010-04-01

    A new coating system of under layer for hot dip zinc coating was explored as an effective coating for steel especially for application in relatively high aggressive environments. The influence of different barrier layers formed prior to hot dip galvanization was investigated to optimize high performance protective galvanic coatings. The deposition of ZnO and Ni-P inner layers and characteristics of hotdip zinc coatings were explored in this study. The coating morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The hot dip zinc coatings containing under layer showed substantial improvement in their properties such as good adhesion, and high hardness. In addition, a decrease in the thickness of the coating layer and an enhancement of the corrosion resistance were found. Open circuit potential (OCP) of different galvanized layers in different corrosive media viz. 5% NaCl and 0.5 M H 2SO 4 solutions at 25 ± 1 °C was measured as a function of time. A nobler OCP was exhibited for samples treated with ZnO and Ni than sample of pure Zn; this indicates a dissolution process followed by passivation due to the surface oxide formation. The high negative OCP can be attributed to the better alloying reaction between Zn and Fe and to the sacrificial nature of the top pure zinc layer.

  11. An investigation of the elevated temperature cracking susceptibility of alloy C-22 weld-metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Morgan Leo

    Alloy C-22 is one of the most corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloys available today, and is particularly versatile. As a result, Alloy C-22 is being considered for use in the construction of storage canisters for permanent disposal of radioactive waste in the Yucca Mountain Project. However, in such a critical application, weld related defects (such as these two forms of cracking) are simply unacceptable. Solidification cracking occurs when weld shrinkage strains are applied to liquid films that result from microsegregation during solidification. Many nickel-base alloys are susceptible to solidification cracking since they solidify as austenite and many of their alloying additions partition during solidification and form low melting eutectic constituents. The transvarestraint test was used to quantify the susceptibility of Alloy C-22 to solidification cracking. The solidification cracking temperature range (SCTR) was found to be approximately 50°C (90°F); this SCTR predicts that Alloy-C-22 will have only slightly higher susceptibility than known crack-resistant alloys, such as duplex stainless-steel 2205 and austenitic stainless-steel Type 304 (FN6). Ductility-dip cracking (DDC) is a solid-state cracking phenomenon that occurs below the effective solidus temperature in highly restrained austenitic alloys. Although this type of cracking is relatively uncommon, it can be costly in critical applications where there is a low tolerance for defects. This investigation used two separate tests to quantify the susceptibility of the alloy to DDC: the hot-ductility test and the strain-to-fracture (STF) test. The hot-ductility test revealed that Alloy C-22 weld-metal exhibits an intermediate temperature ductility-dip, with ductility recovery at the upper end of the testing temperature range. The ductility minimum in the hot-ductility tests occurred around 950°C (1742°F) in both the on-heating and on-cooling tests. The strain-to-fracture test also revealed Alloy C-22 to be

  12. An experimentally verified finite element study of the stress-strain response of crack geometries experiencing large-scale yielding

    SciTech Connect

    Panontin, T.L.; Sheppard, S.D.

    1997-12-01

    Large-strain, 3-D finite element analyses with incremental plasticity were performed for a variety of crack geometries to study local crack-tip stress-strain fields and associated global fracture parameters under conditions of large-scale yielding. The geometries analyzed include thin, single-edge crack tension, single-edge crack bending, and center-crack tension fracture specimens with varying crack depth (a/W) ratios. Two materials were investigated: a high-hardening, low-strength steel and a moderate-hardening, high-strength steel. Mesh refinement studies were performed to ensure convergence of the finite element predictions. The studies examine the effects of in-plane crack-tip element size, initial crack-tip radius size, and number of through-thickness layers on predicted distributions of crack-tip stress and plastic strain and predicted values of the J-integral and CTOD. In addition, the finite element predictions of specimen behavior were verified experimentally by direct measurements, namely load displacement, load longitudinal strain, and load CTOS, made during and following testing of the fracture specimens. Representative results of the finite element analyses are presented and compared to previously published data where pertinent. Results from the mesh refinement studies and the verification testing are shown. Predicted trends among the specimens and materials in local distributions of crack-tip plastic strain, triaxiality, and opening stress as well as in global parameters, J-integral and m-factor, are discussed.

  13. Micromechanism of the transition of fibrous cracking to cleavage of C-Mn base and weld steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wang, G. Z.

    1994-07-01

    In this present work, crack opening displacement (COD), four-point bending (4PB), Charpy V, and three-point bending (3NB) tests of specimens of C-Mn base and weld steel were carried out in the brittle-ductile transition temperature region. Some specimens were fractured and some specimens were unloaded prior to fracture after fibrous cracking occurred and extended to variouslengths. Through detailed observation of the variation in the shapes of microcavities located at the tip or on the two sides of fibrous cracks in unloaded specimens and the variations of shapes of dimples located at various lengths of cracks on fracture surfaces, the micromechanism of the change from fibrous cracking to cleavage was analyzed. It was revealed that no matter whether a specimen was notched or precracked, as long as a fibrous crack initiated and propagated in it, the critical event for cleavage fracture is the unstable extension of a ferrite grainsized crack. The main factor promoting the transition from the fibrous crack to cleavage was the increase of the local tensile stress ahead of the crack which was caused by the increase of the triaxiality of stress and the apparent normal stress in the remaining ligament. The considerable scattering of toughness values in the transition temperature region is due to the random variation of the widths of the tips of the fibrous cracks during their extension and the random distribution of the weakest constituents in the microstructure.

  14. Micromechanism of the transition of fibrous cracking to cleavage to C-Mn base and weld steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Wang, G.Z. )

    1994-07-01

    In this present work, crack opening displacement (COD), four-point bending (4PB), Charpy V, and three-point bending (3NB) tests of specimens of C-Mn base and weld steel were carried out in the brittle-ductile transition temperature region. Some specimens were fractured and some specimens were unloaded prior to fracture after fibrous cracking occurred and extended to various lengths. Through detailed observation of the variation in the shapes of microcavities located at the tip or on the two sides of fibrous cracks in unloaded specimens and the variations of shapes of dimples located at various lengths of cracks on fracture surfaces, the micromechanism of the change from fibrous cracking to cleavage was analyzed. It was revealed that no matter whether a specimen was notched or precracked, as long as a fibrous crack initiated and propagated in it, the critical event for cleavage fracture is the unstable extension of a ferrite grainsized crack. The main factor promoting the transition from the fibrous crack to cleavage was the increase of the local tensile stress ahead of the crack which was caused by the increase of the triaxiality of stress and the apparent normal stress in the remaining ligament. The considerable scattering of toughness values in the transition temperature region is due to the random variation of the widths of the tips of the fibrous cracks during their extension and the random distribution of the weakest constituents in the microstructure.

  15. Prediction of fatigue-crack growth in a high-strength aluminum alloy under variable-amplitude loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the application of an analytical crack-closure model to study crack growth under various load histories. The model was based on a crack-tip plasticity concept like the Dugdale model, but modified to leave plastically deformed material in the wake of the advancing crack tip. The effect of material thickness on plasticity was accounted for by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack tip. The model was used to correlate crack-growth rates under constant-amplitude loading, and to predict crack growth under variable-amplitude loading on a high-strength aluminum alloy (7475-T7351) sheet material. The experimental data were obtained from Zhang et al. Predicted crack-growth lives agreed well with experimental data. For ten crack-growth tests subjected to various variable-amplitude load histories, the ratio of predicted-to-experimental lives ranged from 0.54 to 1.19. The mean value of the ratio of predicted-to-experimental lives was 0.95 and the standard error was 0.2 using a constraint factor of 1.9 in the model. Crack-opening stresses calculated from the model were significantly different from those determined by Zhang et al. using a striation-based experimental method.

  16. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  17. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  18. Mechanics of the crack path formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of experimentally obtained curvilinear crack path trajectories formed in a heterogeneous stress field is presented. Experimental crack path trajectories were used as data for the numerical simulations, recreating the actual stress field governing the development of the crack path. Thus, the current theories of crack curving and kinking could be examined by comparing them with the actual stress field parameters as they develop along the experimentally observed crack path. The experimental curvilinear crack path trajectories were formed in the tensile specimens with a hole positioned in the vicinity of a potential crack path. The numerical simulation, based on the solution of equivalent boundary value problems with the possible perturbations of the crack path, is presented.

  19. Mechanics of the crack path formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed analysis of experimentally obtained curvilinear crack path trajectories formed in a heterogeneous stress field is presented. Experimental crack path trajectories were used as data for numerical simulations, recreating the actual stress field governing the development of the crack path. Thus, the current theories of crack curving and kinking could be examined by comparing them with the actual stress field parameters as they develop along the experimentally observed crack path. The experimental curvilinear crack path trajectories were formed in the tensile specimens with a hole positioned in the vicinity of a potential crack path. The numerical simulation, based on the solution of equivalent boundary value problems with the possible perturbations of the crack path, is presented here.

  20. Damage analysis of a crack layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botsis, J.

    1989-01-01

    Damage analysis of a crack layer in polystyrene is carried out by employing optical microscopy and principles of quantitative stereology. The results show that, within the quasistatic phase of crack layer propagation, the average crazing density, along the trailing edge of the active zone, is constant. This is consistent with a self-similarity hypothesis of damage evolution employed by the crack layer theory. The average crazing densities within the active zone and along its trailing edge are found to be practically equal. A layer of constant crazing density, adjacent to the crack planes, accompanies the crack during its quasi-static growth. This suggests that: (1) a certain level of crazing density should be reached, around the crack tip, prior to crack advance; (2) the specific energy, associated with this 'core' of damage, could be considered as a Griffith's type energy. The results are in favor of certain hypothesis adopted by the crack layer theory.